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Sample records for brazilian coinfected men

  1. Detection of HIV and HCV RNA in semen from Brazilian coinfected men using multiplex PCR before and after semen washing

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    Cynthia Liliane Motta do Canto; Segurado, Aluisio C; Cláudio Pannut; Agnaldo Cedenho; Miguel Srougi; Deborah Spaine; Silvana Fernandes; Nadily Carretiero; Maria Carolina Bernal; José Eduardo Levi

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prolonged survival of patients under HAART has resulted in new demands for assisted reproductive technologies. HIV serodiscordant couples wish to make use of assisted reproduction techniques in order to avoid viral transmission to the partner or to the newborn. It is therefore essential to test the effectiveness of techniques aimed at reducing HIV and HCV loads in infected semen using molecular biology tests. METHODS: After seminal analysis, semen samples from 20 coinfected pati...

  2. Global challenges in human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis coinfection among men who have sex with men.

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    Roberts, Chelsea P; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-11-01

    Syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection disproportionately affects men who have sex with men (MSM), and the rate of coinfection has been increasing over the last decade. HIV and syphilis coinfection is particularly challenging because the infections interact synergistically thereby increasing the risk of acquisition and transmission as well as accelerating disease progression. Areas covered: This paper reviews and summarizes the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical management and prevention of HIV and syphilis coinfection among MSM. Expert commentary: Research does not support a different syphilis treatment for coinfected individuals; however, coinfection may warrant a recommendation for antiretroviral therapy. In order to reverse the epidemic of syphilis and HIV coinfection, there needs to be greater awareness, improved cultural sensitivity among health care providers, improved access to preventative services and increased screening for syphilis and HIV.

  3. Syphilis and HIV/Syphilis Co-infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) in Ecuador.

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    Hernandez, Isabel; Johnson, Ayesha; Reina-Ortiz, Miguel; Rosas, Carlos; Sharma, Vinita; Teran, Santiago; Naik, Eknath; Salihu, Hamisu M; Teran, Enrique; Izurieta, Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    There is a reemergence of syphilis in the Latin American and Caribbean region. There is also very little information about HIV/Syphilis co-infection and its determinants. The aim of this study is to investigate knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding sexually transmitted infections (STIs), in particular syphilis infection and HIV/Syphilis co-infection, as well as to estimate the prevalence of syphilis among men who have sex with men (MSM) in a city with one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in Ecuador. In this study, questionnaires were administered to 291 adult MSM. Questions included knowledge about STIs and their sexual practices. Blood samples were taken from participants to estimate the prevalence of syphilis and HIV/syphilis co-infection. In this population, the prevalence of HIV/syphilis co-infection was 4.8%, while the prevalence of syphilis as mono-infection was 6.5%. Participants who had syphilis mono-infection and HIV/syphilis co-infection were older. Men who had multiple partners and those who were forced to have sex had increased odds of syphilis and HIV/syphilis co-infection. A high prevalence of syphilis and self-reported STI was observed, which warrants targeted behavioral interventions. Co-infections are a cause for concern when treating a secondary infection in a person who is immunocompromised. These data suggest that specific knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among MSM are associated with increased odds of STIs (including HIV/syphilis co-infections) in this region of Ecuador.

  4. Genital prevalence of HPV types and co-infection in men

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    Marcos P. Freire

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HPV infection is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted disease and there is evidence of the relationship of HPV infection and the development of genital warts, penile intraepitelial neoplasia, invasive penile carcinoma and cervical cancer. However, there is sparse data regarding the prevalence of HPV types and co-infection of different HPV types among men. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of HPV subtypes infections and rates of co-infection among men. Materials and Methods: 366 men were evaluated from March to October 2010. Men were referred to our institution for HPV diagnostic evaluation based on the following criteria: 1. presence of a genital wart; 2. presence of an atypical genital lesion; 3. absence of symptoms and a partner with a HPV diagnosis; 4. absence of symptoms and a desire to undergo a full STD diagnostic evaluation. Genital samples were collected from the urethra, penile shaft, scrotum and anus with Digene® collection and preservation kit and submitted to HPV genotype microarray detection (Papillocheck®. All men were tested for the low-risk HPV types 6-11-40-42-43-44 and for the high-risk HPV types 16-18-31-33-35-39-45-51-52-53-56-58-59-66-68-70-73-82. Results: Of the 366 men, 11 were tested inconclusive and were excluded from the analysis. 256 men (72.1% of the men from the cohort referred to our institution tested positive with genotype micro-array detection and 99 tested negative. The most prevalent HPV-subtypes in the studied population were 6, 42, 51 and 16. Co-infection was found in 153 men. Of those, 70 (19.7% had a co-infection by 2 types, 37 (10.4% by 3 types; 33 men (9.2% by 4 types; 8 men (2.2% by 5 types; 1 man (0.3% by 6 types; 1 man (0.3% by 7 types; 2 men (0.6% by 8 types and 1 man (0.3% by 9 types. Conclusion: The most frequent HPV types were 6, 16, 42 and 51. Co-infection was found in 59% of our patients. This information is vital to drive future public health policies including massive

  5. History, current issues and future of the brazilian network for attending and studying Trypanosoma cruzi/HIV coinfection.

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    Ramos Júnior, Alberto Novaes; Correia, Dalmo; Almeida, Eros Antônio; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida

    2010-11-24

    In countries with endemic Chagas disease, coinfection involving Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV is expected to become more frequent. There is a clear need to structure a comprehensive care network aimed at dealing with this situation, with mobilization going from primary care to care at the highest level of technological complexity. The objective of this study was to describe the Brazilian response to the challenges of Chagas disease: the history, current issues, and future of the Brazilian Network for attending and studying T. cruzi/HIV coinfection. This descriptive study reviewed technical documents relating to the basis and structuring process of the Brazilian network for attending and studying T. cruzi/HIV coinfection. The process of setting up the network was marked by technical and political debates in technical-scientific meetings going back to the 1990s. This process made it possible to expand and focus on different aspects of comprehensive care for Chagas disease in Brazil, regardless of the associated immunosuppressive conditions. These meetings produced a structure of national technical guidelines and standards, health care and research protocols and research priorities, along with mobilization and awareness-raising among HIV/AIDS reference centers regarding occurrences of coinfection. The creation of the Brazilian network was a milestone for the country in terms of integration of control programs, with the reference point of quality of care and comprehensiveness. The possibility of extending this network to form a Latin American network is seen as a strategy for dealing more effectively with this condition.

  6. Association Between Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection and Regional Adipose Tissue Volume in HIV-Infected Men and Women

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    Tien, Phyllis C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Gripshover, Barbara; Overton, E. Turner; Rimland, David; Kotler, Don

    2011-01-01

    Objective Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is reported to be associated with a higher prevalence of lipodystrophy than HIV infection alone. We examine the association between HCV and adipose tissue volume in HIV-infected men and women. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected subjects from the study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection. MRI measured regional adipose tissue volume. Detectable HCV RNA defined HCV infection. Results Twenty percent of 792 men and 26% of 329 women were HIV/HCV-coinfected. HIV/HCV-coinfected and HIV-monoinfected women had similar amounts of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in the leg, lower trunk, upper trunk, and arm and similar amounts of visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Similar findings were seen in men, except in the leg and VAT. After adjustment, HCV infection remained associated with more leg fat in men (12.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3 to 25.3; P = 0.043). Among those on stavudine, HIV-monoinfected men had less leg fat (−7% effect per year of stavudine use, 95% CI: −9 to −5; P < 0.001); a weaker association was seen in HIV/HCV-coinfected men (−2% effect, 95% CI: −7 to 3; P = 0.45). Indinavir was associated with less leg fat (−4% in HIV-monoinfected men, 95% CI: −6 to −1; P = 0.002; −5% in HIV/HCV-coinfected men, 95% CI: −11 to 2; P = 0.14). Conclusions Our findings suggest that HIV/HCV coinfection is not associated with less SAT in men and women. HCV infection seems to mitigate the loss of leg fat seen in HIV-infected men on stavudine. PMID:17356466

  7. Bone mineral density in Brazilian men 50 years and older

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    C.A.F. Zerbini

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone mineral density (BMD in the lumbar spine (LSBMD, femoral neck (FNBMD and whole body (WBBMD and whole body tissue composition were evaluated in 288 Brazilian men 50 years and older, 80% white and 20% Mulattoes. Age was inversely correlated with WBBMD (r = -0.20 and FNBMD (r = -0.21 but not with LSBMD (r = 0.03. Body mass index and weight showed a strong positive correlation with WBBMD (r = 0.48 and 0.54, LSBMD (r = 0.37 and 0.45 and FNBMD (r = 0.42 and 0.48. Correlation with height was positive but weaker. No significant bone loss at the lumbar spine level was observed as the population aged. FNBMD and WBBMD decreased significantly only in the last decade (age 70-79 studied. BMD was higher for Brazilian men as compared to Brazilian women at all sites. No significant differences were observed between Brazilian and the US/European male population for BMD in the femoral neck. BMD measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in South American men is reported here for the first time. A decrease in FNBMD was detected only later in life, with a pattern similar to that described for the US/European male population.

  8. [Co-infections of HIV, syphilis and HSV-2 among men who have sex with men at the voluntary HIV counseling and testing clinics in Shanghai].

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    Liu, Y; Tang, H F; Ning, Z; Zheng, H; He, N; Zhang, Y Y

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To understand the prevalence rates of HIV-syphilis and HIV-herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) co-infections and related factors among men having sex with men (MSM) who had visited the voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) clinics in Shanghai, China. Methods: 756 eligible MSM who attended the VCT clinics of Shanghai Municipality and Putuo district during March to August, 2015 were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional survey with questionnaire interview and blood testing for HIV, syphilis and HSV-2. Results: A total of 732 participants completed a valid questionnaire survey. The prevalence rates were 3.3 % (24/732) for HIV/Syphilis co-infection, 1.9 % (14/732) for HIV/HSV-2 co-infection, and 0.7 % (5/732) for HIV/Syphilis/HSV-2 co-infection, respectively. HIV prevalence appeared significantly higher among syphilis-infected participants (45.3 % , 24/53) than those without Syphilis (7.2 % , 61/679) (χ(2)=63.11, P Syphilis co-infection. Those participants who had high middle school or lower levels of education ( OR =6.87, 95 %CI : 1.86-25.42; OR =9.82, 95 %CI : 2.25-42.85) were under risk on HIV and HSV-2 co-infection. Conclusion: HIV/Syphilis and HIV/HSV-2 co-infection were seen among MSM who attended the VCT clinics in Shanghai that called for special attention, especially on migrants, those with low education or illicit drug users.

  9. Human helminth co-infection: analysis of spatial patterns and risk factors in a Brazilian community.

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    Rachel L Pullan

    Full Text Available Individuals living in areas endemic for helminths are commonly infected with multiple species. Despite increasing emphasis given to the potential health impacts of polyparasitism, few studies have investigated the relative importance of household and environmental factors on the risk of helminth co-infection. Here, we present an investigation of exposure-related risk factors as sources of heterogeneity in the distribution of co-infection with Necator americanus and Schistosoma mansoni in a region of southeastern Brazil.Cross-sectional parasitological and socio-economic data from a community-based household survey were combined with remotely sensed environmental data using a geographical information system. Geo-statistical methods were used to explore patterns of mono- and co-infection with N. americanus and S. mansoni in the region. Bayesian hierarchical models were then developed to identify risk factors for mono- and co-infection in relation to community-based survey data to assess their roles in explaining observed heterogeneity in mono and co-infection with these two helminth species.The majority of individuals had N. americanus (71.1% and/or S. mansoni (50.3% infection; 41.0% of individuals were co-infected with both helminths. Prevalence of co-infection with these two species varied substantially across the study area, and there was strong evidence of household clustering. Hierarchical multinomial models demonstrated that relative socio-economic status, household crowding, living in the eastern watershed and high Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI were significantly associated with N. americanus and S. mansoni co-infection. These risk factors could, however, only account for an estimated 32% of variability between households.Our results demonstrate that variability in risk of N. americanus and S. mansoni co-infection between households cannot be entirely explained by exposure-related risk factors, emphasizing the possible role of

  10. HEPATITIS B, C AND HIV CO-INFECTIONS SEROPREVALENCE IN A NORTHEAST BRAZILIAN CENTER

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    Lara Gurgel Fernandes TAVORA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context The occurrence of HIV and hepatitis B (HBV and C (HCV virus associations is of great concern since co-infected patients respond poorly to antiviral treatment and usually progress to chronic and more complicated hepatic disease. In Brazil, these co-infections prevalence is not well known since published data are few and sometimes demonstrate conflicting results. Also, a significant number of co-infected individuals are HBV/HCV asymptomatic carriers, leading to under notification. Objectives The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of the HBV and HCV infection in a recently diagnosed HIV population in the state of Ceará/Brazil. Methods Retrospective cohort, with >18yo patients diagnosed HIV+ from 2008-2010. First year medical attention information was collected. Results A total of 1.291 HIV+ patients were included. HBV serologies were collected in 52% (23% had previous hepatitis B, 3.7% were co-infected and HCV in 25.4% (1.5% had previous hepatitis C, 5.4% co-infection. The majority of HBV/HIV patients referred multiple sexual partners/year, 28% homosexualism and 20% bisexualism. In the HCV/HIV group 38.8% individuals had > one sexual partner/year and 22.2% used intravenous drugs. Conclusion The study reinforce the need for better training healthcare workers and providing laboratory support for a prompt hepatitis diagnosis and adequate medical management to avoid complications and decrease viral spread.

  11. Factors related to HIV/tuberculosis coinfection in a Brazilian reference hospital

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    Bráulio Matias de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Infection with both Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis is currently the world's leading cause of death due to infectious agents. We evaluated factors related to the development of tuberculosis (TB in HIV-infected patients who were being treated at an infectious diseases hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. From January 2004 to December 2005, we made an epidemiological study through the analysis of the medical records of 171 patients, who were diagnosed as having both HIV and tuberculosis. Among these co-infected patients, most (81%, p=0.0006 were male. Co-infection was more frequent (87.8% among patients over 40 years of age and those with lower educational levels (less than eight years of schooling. Forty-one percent of the patients in the study had not had a smear culture test for acid-fast bacilli (AFB. CD4 cell counts were lower than 200 cells/µL in 71.9% of the patients, the mean being 169 cells/µL. This type of data is important for establishing strategies to improve the control of tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients.

  12. JC virus/human immunodeficiency virus 1 co-infection in the Brazilian Amazonian region

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    Izaura Maria Vieira Cayres-Vallinoto

    Full Text Available Abstract JC virus (JCV is a member of the Polyomaviridae family and is associated to a severe disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, PML, which is gradually increasing in incidence as an opportunistic infection among AIDS patients. The present study aimed to investigate the occurrence of JCV among HIV-1 carriers including their types and molecular subtypes and the possible association with disease. Urine samples from 66 HIV-1 infected subjects were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (215 bp and IG (610 bp regions using the polymerase chain reaction. JCV was detected in 32% of the samples. The results confirmed the occurrence of type B (subtype Af2; in addition, another polyomavirus, BKV, was also detected in 1.5% of samples of the HIV-1 infected subjects. Apparently, there was no significant difference between mono- (HIV-1 only and co-infected (HIV-1/JCV subjects regarding their TCD4+/TCD8+ lymphocyte counts or HIV-1 plasma viral load. Self admitted seizures, hearing and visual loses were not significantly different between the two groups.

  13. JC virus/human immunodeficiency virus 1 co-infection in the Brazilian Amazonian region

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    Izaura Maria Vieira Cayres-Vallinoto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV is a member of the Polyomaviridae family and is associated to a severe disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, PML, which is gradually increasing in incidence as an opportunistic infection among AIDS patients. The present study aimed to investigate the occurrence of JCV among HIV-1 carriers including their types and molecular subtypes and the possible association with disease. Urine samples from 66 HIV-1 infected subjects were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (215 bp and IG (610 bp regions using the polymerase chain reaction. JCV was detected in 32% of the samples. The results confirmed the occurrence of type B (subtype Af2; in addition, another polyomavirus, BKV, was also detected in 1.5% of samples of the HIV-1 infected subjects. Apparently, there was no significant difference between mono- (HIV-1 only and co-infected (HIV-1/JCV subjects regarding their TCD4+/TCD8+ lymphocyte counts or HIV-1 plasma viral load. Self admitted seizures, hearing and visual loses were not significantly different between the two groups.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Mycobacterium leprae co-infection: HIV-1 subtypes and clinical, immunologic, and histopathologic profiles in a Brazilian cohort.

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    Pereira, Gisner A S; Stefani, Mariane M A; Araújo Filho, João A; Souza, Luís Carlos S; Stefani, Germana P; Martelli, Celina M T

    2004-11-01

    Co-infections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium leprae represent unique opportunities to investigate the interaction of both pathogens. We determined the immunologic, virologic, and histopathologic characteristics of 22 co-infected Brazilian patients (median age = 38 years, 81.8% males, 72.2% with paucibacillary leprosy, and 95.4% with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). The HIV-1 subtypes B and BF predominated in envelope and gag heteroduplex mobility analysis. Borderline tuberculoid (BT), tuberculoid, lepromatous, and indeterminate morphology with CD3+, CD8+, and CD68+ cell distributions compatible with leprosy patients not infected with HIV were observed. Histologic evidence of nerve damage was observed in BT lesions. IgM antibody to M. leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I was not detected. Two of six co-infected patients monitored during highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) developed a leprosy type 1 reaction after an increase in CD4+ cells, suggesting an immune restoration phenomenon. Clinical, immunologic, histopathologic, and virologic features among these HIV-leprosy co-infected patients indicate that each disease progressed as in single infection. However, HAART immune reconstitution may trigger potential adverse effects, such as leprosy acute inflammatory episodes.

  15. [Men and conjugal violence: an analysis of Brazilian studies].

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    de Oliveira, Kátia Lenz Cesar; Gomes, Romeu

    2011-05-01

    This study consisted of a qualitative analysis of 54 Brazilian texts about men and conjugal violence related to research or intervention activities. Initially, the material was divided up according to the topics under scrutiny, the main focus and the type of text. Analysis and synthesis of the main considerations of the texts, based on the thematic points revealed, was then carried out. This included the different approaches to the problem, the magnitude of conjugal violence, the attitudes of men vis-à-vis violence and interventions and/or policies towards male aggressors. The parameter for the analysis was the national and international debate seeking to overcome the controversy surrounding the definition of the problem as "gender violence" or conjugal violence," essentially fostering the hypothesis of various types of violent conjugal relationships. It was concluded that the unanimous outcome of the study was to view the problem as a gender relationship issue. Lastly, it was argued that the choice of the best approach between the poles of the controversy requires further investigation using qualitative methodologies together with players from different classes and social backgrounds. With respect to further intervention, it was considered necessary to examine a broad gamut of alternatives emphasizing the singular nature of the cases.

  16. Differences between Brazilian Men and Women Managers in Their Managing of Conflicts with Employees.

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    Rossi, Ana Maria; Todd-Mancillas, William R.

    A study was conducted to compare Brazilian men and women managers' preferences for using communication versus power-centered strategies when resolving employer/employee disputes. Subjects were 40 men and 40 women in middle and top-management positions. Each manager read a packet of four scripts describing various problems that a manager might have…

  17. Higher risk of incident hepatitis C virus coinfection among men who have sex with men, in whom the HIV genetic bottleneck at transmission was wide.

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    Kouyos, Roger D; Rauch, Andri; Braun, Dominique L; Yang, Wan-Lin; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Shah, Cyril; Kovari, Helen; Calmy, Alexandra; Cavassini, Matthias; Battegay, Manuel; Vernazza, Pietro L; Bernasconi, Enos; Ledergerber, Bruno; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2014-11-15

    High-risk sexual behaviors have been suggested as drivers of the recent dramatic increase of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). We assessed the association between the genetic bottleneck of HIV at transmission and the prevalence and incidence of HCV coinfection in HIV-infected MSM from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS). As a proxy for the width of the transmission bottleneck, we used the fraction of ambiguous nucleotides detected by genotypic resistance tests sampled during early HIV infection. We defined a broad bottleneck as a fraction of ambiguous nucleotides exceeding a previously established threshold (0.5%). From the SHCS, we identified 671 MSM with available results of HCV serologic tests and with an HIV genotypic resistance test performed during early HIV infection. Of those, 161 (24.0%) exhibited a broad HIV transmission bottleneck, 38 (5.7%) had at least 1 positive HCV test result, and 26 (3.9%) had an incident HCV infection. Individuals with broad HIV transmission bottlenecks exhibited a 2-fold higher odds of having ever experienced an HCV coinfection (odds ratio, 2.2 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.1-4.3]) and a 3-fold higher hazard of having an incident HCV infection (hazard ratio, 3.0 [95% CI, 1.4-6.6]) than individuals with narrow HIV transmission bottlenecks. Our results indicate that the currently occurring sexual spread of HCV is focused on MSM who are prone to exhibit broad HIV transmission bottlenecks. This is consistent with an important role of high-risk behavior and mucosal barrier impairment in the transmission of HCV among MSM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. HIV and Syphilis Co-Infection Increasing among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Chow, Eric P. F.; Wilson, David P.; Zhang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aims to estimate the magnitude and changing trends of HIV, syphilis and HIV-syphilis co-infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China during 2003–2008 through a systematic review of published literature. Methodology/Principal Findings Chinese and English literatures were searched for studies reporting HIV and syphilis prevalence among MSM from 2003 to 2008. The prevalence estimates were summarized and analysed by meta-analyses. Meta-regression was used to identify the potential factors that are associated with high heterogeneities in meta-analysis. Seventy-one eligible articles were selected in this review (17 in English and 54 in Chinese). Nationally, HIV prevalence among MSM increased from 1.3% during 2003–2004 to 2.4% during 2005–2006 and to 4.7% during 2007–2008. Syphilis prevalence increased from 6.8% during 2003–2004 to 10.4% during 2005–2006 and to 13.5% during 2007–2008. HIV-syphilis co-infection increased from 1.4% during 2005–2006 to 2.7% during 2007–2008. Study locations and study period are the two major contributors of heterogeneities of both HIV and syphilis prevalence among Chinese MSM. Conclusions/Significance There have been significant increases in HIV and syphilis prevalence among MSM in China. Scale-up of HIV and syphilis screening and implementation of effective public health intervention programs should target MSM to prevent further spread of HIV and syphilis infection. PMID:21857952

  19. HIV and syphilis co-infection increasing among men who have sex with men in China: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Eric P F Chow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aims to estimate the magnitude and changing trends of HIV, syphilis and HIV-syphilis co-infections among men who have sex with men (MSM in China during 2003-2008 through a systematic review of published literature. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chinese and English literatures were searched for studies reporting HIV and syphilis prevalence among MSM from 2003 to 2008. The prevalence estimates were summarized and analysed by meta-analyses. Meta-regression was used to identify the potential factors that are associated with high heterogeneities in meta-analysis. Seventy-one eligible articles were selected in this review (17 in English and 54 in Chinese. Nationally, HIV prevalence among MSM increased from 1.3% during 2003-2004 to 2.4% during 2005-2006 and to 4.7% during 2007-2008. Syphilis prevalence increased from 6.8% during 2003-2004 to 10.4% during 2005-2006 and to 13.5% during 2007-2008. HIV-syphilis co-infection increased from 1.4% during 2005-2006 to 2.7% during 2007-2008. Study locations and study period are the two major contributors of heterogeneities of both HIV and syphilis prevalence among Chinese MSM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There have been significant increases in HIV and syphilis prevalence among MSM in China. Scale-up of HIV and syphilis screening and implementation of effective public health intervention programs should target MSM to prevent further spread of HIV and syphilis infection.

  20. Reduced serum concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in transsexual Brazilian men.

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    Fontanari, Anna Martha Vaitses; Costa, Angelo Brandelli; Aguiar, Bianca; Tusset, Cíntia; Andreazza, Tahiana; Schneider, Maiko; da Rosa, Eduarda Dias; Soll, Bianca Machado Borba; Schwarz, Karine; da Silva, Dhiordan Cardoso; Borba, André Oliveira; Mueller, Andressa; Massuda, Raffael; Lobato, Maria Inês Rodrigues

    2016-09-06

    Serum BDNF levels are significantly decreased in transsexual Brazilian women when compared to cis-sexual men. Since transsexual men are also exposed to chronic social stress and have a high prevalence of associated psychopathologies, it is plausible to inquire if BDNF serum levels are altered in transsexual men as well. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate differences in BDNF serum level of transsexual men when compared to cis-sexual men and women. Our sample comprises 27 transsexual men, 31 cis-sexual women and 30 cis-sexual men recruited between 2011 and 2015. We observed that BDNF serum concentration is decreased in transsexual men comparing to cis-sexual men and women. Cross-sex hormone treatment, chronic social stress or long-term gender dysphoria (GD) could explain the variation found in BDNF serum levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Frequency of subtype B and F1 dual infection in HIV-1 positive, Brazilian men who have sex with men

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    Soares de Oliveira Ana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because various HIV vaccination studies are in progress, it is important to understand how often inter- and intra-subtype co/superinfection occurs in different HIV-infected high-risk groups. This knowledge would aid in the development of future prevention programs. In this cross-sectional study, we report the frequency of subtype B and F1 co-infection in a clinical group of 41 recently HIV-1 infected men who have sex with men (MSM in São Paulo, Brazil. Methodology Proviral HIV-1 DNA was isolated from subject's peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes that were obtained at the time of enrollment. Each subject was known to be infected with a subtype B virus as determined in a previous study. A small fragment of the integrase gene (nucleotide 4255–4478 of HXB2 was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR using subclade F1 specific primers. The PCR results were further confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. Viral load (VL data were extrapolated from the medical records of each patient. Results For the 41 samples from MSM who were recently infected with subtype B virus, it was possible to detect subclade F1 proviral DNA in five patients, which represents a co-infection rate of 12.2%. In subjects with dual infection, the median VL was 5.3 × 104 copies/ML, whereas in MSM that were infected with only subtype B virus the median VL was 3.8 × 104 copies/ML (p > 0.8. Conclusions This study indicated that subtype B and F1 co-infection occurs frequently within the HIV-positive MSM population as suggested by large number of BF1 recombinant viruses reported in Brazil. This finding will help us track the epidemic and provide support for the development of immunization strategies against the HIV.

  2. Decrease in Seminal HIV-1 RNA Load After Praziquantel Treatment of Urogenital Schistosomiasis Coinfection in HIV-Positive Men-An Observational Study

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    Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; Mudenge, Boniface

    2017-01-01

    Background: Urogenital schistosomiasis due to Schistosoma hematobium infection is hypothesized to cause increased HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen in HIV co-infected men as result of chronic egg-induced inflammation in the prostate and the seminal vesicles. The effect of treatment with the antihelmint...... targeting praziquantel as a supplementary preventive measure of sexual transmission of HIV-1 in S. haematobium endemic areas in sub-Saharan Africa....

  3. An atypical Toxoplasma gondii genotype in a rural Brazilian dog co-infected with Leishmania (Viannia braziliensis

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    Rodrigo Costa da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis and leishmaniasis are two worldwide zoonoses caused by the protozoan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp., respectively. This report describes the clinical and laboratorial findings of a co-infection with both parasites in a 4-year-old female dog suspected of ehrlichiosis that presented anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypoalbuminemia, hyperglobulinemia, tachyzoite-like structures to the lung imprints, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR results positive for T. gondii (kidney, lung, and liver and Leishmania spp. Co-infection with Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania braziliensis was confirmed by sequencing; restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR confirmed an atypical T. gondii genotype circulating in dogs that has been reported to cause human congenital toxoplasmosis.

  4. Prevalence and Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2)/Syphilis Co-Infection and HSV-2 Mono-Infection among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men: a Cross-Sectional Study in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing-Hai; Xu, Jun-Jie; Chu, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Yan-Qiu; Yu, Huan; Ding, Hai-Bo; Jiang, Yong-Jun; Geng, Wen-Qing; Wang, Ning; Shang, Hong

    2017-05-24

    This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)/syphilis co-infection and HSV-2 mono-infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 545 HIV-positive MSM in Shenyang between February 2009 and October 2014. Participants underwent physical examinations and serological tests for HSV-2 and syphilis. A multinomial logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors associated with HSV-2/syphilis co-infection and HSV-2 mono-infection. The prevalence of HSV-2 mono-infection, syphilis mono-infection, and HSV-2/syphilis co-infection (95% confidence interval) was 48.6% (44.4-52.8%), 34.3% (30.3-38.3%), and 22.9% (19.4-26.5%), respectively. After controlling within HSV-2/syphilis-seropositive cases, regression analysis revealed that the related factors for HSV-2/syphilis co-infection included age (25-50 vs. ≤ 24 years: adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.55; > 50 vs. ≤ 24 years: aOR, 43.02), having regular female sexual partner(s) in the past 6 months (aOR, 0.43), and age at first MSM experience (≤ 18 vs. > 18 years: aOR, 2.59) (all P syphilis co-infection in HIV-positive MSM indicates a high secondary HIV transmission risk. A campaign for detection and treatment of HSV-2 and syphilis is urgently required for HIV-positive MSM in China.

  5. Tuberculosis/HIV co-infection in Brazilian state capitals: comments from the data of the Information System of Notifiable Diseases

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    Helder Oliveira e Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the frequency of requests for serological testing for HIV infection in patients with Tuberculosis and the prevalence of such co-infection in Brazilian state capitals and in the Federal District (DF, between 2004 and 2006. Methods: It was a retrospective epidemiological survey based in the data of Brazil’s Information System of Notifiable Diseases (SINAN. The data were collected in August, 2008. In the studied period, there were notified in SINAN, 35,639 cases of Tuberculosis in 2004, 37,520 in 2005 and 34,439 in 2006, in all the 26 state capitals and the DF. The percentage of patients with known serological status and the percentage of patients with positive testing for HIV infection within the patients with Tuberculosis varied widely among the capitals and among the time periods assessed. Results: The municipalities of Rio Branco and Macapá (North region showed the worse coverage of serological testing for HIV infection, with a frequency of not screening above 86.5% in the three years of the study. The best HIV screening coverage occurred in Campo Grande (Center-West region and Curitiba (South region, with frequencies of not testing fewer than 20.5%. The frequency of Tuberculosis/HIV co-infection varied from 64.5% in Florianópolis (South region, in 2004 to 0% in Rio Branco (North region, in 2006. Conclusion: In the study, the regional disparities for HIV serological testing in patients with Tuberculosis were observed. In order to achieve the goals for HIV screening in all patients with Tuberculosis there shall be necessary some operational adjustments and a greater commitment in the implantation of public policies directed for these populations.

  6. Incidence of Co-Infections of HIV, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 and Syphilis in a Large Cohort of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beijing, China

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    Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Zixin; Qi, Xiao; Ruan, Yuhua; Zhou, Yunhua; Li, Chunrong; Luo, Fengji; Lau, Joseph T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The HIV-epidemic among MSM in China has worsened. In this key population, prevalence of HSV-2 and syphilis infection and co-infection with HIV is high. Methods A longitudinal study was conducted (n = 962) in Beijing, China, with three overlapping cohorts (n = 857, 757 and 760) consisting of MSM that were free from pairs of infections of concern (i.e. HIV-HSV-2, HIV-syphilis, HSV-2-syphilis) at baseline to estimate incidence of HIV, HSV-2, syphilis, and those of co-infection. Results The incidence of HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis in the overall cohort was 3.90 (95% CI = 2.37, 5.43), 7.87 (95% CI = 5.74, 10.00) and 6.06 (95% CI = 4.18, 7.94) cases per 100 person-years (PYs), respectively. The incidence of HIV-HSV-2, HIV-Syphilis and HSV-2-Syphilis co-infections was 0.30 (95% CI = 0.29, 0.88), 1.02 (95% CI = 0.13, 2.17) and 1.41 (95% CI: 0.04, 2.78) cases per 100 PYs, respectively, in the three sub-cohorts constructed for this study. Conclusions The incidence of HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis was very high and those of their co-infections were relatively high. Such co-infections have negative impacts on the HIV/STI epidemics. Prevention practices need to take such co-infections into account. PMID:26820145

  7. Prevalence of HIV and syphilis co-infection and associated factors among non-commercial men who have sex with men attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Shenzhen, China.

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    Dai, Wenjie; Luo, Zhenzhou; Xu, Ruiwei; Zhao, Guanglu; Tu, Dan; Yang, Lin; Wang, Feng; Cai, Yumao; Lan, Lina; Hong, Fuchang; Yang, Tubao; Feng, Tiejian

    2017-01-18

    Although HIV and syphilis co-infection has been frequently observed in men who have sex with men (MSM), only few studies have focused on it. Different subgroups of MSM might exhibit heterogeneous HIV and syphilis risk profiles, indicating that interventions for HIV and HIV-related co-infections may vary with different subgroups of MSM. However, no previous study has investigated HIV and syphilis co-infection among non-commercial MSM (ncMSM) attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the prevalence of HIV and syphilis co-infection and associated factors among ncMSM attending an STD clinic in Shenzhen, China. NcMSM attending the STD clinic of Shenzhen Center for Chronic Disease Control were recruited in this cross-sectional study every Monday between March 2013 and August 2015 using a site based convenience sampling method. An anonymous questionnaire was used to collect data regarding socio-demographic characteristics, risky sexual behaviors and HIV-related knowledge. Blood samples were collected to perform HIV and syphilis tests. Totally 533 participants were enrolled in this study and the prevalence of HIV and syphilis co-infection among them was 13.13%. Multivariable analyses indicated that having lived in Shenzhen for less than one year (aOR = 2.80, 95% CI = 1.30-6.05), having first anal sexual intercourse before the age of 18 (aOR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.29-5.89), having 3 to 5 anal sexual partners in the past six months (aOR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.19-5.40), playing exclusively receptive (aOR = 6.87, 95% CI = 3.02-15.61) or both insertive and receptive (aOR = 3.65, 95% CI = 1.64-8.09) roles in anal sexual intercourse and not always using condom in anal sexual intercourse (aOR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.08-4.19) were associated risk factors for HIV and syphilis co-infection, relative to the non-infected ncMSM. Compared with the mono-infected ncMSM, associated risk factors for the co-infection

  8. HIV-related risky practices among Brazilian young men, 2007

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    Célia Landmann Szwarcwald

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral surveillance surveys have been carried among military conscripts, in Brazil, since 1996. This paper presents the results of the 2007 survey and compares actual findings with those obtained in previous studies carried out in the period 1999-2002. The conscripts were selected with a two stage sampling stratified by geographical region. The study included a self-reported questionnaire and blood collection for HIV and syphilis testing. Data from 35,432 conscripts aged 17-20 years old were analyzed. The findings show a reduction in regular condom use, with fixed and casual partners, mainly among those with poor educational level. The proportion of conscripts that have sex with other men was maintained (3.2%, but the index of risky sexual behavioral showed worsening results in this group. Also, the HIV prevalence rate increased from 9 to 11.3 per 10,000 in 2007, though the increase was not statistically significant. In conclusion, the evidences found in this paper indicate the need of reformulate policy among young adults.

  9. [Brazilian men's integral health attention: using indicators for monitoring health's promotion and attention].

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    Moura, Erly Catarina de; Lima, Aline Maria Peixoto; Urdaneta, Margarita

    2012-10-01

    This article presents and discusses the initial actions of Brazilian National Men's Health Policy (PNAISH) concerning indicators used for monitoring promotion and assistance actions of men's health. This multiple case study was developed among five Brazilian cities which had implanted the PNAISH: (Goiânia (GO), Joinville (SC), Petrolina (PE), Rio Branco (AC) and Rio de Janeiro (RJ). A questionnaire was applied to verify the use of data and information required to calculate the indicators recommended by the PNAISH, concerning health's promotion, implementation and expansion of the men's health assistance system, according to the planned goals contained in the cities' local action plans. The results revealed a critical situation concerning monitoring of the activities through the proposed indicators taking into account the lack of standardized procedures to calculate them. Another specific limitation encountered was the limited access to or availability of data by age and sex in the health information systems. These results point out a lack of necessary indicators to define a base line situation, which weakens the systematic monitoring and future evaluation of the actions.

  10. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal.

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    Natalie Olifiers

    Full Text Available Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This

  11. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal.

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    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D'Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the

  12. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

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    ... Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Disease Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  13. Prevalence of syphilis, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and human T-lymphotropic virus infections and coinfections during prenatal screening in an urban Northeastern Brazilian population

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    Adriana Avila Moura

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Syphilis was twice as prevalent among pregnant women in Maceió, compared to the national average, and coinfections with syphilis/HIV and HTLV/HBV were significantly associated among these pregnant women.

  14. Profile of male Brazilian injecting drug users who have sex with men

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    Ferreira Aline Dayrell

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to characterize the profile of male injecting drug users who have sex with other men (MSM IDUs recruited through a cross-sectional multi-city survey (AjUDE-Brasil II Project in six Brazilian cities, in 2000-2001. MSM IDUs were compared to other male IDUs using bivariate and multivariate procedures (logistic regression and answer tree analysis with the CHAID algorithm. Among the 709 male IDUs, 187 (26.4% reported ever having had sex with other men, while only 37 reported sex with other men in the previous six months. MSM IDUs were more likely to be unemployed (OR = 2.3, to have injected tranquilizers (OR = 3.6, and to be HIV-seropositive (OR = 2.1, compared to other male IDUs. Male same-sex relations in this subgroup appear to be associated with strategies to finance drug consuming habits, including sex for drugs with occasional female partners or obtaining injection paraphernalia from occasional sex partners. Further studies should focus on this especially vulnerable subgroup of IDUs, due to the bidirectional and complex interrelationships between their drug injecting habits and sexual risk behaviors.

  15. Characteristics of co-infections by HCV and HBV among Brazilian patients infected by HIV-1 and/or HTLV-1

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    Marcia Moreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human retroviruses HIV-1 and HTLV-1 share the routes of infection with hepatitis viruses B and C. Co-infection by these agents are a common event, but we have scarce knowledge on co-infection by two or more of these agents. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the characteristics and risk factors for co-infections by HBV and HCV in patients infected by HIV-1 or/and HTLV-1, in Salvador, Brazil. METHODS: In a case-control study we evaluated patients followed in the AIDS and HTLV clinics of Federal University of Bahia Hospital. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics were reviewed, and patients were tested for the presence of serological markers of HBV and HCV infections. HCV-infected patients were tested by PCR to evaluate the presence of viremia. RESULTS: A total of 200 HIV-1, 213 HTLV-1-infected, and 38 HIV-HTLV-co-infected individuals were included. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have had more sexual partners in the lifetime than other patients' groups. HIV-HTLV-co-infected subjects were predominantly male. Patients infected by HTLV or co-infected had a significantly higher frequency of previous syphilis or gonorrhea, while HIV infection was mainly associated with HPV infection. Co-infection was significantly associated to intravenous drug use (IVDU. HBV and/or HCV markers were more frequently found among co-infected patients. HBV markers were more frequently detected among HIV-infected patients, while HCV was clearly associated with IVDU across all groups. AgHBs was strongly associated with co-infection by HIV-HTLV (OR = 22.03, 95% CI: 2.69-469.7, as well as confirmed HCV infection (p = 0.001. Concomitant HCV and HBV infection was also associated with retroviral co-infection. Patients infected by HTLV-1 had a lower chance of detectable HCV viremia (OR = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.002-0.85. CONCLUSIONS: Infection by HCV and/or HBV is frequent among patients presenting retroviral infection, but risk factors and prevalence for each

  16. Secular trend in height in enlisted men and recruits from the Brazilian Navy born from 1970 to 1977

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    Gilberto Kac

    Full Text Available This study presents data from a survey on height trends in Brazilian Navy enlisted men and recruits born from 1970 to 1977. The sample consisted of 52,574 enlisted men and 4,459 recruits ranging in age from 18.00 to 18.99 years. The statistical processing employed two-way analysis of variance procedure, simple linear regression comparing height and year of birth and multiple analysis controlling for schooling (regression coefficient and the chi-square. The results show that enlisted men and recruits displayed height increments, characterizing a contemporary process of secular trend. Such increments were also present in the country's various macro-regions. The results were compared to a recent investigation of a national scope the National Survey on Health and Nutrition (PNSN and both enlisted men and recruits displayed higher median height than that reported by the PNSN. Level of schooling for individuals in the Navy is high, far superior to that of the Brazilian population as a whole. This set of data suggests that young men enlisting in the Navy are on average of a higher socioeconomic status than the Brazilian population in general, which limits possibilities for extrapolating the findings from this research.

  17. Safety and efficacy of sildenafil in Brazilian men with erectile dysfunction secondary to spinal cord injury

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    Carlos Eurico Dornelles Cairoli

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of sildenafil in Brazilian patientswith erectile dysfunction secondary to spinal cord injury. Methods:Participants were examined at the time of enrollment and two andsix weeks later. Baseline and follow-up data on sexual functionwere collected. After the second week, the initial dose of sildenafil(50 mg could be adjusted according to efficacy and tolerability.Efficacy was assessed primarily through the scores on questions 3and 4 of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction. Secondaryanalyses included questions and domains of the index, globalefficacy evaluation, percentage of success in sexual intercourseattempts, answers to the Quality of Life and Erectile FunctionQuestionnaire, and partner’s satisfaction. Results: Ninety-onepatients were evaluated as to efficacy and 94 as to safety. Medianage of patients was 33 years, and median time between spinal cordinjury and study enrollment was three years. Sildenafil produceda significant increase in the mean scores of questions 3 and 4(p < 0.001 in both comparisons, as well as in other questionsand in all domains of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction.Improved erections were reported by 89% of patients, and theproportion of successful sexual intercourse attempts went from6 to 74% (p < 0.001. Mean scores on the Quality of Life andErectile Dysfunction Questionnaire increased from 60 to 74%(p < 0.001. Ninety percent of 42 women reported being moderatelysatisfied to very satisfied with their partners’ treatment. The mostcommon adverse events were headache (16%, flushing (11% andnasal congestion (10%. Conclusions: Sildenafil proved to be safeand effective in treating Brazilian men with erectile dysfunctionsecondary to traumatic spinal injury.

  18. HTLV-1/2 seroprevalence and coinfection rate in Brazilian first-time blood donors: an 11-year follow-up

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    Mariana Tomazini Pinto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The seroprevalence and geographic distribution of HTLV-1/2 among blood donors are extremely important to transfusion services. We evaluated the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 infection among first-time blood donor candidates in Ribeirão Preto city and region. From January 2000 to December 2010, 1,038,489 blood donations were obtained and 301,470 were first-time blood donations. All samples were screened with serological tests for HTLV-1/2 using enzyme immunoassay (EIA. In addition, the frequency of coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Chagas disease (CD and syphilis was also determined. In-house PCR was used as confirmatory test for HTLV-1/2. A total of 296 (0.1% first-time donors were serologically reactive for HTLV-1/2. Confirmatory PCR of 63 samples showed that 28 were HTLV-1 positive, 13 HTLV-2 positive, 19 negative and three indeterminate. Regarding HTLV coinfection rates, the most prevalent was with HBV (51.3% and HCV (35.9%, but coinfection with HIV, CD and syphilis was also detected. The real number of HTLV-infected individual and coinfection rate in the population is underestimated and epidemiological studies like ours are very informative.

  19. [Negotiating knowledge and power: the National Policy for Comprehensive Men's Healthcare and the Brazilian Society of Urology].

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    Müller, Rita Flores; Birman, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate the negotiations and disputes between different kinds of knowledge and power in the history of the Brazilian National Policy for Comprehensive Men's Healthcare based on the creation in 2008 of the Technical Area for Men's Health within the Ministry of Health's Department of Strategic Programs. We observed the Brazilian Society of Urology's position as the policy was being drawn up, including the discourse adopted, based on interviews held with managers from the Ministry of Health and the assistant representative of the United Nations Population Fund in Brazil. We analyzed the visibility of the male body in signs of resistance to the interventions of biopower in the expression of the right to health.

  20. Painful and multiple anogenital lesions are common in men with Treponema pallidum PCR-positive primary syphilis without herpes simplex virus coinfection: a cross-sectional clinic-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Janet M; Leslie, David E; Denham, Ian; Azzato, Francesca; Fairley, Christopher K; Chen, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Chancres, the hallmark of primary syphilis, are classically described as single, painless ulcers at the site of Treponema pallidum inoculation. We aimed to determine the frequency of painful or multiple anogenital lesions of primary syphilis among men, whether there was concurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection and whether HIV status altered clinical presentations. This study was conducted among men with T. pallidum PCR-positive lesions, attending a clinic in Melbourne, Australia, between 2009 and 2014. Lesions were also tested with HSV PCR, and syphilis serology undertaken. 183 men with T. pallidum PCR-positive primary anogenital lesions were included. 89% were men who have sex with men, and 10.9% were heterosexual. 38 men (20.8%) were HIV positive. Anal lesions were more common in HIV-positive men (34.2%) than in HIV-negative men (11.6%). Primary lesions were frequently painful (49.2%) or multiple (37.7%), and infrequently associated with HSV (2.7%). Of 37 men with both painful and multiple primary lesions, only 8% had concurrent HSV. Presentation was not significantly altered by HIV status. Primary syphilis lesions are often painful and/or multiple in the absence of herpes coinfection, and may be clinically misdiagnosed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Mortality due to Cardiovascular Diseases in Women and Men in the Five Brazilian Regions, 1980-2012

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    Antonio de Padua Mansur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Studies have shown different mortalities due to cardiovascular diseases (CVD, ischemic heart disease (IHD and cerebrovascular diseases (CbVD in the five Brazilian regions. Socioeconomic conditions of those regions are frequently used to justify differences in mortality due to those diseases. In addition, studies have shown a reduction in the differences between the mortality rates of the five Brazilian regions. Objective: To update CVD mortality data in women and men in the five Brazilian regions. Methods: Mortality and population data were obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics and Ministry of Health. Risk of death was adjusted by use of the direct method, with the 2000 world standard population as reference. We analyzed trends in mortality due to CVD, IHD and CbVD in women and men aged ≥ 30 years in the five Brazilian regions from 1980 to 2012. Results: Mortality due to: 1 CVD: showed reduction in the Northern, West-Central, Southern and Southeastern regions; increase in the Northeastern region; 2 IHD: reduction in the Southeastern and Southern regions; increase in the Northeastern region; and unchanged in the Northern and West-Central regions; 3 CbVD: reduction in the Southern, Southeastern and West-Central regions; increase in the Northeastern region; and unchanged in Northern region. There was also a convergence in mortality trends due to CVD, IHD, and CbVD in the five regions. Conclusion: The West-Central, Northern and Northeastern regions had the worst trends in CVD mortality as compared to the Southeastern and Southern regions. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2016; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0

  2. The impact of serum uric acid on the diagnostic of metabolic syndrome in apparently healthy brazilian middle-aged men.

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    de Oliveira, Alessandro; Miranda Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana; Guedes Cocate, Paula; Bressan, Josefina; Azevedo Novello, Alexandre; Cardoso dos Santos, Eliziária; José Natali, Antônio

    2014-09-01

    Hyperuricemia is related to Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular diseases, but the use of serum uric acid (UA) to diagnose MetS is currently ignored in clinical practices. To examine the impact of serum UA on the diagnostic of MetS and the relationship of serum UA with cardiometabolic risk factors in apparently healthy Brazilian middle-aged men residents in a city of Minas Gerais. In a cross-sectional analysis, 289 apparently healthy middle-aged men underwent anthropometric, clinical, sociodemographic and blood serum biochemical evaluation. By using receive operating curve the internal cutoff of serum UA was determined (5.25 mg/dL). Subjects with two or more components of MetS exhibited higher serum UA as compared to those with one or none component. The inclusion of serum UA ≥ 5.25mg/dL as an additional component of MetS increased the occurrence of this syndrome by 13%. Subjects with UA ≥ 5.25mg/dL showed high prevalence for MetS and association with its components (central obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension) as well as atherogenic risk. Serum UA has an important impact on the diagnostic of MetS and is related to cardiometabolic risk factors in apparently healthy Brazilian middle-aged men. Its use in clinical practices could aggregate accuracy to diagnose MetS. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of human papillomavirus and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection on sperm quality in young heterosexual men with chronic prostatitis-related symptoms.

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    Cai, Tommaso; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Mondaini, Nicola; D'Elia, Carolina; Meacci, Francesca; Migno, Serena; Malossini, Gianni; Mazzoli, Sandra; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effect of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) co-infection on sperm concentration, motility and morphology, in a large cohort of young heterosexual male patients with chronic prostatitis-related symptoms. Patients with chronic prostatitis-related symptoms, attending the same centre for sexually transmitted diseases from January 2005 and December 2010, were consecutively enrolled in this cross-sectional study. All patients underwent clinical and instrumental examination, microbiological cultures for common bacteria, DNA extraction, mucosal and serum antibodies evaluation for Ct, specific tests for HPV and semen analysis. The semen variables analysed were: volume; pH; sperm concentration; motility; and morphology. Subjects were subdivided in two groups: group A, patients with Ct infection alone and group B, patients with Ct and HPV co-infection. The main outcome measurement was the effect of Ct and HPV co-infection on the semen variables examined. Of 3050 screened patients, 1003 were enrolled (32.9%) in the study. A total of 716 (71.3%) patients were allocated to group A, and 287 (28.7%) to group B. Significant differences between the two groups were reported in terms of percentage of motile sperm (degrees of freedom [df] = 1001; t-test = 11.85; P HPV genotype, mucosal IgA type and semen variables was found. In a population of prostatitis-related symptoms attributable to Ct infection, co-infection with HPV has a significant role in decreasing male fertility, in particular with regard to sperm motility and morphology. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  4. Chronic hepatitis C infection: influence of the viral load, genotypes, and GBV-C/HGV coinfection on the severity of the disease in a Brazilian population.

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    Pereira, Leila M M B; Spinelli, Victorino; Ximenes, Ricardo A; Cavalcanti, Maria S; Melo, Raul; Jucá, Norma; Mizokami, Masashi; McFarlane, Ian G

    2002-05-01

    The distributions of the different genotypes of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and GBV-C virus (GBV-C/HGV) vary geographically and information worldwide is still incomplete. In particular, there are few data on the distribution of genotypes (and their relationship to the severity of liver disease) in South America. Findings are described in 114 consecutive patients from Northeast Brazil (median age 52 years, range 18-72 years) who had abnormal levels of serum aminotransferases and seropositivity for HCV RNA. The patients were recruited from an outpatient clinic between November 1997 and April 1998. Quantitative HCV RNA and GBV-C/HGV RNA estimations were carried out by double-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers from the 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of the genomes. HCV genotypes were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with 5'-UTR primers and by PCR with type-specific 5'-UTR primers. GBV-C/HGV-RNA genotypes were determined by RFLP with specific 5'-UTR primers and phylogenetic trees were constructed using the Neighbour-Joining and Drawtree programs. Histological features were graded and staged according to international criteria. Of the 114 patients, 35 (30.7%) patients had cirrhosis and 22 (27.8%) had mild, 51 (64.6%) had moderate, and 6 (7.6%) had severe chronic hepatitis. Median HCV viral load was 10(6) genome equivalents per millilitre (range 10(4)-10(9)/ml). Frequencies of genotypes were 5.3% type 1a, 44.7% type 1b, 3.5% type 2, 41.2% type 3, and 5.3% mixed types. GBV-C/HGV-RNA was detected in the sera of 12 (10.5%) patients and was distributed among three phylogenetic groups. There were no significant differences between patients with the predominant HCV genotypes (1b and 3) with respect to gender, age group, viral load, severity of liver disease, or coinfection with GBV-C/HGV. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Comparison between vertical jumps of high performance athletes on the Brazilian men's beach volleyball team.

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    Ricarte Batista, G; Freire De Araújo, R; Oliveira Guerra, R

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare the anthropometric profile and the vertical jumps of two groups of Brazilian male high performance beach volleyball players. The sample consisted of 38 male beach volleyball players from the Brazilian Beach Volleyball Circuit of 2006, allocated to two groups according to national ranking of their teams. Anthropometric measures and performance in vertical jumps were assessed using a specific methodology. The anthropometric results of the groups showed no statistically significant differences. The players of group 1 (G1) were better in the spike jump (Pjump (Pplayers of group 2 (G2). The prediction model of the spike jump for G2 included body mass and standing spike reach (adjusted R2=0.77) while for the block jump model it was body mass and standing block reach (adjusted R2=0.73). The regression models for G1 were not statistically significant. It is likely that vertical jump height (spike and block) influences the performance of beach volleyball players, and consequently the performance of their teams, since the present study found higher values in G1 than in G2 for the spike jump, block jump and block difference. However, an athlete's success is not related only to the variables investigated in this study; technical skill, tactics, psychology and physical conditioning can also play a role.

  6. Life experiences of Brazilian men with urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes Lopes, Maria Helena Baena; Higa, Rosângela; Cordeiro, Sílvia Nogueira; Rodrigues Estapê, Nuri Aparecida; Levi D'ancona, Carlos Arturo; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the psychosocial meaning and repercussions on lifestyle associated with erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence (UI) in men following radical prostatectomy. Ten men from Southeastern Brazil who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer were interviewed. All participants underwent treatment at a urology clinic during the period of September 2007 to February 2009. A clinical-qualitative study was conducted, using semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Each man was interviewed once. The average length of the interviews was 37 minutes (range: 16 to 81 minutes). Data from the interviews were subjected to content thematic analysis and development of categories based on psychodynamic references. Three themes were identified: (1) sexuality called into question; (2) a body without governance; and (3) experiencing loss. These men reported difficulties in dealing both with the physical and emotional impotence resulting from the treatment. Urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction affected their body by accentuating conflicts related to masculinity, triggering subjective feelings of powerlessness, and psychological distress. Study respondents assigned multiple psychological meanings to issues related to feelings of powerlessness in general, leading to a narcissistic wound. The men experienced UI as a bodily deficiency, and erectile dysfunction was experienced as a feeling of being devitalized. These results suggest that UI from prostate cancer treatment affects sexuality and self-esteem.

  7. Visceral leishmaniasis and leishmaniasis-HIV coinfection: comparative study

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    João Victor Soares Coriolano Coutinho

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to draw clinical and epidemiological comparisons between visceral leishmaniasis (VL and VL associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. METHOD: Retrospective study. RESULTS: Of 473 cases of VL, 5.5% were coinfected with HIV. The highest proportion of cases of both VL and VL/HIV were found among men. A higher proportion of VL cases was seen in children aged 0-10 years, whereas coinfection was more common in those aged 18-50 years. CONCLUSIONS: VL/HIV coinfected patients presented slightly differently to and had a higher mortality rate than those with VL only.

  8. Uroflowmetry in a Large Population of Brazilian Men Submitted to a health check up program and its correlation with ipss and prostate size

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    Joao Paulo Zambon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the uroflowmetry data in a large population of asymptomatic Brazilian men submitted to a health check up program and their correlation to IPSS and prostate size. Materials and Methods Asymptomatic men underwent a health check-up program between January and December 2012. The inclusion criteria were men between 40 and 70 years, IPSS ≤ 7, without bladder, prostate, urethral surgery, neurological diseases, urinary tract infection, PSA < 4.0 ng/dL and urinary volume higher than 150 mL. Urological assessment consisted of clinical history, IPSS, digital rectal examination (DRE, prostate specific antigen (PSA, urinalysis, ultrasonography and uroflowmetry. Results A total of 1041 asymptomatic men were included in this study. The average age was 49 years and average maximum flow rate was 17.4 mL/s. In spite of IPSS and prostate size increase with aging, they had a weak correlation with Qmax cutoffs (10 mL/s and 15 mL/s. A total of 85 men (8.3% had more than 60 years, and even in this group, Qmax was higher than 15 mL/s. Out of 1041 men, 117 had IPSS less than 8 and Qmax less than 10 mL/s. Conclusions In asymptomatic men there is a weak correlation between IPSS, prostate size and uroflowmetric data. The establishment of different normal cutoffs seems to be complicated and uroflowmetry data should be interpreted with caution in order to avoid misdiagnosis.

  9. Prevalence and risk factors for penile lesions/anomalies in a cohort of Brazilian men ≥ 40 years of age

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    Frederico R Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To report the prevalence and risk factors of penile lesions/anomalies in a Metropolitan Brazilian city. Materials and Methods All participants undergoing prostate cancer screening in the city of Curitiba were systematically examined to identify penile lesions including cutaneous mycosis, sexually transmitted diseases, penile cancer, meatal stenosis, hypospadias, and Peyronie's disease. Outcomes of interest included the prevalence and the relative risk and 95% confidence intervals of the lesions/anomalies according to age, school level, race, personal history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, nonspecific urethritis, and vasectomy. Results Balanoposthitis occurred in 11.8% of all participants, with an increased risk in those with diabetes (RR = 1.73, or past history of nonspecific urethritis (RR = 1.58; tinea of the penis was present in 0.2%; condyloma acuminata in 0.5%; herpes virus infection in 0.4%; urethral discharge in 0.2%; genital vitiligo in 0.7%, with an increased prevalence in non-white men (RR = 4.43, and in subjects with lower school level (RR = 7.24; phimosis in 0.5%, with a nearly 7-fold increased risk in diabetics; lichen sclerosus in 0.3%; stenosis of the external urethral meatus in 0.7%, with a higher prevalence in subjects with lichen sclerosus (RR = 214.9, and in those older than 60 years of age (RR = 3.57; hypospadia in 0.6%; fibrosis suggestive of Peyronie's disease in 0.9%, especially in men older than 60 years (RR = 4.59 and with diabetes (RR = 3.91; and penile cancer in 0.06%. Conclusion We estimated the prevalence and risk factors of commonly seen penile diseases in an adult cohort of Brazilian men.

  10. Recalled sexual experiences in childhood with older partners: a study of Brazilian men who have sex with men and male-to-female transgender persons.

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    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Balan, Ivan; Dolezal, Curtis; Mello, Maeve B

    2012-04-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of recalled childhood sexual experiences with an older partner among men who have sex with men (MSM) and/or male-to-female transgender persons recruited in Campinas, Brazil. It also analyzed associations between such recalled experiences and sexual risk behavior in adulthood. Participants recruited using respondent driven sampling completed a self-administered, computer-based questionnaire, and underwent HIV testing. For data analysis, raw scores were weighted based on participants' reported network size. Of 575 participants (85% men and 15% transgender), 32% reported childhood sexual experiences with an older partner. Mean age at first experience was 9 years, partners being, on average, 19 years old, and mostly men. Most frequent behaviors were partners exposing their genitals, mutual fondling, child masturbating partner, child performing oral sex on partner, and child being anally penetrated. Only 29% of the participants who had had such childhood sexual experiences considered it abuse; 57% reported liking, 29% being indifferent and only 14% not liking the sexual experience at the time it happened. Transgender participants were significantly more likely to report such experiences and, compared with men, had less negative feelings about the experience at the time of the interview. No significant associations were found between sexual experiences in childhood and unprotected receptive or insertive anal intercourse in adulthood. Results highlight the importance of assessing participants' perception of abuse, regardless of researchers' pre-determined criteria to identify abuse. MSM and transgender people may experience childhood sexual experiences with older partners differently from other populations (e.g., heterosexuals), particularly in countries with different cultural norms concerning sexuality than those prevalent in Europe and the U.S.

  11. High prevalence of co-infection between human papillomavirus (HPV) 51 and 52 in Mexican population.

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    Gallegos-Bolaños, Jazbet; Rivera-Domínguez, Jessica Alejandra; Presno-Bernal, José Miguel; Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel

    2017-08-08

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with the genesis of cervical carcinoma. The co-infection among HPV genotypes is frequent, but the clinical significance is controversial; in Mexico, the prevalence and pattern of co-infection differ depending on the geographic area of study. We analyzed the mono- and co-infection prevalence of multiple HPV genotypes, as well as preferential interactions among them in a Mexico City sample population. This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study. Cervical cytology samples from 1163 women and 166 urethral scraping samples of men were analyzed between 2010 and 2012. The detection of HPV infection was performed using the hybrid capture and the genotyping was by PCR (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 30, 31, 33, 35, 45, 51, and 52). 36% of women were HPV-positive and the most prevalent genotypes were HPV 51, 52, 16, and 33 (42, 38, 37, and 34%, respectively). The prevalence of co-infection was higher (75.37%) than mono-infection in women HPV positives. All genotypes were co-infected with HPV 16, but the co-infection with 51-52 genotypes was the most frequent combination in all cases. The co-infection was very common; each HPV genotype showed different preferences for co-infection with other genotypes, HPV 51-52 co-infection was the most frequent. The HPV 16, 33, 51 and 52 were the most prevalent and are a public health concern to the Mexican population.

  12. Promiscuity is related to masculine and feminine body traits in both men and women: evidence from Brazilian and Czech samples.

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    Varella, Marco Antonio Correa; Valentova, Jaroslava Varella; Pereira, Kamila Janaina; Bussab, Vera Silvia Raad

    2014-11-01

    One of the possible explanations for human within-sex variation in promiscuity stems from conditional strategies dependent on the level of body sex-dimorphism. There is some evidence that masculine men and feminine women are more promiscuous than their sex-atypical counterparts, although mixed results persist. Moreover, another line of evidence shows that more promiscuous women are rather sex-atypical. We tested whether diverse sex-dimorphic body measures (2D:4D, WHR/WSR, handgrip strength, and height and weight) influence sociosexual desires, attitudes, promiscuous behavior, and age of first intercourse in a sex-typical or sex-atypical direction. Participants were 185 young adults, 51 men and 54 women from Brazil, and 40 men and 40 women from the Czech Republic. In men stronger handgrip and more feminine 2D:4D predicted higher sociosexual behaviors, desires, and lower age of the first sexual intercourse. While in women, sociosexual desires were predicted by lower handgrip strength and more feminine 2D:4D. It thus seems that it is rather a mixture of masculine and feminine traits in men, and feminine traits in women that increase their sociosexuality. Masculine traits (height) predicting female promiscuous behavior were specific for only one population. In conclusion, a mosaic combination of sex-typical but also sex-atypical independent body traits can lead to higher promiscuity, particularly in men. Limitations, implications, and future directions for research are considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neotropical Behaviour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-esteem, confidence, and relationships in Brazilian men with erectile dysfunction receiving sildenafil citrate: a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glina, Sidney; Damião, Ronaldo; Abdo, Carmita; Afif-Abdo, João; Tseng, Li-Jung; Stecher, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial manifestations of erectile dysfunction (ED) differ across cultures. Understanding the treatment response to ED medications within cultural groups can aid in resource allocation and in developing treatment strategies. Evaluate the effect of sildenafil treatment on self-esteem, confidence, and sexual relationship satisfaction in Brazilian men with ED. The Self-Esteem and Relationship (SEAR) questionnaire, a validated, 14-question instrument developed to specifically address self-esteem and relationship issues within the context of ED. Men aged 18 years or older with a clinical diagnosis of ED (self-esteem subscale of the SEAR questionnaire. Thirteen Brazilian sites participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of sildenafil treatment for ED. Patients were randomized to receive either 50 mg of sildenafil (adjustable to 25 mg or 100 mg based on patient response) or matching placebo approximately 1 hour before anticipated sexual activity but not more than once a day. At the end of double-blind treatment, 63 and 66 patients in the placebo and sildenafil groups, respectively, from 13 Brazilian sites were assessed for efficacy. Brazilian patients receiving sildenafil had significantly greater improvements in their scores on the SEAR self-esteem subscale (42.9 [95% confidence interval 35.7-50.0]) compared with placebo (21.1 [95% confidence interval 13.7-28.6]; P self-esteem, confidence, and relationships after treatment with sildenafil.

  14. HIV and hepatitis C coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highleyman, Liz

    2003-01-01

    Coinfection with HIV and the hepatitis C virus (HCV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a growing public health concern. Because the diseases are spread in similar ways--notably through shared use of needles to inject drugs and sexual activity--many people are coinfected with HIV and HCV, HIV and HBV, or even all three viruses. Hepatitis C and hepatitis B are viral infections of the liver; over time they can lead to serious consequences including liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Most studies show that HIV infection leads to more aggressive hepatitis C or hepatitis B and a higher risk of liver damage. Studies of how HCV and HBV affect HIV disease are less clear. Most research shows that HCV does not accelerate HIV disease progression, but HIV/HCV coinfection may impair immune system recovery after starting antiretroviral therapy. Coinfection can complicate treatment. People with liver damage due to chronic hepatitis are more likely to experience hepatotoxicity (liver toxicity) related to anti-HIV drugs. In addition, drugs used to treat HIV and hepatitis can interact and side effects may be exacerbated. Most experts recommend that HIV should be controlled first before a person begins HCV treatment. With careful management, most people with HIV/HCV or HIV/HBV coinfection can be successfully treated for both diseases. In fact, several recent studies suggest that HIV/HCV-coinfected people with well-controlled HIV disease and relatively high CD4 cell counts may do as well as those with HCV alone.

  15. Different methods of calculating ankle-brachial index in mid-elderly men and women: the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil

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    M. Miname

    Full Text Available The ankle-brachial index (ABI is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis related to health-adverse outcomes. ABI is inexpensive compared to other indexes, such as coronary calcium score and determination of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT. Our objective was to identify how the ABI can be applied to primary care. Three different methods of calculating the ABI were compared among 13,921 men and women aged 35 to 74 years who were free of cardiovascular diseases and enrolled in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil. The ABI ratio had the same denominator for the three categories created (the highest value for arm systolic blood pressure, and the numerator was based on the four readings for leg systolic blood pressure: the highest (ABI-HIGH, the mean (ABI-MEAN, and the lowest (ABI-LOW. The cut-off for analysis was ABI20% without the inclusion of ABI<1.0 was 4.9%. For ABI-HIGH, ABI-MEAN and ABI-LOW, the increase in percentage points was 0.3, 0.7, and 2.3%, respectively, and the relative increment was 6.1, 14.3, and 46.9%. In conclusion, all methods were acceptable, but ABI-LOW was more suitable for prevention purposes.

  16. Different methods of calculating ankle-brachial index in mid-elderly men and women: the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miname, M; Bensenor, I M; Lotufo, P A

    2016-01-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis related to health-adverse outcomes. ABI is inexpensive compared to other indexes, such as coronary calcium score and determination of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). Our objective was to identify how the ABI can be applied to primary care. Three different methods of calculating the ABI were compared among 13,921 men and women aged 35 to 74 years who were free of cardiovascular diseases and enrolled in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The ABI ratio had the same denominator for the three categories created (the highest value for arm systolic blood pressure), and the numerator was based on the four readings for leg systolic blood pressure: the highest (ABI-HIGH), the mean (ABI-MEAN), and the lowest (ABI-LOW). The cut-off for analysis was ABI20% without the inclusion of ABI<1.0 was 4.9%. For ABI-HIGH, ABI-MEAN and ABI-LOW, the increase in percentage points was 0.3, 0.7, and 2.3%, respectively, and the relative increment was 6.1, 14.3, and 46.9%. In conclusion, all methods were acceptable, but ABI-LOW was more suitable for prevention purposes.

  17. Risk factors for recurrent falls among Brazilian women and men: the Brazilian Osteoporosis Study (BRAZOS Fatores de risco para quedas recorrentes entre mulheres e homens brasileiros: o Estudo Brasileiro sobre Osteoporose (BRAZOS

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    Marcelo de Medeiros Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to estimate the frequency of recurrent falls and identify the main associated risk factors. The BRAZOS is the first epidemiological study performed on a representative sample of the Brazilian population. Anthropometric data, living habits, previous fractures, falls, dietary intake, physical activity and quality of life were evaluated in 2,420 individuals aged 40 and older. Recurrent falls were reported by 15.5% of men and 25.6% of women. Among women, the risk factors significantly associated to recurrent falls were age, previous fracture, sedentary lifestyle, poor quality of life, diabetes mellitus and current use of benzodiazepine. In men, the risk factors were age, poor quality of life, intake of alcoholic beverages, diabetes mellitus, previous fracture and use of benzodiazepine. A greater intake of vitamin D had a protector effect on the risk of recurrent falls. These findings demonstrated the high prevalence of recurrent falls and emphasize that a multidisciplinary approach is necessary to minimize recurrent falls and their consequences, including osteoporotic fractures.Estimar a freqüência de quedas recorrentes e identificar os principais fatores de risco associados. O BRAZOS é o primeiro estudo epidemiológico realizado em amostragem representativa da população brasileira. Dados antropométricos, hábitos de vida, fratura prévia, quedas, dieta, atividade física e qualidade de vida foram avaliados em 2.420 indivíduos adultos. Quedas recorrentes foram referidas por 15,5% dos homens e 25,6% das mulheres. Nas mulheres, os fatores de risco associados com quedas recorrentes foram idade, fratura prévia, sedentarismo, pior qualidade de vida, diabete mellitus e uso atual de benzodiazepínicos. Nos homens, foram idade, pior qualidade de vida, consumo de bebidas alcoólicas, diabete mellitus, fratura prévia e uso atual de benzodiazepínicos. Maior ingestão de vitamina D desempenhou efeito protetor sobre o

  18. Liver histology in co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV and Hepatitis G virus (HGV

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    STRAUSS Edna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As little is known about liver histology in the co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis G virus (HGV, HGV RNA was investigated in 46 blood donors with hepatitis C, 22 of them with liver biopsy: co-infection HCV / HGV (n = 6 and HCV isolated infection (n = 16. Besides staging and grading of inflammation at portal, peri-portal and lobular areas (Brazilian Consensus, the fibrosis progression index was also calculated. All patients had no symptoms or signs of liver disease and prevalence of HGV / HCV co-infection was 15.2%. Most patients had mild liver disease and fibrosis progression index, calculated only in patients with known duration of infection, was 0.110 for co-infection and 0.130 for isolated HCV infection, characterizing these patients as "slow fibrosers". No statistical differences could be found between the groups, although a lesser degree of inflammation was always present in co-infection. In conclusion co-infection HCV / HGV does not induce a more aggressive liver disease, supporting the hypothesis that HGV is not pathogenic.

  19. HIV and co-infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christina C; Crane, Megan; Zhou, JingLing; Mina, Michael; Post, Jeffrey J; Cameron, Barbara A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Jaworowski, Anthony; French, Martyn A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant reductions in morbidity and mortality secondary to availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection still accounts for 1.5 million deaths annually. The majority of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of opportunistic co-infections are disproportionately high. In this review, we discuss the immunopathogenesis of five common infections that cause significant morbidity in HIV-infected patients globally. These include co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Plasmodium falciparum. Specifically, we review the natural history of each co-infection in the setting of HIV, the specific immune defects induced by HIV, the effects of cART on the immune response to the co-infection, the pathogenesis of immune restoration disease (IRD) associated with each infection, and advances in the areas of prevention of each co-infection via vaccination. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and gaps for future research. PMID:23772618

  20. Mortalidade por câncer em militares da Marinha do Brasil Cancer mortality among service men in the Brazilian Navy

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    Marlene Silva

    2000-08-01

    (ACPMR=135.04, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (ACPMR=152.28 than the referent population. Health-related occupations show an excess of brain neoplasm (ACPMR=2.7, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.1-6.5 and liver cancer (ACPMR=2.9; 95% CI: 1.1- 7.8; colon-rectal cancer was higher among officials of the Army Corp and other administrative occupations (ACPMR=2.4, 95% CI: 1.3 -4.5; larynx cancer (ACPMR=2.3, 95% CI; 1.1, 5.0 is more common among men working in maintenance and repair occupations. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, servicemen of the Brazilian Navy Force have a distinct cancer mortality profile from the general reference population. Risk factors for cancer need to be further evaluated, by using more specific diagnosis and occupational-related exposure data.

  1. Red but not white meat consumption is associated with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and lipid peroxidation in Brazilian middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocate, Paula G; Natali, Antônio José; de Oliveira, Alessandro; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia G; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo G; Longo, Giana Z; dos Santos, Eliziária C; Buthers, Jéssica M; de Oliveira, Leandro L; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana M

    2015-02-01

    The influence of diet on metabolic syndrome and oxidative stress are not completely known. This cross-sectional study assessed the association of red meat and white meat consumption with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and lipid peroxidation in Brazilian middle-aged men. A total of 296 subjects (age: 50.5 ± 5.0 years, body mass index: 25.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)) were evaluated. Anthropometry, lifestyle features, blood biochemical parameters, diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance, a lipid peroxidation marker (oxidized low-density lipoprotein) and triglycerides:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio were assessed. Dietary intake was estimated by a food frequency questionnaire. The subjects included in the highest tertile red meat (≥81.5 g/d) and saturated fatty acid from red meat consumption (≥4.3 g/d) had higher occurrence of central obesity (nearly 60%, p metabolic syndrome (35%, p insulin resistance, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, regardless of interfering factors. There were no associations of highest white meat tertile (≥39.4 g/d) and saturated fatty acid from white meat (≥1.0 g/d) consumption with the assessed parameters (p > 0.05). Red meat consumption was cross-sectionally associated with the occurrence of central obesity, hypertriglyceridaemia, and metabolic syndrome as well as with higher homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance, oxidized low-density lipoprotein concentrations and triglycerides:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. The content of saturated fatty acid from red meat consumption may be a factor that contributed to this relationship, while white meat consumption was not associated with metabolic syndrome and the assessed biomarkers. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Machismo as a Factor Affecting the Use of Power and Communication in the Managing of Personnel Disputes: Brazilian Versus American Men Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ana M.; Todd-Mancillas, William R.

    Acknowledging that the Latin American cultural concept of "machismo" influences the way in which Brazilian managers tend to use authority rather than communication when resolving disputes with subordinates, a study compared Brazilian and American male managers' self-reported preferences for resolving disputes with employees and peer…

  3. HIV / HB coinfection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    Gilson RJC, Hawkins A, Beecham M. Interactions between HIV and hepatitis B virus in homosexual men: effects of the natural history of infection. AIDS 1997; 11: 597-606. 49. Davies SE, Portmann BC, O'Grady JG, et al. Hepatic histological findings after transplantation for chronic hepatitis B virus infection, including a ...

  4. HIV and viral hepatitis co-infection in New York City, 2000-2010: prevalence and case characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prussing, C; Chan, C; Pinchoff, J; Kersanske, L; Bornschlegel, K; Balter, S; Drobnik, A; Fuld, J

    2015-05-01

    Using surveillance data, we describe the prevalence and characteristics of individuals in New York City (NYC) co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Surveillance databases including persons reported to the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene with HIV, HBV, and HCV by 31 December 2010 and not known to be dead as of 1 January 2000, were matched with 2000-2011 vital statistics mortality data. Of 140 606 persons reported with HIV, 4% were co-infected with HBV only, 15% were co-infected with HCV only, and 1% were co-infected with HBV and HCV. In all groups, 70-80% were male. The most common race/ethnicity and HIV transmission risk groups were non-Hispanic blacks and men who have sex with men (MSM) for HIV/HBV infection, and non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and injection drug users for HIV/HCV and HIV/HBV/HCV infections. The overall age-adjusted 2000-2011 mortality was higher in co-infected than HIV mono-infected individuals. Use of population-based surveillance data provided a comprehensive characterization of HIV co-infection with HBV and HCV. Our findings emphasize the importance of targeting HIV and viral hepatitis testing and prevention efforts to populations at risk for co-infection, and of integrating HIV and viral hepatitis care and testing services.

  5. Homens e violência conjugal: uma análise de estudos brasileiros Men and conjugal violence: an analysis of Brazilian studies

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    Kátia Lenz Cesar de Oliveira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available O estudo analisou qualitativamente 54 textos brasileiros sobre homens e violência conjugal, relacionados a atividades de pesquisa ou de intervenção. Primeiramente caracterizou-se o material quanto aos temas abordados, ao foco principal e ao tipo de texto. A seguir fizeram-se sínteses e análises das principais considerações dos textos a partir dos eixos temáticos encontrados: diferentes inteligibilidades da problemática, magnitude da violência conjugal, sentidos de homens relacionados à violência e intervenções e/ou políticas junto a homens agressores. A análise teve como parâmetro o ramo de discussões nacionais e internacionais que se esforça por ultrapassar a polêmica em torno da definição do problema como "violência de gênero" ou "violência conjugal", cunhando sobretudo o pressuposto de que existem diversos estilos de conjugalidade violenta. Concluiu-se que a maior unanimidade dos estudos é pensar a problemática como questão relacional de gênero. Defendeu-se, por fim, a ideia de que a escolha da melhor abordagem articuladora entre os polos da polêmica ainda demanda mais investigações, com metodologias qualitativas junto a atores de diferentes camadas e grupos sociais. Quanto às intervenções, propõem-se investimentos no maior número possível de alternativas, valorizando a singularidade dos casos.This study consisted of a qualitative analysis of 54 Brazilian texts about men and conjugal violence related to research or intervention activities. Initially, the material was divided up according to the topics under scrutiny, the main focus and the type of text. Analysis and synthesis of the main considerations of the texts, based on the thematic points revealed, was then carried out. This included the different approaches to the problem, the magnitude of conjugal violence, the attitudes of men vis-à-vis violence and interventions and/or policies towards male aggressors. The parameter for the analysis was the

  6. Rapid diagnostic test for G6PD deficiency in Plasmodium vivax-infected men: a budget impact analysis based in Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Henry Maia; Brito, Marcelo Augusto Mota; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; de Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; de Oliveira, Maria Regina Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incremental budget impact (IBI) of a rapid diagnostic test to detect G6PDd in male patients infected with Plasmodium vivax in the Brazilian Amazon, as compared with the routine protocol recommended in Brazil which does not include G6PDd testing. The budget impact analysis was performed from the perspective of the Brazilian health system, in the Brazilian Amazon for the years 2013, 2014 and 2015. The analysis used a decision model to compare two scenarios: the first consisting of the routine recommended in Brazil which does not include prior diagnosis of dG6PD, and the second based on the use of RDT CareStart™ G6PD (CS-G6PD) in all male subjects diagnosed with vivax malaria. The expected implementation of the diagnostic test was 30% in the first year, 70% the second year and 100% in the third year. The analysis identified negative IBIs which were progressively smaller in the 3 years evaluated. The sensitivity analysis showed that the uncertainties associated with the analytical model did not significantly affect the results. A strategy based on the use of CS-G6PD would result in better use of public resources in the Brazilian Amazon. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Improved Coinfection with Amphotropic Pseudotyped Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehong Wu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphotropic pseudotyped retroviral vectors have typically been used to infect target cells without prior concentration. Although this can yield high rates of infection, higher rates may be needed where highly efficient coinfection of two or more vectors is needed. In this investigation we used amphotropic retroviral vectors produced by the Plat-A cell line and studied coinfection rates using green and red fluorescent proteins (EGFP and dsRed2. Target cells were primary human fibroblasts (PHF and 3T3 cells. Unconcentrated vector preparations produced a coinfection rate of ∼4% (defined as cells that are both red and green as a percentage of all cells infected. Optimized spinoculation, comprising centrifugation at 1200 g for 2 hours at 15∘C, increased the coinfection rate to ∼10%. Concentration by centrifugation at 10,000 g or by flocculation using Polybrene increased the coinfection rate to ∼25%. Combining the two processes, concentration by Polybrene flocculation and optimized spinoculation, increased the coinfection rate to 35% (3T3 or >50% (PHF. Improved coinfection should be valuable in protocols that require high transduction by combinations of two or more retroviral vectors.

  8. Coinfection by HTLV-I/II is associated with an increased risk of strongyloidiasis and delay in starting antiretroviral therapy for AIDS patients

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    C Brites

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical characteristics and outcomes of HIV-1-HTLV-1 coinfected patients, in Bahia, Brazil. METHODS: Retrospective, comparative study. RESULTS: Among a total of 123 consecutive HIV infected patients, 20 men (20.6% and 6 women (23.1% had detectable antibodies against HTLV-I/II. The major risk factor associated with coinfection by HTLV was intravenous drug use (57.7% of coinfected patient versus 9.2% of HTLV seronegative patients, p < 0.0001. Coinfected patients had higher absolute lymphocyte counts (1,921 + 762 versus 1,587 + 951, p = 0.03. Both groups of patients had similar means of CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts. However, among patients with AIDS CD4+ cell counts were significantly higher among those coinfected with HTLV-I/II (292 ± 92 cells/mm³, versus 140 ± 177cells/mm³, p = 0.36. The frequency and type of opportunistic infections were similar for both groups, but strongyloidiasis and encephalopathy were more frequently diagnosed in coinfected patients (p < 0.05. On the other hand, patients coinfected with HTLV-I/II received significantly less antiretroviral therapy than singly infected by HIV-1. CONCLUSION: Coinfection by HTLV-I/II is associated with an increased risk of strongyloidiasis for HIV patients. Higher CD4 count may lead to underestimation of immunodeficiency, and delay to initiate antiretroviral therapy.

  9. Perceptions about penis size among supposedly healthy 40 to 60-year-old Brazilian men: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Margareth de Mello Ferreira dos; Glina, Sidney; Abdo, Carmita Helena Najjar

    2015-01-01

    Many men seek medical treatments complaining that their penises are too small (short) when in fact they are not (they are not cases of micropenis). The objective of the present study was to evaluate men's satisfaction with their own bodies and sex life and the prevalence of erectile dysfunction, among men who were not seeking medical or psychological advice. Cross-sectional study in a private, philanthropic hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. In this study, 300 male blood donors aged between 40 and 60 years old answered a questionnaire, in privacy, about their sex life and their satisfaction with their own bodies. They were also screened for erectile dysfunction by means of the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire. Seven men (2.3%) reported that they were dissatisfied with their penis size (they thought that it was small), and among these, one was found to have mild erectile dysfunction. However, none of them had sought medical attention. Among these seven, only two had normal body mass index; the other five were overweight (three) or obese (two). The prevalence of dissatisfaction with penis size was low. Among the seven dissatisfied men, only one had erectile dysfunction, of mild type, and all of them felt potent.

  10. Perceptions about penis size among supposedly healthy 40 to 60-year-old Brazilian men: a cross-sectional pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth de Mello Ferreira dos Reis

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Many men seek medical treatments complaining that their penises are too small (short when in fact they are not (they are not cases of micropenis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate men's satisfaction with their own bodies and sex life and the prevalence of erectile dysfunction, among men who were not seeking medical or psychological advice. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in a private, philanthropic hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: In this study, 300 male blood donors aged between 40 and 60 years old answered a questionnaire, in privacy, about their sex life and their satisfaction with their own bodies. They were also screened for erectile dysfunction by means of the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire. RESULTS: Seven men (2.3% reported that they were dissatisfied with their penis size (they thought that it was small, and among these, one was found to have mild erectile dysfunction. However, none of them had sought medical attention. Among these seven, only two had normal body mass index; the other five were overweight (three or obese (two. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of dissatisfaction with penis size was low. Among the seven dissatisfied men, only one had erectile dysfunction, of mild type, and all of them felt potent.

  11. Viral coinfection in childhood respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Roig, A; Salvadó, M; Caballero-Rabasco, M A; Sánchez-Buenavida, A; López-Segura, N; Bonet-Alcaina, M

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of molecular techniques has enabled better understanding of the etiology of respiratory tract infections in children. The objective of the study was to analyze viral coinfection and its relationship to clinical severity. Hospitalized pediatric patients with a clinical diagnosis of respiratory infection were studied during the period between 2009-2010. Clinical and epidemiological data, duration of hospitalization, need for oxygen therapy, bacterial coinfection and need for mechanical ventilation were collected. Etiology was studied by multiplex PCR and low-density microarrays for 19 viruses. A total of 385 patients were positive, 44.94% under 12 months. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV-B: 139, rhinovirus: 114, RSV-A: 111, influenza A H1N1-2009: 93 and bocavirus: 77. Coinfection was detected in 61.81%, 36.36% with 2 viruses, 16.10% and 9.35% with 3 to 4 or more. Coinfection was higher in 2009 with 69.79 vs. 53.88% in 2010. Rhinovirus/RSV-B on 10 times and RSV-A/RSV-B on 5 times were the most detected coinfections. Hospitalization decreased with greater number of viruses (Prespiratory disease and its correlation with the clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Temporal analysis of reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012

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    Renato Simões Gaspar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012. Methods: This was an observational study based on secondary time series data collected from the Brazilian Case Registry Database for the 2002-2012 period. The incidence of tuberculosis was stratified by gender, age group, geographical region, and outcome, as was that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection. Results: Nationally, the incidence of tuberculosis declined by 18%, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 3.8%. There was an overall decrease in the incidence of tuberculosis, despite a significant increase in that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased only in the 0- to 9-year age bracket, remaining stable or increasing in the other age groups. The incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 209% in the ≥ 60-year age bracket. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased in all geographical regions except the south, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by over 150% in the north and northeast. Regarding the outcomes, patients with tuberculosis-HIV co-infection, in comparison with patients infected with tuberculosis only, had a 48% lower chance of cure, a 50% greater risk of treatment nonadherence, and a 94% greater risk of death from tuberculosis. Conclusions: Our study shows that tuberculosis continues to be a relevant public health issue in Brazil, because the goals for the control and cure of the disease have yet to be achieved. In addition, the sharp increase in the incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women, in the elderly, and in the northern/northeastern region reveals that the population of HIV-infected individuals is rapidly becoming more female, older, and more impoverished.

  13. Co-infections with Chikungunya and Dengue Viruses, Guatemala, 2015

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edwards, Thomas; Signor, Leticia del Carmen Castillo; Williams, Christopher; Donis, Evelin; Cuevas, Luis E; Adams, Emily R

    2016-01-01

    ... infections and 635,000 CHIKV infections were reported in this region in 2015 (4,5). However, details of the frequency of co-infection are lacking (1), although a recent study involving 173 samples from Nicaragua that were positive for either virus found a co-infection rate of 22% (6). Co-infections might be frequently missed by surveillance ...

  14. The effect of HIV viral control on the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in veterans with hepatitis C and HIV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Jennifer R; Kowalkowski, Marc A; Duan, Zhigang; Chiao, Elizabeth Y

    2015-04-01

    HIV increases the risk of progression to hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis among individuals coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, the impact of HIV-related immune suppression on the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently unknown. We used the Veterans Affairs HIV Clinical Case Registry to identify patients with HIV infection between 1985 and 2010 and HCV coinfection (positive HCV RNA or genotype test) between 1995 and 2010. The outcome was incident HCC as indicated by International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification code (87% positive predictive value). Patients with HCV monoinfection were included as a comparison group for HCC incidence. Age-adjusted HCC incidence rates were calculated for the coinfected cohort and HCV monoinfected cohort. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each risk factor on the time to HCC diagnosis in the coinfected cohort. There were 66,991 veterans with HIV; 8563 had at least 1 positive HCV RNA test, and 234 of these developed HCC. The overall age-adjusted incidence rate of HCC in monoinfected patients was 2.99/1000 person-years vs. 4.44/1000 person-years in coinfected patients. In patients with coinfection, presence of cirrhosis (HR = 4.88; 95% CI: 3.30 to 7.21), HIV diagnosis >2002 (HR = 4.65; 95% CI: 2.70 to 8.02), and a recent low CD4 cell count <200 (HR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.20 to 2.45) were associated with an increased risk for HCC. The risk of HCC in HCV- and HIV-coinfected veteran men was higher than HCV monoinfection. Diagnosis of cirrhosis and low recent CD4 cell count were the most important predictors of developing HCC in this group.

  15. Management of Coinfections in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Sabra S

    2018-03-01

    In addition to chronic use of antiretrovirals to maintain suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), many persons living with HIV are coinfected with tuberculosis, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C. These coinfections can be successfully treated or managed alongside HIV infection. Clinicians should follow practice guidelines to appropriately screen patients with HIV for these coinfections and initiate treatment when necessary. The most significant concern when treating any of these coinfections is to avoid drug-drug interactions with the patient's antiretrovirals. Several excellent practice guidelines exist for treatment of these common HIV coinfections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. HCV and HIV infection and co-infection: injecting drug use and sexual behavior, AjUDE-Brasil I Project

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    Keli Bahia Felicíssimo Zocratto

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize sexual and drug-use behaviors in injecting drug users (IDUs in relation to single hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and HCV/HIV co-infection. The sample consisted of 272 IDUs enrolled in the AjUDE-Brasil I Project, a cross-sectional multi-center study conducted in five Brazilian cities in 1998. Data were collected with a structured questionnaire using self-reported risk behavior, and HCV and HIV serological status used ELISA on filter paper. IDUs were clustered in four distinct groups: HCV/HIV seronegative; HCV mono-infected; HIV mono-infected; and HCV/HIV co-infected. Active sharing of injecting equipment was associated with HCV infection (p = 0.001. Sexual behavior variables, especially male same-sex sexual relations, were consistently associated with HIV infection. HCV/HIV co-infection was associated with both sexual and drug use variables. It was possible to distinguish different behavioral indicators for HCV and HIV infection and co-infection in this population.

  17. Genital human papillomavirus prevalence and human papillomavirus concordance in heterosexual couples are positively associated with human immunodeficiency virus coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbulawa, Zizipho Z A; Coetzee, David; Marais, Dianne J; Kamupira, Mercy; Zwane, Eugene; Allan, Bruce; Constant, Deborah; Moodley, Jennifer R; Hoffman, Margaret; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2009-05-15

    This study examined the concordance of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in 254 heterosexually active couples and the impact of HIV coinfection. Genital HPV detection was significantly more common among HIV-infected women than among HIV-seronegative women (99 [68%] of 145 women vs. 33 [31%] of 107 women; P HPV detection was significantly more common among HIV-infected men than among HIV-seronegative men (67 [72%] of 93 and 65 [43%] of 150 men, respectively; P women had a significantly greater prevalence of HPV infection than did HIV-seronegative male partners of HIV-seronegative women (38 [58%] of 65 men vs. 27 [32%] of 85 men; P = .001), indicating that HIV coinfection in one partner has a significant impact on the prevalence of HPV genital infection in the other partner. HPV concordance between couples was associated with HIV infection status (P HPV was associated with HIV concordance status (P = .024). HIV-seronegative couples were more likely to share 1 HPV type and were unlikely to share >1 type, whereas HIV-infected or HIV-discordant couples were more likely to share >1 HPV type. Women with a high HPV load frequently shared HPV types with their male partners, suggesting that a high HPV load may play a role in HPV transmission between partners. In conclusion, HIV coinfection in one or both sexually active partners increased HPV prevalence and HPV type-specific concordance.

  18. coinfection with malaria, hookworm and schistosomiasis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Introduction:A school based rapid survey was conducted th th from the 17 to the 19 of May 2011in Zambezi District of. Zambia to determine the prevalence and coinfection rate of malaria, hookworm and schistosomiasis in schoolchildren in other to inform decision maker. Methodology: The study design, sampling methods,.

  19. Co-infection alters population dynamics of infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Hanna; Barrès, Benoit; Vale, Pedro F; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2015-01-08

    Co-infections by multiple pathogen strains are common in the wild. Theory predicts co-infections to have major consequences for both within- and between-host disease dynamics, but data are currently scarce. Here, using common garden populations of Plantago lanceolata infected by two strains of the pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis, either singly or under co-infection, we find the highest disease prevalence in co-infected treatments both at the host genotype and population levels. A spore-trapping experiment demonstrates that co-infected hosts shed more transmission propagules than singly infected hosts, thereby explaining the observed change in epidemiological dynamics. Our experimental findings are confirmed in natural pathogen populations-more devastating epidemics were measured in populations with higher levels of co-infection. Jointly, our results confirm the predictions made by theoretical and experimental studies for the potential of co-infection to alter disease dynamics across a large host-pathogen metapopulation.

  20. Satisfação sexual entre homens idosos usuários da atenção primária Sexual satisfaction among older men assisted by the Brazilian primary care

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    Viviane Xavier de Lima e Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar a satisfação sexual entre homens idosos usuários da Estratégia Saúde da Família do Recife. PROCEDIMENTOS METODOLÓGICOS: Mediante entrevistas domiciliares face a face, foram estudados 245 homens de 60 a 95 anos, por meio de questionário semiestruturado, anônimo e pré-testado. RESULTADOS: A maior parte dos entrevistados compôs-se de pardos (51,8%, católicos (67,2%, com renda familiar de até dois salários mínimos (71,1% e média de 3,5 anos de estudo. Quase metade classifica sua saúde como regular. Pouco mais de 83% residem com uma companheira e 89,7% destes consideram esse relacionamento como bom ou ótimo. Setenta e três por cento afirmam permanecer sexualmente ativos, sendo os que possuem até 70 anos e que coabitam com uma companheira os de maior frequência sexual. Foi observada associação estatisticamente significativa entre a satisfação sexual atual e a idade, a saúde autopercebida, a satisfação sexual antes dos 60 anos e a frequência sexual. CONCLUSÃO: A sexualidade continua presente na vida dos homens maiores de 60 anos. Não se pode minimizar o papel da cultura na qual estão imersos os entrevistados sobre as questões da masculinidade, da velhice e da sexualidade. A vivência da sexualidade e a interpretação dessas experiências por esses homens têm um caráter plural e assim devem ser encaradas pela sociedade e pelas equipes de saúde da família.OBJECTIVE: Investigate the sexual satisfaction among older men assisted by the Brazilian family health care strategy in city of Recife. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES: A sample of 245 men between 60 and 95 years, assisted by the family health care providers, was face-to-face interviewed, with semi-structured, anonymous, standardized questionnaires. RESULTS: The most were non-white (78%, catholic (67,2%, with median of 3,5 years of study and low economic status. Almost a half perceives their health as regular. 83,3% have a spouse and the most (89

  1. Role of viral coinfections in asthma development.

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    Maria Luz Garcia-Garcia

    Full Text Available Viral respiratory infections, especially acute bronchiolitis, play a key role in the development of asthma in childhood. However, most studies have focused on respiratory syncytial virus or rhinovirus infections and none of them have compared the long-term evolution of single versus double or multiple viral infections.Our aim was to compare the frequency of asthma development at 6-8 years in children with previous admission for bronchiolitis associated with single versus double or multiple viral infection.A cross-sectional study was performed in 244 children currently aged 6-8 years, previously admitted due to bronchiolitis between September 2008 and December 2011. A structured clinical interview and the ISAAC questionnaire for asthma symptoms for 6-7-year-old children, were answered by parents by telephone. Specimens of nasopharyngeal aspirate for virological study (polymerase chain reaction and clinical data were prospectively taken during admission for bronchiolitis.Median current age at follow-up was 7.3 years (IQR: 6.7-8.1. The rate of recurrent wheezing was 82.7% in the coinfection group and 69.7% in the single-infection group, p = 0.06. The number of wheezing-related admissions was twice as high in coinfections than in single infections, p = 0.004. Regarding the ISAAC questionnaire, 30.8% of coinfections versus 15% of single infections, p = 0.01, presented "wheezing in the last 12 months", data that strongly correlate with current prevalence of asthma. "Dry cough at night" was also reported more frequently in coinfections than in single infections, p = 0.02. The strongest independent risk factors for asthma at 6-8 years of age were: age > 9 months at admission for bronchiolitis (OR: 3.484; CI95%: 1.459-8.317, p:0.005, allergic rhinitis (OR: 5.910; 95%CI: 2.622-13.318, p<0.001, and viral coinfection-bronchiolitis (OR: 3.374; CI95%: 1.542-7.386, p:0.01.Asthma at 6-8 years is more frequent and severe in those children previously hospitalized

  2. Brazilian Firms

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    Vicente Lima Crisóstomo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work makes an analysis of the determinants of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR of Brazilian firms, as proxied by firm membership of the ISE Index of BM&FBOVESPA. Besides other proposed determinants of CSR present in the literature (firm size, profitability, growth opportunities, the work examines ownership concentration and the persistence on CSR status. Logit regression estimates have been run for a sample of 1649 firm-year observations in the period 2006-2011. The findings show that CSR of Brazilian firms is inversely correlated to its ownership concentration indicating that controlling voting shareholders may not see social concerns as a priority. Besides, firms tend to maintain their present CSR status. The results also indicate that leading CSR firms are larger, face more growth opportunities, and are persistent in their superior CSR situation.

  3. Brazilian energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Shaughnessy, H.

    1997-04-01

    Brazilian Energy provides all the information necessary for energy companies to invest and operate in Brazil, including: a review of Brazil`s natural resources; an assessment of privatisation strategies at the federal, state and regional level; an analysis of the electricity industry and the future for Electrobras; an analysis of the oil industry and, in particular, Petrobras; a discussion of the fuel alcohol industry; the discovery of local natural gas, its prospects and the involvement of the auto industry; an assessment of the problems facing the coal industry and its future; a discussion of the regulatory framework for the newly privatised companies; the importance of intra-regional energy links and the booming membership of Mercosur; the difficulties experienced by foreign investors doing business in Brazil; brief profiles of the key energy companies; profiles of key people influencing the privatisation process in Brazil. Brazilian energy is essential reading for those wishing to advise and assist Brazil in this period of change and development, as well as those who wish to invest or become key players in the Brazilian energy sector. (author)

  4. Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Berghoff, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease concurrent infections frequently occur. The clinical and pathological impact of co-infections was first recognized in the 1990th, i.e. approximately ten years after the discovery of Lyme disease. Their pathological synergism can exacerbate Lyme disease or induce similar disease manifestations. Co-infecting agents can be transmitted together with Borrelia burgdorferi by tick bite resulting in multiple infections but a fraction of co-infections occur independently of tick bite. ...

  5. Coinfection by Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp. in domestic cats (Felis catus in State of Mato Grosso do Sul

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    Audrey Rennó Campos Braga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Leishmaniasis and toxoplasmosis are important to public health. Methods Antibodies for Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp. were evaluated in cats from Campo Grande, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, a region endemic for canine visceral leishmaniasis. Serum samples from 50 asymptomatic cats were titrated for T. gondii by the immunofluorescence antibody test and modified agglutination test and for Leishmania spp. by the immunofluorescence antibody test. Results These two agents coinfected two (4% of the 50 tested animals. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the concomitant presence of two important zoonoses in cats from Brazilian endemic regions for canine visceral leishmaniasis.

  6. Weight and height of people living with HIV/AIDS attended by the Brazilian National Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassichetto, Katia Cristina; Bergamaschi, Denise Pimentel; Frainer, Deivis Elton Schlickmann; Garcia, Vania Regina Salles; Trovões, Edina Aparecida Tramarin

    2013-09-01

    The nutritional status of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is related to morbidity and mortality and its monitoring is important in the maintenance of the health status. This is a cross-sectional study carried out in Brazilian National Health System in the Municipality of São Paulo. It describes anthropometrical characteristics: weight and height; indices of weight for height (W/H), height for age (H/A), body mass index for age (BMI/A) and Z score for height and weight. The study includes 772 participants from all ages: children, adolescents, adults and elderly. The graphical analysis shows that in under-5s and in the 5 to 19 years old group, the W/H, the H/A and the BMI/A curves are similar to the reference population with an exception in the H/A for 5 to 19 years old group which is left-shifted (mean Z = -0.66). In the case of adults, graphics for the study population show median weight apparently lower than in the reference population for most age groups in the case of men, and when age is greater in women. The proportion of people over 20 years old with AIDS on anti-retroviral therapy is lower when coinfection is present (p < 0.001). The findings of the study showed that, for children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS, the average weight and height are lower than the values for non infected population. For adults and elderly, the weight average is lower than the reference population with a worsening among coinfected patients. This underscores the need to direct more effort in nutritional actions thus helping enhance the health status of this group.

  7. Nutritional status and food intake of HCV/HIV coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Giselle Souza; Zanolla, Anelise Fernanda; Tovo, Cristiane Valle; Gottschall, Catarina Bertaso Andreatta; Buss, Caroline

    2016-10-18

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection may cause nutrient deficiency and affect the nutritional status.Objetive: To assess nutritional status, and energy and macronutrient intake in HCV/HIV coinfected patients. Cross-sectional study on HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated in a public hospital. Nutritional status was assessed by measurements of weight, height, waist circumference (WC), arm circumference (AC), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), non-dominant hand gripltrength (NDHGS), body mass index (BMI) and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC). Dietary intake was assessed by 24-hour recall. Fifty-seven patients (59.6% women) with mean age of 46 ± 11.2 years were studied. According to BMI, more than half of patients were overweight or obese, and 41% of men and 68% of women had increased or substantially increased WC. The prevalence of malnutrition varied between the methods -10.5% (BMI), 29.8% (AC), 56.2% (TST), 17.6% (MUAC), and 12.3% (NDHGS). We found a high percentage of patients with inadequate intake of protein, fat and energy. The percentage of total energy intake (%TEI) from carbohydrates inversely correlated with WC and AC. A positive correlation was observed between %TEI from protein and NDHGS, and between %TEI from fat and BMI, WC and AC. We found a high prevalence of increased body weight and WC, and inadequate dietary intake in HCV/HIV coinfected patients. We observed a positive association between protein intake and muscle function, and between fat intake and obesity.

  8. Leishmaniasis–HIV coinfection: current challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindoso JAL

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available José Angelo Lauletta Lindoso,1,2 Mirella Alves Cunha,3 Igor Thiago Queiroz,4 Carlos Henrique Valente Moreira2 1Laboratory of Soroepidemiology (LIM HC-FMUSP, São Paulo University, São Paulo, 2Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas-SES, São Paulo, 3Department of Infectious Disease, Faculty of Medicine, São Paulo University, São Paulo, 4Hospital Giselda Trigueiro - SESAP, Natal, Brazil Abstract: Leishmaniasis – human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection can manifest itself as tegumentary or visceral leishmaniasis. Almost 35 countries have reported autochthonous coinfections. Visceral leishmaniasis is more frequently described. However, usual and unusual manifestations of tegumentary leishmaniasis have been reported mainly in the Americas, but the real prevalence of Leishmania infection in HIV-infected patients is not clear. Regarding the clinical manifestations, there are some reports showing unusual manifestations in visceral leishmaniasis and tegumentary leishmaniasis in HIV-infected patients; yet, the usual manifestations are more frequent. Leishmaniasis diagnosis relies on clinical methods, but serological tests are used to diagnose visceral leishmaniasis despite them having a low sensitivity to tegumentary leishmaniasis. The search for the parasite is used to diagnose both visceral leishmaniasis and tegumentary leishmaniasis. Nevertheless, in HIV-infected patients, the sensitivity of serology is very low. Drugs available to treat leishmaniasis are more restricted and cause severe side effects. Furthermore, in HIV-infected patients, these side effects are more prominent and relapses and lethality are more recurrent. In this article, we discuss the current challenges of tegumentary leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis–HIV infection, focusing mainly on the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of leishmaniasis. Keywords: leishmaniasis, HIV infection, coinfection, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

  9. Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are major health problems worldwide. HCV/HIV co-infection has been shown to increase the frequency of liver disease and also maternal-fetal transmission of HCV. Little data exist on the prevalence of co-infection of these viruses in ...

  10. Management of BU-HIV co-infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, D. P.; Ford, N.; Vitoria, M.; Christinet, V.; Comte, E.; Calmy, A.; Stienstra, Y.; Eholie, S.; Asiedu, K.

    BACKGROUND Buruli Ulcer (BU)-HIV co-infection is an important emerging management challenge for BU disease. Limited by paucity of scientific studies, guidance for management of this co-infection has been lacking. METHODS Initiated by WHO, a panel of experts in BU and HIV management developed

  11. Co-infections with Chikungunya and Dengue Viruses, Guatemala, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas; Signor, Leticia Del Carmen Castillo; Williams, Christopher; Donis, Evelin; Cuevas, Luis E; Adams, Emily R

    2016-11-01

    We screened serum samples referred to the national reference laboratory in Guatemala that were positive for chikungunya or dengue viruses in June 2015. Co-infection with both viruses was detected by reverse transcription PCR in 46 (32%) of 144 samples. Specimens should be tested for both arboviruses to detect co-infections.

  12. Co-infections with Chikungunya and Dengue Viruses, Guatemala, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Thomas; Signor, Leticia del Carmen Castillo; Williams, Chris; Donis, Evelin; Cuevas, Luis; Adams, Emily

    2016-01-01

    We screened serum samples referred to the national reference laboratory in Guatemala that were positive for chikungunya or dengue viruses in June 2015. Co-infection with both viruses was detected by reverse transcription PCR in 46 (32%) of 144 samples. Specimens should be tested for both arboviruses to detect co-infections.

  13. Influenza and Bacterial Pathogen Coinfections in the 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Yi Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To help understand the potential impact of bacterial coinfection during pandemic influenza periods, we undertook a far-reaching review of the existing literature to gain insights into the interaction of influenza and bacterial pathogens. Reports published between 1950 and 2006 were identified from scientific citation databases using standardized search terms. Study outcomes related to coinfection were subjected to a pooled analysis. Coinfection with influenza and bacterial pathogens occurred more frequently in pandemic compared with seasonal influenza periods. The most common bacterial coinfections with influenza virus were due to S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Of these, S. pneumoniae was the most common cause of bacterial coinfection with influenza and accounted for 40.8% and 16.6% of bacterial coinfections during pandemic and seasonal periods, respectively. These results suggest that bacterial pathogens will play a key role in many countries, as the H1N1(A influenza pandemic moves forward. Given the role of bacterial coinfections during influenza epidemics and pandemics, the conduct of well-designed field evaluations of public health measures to reduce the burden of these common bacterial pathogens and influenza in at-risk populations is warranted.

  14. Coinfection. Virus-helminth coinfection reveals a microbiota-independent mechanism of immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lisa C; Monticelli, Laurel A; Nice, Timothy J; Sutherland, Tara E; Siracusa, Mark C; Hepworth, Matthew R; Tomov, Vesselin T; Kobuley, Dmytro; Tran, Sara V; Bittinger, Kyle; Bailey, Aubrey G; Laughlin, Alice L; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Wherry, E John; Bushman, Frederic D; Allen, Judith E; Virgin, Herbert W; Artis, David

    2014-08-01

    The mammalian intestine is colonized by beneficial commensal bacteria and is a site of infection by pathogens, including helminth parasites. Helminths induce potent immunomodulatory effects, but whether these effects are mediated by direct regulation of host immunity or indirectly through eliciting changes in the microbiota is unknown. We tested this in the context of virus-helminth coinfection. Helminth coinfection resulted in impaired antiviral immunity and was associated with changes in the microbiota and STAT6-dependent helminth-induced alternative activation of macrophages. Notably, helminth-induced impairment of antiviral immunity was evident in germ-free mice, but neutralization of Ym1, a chitinase-like molecule that is associated with alternatively activated macrophages, could partially restore antiviral immunity. These data indicate that helminth-induced immunomodulation occurs independently of changes in the microbiota but is dependent on Ym1. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Viral Co-infection and Leprosy Outcomes: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Paulo R L; Machado, Lídia M; Shibuya, Mayume; Rego, Jamile; Johnson, Warren D; Glesby, Marshall J

    2015-01-01

    The role of the host immunity in determining leprosy clinical forms and complications is well recognized, implying that changes in the immune status may interfere with several aspects of the disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that the presence of viral co-infections and associated immunological changes will have a clinical impact on leprosy outcomes. The aim of our study was to determine the clinical impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection on the development of reactions, neuritis, neuropathy and relapses. Cohort study in 245 leprosy subjects from Bahia, Brazil. Patients were followed from the time of diagnosis until at least the end of multidrug therapy. Viral co-infection was detected in 36 out of the 245 patients (14.7%). Specific co-infection rates were 10.6% for HBV, 2.9% for HIV, 2.5% for HTLV-1 and 0.8% for HCV. All four groups of co-infected patients had higher rates of neuritis and nerve function impairment compared to non co-infected leprosy subjects. The relapse rate was also higher in the co-infected group (8.3%) versus patients without co-infection (1.9%); relative risk 4.37, 95% confidence interval 1.02-18.74. Leprosy patients should be screened for HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV-1 co-infections. Besides contributing to better health care, this measure will facilitate the early detection of severe complications through targeting of higher risk patients.

  16. A systemic review of tuberculosis with HIV coinfection in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo, Jaishree; Mahomed, Nasreen; Moodley, Halvani [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2017-09-15

    The epidemiology of tuberculosis is adversely impacted by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. HIV-infected patients are more prone to opportunistic infections, most commonly tuberculosis, and the risk of death in coinfected patients is higher than in those without HIV. Due to the impaired cellular immunity and reduced immunological response in HIV-infected patients, the classic imaging features of tuberculosis usually seen in patients without HIV may present differently. The aim of this review article is to highlight the imaging features that may assist in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients with HIV coinfection. (orig.)

  17. HIV co-infection with hepatitis B and C viruses among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result. The prevalence of HIV/HBV co-infection was 7.7%, while that of HIV/HCV co-infection was 5.2%. No child was co-infected with all three viruses. Children who were co-infected with HCV were more likely to be older than 5 years. There was no significant association between co-infection with either of the hepatitis ...

  18. Interacting epidemics and coinfection on contact networks

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, M E J

    2013-01-01

    The spread of certain diseases can be promoted, in some cases substantially, by prior infection with another disease. One example is that of HIV, whose immunosuppressant effects significantly increase the chances of infection with other pathogens. Such coinfection processes, when combined with nontrivial structure in the contact networks over which diseases spread, can lead to complex patterns of epidemiological behavior. Here we consider a mathematical model of two diseases spreading through a single population, where infection with one disease is dependent on prior infection with the other. We solve exactly for the sizes of the outbreaks of both diseases in the limit of large population size, along with the complete phase diagram of the system. Among other things, we use our model to demonstrate how diseases can be controlled not only by reducing the rate of their spread, but also by reducing the spread of other infections upon which they depend.

  19. Interacting epidemics and coinfection on contact networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M E J Newman

    Full Text Available The spread of certain diseases can be promoted, in some cases substantially, by prior infection with another disease. One example is that of HIV, whose immunosuppressant effects significantly increase the chances of infection with other pathogens. Such coinfection processes, when combined with nontrivial structure in the contact networks over which diseases spread, can lead to complex patterns of epidemiological behavior. Here we consider a mathematical model of two diseases spreading through a single population, where infection with one disease is dependent on prior infection with the other. We solve exactly for the sizes of the outbreaks of both diseases in the limit of large population size, along with the complete phase diagram of the system. Among other things, we use our model to demonstrate how diseases can be controlled not only by reducing the rate of their spread, but also by reducing the spread of other infections upon which they depend.

  20. Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... men need to pay more attention to their health. Compared to women, men are more likely to ... regular checkups and medical care There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate ...

  1. Schistosoma haematobium co-infection with soil-transmitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transmitted helminthes afflict most-at-risk populations in endemic communities in the developing world. Aim: This study investigated S. haematobium co-infection with soil-transmitted helminthes, and host risk factors in two communities in the ...

  2. Hepatitis B and C coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection have become a global health challenge. The situation is made worse by the fact that they share the same route of transmission and co-infection increase's progression, complications and outcome illness. Prompt recognition of the ...

  3. Visceral leishmaniasis and HIV coinfection in the Mediterranean region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Monge-Maillo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is hypoendemic in Mediterranean countries, where it is caused by the flagellate protozoan Leishmania infantum. VL cases in this area account for 5%-6% of the global burden. Cases of Leishmania/HIV coinfection have been reported in the Mediterranean region, mainly in France, Italy, Portugal, and Spain. Since highly active antiretroviral therapy was introduced in 1997, a marked decrease in the number of coinfected cases in this region has been reported. The development of new diagnostic methods to accurately identify level of parasitemia and the risk of relapse is one of the main challenges in improving the treatment of coinfected patients. Clinical trials in the Mediterranean region are needed to determine the most adequate therapeutic options for Leishmania/HIV patients as well as the indications and regimes for secondary prophylaxis. This article reviews the epidemiological, diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of Leishmania/HIV coinfection in the Mediterranean region.

  4. Leprosy reactions: coinfections as a possible risk factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina F. Motta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the frequency of coinfections in leprosy patients and whether there is a relationship between the presence of coinfections and the development of leprosy reactional episodes. METHOD: A cross-sectional study based on an analysis of the medical records of the patients who were treated at the Leprosy Clinics of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, was conducted from 2000 to 2010. Information was recorded regarding the age, sex, clinical status, WHO classification, treatment, presence of reactions and coinfections. Focal and systemic infections were diagnosed based on the history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between the leprosy reactions and the patients' gender, age, WHO classification and coinfections. RESULTS: Two hundred twenty-five patients were studied. Most of these patients were males (155/225 = 68.8% of an average age of 49.31±15.92 years, and the most prevalent clinical manifestation was the multibacillary (MB form (n = 146, followed by the paucibacillary (PB form (n = 79. Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL was more prevalent (78/122 = 63.9% than the reversal reaction (RR (44/122 = 36.1%, especially in the MB patients (OR 5.07; CI 2.86-8.99; p<0.0001 who exhibited coinfections (OR 2.26; CI 1.56-3.27; p,<0.0001. Eighty-eight (88/225 = 39.1% patients exhibited coinfections. Oral coinfections were the most prevalent (40/88 = 45.5%, followed by urinary tract infections (17/88 = 19.3%, sinusopathy (6/88 = 6.8%, hepatitis C (6/88 = 6.8%, and hepatitis B (6/88 = 6.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Coinfections may be involved in the development and maintenance of leprosy reactions.

  5. Syphilis in Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Warning Sign for HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gállego-Lezáun, C; Arrizabalaga Asenjo, M; González-Moreno, J; Ferullo, I; Teslev, A; Fernández-Vaca, V; Payeras Cifre, A

    2015-11-01

    To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of syphilis in men who have sex with men (MSM) in an area of Mallorca, Spain. We performed a retrospective analysis of syphilis cases in MSM seen at a hospital in Mallorca between January 2005 and June 2013. Fifty-five cases of syphilis were recorded in MSM during the study period (34.3% of all cases diagnosed), and 74.5% of these patients had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. The two diseases had been diagnosed simultaneously in 70.7% of this population. Patients with HIV coinfection had a median CD4 count of 456cells/μL (range, 29-979 cells/μL). Syphilis was diagnosed clinically in 49.1% of cases and by screening in the remaining 50.9%. The most common form of syphilis was late latent or indeterminate syphilis (41.9% of cases). In the group of men with syphilis, MSM had a higher risk of HIV infection. A majority of MSM with syphilis had HIV coinfection. HIV screening is therefore essential in this population and could even result in early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  6. Brief Report: HIV/HBV Coinfection is a Significant Risk Factor for Liver Fibrosis in Tanzanian HIV-Infected Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Claudia; Christian, Beatrice; Fabian, Emanuel; Macha, Irene; Gawile, Cecilia; Mpangala, Shida; Ulenga, Nzovu; Thio, Chloe L; Ammerman, Lauren R; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Fawzi, Wafaie; Green, Richard; Murphy, Robert

    2017-11-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, the burden of liver disease associated with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HIV is unknown. We characterized liver disease using aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) and FIB-4 in patients with HIV, HBV, and HIV/HBV coinfection in Tanzania. Using a cross-sectional design, we compared the prevalence of liver fibrosis in treatment-naive HIV monoinfected, HBV monoinfected, and HIV/HBV-coinfected adults enrolled at Management and Development for Health (MDH)-supported HIV treatment clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Risk factors associated with significant fibrosis (APRI >0.5 and FIB-4 >1.45) were examined. Two hundred sixty-seven HIV-infected, 165 HBV-infected, and 63 HIV/HBV-coinfected patients were analyzed [44% men, median age 37 (interquartile range 14), body mass index 23 (7)]. APRI and FIB-4 were strongly correlated (r = 0.78, P HBV [0.36 (interquartile range 0.4)], HIV [0.23 (0.17)], HBV [0.29 (0.15)] (P HBV coinfection was associated with APRI >0.5 [HIV/HBV vs. HIV: odds ratio (OR) 3.78 (95% confidence interval: 1.91 to 7.50)], [HIV/HBV vs. HBV: OR 2.61 (1.26 to 5.44)]. HIV RNA per 1 log10 copies/mL increase [OR 1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.04 to 2.26)] and HBV DNA per 1 log10 copies/mL increase [OR 1.36 (1.15, 1.62)] were independently associated with APRI >0.5 in HIV-infected and HBV-infected patients, respectively. HIV/HBV coinfection is an important risk factor for significant fibrosis. Higher levels of circulating HIV and HBV virus may play a direct role in liver fibrogenesis. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive monitoring of liver disease in HIV/HBV coinfection is warranted.

  7. Estudo comparativo da força muscular da mão entre cadetes homens e mulheres da Força Aérea Brasileira Grip and pinch strength in Brazilian Air Force cadet pilots: a comparative study between men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Donatelli Meibach Teixeira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi quantificar a força muscular da mão, nos movimentos de preensão palmar e três tipos de pinça, comparando os cadetes homens e mulheres. Foram avaliados 31 cadetes da Academia da Força Aérea Basileira, sendo 17 homens e 14 mulheres, com os dinamômetros Jamar e Preston Pinch Gauge. A média de preensão das mulheres foi de 31,4 kgf no lado dominante e 29,3 kgf no lado não-dominante; nos homens, foi 43,6 e 41,2 kgf, respectivamente (pThe aim of this study was to quantify the hand muscle strength during grip and pinch movements, and to compare results between men and women. Thirty-one cadet pilots (17 men and 14 women from the Brazilian Air Force Academy were assessed by means of Jamar dynamometer (grip and Preston Pinch Gauge (pinch. Female cadets mean grip was 31.4 kgf at dominant hand and 29.3 kgf at non-dominant hand; in male subjects, corresponding values were 43.6 kgf and 41.2 kgf. Mean female lateral pinch at the dominant hand was 7.4 kgf and men's, 10.2 kgf (p<0.01; tripod pinch values were 7.2 kgf at dominant side and 7.1 kgf at non-dominant for women, and 9.8 kgf and 9.50 kgf for men, respectively (p<0.01; women pinch values were 4.9 kgf and 4.6 at dominant and non-dominant hands, and men's, 6.5 kgf and 5.7 kgf respectively (p<0.01. Grip, pinch, lateral pinch, and tripod pinch were all significantly higher (p<0.01 in men than in women. Both sexes showed higher strength at the dominant side, except of the tripod pinch. When compared to the population in general, there are little differences among cadets, both as to sex and dominance. These findings may be of relevance both for pilots performance and physical therapy assessment.

  8. A política de atenção à saúde do homem no Brasil: os paradoxos da medicalização do corpo masculino The Brazilian national policy for men's health: the paradoxical medicalization of masculinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carrara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata do lançamento da Política Nacional de Atenção Integral à Saúde do Homem pelo governo brasileiro, em 2008. Analisamos as ações da Sociedade Brasileira de Urologia (SBU nos anos que precederam o lançamento dessa política, e sua atuação durante sua implantação, focalizada na caracterização da disfunção erétil como problema de saúde pública. Examinamos em seguida o documento "Política Nacional de Atenção Integral à Saúde do Homem (princípios e diretrizes", disponibilizado pelo Ministério da Saúde em agosto de 2008. A partir desses dados, buscamos discutir o modo como o discurso dos especialistas (no caso, os médicos urologistas se articula ao discurso militante dos movimentos sociais, tendo como objetivo a medicalização do corpo masculino. Argumentamos que tal objetivo, sustentado na afirmação do direito à saúde, implica a ideia de uma masculinidade em si "insalubre", e visa, ao contrário das políticas voltadas para as mulheres e outras minorias, ao "desempoderamento" do sujeito à qual se dirige.This paper discusses the launching of the Brazilian National Policy on Men's Health in 2008. We analyze the actions of the Brazilian Society of Urology while the policy was being planned and during its implementation. These actions can be described as an effort to promote "erectile dysfunction" as a public health problem. We then present the main points of the document "National Policy for the Integral Assistance to Men's Health (principles and guidelines" launched by the Ministry of Health in August 2008. Based on this data, we discuss the way the specialists' discourse was articulated to the political discourse of social movements, with the aim of medicalizing man's body. We argue that the Policy, using the right to health as its justification, implies the idea of masculinity as intrinsically unhealthy, and, unlike the policies aimed at women and other minorities, aims at the "disempowerment" of men.

  9. Telaprevir-containing triple therapy in acute HCV coinfection: The CHAT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesecke, Christoph; Singh, Gurmit K Jagjit; Scholten, Stefan H-A; Lutz, Thomas; Baumgarten, Axel; Schneeweiss, Stephan M; Trein, Andreas; Rausch, Michael; Ingiliz, Patrick; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Nelson, Mark

    2017-01-01

    No published randomized controlled data on the use of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) in acute hepatitis C (AHC) coinfection exist. However, with the AHC epidemic ongoing among men who have sex with men (MSM) these are urgently needed. The CHAT study is a randomized controlled trial of pegylated interferon + ribavirin (PR) plus telaprevir (TVR) for 12-24 weeks versus PR alone for 24-48 weeks in the response-guided treatment of patients with AHC genotype (GT) 1 infection and HIV-1 coinfection in Germany and Great Britain. 34 patients were included: 15 were randomized to the PR arm (arm 1), 19 to the TVR + PR arm (arm 2). All patients were MSM, median age was 40 years. 55% had IL28B C/C GT. Median baseline HCV RNA was 291,227 IU/ml, median alanine aminotransferase was 105 U/l. 85% received cART, all had baseline HIV RNA <40 copies/ml. Overall sustained virological response (SVR 12 ) rate was 79.4% (27/34). SVR 12 was seen in 12/15 (80%) in arm 1 and in 15/19 (79.8%) in arm 2. Of the four patients without SVR in arm 2, one experienced viraI breakthrough, two were non-responders; in one case HCV protease inhibitor (PI)-associated mutations were selected under TVR (V36M, R155K). Due to moderate response rates and additional toxicities 1st generation HCV PIs should not be used in treating acute HCV. While not being licensed, recent study data and guidelines support the use of dual DAA therapy but optimal treatment duration in acute HCV needs further investigation.

  10. Mechanisms of accelerated liver fibrosis in HIV-HCV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysanthidis, Theofilos; Loli, Georgia; Metallidis, Simeon; Germanidis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Although there is evidence that HCV progresses rapidly in HIV/HCV coinfected patients in comparison with HCV monoinfected, the HIV-, HCV- and host/genetic-related factors, as well as the exact mechanisms implicated in this process are not fully elucidated. Furthermore, cure of HCV in those coinfected seems possible with the new antiviral drugs, but high cost as well as insufficient identification, linkage with care and treatment hamper the achievement of this goal. Research on the subject, could reveal an important prognostic marker for the effectiveness of persuasion of patients with HIV/HCV coinfection with a predicted accelerated fibrosis course, in order to facilitate and prioritize, not in terms of guidelines but in the real life situation, their treatment with a medically just framework.

  11. Virological Mechanisms in the Coinfection between HIV and HCV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carla Liberto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to shared transmission routes, coinfection with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV is common in patients infected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV. The immune-pathogenesis of liver disease in HIV/HCV coinfected patients is a multifactorial process. Several studies demonstrated that HIV worsens the course of HCV infection, increasing the risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, HCV might increase immunological defects due to HIV and risk of comorbidities. A specific cross-talk among HIV and HCV proteins in coinfected patients modulates the natural history, the immune responses, and the life cycle of both viruses. These effects are mediated by immune mechanisms and by a cross-talk between the two viruses which could interfere with host defense mechanisms. In this review, we focus on some virological/immunological mechanisms of the pathogenetic interactions between HIV and HCV in the human host.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and tropical diseases: a Brazilian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgado Mariza G

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes recent findings on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/Aids, highlighting the role of co-infections with major tropical diseases. Such co-infections have been studied in the Brazilian context since the beginning of the Aids epidemic and are expected to be more frequent and relevant as the Aids epidemic in Brazil proceeds towards smaller municipalities and the countryside, where tropical diseases are endemic. Unlike opportunistic diseases that affect basically the immunocompromised host, most tropical diseases, as well as tuberculosis, are pathogenic on their own, and can affect subjects with mild or no immunossuppression. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapies (HAART, opportunistic diseases seem to be on decrease in Brazil, where such medicines are fully available. Benefiting from HAART in terms of restoration of the immune function, putative milder clinical courses are expected in the future for most co-infections, including tropical diseases. On the other hand, from an ecological perspective, the progressive geographic diffusion of Aids makes tropical diseases and tuberculosis a renewed challenge for Brazilian researchers and practitioners dealing with HIV/Aids in the coming years.

  13. HIV co-infection with hepatitis B and C viruses among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection was 5.2%. No child was co-infected with all three viruses. Children who were co-infected with HCV were more likely to be older than 5 years. There was no significant association between co-infection with either of the hepatitis viruses and ...

  14. Persistent, triple-virus co-infections in mosquito cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malasit Prida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that insects and crustaceans can carry simultaneous, active infections of two or more viruses without showing signs of disease, but it was not clear whether co-infecting viruses occupied the same cells or different cells in common target tissues. Our previous work showed that successive challenge of mosquito cell cultures followed by serial, split-passage resulted in stabilized cultures with 100% of the cells co-infected with Dengue virus (DEN and an insect parvovirus (densovirus (DNV. By addition of Japanese encephalitis virus (JE, we tested our hypothesis that stable, persistent, triple-virus co-infections could be obtained by the same process. Results Using immunocytochemistry by confocal microscopy, we found that JE super-challenge of cells dually infected with DEN and DNV resulted in stable cultures without signs of cytopathology, and with 99% of the cells producing antigens of the 3 viruses. Location of antigens for all 3 viruses in the triple co-infections was dominant in the cell nuclei. Except for DNV, this differed from the distribution in cells persistently infected with the individual viruses or co-infected with DNV and DEN. The dependence of viral antigen distribution on single infection or co-infection status suggested that host cells underwent an adaptive process to accommodate 2 or more viruses. Conclusions Individual mosquito cells can accommodate at least 3 viruses simultaneously in an adaptive manner. The phenomenon provides an opportunity for genetic exchange between diverse viruses and it may have important medical and veterinary implications for arboviruses.

  15. Acute hepatitis with nontyphoidal salmonella and hepatitis E virus coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Kuo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old Taiwanese man presented with dark urine for 5 days before admission to hospital and with fever on the 2nd day of admission to hospital. Laboratory studies showed acute hepatitis with hyperbilirubinemia. Acute hepatitis with nontyphoidal salmonella and hepatitis E virus coinfection was diagnosed. The fever subsided after treatment with ceftriaxone and cefepime. His serum bilirubin reached its peak value on the 3rd week after admission to hospital and then gradually returned to the normal range. To the best of our knowledge, acute hepatitis E coinfection with nontyphoidal salmonella has not been reported previously.

  16. Gardnerella vaginalis and Mollicute detection in rectal swabs from men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ciara; Watt, Alison P; McKenna, James P; Coyle, Peter V

    2017-06-01

    The numbers of rectal sexually transmitted infections are on the rise especially among men who have sex with men. Males from men who have sex with men population are encouraged to send a rectal swab to the laboratory for sexually transmitted infection screening at their visit to the Genitourinary Medicine Clinic. In healthy asymptomatic males, the range of pathogens tested is limited therefore other pathogens may be left untreated allowing infections to persist among sexual partners. Molecular techniques have revolutionarised sexually transmitted infection testing enabling the detection of previously difficult-to-culture pathogens in extra-genital sites and have increased the evidence base for their clinical significance. The present study tests 107 rectal swabs from men who have sex with men negative for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae against quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays targeting five common sexually transmitted bacteria which include Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum and Gardnerella vaginalis. The pathogenic role of these five bacteria in men who have sex with men is currently unknown. Amongst the 107 patients, a positive qPCR was obtained respectively for G. vaginalis 89 (83.2%); U. urealyticum 26 (24.3%); M. hominis 26 (24.3%); M. genitalium 10 (9.3%) and U. parvum 5 (4.7%). Bacterial loads in single and co-infections were compared for each organism. G. vaginalis and M. hominis loads were significantly ( p = 0.007 and p = 0.005, respectively) higher when co-infecting with at least one other organism. Amongst co-infections, the loads of each organism were assessed to determine possible synergies. G. vaginalis and M. hominis displayed a synergistic pattern ( r = 0.51; p = 0.02) which is in keeping with a similar synergy detected previously in the vagina of women with bacterial vaginosis. This study outlines that potential significant infections are being

  17. Brazilian antidoping public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Claudio Bispo de; Rodrigues, Deyvis Nascimento

    2014-07-01

    Doping, used to improve sports performance, is legally prohibited. This paper describes Brazilian regulations, resolutions, and Federal laws addressing the issue of doping and antidoping which were collected in 2012 from official websites. We conclude that Brazilian laws have constrained doping, and have been updated over the years to conform to worldwide legal guidelines. Study limitations are noted.

  18. Coinfection with Hepatitis B and C Viruses among HIV Positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis B and C viruses coinfection in HIV positive pregnant women is a common public health problem and recognized worldwide. The consequences of this problem in our poor resource setting with the risk of mother to child transmission is obvious with increased morbidity and mortality in our environment.

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 36 HIV/HCV co-infected isolates (22 from volunteer blood donors and 14 from people living with HIV/AIDS not yet on antiretroviral treatment) were analyzed using molecular biology techniques that involved RT-PCR, gene/TOPO cloning, DNA sequencing, and bioinformatics tools for sequence management and ...

  20. Review of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and HIV Co-Infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a review of pulmonary tuberculosis in pregnancy with special emphasis on co-infection with HIV and the situation in Sub Saharan Africa. PTB in conjunction with HIV has significantly impacted maternal morbidity, mortality and poor pregnancy outcomes in Sub Saharan Africa. Active tuberculosis is often asymptomatic ...

  1. HBV, HIV CO-INFECTION AT KISUMU DISTRICT HOSPITAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-12-12

    Dec 12, 2004 ... HIV positive patients due to depressed cell mediated immunity. This causes predominant hepatocytolysis and worsens the liver disease (6,11,12). A study done in. Mexico showed that co-infection with HBV and HIV is high among homosexuals, which was also associated with severe liver disease (13-16).

  2. Fatal coinfection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 8 and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Bemer, Pascale; Gay-Andrieu, Françoise; Bretonnière, Cédric; Lepelletier, Didier; Mahé, Pierre-Joachim; Villers, Daniel; Jarraud, Sophie; Reynaud, Alain; Corvec, Stéphane

    2008-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. We report on a patient who simultaneously developed L. pneumophila serogroup 8 pneumonia and Aspergillus fumigatus lung abscesses. Despite appropriate treatments, Aspergillus disease progressed with metastasis. Coinfections caused by L. pneumophila and A. fumigatus remain exceptional. In apparently immunocompetent patients, corticosteroid therapy is a key risk factor for aspergillosis.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Liver Fibrosis in HIV/HCV Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio M. Mastroianni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in people coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Several studies have shown that HIV infection promotes accelerated HCV hepatic fibrosis progression, even with HIV replication under full antiretroviral control. The pathogenesis of accelerated hepatic fibrosis among HIV/HCV coinfected individuals is complex and multifactorial. The most relevant mechanisms involved include direct viral effects, immune/cytokine dysregulation, altered levels of matrix metalloproteinases and fibrosis biomarkers, increased oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis, HIV-associated gut depletion of CD4 cells, and microbial translocation. In addition, metabolic alterations, heavy alcohol use, as well drug use, may have a potential role in liver disease progression. Understanding the pathophysiology and regulation of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infection may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for the management of all patients with ongoing liver disease. In this review, we therefore discuss the evidence and potential molecular mechanisms involved in the accelerated liver fibrosis seen in patients coinfected with HIV and HCV.

  4. Seroprevalence and factors associated with hepatitis C coinfection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hepatocellular carcinoma.[12]. Seroprevalence and factors associated with hepatitis C coinfection among HIV‑positive pregnant women at the ..... Instead, the risk factors for HIV infection were used as proxy on account of the similarity in modes of transmission of both viruses. Second, plasma HCV‑RNA was not quantified.

  5. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi/HIV coinfection in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Stauffert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease reactivation has been a defining condition for acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Brazil for individuals coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV since 2004. Although the first coinfection case was reported in the 1980s, its prevalence has not been firmly established. In order to know coinfection prevalence, a cross-sectional study of 200 HIV patients was performed between January and July 2013 in the city of Pelotas, in southern Rio Grande do Sul, an endemic area for Chagas disease. Ten subjects were found positive for T. cruzi infection by chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay and indirect immunofluorescence. The survey showed 5% coinfection prevalence among HIV patients (95% CI: 2.0–8.0, which was 3.8 times as high as that estimated by the Ministry of Health of Brazil. Six individuals had a viral load higher than 100,000 copies per μL, a statistically significant difference for T. cruzi presence. These findings highlight the importance of screening HIV patients from Chagas disease endemic areas.

  6. Consequences of symbiont co-infections for insect host phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Ailsa H C; Parker, Benjamin J; Hrček, Jan; Kavanagh, James C; Wellham, Peter A D; Godfray, H Charles J

    2017-05-25

    Most animals host communities of symbiotic bacteria. In insects, these symbionts may have particularly intimate interactions with their hosts: many are intracellular and can play important roles in host ecology and evolution, including protection against natural enemies. We investigated how interactions between different species or strains of endosymbiotic bacteria within an aphid host influence the outcome of symbiosis for both symbiont and host. We first asked whether different combinations of facultative symbiont species or strains can exist in stable co-infections. We then investigated whether the benefits that facultative bacteria confer on their hosts (protection against natural enemies) are enhanced, reduced or unaltered by the presence of a co-infecting symbiont. We asked this both for co-infecting symbionts that confer different phenotypes on their hosts (protection against fungal pathogens vs. parasitoid wasps) and symbionts with overlapping functions. Finally, we investigated the additional survival costs to aphids of carrying multiple infections of symbiont species or strains, and compared symbiont titres in double and single infections. We found that stable co-infections were possible between all of the combinations of facultative symbiont species (Regiella insecticola + Hamiltonella defensa, Regiella + Rickettsiella sp., Regiella + Spiroplasma sp.) and strains (Hamiltonella) that we studied. Where symbionts provided protection against different natural enemies, no alteration in protection was observed in the presence of co-infections. Where symbionts provided protection against the same natural enemy, the level of protection corresponded to the higher of the two symbionts present. In some instances, aphid hosts suffered additional survival costs when hosting double infections. In the case of Hamiltonella, however, infection with multiple strains of the same symbiont led to lower symbiont titres than single infections, and actually improved aphid

  7. Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease concurrent infections frequently occur. The clinical and pathological impact of co-infections was first recognized in the 1990th, i.e. approximately ten years after the discovery of Lyme disease. Their pathological synergism can exacerbate Lyme disease or induce similar disease manifestations. Co-infecting agents can be transmitted together with Borrelia burgdorferi by tick bite resulting in multiple infections but a fraction of co-infections occur independently of tick bite. Clinically relevant co-infections are caused by Bartonella species, Yersinia enterocolitica, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In contrast to the USA, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) and babesiosis are not of major importance in Europe. Infections caused by these pathogens in patients not infected by Borrelia burgdorferi can result in clinical symptoms similar to those occurring in Lyme disease. This applies particularly to infections caused by Bartonella henselae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Chlamydia trachomatis primarily causes polyarthritis. Chlamydophila pneumoniae not only causes arthritis but also affects the nervous system and the heart, which renders the differential diagnosis difficult. The diagnosis is even more complex when co-infections occur in association with Lyme disease. Treatment recommendations are based on individual expert opinions. In antibiotic therapy, the use of third generation cephalosporins should only be considered in cases of Lyme disease. The same applies to carbapenems, which however are used occasionally in infections caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. For the remaining infections predominantly tetracyclines and macrolides are used. Quinolones are for alternative treatment, particularly gemifloxacin. For Bartonella henselae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae the combination with rifampicin is recommended. Erythromycin is the drug of choice for

  8. Modeling malaria and typhoid fever co-infection dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutua, Jones M; Wang, Feng-Bin; Vaidya, Naveen K

    2015-06-01

    Malaria and typhoid are among the most endemic diseases, and thus, of major public health concerns in tropical developing countries. In addition to true co-infection of malaria and typhoid, false diagnoses due to similar signs and symptoms and false positive results in testing methods, leading to improper controls, are the major challenges on managing these diseases. In this study, we develop novel mathematical models describing the co-infection dynamics of malaria and typhoid. Through mathematical analyses of our models, we identify distinct features of typhoid and malaria infection dynamics as well as relationships associated to their co-infection. The global dynamics of typhoid can be determined by a single threshold (the typhoid basic reproduction number, R0(T)) while two thresholds (the malaria basic reproduction number, R0(M), and the extinction index, R0(MM)) are needed to determine the global dynamics of malaria. We demonstrate that by using efficient simultaneous prevention programs, the co-infection basic reproduction number, R0, can be brought down to below one, thereby eradicating the diseases. Using our model, we present illustrative numerical results with a case study in the Eastern Province of Kenya to quantify the possible false diagnosis resulting from this co-infection. In Kenya, despite having higher prevalence of typhoid, malaria is more problematic in terms of new infections and disease deaths. We find that false diagnosis-with higher possible cases for typhoid than malaria-cause significant devastating impacts on Kenyan societies. Our results demonstrate that both diseases need to be simultaneously managed for successful control of co-epidemics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Host resistance and pathogen aggressiveness are key determinants of coinfection in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Hanna; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2017-08-01

    Coinfection, whereby the same host is infected by more than one pathogen strain, may favor faster host exploitation rates as strains compete for the same limited resources. Hence, coinfection is expected to have major consequences for pathogen evolution, virulence, and epidemiology. Theory predicts genetic variation in host resistance and pathogen infectivity to play a key role in how coinfections are formed. The limited number of studies available has demonstrated coinfection to be a common phenomenon, but little is known about how coinfection varies in space, and what its determinants are. Our aim is to understand how variation in host resistance and pathogen infectivity and aggressiveness contribute to how coinfections are formed in the interaction between fungal pathogen Podosphaera plantaginis and Plantago lanceolata. Our phenotyping study reveals that more aggressive strains are more likely to form coinfections than less aggressive strains in the natural populations. In the natural populations most of the variation in coinfection is found at the individual plant level, and results from a common garden study confirm the prevalence of coinfection to vary significantly among host genotypes. These results show that genetic variation in both the host and pathogen populations are key determinants of coinfection in the wild. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalka, Sérgio; Steiner, Denise; Ravelli, Flávia Naranjo; Steiner, Tatiana; Terena, Aripuanã Cobério; Marçon, Carolina Reato; Ayres, Eloisa Leis; Addor, Flávia Alvim Sant'anna; Miot, Helio Amante; Ponzio, Humberto; Duarte, Ida; Neffá, Jane; da Cunha, José Antônio Jabur; Boza, Juliana Catucci; Samorano, Luciana de Paula; Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula; Maia, Marcus; Nasser, Nilton; Leite, Olga Maria Rodrigues Ribeiro; Lopes, Otávio Sergio; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; Meyer, Renata Leal Bregunci; Cestari, Tânia; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva; Rego, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with a large heterogeneity of climates and massive mixing of the population. Almost the entire national territory is located between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn, and the Earth axial tilt to the south certainly makes Brazil one of the countries of the world with greater extent of land in proximity to the sun. The Brazilian coastline, where most of its population lives, is more than 8,500 km long. Due to geographic characteristics and cultural trends, Brazilians are among the peoples with the highest annual exposure to the sun. Epidemiological data show a continuing increase in the incidence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Photoprotection can be understood as a set of measures aimed at reducing sun exposure and at preventing the development of acute and chronic actinic damage. Due to the peculiarities of Brazilian territory and culture, it would not be advisable to replicate the concepts of photoprotection from other developed countries, places with completely different climates and populations. Thus the Brazilian Society of Dermatology has developed the Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection, the first official document on photoprotection developed in Brazil for Brazilians, with recommendations on matters involving photoprotection. PMID:25761256

  11. Tuberculosis mortality in Brazilian capitals, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccon, Roger Flores; Maffacciolli, Rosana; Burille, Andréia; Meneghel, Stela Nazareth; Oliveira, Dora Lúcia Leidens Correa de; Gerhardt, Tatiana Engel

    2017-01-01

    to analyze the association between tuberculosis mortality and socio-demographics and health indicators in the capitals of Brazilian states and the Federal District. this is an ecological study whose outcome was the standardized coefficient of tuberculosis mortality in the 2008-2010 period; the independent variables comprised 16 indicators, grouped into three blocks; Pearson correlation test and multiple linear regression were applied for analysis. 4,744 deaths from tuberculosis were registered in the 27 municipalities (2.7 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants); the following indicators were associated with tuberculosis mortality (p<0.10): income inequality (Gini index of monthly income of individuals over 10 years old: β=0.454; 95%CI 6.21;28.51), proportion of migrants in the municipality (β=0.537 95%CI 0.12;0.31), poor black-skinned individuals (β=0.302 95%CI 0.004;0.109) and coefficient of Tb/HIV coinfection (β=0.449 95%CI 0.05;0.28). tuberculosis mortality was higher in capitals with greater income inequality, migration, poverty among black-skinned individuals and occurrence of Tb/HIV coinfection.

  12. Validade preditiva de equações de referência para força de preensão manual em homens brasileiros de meia idade e idosos Predictive validity of reference equations to hand grip strength in Brazilian men of middle age and elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex de Andrade Fernandes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a validade preditiva das equações de referência para predição da força de preensão manual (FPM em homens brasileiros de meia idade e idosos. Foram avaliados 60 homens com idade de 58,7±8,6 anos (50-84 anos, estatura 168,7±8,0 cm, massa corporal 67,9±13,0 kg e índice de massa corporal 23,7±4,0 kg/m², utilizando equipamento 'padrão-ouro' na avaliação da FPM e seguindo todas as recomendações metodológicas preconizadas pela American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT. Os resultados do diagrama de Bland-Altman para mão dominante (MD apresentam um erro médio (viés de -8,4% (IC95% -51,6-34,7. Já o diagrama de Bland-Altman para mão não dominante (MND apresenta um erro médio (viés de 1,4% (IC95% -47,1-49,8. O cálculo de Cronbach's alpha para a MD foi de 0,69 e 0,59 para MND. O coeficiente de correlação intraclasse para MD foi 0,52 (IC95% 31-68 e de 0,42 (IC95% 20-60 para a MND. Concluímos que as equações para predição analisadas neste estudo, para uma população de homens brasileiros de meia idade e idosos, apresentou baixa validade preditiva, o que pode gerar erros de interpretação dos resultados.The objective of this study was to verify the predictive validity of reference equations for hand grip strength (HGS in middle-aged and elderly Brazilian men. We evaluated 60 men with age of 58.7±8.6 years, height 168.7±8.0 cm, body mass 67.9±13.0 kg, and body mass index 23.7±4.0 kg/m², utilizing the gold standard equipment for evaluation of HGS and following all methodological recommendations of the American Society of Hand Therapists (ASTH. The results of the Bland-Altman diagram for the dominant hand (DH had a mean error (bias of -8.4% (95%CI -51.6-34.7. The Bland-Altman diagram for the non-dominant hand (NDH had a mean error (bias of 1.4% (95%CI -47.1-49.8. The calculation of Cronbach's alpha was 0.69 for the DH and 0.59 for the NDH. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0

  13. Co-infections and Pathogenesis of KSHV-Associated Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhani eThakker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also known as human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8 is one of the several carcinogenic viruses that infect humans. KSHV infection has been implicated in the development of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, and multicentric Castleman’s Disease (MCD. While KSHV infection is necessary for the development of KSHV associated malignancies, it is not sufficient to induce tumoriegenesis. Evidently, other co-factors are essential for the progression of KSHV induced malignancies. One of the most important co-factors, necessary for the progression of KSHV induced tumors, is immune suppression that frequently arises during co-infection with HIV and also by other immune suppressants. In this mini-review, we discuss the roles of co-infection with HIV and other pathogens on KSHV infection and pathogenesis.

  14. Septic arthritis due to tubercular and Aspergillus co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus septic arthritis is a rare and serious medical and surgical problem. It occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common causative organism followed by Aspergillus flavus. The most common site affected is knee followed by shoulder, ankle, wrist, hip and sacroiliac joint. Debridement and voriconazole are primary treatment of articular aspergilosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of co-infection of tuberculosis (TB and Aspergillus infecting joints. We report a case of co-infection of TB and A. flavus of hip and knee of a 60-year-old male, with type 2 diabetes mellitus. He was treated with debridement, intravenous voriconazole, and antitubercular drugs.

  15. Melioidosis and pulmonary tuberculosis co-infection in a diabetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty Anup

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis. It is endemic in South East Asian countries and North Australia. Sporadic cases of melioidosis have been reported from several parts of South India. Melioidosis may manifest as chronic pneumonia mimicking tuberculosis and generally be seen as a single entity. We report the first case of melioidosis and pulmonary tuberculosis co-infection in a diabetic patient. The causative agents were identified using standard methods and the patient recovered after completion of the recommended antibiotic therapy. Melioidosis is an emerging infectious disease in India. Though melioidosis and tuberculosis present with similar clinical picture, co-infections are rare. Hence, increased awareness among clinicians and microbiologists can help in diagnosing the disease even when there is no clinical suspicion.

  16. HIV and parasitic co-infections in tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Range, N.; Magnussen, Pascal; Mugomela, A.

    2007-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania, to determine the burden of HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients who were confirmed or suspected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Of the 655 patients investigated, 532 (81.2%) had been confirmed as PTB cases, by microscopy...... and Strongyloides stercoralis infections were less common, each recorded at a prevalence of HIV-positive than the PTB- patients (43.6% v. 62.6%; PHIV-positive had a significantly lower prevalence (12.1% v. 25%; P... intensity (49 v. 123 eggs/g; P=0.003) of hookworm infection than the HIV-negative. The PTB patients in the study area were, however, still frequently co-infected with HIV and with parasitic infections that may increase morbidity and accelerate the progression of HIV disease. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jun...

  17. Mad Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen omhandler den amerikanske tv-serie Mad Men. Fokus er på hvordan Koreakrigens indflydelse på ændrede manderoller har haft betydning for hovedpersonen Don Drapers performative maskulinitet.......Artiklen omhandler den amerikanske tv-serie Mad Men. Fokus er på hvordan Koreakrigens indflydelse på ændrede manderoller har haft betydning for hovedpersonen Don Drapers performative maskulinitet....

  18. GBV-C/HGV and HIV-1 coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Maidana

    Full Text Available An interesting interaction pattern has been found between HIV-1 and GBV-C/HGV, resulting in protection against progression to AIDS. The mechanisms involved in this interaction remain to be clarified. We examined the current knowledge concerning this coinfection and developed hypotheses to explain its effects. A better understanding of this interaction could result in new concepts, which may lead to new strategies to control HIV-1 replication and progression to AIDS.

  19. Co-infections and co-morbidities among injecting drug users versus sexually infected patients in Bucharest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Manea

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: After the 2008 introduction of new psychoactive substances (NPS in Romania, the number of newly diagnosed HIV infections showed significant increase among injecting drug users (IDUs. Our objective was to analyze the differences between co-infections related to the HIV infection, based on the way of transmission (IDUs versus sexually infected. Materials and Methods: A retrospective transversal study was carried out, analyzing 245 adult HIV-positive patients, diagnosed between January 2013 and December 2013 in our hospital. We collected socio-demographic, epidemiological and laboratory data at the diagnosis and analyzed them using SPSS version 20. Results: Most patients (71%, 174/245 were men and the median age was 32 years (IQR: 26–38. 91 patients (37% were former/active IDUs (most of them injecting both opioids and NPS, while 154 patients (63% were sexually infected, with 84% being heterosexuals and 16% men having sex with men (MSM. The median CD4 count, at the moment of diagnosis, was 294 cells/mm3 (IQR: 119–483.Other co-infections at diagnosis were toxoplasmosis (four patients, cryptococcosis (two patients and cytomegalovirus reactivations (three patients without significant association between the two groups. Conclusion: Heterosexual transmission was the most common way of HIV transmission in 2013 in contrast with EU/CEE, where MSM accounted for the majority of cases of HIV epidemics in 2012 [1]. Sexually transmitted HIV infection was associated with late presentation, stage C and syphilis. We noted a high percentage of IDU transmission, which was associated with stage A and hepatitis C infection.

  20. Enteric Pathogens and Coinfections in Foals with and without Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovane Olivo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea is a major clinical problem affecting foals up to 3 months of age. The aim of this study was to identify enteric microorganisms involved in monoinfections and coinfections and the associated virulence factors in healthy and diarrheic foals. Diarrheic (D (n=56 and nondiarrheic (ND foals (n=60 up to three months of age were studied. Fecal samples were analyzed for identification of infectious agents (microbiological culturing, molecular techniques, and microscopic analyses. Escherichia coli fimH (30% versus 25%, Salmonella spp. (25% versus 7%, Strongyloides westeri (25% versus 25%, Clostridium perfringens type A (21% versus 10%, E. coli ag43 (20% versus 35%, Strongylus (11% versus 18%, and vapA-positive Rhodococcus equi (5% versus 2% were the most frequent enteric pathogens detected in D and ND foals, respectively. The frequency of toxin A-positive C. perfringens was significantly increased in the D (p=0.033 compared with the ND animals. R. equi strains harboring virulent plasmids were also identified (VapA 85-kb type I and VapA 87-kb type I in D and ND foals. Coinfections were observed in 46% of the D and 33% of the ND foals. Our results demonstrate the great diversity of enteric pathogens, virulence factors, and coinfections involved in enteric infections of foals.

  1. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics associated with unfavorable tuberculosis treatment outcomes in TB-HIV co-infected patients in Brazil: a hierarchical polytomous analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Thiago Nascimento do; Rajan, Jayant V; Miranda, Angélica Espinosa; Dias, Elias Dos Santos; Cosme, Lorrayne Beliqui; Possuelo, Lia Gonçalves; Sanchez, Mauro N; Golub, Jonathan E; Riley, Lee W; Maciel, Ethel Leonor

    TB patients co-infected with HIV have worse treatment outcomes than non-coinfected patients. How clinical characteristics of TB and socioeconomic characteristics influence these outcomes is poorly understood. Here, we use polytomous regression analysis to identify clinical and epidemiological characteristics associated with unfavorable treatment outcomes among TB-HIV co-infected patients in Brazil. TB-HIV cases reported in the Brazilian information system (SINAN) between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2011 were identified and categorized by TB treatment outcome (cure, default, death, and development of MDR TB). We modeled treatment outcome as a function of clinical characteristics of TB and patient socioeconomic characteristics by polytomous regression analysis. For each treatment outcome, we used cure as the reference outcome. Between 2001 and 2011, 990,017 cases of TB were reported in SINAN, of which 93,147 (9.4%) were HIV co-infected. Patients aged 15-19 (OR=2.86; 95% CI: 2.09-3.91) and 20-39 years old (OR=2.30; 95% CI: 1.81-2.92) were more likely to default on TB treatment than those aged 0-14 years old. In contrast, patients aged ≥60 years were more likely to die from TB (OR=2.22; 95% CI: 1.43-3.44) or other causes (OR=2.86; 95% CI: 2.14-3.83). Black patients were more likely to default on TB treatment (OR=1.33; 95% CI: 1.22-1.44) and die from TB (OR=1.50; 95% CI: 1.29-1.74). Finally, alcoholism was associated with all unfavorable outcomes: default (OR=1.94; 95% CI: 1.73-2.17), death due to TB (OR=1.46; 95% CI: 1.25-1.71), death due to other causes (OR=1.38; 95% CI: 1.21-1.57) and MDR-TB (OR=2.29; 95% CI: 1.46-3.58). Socio-economic vulnerability has a significant effect on treatment outcomes among TB-HIV co-infected patients in Brazil. Enhancing social support, incorporation of alcohol abuse screening and counseling into current TB surveillance programs and targeting interventions to specific age groups are interventions that could improve treatment

  2. Indigenous Brazilian Management Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zandra Balbinot

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research seeks to understand to what extent companies in emerging countries, specifically, Brazilian, adopt dominant management practices, the so-called Euro-American practices, possess their one, or show a syncretism between the two. Methods: Mixed research. One phase was to collect data using a survey about cultural dimensions adopted from GLOBE (House 1998 management practices and also from Brazilian academy. Another was to collect data through interviews, which were analyzed in parallel. Results: Of the seven dominant cultural dimensions, indigenous practices influenced two. Another three were influenced by dominant management practices. Two of the local dimensions, even with internationalization, merged practices with Brazilian cultural traits. Even so, the practices derived from Jeitinho diminished relative to the international relations and experience of managers. Conclusions: The paper shows the existence of powerful Brazilian Indigenous Managerial Practices such as personalism and formalism. These practices have great influence on international business negotiations. On the other hand, it also shows that there are still dominant managerial practices specially in the case of more internationalized Brazilian managers

  3. Prevalence and patterns of cigarette smoking among patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwiru, Ramadhani Stephano; Nagu, Tumaini Joseph; Kaduri, Pamela; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the major risk factors for non-AIDS related morbidities and is highly prevalent among HIV infected people. However, no reports exist from Tanzania, one of the countries highly affected by the HIV pandemic and one of Africa's biggest tobacco producer. We examined the patterns and prevalence of cigarette smoking among HIV and TB co-infected adult patients in Dar es Salaam using a cross sectional study design. Proportions were used to describe the pattern of cigarette smoking. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of various participant characteristics with smoking. Out of the 518 participants, 17 (3.3%) were current smokers, 96 (18.5%) were ex-smokers and the rest (78.2%) denied ever smoking. Male sex (p<0.001), alcohol (p<0.001), and illicit substance use (p<0.001) were significantly associated with cigarette smoking. The study indicates that, the level of current cigarette smoking among HIV/TB co-infected patients in Dar es Salaam is low. Nevertheless, the preponderance of cigarette smoking among men, alcohol drinkers, and those who use illicit substances provides a unique opportunity for targeting such population with smoking cessation interventions; HIV care and treatment clinics are uniquely positioned to provide such interventions. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Relationship of liver disease stage and antiviral therapy with liver-related events and death in adults coinfected with HIV/HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Mehta, Shruti H; Sutcliffe, Catherine G; Higgins, Yvonne M; Torbenson, Michael S; Brinkley, Sherilyn C; Moore, Richard D; Thomas, David L; Sulkowski, Mark S

    2012-07-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) accelerates hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease progression; however, the effect of liver disease stage and antiviral therapy on the risk of clinical outcomes is incompletely understood. To determine the incidence of end-stage liver disease (ESLD), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), or death according to baseline hepatic fibrosis and antiviral treatment for HIV/HCV coinfected individuals. Prospective cohort of 638 coinfected adults (80% black, 66% men) receiving care at the Johns Hopkins HIV clinic and receiving a liver biopsy and who were prospectively monitored for clinical events between July 1993 and August 2011 (median follow-up, 5.82 years; interquartile range, 3.42-8.85 years). Histological specimens were scored for hepatic fibrosis stage according to the METAVIR scoring system. Incidence of composite outcome of ESLD, HCC, or death. Patients experienced a graded increased risk in incidence of clinical outcomes based on baseline hepatic fibrosis stage (classification range, F0-F4): F0, 23.63 (95% CI, 16.80-33.24); F1, 36.33 (95% CI, 28.03-47.10); F2, 53.40 (95% CI, 33.65-84.76); F3, 56.14 (95% CI, 31.09-101.38); and F4, 79.43 (95% CI, 55.86-112.95) per 1000 person-years (P HIV/HCV coinfection, hepatic fibrosis stage was independently associated with a composite outcome of ESLD, HCC, or death.

  5. iTRAQ based investigation of plasma proteins in HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients - C9 and KLK are related to HIV/HBV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Li; Wu, Ao; Zhang, Yujiao; Jia, Xiaofang; Yin, Lin; Lu, Hongzhou; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, and rapid progression of hepatic and immunodeficiency diseases has been observed in coinfected individuals. Our main objective was to investigate the molecular mechanism of HIV/HBV coinfections. We selected HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients with and without Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). Low abundance proteins enriched using a multiple affinity removal system (MARS) were labeled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) kits and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The differential proteins were analyzed by Gene Ontology (GO) database. A total of 41 differential proteins were found in HIV/HBV coinfected patients as compared to HIV mono-infected patients with or without HAART treatment, including 7 common HBV-regulated proteins. The proteins involved in complement and coagulation pathways were significantly enriched, including plasma kallikrein (KLK) and complement component C9 (C9). C9 and KLK were verified to be down-regulated in HIV/HBV coinfected patients through ELISA analysis. The present iTRAQ based proteomic analyses identified 7 proteins that are related to HIV/HBV coinfection. HBV might influence hepatic and immune functions by deregulating complement and coagulation pathways. C9 and KLK could potentially be used as targets for the treatment of HIV/HBV coinfections. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Risco e saúde reprodutiva: a percepção dos homens de camadas populares Reproductive health and risk as perceived by low-income Brazilian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cristina Lima de Almeida

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos desenvolvidos na saúde reprodutiva discutem, entre outras coisas, as lacunas existentes nos modelos tradicionais de pesquisa, os quais negligenciam aspectos sócio-culturais e também ético-filosóficos. Estes aspectos atravessam a definição de temas essenciais à pesquisa em saúde reprodutiva, tais como: sexualidade, reprodução e gênero. A busca da articulação entre as duas disciplinas (Ciências Sociais e Saúde Pública ajuda a pensar como as pessoas e os grupos sociais delimitam e percebem os riscos que enfrentam. Neste estudo, analisamos a percepção de risco em saúde reprodutiva de um grupo de homens de camadas populares do Rio de Janeiro, entrevistados no âmbito de uma pesquisa sobre contracepção. Visamos identificar as situações e os contextos em que o problema emerge e o conteúdo atribuído ao mesmo. A partir desses depoimentos, é possível concluir que existe uma hierarquia de riscos entre os entrevistados, a qual é modificada dependendo de valores culturais, contextos relacionais, institucionais e sociais.Studies in the field of reproductive health discuss existing gaps in traditional research models, which neglect not only social and cultural aspects but also ethical and philosophical ones. Such aspects cut cross over the definition of essential themes for reproductive health research, like sexuality, reproduction, and gender. The search for connections between the two disciplines (Social Science and Public Health relates to how people and social groups limit and deal with the risks they face. In this study, we analyze the perception of risk in reproductive health among a group of low-income men from Rio de Janeiro. The group was interviewed during a study on male contraception. The objective was to identify the situations and contexts from which the problem (and the contents ascribed to it emerge. One can conclude from the interviews that there is a risk hierarchy which is modified according to

  7. Aging, Gender and Sexuality in Brazilian Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guita Grin Debert

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the interplay between gender, aging, and sexuality, the aim of this article is twofold: (1 to show how Brazilian gerontologists treat gender differences and sexual activity in old age; (2 to analyze the  ways  discourses regarding the aging body and sexuality are perceived and evaluated by older women and men . I argue that  attempts of gerontologists’ to eroticize old age have to contend with the widespread notion that the desire for sex is inevitably lost with age. Thus, in the retiree associations that were studied, men had a tendency to assume they are not ‘old’ because their erectile function was still in good condition, and divorced or widowed women, in senior citizen associations, tend to regard themselves as happy due to having freed themselves from the sexual obligations imposed by marriage. In both cases, the dominant belief that there is a loss of sexual desire in old age was reproduced.

  8. iTRAQ based investigation of plasma proteins in HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients — C9 and KLK are related to HIV/HBV coinfection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tao Sun; Li Liu; Ao Wu; Yujiao Zhang; Xiaofang Jia; Lin Yin; Hongzhou Lu; Lijun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    .... Our main objective was to investigate the molecular mechanism of HIV/HBV coinfections. Methods: We selected HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients with and without Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy...

  9. Anal HPV infection in HIV-positive men who have sex with men from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anal HPV infection, which contributes to the development of anal warts and anal cancer, is well known to be common among men who have sex with men (MSM, especially among those HIV positives. However, HIV and anal HPV co-infection among MSM has not been addressed in China. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing and Tianjin, China. Study participants were recruited using multiple methods with the collaboration of local volunteer organizations. Blood and anal swabs were collected for HIV-1 serological test and HPV genotyping. RESULTS: A total of 602 MSM were recruited and laboratory data were available for 578 of them (96.0%. HIV and anal HPV prevalence were 8.5% and 62.1%, respectively. And 48 MSM (8.3% were found to be co-infected. The HPV genotypes identified most frequently were HPV06 (19.6%, HPV16 (13.0%, HPV52 (8.5% and HPV11 (7.6%. Different modes of HPV genotypes distribution were observed with respect to HIV status. A strong dose-response relationship was found between HIV seropositivity and multiplicity of HPV genotypes (p<0.001, which is consistent with the observation that anal HPV infection was an independent predictor for HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: A high prevalence of HIV and anal HPV co-infection was observed in the MSM community in Beijing and Tianjin, China. Anal HPV infection was found to be independently associated with increased HIV seropositivity, which suggests the application of HPV vaccine might be a potential strategy to reduce the acquisition of HIV infection though controlling the prevalence of HPV.

  10. Estudio epidemiológico, clínico e inmunológico de pacientes infectados con HIV y HTLV-1 Clinical, epidemiological and immunological study of patients coinfected with HIV and htlv-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo G. Scapellato

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Se efectuó un estudio prospectivo parcial de seroprevalencia de HTLV-1 en todos los pacientes infectados con HIV seguidos en el consultorio externo de infectología de nuestro hospital entre el 1 de enero de 2000 y el 30 de junio de 2003. Se analizaron retrospectivamente las características clínicas, carga viral de HIV (CV y recuento de células CD4, comparando a la población de pacientes coinfectados y no coinfectados. Hallamos una seroprevalencia de HTLV-1 de 8.1% (23/282; 8.5% (12/141 entre hombres y 7.8% (11/141 entre mujeres [OR=0.91(0.36We studied the prevalence of antibodies against HTLV-1 among every HIV-infected outpatients assisted in our hospital between January 1st 2000 and June 30th 2003. We reviewed the epidemiological data, clinical findings, viral load and CD4 cells-count, comparing coinfected with non HTLV-1 coinfected. We found a prevalence of HTLV-1 infection of 8.1% (23/282; 8.5% (12/141 in men and 7.8% (11/141 in women [OR=0.91(0.36coinfected and no coinfected patients. No patient developed any disease relative to HTLV-1. The mean of CD4-cells among HTLV-1 coinfected with history of ADD näive patients (n=7 was 211 cells/ml, and 87.9 cells/ml among those not-coinfected (n=55 [t-test=2.82; p=0.006]. The viral load was similar among every investigated group of patients. We found a high prevalence of HTLV-1 infection in HIV-infected patients (higher among IDU. The CD4-cell count of patients suffering from an AIDS defining disease was higher among HTLV-1/HIV coinfected patients than in singly HIV infected, this could show a grade of missfunction of CD4-cells in

  11. HIV and tuberculosis trends and survival of coinfection in a referral center in Tehran: A 12-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Baghaei

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our retrospective review of coinfected TB-HIV patients hospitalized in Tehran showed that the management and monitoring of coinfection, pneumothorax and other adverse effects, as well as early initiation of ART, improved patient survival.

  12. Low viral suppression and high HIV diagnosis rate among men who have sex with men with syphilis--Baltimore, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Laura A; Pearl, Marcia L; Flynn, Colin; Ross, Christine; Hart-Cooper, Geoffrey; Elmore, Kim; Blythe, David; Morgan, James; Oster, Alexandra M

    2015-04-01

    The burden of syphilis and HIV among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in Baltimore, Maryland, is substantial. Syphilis and HIV surveillance data were analyzed to characterize MSM with syphilis, including those with repeat infection and HIV coinfection, to strengthen prevention efforts. MSM 15 years or older from Baltimore City or County diagnosed as having early syphilis in 2010 to 2011 were included. Those previously treated for syphilis in 2007 to 2011 were considered to have repeat syphilis infection. HIV surveillance data were used to identify HIV coinfection and assess viral suppression. For MSM not diagnosed as having HIV at or before their syphilis diagnosis, annual HIV diagnosis rates were estimated, using Baltimore City data. Of 460 MSM with early syphilis in 2010 or 2011, 92 (20%) had repeat infection; 55% of MSM with a single diagnosis and 86% with repeat infection were HIV coinfected. Among MSM diagnosed as having HIV, viral suppression was low (25%, or 46% of those with a viral load reported). Among Baltimore City MSM without a prior HIV diagnosis, estimated annual HIV diagnosis rates were high (5% for those with 1 syphilis diagnosis, 23% for those with repeat infection). Baltimore-area MSM with syphilis, particularly those with repeat infection, represent a unique population for whom coinfection with HIV is high. Increasing frequency of syphilis and HIV testing among Baltimore area MSM with a syphilis diagnosis and prioritizing HIV-infected MSM with syphilis in efforts to achieve viral suppression may improve outcomes locally for both infections.

  13. Modeling HIV-HCV coinfection epidemiology in the direct-acting antiviral era: the road to elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virlogeux, Victor; Zoulim, Fabien; Pugliese, Pascal; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Valantin, Marc-Antoine; Cuzin, Lise; Reynes, Jacques; Billaud, Eric; Huleux, Thomas; Bani-Sadr, Firouze; Rey, David; Frésard, Anne; Jacomet, Christine; Duvivier, Claudine; Cheret, Antoine; Hustache-Mathieu, Laurent; Hoen, Bruno; Cabié, André; Cotte, Laurent

    2017-12-18

    HCV treatment uptake has drastically increased in HIV-HCV coinfected patients in France since direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment approval, resulting in HCV cure in 63% of all HIV-HCV patients by the end of 2015. We investigated the impact of scaling-up DAA on HCV prevalence in the whole HIV population and in various risk groups over the next 10 years in France using a transmission dynamic compartmental model. The model was based on epidemiological data from the French Dat'AIDS cohort. Eight risk groups were considered, including high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) men who have sex with men (MSM) and male/female heterosexuals, intra-venous drug users, or patients from other risk groups. The model was calibrated on prevalence and incidence data observed in the cohort between 2012 and 2015. On January 1, 2016, 156,811 patients were registered as infected with HIV in France (24,900 undiagnosed patients) of whom 7938 (5.1%) had detectable HCV-RNA (722 undiagnosed patients). Assuming a treatment coverage (TC) rate of 30%/year (i.e., the observed rate in 2015), model projections showed that HCV prevalence among HIV patients is expected to drop to 0.81% in 2026. Sub-analyses showed a similar decrease of HIV-HCV prevalence in most risk groups, including LR MSM. Due to higher infection and reinfection rates, predicted prevalence in HR MSM remained stable from 6.96% in 2016 to 6.34% in 2026. Increasing annual TC rate in HR MSM to 50/70% would decrease HCV prevalence in this group to 2.35/1.25% in 2026. With a 30% TC rate, undiagnosed patients would account for 34% of HCV infections in 2026. Our model suggests that DAA could nearly eliminate coinfection in France within 10 years for most risk groups, including LR MSM. Elimination in HR MSM will require increased TC.

  14. Seroprevalence of serum IgG of HSV-1 coinfected with HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the seroprevalence of IgG of HSV-1 coinfected HIV patients who attended Offa General Hospital, Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic (HAART). Methods: A cross sectional study used to study the seroprevalence of IgG of HSV-1 coinfected HIV infected patients that attended Offa Highly Active ...

  15. HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients seeking care at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients seeking care at health facilities in Tanzania. ... there have been few studies conducted in resource limited settings to ascertain the interaction of parasitic co-infection where HIV/AIDS management largely depends on CD4+ T lymphocyte cells counts and WHO clinical staging.

  16. Prevalence and clinical correlates of Schistosoma mansoni co-infection among malaria infected patients, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getie, Sisay; Wondimeneh, Yitayih; Getnet, Gebeyaw; Workineh, Meseret; Worku, Ligabaw; Kassu, Afework; Moges, Beyene

    2015-09-28

    In Ethiopia, where malaria and schistosomiasis are co-endemic, co-infections are expected to be high. However, data about the prevalence of malaria-schistosomiasis co-infection and their clinical correlation is lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni co-infection and associated clinical correlates in malaria patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 at Chwahit Health Center, in northwest Ethiopia. Blood film positive malaria patients (N = 205) were recruited for the study. Clinical, parasitological, hematological, and biochemical parameters were assessed from every study participant. Stool samples were also collected and processed with Kato-Katz technique to diagnose and classify intensity of Schistosoma mansoni. The prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni and malaria co-infection was 19.5%. The age group of 16-20 years old was significantly associated with co-infection. Co-infected patients with a moderate-heavy egg burden of Schistosoma mansoni had significantly high mean Plasmodium parasitemia. On the other hand, age group of 6-10 years old and moderate-heavy Schistosoma mansoni co-infection were significantly associated with severe malaria. Prevalence of malaria and Schistosoma mansoni co-infection in the study area was considerably high. Severity of malaria and parasitemia of Plasmodium were associated with certain age groups and intensity of concurrent Schistosoma mansoni. Further study is needed to explore the underlying mechanisms of interaction between malaria and Schistosoma mansoni.

  17. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Thakkar, Mayur Deepak; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a fatal infectious disease of childhood caused by persistence of the measles virus in the brain. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on subacute sclerosing panencephalitis remains elusive and rare. We report a child who developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis following a short latency period and a rapidly progressive course with HIV co-infection.

  18. Absence of human metapneumovirus co-infection in cases of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J. B. M.; Bos, A. P.; Lutter, R.; Rossen, J. W. A.; Schuurman, R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that co-infection of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in severe respiratory syncytial (RSV) virus bronchiolitis is very common. To evaluate the epidemiology of hMPV co-infection in children with severe lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV virus. This was an observational

  19. Coinfection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia garinii alters the course of murine Lyme borreliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovius, Joppe W. R.; Li, Xin; Ramamoorthi, Nandhini; van Dam, Alje P.; Barthold, Stephen W.; van der Poll, Tom; Speelman, Peter; Fikrig, Erol

    2007-01-01

    Ixodes ricinus ticks and mice can be infected with both Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia garinii. The effect of coinfection with these two Borrelia species on the development of murine Lyme borreliosis is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether coinfection with the

  20. War and peace between microbes: HIV-1 interactions with coinfecting viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2009-11-19

    HIV-1 disrupts the homeostatic equilibrium between the host and coinfecting microbes, facilitating reactivation of persistent viruses and invasion by new viruses. These viruses usually accelerate HIV disease but occasionally create conditions detrimental for HIV-1. Understanding these phenomena may lead to anti-HIV-1 strategies that specifically target interactions between HIV-1 and coinfecting viruses.

  1. Prevalence and immune status of HIV/HBV co-infected pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV/HBV co-infection places patients at high risk of liver-related morbidity and mortality and the interaction of the two viruses can further complicate treatment. Pregnant women are especially at high risk for increased morbidity and mortality due to infection, and information about HIV/HBV co-infection in pregnant women is ...

  2. High prevalence of HIV and malaria co-infection in urban Douala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives were to determine the prevalence of HIV/malaria co-infection and to determine and compare the prevalence of some parasitological, haematological and clinical parameters between co-infection and mono-infection with HIV or malaria in the study population. Information was collected on HIV serostatus, and ...

  3. Absence of human metapneumovirus co-infection in cases of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J B M; Bos, A P; Lutter, R; Rossen, J W A; Schuurman, R

    It has been suggested that co-infection of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in severe respiratory syncytial (RSV) virus bronchiolitis is very common. To evaluate the epidemiology of hMPV co-infection in children with severe lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV virus. This was an observational

  4. TB-HIV co-infection in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, M J; Sebhatu, M; Weldegergis, T; Tesfazion, A; Borgdorff, M W

    2007-07-01

    We assessed the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection and identified risk factors for HIV infection in smear-positive TB patients diagnosed by the TB programme in Eritrea. Of 365 notified TB patients, 220 (60.3%) could be traced and provided a blood sample that was tested. Of these, 26 (11.8%, 95%CI 7.6-16.1) were HIV-infected. Risk factors were age, urban residence and schooling level. The data indicate that, starting with the urban areas, it is time for Eritrea to introduce HIV testing of all TB patients.

  5. Diagnosis of opportunistic infections: HIV co-infections - tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lesley; da Silva, Pedro; Boehme, Catharina C; Stevens, Wendy; Gilpin, Christopher M

    2017-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) incidence has declined ∼1.5% annually since 2000, but continued to affect 10.4 million individuals in 2015, with 1/3 remaining undiagnosed or underreported. The diagnosis of TB among those co-infected with HIV is challenging as TB remains the leading cause of death in such individuals. Accurate and rapid diagnosis of active TB will avert mortality in both adults and children, reduce transmission, and assist in timeous decisions for antiretroviral therapy initiation. This review describes advances in diagnosing TB, especially among HIV co-infected individuals, highlights national program's uptake, and impact on patient care. The TB diagnostic landscape has been transformed over the last 5 years. Molecular diagnostics such as Xpert MTB/RIF, which simultaneously detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) resistance to rifampicin, has revolutionized TB control programs. WHO endorsed the use of Xpert MTB/RIF in 2010 for use in HIV/TB co-infected patients, and later in 2013 for use as the initial diagnostic test for all adults and children with signs and symptoms of pulmonary TB. Line probe assays (LPAs) are recommended for the detection of rifampicin and isoniazid resistance in sputum smear-positive specimens and mycobacterial cultures. A second-line line probe assay has been recommended for the diagnosis of extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB Assays such as the urine lateral flow (LF)-lipoarabinomannan (LAM), can be used at the point of care (POC) and have a niche role to supplement the diagnosis of TB in seriously ill HIV-infected, hospitalized patients with low CD4 cell counts of less than 100 cells/μl. Polyvalent platforms such as the m2000 (Abbott Molecular) and GeneXpert (Cepheid) offer potential for integration of HIV and TB testing services. While the Research and Development (R&D) pipeline appears to be rich at first glance, there are actually few leads for true POC tests that would allow for earlier TB diagnosis or rapid, comprehensive

  6. Coinfection with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis: a cross-sectional analysis of positivity and risk factors in remote Australian Aboriginal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Rebecca; Ward, James; Wand, Handan; Rumbold, Alice; Garton, Linda; Hengel, Belinda; Silver, Bronwyn; Taylor-Thomson, Debbie; Knox, Janet; McGregor, Skye; Dyda, Amalie; Fairley, Christopher; Maher, Lisa; Donovan, Basil; Kaldor, John

    2015-05-01

    To determine the co-occurrence and epidemiological relationships of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) in a high-prevalence setting in Australia. In the context of a cluster randomised trial in 68 remote Aboriginal communities, we obtained laboratory reports on simultaneous testing for CT, NG and TV by nucleic acid amplification tests in individuals aged ≥16 years and examined relationships between age and sex and the coinfection positivity. ORs were used to determine which infections were more likely to co-occur by demographic category. Of 13 480 patients (median age: 30 years; men: 37%) tested for all three infections during the study period, 33.3% of women and 21.3% of men had at least one of them, highest in patients aged 16-19 years (48.9% in women, 33.4% in men). The most frequent combination was CT/NG (2.0% of women, 4.1% of men), and 1.8% of women and 0.5% of men had all three. In all co-combinations, coinfection positivity was highest in patients aged 16-19 years. CT and NG were highly predictive of each other's presence, and TV was associated with each of the other two infections, but much more so with NG than CT, and its associations were much stronger in women than in men. In this remote high-prevalence area, nearly half the patients aged 16-19 years had one or more sexually transmitted infections. CT and NG were more common dual infections. TV was more strongly associated with NG coinfections than with CT. These findings confirm the need for increased simultaneous screening for CT, NG and TV, and enhanced control strategies. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000358044. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. High Prevalence of Treponema pallidum Infection in Brazilian Prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Maisa Estopa; Croda, Julio; Coimbra Motta de Castro, Ana Rita; Maria do Valle Leone de Oliveira, Sandra; Pompilio, Maurício Antonio; Omizolo de Souza, Ronaldo; Ferreira de Sá Queiroz, Júlio Henrique; Esther da Silva, Kesia; Ko, Albert I; Simionatto, Simone

    2017-10-01

    The number of new syphilis cases in Brazil has risen alarmingly in recent years. However, there is limited data regarding syphilis prevalence in the Brazilian prison population. To facilitate the development of effective interventions, a cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Treponema pallidum infection, active syphilis, and associated risk factors among Brazilian prisoners. We administered a questionnaire to a population-based sample of prisoners from 12 prisons in Central-West Brazil and collected sera for syphilis testing, from January to December 2013. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were performed to assess associations with active syphilis. We recruited 3,363 prisoners (men: 84.6%; women: 15.4%). The overall lifetime and active syphilis prevalences were 10.5% (9.4% among men; 17% among women, P pallidum infection in the prison environment, mainly in women institutions, is important to prevent severe forms of this disease and congenital infections.

  8. Trust within Brazilian New Economy Organizations: an Empirical Investigation of Gender Effects Benchmarked on Brazilian Old Economy Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tulio Zanini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that one of the negative aspects of the New Economy has been growing organizational survival-risk both at the firm and the sector levels. This precarious positioning of the firm has profoundly changed the work environment resulting in the dissolution of job-definition-boundaries, thereby raising the intensity of work and finally affecting the level and nature of trust in the workplace. This is the starting point for our study. Using a questionnaire developed by Gillespie, we investigated gender profiles concerning trust in Supervisors, Peers, and Team in the New and the Old Economies for Brazilian managers. The results show that, for the New Economy, Brazilian women are more willing to give trust to Supervisors whereas Brazilian men expressed higher levels of trust when dealing with Team members. The Peer results are mixed. For the Old Economy, men uniformly express higher levels of trust compared to women over all three reference groups. Finally, for gender matched comparisons, those working in the Brazilian Old Economy firms express higher levels of trust compared to their counterparts in the New Economy independent of gender or time worked. We conclude by discussing the control implications of the above results.

  9. Sex trade among men: negotiating sex, bodies and identity categories

    OpenAIRE

    Murilo dos Santos Moscheta; Sheila McNamee; Manoel Antônio dos Santos

    2013-01-01

    Commercial sex is a marginalized and highly stigmatized activity in Brazilian culture. In this article we aim at investigating the discursive strategies used by young men who trade sex in order to resist stigmatization and social exclusion. We interviewed 24 young men who trade sex in a medium sized city in Brazil. Discursive strategies used by the interviewees to avoid social stigma could be summarized as (1) a reduction of sexual activity to its commercial sense by employing a conceptualiza...

  10. Construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Frainer, Deivis Elton Schlickmann; Adami, Fernando; Almeida, Fernando de Souza; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E; Demarzo,Marcelo Marcos Piva; MONTEIRO, Carlos Bandeira de Mello; Oliveira, Fernando R.

    2012-01-01

    p. 1-6 Background Figure rating scales were developed as a tool to determine body dissatisfaction in women, men, and children. However, it lacks in the literature the validation of the scale for body silhouettes previously adapted. We aimed to obtain evidence for construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents. Methods The study was carried out with adolescent students attending three public schools in an urban region of the municipality of Florianopolis in the Sta...

  11. Syphilis epidemiology in Norway, 1992-2008: resurgence among men who have sex with men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years, the number of syphilis cases has stabilised in many countries of Western Europe, however several countries have reported increases among men who have sex with men (MSM). The aim of this article was to describe the epidemiology of early syphilis in Norway in 1992-2008. Methods Cases of early syphilis and congenital syphilis reported to the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS) 1992-2008 were described by route of transmission, gender, age, birthplace, stage of disease, HIV co-infection, source partner and place of infection. Results The incidence of reported syphilis ranged from 0.05 (1992) to 1.50 (2002) per 100 000 person-years. Of 562 cases reported to MSIS during the study period, 62% were men infected by another man. The proportion of those, infected homosexually increased from 0 (1992-1994) to 77% (2008). Most of them were Norwegians (83%). The proportion of HIV co-infection among homosexually infected increased over time and reached 39% in 2008. The majority reported being infected by a casual partner (73%) and in the municipality of Oslo (72%). Of 152 heterosexually infected men 64% were Norwegians; 51% were infected by casual contacts and 20% by commercial sex workers; 73% were infected abroad. Among 56 women, 57% were Norwegians, 57% were infected by a steady partner and 40% were infected abroad. Almost half (46%) were diagnosed in the early latent stage. Four cases had congenital syphilis, two of whom were adopted from abroad. Conclusions Syphilis is rare in Norway, but MSM represent almost two thirds of cases. The increase of HIV co-infected cases among MSM may enhance transmission of both infections. We recommend sexually active MSM to be tested for syphilis 2-4 times a year. Due to its variable clinical course, syphilis might be difficult to recognise at an early stage among women in a low-prevalence population. We estimate current practice of prenatal screening in Norway as sufficient. PMID:20429881

  12. Syphilis epidemiology in Norway, 1992-2008: resurgence among men who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsen Øivind

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the number of syphilis cases has stabilised in many countries of Western Europe, however several countries have reported increases among men who have sex with men (MSM. The aim of this article was to describe the epidemiology of early syphilis in Norway in 1992-2008. Methods Cases of early syphilis and congenital syphilis reported to the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS 1992-2008 were described by route of transmission, gender, age, birthplace, stage of disease, HIV co-infection, source partner and place of infection. Results The incidence of reported syphilis ranged from 0.05 (1992 to 1.50 (2002 per 100 000 person-years. Of 562 cases reported to MSIS during the study period, 62% were men infected by another man. The proportion of those, infected homosexually increased from 0 (1992-1994 to 77% (2008. Most of them were Norwegians (83%. The proportion of HIV co-infection among homosexually infected increased over time and reached 39% in 2008. The majority reported being infected by a casual partner (73% and in the municipality of Oslo (72%. Of 152 heterosexually infected men 64% were Norwegians; 51% were infected by casual contacts and 20% by commercial sex workers; 73% were infected abroad. Among 56 women, 57% were Norwegians, 57% were infected by a steady partner and 40% were infected abroad. Almost half (46% were diagnosed in the early latent stage. Four cases had congenital syphilis, two of whom were adopted from abroad. Conclusions Syphilis is rare in Norway, but MSM represent almost two thirds of cases. The increase of HIV co-infected cases among MSM may enhance transmission of both infections. We recommend sexually active MSM to be tested for syphilis 2-4 times a year. Due to its variable clinical course, syphilis might be difficult to recognise at an early stage among women in a low-prevalence population. We estimate current practice of prenatal screening in Norway as

  13. The Brazilian School Principals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo Ricardo de Souza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the policy nature of school principal, considering the thoughts of many authors about school administration and the debate about politics, power and burocracy. The study still presents a profile of Brazilian school principals with the data of Basic Education Evaluation System – SAEB, of 2003, specially comparing elements about gender, experience and formation of school principals, and aspects linked with methodology to provide/indicate the school principal and its possible democratic vocation.

  14. Brazilian Trichoptera Checklist II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Paprocki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A second assessment of Brazilian Trichoptera species records is presented here. A total of 625 species were recorded for Brazil. This represents an increase of 65.34% new species recorded during the last decade. The Hydropsychidae (124 spp., followed by the Hydroptilidae (102 spp. and Polycentropodidae (97 spp., are the families with the greatest richness recorded for Brazil. The knowledge on Trichoptera biodiversity in Brazil is geographically unequal. The majority of the species is recorded for the southeastern region.

  15. BRAZILIAN NEWS PORTALS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloiza G. Herckovitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A content analysis of four Brazilian news media portals found that economic news dominated the top headlines with little attention paid to education, the environment and welfare. Other trends included a focus on local events and national news sources, reliance on few sources, mostly official ones, and a low percentage of news that fitted the concept of newsworthiness (a combination of both social significance and deviance concepts. Other findings of a study of 432 top news stories published by UOL, Estadão, iG and Terra during a 15-day period between February and March 2008 indicate that the top portions of the portals’ front pages carry news that lacks story depth, editorial branding, and multimedia applications. The results suggest that online news portals are in their infancy although Brazil has the largest online population of Latin America. This study hopes to shed light on the gatekeeping process in Brazilian news portals. Brazilian media portals have yet to become a significant editorial force able to provide knowledge about social issues and public affairs in a socially responsible fashione.

  16. Clinical manifestations of primary syphilis in homosexual men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bjekić

    Full Text Available At the beginning of a new millennium, syphilis incidence has been increasing worldwide, occurring primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM. The clinical features of primary syphilis among MSM is described, a case-note review of the primary syphilis (PS patients who attended the Institute of Skin and Venereal Diseases. The diagnosis was assessed based upon the clinical features and positive syphilis serology tests. Among 25 patients with early syphilis referred during 2010, PS was diagnosed in a total of 13 cases. In all patients, unprotected oral sex was the only possible route of transmission, and two out of 13 patients had HIV co-infection. Overall, 77% of men presented with atypical penile manifestation. The VDRL test was positive with low titers. The numerous atypical clinical presentations of PS emphasize the importance of continuing education of non-experienced physicians, especially in countries with lower reported incidence of syphilis.

  17. Patterns of prevalent HPV and STI co-infections and associated factors among HIV-negative young Western Cape, South African women: the EVRI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Lynette J; Pokharel, Ubin; Sudenga, Staci L; Botha, Matthys H; Zeier, Michele; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Glashoff, Richard H; Engelbrecht, Susan; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; van der Laan, Louvina E; Kipping, Siegfried; Taylor, Douglas; Giuliano, Anna R

    2017-05-10

    To estimate the prevalence and describe the patterns of concurrent human papillomavirus (HPV) and STIs and associated factors among HIV-negative young Western Cape, South African women participating in the Efficacy of HPV Vaccine to Reduce HIV Infection (EVRI) trial. HIV-negative women aged 16-24 years old were enrolled in the EVRI trial (NCT01489527) and randomised to receive the licensed four-valent HPV vaccine or placebo. At study entry, participants were clinically evaluated for five STIs: herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and disease-causing HPV genotypes (6/11/16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59/68). Demographic and sexual history characteristics were compared among women with STI co-infections, single infection and no infection using Pearson χ(2) and Mann-Whitney tests. ORs were calculated to evaluate factors associated with STI co-infection prevalence. Among 388 young women, STI co-infection prevalence was high: 47% had ≥2 concurrent STIs, 36% had a single STI and 17% had none of the five evaluated STIs. HPV/HSV-2 (26%) was the most prevalent co-infection detected followed by HPV/HSV-2/Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) (17%) and HPV/CT (15%). Co-infection prevalence was independently associated with alcohol use (adjusted OR=2.01, 95% CI 1.00 to 4.06) and having a sexual partner with an STI (adjusted OR=6.96, 95% CI 1.53 to 30.08). Among high-risk young women from underserved communities such as in Southern Africa, a multicomponent prevention strategy that integrates medical and behavioural interventions targeting both men and women is essential to prevent acquisition of concurrent STI infections and consequent disease. NCT01489527; Post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes in HCV/HIV co-infected patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roe, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    While hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune responses are attenuated in HCV\\/HIV co-infected patients compared to those infected with HCV alone, the reasons for this remain unclear. In this study, the proportions of regulatory, naïve, and memory T cells, along with chemokine receptor expression, were measured in co-infected and mono-infected patients to determine if there is an alteration in the phenotypic profile of lymphocytes in these patients. HCV\\/HIV co-infected patients had increased proportions of CD4(+) naïve cells and decreased proportions of CD4(+) effector cells when compared to HCV mono-infected patients. The proportions of CD4(+) Tregs and CD4(+) CXCR3(+) T cells were also significantly lower in co-infected patients. A decrease in CD4(+) Tregs and subsequent loss of immunosuppressive function may contribute to the accelerated progression to liver disease in co-infected individuals. Dysregulation of immune responses following reduction in the proportions of CD4(+) CXCR3(+) Th-1 cells may contribute to the reduced functional capacity of HCV-specific immune responses in co-infected patients. The findings of this study provide new information on the T-cell immunophenotype in HCV\\/HIV co-infected patients when compared to those infected with HCV alone, and may provide insight into why cell-mediated immune responses are diminished during HCV infection.

  19. The negative impact of HBV/HCV coinfection on cirrhosis and its consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, S; Haour, G; Fontaine, H; Dorival, C; Petrov-Sanchez, V; Bourliere, M; Capeau, J; Carrieri, P; Larrey, D; Larsen, C; Marcellin, P; Pawlostky, J-M; Nahon, P; Zoulim, F; Cacoub, P; de Ledinghen, V; Mathurin, P; Negro, F; Pageaux, G-P; Yazdanpanah, Y; Wittkop, L; Zarski, J-P; Carrat, F

    2017-10-09

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) confection has been rarely studied in nonasian series. To compare the characteristics of HBV/HCV coinfected patients to those of HBV- or HCV-monoinfected patients in the ANRS CO22 HEPATHER cohort study. Of the 20 936 included patients, 95 had HBV/HCV coinfection (hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV antibody and HCV RNA positive) and were matched with 375 HBV- and 380 HCV-monoinfected patients on age, gender and time since HBV or HCV diagnosis. F3-F4 fibrosis was more frequent in coinfected patients (58%) than in HBV- (32%, P HBV- (2%, P = .0002) or HCV- (4%, P = .0275) monoinfected patients. Past excessive alcohol use was more frequent in coinfected patients (26%) than in HBV (12%, P = .0011), but similar in HCV monoinfected patients (32%, P = .2868). Coinfected patients had a higher proportion with arterial hypertension (42%) than HBV- (26%) or HCV-monoinfected patients (25%) (P HBV-infected patients (OR = 3.84, 95% CI 1.99-7.43) and the association between decompensated cirrhosis and coinfection in HBV infected (OR = 5.58, 95% CI 1.42-22.0) or HCV infected patients (OR = 3.02, 95% CI 1.22-7.44). HCV coinfection harmfully affects liver fibrosis in HBV patients, while decompensated cirrhosis is increased in coinfected patients compared with HBV- or HCV-monoinfected patients. HCV treatment is as safe and effective in coinfected as monoinfected patients and should be considered following the same rules as HCV monoinfected patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for HCV infection in patients coinfected with HBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gane, Edward J; Hyland, Robert H; An, Di; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S; Brainard, Diana; McHutchison, John G

    2016-01-01

    Currently there are no all-oral treatment regimens for HCV in patients coinfected with HBV. In this pilot study, we evaluated whether ledipasvir and sofosbuvir therapy can suppress HCV infection in patients coinfected with HBV. Patients with HBV and genotype-1 HCV received 90 mg ledipasvir and 400 mg sofosbuvir daily for 12 weeks. The efficacy end point was sustained virological response (HCV RNA ledipasvir/sofosbuvir was a safe and effective treatment for genotype-1 HCV infection in patients coinfected with HBV. Larger studies with longer follow-up are warranted.

  1. Placental examination in intrauterine coinfection with herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlemann, K; Menegus, M A

    1996-01-01

    Intrauterine coinfections have rarely been reported. However, pregnancies exposed to multiple sexually transmitted infectious agents and drugs are likely to occur with increasing frequency and lead to complex pathology in the newborn. Often it will be difficult to establish a diagnosis, above all when this has to be done retrospectively. A premature (34 weeks) newborn presented with a complex clinical picture after exposure to multiple infectious and noninfectious teratogens during gestation. Immunocytochemical staining of the placental membranes and parenchyma suggested intrauterine coinfection by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 and cytomegalovirus. This case illustrates the importance of careful placental investigation with modern techniques for the diagnosis of intrauterine HSV infection and coinfections.

  2. Enteric Helminths Promote Salmonella Coinfection by Altering the Intestinal Metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Redpath, Stephen A; Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Gill, Navkiran; Brown, Eric M; van der Heijden, Joris; Brosschot, Tara P; Han, Jun; Marshall, Natalie C; Woodward, Sarah E; Valdez, Yanet; Borchers, Christoph H; Perona-Wright, Georgia; Finlay, B Brett

    2017-04-15

    Intestinal helminth infections occur predominantly in regions where exposure to enteric bacterial pathogens is also common. Helminth infections inhibit host immunity against microbial pathogens, which has largely been attributed to the induction of regulatory or type 2 (Th2) immune responses. Here we demonstrate an additional 3-way interaction in which helminth infection alters the metabolic environment of the host intestine to enhance bacterial pathogenicity. We show that an ongoing helminth infection increased colonization by Salmonella independently of T regulatory or Th2 cells. Instead, helminth infection altered the metabolic profile of the intestine, which directly enhanced bacterial expression of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) genes and increased intracellular invasion. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which a helminth-modified metabolome promotes susceptibility to bacterial coinfection. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Further notes on Brazilian Conidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, van J.-J.; Tursch, B.; Kempf, M.

    1971-01-01

    Since the publication of a survey of brazilian Conidae (Van Moll et al., 1967) new extensive dredgings effected by one of us (M.K.) along considerable portions of the Brazilian coast have brought a rich material allowing us to add to the previous work and to correct certain opinions therein

  4. Brazilian normative data for the Short Form 36 questionnaire, version 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué Laguardia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available METHODS: The study Pesquisa Dimensões Sociais das Desigualdades (PDSD (Social Dimensions of Inequalities involves 12,423 randomly selected Brazilian men and women aged 18 years old or more from urban and rural areas of the five Brazilian regions, and the information collected included the SF-36 as a measure of health-related quality of life. This provided a unique opportunity to develop age and gender-adjusted normative data for the Brazilian population. RESULTS: Brazilian men scored substantially higher than women on all eight domains and the two summary component scales of the SF-36. Brazilians scored less than their international counterparts on almost all of SF-36 domains and both summary component scales, except on general health status (US, pain (UK and vitality (Australia, US and Canada. CONCLUSION: The differences in the SF-36 scores between age groups, genders and countries confirm that these Brazilian norms are necessary for comparative purposes. The data will be useful for assessing the health status of the general population and of patient populations, and the effect of interventions on health-related quality of life.

  5. Brazilian normative data for the Short Form 36 questionnaire, version 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguardia, Josue; Campos, Monica Rodrigues; Travassos, Claudia; Najar, Alberto Lopes; Anjos, Luiz Antonio dos; Vasconcellos, Miguel Murat

    2013-12-01

    The study Pesquisa Dimensões Sociais das Desigualdades (PDSD) (Social Dimensions of Inequalities) involves 12,423 randomly selected Brazilian men and women aged 18 years old or more from urban and rural areas of the five Brazilian regions, and the information collected included the SF-36 as a measure of health-related quality of life. This provided a unique opportunity to develop age and gender-adjusted normative data for the Brazilian population. Brazilian men scored substantially higher than women on all eight domains and the two summary component scales of the SF-36. Brazilians scored less than their international counterparts on almost all of SF-36 domains and both summary component scales, except on general health status (US), pain (UK) and vitality (Australia, US and Canada). The differences in the SF-36 scores between age groups, genders and countries confirm that these Brazilian norms are necessary for comparative purposes. The data will be useful for assessing the health status of the general population and of patient populations, and the effect of interventions on health-related quality of life.

  6. [Prevalence and genotype distribution changes in hepatitis C virus co-infection among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Celia; Mancebo-Hernández, María; Pérez-Navarro, Elisabet; Recio, Eva; Monje-Agudo, Patricia; Valiente, Adoración; Pineda, Juan A

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of hepatitisC is decreasing among new diagnoses of HIV/HCV coinfection in Spain. The increasing use of the HCV treatment could have changed the HCV genotype distribution. The aim of this study is to analyze changes in the prevalence of HCV coinfection and in HCV genotype distribution among HIV-infected patients. A serial cross-sectional study was conducted that included all HIV-infected patients who attended the Outpatient Clinic of a hospital in Andalusia, between September 2008 and February 2009 (first period), and between January 2013 and June 2013 (second period). A total of 520 and 651 patients were included in the first and second period, respectively. The risk factors of HCV infection in the first vs. second period were: IDU, 319 (61%) vs. 348 (53%); heterosexual contact, 111 (21%) vs. 135 (21%); homosexual men, 76 (15%) vs. 114 (22%) (P=.006). The prevalence of HCV antibody per period was: 358 (69%) vs. 380 (58%) (P=<.001), and for the HCV-RNA was 255 (49%) vs. 240 (37%) (P=<.001). In both periods, the HCV genotype distribution was: 1, 137 (60%) vs. 138 (59%); 3, 45 (20%) vs. 42 (18%); 4, 42 (18%) vs. 47 (20%) (P=.881). The prevalence of HCV infection in HIV-infected patients has decreased in our area, including overall exposure to HCV virus and active infection during the last 5 years. However, the HCV genotype distribution has not changed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. GBV-C coinfection is negatively correlated to Fas expression and Fas-mediated apoptosis in HIV-1 infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenkemeyer, Maren; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Tillmann, Hans L; Heiken, Hans

    2008-11-01

    Persistent coinfection with the apathogenic GB virus C (GBV-C) is associated with slower disease progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection. Aim of this study was to investigate whether Fas plays a role in this beneficial effect. Fas expression and susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis (FMA) was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HIV-1 patients coinfected and non-coinfected with GBV-C. Fas expression and function was evaluated in 42 GBV-C coinfected and 101 non-coinfected HIV-1 patients. Thirteen healthy and 11 Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected individuals were analyzed as controls. Cell surface Fas expression was determined by flow cytometric analysis. Apoptosis was evaluated by staining with Annexin V and Viaprobe followed by multiparameter flow cytometry analysis. In untreated HIV-1 patients GBV-C coinfection was associated with significantly lower percentage of Fas expressing cells as compared to GBV-C non-coinfected individuals. Expression of Fas was directly correlated with sensitivity to Fas-mediated apoptosis. Sensitivity to FMA was unchanged in GBV-C coinfected patients. PBMCs of patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) did not show such a difference. Untreated HIV-1 patients with GBV-C coinfection have reduced cell surface Fas expression. Lower FMA of T-cells might contribute to prolonged survival of GBV-C coinfected HIV-1 patients. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Synergistic Effects Between Rotavirus and Coinfecting Pathogens on Diarrheal Disease: Evidence from a Community-based Study in Northwestern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Darlene; Goldstick, Jason E.; Cevallos, William; Trueba, Gabriel; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries where diarrheal disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age, enteric coinfection is common. There is little understanding, however, of the biologic interaction between coinfecting pathogens. The authors investigated the potential for synergistic interaction between coinfecting pathogens on diarrhea pathogenesis using an epidemiologic framework. They conducted community-based, case-control studies in 22 communities in northwestern Ecuador between 2003 and 2008. Risk ratios of diarrhea associated with single infections and coinfections were estimated. Interaction between coinfecting pathogens was assessed through departure from risk ratio additivity and multiplicativity after adjustment for age. On the additive scale, the authors found departure from the null value of 0 for rotavirus-Giardia coinfections (interaction contrast ratio = 8.0, 95% confidence interval: 3.1, 18.9) and for rotavirus-Escherichia coli coinfections (interaction contrast ratio = 9.9, 95% confidence interval: 2.6, 28.4). On the multiplicative scale, they found departure from the value of 1 for rotavirus-Giardia coinfections (multiplicative interaction = 3.6, 95% confidence interval: 1.3, 8.7). This research provides epidemiologic evidence for synergism between rotavirus and other enteric pathogens. During coinfection, the pathogenic potential of each organism appears to be enhanced. The potential for pathogenesis to be more severe in the presence of a rotavirus coinfection amplifies the need for rotavirus vaccination. PMID:22842722

  9. Expression of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in leprosy reactions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; de Souza Aarão, Tinara Leila; de Souza, Jorge Rodrigues; Macedo, Geraldo Mariano Moraes; Neto, Fernando Octávio Machado Jucá; Xavier, Marília Brasil

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that coinfection of leprosy and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not decrease the frequency and intensity of leprosy reactions. However, the immunological aspects of leprosy reactions in coinfected patients remain obscure, with a limited number of studies showing contradictory results. Observational study using tissue samples collected during leprosy reactions from 15 patients coinfected with leprosy and HIV and from 15 patients with leprosy alone. Patients were part of a prior larger cohort study of leprosy patients with and without HIV coinfection. Specific antibodies were used to detect IL-1β and IL-6 expression in skin biopsy tissue cells. IL-1β and IL-6 expression was similar between leprosy patients with and without HIV coinfection (p>0.05). Coinfected and non-coinfected tissues showed similar levels of IL-1β and IL-6 expression for type 1 reactions. A trend towards increased levels of IL-1β and IL-6 expression was observed in tissue from coinfected patients (p=0.0024). The expression of IL-1β and IL-6 during leprosy reactions did not differ significantly between tissues obtained from leprosy patients with and without HIV coinfection. Therefore, we conclude that HIV coinfection does not affect the immunological pattern of leprosy reactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Is the treatment of Enterobius vermicularis co-infection necessary to eradicate Dientamoeba fragilis infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Boga

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Co-infection with E. vermicularis may act as a factor favoring D. fragilis infection by preventing eradication measures. This suggests that both parasites should be treated simultaneously.

  11. HTLV-1 and HIV-1 co-infection: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Isache

    2016-01-01

    HTLV and HIV share the same routes of transmission and the same tropism for T-lymphocytes. Co-infection occurs probably more frequently than we are aware, since testing for HTLV is not routinely performed in outpatient HIV clinics.

  12. Psychiatric and substance use disorders comorbidities in veterans with hepatitis C virus and HIV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Bret E; Loftis, Jennifer M; Rodriguez, Veronica L; McQuesten, Matthew J; Hauser, Peter

    2009-07-01

    A growing number of veterans in the Veterans Health Administration are coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus. This review covers timely research relative to comorbid conditions that are common in this population including psychiatric diagnoses, substance use disorders and neurocognitive problems. Current literature on the psychiatric, substance use disorders and cognitive problems of the coinfected population show that not only are rates of morbidity higher in the coinfected population but that this affects antiviral treatments as well. There is new evidence that brain injuries and infiltration of the virus into the central nervous system may be responsible for cognitive dysfunction. Cotesting, particularly in hepatitis C infected individuals, is not done routinely despite shared risk factors. With this understanding of the comorbidities of the coinfected population, integrated healthcare models involving mental health, internal medicine, substance abuse treatment and internal medicine are crucial to work with these medically and psychologically complex patients.

  13. Life expectancy among elderly Brazilians in 2003 according to different levels of functional disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargos, Mirela Castro Santos; Machado, Carla Jorge; Rodrigues, Roberto Nascimento

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate disability-free life expectancy for the Brazilian elderly in 2003, by gender and age, based on different concepts of functional disability. The Sullivan method is used to combine the period life tables from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE, 2003) and the prevalence of functional disability according to the 2003 National Sample Household Survey (PNAD 2003). The main results of the study indicate that at age 60, Brazilian men can expect to live 19 years, 39% with mild, 21% with moderate, and 14% with severe functional disability, respectively. At the same age, Brazilian women can expect to live 22 years: 56% with mild, 32% with moderate, and 18% with severe functional disability.

  14. Monocyte activation in HIV/HCV coinfection correlates with cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Rempel

    Full Text Available Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV challenges the immune system with two viruses that elicit distinct immune responses. Chronic immune activation is a hallmark of HIV infection and an accurate indicator of disease progression. Suppressing HIV viremia by antiretroviral therapy (ART effectively prolongs life and significantly improves immune function. HIV/HCV coinfected individuals have peripheral immune activation despite effective ART control of HIV viral load. Here we examined freshly isolated CD14 monocytes for gene expression using high-density cDNA microarrays and analyzed T cell subsets, CD4 and CD8, by flow cytometry to characterize immune activation in monoinfected HCV and HIV, and HIV-suppressed coinfected subjects. To determine the impact of coinfection on cognition, subjects were evaluated in 7 domains for neuropsychological performance, which were summarized as a global deficit score (GDS. Monocyte gene expression analysis in HIV-suppressed coinfected subjects identified 43 genes that were elevated greater than 2.5 fold. Correlative analysis of subjects' GDS and gene expression found eight genes with significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Correlative expression of six genes was confirmed by qPCR, five of which were categorized as type 1 IFN response genes. Global deficit scores were not related to plasma lipopolysaccharide levels. In the T cell compartment, coinfection significantly increased expression of activation markers CD38 and HLADR on both CD4 and CD8 T cells but did not correlate with GDS. These findings indicate that coinfection is associated with a type 1 IFN monocyte activation profile which was further found to correlate with cognitive impairment, even in subjects with controlled HIV infection. HIV-suppressed coinfected subjects with controlled HIV viral load experiencing immune activation could benefit significantly from successful anti-HCV therapy and may be

  15. Malaria and helminth co-infections in school and preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinung'hi, Safari M; Magnussen, Pascal; Kaatano, Godfrey M

    2014-01-01

    Malaria, schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminth infections (STH) are important parasitic infections in Sub-Saharan Africa where a significant proportion of people are exposed to co-infections of more than one parasite. In Tanzania, these infections are a major public health problem particu...... particularly in school and pre-school children. The current study investigated malaria and helminth co-infections and anaemia in school and pre-school children in Magu district, Tanzania....

  16. Identification of co-infection by rotavirus and parvovirus in dogs with gastroenteritis in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Flores Ortega

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This is the first report on circulating canine rotavirus in Mexico. Fifty samples from dogs with gastroenteritis were analyzed used polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in order to identify parvovirus and rotavirus, respectively; 7% of dogs were infected with rotavirus exclusively, while 14% were co-infected with both rotavirus and parvovirus; clinical signs in co-infected dogs were more severe.

  17. Clinical correlate of tuberculosis in HIV co-infected children at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co-infection was significantly higher in older children (>5 years) than in younger children <5 years (32 vs 9, P < 0.05). Severe weight loss was the only clinical feature found to have a fairly good sensitivity (88.9%) and specificity (88.6%) for TB in co-infected children, with a positive predictive value of 23.0%. While immune ...

  18. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Thakkar, Mayur Deepak; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a fatal infectious disease of childhood caused by persistence of the measles virus in the brain. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on subacute sclerosing panencephalitis remains elusive and rare. We report a child who developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis following a short latency period and a rapidly progressive course with HIV co-infection. © 2016 Marshfield Clinic.

  19. Human ?-defensin-2 production upon viral and bacterial co-infection is attenuated in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Arnason, Jason W.; Murphy, James C.; Kooi, Cora; Wiehler, Shahina; Traves, Suzanne L.; Shelfoon, Christopher; Maciejewski, Barbara; Dumonceaux, Curtis J.; Lewenza, W. Shawn; Proud, David; Leigh, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Viral-bacterial co-infections are associated with severe exacerbations of COPD. Epithelial antimicrobial peptides, including human ?-defensin-2 (HBD-2), are integral to innate host defenses. In this study, we examined how co-infection of airway epithelial cells with rhinovirus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates HBD-2 expression, and whether these responses are attenuated by cigarette smoke and in epithelial cells obtained by bronchial brushings from smokers with normal lung function or from...

  20. Prevalence and characteristics of HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfections in Tuscany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia Puglia

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: We have observed less advanced disease in HIV and HCV-HIV patients compared with HBV–HIV coinfected patients. Moreover, our results show a higher prevalence of HIV/HCV among drug addicts and in the age-group 35–59, corresponding to those born in years considered most at risk for addiction. This study also confirms the finding of a less advanced HIV disease in HIV/HCV coinfected patients.

  1. Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzio, Adalberto

    2015-03-01

    In Brazil there is intense research activity in nanotechnology, most of these developed in universities and research institutes. The Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative (BNI) aims to integrate government actions to promote the competitiveness of the Brazilian industry. This initiative is founded on support for research and development in the laboratories of the National Laboratories for Nanotechnology (SisNANO), starting from an improvement in infrastructure and opening of laboratories for users of academia and business, promoting interaction and transfer knowledge between academia and business. Country currently has 26 thematic networks of nanotechnology, 16 -Virtual-National Institutes of Technology, seven National- Laboratories and 18 Associate Laboratories, which comprise the SisNANO. Seeking to expand and share governance with other government actors, the Interministries Committee for Nanotechnology was set up, composed of 10 ministries, and has the task of coordinating the entire program of the Federal Government Nanotechnology.Cooperation activities are an important part of BNI. Currently Brazil has cooperation programs with U.S., China, Canada and European Union among others. Recently, Brazil decided to join the European NanoReg program where 60 research groups are joining efforts to provide protocols and standards that can help regulatory agencies and governments.

  2. High prevalence of hepatitis B virus dual infection with genotypes A and G in HIV-1 infected men in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, during 2000-2011

    OpenAIRE

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Hogema, Boris; Bakker, Margreet; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Back, Nicole KT; Berkhout, Ben; Zaaijer, Hans L; Cornelissen, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is divided into 8 definite (A-H) and 2 putative (I, J) genotypes that show a geographical distribution. HBV genotype G, however, is an aberrant genotype of unknown origin that demonstrates severe replication deficiencies and very little genetic variation. It is often found in co-infections with another HBV genotype and infection has been associated with certain risk groups such as intravenous drug users and men having sex with men (MSM). We aimed to estimate...

  3. Helminth-microparasite co-infection in wildlife: lessons from ruminants, rodents and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenwa, V O

    2016-09-01

    Co-infection is now recognized as the natural state of affairs in most hosts and co-infecting parasites interact in a variety of ways that can impact host health and parasite fitness. Interactions between helminths and microparasites have captured particular attention in this regard owing to the ubiquity of helminth infections in many host populations. The mechanistic underpinnings and health implications of co-infection are typically studied in laboratory and clinical settings, but recently studies of wild species have begun to tackle similar issues. Case studies from three wild mammal groups-ruminants, rodents and rabbits-serve to highlight how wild studies are contributing to the broader co-infection literature. This work suggests that wildlife research can generate new and unique insights about helminth-microparasite co-infection that are fostered in part by studying parasite interactions in a natural context. For this reason, increased integration of wild studies with research in human, laboratory and veterinary animal populations can help pave the way towards a more complete understanding of the issue of co-infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Is the treatment of Enterobius vermicularis co-infection necessary to eradicate Dientamoeba fragilis infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boga, José A; Rojo, Susana; Fernández, Jonathan; Rodríguez, Mercedes; Iglesias, Carmen; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Vázquez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Guardado, Azucena

    2016-08-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a pathogenic protozoan of the human gastrointestinal tract with a worldwide distribution, which has emerged as an important and misdiagnosed cause of chronic gastrointestinal illnesses such as diarrhea and 'irritable-bowel-like' gastrointestinal disease. Very little research has been conducted on the use of suitable antimicrobial compounds. Furthermore, higher rates of co-infection with Enterobius vermicularis have been described, suggesting that E. vermicularis could influence the treatment of D. fragilis-infected patients. To study this, the treatment of E. vermicularis and D. fragilis co-infected patients was evaluated. Forty-nine patients with a D. fragilis infection, including 25 (51.0%) patients co-infected with E. vermicularis, were studied. All of them were treated with metronidazole. Patients with E. vermicularis co-infection and/or an E. vermicularis-positive case in the family were treated with mebendazole. Metronidazole treatment failure was significantly more frequent in patients with E. vermicularis co-infection and in patients with children in the family. Co-infection with E. vermicularis may act as a factor favoring D. fragilis infection by preventing eradication measures. This suggests that both parasites should be treated simultaneously. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Pharmacogenetics in the Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme eSuarez-Kurtz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is the 5th largest country in the world and its present population, in excess of 190 million, is highly heterogeneous, as a result of centuries of admixture between Amerindians, Europeans and Sub-Saharan Africans. The estimated individual proportions of biogeographical ancestry vary widely and continuously among Brazilians, most individuals - irrespective of self-identification as White, Brown or Black, the major categories of the Brazilian Census race/color system - having significant degrees of European and African ancestry, while a sizeable number display also Amerindian ancestry. These features have important pharmacogenetic (PGx implications: first, extrapolation of PGx data from relatively well-defined ethnic groups is clearly not applicable to the majority of Brazilians; second, the frequency distribution of polymorphisms in pharmacogenes (e.g. CYP3A5, CYP2C9, GSTM1, ABCB1, GSTM3, VKORC, etc varies continuously among Brazilians and is not captured by race/color self-identification; third, the intrinsic heterogeneity of the Brazilian population must be acknowledged in the design and interpretation of PGx studies in order to avoid spurious conclusions based on improper matching of study cohorts. The peculiarities of PGx in Brazilians are illustrated with data for different therapeutic groups, such as anticoagulants, HIV-protease inhibitors and nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs, and the challenges and advantages created by population admixture for the study and implementation of PGx are discussed. PGx data for Amerindian groups and Brazilian-born, first generation Japanese are presented to illustrate the rich diversity of the Brazilian population. Finally, I introduce the reader to the Brazilian Pharmacogenetic Network or Refargen (www.refargen.org.br, a nationwide consortium of research groups, with the mission to provide leadership in PGx research and education in Brazil, with a population health impact.

  6. The rise of Brazilian agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Grinsted; Vink, Nick; Sandrey, Ron

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore some of the possible lessons for South African agriculture from the Brazilian experience. To this end, the article discusses the performance of Brazilian agriculture in terms of land and labour use, production, and exports. This is followed by aspects...... of Brazilian agricultural policies, namely farmer support, the research and technology transfer system and land issues. The implications for South African agriculture can be summarized as the recognition that history, geography, the development path and agricultural policies all matter. The article...... then identifies five important lessons for agricultural development in South Africa....

  7. Brazilian Space Weather Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Antonio; Takahashi, Hisao; de Paula, Eurico; Sawant, Hanumant; de Campos Velho, Haroldo; Vitorello, Icaro; Costa, Joaquim; Souza, Jonas; Cecatto, José; Mendes, Odim; Gonzalez Alarcon, Walter Demétrio

    A space weather program is being initiated at the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research (INPE) to study events from their initiation on the sun to their impacts on the earth, including their effects on space-based and ground-based technological systems. The program is built on existing capabilities at INPE, which include scientists with a long tradition and excellence in the observation, analysis and modeling of solar and solar-terrestrial phenomena and an array of geophysical instruments that spans all over the Brazilian territory from the north to south of the magnetic dip equator. Available sensors include solar radio frequency receivers and telescopes, optical instruments and solar imagers, GNSS receivers, ionosondes, radars, allsky imagers, magnetometers and cosmic ray detectors. In the equatorial region, ionosphere and thermosphere constitute a coupled system with electrodynamical and plasma physical processes being responsible for a variety of peculiar phenomena. The most important of them are the equatorial electrojet current system and its instabilities, the equatorial ionization anomaly, and the plasma instabilities/irregularities of the night-time ionosphere (associated with the plasma bubble events). In addition, space weather events modify the equatorial ionosphere in a complex and up to now unpredictable manner. Consequently, a main focus of the program will be on monitoring the low, middle and upper atmosphere phenomena and developing a predictive model of the equatorial ionosphere through data assimilation, that could help to mitigate against the deleterious effects on radio communications and navigation systems. The technological, economic and social importance of such activities was recognized by the Brazilian government and a proposal for funding was approved for the period 2008-2011. New ground instruments will be installed during this period allowing us to extend our current capability to provide space weather observations, accurate

  8. brazilian subsidiaries of multinationals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Mendes Borini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The theme of corporate social responsibility (CSR has not been widely examined in the context of multinationals. This dearth is even greater with respect to subsidiaries, particularly the subject of reverse transfer of practices, that is, the transfer of practices developed in subsidiaries back to the parent company. Because of this theoretical gap, the present article investigates the factors involved on reverse transfer of CSR practices. The research hypotheses test the importance of developing nonlocation-bound capabilities, of integration between subsidiaries and parent and of institutional distance. The data were obtained by a survey of the main foreign subsidiaries in Brazil. All told, we analyzed 150 Brazilian subsidiaries of multinationals, by applying multiple linear regression. The results indicate that the reverse transfer of CSR depends on the development of nonlocation-bound capabilities of the subsidiaries and integration between the parent company and its foreign subsidiaries.

  9. Brazilian Eratosthenes Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhi, R.; Vilaça, J.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of Brazilian Eratosthenes Project is the development and application of teaching training actions according the ``docent autonomy" concept to basic Astronomy Education. Argentina coordinates the project in South America, but Brazil works in this project since 2010 with the theme ``Projeto Eratóstenes Brasil" in the homepage: http://sites.google.com/site/projetoerato. Two schools measure a sticks shadow and communicate their results. After, they calculate an average radius of Earth. The stick (gnomon) should stay in vertical position in the leveled ground. Since 2010, the project received hundreds of Brazilian schools with different experiments that were constructed with autonomy, because our site doesn't show some itinerary pre-ready to elaborate the experiments. To collect data for our research, we will use interviews via Skype with the teachers. These data are useful to researches about Science Education area and the Teaching Formation. Teaching professional practice could change and we see modifications in the teachers work, what depends of their realities and context. This project intents to respect the docent autonomy. This autonomy to responsible modifications during continued formation is called ``activist formative model" according Langhi & Nardi (Educação em Astronomia: repensando a formação de professores. São Paulo: Escrituras Editora, 2012). This project discusses about researches in Astronomy Education - still extreme rare in Brazil, when we compare with other areas in Science Education. We believe that actions like this could motivate the students to learn more Astronomy. Furthermore, this national action can be a rich source of data to investigations about teaching formation and scientific divulgation.

  10. INNOVATION IN BRAZILIAN SMALL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonny Kerley de Alencar Rodrigues

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the interfaces and boundaries of innovation orientation of Brazilian MSEs because despite the importance of innovation for Brazilian MSEs, a thorough analysis of such initiatives in Brazil still has not actually happened. The search was developed from a quantitative approach, of applied nature and descriptive. For that a structured questionnaire was used where were interviewed 700 MSEs using a probabilistic sampling. The study offers two important conclusions. The challenges for innovation can be perceived along three dimensions: design innovation, the implementation of innovation and functional area of innovation. And the data confirms that small Brazilian companies generally have difficulties to sell their innovations. The study offers two important conclusions. The challenges for innovation can be perceived along three dimensions: design innovation, the implementation of innovation and functional area of innovation. And the data confirms that small Brazilian companies generally have difficulties to sell their innovations.

  11. Influenza and dengue virus co-infection impairs monocyte recruitment to the lung, increases dengue virus titers, and exacerbates pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael A; González, Karla N; Shah, Sanjana; Peña, José; Mack, Matthias; Talarico, Laura B; Polack, Fernando P; Harris, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Co-infections of influenza virus and bacteria are known to cause severe disease, but little information exists on co-infections with other acute viruses. Seasonal influenza and dengue viruses (DENV) regularly co-circulate in tropical regions. The pandemic spread of influenza virus H1N1 (hereafter H1N1) in 2009 led to additional severe disease cases that were co-infected with DENV. Here, we investigated the impact of co-infection on immune responses and pathogenesis in a new mouse model. Co-infection of otherwise sublethal doses of a Nicaraguan clinical H1N1 isolate and two days later with a virulent DENV2 strain increased systemic DENV titers and caused 90% lethality. Lungs of co-infected mice carried both viruses, developed severe pneumonia, and expressed a unique pattern of host mRNAs, resembling only partial responses against infection with either virus alone. A large number of monocytes were recruited to DENV-infected but not to co-infected lungs, and depletion and adoptive transfer experiments revealed a beneficial role of monocytes. Our study shows that co-infection with influenza and DENV impairs host responses, which fail to control DENV titers and instead, induce severe lung damage. Further, our findings identify key inflammatory pathways and monocyte function as targets for future therapies that may limit immunopathology in co-infected patients. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Age can be a Problem: Clostridium difficile and Cytomegalovirus Colitis Coinfection in an Immunocompetent 90-year-old Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hsun Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis and cytomegalovirus colitis coinfection has been documented in immunocompromised patients. However, this kind of coinfection has rarely been reported in immunocompetent patients. We present a 90-year-old, critically ill, immunocompetent patient, who had a C. difficile and cytomegalovirus colitis coinfection. Although the common risk factors of both types of colitis are well known, clinical physicians still need to be alert to this coinfection because severe complications of CMV colitis have been reported previously. Physicians should be more aggressive in the management of elderly immunocompetent patients with refractory symptoms of colitis.

  13. Substantially Higher and Earlier Occurrence of Anti-Tuberculosis Drug-Related Adverse Reactions in HIV Coinfected Tuberculosis Patients: A Matched-Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matono, Takashi; Nishijima, Takeshi; Teruya, Katsuji; Morino, Eriko; Takasaki, Jin; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Oka, Shinichi

    2017-11-01

    Little information exists on the frequency, severity, and timing of first-line anti-tuberculosis drug-related adverse events (TB-AEs) in HIV-tuberculosis coinfected (HIV-TB) patients in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. This matched-cohort study included HIV-TB patients as cases and HIV-uninfected tuberculosis (non-HIV-TB) patients as controls. Tuberculosis was culture-confirmed in both groups. Cases were matched to controls in a 1:4 ratio on age, sex, and year of diagnosis. TB-AEs were defined as Grade 2 or higher requiring drug discontinuation/regimen change. From 2003 to 2015, 94 cases and 376 controls were analyzed (95% men, 98% Asians). Standard four-drug combination therapy was initiated in 91% of cases and 89% of controls (p = 0.45). Cases had a higher frequency of TB-AE [51% (48/94) vs. 10% (39/376), p tuberculosis treatment. HIV infection was an independent risk factor for TB-AEs in the multivariate Cox analysis [adjusted HR (aHR): 6.96; 95% confidence interval: 3.93-12.3]. TB-AEs occurred more frequently in HIV-TB than in non-HIV-TB patients, and were more severe. The majority of TB-AEs occurred within 4 weeks of initiating anti-tuberculosis treatment. Because TB-AEs may delay ART initiation, careful monitoring during this period is warranted in coinfected patients.

  14. Innovation in brazilian small companies

    OpenAIRE

    Tonny Kerley de Alencar Rodrigues; Átila de Melo Lira; Irenilza Alencar Naas

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the interfaces and boundaries of innovation orientation of Brazilian MSEs because despite the importance of innovation for Brazilian MSEs, a thorough analysis of such initiatives in Brazil still has not actually happened. The search was developed from a quantitative approach, of applied nature and descriptive. For that a structured questionnaire was used where were interviewed 700 MSEs using a probabilistic sampling. The study offers two important conclusions. The ...

  15. High prevalence of trypanosome co-infections in freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grybchuk-Ieremenko, Anastasiia; Losev, Alexander; Kostygov, Alexei Yu; Lukeš, Julius; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav

    2014-12-01

    One thousand three hundred seventy three fish specimens of eight different species from the vicinity of Kyiv, Ukraine, were examined for the presence of trypanosomes and 921 individuals were found to be infected. The prevalence of infection ranged from 24% in freshwater bream, Abramis brama (Linnaeus), to 100% in spined loach, Cobitis 'taenia' Linnaeus. The level of parasitaemia also varied significantly between generally mild infections in pikeperch, Sander lucioperca (Linnaeus), and heavy ones in C. 'taenia'. In most cases the infections with trypanosomes were asymptomatic. Cases of co-infection with species of Trypanoplasma Laveran et Mesnil, 1901 were documented for five out of eight examined host species. Molecular analysis of the 18S rDNA sequences revealed that four hosts, namely northern pike, Esox lucius Linnaeus, freshwater bream, spined loach and European perch, Perca fluviatilis Linnaeus, were simultaneously infected with two different trypanosome species. Our findings advocate the view that to avoid the risk posed by mixed infections, subsequent molecular taxonomic studies should be performed on clonal lines derived from laboratory cultures of fish trypanosomes.

  16. [Recurrent tuberculosis in patients with coinfection by HIV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ordóñez, M A; Martínez González, J; Orihuela Cañadas, F; Jiménez Oñate, F; Colmenero Castillo, J D

    2003-06-01

    Analysis and identification of factors associated with the tuberculosis (TB) recurrence in HIV-infected patients. The HIV-infected patients diagnosed with TB between 1995-2000 and with correct completion of the treatment were selected. There were compared those patients who presented a tuberculous disease recurrence with those which did not presented it. Multivariate analysis was carried out by logistic regression in order to identify factors associated with a new episode of TB. In the total sample of 223 diagnosed HIV-infected patients with TB, 159 (71.3%) patients completed adequately the treatment and were considered cured. The rest were excluded because of: death before completing the treatment (5.8%), lost in the follow-up (11.7%), therapeutic abandonment (9.4%), and therapeutic failure (1.8%). In the 159 patient final sample, 14 (8.8%) patients presented later recurrence. The patients with recurrent TB presented a greater degree of immunosuppression, more previous complications indicative of AIDS, and greater frequency of extrapulmonary TB in the initial episode. After the multivariate analysis, a count of lymphocytes CD4 lower than 100/mm3 in the first episode of TB was associated with recurrent tuberculous disease (odds ratio [OR]: 4,6; 95% confidence index [CI]: 1,3-18,2). Mortality was high (35.7%) in the patients with recurrent episodes. The recurrence of TB in patients coinfected by HIV occurs in individuals with profound immunossuppression and is associated to high mortality.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus and Influenza A Virus: Partners in Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E. Mulcahy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is a significant risk factor for secondary staphylococcal pneumonia in influenza A virus (IAV-infected hosts. However, little research has been undertaken to define the environmental and physiological changes that cause S. aureus to shift from commensal to pathogenic organism in this setting. The ability of virus-driven danger signals to cause S. aureus to transition from commensalism to pulmonary infection was explored in a recent study by Reddinger et al. R. M. Reddinger, N. R. Luke-Marshall, A. P. Hakansson, and A. A. Campagnari, mBio 7(6:e01235-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01235-16. The authors report that physiological host changes, including febrile temperature and a combination of host stress response signals, caused S. aureus biofilms to disperse from the nasal environment and cause active pulmonary infection. This commentary discusses the new finding in light of the current understanding of the mechanisms behind staphylococcal coinfection with IAV. In addition, it considers the mechanisms behind staphylococcal dispersal in this model. Overall, the study indicates that interkingdom signaling may occur following IAV infection and this likely contributes to sensitizing the IAV-infected host to secondary staphylococcal pneumonia.

  18. Clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga Eduardo Lorens

    Full Text Available Co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is increasingly common and affects the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C. Highly active antiretroviral therapy has improved the life expectancy of HIV infected patients, but, by extending survival, it permits the development of HCV cirrhosis. This study tried to evaluate clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV. We evaluated 134 HCV-infected patients: i group A - 65 co-infected HCV/HIV patients, ii group B - 69 mono-infected HCV patients. The impact of HIV infection on HCV liver disease was analyzed using Child's score, ultrasound findings and liver histology. Patients were subjected to HCV genotyping and anti-HBs dosage. Patients mean age was 42.4 years (±9.1 and 97 (72.4% were males. Injected drug use and homo/bisexual practice were more frequently encountered in the co-infected group: 68.3% and 78.0%, respectively. Antibodies against hepatitis B virus (anti-HBs were found in only 38.1% of the patients (66.7% group A x 33.3% group B. Ten out of 14 individuals (71.4% who had liver disease (Child B or C and 25 out of 34 (73.5% who showed ultrasound evidence of chronic liver disease were in the co-infection group. HCV genotype-2/3 was more frequently encountered in co-infected patients (36.9% group A vs. 21.8% group B. Conclusions: a HIV infection seems to adversely affect the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C, b injected drug use, bi/homosexual practice and genotype-2/3 were more frequently encountered in co-infected patients, c immunization against HBV should be encouraged in these patients.

  19. HBV/HIV coinfection is associated with poorer outcomes in hospitalized patients with HBV or HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, R; Jun, T; Khalili, H; Chung, R T; Ananthakrishnan, A N

    2016-10-01

    We examined the impact of HBV/HIV coinfection on outcomes in hospitalized patients compared to those with HBV or HIV monoinfection. Using the 2011 US Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we identified patients who had been hospitalized with HBV or HIV monoinfection or HBV/HIV coinfection using ICD-9-CM codes. We compared liver-related admissions between the three groups. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of in-hospital mortality, length of stay and total charges. A total of 72 584 discharges with HBV monoinfection, 133 880 discharges with HIV monoinfection and 8156 discharges with HBV/HIV coinfection were included. HBV/HIV coinfection was associated with higher mortality compared to HBV monoinfection (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.30-2.15) but not when compared to HIV monoinfection (OR 1.22, 95% CI 0.96-1.54). However, the presence of HBV along with cirrhosis or complications of portal hypertension was associated with three times greater in-hospital mortality in patients with HIV compared to those without these complications (OR 3.00, 95% CI 1.80-5.02). Length of stay and total hospitalization charges were greater in the HBV-/HIV-coinfected group compared to the HBV monoinfection group (+1.53 days, P HBV/HIV coinfection is a risk factor for in-hospital mortality, particularly in liver-related admissions, compared to HBV monoinfection. Overall healthcare utilization from HBV/HIV coinfection is also higher than for either infection alone and higher than the national average for all hospitalizations, thus emphasizing the healthcare burden from these illnesses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Clonorchis sinensis Co-infection Could Affect the Disease State and Treatment Response of HBV Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Chen, Tingjin; Kong, Xiangzhan; Sun, Hengchang; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) is considered to be an important parasitic zoonosis because it infects approximately 35 million people, while approximately 15 million were distributed in China. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health issue. Two types of pathogens have the potential to cause human liver disease and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Concurrent infection with HBV and C. sinensis is often observed in some areas where C. sinensis is endemic. However, whether C. sinensis could impact HBV infection or vice versa remains unknown. Principal Findings Co-infection with C. sinensis and HBV develops predominantly in males. Co-infected C. sinensis and HBV patients presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA titers. Combination treatment with antiviral and anti-C. sinensis drugs in co-infected patients could contribute to a reduction in viral load and help with liver function recovery. Excretory-secretory products (ESPs) may, in some ways, increase HBV viral replication in vitro. A mixture of ESP and HBV positive sera could induce peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to produce higher level of Th2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 compared to HBV alone, it seems that due to presence of ESP, the cytokine production shift towards Th2. C. sinensis/HBV co-infected patients showed higher serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels and lower serum IFN-γ levels. Conclusions/Significance Patients with concomitant C. sinensis and HBV infection presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA copies. In co-infected patients, the efficacy of anti-viral treatment was better in patients who were prescribed with entecavir and praziquantel than entecavir alone. One possible reason for the weaker response to antiviral therapies in co-infected patients was the shift in cytokine production from Th1 to Th2 that may inhibit viral clearance. C. sinensis/HBV co-infection could exacerbate the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokine. PMID:27348302

  1. Partner selection among Latino immigrant men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Fernanda T; Shedlin, Michele G; Brooks, Kelly D; Montes Penha, Marcelo; Reisen, Carol A; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Poppen, Paul J

    2010-12-01

    This qualitative study explored partner selection in a sample of immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). In-depth interviews were conducted with men living in the greater New York metropolitan area who had been born in Brazil (n = 10), Colombia (n = 14), or the Dominican Republic (n = 9). One focus group was conducted with MSM from each of the three countries (9 Brazilian, 11 Colombian, and 5 Dominican participants). A grounded theory approach revealed three main themes relating to partner selection. The first concerned stereotypes of how Latino and Anglo-American men tend to behave in their sexual encounters and relationships. The participants perceived Latinos to be more affectionate and passionate, whereas they saw Anglo-American men as more independent and practical. These cultural discrepancies sometimes resulted in a preference for Latino partners. A second theme concerned stereotypes of the national groups, including expectations that Brazilians would be sexy and sensual and that Dominicans would have large penises. As found in other research on MSM of color, ethnic and national stereotypes were associated with experiences of sexual objectification. The third theme addressed the importance of masculine characteristics in sexual attraction and partner selection. Negative feelings towards effeminate men who did not conform to normative male physical or behavioral presentation reflect a stigma found inside and outside of the gay community. These findings suggest that gender and ethnic stereotypes play an important role in shaping partner choice and have implications for sexual risk and relationship formation.

  2. CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network Coinfection and Concurrent Diseases Core: Canadian guidelines for management and treatment of HIV/hepatitis C coinfection in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Mark; Klein, Marina; Shafran, Stephen; Tseng, Alice; Giguère, Pierre; Côté, Pierre; Poliquin, Marc; Cooper, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection occurs in 20% to 30% of Canadians living with HIV, and is responsible for a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. HIV-HCV management is more complex due to the accelerated progression of liver disease, the timing and nature of antiretroviral and HCV therapy, mental health and addictions management, socioeconomic obstacles and drug-drug interactions between new HCV direct-acting antiviral therapies and antiretroviral regimens. OBJECTIVE: To develop national standards for the management of HCV-HIV coinfected adults in the Canadian context. METHODS: A panel with specific clinical expertise in HIV-HCV co-infection was convened by The CIHR HIV Trials Network to review current literature, existing guidelines and protocols. Following broad solicitation for input, consensus recommendations were approved by the working group, and were characterized using a Class (benefit verses harm) and Level (strength of certainty) quality-of-evidence scale. RESULTS: All HIV-HCV coinfected individuals should be assessed for HCV therapy. Individuals unable to initiate HCV therapy should initiate antiretroviral therapy to slow liver disease progression. Standard of care for genotype 1 is pegylated interferon and weight-based ribavirin dosing plus an HCV protease inhibitor; traditional dual therapy for 24 weeks (for genotype 2/3 with virological clearance at week 4); or 48 weeks (for genotypes 2–6). Therapy deferral for individuals with mild liver disease may be considered. HIV should not be considered a barrier to liver transplantation in coinfected patients. DISCUSSION: Recommendations may not supersede individual clinical judgement. PMID:24489565

  3. Alterations of the NK cell pool in HIV/HCV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Dominik J; Kokordelis, Pavlos; Krämer, Benjamin; Glässner, Andreas; Wolter, Franziska; Goeser, Felix; Lutz, Philipp; Schwarze-Zander, Carolynne; Boesecke, Christoph; Strassburg, Christian P; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Spengler, Ulrich; Nattermann, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    A relevant proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients is co-infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV co-infection in HIV-positive patients is associated with faster progression of liver disease in comparison to HCV mono-infection. Natural killer (NK) cells critically modulate the natural course of HCV infection. Both HIV and HCV mono-infection are associated with alterations of the NK cell pool. However, little data is available concerning phenotype and function of NK cells in HIV/HCV co-infection. A total of 34 HIV/HCV co-infected, 35 HIV and 39 HCV mono-infected patients and 43 healthy control persons were enrolled into this study. All HIV-positive patients were under effective antiretroviral therapy. NK cell phenotype, IFN-γ production and degranulation were studied by flow cytometry. NK cell frequency in HIV/HCV co-infection was significantly lower than in healthy individuals but did not differ from HIV and HCV mono-infection. HIV/HCV co-infection was associated with significantly decreased expression of the maturation/differentiation markers CD27/62L/127 on NK cells but increased expression of CD57 compared to healthy controls. Of note, expression also differed significantly from HCV mono-infection but was similar to HIV mono-infection, suggesting a pronounced impact of HIV on these alterations. Similar findings were made with regard to the NK cell receptors NKG2A/C and NKp30. More importantly, NK cells in co-infection displayed a highly impaired functional activity with significantly lower IFN-γ production and degranulation than in healthy donors as well as HIV and HCV mono-infection, suggesting a synergistic effect of both viruses. Our data indicate that HIV/HCV co-infection is associated with significant alterations of the NK cell pool, which might be involved in the rapid progression of liver disease in co-infected patients and which mainly reflect alterations observed in HIV mono-infection.

  4. Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm co-infection: spatial distribution and determinants in Preah Vihear Province, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrer, Armelle; Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Vounatsou, Penelope; Chammartin, Frédérique; Marti, Hanspeter; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2018-01-12

    Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm are two soil-transmitted helminths (STH) that are highly prevalent in Cambodia. Strongyloides stercoralis causes long-lasting infections and significant morbidity but is largely neglected, while hookworm causes the highest public health burden among STH. The two parasites have the same infection route, i.e. skin penetration. The extent of co-distribution, which could result in potential high co-morbidities, is unknown in highly endemic settings like Cambodia. The aim of this study was to predict the spatial distribution of S. stercoralis-hookworm co-infection risk and to investigate determinants of co-infection in Preah Vihear Province, North Cambodia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2010 in 60 villages of Preah Vihear Province. Diagnosis was performed on two stool samples, using combined Baermann technique and Koga agar culture plate for S. stercoralis and Kato-Katz technique for hookworm. Bayesian multinomial geostatistical models were used to assess demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioural determinants of S. stercoralis-hookworm co-infection and to predict co-infection risk at non-surveyed locations. Of the 2576 participants included in the study, 48.6% and 49.0% were infected with S. stercoralis and hookworm, respectively; 43.8% of the cases were co-infections. Females, preschool aged children, adults aged 19-49 years, and participants who reported regularly defecating in toilets, systematically boiling drinking water and having been treated with anthelmintic drugs had lower odds of co-infection. While S. stercoralis infection risk did not appear to be spatially structured, hookworm mono-infection and co-infection exhibited spatial correlation at about 20 km. Co-infection risk was positively associated with longer walking distances to a health centre and exhibited a small clustering tendency. The association was only partly explained by climatic variables, suggesting a role for underlying factors, such as

  5. Prisoners co-infected with tuberculosis and HIV: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Chantal L; King, Emma J; Dolan, Kate; McKee, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Almost from the beginning of the HIV epidemic in 1981, an association with tuberculosis (TB) was recognized. This association between HIV and TB co-infection has been particularly evident amongst prisoners. However, despite this, few studies of TB in prisons have stratified results by HIV status. Given the high prevalence of HIV-positive persons and TB-infected persons in prisons and the documented risk of TB in those infected with HIV, it is of interest to determine how co-infection varies amongst prison populations worldwide. For this reason we have undertaken a systematic review of studies of co-infected prisoners to determine the incidence and/or prevalence of HIV/TB co-infection in prisons, as well as outcomes in this group, measured as treatment success or death. Methods A literature search was undertaken using the online databases PubMed, Embase, IBSS, Scopus, Web of Science, Global Health and CINAHL Plus. No restrictions were set on language or publication date for article retrieval, with articles included if indexed up to 18 October 2015. A total of 1975 non-duplicate papers were identified. For treatment and outcome data all eligible papers were appraised for inclusion; for incidence/prevalence estimates papers published prior to 2000 were excluded from full text review. After full text appraisal, 46 papers were selected for inclusion in the review, 41 for incidence/prevalence estimates and nine for outcomes data, with four papers providing evidence for both outcomes and prevalence/incidence. Results Very few studies estimated the incidence of TB in HIV positive prisoners, with most simply reporting prevalence of co-infection. Co-infection is rarely explicitly measured, with studies simply reporting HIV status in prisoners with TB, or a cross-sectional survey of TB prevalence amongst prisoners with HIV. Estimates of co-infection prevalence ranged from 2.4 to 73.1% and relative risks for one, given the other, ranged from 2.0 to 10.75, although

  6. The synergy between TB and HIV co-infection on perceived stigma in Ethiopia

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    Desalegn Dejene

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The synergy between tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV co-infection on perceived stigma is not well studied. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of TB/HIV co-infection on perceived stigma in selected hospitals of Oromiya region, Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted from February to April, 2009 in Adama, Nekemet and Jimma Specialized hospitals. Data were collected by trained HIV counselors. A structured questionnaire which consisted of socio-demographic variables, clinical information, perceived stigma, and depression was used to collect the data Findings A total of 591 participants were included in the study of whom 124 (20.9% were co-infected with TB/HIV. The stigma items were highly reliable (Cronbach's alpha = 0.93 and had strong inter dimension correlation. Respondents who were co-infected with TB and HIV were more likely to have perceived stigma compared to non-co-infected HIV patients, [OR = 1.4, (95% CI: 1.2, 2.0]. Non-literate individuals [OR = 1.9, (95% CI: 1.2, 3.0] and females [OR = 1.6, (95% CI: 1.2, 2.3] had also more perceived stigma. Conclusions TB/HIV co-infected patients, non-literate individuals and females were more likely to have high perceived stigma. Behavioral Change Communication should focus on these segments of the population to rectify the high perceived stigma.

  7. Blood-borne viral co-infections among human immunodeficiency virus-infected inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontali, Emanuele; Bobbio, Nicoletta; Zaccardi, Marilena; Urciuoli, Renato

    2016-06-13

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prevalence of HBV and/or HCV co-infection among HIV-infected inmates entering the correctional facility. Design/methodology/approach - Prospective collection of data of HIV-infected inmates entered the institution over a ten-year period. Findings - During study period 365 consecutive different inmates were evaluated. HCV co-infection was observed in more than 80 per cent of the tested HIV-infected inmates, past HBV infection in 71.6 per cent and active HBV co-infection was detected in 7.1 per cent; triple coinfection (HIV, HCV and HBs-Ag positivity) was present in 6 per cent of the total. Originality/value - This study confirms high prevalence of co-infections among HIV-infected inmates. Testing for HBV and HCV in all HIV-infected inmates at entry in any correctional system is recommended to identify those in need of specific care and/or preventing interventions.

  8. Effects of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Liver Fibrosis in HIV and Hepatitis C Coinfection

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    Lindsey J. Reese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Liver fibrosis is accelerated in HIV and hepatitis C coinfection, mediated by profibrotic effects of angiotensin. The objective of this study was to determine if angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is attenuate liver fibrosis in coinfection. Methods. A retrospective review of 156 coinfected subjects was conducted to analyze the association between exposure to ACE-Is and liver fibrosis. Noninvasive indices of liver fibrosis (APRI, FIB-4, Forns indices were compared between subjects who had taken ACE-Is and controls who had not taken them. Linear regression was used to evaluate ACE-I use as an independent predictor of fibrosis. Results. Subjects taking ACE-Is for three years were no different than controls on the APRI and the FIB-4 but had significantly higher scores than controls on the Forns index, indicating more advanced fibrosis. The use of ACE-Is for three years remained independently associated with an elevated Forns score when adjusted for age, race, and HIV viral load (P<0.001. There were significant associations between all of the indices and significant fibrosis, as determined clinically and radiologically. Conclusions. There was not a protective association between angiotensin inhibition and liver fibrosis in coinfection. These noninvasive indices may be useful for ruling out significant fibrosis in coinfection.

  9. Astrocyte Apoptosis and HIV Replication Are Modulated in Host Cells Coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Javier M. Urquiza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In immunosuppressed individuals, as it occurs in the coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the central nervous system may be affected. In this regard, reactivation of Chagas disease is severe and often lethal, and it accounts for meningoencephalitis. Astrocytes play a crucial role in the environment maintenance of healthy neurons; however, they can host HIV and T. cruzi. In this report, human astrocytes were infected in vitro with both genetically modified-pathogens to express alternative fluorophore. As evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, HIV and T. cruzi coexist in the same astrocyte, likely favoring reciprocal interactions. In this context, lower rates of cell death were observed in both T. cruzi monoinfected-astrocytes and HIV-T. cruzi coinfection in comparison with those infected only with HIV. The level of HIV replication is significantly diminished under T. cruzi coinfection, but without affecting the infectivity of the HIV progeny. This interference with viral replication appears to be related to the T. cruzi multiplication rate or its increased intracellular presence but does not require their intracellular cohabitation or infected cell-to-cell contact. Among several Th1/Th2/Th17 profile-related cytokines, only IL-6 was overexpressed in HIV-T. cruzi coinfection exhibiting its cytoprotective role. This study demonstrates that T. cruzi and HIV are able to coinfect astrocytes thus altering viral replication and apoptosis.

  10. HIV–Tuberculosis Coinfection in Southern California: Evaluating Disparities in Disease Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Richard F. W.; Moore, Marisa; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Raich, Annie; Moser, Kathleen S.; Garfein, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to understand tuberculosis (TB) and HIV coinfection trends in San Diego County, California, and to identify associations between sociodemographic risk factors and TB and HIV coinfection. Methods. We analyzed TB surveillance data from 1993 through 2007. TB cases were grouped by HIV status: positive, negative, or unknown. We used Poisson regression to estimate trends and tested associations between TB and HIV coinfection and sociodemographic risk factors with polychotomous logistic regression. Results. Of 5172 TB cases, 8.8% were also infected with HIV. Incidence of coinfected cases did not change significantly over the period studied, but the proportion of cases among Hispanics increased significantly, whereas cases among non-Hispanic Whites and Blacks decreased. TB cases with HIV coinfection were significantly more likely to be Hispanic, male, injection drugs users, and aged 30 to 49 years, relative to cases with TB disease only. Conclusions. The burden of TB and HIV in San Diego has shifted to Hispanics in the last decade. To address this health disparity, binational TB and HIV prevention efforts are needed. PMID:20147681

  11. Astrocyte Apoptosis and HIV Replication Are Modulated in Host Cells Coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Javier M; Burgos, Juan M; Ojeda, Diego S; Pascuale, Carla A; Leguizamón, M Susana; Quarleri, Jorge F

    2017-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In immunosuppressed individuals, as it occurs in the coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the central nervous system may be affected. In this regard, reactivation of Chagas disease is severe and often lethal, and it accounts for meningoencephalitis. Astrocytes play a crucial role in the environment maintenance of healthy neurons; however, they can host HIV and T. cruzi. In this report, human astrocytes were infected in vitro with both genetically modified-pathogens to express alternative fluorophore. As evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, HIV and T. cruzi coexist in the same astrocyte, likely favoring reciprocal interactions. In this context, lower rates of cell death were observed in both T. cruzi monoinfected-astrocytes and HIV-T. cruzi coinfection in comparison with those infected only with HIV. The level of HIV replication is significantly diminished under T. cruzi coinfection, but without affecting the infectivity of the HIV progeny. This interference with viral replication appears to be related to the T. cruzi multiplication rate or its increased intracellular presence but does not require their intracellular cohabitation or infected cell-to-cell contact. Among several Th1/Th2/Th17 profile-related cytokines, only IL-6 was overexpressed in HIV-T. cruzi coinfection exhibiting its cytoprotective role. This study demonstrates that T. cruzi and HIV are able to coinfect astrocytes thus altering viral replication and apoptosis.

  12. Astrocyte Apoptosis and HIV Replication Are Modulated in Host Cells Coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Javier M.; Burgos, Juan M.; Ojeda, Diego S.; Pascuale, Carla A.; Leguizamón, M. Susana; Quarleri, Jorge F.

    2017-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In immunosuppressed individuals, as it occurs in the coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the central nervous system may be affected. In this regard, reactivation of Chagas disease is severe and often lethal, and it accounts for meningoencephalitis. Astrocytes play a crucial role in the environment maintenance of healthy neurons; however, they can host HIV and T. cruzi. In this report, human astrocytes were infected in vitro with both genetically modified-pathogens to express alternative fluorophore. As evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, HIV and T. cruzi coexist in the same astrocyte, likely favoring reciprocal interactions. In this context, lower rates of cell death were observed in both T. cruzi monoinfected-astrocytes and HIV-T. cruzi coinfection in comparison with those infected only with HIV. The level of HIV replication is significantly diminished under T. cruzi coinfection, but without affecting the infectivity of the HIV progeny. This interference with viral replication appears to be related to the T. cruzi multiplication rate or its increased intracellular presence but does not require their intracellular cohabitation or infected cell-to-cell contact. Among several Th1/Th2/Th17 profile-related cytokines, only IL-6 was overexpressed in HIV-T. cruzi coinfection exhibiting its cytoprotective role. This study demonstrates that T. cruzi and HIV are able to coinfect astrocytes thus altering viral replication and apoptosis. PMID:28824880

  13. Co-infection and risk factors of tuberculosis in a Mexican HIV+ population

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    Roberto Zenteno-Cuevas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The situation of tuberculosis (TB is being modified by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, which is increasing the occurrence of new cases and the generation of drug resistant strains, affecting not only the people infected with HIV, but also their close contacts and the general population, conforming a serious public health concern. However, the magnitudes of the factors associated to this co-infection differ considerably in relation to the population groups and geographical areas. METHODS: In order to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for the co-infection of tuberculosis (TB in a population with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV+ in the Southeast of Mexico, we made the analysis of clinical and epidemiological variables and the diagnosis of tuberculosis by isolation of mycobacteria from respiratory samples. RESULTS: From the 147 HIV+ individuals analyzed, 12 were culture positive; this shows a prevalence of 8% for the co-infection. The only variable found with statistical significance for the co-infection was the number of CD4-T < 200 cells/mm³, OR 13 (95%, CI 2-106 vs 12-109. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge this is the first report describing the factors associated with tuberculosis co -infection with HIV in a population from Southern Mexico. The low number of CD4 T-cells was the only variable associated with the TB co-infection and the rest of the variables provide scenarios that require specific and particular interventions for this population group.

  14. Detection of Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection in Patients with Dengue Diagnosis

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    Carlos Machain-Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coinfection produced by dengue virus (DENV and hepatitis C virus (HCV is a serious problem of public health in Mexico, as they both circulate in tropical zones and may lead to masking or complicating symptoms. In this research, we detected active coinfected patients by HCV residing in the endemic city of Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico, with positive diagnosis to dengue during the acute phase. We performed a retrospective analysis of 240 serum samples from dengue patients. The IgM-ELISA serological test was used for dengue diagnosis, as well as viral isolation to confirm infection. DENV and HCV were detected by RT-PCR. Thus, 31 (12.9% samples showed DENV-HCV coinfection, but interestingly the highest frequency of coinfection cases was found in male patients presenting hemorrhagic dengue in 19/31 (61.29%, with a predominance of 12 : 7 in males. Firstly, coinfection of DENV-HCV in Mérida, Mexico, was detected in young dengue patients, between 11 and 20 years old (38.7%, followed by those between 21 and 30 years old (32%; only 16.13% were between 0 and 10 years of age. Diagnosis of HCV infection in patients with dengue is highly recommended in order to establish potential risk in clinical manifestations as well as dictate patients' special care.

  15. Report on Influenza A and B Viruses: Their Coinfection in a Saudi Leukemia Patient

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    Fahad N. Almajhdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Influenza A and B viruses are the leading cause of respiratory infections in children worldwide, particularly in developing countries. There is a lack of data on coinfection of influenza A and B viruses circulating in Saudi Arabia. In this study, we aimed to identify the circulation of influenza viruses that contribute to respiratory tract infections in Saudi children. Methods. We collected 80 nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs from hospitalized children with acute respiratory illness (ARI at Riyadh during the period extended from October 2010 till April 2011. Samples were tested for the common respiratory viruses including influenza viruses by RT-PCR. Results. Overall, 6 samples were found positive for influenza A and/or B viruses. Among these positive clinical samples, only one collected sample from a female one-year-old immunocompromised child with leukemia showed a coinfection with influenza A and B viruses. In present study coinfection was confirmed by inoculation of the clinical specimen in specific pathogenfree embryonating chicken eggs and identification of the virus isolates by hemagglutination and one-step RT-PCR. Conclusion. This study opens the scene for studying the role of influenza virus’s coinfection in disease severity and virus evolution. Further studies are required to better understand the clinical importance of viral coinfection.

  16. Detection of hepatitis C virus coinfection in patients with dengue diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa Carmina; Carrillo-Navarrete, Jaquelin; Rivero-Cárdenas, Nubia; Salazar, Ma Isabel; Farfán-Ale, José Arturo; Puerto, Fernando I; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Coinfection produced by dengue virus (DENV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a serious problem of public health in Mexico, as they both circulate in tropical zones and may lead to masking or complicating symptoms. In this research, we detected active coinfected patients by HCV residing in the endemic city of Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico, with positive diagnosis to dengue during the acute phase. We performed a retrospective analysis of 240 serum samples from dengue patients. The IgM-ELISA serological test was used for dengue diagnosis, as well as viral isolation to confirm infection. DENV and HCV were detected by RT-PCR. Thus, 31 (12.9%) samples showed DENV-HCV coinfection, but interestingly the highest frequency of coinfection cases was found in male patients presenting hemorrhagic dengue in 19/31 (61.29%), with a predominance of 12 : 7 in males. Firstly, coinfection of DENV-HCV in Mérida, Mexico, was detected in young dengue patients, between 11 and 20 years old (38.7%), followed by those between 21 and 30 years old (32%); only 16.13% were between 0 and 10 years of age. Diagnosis of HCV infection in patients with dengue is highly recommended in order to establish potential risk in clinical manifestations as well as dictate patients' special care.

  17. iTRAQ based investigation of plasma proteins in HIV infected and HIV/HBV coinfected patients — C9 and KLK are related to HIV/HBV coinfection

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    Tao Sun

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: The present iTRAQ based proteomic analyses identified 7 proteins that are related to HIV/HBV coinfection. HBV might influence hepatic and immune functions by deregulating complement and coagulation pathways. C9 and KLK could potentially be used as targets for the treatment of HIV/HBV coinfections.

  18. First Autochthonous Coinfected Anthrax in an Immunocompetent Patient

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    Parvaneh Afshar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous anthrax has a mortality rate of 20% if no antibacterial treatment is applied. The clinical manifestations of cutaneous anthrax are obviously striking, but coinfection may produce atypical lesions and mask the clinical manifestations and proper laboratory diagnosis. Anthrax is known to be more common in the Middle East and Iran is one of the countries in which the zoonotic form of anthrax may still be encountered. We report a case of a 19-years-old male who used to apply Venetian ceruse on his skin. Venetian ceruse (also known as Spirits of Saturn is an old cosmetic product used for skin whitening traditionally made from sheep’s spinal cord. The patient referred to the Referral Laboratory, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran, with atypical dermatosis, pronounced pain, and oedema of the affected tissue. It was confirmed by both conventional and molecular analysis that culture was a mixture of Bacillus anthracis and Trichophyton interdigitale. The patient was initially treated with ceftriaxone (1000 mg/day for two weeks, gentamicin (1.5–2 mg/kg/day, terbinafine (200 mg/week for one month, and 1% clotrimazole cream (5 weeks two times per day which resulted in gradual improvement. No relapse could be detected after one-year follow-up. Anthrax infection might present a broader spectrum of symptoms than expected by clinicians. These unfamiliar characteristics may lead to delayed diagnosis, inadequate treatment, and higher mortality rate. Clinicians need to be aware of this issue in order to have successful management over this infection.

  19. TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV COINFECTION: A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL STUDY

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    Vivek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The aim of the present study is to record the clinical, radiological profile of pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB in HIV positive patients. To win the battle against AIDS we have to fight against TB. Unlike HIV/AIDS, TB is completely curable in the vast majority of cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective study was conducted in the department of pulmonary medicine, Gadag institute of medical sciences, Gadag. All newly diagnosed HIV patients during the study period were included and screened for TB. HIV infection was confirmed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using two different antigens and a rapid test as recommended by NACO. RESULTS Among 370 newly diagnosed HIV positive patients, 113(30.54% patients were diagnosed to have TB. Most common affected age group was 31-40years with a mean age of 38.08 years. Unprotected heterosexual contact was the most common mode of HIV transmission. Fever, weight loss and cough were the commonest symptoms at presentation. Pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 85(22.97% patients, EPTB in 21(5.67% and disseminated TB in 7(1.8% patients. Among the EPTB patients, 2(9.5% patients had extra thoracic lymphadenopathy. Cervical lymph node was the commonest lymph node involved. 14(66.66% patients had pleural effusion, 3(14.28% had abdominal TB, 1(4.76% had tubercular meningitis and 1(4.76% patient had TB testis. CONCLUSION The prevalence of HIV–TB co-infection was high. Moreover, HIV positive patients need early diagnosis and treatment of active TB. However large sample size prospective studies are needed to correlate the clinical and CD4 count with the occurrence of different types of tuberculosis.

  20. Amazon, priority for Brazilian National Defense Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira, Sergio

    2000-01-01

    .... The Brazilian national defense policy, issued in 1996, the first in the history of the country, established directives to orient the Brazilian military strategic planning as well as diplomatic...

  1. Temporal analysis of reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Renato Simões; Nunes, Natália; Nunes, Marina; Rodrigues, Vandilson Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the reported cases of tuberculosis and of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in Brazil between 2002 and 2012. This was an observational study based on secondary time series data collected from the Brazilian Case Registry Database for the 2002-2012 period. The incidence of tuberculosis was stratified by gender, age group, geographical region, and outcome, as was that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection. Nationally, the incidence of tuberculosis declined by 18%, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 3.8%. There was an overall decrease in the incidence of tuberculosis, despite a significant increase in that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased only in the 0- to 9-year age bracket, remaining stable or increasing in the other age groups. The incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by 209% in the ≥ 60-year age bracket. The incidence of tuberculosis decreased in all geographical regions except the south, whereas that of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection increased by over 150% in the north and northeast. Regarding the outcomes, patients with tuberculosis-HIV co-infection, in comparison with patients infected with tuberculosis only, had a 48% lower chance of cure, a 50% greater risk of treatment nonadherence, and a 94% greater risk of death from tuberculosis. Our study shows that tuberculosis continues to be a relevant public health issue in Brazil, because the goals for the control and cure of the disease have yet to be achieved. In addition, the sharp increase in the incidence of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in women, in the elderly, and in the northern/northeastern region reveals that the population of HIV-infected individuals is rapidly becoming more female, older, and more impoverished. Investigar os casos notificados de tuberculose e de sua coinfecção com o HIV na população brasileira no período entre 2002 e 2012. Realizou-se um estudo observacional de série temporal, no qual

  2. Prevalence of TB/HIV co-infection in countries except China: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao, Junling; Zheng, Pinpin; Fu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    .... But the prevalence of TB/HIV co-infection was diversified among countries. Exploring the reasons of the diversity of TB/HIV co-infection is important for public policy, planning and development of collaborative TB/HIV activities...

  3. Hepatitis C virus infection and spontaneous clearance in HTLV-1 and HIV co-infected patients in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Le Marchand

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Our study found that patients coinfected with HIV and HTLV-1 were more likely to spontaneously clear hepatitis C virus than patients with HIV/HCV or HCV alone. The effects of HTLV coinfection on the immune response of such patients may be associated with these findings.

  4. [Viral respiratory co-infections in pediatric patients admitted for acute respiratory infection and their impact on clinical severity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Pamela; Cordero, Jaime; Valverde, Cristián; Unanue, Nancy; Dalmazzo, Roberto; Piemonte, Paula; Vergara, Ivonne; Torres, Juan P

    2012-04-01

    Respiratory viruses are the leading cause of acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) in children. It has been reported that viral respiratory co-infection could be associated with severe clinical course. To describe the frequency of viral co-infection in children admitted for AlRI and evaluate whether this co-infection was associated with more severe clinical course. Prospective, descriptive study in pediatric patients who were hospitalized for ARI, with molecular detection of at least 1 respiratory virus in nasopharyngeal sample studied by PCR-Microarray for 17 respiratory viruses. 110 out of 147 patients with detection of > 1 respiratory virus were included. Viral co-infection was detected in 41/110 (37%). 22/110 children (20%) were classified as moderate to severe clinical course and 88/110 (80%) were classified as mild clinical course. In the group of moderate to severe clinical course, viral respiratory co-infection was detected in 6/22 (27.3%), compared to 35/88 (39.8 %) in the mild clinical course group. No statistically significant difference was found regarding the presence of co-infection between groups (p = 0.33). We detected high rates of viral co-infection in children with ARI. It was not possible to demonstrate that viral co-infections were related with severe clinical course in hospitalized children.

  5. Complementary role of HCV and HIV in T-cell activation and exhaustion in HIV/HCV coinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feuth, T.; Arends, J.E.; Fransen, J.H.; Nanlohy, N.M.; Erpecum, K.J. van; Siersema, P.D.; Hoepelman, A.I.; Baarle, D. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether T-cell activation and exhaustion is linked to HCV- and HIV disease parameters in HIV/HCV infected individuals, we studied T-cell characteristics in HIV/HCV coinfected patients and controls. METHODS: 14 HIV/HCV coinfected, 19 HCV monoinfected, 10 HIV monoinfected

  6. Recurrent paratyphoid fever A co-infected with hepatitis A reactivated chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanling; Xiong, Yujiao; Huang, Wenxiang; Jia, Bei

    2014-05-12

    We report here a case of recurrent paratyphoid fever A with hepatitis A co-infection in a patient with chronic hepatitis B. A 26-year-old male patient, who was a hepatitis B virus carrier, was co-infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and hepatitis A virus. The recurrence of the paratyphoid fever may be ascribed to the coexistence of hepatitis B, a course of ceftriaxone plus levofloxacin that was too short and the insensitivity of paratyphoid fever A to levofloxacin. We find that an adequate course and dose of ceftriaxone is a better strategy for treating paratyphoid fever. Furthermore, the co-infection of paratyphoid fever with hepatitis A may stimulate cellular immunity and break immunotolerance. Thus, the administration of the anti-viral agent entecavir may greatly improve the prognosis of this patient with chronic hepatitis B, and the episodes of paratyphoid fever and hepatitis A infection prompt the use of timely antiviral therapy.

  7. Sofosbuvir and ledipasvir for HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Elana S; Kottilil, Shyam; Polis, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a chronic infection that disproportionately impacts people living with HIV. In the past, HCV therapy was less effective in individuals with HIV co-infection. However, the advent of direct-acting antivirals has revolutionized HCV treatment with high rates of success in patients both with and without HIV. In this paper, we review the evidence supporting the use of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) for the treatment of HCV in patients with HIV co-infection. Articles searchable on MEDLINE/PubMed were reviewed to provide context for use of LDV/SOF in individuals with HCV and HIV co-infection. This treatment is highly effective in achieving HCV cure or sustained virologic response, however further studies need to done to address efficacy of treatment in people with uncontrolled HIV, concerns regarding drug-interactions with antiretroviral therapy, and potential for shorter duration treatment.

  8. Dengue Virus Coinfection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Patients on the West Coast of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Valle-Reyes, Salvador; Ochoa-Jiménez, Rodolfo; Arechiga-Ramírez, Conrado; Gámez-Arroyo, José L; Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Guzmán-Bracho, Carmen; Vásquez, Clemente; López-Lemus, Uriel A

    2017-09-01

    Dengue virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is not well studied. Previous reports suggest a transitory inhibition of the HIV-1 viral load, as well as a benign clinical progression of dengue. The follow-up of six HIV-1-infected patients, diagnosed and hospitalized with dengue virus infection in the State of Colima, Mexico, was carried out to analyze the progression of this viral coinfection. The presence of dengue virus serotype 1 was confirmed through molecular tests. No severe complications were observed in any of the patients during dengue virus infection. Significant alteration of the HIV-1 viral loads was not observed during dengue virus infection and 6 months after coinfection. Further studies are required to understand the pathology, as well as the clinical course, of these viral coinfections.

  9. The Influence of Coinfection on Mood States in HTLV-1-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascón, Maria Rita Polo; Capitão, Claudio Garcia; Nogueira-Martins, Maria Cezira Fantini; Casseb, Jorge; Penalva Oliveira, Augusto Cesar

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to discuss the influence of coinfection on mood states (depression and anxiety) in Human T Lymphotropic virus type 1 HTLV-1-infected patients. A cross-sectional study was performed with a sample obtained through a nonprobabilistic technique. A total of 130 patients in treatment at the HTLV Ambulatory of Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas participated in the research, of whom 63 had HAM/TS and 67 were asymptomatic. A sociodemographic survey and the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories were used. The results indicated a prevalence of 7.2% for HTLV-1/HIV co-infection, 7.2% for HTLV-1/HCV, and 4.0% for HTLV-1/HIV/HCV. It is possible that the presence of a co-infection causes greater fear and concern about the future than asymptomatic HTLV-1 infection, increasing the observed degree of depression and anxiety.

  10. Epidemiology of Plasmodium and Helminth Coinfection and Possible Reasons for Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Degarege

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the impact of helminth infections on clinical malaria is useful for designing effective malaria control strategies. Plenty of epidemiological studies have been conducted to unravel the nature of interactions between Plasmodium and helminth infection. Careful broad summarization of the existing literature suggests that Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm infections may increase the risk of clinical malaria and associated morbidities, but Trichuris trichiura infection is not associated with the occurrence of clinical malaria and related outcomes. However, findings about effect of Ascaris lumbricoides and Schistosoma haematobium infection on clinical malaria are contradictory. Furthermore, the nature of relationship of helminth infection with severe malaria has also not been determined with certainty. This review summarizes the findings of epidemiological studies of Plasmodium and helminth coinfection, placing greater emphasis on the impact of the coinfection on malaria. Possible reasons for the heterogeneity of the findings on malaria and helminth coinfections are also discussed.

  11. Quality of life in men diagnosed with anogenital warts*

    OpenAIRE

    de Camargo, Caio Cavassan; D'Elia, Maria Paula Barbieri; Miot, Helio Amante

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Anogenital warts are a worldwide public health problem. They consist of epithelial proliferations caused by HPV, whose transmission occurs mainly through sexual intercourse. In this study, we evaluated their impact on the quality of life of adult males. We interviewed 88 men in an outpatient clinic for sexually transmitted diseases at a Brazilian public institution, using the DLQI-BRA questionnaire. Most patients (81%) presented mild or no impairment of quality of life. The main dime...

  12. Mapping Helminth Co-Infection and Co-Intensity: Geostatistical Prediction in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Magalhães, Ricardo J.; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Gyapong, John O.; Brooker, Simon; Zhang, Yaobi; Blair, Lynsey; Fenwick, Alan; Clements, Archie C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Morbidity due to Schistosoma haematobium and hookworm infections is marked in those with intense co-infections by these parasites. The development of a spatial predictive decision-support tool is crucial for targeting the delivery of integrated mass drug administration (MDA) to those most in need. We investigated the co-distribution of S. haematobium and hookworm infection, plus the spatial overlap of infection intensity of both parasites, in Ghana. The aim was to produce maps to assist the planning and evaluation of national parasitic disease control programs. Methodology/Principal Findings A national cross-sectional school-based parasitological survey was conducted in Ghana in 2008, using standardized sampling and parasitological methods. Bayesian geostatistical models were built, including a multinomial regression model for S. haematobium and hookworm mono- and co-infections and zero-inflated Poisson regression models for S. haematobium and hookworm infection intensity as measured by egg counts in urine and stool respectively. The resulting infection intensity maps were overlaid to determine the extent of geographical overlap of S. haematobium and hookworm infection intensity. In Ghana, prevalence of S. haematobium mono-infection was 14.4%, hookworm mono-infection was 3.2%, and S. haematobium and hookworm co-infection was 0.7%. Distance to water bodies was negatively associated with S. haematobium and hookworm co-infections, hookworm mono-infections and S. haematobium infection intensity. Land surface temperature was positively associated with hookworm mono-infections and S. haematobium infection intensity. While high-risk (prevalence >10–20%) of co-infection was predicted in an area around Lake Volta, co-intensity was predicted to be highest in foci within that area. Conclusions/Significance Our approach, based on the combination of co-infection and co-intensity maps allows the identification of communities at increased risk of severe morbidity and

  13. Immunomodulatory Therapy of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Coinfected Patients

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    Wim Adriaensen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL–human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection experience increased drug toxicity and treatment failure rates compared to VL patients, with more frequent VL relapse and death. In the era of VL elimination strategies, HIV coinfection is progressively becoming a key challenge, because HIV-coinfected patients respond poorly to conventional VL treatment and play an important role in parasite transmission. With limited chemotherapeutic options and a paucity of novel anti-parasitic drugs, new interventions that target host immunity may offer an effective alternative. In this review, we first summarize current views on how VL immunopathology is significantly affected by HIV coinfection. We then review current clinical and promising preclinical immunomodulatory interventions in the field of VL and discuss how these may operate in the context of a concurrent HIV infection. Caveats are formulated as these interventions may unpredictably impact the delicate balance between boosting of beneficial VL-specific responses and deleterious immune activation/hyperinflammation, activation of latent provirus or increased HIV-susceptibility of target cells. Evidence is lacking to prioritize a target molecule and a more detailed account of the immunological status induced by the coinfection as well as surrogate markers of cure and protection are still required. We do, however, argue that virologically suppressed VL patients with a recovered immune system, in whom effective antiretroviral therapy alone is not able to restore protective immunity, can be considered a relevant target group for an immunomodulatory intervention. Finally, we provide perspectives on the translation of novel theories on synergistic immune cell cross-talk into an effective treatment strategy for VL–HIV-coinfected patients.

  14. Hepatitis C virus coinfection independently increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Montero, J V; Barreiro, P; de Mendoza, C; Labarga, P; Soriano, V

    2016-01-01

    Patients infected with HIV are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease despite successful antiretroviral therapy. Likewise, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with extrahepatic complications, including cardiovascular disease. However the risk of cardiovascular disease has not been formally examined in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. A retrospective study was carried out to assess the influence of HCV coinfection on the risk of cardiovascular events in a large cohort of HIV-infected patients recruited since year 2004. A composite event of cardiovascular disease was used as an endpoint, including myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke or death due to any of them. A total of 1136 patients (567 HIV-monoinfected, 70 HCV-monoinfected and 499 HIV/HCV-coinfected) were analysed. Mean age was 42.7 years, 79% were males, and 46% were former injection drug users. Over a mean follow-up of 79.4 ± 21 months, 3 patients died due to cardiovascular disease, whereas 29 suffered a first episode of coronary ischaemia or stroke. HIV/HCV-coinfected patients had a greater incidence of cardiovascular disease events and/or death than HIV-monoinfected individuals (4% vs 1.2%, P = 0.004) and HCV-monoinfected persons (4% vs 1.4%, P = 0.5). After adjusting for demographics, virological parameters and classical cardiovascular disease risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes, high LDL cholesterol), both HIV/HCV coinfection (HR 2.91; CI 95%: 1.19-7.12; P = 0.02) and hypertension (HR 3.65; CI 95%: 1.34-9.94; P = 0.01) were independently associated with cardiovascular disease events and/or death in HIV-infected patients. Chronic hepatitis C and hypertension are independently associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk in HIV-infected patients. Therefore, treatment of chronic hepatitis C should be prioritized in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients regardless of any liver fibrosis staging. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mapping helminth co-infection and co-intensity: geostatistical prediction in ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J Soares Magalhães

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Morbidity due to Schistosoma haematobium and hookworm infections is marked in those with intense co-infections by these parasites. The development of a spatial predictive decision-support tool is crucial for targeting the delivery of integrated mass drug administration (MDA to those most in need. We investigated the co-distribution of S. haematobium and hookworm infection, plus the spatial overlap of infection intensity of both parasites, in Ghana. The aim was to produce maps to assist the planning and evaluation of national parasitic disease control programs.A national cross-sectional school-based parasitological survey was conducted in Ghana in 2008, using standardized sampling and parasitological methods. Bayesian geostatistical models were built, including a multinomial regression model for S. haematobium and hookworm mono- and co-infections and zero-inflated Poisson regression models for S. haematobium and hookworm infection intensity as measured by egg counts in urine and stool respectively. The resulting infection intensity maps were overlaid to determine the extent of geographical overlap of S. haematobium and hookworm infection intensity. In Ghana, prevalence of S. haematobium mono-infection was 14.4%, hookworm mono-infection was 3.2%, and S. haematobium and hookworm co-infection was 0.7%. Distance to water bodies was negatively associated with S. haematobium and hookworm co-infections, hookworm mono-infections and S. haematobium infection intensity. Land surface temperature was positively associated with hookworm mono-infections and S. haematobium infection intensity. While high-risk (prevalence >10-20% of co-infection was predicted in an area around Lake Volta, co-intensity was predicted to be highest in foci within that area.Our approach, based on the combination of co-infection and co-intensity maps allows the identification of communities at increased risk of severe morbidity and environmental contamination and provides a platform

  16. Modulation of the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during malaria/M. tuberculosis co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuanukwu, R C; Onyenekwe, C C; Martinez-Pomares, L; Flynn, R; Singh, S; Amilo, G I; Agbakoba, N R; Okoye, J O

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity and mortality on a global scale. The African region has 24% of the world's TB cases. TB overlaps with other infectious diseases such as malaria and HIV, which are also highly prevalent in the African region. TB is a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients and co-infection with HIV and TB has been described as a syndemic. In view of the overlapping epidemiology of these diseases, it is important to understand the dynamics of the immune response to TB in the context of co-infection. We investigated the cytokine response to purified protein derivative (PPD) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from TB patients co-infected with HIV or malaria and compared it to that of malaria- and HIV-free TB patients. A total of 231 subjects were recruited for this study and classified into six groups; untreated TB-positive, TB positive subjects on TB drugs, TB- and HIV-positive, TB- and malaria-positive, latent TB and apparently healthy control subjects. Our results demonstrate maintenance of interferon (IFN)-γ production in HIV and malaria co-infected TB patients in spite of lower CD4 counts in the HIV-infected cohort. Malaria co-infection caused an increase in the production of the T helper type 2 (Th2)-associated cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in PPD-stimulated cultures. These results suggest that malaria co-infection diverts immune response against M. tuberculosis towards a Th-2/anti-inflammatory response which might have important consequences for disease progression. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  17. Intrahepatic cytokine expression is downregulated during HCV/HIV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackard, Jason T; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Perret, Magali; Sodoyer, Mireille; Smeaton, Laura; St Clair, J Benjamin; Chapman, Stacey; Taylor, Lynn E; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Chung, Raymond T

    2006-02-01

    HIV co-infection is associated with reduced HCV treatment response rates and accelerated HCV-related liver disease. Cytokines play an important role in regulating hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis during chronic HCV infection, yet the roles of HIV and/or its therapies on cytokine expression are unknown. Total RNA was extracted from liver biopsies of 12 HCV mono-infected and 14 HCV/HIV co-infected persons. We used real-time PCR to quantify cytokines that contribute to innate and adaptive immune responses, including IFNalpha, IFNgamma, TNFalpha, TGFbeta(1), IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, and IL-12p40. Positive- and negative-strand HCV RNA levels were quantified using a molecular beacon approach. Detection of positive-strand HCV RNA was 100% in both groups; negative-strand HCV RNA was detected in four (33%) HCV mono-infected persons and in nine (64%) HCV/HIV co-infected persons. Median strand-specific HCV RNA levels were not significantly different between the two groups. Detection rates of cytokine mRNAs were lower for the HCV/HIV co-infected group compared to the HCV mono-infected group; the detection rates for TNFalpha, IL-8, and IL-10 were statistically significant. Overall, cytokine mRNA quantities were lower for HCV/HIV co-infected compared to HCV mono-infected persons, with the exception of TGFbeta1. These data suggest that a defect in cytokine activation may occur in HCV/HIV co-infected persons that limits efficient clearance of HCV from the liver. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Coinfections With Rhinovirus and Human Bocavirus in Hospitalized Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Cristina; García-García, María Luz; Pozo, Francisco; Paula, Gallardo; Molinero, Mar; Calderón, Ana; González-Esguevillas, Mónica; Casas, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is not clearly established if coinfections are more severe than single viral respiratory infections. The aim of the study was to study and to compare simple infections and viral coinfections of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in hospitalized children. From September 2005 to August 2013, a prospective study was conducted on children younger than 14 years of age, admitted with respiratory infection to the Pediatric Department of the Severo Ochoa Hospital, in Spain. Specimens of nasopharyngeal aspirate were taken for virological study by using polymerase chain reaction, and clinical data were recorded. Simple RSV infections were selected and compared with double infections of RSV with rhinovirus (RV) or with human bocavirus (HBoV). In this study, 2993 episodes corresponding to 2525 children were analyzed. At least 1 virus was detected in 77% (2312) of the episodes. Single infections (599 RSV, 513 RV, and 81 HBoV) were compared with 120 RSV-RV and 60 RSV-HBoV double infections. The RSV-RV coinfections had fever (63% vs 43%; P < 0.001) and hypoxia (70% vs 43%; P < 0.001) more often than RV infections. Hypoxia was similar between single or dual infections (71%). Bronchiolitis was more frequent in the RSV simple group (P < 0.001). Pediatric intensive care unit admission was more common in RSV simple or RSV-RV groups than in the RV monoinfection (P = 0.042). Hospitalization was longer for both RSV simple group and RSV-HBoV coinfection, lasting about 1 day (4.7 vs 3.8 days; P < 0.001) longer than in simple HBoV infections. There were no differences in PICU admission. RSV single group was of a younger age than the other groups. Coinfections between RSV-RV and RSV-HBoV are frequent. Overall viral coinfections do not present greater severity, but have mixed clinical features. PMID:26496310

  19. Prevalence and clinical relevance of helminth co-infections among tuberculosis patients in urban Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Mhimbira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections can negatively affect the immunologic host control, which may increase the risk of progression from latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis (TB disease and alter the clinical presentation of TB. We assessed the prevalence and determined the clinical relevance of helminth co-infection among TB patients and household contact controls in urban Tanzania.Between November 2013 and October 2015, we enrolled adult (≥18 years sputum smear-positive TB patients and household contact controls without TB during an ongoing TB cohort study in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We used Baermann, FLOTAC, Kato-Katz, point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen, and urine filtration to diagnose helminth infections. Multivariable logistic regression models with and without random effects for households were used to assess for associations between helminth infection and TB.A total of 597 TB patients and 375 household contact controls were included. The median age was 33 years and 60.2% (585/972 were men. The prevalence of any helminth infection among TB patients was 31.8% (190/597 and 25.9% (97/375 among controls. Strongyloides stercoralis was the predominant helminth species (16.6%, 161, followed by hookworm (9.0%, 87 and Schistosoma mansoni (5.7%, 55. An infection with any helminth was not associated with TB (adjusted odds ratio (aOR 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.88-1.80, p = 0.22, but S. mansoni infection was (aOR 2.15, 95% CI: 1.03-4.45, p = 0.040. Moreover, S. mansoni infection was associated with lower sputum bacterial load (aOR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.38-5.26, p = 0.004 and tended to have fewer lung cavitations (aOR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.12-1.16, p = 0.088.S. mansoni infection was an independent risk factor for active TB and altered the clinical presentation in TB patients. These findings suggest a role for schistosomiasis in modulating the pathogenesis of human TB. Treatment of helminths should be considered in clinical management of

  20. Clinical predictors of dengue fever co-infected with leptospirosis among patients admitted for dengue fever - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppiah, Jeyanthi; Chan, Shie-Yien; Ng, Min-Wern; Khaw, Yam-Sim; Ching, Siew-Mooi; Mat-Nor, Lailatul Akmar; Ahmad-Najimudin, Naematul Ain; Chee, Hui-Yee

    2017-06-28

    Dengue and leptospirosis infections are currently two major endemics in Malaysia. Owing to the overlapping clinical symptoms between both the diseases, frequent misdiagnosis and confusion of treatment occurs. As a solution, the present work initiated a pilot study to investigate the incidence related to co-infection of leptospirosis among dengue patients. This enables the identification of more parameters to predict the occurrence of co-infection. Two hundred sixty eight serum specimens collected from patients that were diagnosed for dengue fever were confirmed for dengue virus serotyping by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Clinical, laboratory and demographic data were extracted from the hospital database to identify patients with confirmed leptospirosis infection among the dengue patients. Thus, frequency of co-infection was calculated and association of the dataset with dengue-leptospirosis co-infection was statistically determined. The frequency of dengue co-infection with leptospirosis was 4.1%. Male has higher preponderance of developing the co-infection and end result of shock as clinical symptom is more likely present among co-infected cases. It is also noteworthy that, DENV 1 is the common dengue serotype among all cases identified as dengue-leptospirosis co-infection in this study. The increasing incidence of leptospirosis among dengue infected patients has posed the need to precisely identify the presence of co-infection for the betterment of treatment without mistakenly ruling out either one of them. Thus, anticipating the possible clinical symptoms and laboratory results of dengue-leptospirosis co-infection is essential.

  1. Modelling CD4 T Cell Recovery in Hepatitis C and HIV Co-infected Children Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majekodunmi, Adedeji O; Thorne, Claire; Malyuta, Ruslan; Volokha, Alla; Callard, Robin E; Klein, Nigel J; Lewis, Joanna

    2017-05-01

    The effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection on CD4 T cell recovery in treated HIV-infected children is poorly understood. To compare CD4 T cell recovery in HIV/HCV coinfected children with recovery in HIV monoinfected children. We studied 355 HIV monoinfected and 46 HIV/HCV coinfected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) during a median follow-up period of 4.2 years (interquartile range: 2.7-5.3 years). Our dataset came from the Ukraine pediatric HIV Cohort and the HIV/HCV coinfection study within the European Pregnancy and Paediatric HIV Cohort Collaboration. We fitted an asymptotic nonlinear mixed-effects model of CD4 T cell reconstitution to age-standardized CD4 counts in all 401 children and investigated factors predicting the speed and extent of recovery. We found no significant impact of HCV coinfection on either pre-ART or long-term age-adjusted CD4 counts (z scores). However, the rate of increase in CD4 z score was slower in HIV/HCV coinfected children when compared with their monoinfected counterparts (P < 0.001). Both monoinfected and coinfected children starting ART at younger ages had higher pre-ART (P < 0.001) and long-term (P < 0.001) CD4 z scores than those who started when they were older. HIV/HCV coinfected children receiving ART had slower CD4 T cell recovery than HIV monoinfected children. HIV/HCV coinfection had no impact on pre-ART or long-term CD4 z scores. Early treatment of HIV/HCV coinfected children with ART should be encouraged.

  2. Brazilian medical publications: citation patterns for Brazilian-edited and non-Brazilian literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Cunha-Melo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, the quality of a scientific article depends on the periodical in which it is published and on the number of times the article is cited in the literature. In Brazil, the criteria for the evaluation of this scientific production are improving. However, there is still some resistance, with authors arguing that Brazilian publications must be preferentially addressed to the national readers and, therefore, they should ideally be written in Portuguese. In order to determine the kind of scientific journals cited in the reference lists of articles published in medical periodicals edited in Brazil, in the present study we determine the rate of Portuguese/English citations. Three issues of 43 periodicals (19 indexed in SciELO, 10 in PubMed, 10 in LILACS, and 4 in the ISI-Thompson base of different medical specialties were analyzed, and the number of both Portuguese and English citations in the reference list of each article was recorded. The results showed that in Brazilian-edited journals the mean number of citations/article was 20.9 ± 6.9 and the percentage of citations of international non-Brazilian periodicals was 86.0 ± 11.2%. Of the latter, 94.4 ± 7.0 are indexed by ISI-Thompson. Therefore, we conclude that Brazilian medical scientists cite the international non-Brazilian periodicals more than the national journals, and most of the cited papers are indexed by ISI-Thompson.

  3. The Infectiousness of Tuberculosis Patients Coinfected with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escombe, A. Roderick; Moore, David A. J; Gilman, Robert H; Pan, William; Navincopa, Marcos; Ticona, Eduardo; Martínez, Carlos; Caviedes, Luz; Sheen, Patricia; Gonzalez, Armando; Noakes, Catherine J; Friedland, Jon S; Evans, Carlton A

    2008-01-01

    Background The current understanding of airborne tuberculosis (TB) transmission is based on classic 1950s studies in which guinea pigs were exposed to air from a tuberculosis ward. Recently we recreated this model in Lima, Perú, and in this paper we report the use of molecular fingerprinting to investigate patient infectiousness in the current era of HIV infection and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. Methods and Findings All air from a mechanically ventilated negative-pressure HIV-TB ward was exhausted over guinea pigs housed in an airborne transmission study facility on the roof. Animals had monthly tuberculin skin tests, and positive reactors were removed for autopsy and organ culture for M. tuberculosis. Temporal exposure patterns, drug susceptibility testing, and DNA fingerprinting of patient and animal TB strains defined infectious TB patients. Relative patient infectiousness was calculated using the Wells-Riley model of airborne infection. Over 505 study days there were 118 ward admissions of 97 HIV-positive pulmonary TB patients. Of 292 exposed guinea pigs, 144 had evidence of TB disease; a further 30 were tuberculin skin test positive only. There was marked variability in patient infectiousness; only 8.5% of 118 ward admissions by TB patients were shown by DNA fingerprinting to have caused 98% of the 125 characterised cases of secondary animal TB. 90% of TB transmission occurred from inadequately treated MDR TB patients. Three highly infectious MDR TB patients produced 226, 52, and 40 airborne infectious units (quanta) per hour. Conclusions A small number of inadequately treated MDR TB patients coinfected with HIV were responsible for almost all TB transmission, and some patients were highly infectious. This result highlights the importance of rapid TB drug-susceptibility testing to allow prompt initiation of effective treatment, and environmental control measures to reduce ongoing TB transmission in crowded health care settings. TB infection control must be

  4. When Men Meet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Henning

    men, mænd, masculinity, maskulinitet, gender, køn, homosexuality, homoseksualitet, modernity, modernitet, postmodernity, postmodernitet......men, mænd, masculinity, maskulinitet, gender, køn, homosexuality, homoseksualitet, modernity, modernitet, postmodernity, postmodernitet...

  5. Healthy Eating for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workout Nutrition Timing Your Pre- and Post-Workout Nutrition weights and fruits Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet For Kids For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Healthy Eating for Men Published June 23, 2014 ...

  6. Men's Reproductive Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Cancel Close Email Share Dialog × Print Men's Reproductive Health Reproductive health is an important component of men's overall health ... often, males have been overlooked in discussions of reproductive health, especially when reproductive issues such as contraception and ...

  7. Osteoporosis in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from you Breadcrumb Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis in Men Osteoporosis in Men Osteoporosis is a disease that causes ... as life expectancy continues to rise. What Causes Osteoporosis? Bone is constantly changing—that is, old bone ...

  8. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  9. Preliminary Validation of a Brazilian Version of the Sport Motivation Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Bara Filho

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sport Motivation Scale was firstly developed in French and later translated into English and validated by Pelletier et al. (1995. It is based on the principles of self-determination theory. The present study translated the English version into Portuguese to access and validate it with Brazilian athletes using a sample of 419 athletes (127 women and 292 men from ten sports. The Brazilian version of the scale showed satisfactory levels of internal consistency and temporal stability over a four-week period. The results of a confirmatory factor analysis partially supported the seven-factor structure. Finally, gender differences were found in all subscales. Taken together, these findings support the use of the Brazilian version of the scale for the assessment of motivation in sport.

  10. Eating patterns in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil): an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Letícia de Oliveira; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Melere, Cristiane; Luft, Vivian Cristine; Molina, Maria Del Carmen Bisi; Faria, Carolina Perim de; Benseñor, Isabela M; Matos, Sheila Maria Alvim; Fonseca, Maria de Jesus Mendes da; Griep, Rosane Harter; Chor, Dóra

    2016-01-01

    The food consumption of 15,071 public employees was analyzed in six Brazilian cities participating in the baseline for Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil, 2008-2010) with the aim of identifying eating patterns and their relationship to socio-demographic variables. Multiple correspondence and cluster analysis were applied. Four patterns were identified, with their respective frequencies: "traditional" (48%); "fruits and vegetables" (25%); "pastry shop" (24%); and "diet/light" (5%) The "traditional" and "pastry shop" patterns were more frequent among men, younger individuals, and those with less schooling. "Fruits and vegetables" and "diet/light" were more frequent in women, older individuals, and those with more schooling. Our findings show the inclusion of new items in the "traditional" pattern and the appearance of the "low sugar/low fat" pattern among the eating habits of Brazilian workers, and signal socio-demographic and regional differences.

  11. Eating patterns in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil: an exploratory analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia de Oliveira Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The food consumption of 15,071 public employees was analyzed in six Brazilian cities participating in the baseline for Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil, 2008-2010 with the aim of identifying eating patterns and their relationship to socio-demographic variables. Multiple correspondence and cluster analysis were applied. Four patterns were identified, with their respective frequencies: "traditional" (48%; "fruits and vegetables" (25%; "pastry shop" (24%; and "diet/light" (5% The "traditional" and "pastry shop" patterns were more frequent among men, younger individuals, and those with less schooling. "Fruits and vegetables" and "diet/light" were more frequent in women, older individuals, and those with more schooling. Our findings show the inclusion of new items in the "traditional" pattern and the appearance of the "low sugar/low fat" pattern among the eating habits of Brazilian workers, and signal socio-demographic and regional differences.

  12. Comparison of frailty among Japanese, Brazilian Japanese descendants and Brazilian community-dwelling older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Priscila Yukari Sewo; Sampaio, Ricardo Aurélio Carvalho; Yamada, Minoru; Ogita, Mihoko; Arai, Hidenori

    2015-06-01

    To investigate frailty in Japanese, Brazilian Japanese descendants and Brazilian older women. The collected data included sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, and the frailty index Kihon Checklist. We analyzed the differences between the mean scores of Kihon Checklist domains (using ancova) and the percentage of frail women (using χ(2)-test). We carried out a binary logistic regression with Kihon Checklist domains. A total of 211 participants (Japanese n = 84, Brazilian Japanese descendants n = 55, Brazilian n = 72) participated in this research. The Brazilian participants had the highest total Kihon Checklist scores (more frail), whereas the Brazilian Japanese descendants had the lowest scores (P Brazilian group had more participants with oral dysfunction (P Brazilian women were likely to be more frail than the participants in other groups. More than the environment itself, the lifestyle and sociodemographic conditions could affect the frailty of older Brazilian women. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Nutrition for Older Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Nutrition for Older Men Published February 01, 2014 Print ... Tags Health Wellness Healthy Aging For Men For Seniors Latest Content 1 2 3 4 5 Eat Right While Traveling Nutrition Info about Beverages 5 Tips to Curb Your ...

  14. Men and IC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... study of the IC urine marker antiproliferative factor (APF) in men showed differences. Men with definite IC had APF and men with CP/CPPS did not, but ... who had voiding symptoms typical of IC had APF and should have been classified as having IC. ...

  15. INNOVATION IN BRAZILIAN SMALL COMPANIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodrigues, Tonny Kerley de Alencar; Lira, Átila De Melo; Naas, Irenilza De Alencar

    2015-01-01

    .... And the data confirms that small Brazilian companies generally have difficulties to sell their innovations. Keywords: innovation, small enterprises, patents. 1. INTRODUCTION Companies worldwide are looking to technological innovation as feasible for your market expansion (BURNS; STALKER, 1961; NELSON, 1993) alternative. In Brazil, the change an...

  16. BRAZILIAN EXPORTS OF MANUFACTURED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Azevedo Calderon

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the Brazilian exports of sawnwood of non-coniferous, veneer sheets and plywood, from 1961 to 2002. The data regarding the three studied products, sawnwood of non-coniferous, veneer sheets and plywood, were joined through the method of Fisher so that an econometric evaluation of the market of the three products could be carried out. Supply and demand models of the Brazilian exports were specified. The results were satisfactory and they match with the literature. The supply of exports presented a positive answer in relation to the exporter's remuneration, to the production, to the use of the installed capacity (cycles of domestic economical activity and to the tendency, and negative in relation to the internal demand. The demand for the Brazilian exports was influenced positively by the world income, participation index and tendency, and negatively for the relative price. The low elasticity-price of the found demand can have implications in the conservation of the Brazilian forest resources because the exporters can increase the prices, reduce the amounts and still increase the incomes.

  17. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhout van Solinge, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156696207

    2015-01-01

    This essay takes a (green) criminological and multidisciplinary perspective on deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, by focusing on the crimes and damages that are associated with Amazonian deforestation. The analysis and results are partly based on longer ethnographic stays in North Brazil (Amazon

  18. TB and HIV co-infection: when to start antiretroviral therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-02

    Oct 2, 2011 ... been delayed in many co-infected patients until after the completion of TB therapy. This strategy reflected concerns about ongoing transmission of TB, as well as drug-drug interactions, high pill burden, overlapping drug .... to an IRIS event after ART initiation also varies widely (1 - 180 days) with most cases ...

  19. Factors Associated with Survival of HIV/HBV Co-infected Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients who were educated had a reduced death rate as compared to the uneducated ones. Therefore, emphasis should be on designing Information Education Communication (IEC) materials to sensitize the uneducated HIV/HBV co-infected patients on effects of non compliance and unbalanced diets. Keywords: HIV/HBV ...

  20. Hepatitis B Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus co-infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B Virus(HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus(HIV) share similar properties such as modes of transmission. This study was therefore designed to find out the prevalence of HBV/HIV co-infection in Zawan village. Three hundred subjects were recruited into the study through simple random sampling method ...

  1. Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens show circadian co-periodicity in naturally co-infected dogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ionică, A.M.; Matei, I.A.; D'Amico, G.; Bel, L.; Dumitrache, M.O.; Modrý, David; Mihalca, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, FEB 28 (2017), č. článku 116. ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : periodicity * microfilariae * co-infection * Dirofilaria immitis * Dirofilaria repens Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 3.080, year: 2016

  2. Infection-related hemolysis and susceptibility to Gram-negative bacterial co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eOrf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased susceptibility to co-infection with enteric Gram-negative bacteria, particularly non-typhoidal Salmonella, is reported in malaria and Oroya fever (Bartonella bacilliformis infection, and can lead to increased mortality. Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates a causal association with risk of bacterial co-infection, rather than just co-incidence of common risk factors. Both malaria and Oroya fever are characterised by hemolysis, and observations in humans and animal models suggest that hemolysis causes the susceptibility to bacterial co-infection. Evidence from animal models implicates hemolysis in the impairment of a variety of host defence mechanisms, including macrophage dysfunction, neutrophil dysfunction and impairment of adaptive immune responses. One mechanism supported by evidence from animal models and human data, is the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in bone marrow, which impairs the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a competent oxidative burst. As a result, dysfunctional neutrophils become a new niche for replication of intracellular bacteria. Here we critically appraise and summarize the key evidence for mechanisms which may contribute to these very specific combinations of co-infections, and propose interventions to ameliorate this risk.

  3. Incidence of Severe Hepatotoxicity Related to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Heil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hepatotoxicity is a concern in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV coinfected patients due to their underlying liver disease. This study assessed the incidence of hepatotoxicity in HIV/HCV co-infected patients in two outpatient infectious diseases clinics. Methods. HIV/HCV co-infected adults were included in this retrospective study if they were PI or NNRTI naïve at their first clinic visit and were initiated on an NNRTI- and/or PI-based antiretroviral regimen. Patients were excluded if they had active or chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV. The primary objective was to determine the overall incidence of severe hepatotoxicity. Results. Fifty-six of the 544 patients identified met inclusion criteria. The incidence of severe hepatotoxicity was 10.7% (6/56 patients. Severe hepatotoxicity occurred with efavirenz (=2, nevirapine (=1, indinavir (=1, nelfinavir (=1, and saquinavir/ritonavir (=1. Conclusion. The incidence of severe hepatotoxicity appears to be low in this retrospective analysis of HIV/HCV co-infected patients receiving a PI-and/or NNRTI-based regimen.

  4. Hepatitis B and C viruses co-infection with Human Immodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and two (102) HIV infected patients at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, were screened for markers of HBV and HCV in order to determine the prevalences of co-infection, and were compared to those in blood donors. The diagnosis of HIV infection was made on the basis of reactivity with two ...

  5. Repeatable population dynamics among vesicular stomatitis virus lineages evolved under high co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S.C.P. Williams

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Parasites and hosts can experience oscillatory cycles, where the densities of these interacting species dynamically fluctuate through time. Viruses with different replication strategies can also interact to produce cyclical dynamics. Frequent cellular co-infection can select for defective-interfering particles (DIPs: cheater viruses with shortened genomes that interfere with intracellular replication of full-length (ordinary viruses. DIPs are positively selected when rare because they out-replicate ordinary viruses during co-infection, but DIPs are negatively selected when common because ordinary viruses become unavailable for intracellular exploitation via cheating. Here we tested whether oscillatory dynamics of ordinary viruses were similar across independently evolved populations of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. Results showed identical cyclical dynamics across populations in the first 10 experimental passages, which transitioned to repeatable dampened oscillations by passage 20. Genomic analyses revealed parallel molecular substitutions across populations, particularly novel mutations that became dominant by passage 10. Our study showed that oscillatory dynamics and molecular evolution of interacting viruses were highly repeatable in VSV populations passaged under frequent co-infection. Furthermore, our data suggested that frequent co-infection with DIPs caused lowered performance of full-length viruses, by reducing their population densities by orders of magnitude compared to reproduction of ordinary viruses during strictly clonal infections.

  6. Specific serum antibody responses following a Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis co-infection in swine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokken, G.C.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838578; van Eerden, E.; Opsteegh, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31149305X; Augustijn, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836680; Graat, E.A.M.; Franssen, F.F.J.; Gorlich, K.; Buschtöns, S.; Tenter, A.M.; van der Giessen, J.W.B.; Bergwerff, A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125023553; van Knapen, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070114749

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the dynamics of parasite specific antibody development in Trichinella spiralis and Toxoplasma gondii co-infections in pigs and to compare these with antibody dynamics in T. spiralis and T. gondii single infections. In this experiment, fifty-four pigs were divided

  7. Specific serum antibody responses following a Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis co-infection in swine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokken, G.; Eerden, van E.; Opsteegh, M.; Augustijn, M.; Graat, E.A.M.; Franssen, F.; Görlich, K.; Buschtöns, S.; Tenter, A.M.; Giessen, van der J.W.B.; Bergwerff, A.A.; Knapen, van F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the dynamics of parasite specific antibody development in Trichinella spiralis and Toxoplasma gondii co-infections in pigs and to compare these with antibody dynamics in T. spiralis and T. gondii single infections. In this experiment, fiftyfour pigs were divided

  8. Co-infection of Tylosema esculentum (Marama bean) seed pods by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co-infection of Tylosema esculentum (Marama bean) seed pods by Alternaria tenuissima and a Phoma spp. ... Two fungi with different cultural conidial morphology were isolated. Single spores from the two cultures were separately inoculated on PDA to obtain a pure culture. Genomic fungal DNA was extracted from fresh ...

  9. Outcomes of TB/HIV co-infected patients presenting with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    8% mortality at 6 months among the general population of patients with TB/HIV co-infection treated at the hospital.[9]. The aim of this article is to describe patient characteristics of an SA adult HIV-infected population presenting with TB DILI, determine the factors that impact on the reintroduction of a standard or modified TBT ...

  10. Frequency of hepatitis B and C co-infection in chronic liver disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B (HBsAg) and C (HCV) virus are becoming a significant causative factors in the aetiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) worldwide. However, the information on the frequency of HBsAg and HCV virus co-infection in CLD is sparsely reported in Nigeria. In this study, we assessed the frequency of HBsAg and HCV ...

  11. Effect of Hepatitis B Virus Co-Infection on CD4 Cell Count and Liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, making it possible for an individual to have a co-infection. HBV infection is well known to be a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HBV ...

  12. Hepatitis B co-infection in HIV-infected patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B co-infection in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at the TC Newman ... Journal Home > Vol 17, No 1 (2016) > ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed ...

  13. Frequency of hepatitis B and C co-infection in chronic liver disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frequency of hepatitis B and C co-infection in chronic liver disease patients in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria. ... Journal Home > Vol 31, No 1 (2016) > ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader ...

  14. HIV and TB co-infection in South Sudan: a three year retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Objective: To determine the prevalence of HIV/TB co-infection among patients attending the HIV clinic at Juba Teaching Hospital (JTH) from 2011 to 2013. Method and Materials: This was a retrospective study using data abstracted from the registration book in the HIV clinic. A data sheet was used to collect relevant ...

  15. HIV, Hepatitis B and C viruses' coinfection among patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Hepatitis co-infection with HIV is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out among HIV positive patients and HIV negative blood donors, HIV infected patients were recruited from the antiretroviral therapy clinics of the Lagos State University Teaching ...

  16. Bacterial co-infection and early mortality among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Manila, The Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, T; Taniguchi, T; Saludar, N R D; Gustilo, L M; Kato, T; Furumoto, A; Kato, K; Saito, N; Go, W S; Tria, E S; Salva, E P; Dimaano, E M; Parry, C; Ariyoshi, K; Villarama, J B; Suzuki, M

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of bacterial co-infection and its effect on early mortality among hospitalised human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) negative pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients in Manila, the Philippines. A prospective observational study was conducted at a national infectious disease hospital. HIV-negative PTB patients aged 13 years hospitalised from November to December 2011 and from December 2012 to May 2013 were enrolled. Sputum samples were tested for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and six respiratory bacterial pathogens using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 466 patients, 228 (48.9%) were TB-PCR-positive. Overall, bacterial pathogens in purulent sputum were detected in 135 (29.0%) patients: Haemophilus influenzae was the most common bacterium (21.2%), followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (7.9%). The prevalence of bacterial co-infection did not differ between TB-PCR-positive and -negative patients. A total of 92 (19.7%) patients died within 2 weeks. Bacterial co-infection was significantly associated with an increased risk of 2-week mortality among TB-PCR-positive patients (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] 1.67, 95%CI 1.03-2.72). This association was also observed but did not reach statistical significance among TB-PCR-negative patients (aRR1.7, 95%CI 0.95-3.02). Bacterial co-infection is common and contributes to an increased risk of early mortality among HIV-negative PTB patients.

  17. Treatment outcome of Tuberculosis and HIV Co-infection at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . TB is a reemerging disease linked with HIV infections. It is necessary to compare the treatment outcome of patients with only Tuberculosis with those with HIV/AIDs co-infection. This study will also provide baseline information on treatment ...

  18. Frequency of Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in Chronic Liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Summary: Hepatitis B (HBsAg) and C (HCV) virus are becoming a significant causative factors in the aetiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) worldwide. However, the information on the frequency of HBsAg and HCV virus co-infection in CLD is sparsely reported in Nigeria. In this study, we assessed the frequency of HBsAg ...

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLES HBV/HIV co-infection: The dynamics of HBV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HBV endemic area. South Africa's HBV prevalence is estimated to be. 10%; however, this estimate comes from studies that were conducted in high-risk groups for HBV such as adult males or children during the pre-vaccination era.2. HBV co-infection with HIV is common, affecting 5 - 10% of patients infected with HIV.

  20. HIV and malaria co-infection in pregnancy in a teaching hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The high prevalence of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malaria infection in sub Saharan Africa, makes co-infection a burden in this region, as together, they are responsible for 4 million deaths annually. A study of the health implications of this interaction in our pregnant women is important. Objective: ...

  1. Semi-Analytic Solution of HIV and TB Co-Infection Model BOLARIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    https://dx.doi.org/10.4314/jasem.v21i2.7. Keywords: Tuberculosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Co-infection, Treatment and Homotopy Perturbation. Method (HPM). Tuberculosis (TB) and Human Immunodeficiency ...... Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and. Engineering. 178(3-4):257–262. Ji-Haun, H. (2000).

  2. Impact of Tuberculosis Co-Infection on the Level of PCV in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It has been documented that HIV causes anemia in HIV infected patients. One of the commonest opportunistic infection in HIV patients is TB, and this has also been documented to cause anemia. In Nigeria, several cases of HIV and TB co-infections have been diagnosed. This study was carried out to determine ...

  3. Prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Tuberculosis is one of the world's most common causes of death in the era of Human immunodeficiency virus. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection. Methods: Hospital based retrospective studies were conducted among adult ...

  4. HPV/Chlamydia trachomatis co-infection: metagenomic analysis of cervical microbiota in asymptomatic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Marisa; Filardo, Simone; Porpora, Maria Grazia; Recine, Nadia; Latino, Maria Agnese; Sessa, Rosa

    2018-01-09

    HPV and Chlamydia trachomatis are the most common causes of sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Most infections are asymptomatic and left untreated lead to severe reproductive tract sequelae such as cervical cancer and infertility. Interestingly, C. trachomatis may also increase the susceptibility to HPV infection as well as contribute to viral persistence. Recently, a growing body of evidence has suggested that the composition of the cervico-vaginal microbiota plays a key role in the susceptibility and outcome of genital infections caused by several pathogens, including HPV and C. trachomatis. The aim of our study was to undertake a metagenomic analysis of sequenced 16s rRNA gene amplicons to characterize the cervical microbiota from asymptomatic women with HPV/C. trachomatis co-infection. The composition of the cervical microbiota from HPV-positive or C. trachomatis-positive women was also analysed. The main finding of our study showed that the cervical microbiota in HPV/C. trachomatis co-infected women had a higher microbial diversity than the cervical microbiota in healthy controls (p<0.05). In addition, Aerococcus christensenii was associated with C. trachomatis infection. In conclusion, the increased cervical microbial diversity observed in HPV/C. trachomatis co-infected women and the detection of potential microbiological biomarkers of C. trachomatis infection will open the way to innovative approaches that may be helpful to identify women at risk of co-infection.

  5. Co-infection of malaria and typhoid fever in a tropical community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stool culture was used as an additional diagnostic test for typhod fever. The study indicated that ... The difference in the Pasmodium falciprum parasteamia and Salmonella antibody titre was only significant using Widal test. Diagnosis of typhoid ... Keywords: Co-infection, Plasmodium, Salmonella, Malaria, Typhoid fever ...

  6. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in North-central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B M Musa

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: TB/HIV co-infection is common in our population with substantial number of persons sfrf declining HIV screening. The cure rate for TB in this cohort is poor. Further studies are suggested to trul. address the poor treatment outcome.

  7. Favourable SVR12 rates with boceprevir or telaprevir triple therapy in HIV/HCV coinfected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, J. E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314063242; van der Meer, J. T M; Posthouwer, D.; Kortmann, W.; Brinkman, K.; van Assen, S.; Smit, C.; van der Valk, M.; van der Ende, M.; Schinkel, J.; Reiss, P.; Richter, C.; Hoepelman, A. I M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074382160

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent publications have reported superior efficacy of telaprevir- or boceprevir-based triple therapy over conventional peginterferon-alfa/ribavirin therapy, albeit with varying rates of adverse events and treatment discontinuations in HIV/ HCV coinfected patients. Therefore, the aim of

  8. Clinical correlate of tuberculosis in HIV co-infected children at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-01

    Feb 1, 2011 ... Conclusions: TB co-infection with HIV in children is common in this environment. Severe weight ... Department of Paediatrics,University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, ... because the affected children may have many other acute/ ... of the present study is to determine the prevalence, pattern, .... for Surveillance.

  9. HIV co-infection and mortality pattern of purulent meningitis: A 5 year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study utilized retrospective autopsy data to examine the relationship between HIV co-infection and mortality pattern of purulent meningitis. All autopsy log books and available hospital files were reviewed for information on purulent meningitis for which autopsies were performed in 2005 through 2009 at the Pathology ...

  10. Visceral leishmaniasis – malaria co-infections : Epidemiological, immunological and parasitological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaart, E.

    2017-01-01

    Concomitant infections by multiple pathogen species represent a serious threat to human health. Affecting over a billion people worldwide, co-infections are an important cause of human morbidity and mortality, and a powerful driver of pathogen evolution. Their clinical and pathological spectrum

  11. Genotypes of HBV and HCV among HIV-1 co-infected individuals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C viruses are the major causes of liver disease worldwide. Co-infections with HBV and HCV have turned out to be increasingly very common among people living with HIV, leading to a major public health concern. Objective: To determine HBV and HCV diversity among HIV infected ...

  12. Managemetn of HIV and tuberculosis co-infection in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managemetn of HIV and tuberculosis co-infection in South Africa. K Cohen, G Maartens. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  13. Infection and Coinfection of Human Rhinovirus C in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Canducci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In 54 adult stem cell transplant recipients, the presence and persistence of human rhinoviruses (including the novel lineage C were evaluated by molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis, independently from respiratory symptoms. In the same group of patients, the presence of other coinfecting respiratory pathogens, including the novel enterovirus 109, was also evaluated.

  14. Dimorphic Fungal Coinfection as a Cause of Chronic Diarrhea and Pancolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduar A. Bravo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis are dimorphic fungi that cause systemic mycosis mostly in tropical South America and some areas of North America. Gastrointestinal involvement is not uncommon among these fungal diseases, but coinfection has not previously been reported. We report a patient with chronic diarrhea and pancolitis caused by paracoccidioidomycosis and histoplasmosis.

  15. Risk factors of accelerated liver fibrosis in HIV-HCV coinfection: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors. Results: Using Metavir unit system, the mean (+ standard deviation [SD]) estimated fibrosis rates were 0.26 (+ 0.17) and 0.11 (+ 0.09) for HIV-HCV coinfected and HCV-only patients respectively (unmatched analysis p=0.001). The mean (+ SD) duration ...

  16. Malaria and HIV co-infection and their effect on haemoglobin levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of malaria and HIV co-infection as well as anaemia among selected patients from three health-care institutions in Lagos ... infection fuels the spread of both diseases especially in sub-Saharan Africa16. .... malnutrition, iron deficiency, vitamins A, C and B12 deficiency, foliate deficiency ...

  17. Hepatitis B co-infection in HIV-infected patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-20

    May 20, 2016 ... almost 8% confirms the need for testing of HIV-positive patients for hepatitis B. Hepatitis B co-infection in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at the. TC Newman Anti Retroviral Treatment Clinic in Paarl, Western Cape. Read online: Scan this QR code with your smart phone or mobile device.

  18. Coinfection of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces israelii in Mastoiditis Diagnosed by Next-Generation DNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Abbott, April N.; SenGupta, Dhruba J.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Butler-Wu, Susan M.; Stephens, Karen; Cookson, Brad T.; Hoffman, Noah G.

    2014-01-01

    Some bacterial infections involve potentially complex mixtures of species that can now be distinguished using next-generation DNA sequencing. We present a case of mastoiditis where Gram stain, culture, and molecular diagnosis were nondiagnostic or discrepant. Next-generation sequencing implicated coinfection of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces israelii, resolving these diagnostic discrepancies. PMID:24574281

  19. Mortality in siblings of patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a poor prognostic factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. We examined whether the increased mortality in these patients is partly explained by a familial excess risk of death. METHODS: Danish HIV-infected patients who...

  20. effect of hepatitis b virus co-infection on cd4 cell count and liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-01

    Mar 1, 2015 ... SUMMARY. Background:Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, making it possible for an individual to have a co-infection. HBV infection is well known to be a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. The aim of this study was to ...

  1. A five year review of tuberculosis and HIV co-infection at Abia State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority of the affected patients were traders and artisans. The prognosis was good for HIV patients on TB treatment who strictly adhered to their anti-TB treatment. Conclusion: The low prevalence of TB/HIV co-infection observed may be attributed to the inadequate intensified tuberculosis case finding observed from the ...

  2. Incidence of malaria/typhoid co-infection among adult population in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria and typhoid fever are two leading infections of poverty with serious health and socioeconomic impacts, and due to their geographical overlap, co-infections are very common. Their mimicking symptomatology often present with gross misdiagnosis and mistreatment. This study was carried out to ...

  3. Malaria and Hepatitis B co-infection in patients with febrile illnesses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaria and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infections are co-endemic throughout much of the tropical and sub-Saharan Africa and both present major threat to public health. A study on the prevalence of HBV and Malaria co-infection was carried out on 200 patients presenting with fever at the General Outpatient Department ...

  4. Emerging co-infection of HIV and hepatitis B virus in far western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Krishna C; Jimba, Masamine; Okumura, Junko; Wakai, Susumu

    2006-07-01

    We detected a prevalence (11%) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among male adult villagers (n = 149) in far western Nepal where migration to India is common. Although only one migrant-returnee was infected with both HBV and HIV, co-infection may occur more frequently in future as the HIV prevalence is high (8%).

  5. effect of hepatitis b virus co-infection on cd4 cell count and liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-01

    Mar 1, 2015 ... therapy-naive HIV-infected individuals. The CD4 count, Hepatitis B surface antigen, Serum albumin, total Protein, and liver enzymes were determined using standard techniques. Results:The prevalence of HIV and HBV co-infection was 37%. The mean serum ALT and ALP were significantly higher in the ...

  6. Effect of Hepatitis-B Virus Co-Infection on CD4 Cell Count and Liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The CD4 count, Hepatitis B surface antigen, Serum albumin, total Protein, and liver enzymes were determined using standard techniques. Results: The prevalence of HIV and HBV co-infection was 37%. The mean serum ALT and ALP were significantly higher in the co- infected patients (P-values <0.05). The mean CD4 ...

  7. Prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 16, No 2 (2016) > ... patients who were ambulatory at the initiation of ART, patients whose marital status was single were significant predictors for increased risk of tuberculosis in PLWHIV (P<0.05). ... Conclusion: The prevalence of TB/HIV co-infection in adults on ART in our study was moderately high.

  8. Bacterial co-infections in a captive Python bivittatus with septicemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2016-05-27

    May 27, 2016 ... *Correspondence: Tel.: +60 1116689774, E-mail: usuba5050@yahoo.com. Abstract. This case reports bacterial co-infection in a dead albino python (Python bivittatus). The snake was brought in dead to the Universiti Veterinary Hospital, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Necropsy was conducted and organ.

  9. Semi-Analytic Solution of HIV and TB Co-Infection Model | Bolarin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result of the numerical simulation shows that at high HIV and TB treatment rates; TB, AIDS and HIV/TB co-infection will be eradicated completely in the population. Also, early detection of HIV and TB cases and provision of early treatments can reduce the rate of infection, reduce the rate of progression of HIV infected ...

  10. Comparative analysis of the safety of triple therapy with telaprevir between HCV monoinfected and HIV coinfected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sangrador Pelluz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To know the possible differences in the toxicity profile of triple therapy with telaprevir between monoinfected and coinfected patients. Method: A retrospective observational study (January 2012- November 2013 of patients with HCV genotype 1, both monoinfected and coinfected with HIV, who had completed 12 weeks of treatment with telaprevir. The necessary variables were collected to characterize patients and the treatment received. The classification was made according to the toxicity criteria of the Division of AIDS v.1.0. A descriptive and comparative statistical analysis using the SPSS v.15.0 software was performed. Results: 100 patients were included, 41% coinfected with HIV. Cirrhosis rate was observed at higher coinfected patients (97.6% vs 52.5%, p <0.001. Toxicity: increased incidence in coinfected hyperbilirubinemia (51.2% vs 27.1% p = 0.012. Toxicity grades: no differences in mild-moderate toxicity were observed between the two groups, while severe hyperbilirubinemia was higher in coinfected (26.8% vs 3.4% p = 0.001. Increased use of exogenous erythropoietin (39.9% vs 12.2% p = 0.003 was observed, and dose adjustment of ribavirin (64.4% vs 26.8% p <0.001 in monoinfected patients. Conclusions: The study shows a similar toxicity profile between the two groups except for hyperbilirubinemia appears greater in coinfected patients (possibly related to the use of atazanavir and less use of exogenous erythropoietin and dose reduction of ribavirin in them.

  11. HBV and HCV Coinfection among HIV/AIDS Patients in the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bùi Vũ Huy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine prevalence and characterization of HBV and HCV coinfection among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods. This cross-sectional, retrospective study analyzed 724 HIV/AIDS patients in the HIV clinic at the National Hospital of Tropical Diseases (NHTD, from 5/2005 to 4/2011. Results. The prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection was 50.3% (364/724, of which HbsAg, HCV, and both of HbsAg, and HCV positivity were 8.4%, 35.4%, and 6.5%, respectively. The cohort (364 patients with HBV, HCV, and HIV coinfection live in the 30 provinces/cities in the North and Central area of Vietnam. We found statistically significant associations between heightened risk of coinfection with HIV and HCV in the age group 30–39 years (P<0.001, male gender (P<0.001, never married patients (P<0.001, patients with a history of injection drug use (P<0.001, and clinical stages 2–4 (P<0.001. Coinfection with HBV/HIV was statistically significant associations between heightened risk of marital status (never married (P<0.001 and those who reported transmission through sexual intercourse. Conclusion. Coinfection with viral hepatitis is common in HIV patients; further study of the impact and evolution of coinfection is necessary to find effective treatment algorithms.

  12. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Lima Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, hepatitis B virus (HBV or hepatitis C virus (HCV are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical manifestations and outcomes of leprosy. HTLV-1, HBV and HCV are associated with leprosy in some regions and institutionalization is an important risk factor for these viral coinfections. Some studies show a higher prevalence of viral coinfection in lepromatous cases. Although HBV and HCV coinfection were associated with reversal reaction in one study, there is a lack of information about the consequences of viral coinfections in leprosy. It is not known whether clinical outcomes associated with leprosy, such as development of reactions or relapses could be attributed to a specific viral coinfection. Furthermore, whether the leprosy subtype may influence the progression of the viral coinfection is unknown. All of these important and intriguing questions await prospective studies to definitively establish the actual relationship between these entities.

  13. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Johnson, Warren D; Glesby, Marshall J

    2012-12-01

    Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical manifestations and outcomes of leprosy. HTLV-1, HBV and HCV are associated with leprosy in some regions and institutionalization is an important risk factor for these viral coinfections. Some studies show a higher prevalence of viral coinfection in lepromatous cases. Although HBV and HCV coinfection were associated with reversal reaction in one study, there is a lack of information about the consequences of viral coinfections in leprosy. It is not known whether clinical outcomes associated with leprosy, such as development of reactions or relapses could be attributed to a specific viral coinfection. Furthermore, whether the leprosy subtype may influence the progression of the viral coinfection is unknown. All of these important and intriguing questions await prospective studies to definitively establish the actual relationship between these entities.

  14. The Importance of Scabies Coinfection in the Treatment Considerations for Impetigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasani, Monika; Tong, Steven Y C; Andrews, Ross M; Holt, Deborah C; Currie, Bart J; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Bowen, Asha C

    2016-04-01

    Skin infections account for a high disease burden in indigenous children living in northern Australia. Although the relationship between impetigo and scabies is recognized, the prevalence of scabies in children with impetigo is not well reported. We report the prevalence, demographics and treatment success outcomes of impetigo and scabies coinfection in indigenous children who were participants in a randomized controlled trial of impetigo treatment conducted in remote communities of the Northern Territory, Australia. Of 1715 screening episodes for impetigo, 508 children were randomized to receive intramuscular benzathine benzylpenicillin (BPG), twice daily co-trimoxazole (SXT) for 3 days (4 mg/kg trimethoprim plus 20 mg/kg sulfamethoxazole per dose) or once daily SXT for 5 days (8 mg/kg trimethoprim plus 40 mg/kg sulfamethoxazole per dose). A clinical diagnosis of scabies; tinea of the skin, scalp or nail; and head lice was made on all children. Scabies presence was not confirmed using diagnostic scrapings. In a post-hoc analysis, we determined whether coinfection with scabies had an impact on treatment success for impetigo. Of children randomized to receive treatment for impetigo, 84 of 508 (16.5%) had scabies. The presence of scabies ranged from 14.3% to 20.0% in the 3 treatment groups. Treatment success for impetigo with and without scabies coinfection, independent of the treatment groups, was 75.9% and 86.6%, respectively, absolute difference 10.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): +1% to +21%]. Treatment success for impetigo with and without scabies coinfection in the BPG group was 69.6% and 88.0%, respectively, absolute difference 18.4% (95% CI: -1% to +38%). In the pooled SXT groups, the treatment success for impetigo with and without scabies coinfection was 78.6% and 86.0%, respectively, with absolute difference 7.4% (95% CI: -4% to +18%). Treatment success in the pooled SXT group with scabies (78.6%) was higher than in the BPG group (69.6%) with scabies

  15. Hepatitis B virus and HIV co-infection among pregnant women in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagoma, Mwumvaneza; Balisanga, Helene; Malamba, Samuel S; Sebuhoro, Dieudonné; Remera, Eric; Riedel, David J; Kanters, Steve; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2017-09-11

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) affects people worldwide but the local burden especially in pregnant women and their new born babies is unknown. In Rwanda HIV-infected individuals who are also infected with HBV are supposed to be initiated on ART immediately. HBV is easily transmitted from mother to child during delivery. We sought to estimate the prevalence of chronic HBV infection among pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic (ANC) in Rwanda and to determine factors associated with HBV and HIV co-infection. This study used a cross-sectional survey, targeting pregnant women in sentinel sites. Pregnant women were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HIV infection. A series of tests were done to ensure high sensitivity. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of HBV-HIV co-infection among those collected during ANC sentinel surveillance, these included: age, marital status, education level, occupation, residence, pregnancy and syphilis infection. The prevalence of HBsAg among 13,121 pregnant women was 3.7% (95% CI: 3.4-4.0%) and was similar among different socio-demographic characteristics that were assessed. The proportion of HIV-infection among HBsAg-positive pregnant women was 4.1% [95% CI: 2.5-6.3%]. The prevalence of HBV-HIV co-infection was higher among women aged 15-24 years compared to those women aged 25-49 years [aOR = 6.9 (95% CI: 1.8-27.0)]. Women residing in urban areas seemed having HBV-HIV co-infection compared with women residing in rural areas [aOR = 4.3 (95% CI: 1.2-16.4)]. Women with more than two pregnancies were potentially having the co-infection compared to those with two or less (aOR = 6.9 (95% CI: 1.7-27.8). Women with RPR-positive test were seemed associated with HBV-HIV co-infection (aOR = 24.9 (95% CI: 5.0-122.9). Chronic HBV infection is a public health problem among pregnant women in Rwanda. Understanding that HBV-HIV co-infection may be more prominent in younger women from urban

  16. [Healthy life expectancy to Brazilian elders, 2003].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargos, Mirela Castro Santos; Rodrigues, Roberto do Nascimento; Machado, Carla Jorge

    2009-01-01

    The increase of the percentage of elderly population in Brazil and the increase in longevity incite a demand for information on the quantity of years spent in good health. The aim of the present study is to measure the life expectancy for the elderly of 60 years and above, by sex and age, in the year of 2003. The Sullivan method was used, which combined the life-table with the current experience of mortality and the self-perceived health. The mortality information was obtained from the life tables published by the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics), 2003. The self-perceived health was used and it was dichotomized in good and bad. This information came from the National Research of Household Sample (PNAD), 2003. The results indicate that women live longer, but spend a higher number of years perceiving their health as bad, as compared to men. The results also highlights to the need of considering the differences between sexes in relation to the demand for health care. It is also important to consider the need to have policies designed to allow the increase in the number of years that the elderly can live in good health conditions.

  17. Co-Infection by Chytrid Fungus and Ranaviruses in Wild and Harvested Frogs in the Tropical Andes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin W Warne

    Full Text Available While global amphibian declines are associated with the spread of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, undetected concurrent co-infection by other pathogens may be little recognized threats to amphibians. Emerging viruses in the genus Ranavirus (Rv also cause die-offs of amphibians and other ectotherms, but the extent of their distribution globally, or how co-infections with Bd impact amphibians are poorly understood. We provide the first report of Bd and Rv co-infection in South America, and the first report of Rv infections in the amphibian biodiversity hotspot of the Peruvian Andes, where Bd is associated with extinctions. Using these data, we tested the hypothesis that Bd or Rv parasites facilitate co-infection, as assessed by parasite abundance or infection intensity within individual adult frogs. Co-infection occurred in 30% of stream-dwelling frogs; 65% were infected by Bd and 40% by Rv. Among terrestrial, direct-developing Pristimantis frogs 40% were infected by Bd, 35% by Rv, and 20% co-infected. In Telmatobius frogs harvested for the live-trade 49% were co-infected, 92% were infected by Bd, and 53% by Rv. Median Bd and Rv loads were similar in both wild (Bd = 101.2 Ze, Rv = 102.3 viral copies and harvested frogs (Bd = 103.1 Ze, Rv = 102.7 viral copies. While neither parasite abundance nor infection intensity were associated with co-infection patterns in adults, these data did not include the most susceptible larval and metamorphic life stages. These findings suggest Rv distribution is global and that co-infection among these parasites may be common. These results raise conservation concerns, but greater testing is necessary to determine if parasite interactions increase amphibian vulnerability to secondary infections across differing life stages, and constitute a previously undetected threat to declining populations. Greater surveillance of parasite interactions may increase our capacity to contain and mitigate the impacts of these and

  18. Prevalence of autoantibodies against cellular antigens in patients with HIV and leprosy coinfection in the Amazon region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichara, Clea Nazaré Carneiro; Bichara, Carlos David Araújo; Tostes, Camila; Povoa, Marinete Marins; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões; Xavier, Marília Brasil

    2017-06-01

    Infectious agents can activate self-reactive T cells. In general, infections trigger various mechanisms, including a lack of auto-tolerance, induction of costimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells, and molecular simulation, in addition to cross-reactions between microbial antigens and self-antigens. HIV and leprosy coinfections lead to self-immunity with the production of autoantibodies. However, not enough data on the immune behaviour associated with this coinfection are available. Therefore, this study focused on the detection of autoantibodies against cellular antigens (AACA) in individuals with HIV and leprosy coinfection in the Amazon region. Patients were distributed into four groups according to their infections: (i) coinfection with HIV and leprosy (n = 23), (ii) infection with leprosy (n = 33), (iii) infection with HIV/AIDS (n = 25), and (iv) healthy blood donor controls (n = 100). AACA were identified by indirect immunofluorescence and the samples were tested using a commercial diagnosis kit containing the antinuclear antibody HEp-2. Morphologically, all stages of cell division were assessed in addition to the morphological features associated with the nuclear matrix, nucleolus, mitotic spindle, and cytoplasm. There was a high prevalence of AACA in the coinfection group (47.8%, n = 11) when compared with the control group of healthy blood donors (2.0%). The results showed predominantly cytoplasmic staining in all groups analysed, and no difference was observed between the presence or absence of AACA and the leprosy forms (paucibacillary and multibacillary) in the coinfection group. The results of this study show that despite the tendency of coinfected patients to have higher levels of autoantibodies, no correlation was observed between clinical and laboratorial variables and morbidity associated with HIV and leprosy coinfections or the levels of AACA in the serum of coinfected patients. These data are important to elucidate

  19. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: its impact on quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belachew Tefera

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Very little is known about the quality of life of tuberculosis (TB and HIV co-infected patients. In this study in Ethiopia, we compared the quality of life HIV positive patients with and without TB. Methods- A cross sectional study was conducted from February to April, 2009 in selected hospitals in Oromiya Regional state, Ethiopia. The study population consisted of 467 HIV patients and 124 TB/HIV co-infected patients. Data on quality of life was collected by trained nurses through face to face interviews using the short Amharic version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument for HIV clients (WHOQOL HIV. Depression was assessed using a validated version of the Kessler scale. Data was collected by trained nurses and analyzed using SPSS 15.0 statistical software. Results TB/HIV co-infected patients had a lower quality of life in all domains as compared to HIV infected patients without active TB. Depression, having a source of income and family support were strongly associated with most of the Quality of life domains. In co-infected patients, individuals who had depression were 8.8 times more likely to have poor physical health as compared to individuals who had no depression, OR = 8.8(95%CI: 3.2, 23. Self-stigma was associated with a poor quality of life in the psychological domain. Conclusion- The TB control program should design strategies to improve the quality of life of TB/HIV co-infected patients. Depression and self-stigma should be targeted for intervention to improve the quality of life of patients.

  20. Use of Daclatasvir in HCV/HIV-Coinfected Patients in a Real-Life Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Stefano; Puoti, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The burden of HIV and HCV coinfection is estimated to affect 5-7 million people worldwide, with approximately 15-30% of people with HIV coinfected with HCV. The first oral direct-acting antivirals have shown to improve the response in patients with HIV/HCV coinfection, and more recently, other direct-acting antivirals that target various stages of the HCV life cycle have been developed, among them daclatasvir. The objective of this article is to examine recent clinical studies investigating the efficacy and safety of daclatasvir in comparison with other antiretroviral drugs, focusing on its efficacy in the coinfected HIV patient and real-life data. Daclatasvir is a direct-acting antiviral first-in-class HCV NS5A replication complex inhibitor, approved in June 2014 by the European Medicines Agency for use in combination with other medicinal products for the treatment of chronic HCV infection in adults, and in July 2015 by the Food and Drug Administration. Its efficacy was demonstrated in several trials, with a mean sustained virologic response 12 weeks after therapy completion above 90%. The majority of adverse events related to treatment were mild-to-moderate in severity, with no discontinuation of therapy because of an adverse event and no clinically significant interactions with most of HIV antiretrovirals. The efficacy of daclatasvir in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients was demonstrated in many studies, and confirmed by real-life data for patients with different genotypes, patients with cirrhosis, and in association with ribavirin, opening a new frontier in the treatment of these patients.

  1. HIV-1 and GBV-C co-infection in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Anny Karely; Garzaro, Domingo José; Loureiro, Carmen Luisa; Gutiérrez, Cristina R; Ameli, Gladys; Jaspe, Rossana Celeste; Porto, Leticia; Monsalve, Francisca; Pozada, Ángela; Vázquez, Luzmary; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E; Pujol, Flor Helene; Rangel, Héctor Rafael

    2014-07-14

    Co-infection with GB virus C (GBV-C) in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) has been associated with prolonged survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GBV-C infection among HIV-1-infected patients in Venezuela, and to determine the effects of the co-infection on the levels of relevant cytokines. Plasma samples were collected from 270 HIV-1-seronegative and 255 HIV-1-seropositive individuals. GBV-C infection was determined by RT-PCR of the NS5 region and genotyped by sequence analysis of the 5´UTR region. HIV-1 strains were characterized by sequence analysis of pol, vif, env, and nef genes. Selected cytokines were evaluated by ELISA. Ninety-seven of 525 (18.5%) plasma samples tested positive for GBV-C RNA. A significantly higher prevalence of GBV-C was found among HIV-1 patients compared to HIV-1-seronegative individuals (67/255, 26% versus 30/270, 11%; p GBV-C+ and HIV-1+GBV-C- (p = 0.014), although no differences in CD4+ cell counts were found between both groups. TNFα concentration was higher in HIV-1+GBV-C- than in HIV-1+GBV-C+ patients (25.9 pg/mL versus 17.3 pg/mL; p = 0.02); RANTES expression levels were more variable in GBV-C co-infected patients and more frequently elevated in HIV-1 mono-infected patients compared to patients co-infected with GBV-C. The previously observed beneficial effect of co-infection with HIV-1 and GBV-C on disease progression is complex and might be due in part to a change in the cytokine environment. More studies are required to understand the interaction between both viruses.

  2. The unique clinical features and outcome of infectious endocarditis and vertebral osteomyelitis co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslow, Matthew; Kuperstein, Rafael; Eshed, Iris; Perelman, Marina; Maor, Elad; Sidi, Yechezkel

    2014-07-01

    The clinical significance of vertebral osteomyelitis and infectious endocarditis co-infection is unclear. This study investigates the rate, clinical features, and outcome of vertebral osteomyelitis with and without concomitant infectious endocarditis. A retrospective study of all cases of osteomyelitis with spinal imaging (n = 176), from January 2007 to April 2013, that were diagnosed as vertebral osteomyelitis. Sixty-two patients with spontaneous vertebral osteomyelitis were identified after excluding postsurgical, decubitus ulcers and spinal metastases. Seventeen (27%) were identified with concomitant infectious endocarditis. All patients presented with back pain and 59% were diagnosed with infectious endocarditis subsequent to vertebral osteomyelitis. Distinguishing features among the co-infection group include the increased use of transesophageal echocardiography (94% vs 58%, P = .004), predisposing cardiac conditions (59% vs 16%, P = .001), and Gram-positive bacteremia, of which Streptococcus sp. and Enterococcus sp. were more common (35% vs 11%, P = .026). Adverse neurologic events were increased significantly in the co-infection group (59% vs 22%, P = .006). On transesophageal echocardiography, 88% of co-infection patients had highly mobile vegetations, 9 of which measured 10 mm or more. The overall mortality was 41% and 29% in the co-infection and lone vertebral osteomyelitis groups, respectively (P = .356). One-year mortality was identical for both groups at 24% (P = .999), and higher than previously reported (11.3% for lone vertebral osteomyelitis). Patients with vertebral osteomyelitis, in whom infectious endocarditis is not excluded, are at increased risk for adverse neurologic events and mortality. The prompt diagnosis of infectious endocarditis, and associated high-risk features that may benefit from surgical intervention, require early evaluation by transesophageal echocardiography. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of chronic hepatitis C in patients co-infected with HIV: focus on safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Miriam; Pérez-Olmeda, Mayte; García-Samaniego, Javier; Soriano, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a significant public health problem and one of the most important causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. Co-infection with HCV and HIV occurs frequently, mainly because both viruses share the same transmission routes. In recent years, the life expectancy of patients with HIV disease has been increased due to the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Furthermore, several studies have established that HIV infection is associated with a major progression of the HCV-related liver disease. Thus, end-stage liver disease has become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this population, emphasising the importance of treatment of chronic hepatitis C in HIV-infected persons. The biological and histological benefit of interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) therapy in patients co-infected with HCV/HIV is not significantly different from that noted in similar patients without HIV when the HIV infection is adequately controlled. However, patients with low CD4+ cell counts tend to respond poorly to anti-HCV therapy.Given the relatively low sustained virological response rate to IFN alone, the use of IFNalpha monotherapy has been largely abandoned in favour of combination therapy with ribavirin. In the last 2 years, IFN plus ribavirin combination therapy has been the standard care for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Although information on the safety and efficacy of this dual therapy in HCV/HIV co-infected patients is scarce, recent trials have reported that the combination of IFN plus ribavirin is well tolerated and feasible in patients co-infected with HCV/HIV. However, the rates of sustained virological response seem to be worse than those observed in patients without HIV infection. New IFN formulations (e.g. pegylated interferon) plus ribavirin appear to be way of the future for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in patients both with and without HIV co-infection.

  4. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: its impact on quality of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background- Very little is known about the quality of life of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV co-infected patients. In this study in Ethiopia, we compared the quality of life HIV positive patients with and without TB. Methods- A cross sectional study was conducted from February to April, 2009 in selected hospitals in Oromiya Regional state, Ethiopia. The study population consisted of 467 HIV patients and 124 TB/HIV co-infected patients. Data on quality of life was collected by trained nurses through face to face interviews using the short Amharic version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument for HIV clients (WHOQOL HIV). Depression was assessed using a validated version of the Kessler scale. Data was collected by trained nurses and analyzed using SPSS 15.0 statistical software. Results TB/HIV co-infected patients had a lower quality of life in all domains as compared to HIV infected patients without active TB. Depression, having a source of income and family support were strongly associated with most of the Quality of life domains. In co-infected patients, individuals who had depression were 8.8 times more likely to have poor physical health as compared to individuals who had no depression, OR = 8.8(95%CI: 3.2, 23). Self-stigma was associated with a poor quality of life in the psychological domain. Conclusion- The TB control program should design strategies to improve the quality of life of TB/HIV co-infected patients. Depression and self-stigma should be targeted for intervention to improve the quality of life of patients. PMID:20040090

  5. Cirrhosis and liver transplantation in patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis B or C: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Childs, Kate; Thornton, Alicia; Bhagani, Sanjay; Demma, Shirin; Srivastava, Ankur; Leen, Clifford; Agarwal, Kosh; Rodger, Alison J; Sabin, Caroline A

    2017-04-01

    This study assessed the likelihood of referral for liver transplantation assessment in a prospective cohort of patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis B or C with complications of cirrhosis. There were 141 co-infected patients from 11 UK centres with at least one complication of cirrhosis recorded (either decompensation or hepatocellular carcinoma) out of 772 identified with cirrhosis and/or HCC. Only 23 of these 141 (16.3%) were referred for liver transplantation assessment, even though referral is recommended for co-infected patients after the first decompensation episode.

  6. Tuberculosis in indigenous children in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Gava

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assess the epidemiological aspects of tuberculosis in Brazilian indigenous children and actions to control it. METHODS: An epidemiological study was performed with 356 children from 0 to 14 years of age in Rondônia State, Amazon, Brazil, during the period 1997-2006. Cases of TB reported to the Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System were divided into indigenous and non-indigenous categories and analyzed according to sex, age group, place of residence, clinical form, diagnostic tests and treatment outcome. A descriptive analysis of cases and hypothesis test (χ² was carried out to verify if there were differences in the proportions of illness between the groups investigated. RESULTS: A total of 356 TB cases were identified (125 indigenous, 231 non-indigenous of which 51.4% of the cases were in males. In the indigenous group, 60.8% of the cases presented in children aged 0-4 years old. The incidence mean was much higher among indigenous; in 2001, 1,047.9 cases/100,000 inhabitants were reported in children aged < 5 years. Pulmonary TB was reported in more than 80% of the cases, and in both groups over 70% of the cases were cured. Cultures and histopathological exams were performed on only 10% of the patients. There were 3 cases of TB/HIV co-infection in the non-indigenous group and none in the indigenous group. The case detection rate was classified as insufficient or fair in more than 80% of the indigenous population notifications, revealing that most of the diagnoses were performed based on chest x-ray. CONCLUSIONS: The approach used in this study proved useful in demonstrating inequalities in health between indigenous and non-indigenous populations and was superior to the conventional analyses performed by the surveillance services, drawing attention to the need to improve childhood TB diagnosis among the indigenous population.

  7. Passages on Brazilian scientific cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Jane; da Silva, Cicero Inacio; Suppia, Alfredo; Stalbaum, Brett

    2017-07-01

    The article examines the conditions of production and recognition of scientific cinema in Brazil by comparing three distinct moments and contexts: the first moment takes place in the nineteenth century, and it is related to the contribution of a Brazilian astronomer otherwise little known to Brazilian film scholars, the second addresses Benedito Junqueira Duarte's voluminous mid-twentieth-century filmography, and the third moment documents recent scientific film experiences within ultra high resolution movies transmitted over photonic networks. Future trajectories for aesthetic concerns and practical issues such as the archiving of ultra high definition cinema are usefully informed by these histories of scientific cinema, even as a current generation of multidisciplinary teams including scientists, filmmakers, computer scientists, and network engineers reinvent, rediscover, and necessarily expand the scientific cinema toward concerns of real time collaboration and teaching.

  8. Brands Repositioning: Brazilian case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Serralvo, Francisco Antonio; Furrier, Márcio Tadeu

    2008-01-01

    Based on the assumption of the increasing relevance of both brand positioning and equity in the context of marketing management in competitive environments, the objective of this work was to deepen the existing knowledge on the brand repositioning process. Four theoretical models of reference obtained after literature review supported the empiric verification represented by content analysis of six reports (cases) of Brazilian brands repositioning experiences awarded with the “Top of Marketing...

  9. Brazilian Participation in World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-15

    internal rebellions and secessionist movements such as the Canudos rebellion in 1897 and 1898 in Bahia province. As a 2 result, the Brazilian Army...Brazilian Army would play an important role in ending this dictatorship. Brazil had accepted large numbers of Italian and German immigrants for more than...including the Brazilian Armed Forces. They had a significant influence on decision makers. In the 1930s, German immigrants numbered more than 900,000 and

  10. Severity of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Lower Respiratory Tract Infection With Viral Coinfection in HIV-Uninfected Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazur, Natalie I; Bont, Louis; Cohen, Adam L; Cohen, Cheryl; von Gottberg, Anne; Groome, Michelle J; Hellferscee, Orienka; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mekgoe, Omphile; Naby, Fathima; Moyes, Jocelyn; Tempia, Stefano; Treurnicht, Florette K; Venter, Marietje; Walaza, Sibongile; Wolter, Nicole; Madhi, Shabir A

    2017-01-01

    Background.: Molecular diagnostics enable sensitive detection of respiratory viruses, but their clinical significance remains unclear in pediatric lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). We aimed to determine whether viral coinfections increased life-threatening disease in a large cohort.

  11. Does hepatitis C viremia or genotype predict the risk of mortality in individuals co-infected with HIV?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The influence of HCV-RNA levels and genotype on HCV disease progression is not well studied. The prognostic value of these markers was investigated in HIV/HCV co-infected individuals from the EuroSIDA cohort....

  12. Co-infection rate of HIV, HBV and Syphilis among HCV seropositive identified blood donors in Kathmandu, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chandra Shrestha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV, HBV, Syphilis and HCV share common modes of transmission. Objective: The study was aimed to determine the co-infection rate of HIV, HBV and Syphilis among HCV seropositive identified blood donors. Methods: The study was conducted on blood samples screened as HCV seropositive at Nepal Red Cross Society, Central Blood Transfusion Service, Kathmandu, Nepal. HCV seropositive samples were further tested for HIV, HBV and Syphilis. Results: Eight co-infections were observed in 139 HCV seropositives with total co-infection rate of 5.75% (95% CI = 2.52-11.03. Conclusion: Co-infection of HIV, HBV and Syphilis with HCV is prevalent in the healthy looking blood donors of Kathmandu, Nepal.

  13. Leishmania-HIV co-infection: clinical presentation and outcomes in an urban area in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, Gláucia F; de Sousa, Marcos R; de Mendonça, Andrea Laender Pessoa; Patrocinio, Allan; Assunção, Luiza Siqueira; de Faria, Sidnei Rodrigues; Rabello, Ana

    2014-04-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an emerging condition affecting HIV-infected patients living in Latin America, particularly in Brazil. Leishmania-HIV coinfection represents a challenging diagnosis because the clinical picture of VL is similar to that of other disseminated opportunistic diseases. Additionally, coinfection is related to treatment failure, relapse and high mortality. To assess the clinical-laboratory profile and outcomes of VL-HIV-coinfected patients using a group of non HIV-infected patients diagnosed with VL during the same period as a comparator. The study was conducted at a reference center for infectious diseases in Brazil. All patients with suspected VL were evaluated in an ongoing cohort study. Confirmed cases were divided into two groups: with and without HIV coinfection. Patients were treated according to the current guidelines of the Ministry of Health of Brazil, which considers antimony as the first-choice therapy for non HIV-infected patients and recommends amphotericin B for HIV-infected patients. After treatment, all patients with CD4 counts below 350 cells/mm3 received secondary prophylaxis with amphotericin B. Between 2011 and 2013, 168 patients with suspected VL were evaluated, of whom 90 were confirmed to have VL. In total, 51% were HIV coinfected patients (46 patients). HIV-infected patients had a lower rate of fever and splenomegaly compared with immunocompetent patients. The VL relapse rate in 6 months was 37% among HIV-infected patients, despite receiving secondary prophylaxis. The overall case-fatality rate was 6.6% (4 deaths in the HIV-infected group versus 2 deaths in the non HIV-infected group). The main risk factors for a poor outcome at 6 months after the end of treatment were HIV infection, bleeding and a previous VL episode. Although VL mortality rates among HIV-infected individuals are close to those observed among immunocompetent patients treated with amphotericin B, HIV coinfection is related to a low clinical response

  14. Factors associated with HIV and HBV co-infection in Northern Thailand

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    Tawatchai Apidechkul

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify factors associated with HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV co-infection in Northern Thailand. Methods: We tested 355 newly diagnosed HIV-infected subjects for hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody by using immunochromatographic and ELISA methods. Cases were positive for one or more of the HBV markers and controls were negative for all HBV markers. All study subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire to identify the associations between variables. We used logistic regression model to evaluate the associations between demographic and behavioral variables and HIV/HBV co-infection. Results: A total of 41 cases and 83 controls were suitable to analyze in the study. Among them, 15.0% were males, 40.3% were 30–39 years old, 62.9% were married, 18.6% were illiterate and 89.5% were employed. Besides, 26 cases (23.4% had a history of a blood transfusion, 12.9% had a history of jaundice, 29.0% had a CD4 cell count ≤ 200 cells/mm3, 0.8% were intravenous drug user, 29.8% tattooed, 64.5% had a body piercing, 12.1% were commercial sex workers, 11.3% had first sexual intercourse at age ≤ 15 years old, 6.5% were homosexual, and no one had a history of HBV vaccination. After controlling for all possible confounder factors in the multiple logistic regression model, we found two factors associated with HIV/ HBV co-infection: number of years in school and CD4 cell count. Subjects with no education were more likely to have HIV/HBV co-infection, which was 7.07 times (odds ratio = 7.07, 95% confidence interval = 1.77–28.24 greater than those with 7 years of education group. Subjects with CD4 count ≤ 200 cells/mm3 were less likely to have HIV/HBV co-infection than those with a CD count ≥ 200 cells/mm3 (odds ratio = 0.35, 95% confidence interval = 0.13–0.94. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that having a good education and having a good immune status are a protective factor of HIV

  15. Prevalence and characteristics of HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfections in Tuscany

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    Monia Puglia

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Worldwide about 30% of HIV-infected patients are coinfected with HCV or HBV. The HIV/HCV coinfection is more common in individuals who have a history of drug addiction. The aims of this study were to assess the HCV and HBV prevalence in HIV-infected patients and analyze their characteristics. Methods We considered the new HIV diagnoses notified by the regional surveillance system of Tuscany from 2009 to 2013. Descriptive analyses were conducted on the socio-demographic characteristics, routes of transmission, and reason to perform the test. In coinfected patients we assessed the risk for being late presenter (LP or the risk of having AIDS. Results In 5 years of surveillance a total of 1354 new HIV diagnoses were notified: 1188 (87.7% were HIV alone, 106 (7.8% HIV/HCV, 56 (4.1% HIV/HBV, and 4 (0.33% HIV/HCV/HBV. The main risk factor was injection drug use in 52.8% of HCV/HIV cases, while in HIV/HBV patients the main risk factor was sexual exposure. HIV/HBV coinfected patients showed worse clinical and immunological features than HIV and HIV/HCV patients: 78.6% had CD4 count less than 350 mm−3 (vs. 54.6% and 62.1%, respectively and 39.4% had AIDS (vs 20.7% and 7.6%. The risk for being LP triples for HIV/HBV (OR 2.98; 95% IC: 1.56–5.70 than patients with HIV alone. Conclusions We have observed less advanced disease in HIV and HCV-HIV patients compared with HBV–HIV coinfected patients. Moreover, our results show a higher prevalence of HIV/HCV among drug addicts and in the age-group 35–59, corresponding to those born in years considered most at risk for addiction. This study also confirms the finding of a less advanced HIV disease in HIV/HCV coinfected patients.

  16. Common mental disorders in TB/HIV co-infected patients in Ethiopia

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    Abebe Gemeda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- The relationship between TB/HIV co-infection and common mental disorders (CMD has been scarcely investigated. In this study, we compared the occurrence of CMD in TB/HIV co-infected and non-co-infected HIV patients in Ethiopia. Methods- We conducted a cross sectional study in three hospitals in Ethiopia from February to April, 2009. The study population consisted of 155 TB/HIV co-infected and 465 non-co-infected HIV patients. CMD was assessed through face to face interviews by trained clinical nurses using the Kessler 10 scale. Several risk factors for CMD were assessed using a structured questionnaire. Results- TB/HIV co-infected patients had significantly (p = 0.001 greater risk of CMD (63.7% than the non-co-infected patients (46.7%. When adjusted for the effect of potential confounding variables, the odds of having CMD for TB/HIV co-infected individuals was 1.7 times the odds for non-co-infected patients [OR = 1.7, (95%CI: 1.0, 2.9]. Individuals who had no source of income [OR = 1.7, (95%CI: 1.1, 2.8], and day labourers [OR = 2.4, 95%CI: 1.2, 5.1] were more likely to have CMD as compared to individuals who had a source of income and government employees respectively. Patients who perceived stigma [OR = 2.2, 95%CI: 1.5, 3.2] and who rate their general health as "poor" [OR = 10.0, 95%CI: 2.8, 35.1] had significantly greater risk of CMD than individual who did not perceive stigma or who perceived their general health to be "good". Conclusion- TB/HIV control programs should develop guidelines to screen and treat CMD among TB/HIV co-infected patients. Screening programs should focus on individuals with no source of income, jobless people and day labourers.

  17. Leishmania-HIV co-infection: clinical presentation and outcomes in an urban area in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia F Cota

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is an emerging condition affecting HIV-infected patients living in Latin America, particularly in Brazil. Leishmania-HIV coinfection represents a challenging diagnosis because the clinical picture of VL is similar to that of other disseminated opportunistic diseases. Additionally, coinfection is related to treatment failure, relapse and high mortality. OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical-laboratory profile and outcomes of VL-HIV-coinfected patients using a group of non HIV-infected patients diagnosed with VL during the same period as a comparator. METHODS: The study was conducted at a reference center for infectious diseases in Brazil. All patients with suspected VL were evaluated in an ongoing cohort study. Confirmed cases were divided into two groups: with and without HIV coinfection. Patients were treated according to the current guidelines of the Ministry of Health of Brazil, which considers antimony as the first-choice therapy for non HIV-infected patients and recommends amphotericin B for HIV-infected patients. After treatment, all patients with CD4 counts below 350 cells/mm3 received secondary prophylaxis with amphotericin B. RESULTS: Between 2011 and 2013, 168 patients with suspected VL were evaluated, of whom 90 were confirmed to have VL. In total, 51% were HIV coinfected patients (46 patients. HIV-infected patients had a lower rate of fever and splenomegaly compared with immunocompetent patients. The VL relapse rate in 6 months was 37% among HIV-infected patients, despite receiving secondary prophylaxis. The overall case-fatality rate was 6.6% (4 deaths in the HIV-infected group versus 2 deaths in the non HIV-infected group. The main risk factors for a poor outcome at 6 months after the end of treatment were HIV infection, bleeding and a previous VL episode. CONCLUSION: Although VL mortality rates among HIV-infected individuals are close to those observed among immunocompetent patients treated with

  18. Brazilian Studies Then and Now

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    Anthony Pereira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1912 the Brazilian diplomat and scholar Manuel de Oliveira Lima gave six lectures at Stanford University that encapsulated his views of what we now call Brazilian Studies. This article summarizes Oliveira Lima’s lectures. It then points out three aspects of Oliveira Lima’s worldview that are problematic from the perspective of the twenty-first century: his Eurocentrism; the unproblematic nature of the nation-state in his thinking; and his largely negative view of Brazil’s racial heritage. The third part of the essay analyzes three aspects of Oliveira Lima’s lectures that are still contemporary. These are the need to establish an adequate comparative context for the study of Brazil; the difficulty of justifying an academic discipline that revolves around the study of a single country; and the challenge of uniting disparate and specialized disciplines in order to appreciate Brazil’s complexity and trajectory in the modern world. In the conclusion, some guidelines for maintaining Brazilian Studies as a vibrant field are suggested.

  19. Limited but increasing use of treatment for hepatitis C across Europe in patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Rockstroh, J; Soriano, V

    2006-01-01

    Uptake of hepatitis C (HCV) treatment in HIV-coinfected patients is not well described. Of 2356 HCV-seropositive patients, 180 (7.6%) started HCV treatment with interferon-based therapies. In multivariate Poisson-regression models, there was a 38% increase per year in the incidence of starting HCV...... treatment (95% CI 26 - 51%, pHIV-coinfected patients, it remains infrequent and variable...

  20. Necator americanus and helminth co-infections: further down-modulation of hookworm-specific type 1 immune responses.

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    Stefan Michael Geiger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Helminth co-infection in humans is common in tropical regions of the world where transmission of soil-transmitted helminths such as Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and the hookworms Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale as well as other helminths such as Schistosoma mansoni often occur simultaneously.We investigated whether co-infection with another helminth(s altered the human immune response to crude antigen extracts from either different stages of N. americanus infection (infective third stage or adult or different crude antigen extract preparations (adult somatic and adult excretory/secretory. Using these antigens, we compared the cellular and humoral immune responses of individuals mono-infected with hookworm (N. americanus and individuals co-infected with hookworm and other helminth infections, namely co-infection with either A. lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni, or both. Immunological variables were compared between hookworm infection group (mono- versus co-infected by bootstrap, and principal component analysis (PCA was used as a data reduction method.Contrary to several animal studies of helminth co-infection, we found that co-infected individuals had a further downmodulated Th1 cytokine response (e.g., reduced INF-γ, accompanied by a significant increase in the hookworm-specific humoral immune response (e.g. higher levels of IgE or IgG4 to crude antigen extracts compared with mono- infected individuals. Neither of these changes was associated with a reduction of hookworm infection intensity in helminth co-infected individuals. From the standpoint of hookworm vaccine development, these results are relevant; i.e., the specific immune response to hookworm vaccine antigens might be altered by infection with another helminth.

  1. Nematode-coccidia parasite co-infections in African buffalo: Epidemiology and associations with host condition and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsich, Erin E; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Jolles, Anna E

    2014-08-01

    Co-infections are common in natural populations and interactions among co-infecting parasites can significantly alter the transmission and host fitness costs of infection. Because both exposure and susceptibility vary over time, predicting the consequences of parasite interactions on host fitness and disease dynamics may require detailed information on their effects across different environmental (season) and host demographic (age, sex) conditions. This study examines five years of seasonal health and co-infection patterns in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer). We use data on two groups of gastrointestinal parasites, coccidia and nematodes, to test the hypothesis that co-infection and season interact to influence (1) parasite prevalence and intensity and (2) three proxies for host fitness: host pregnancy, host body condition, and parasite aggregation. Our results suggest that season-dependent interactions between nematodes and coccidia affect the distribution of infections. Coccidia prevalence, coccidia intensity and nematode prevalence were sensitive to factors that influence host immunity and exposure (age, sex, and season) but nematode intensity was most strongly predicted by co-infection with coccidia and its interaction with season. The influence of co-infection on host body condition and parasite aggregation occurred in season-dependent manner. Co-infected buffalo in the early wet season were in worse condition, had a less aggregated distribution of nematode parasites, and lower nematode infection intensity than buffalo infected with nematodes alone. We did not detect an effect of infection or co-infection on host pregnancy. These results suggest that demographic and seasonal variation may mediate the effects of parasites, and their interactions, on the distribution and fitness costs of infection.

  2. Nematode–coccidia parasite co-infections in African buffalo: Epidemiology and associations with host condition and pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Gorsich, Erin E.; Vanessa O. Ezenwa; Jolles, Anna E

    2014-01-01

    Co-infections are common in natural populations and interactions among co-infecting parasites can significantly alter the transmission and host fitness costs of infection. Because both exposure and susceptibility vary over time, predicting the consequences of parasite interactions on host fitness and disease dynamics may require detailed information on their effects across different environmental (season) and host demographic (age, sex) conditions. This study examines five years of seasonal h...

  3. Nematode–coccidia parasite co-infections in African buffalo: Epidemiology and associations with host condition and pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsich, Erin E.; Ezenwa, Vanessa O.; Jolles, Anna E.

    2014-01-01

    Co-infections are common in natural populations and interactions among co-infecting parasites can significantly alter the transmission and host fitness costs of infection. Because both exposure and susceptibility vary over time, predicting the consequences of parasite interactions on host fitness and disease dynamics may require detailed information on their effects across different environmental (season) and host demographic (age, sex) conditions. This study examines five years of seasonal health and co-infection patterns in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer). We use data on two groups of gastrointestinal parasites, coccidia and nematodes, to test the hypothesis that co-infection and season interact to influence (1) parasite prevalence and intensity and (2) three proxies for host fitness: host pregnancy, host body condition, and parasite aggregation. Our results suggest that season-dependent interactions between nematodes and coccidia affect the distribution of infections. Coccidia prevalence, coccidia intensity and nematode prevalence were sensitive to factors that influence host immunity and exposure (age, sex, and season) but nematode intensity was most strongly predicted by co-infection with coccidia and its interaction with season. The influence of co-infection on host body condition and parasite aggregation occurred in season-dependent manner. Co-infected buffalo in the early wet season were in worse condition, had a less aggregated distribution of nematode parasites, and lower nematode infection intensity than buffalo infected with nematodes alone. We did not detect an effect of infection or co-infection on host pregnancy. These results suggest that demographic and seasonal variation may mediate the effects of parasites, and their interactions, on the distribution and fitness costs of infection. PMID:25161911

  4. Case report: Co-infection of Rickettsia rickettsii and Streptococcus pyogenes: is fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever underdiagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczniak, Gregory A; Kato, Cecilia; Chung, Ida H; Austin, Amy; McQuiston, Jennifer H; Weis, Erica; Levy, Craig; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria S; Mitchell, Audrey; Bjork, Adam; Regan, Joanna J

    2014-12-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a tick-borne disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, is challenging to diagnose and rapidly fatal if not treated. We describe a decedent who was co-infected with group A β-hemolytic streptococcus and R. rickettsii. Fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever may be underreported because they present as difficult to diagnose co-infections. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. HIV-1 coinfection profoundly alters intrahepatic chemokine but not inflammatory cytokine profiles in HCV-infected subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sishun Hu

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of accelerated liver damage in subjects coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 remains largely unknown. Recent studies suggest that ongoing chronic liver inflammation is responsible for the liver injury in HCV-infected patients. We aimed to determine whether HIV-1 coinfection altered intrahepatic inflammatory profiles in HCV infection, thereby hastening liver damage. We used a real-time RT-PCR-based array to comparatively analyze intrahepatic inflammation gene profiles in liver biopsy specimens from HCV-infected (n = 16, HCV/HIV-1-coinfected (n = 8 and uninfected (n = 8 individuals. We then used human hepatocytes to study the molecular mechanisms underlying alternations of the inflammatory profiles. Compared with uninfected individuals, HCV infection and HCV/HIV-1 coinfection markedly altered expression of 59.5% and 50.0% of 84 inflammation-related genes tested, respectively. Among these genes affected, HCV infection up-regulated the expression of 24 genes and down-regulated the expression of 26 genes, whereas HCV/HIV-1 coinfection up-regulated the expression of 21 genes and down-regulated the expression of 21 genes. Compared with HCV infection, HCV/HIV-1 coinfection did not dramatically affect intrahepatic gene expression profiles of cytokines and their receptors, but profoundly altered expression of several chemokine genes including up-regulation of the CXCR3-associated chemokines. Human hepatocytes produced these chemokines in response to virus-related microbial translocation, viral protein stimulation, and antiviral immune responses.HIV-1 coinfection profoundly alters intrahepatic chemokine but not cytokine profiles in HCV-infected subjects. The altered chemokines may orchestrate the tissue-specific and cell-selective trafficking of immune cells and autoimmunity to accelerate liver disease in HCV/HIV-1 coinfection.

  6. Malaria and helminth co-infections in outpatients of Alaba Kulito Health Center, southern Ethiopia: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Legesse Mengistu; Animut Abebe; Degarege Abraham; Erko Berhanu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Distribution of malaria and intestinal helminths is known to overlap in developing tropical countries of the world. Co-infections with helminth and malaria parasites cause a significant and additive problem against the host. The aim of this study was to asses the prevalence of malaria/helminth co-infection and the associated problems among febrile outpatients that attended Alaba Kulito Health Center, southern Ethiopia November and December 2007. A total of 1802 acute febri...

  7. Responder Interferon ? Genotypes Are Associated With Higher Risk of Liver Fibrosis in HIV?Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Moqueet, Nasheed; Cooper, Curtis; Gill, John; Hull, Mark; Platt, Robert W.; Marina B. Klein

    2016-01-01

    Background. ?Liver fibrosis progresses faster in individuals coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Interferon ?3 (IFN-?3) has both antiviral and proinflammatory properties. Genotypes at IFNL single-nucleotide proteins (SNPs; rs12979860CC and rs8099917TT) are linked to higher HCV clearance, potentially via rs8103142. We examined the relationship between IFN-? genotypes and significant liver fibrosis in HIV-HCV coinfection. Methods. ?From the prospectiv...

  8. A prognostic model for development of significant liver fibrosis in HIV-hepatitis C co-infection

    OpenAIRE

    Moqueet, Nasheed; Kanagaratham, Cynthia; Gill, M. John; Hull, Mark; Walmsley, Sharon; Radzioch, Danuta; Saeed, Sahar; Platt, Robert W.; Marina B. Klein

    2017-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis progresses rapidly in HIV-Hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected individuals partially due to heightened inflammation. Immune markers targeting stages of fibrogenesis could aid in prognosis of fibrosis. Methods A case-cohort study was nested in the prospective Canadian Co-infection Cohort (n = 1119). HCV RNA positive individuals without fibrosis, end-stage liver disease or chronic Hepatitis B at baseline (n = 679) were eligible. A random subcohort (n = 236) was selected...

  9. Etiology and STI/HIV coinfections among patients with urethral and vaginal discharge syndromes in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlongo, Sakhile; Magooa, Precious; Müller, Etienne E; Nel, Noel; Radebe, Frans; Wasserman, Elizabeth; Lewis, David A

    2010-09-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the etiology of the male urethral discharge (MUDS) and vaginal discharge (VDS) syndromes, to determine the prevalence of other sexually transmitted infections (STI) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfections, and to examine associations between STIs and HIV serostatus among STI patients in South Africa. A total of 507 MUDS and 300 VDS patients were recruited in Cape Town (CPT) and Johannesburg (JHB). A multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay detected Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Mycoplasma genitalium infections. Bacterial vaginosis and candidiasis were detected by microscopy. Sera were screened for syphilis, HSV-2, and HIV antibodies. Etiological diagnoses were made for 92% of MUDS patients and 85% of VDS patients. Gonorrhoea accounted for 85% (CPT) and 71% (JHB) of MUDS presentations. Chlamydia was the second most frequently detected MUDS pathogen (CPT, 13%; JHB, 24%). Among VDS patients, bacterial vaginosis was the most common cause (CPT, 46%; JHB, 36%) and trichomoniasis the most frequently detected STI pathogen (CPT, 19%; JHB, 34%). Few patients (4%) had serological evidence of syphilis. The HSV-2 and HIV seroprevalence were higher in Johannesburg compared to Cape Town and among women compared to men. HIV infection was statistically significantly associated with HSV-2 seropositivity at both sites and with the presence of N. gonorrhoeae and absence of C. trachomatis in Cape Town MUDS patients. Gonorrhoea and bacterial vaginosis were confirmed as the most frequent causes of MUDS and VDS. The high HIV seroprevalence in STI patients emphasizes the need to address HIV testing among this population.

  10. HIV/AIDS knowledge among men who have sex with men: applying the item response theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Regina de Freitas Magalhães Gomes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To evaluate the level of HIV/AIDS knowledge among men who have sex with men in Brazil using the latent trait model estimated by Item Response Theory. METHODS Multicenter, cross-sectional study, carried out in ten Brazilian cities between 2008 and 2009. Adult men who have sex with men were recruited (n = 3,746 through Respondent Driven Sampling. HIV/AIDS knowledge was ascertained through ten statements by face-to-face interview and latent scores were obtained through two-parameter logistic modeling (difficulty and discrimination using Item Response Theory. Differential item functioning was used to examine each item characteristic curve by age and schooling. RESULTS Overall, the HIV/AIDS knowledge scores using Item Response Theory did not exceed 6.0 (scale 0-10, with mean and median values of 5.0 (SD = 0.9 and 5.3, respectively, with 40.7% of the sample with knowledge levels below the average. Some beliefs still exist in this population regarding the transmission of the virus by insect bites, by using public restrooms, and by sharing utensils during meals. With regard to the difficulty and discrimination parameters, eight items were located below the mean of the scale and were considered very easy, and four items presented very low discrimination parameter (< 0.34. The absence of difficult items contributed to the inaccuracy of the measurement of knowledge among those with median level and above. CONCLUSIONS Item Response Theory analysis, which focuses on the individual properties of each item, allows measures to be obtained that do not vary or depend on the questionnaire, which provides better ascertainment and accuracy of knowledge scores. Valid and reliable scales are essential for monitoring HIV/AIDS knowledge among the men who have sex with men population over time and in different geographic regions, and this psychometric model brings this advantage.

  11. Assessment of factors associated with the quality of life of patients living with HIV/HCV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marco; Fialho, Renata

    2016-10-01

    This study compared the quality of life (QoL) of HIV-infected patients with and without hepatitis C and examined the sociodemographic, HIV-related and psychological symptoms associated with the QoL domains in patients with HIV/HCV co-infection. The sample consisted of 248 HIV/HCV co-infected patients (18-74 years, 81.5 % male) and 482 patients only with HIV (24-78 years, 62.7 % male). Participants completed the WHOQOL-HIV-Bref questionnaire and the Brief Symptom Inventory. The HIV/HCV co-infected patients reported significantly lower QoL in all domains, as well as significantly lower scores in 10 of the 17 specific facets. Overall, among the co-infected patients, male gender, employment, combination antiretroviral therapy use and fewer depressive and anxiety symptoms were significantly associated with higher QoL. Symptoms of psychological distress accounted for significant variability in the QoL scores of co-infected patients. These data reinforce the need for tailored interventions to improve the overall well-being of HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses.

  13. Human β-defensin-2 production upon viral and bacterial co-infection is attenuated in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Jason W; Murphy, James C; Kooi, Cora; Wiehler, Shahina; Traves, Suzanne L; Shelfoon, Christopher; Maciejewski, Barbara; Dumonceaux, Curtis J; Lewenza, W Shawn; Proud, David; Leigh, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Viral-bacterial co-infections are associated with severe exacerbations of COPD. Epithelial antimicrobial peptides, including human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2), are integral to innate host defenses. In this study, we examined how co-infection of airway epithelial cells with rhinovirus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates HBD-2 expression, and whether these responses are attenuated by cigarette smoke and in epithelial cells obtained by bronchial brushings from smokers with normal lung function or from COPD patients. When human airway epithelial cells from normal lungs were infected with rhinovirus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or the combination, co-infection with rhinovirus and bacteria resulted in synergistic induction of HBD-2 (peffects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were mediated via interactions of flagellin with TLR5. The effects of HRV-16 depended upon viral replication but did not appear to be mediated via the intracellular RNA helicases, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I or melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5. Cigarette smoke extract significantly decreased HBD-2 production in response to co-infection. Attenuated production was also observed following co-infection of cells obtained from healthy smokers or COPD patients compared to healthy controls (pexposure to HRV-16 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces synergistic production of HBD-2 from epithelial cells and that this synergistic induction of HBD-2 is reduced in COPD patients. This may contribute to the more severe exacerbations these patients experience in response to viral-bacterial co-infections.

  14. Predictors of Mortality among Tuberculosis/HIV-Coinfected Persons in Southwest Ethiopia: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deribe, Kebede; Yami, Alemeshet; Deribew, Amare; Mesfin, Nebiyu; Colebunders, Robert; Van Geertruyden, Jean Pierre; Woldie, Mirkuzie; Maja, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the most common cause of death in people living with HIV/AIDS. The aim of the present study was to identify predictors of mortality in TB/HIV-coinfected patients. We conducted an unmatched case-control study among a cohort of TB/HIV-coinfected adults who were on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Cases comprised 69 TB/HIV-coinfected patients who died during this period. For each case, we selected 3 (207) TB/HIV-coinfected patients who were alive during the end of the follow-up period. Male sex (odds ratio [OR] = 2.04, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-4.02), being bedridden at enrollment (OR = 2.84, 95% CI: 1.17-6.89), and cough of more than 2 weeks during initiation of ART (OR = 4.75 95% CI: 2.14-10.56) were the best predictors of mortality among TB/HIV-coinfected patients. Mortality among TB/HIV-coinfected patients accounted for a considerable number of deaths among the cohort. Patients with cough at ART initiation and with poor functional status should be strictly followed to reduce death. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Sofosbuvir and Ledipasvir for 8 Weeks for the Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection in HCV-Monoinfected and HIV-HCV-Coinfected Individuals: Results From the German Hepatitis C Cohort (GECCO-01).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingiliz, Patrick; Christensen, Stefan; Kimhofer, Torben; Hueppe, Dietrich; Lutz, Thomas; Schewe, Knud; Busch, Heiner; Schmutz, Günther; Wehmeyer, Malte H; Boesecke, Christoph; Simon, Karl-Georg; Berger, Florian; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Baumgarten, Axel; Mauss, Stefan

    2016-11-15

    Shortening the duration of treatment with HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) leads to substantial cost reductions. According to the label, sofosbuvir and ledipasvir can be prescribed for 8 weeks (SL8) in noncirrhotic women or men with HCV genotype 1 and low viral loads. However, real-world data about the efficacy and safety of SL8 are largely missing. Interim results from an ongoing prospective, multicenter cohort of 9 treatment centers in Germany (GECCO). All patients started on treatment with HCV DAAs since January 2014 were included. This report describes safety and efficacy outcomes in 210 patients with HCV monoinfection and 35 with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-HCV coinfection given SL8 in a real-world setting. Of 1353 patients included into the GECCO cohort until December 2015, a total of 1287 had complete data sets for this analysis; 337 (26.2%) fulfilled the criteria for SL8 according to the package insert, but only 193 (57.2%) were eventually treated for 8 weeks. Another 52 patients did not fulfill the criteria but were treated for 8 weeks. SL8 was generally well tolerated. The overall sustained virologic response rate 12 weeks after the end of treatment was 93.5% (186 of 199). The on-treatment response rate was 99.4% (159 of 160) in HCV-monoinfected and 96.4% (27 of 28) in HIV-HCV-coinfected patients. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. SL8 seems highly effective and safe in well-selected HCV-monoinfected and HIV-HCV-coinfected patients in a real-world setting. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Morbidity due to Schistosoma mansoni--Entamoeba histolytica coinfection in hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolabella, Silvio Santana; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech; Borçari, Izabela Torquetti; Mello, Nelson Azevedo Santos Teixeira; Andrade, Zilton de Araújo; Silva, Edward Felix

    2007-01-01

    Data on Schistosoma mansoni-Entamoeba histolytica coinfection are scarce in the literature. In the present study, hamsters that had been infected for 70 days with Schistosoma mansoni (LE strain) were inoculated via the portal vein with two strains of trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica: ICB-EGG (highly virulent) and ICB-RPS (non-virulent). The most evident result of coinfection was increased morbidity and mortality, in comparison with either of the infections alone. Histologically, there were no evident signs of interaction between these two infections. The morphological findings of schistosomal granuloma and amoebic abscesses in the liver were similar to those seen in the respective single-infection controls. However, there was severe wasting of the animals with both infections and greater numbers of amoebic lesions in their livers. The results obtained indicated that schistosomiasis aggravates the course of amoebiasis in hamsters.

  17. Immunophenotyping of circulating T cells in a mucosal leishmaniasis patient coinfected with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Roberto Castellano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available HIV coinfection modifies the clinical course of leishmaniasis by promoting a Th2 pattern of cytokine production. However, little information is available regarding the lymphocytic response in untreated coinfected patients. This work presents the immunophenotyping of Leishmania-stimulated T cells from a treatment-naÏve HIV+ patient with ML. Leishmania braziliensis antigens induced CD69 expression on CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ cells. It also increased IL-4 intracellular staining on CD3+CD4+GATA3- population and decreased the percentage of CD3+CD4+IL-17+ cells. This suggests that modulations in the IL-4R/STAT6 pathway and the Th17 population may serve as parasitic evasion mechanisms in HIV/ML. Further studies are required to confirm these results.

  18. Virus-helminth co-infection reveals a microbiota-independent mechanism of immuno-modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lisa C.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Nice, Timothy J.; Sutherland, Tara E.; Siracusa, Mark C.; Hepworth, Matthew R.; Tomov, Vesselin T.; Kobuley, Dmytro; Tran, Sara V.; Bittinger, Kyle; Bailey, Aubrey G.; Laughlin, Alice L.; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Wherry, E. John; Bushman, Frederic D.; Allen, Judith E.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Artis, David

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian intestine is colonized by beneficial commensal bacteria and is a site of infection by pathogens, including helminth parasites. Helminths induce potent immuno-modulatory effects, but whether these effects are mediated by direct regulation of host immunity or indirectly through eliciting changes in the microbiota is unknown. We tested this in the context of virus-helminth co-infection. Helminth co-infection resulted in impaired antiviral immunity and was associated with changes in the microbiota and STAT6-dependent helminth-induced alternative activation of macrophages. Notably, helminth-induced impairment of antiviral immunity was evident in germ-free mice but neutralization of Ym1, a chitinase-like molecule that is associated with alternatively-activated macrophages, could partially restore antiviral immunity. These data indicate that helminth-induced immuno-modulation occurs independently of changes in the microbiota but is dependent on Ym1. PMID:25082704

  19. [Coinfection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae in a middle-aged adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Toshio; Takigawa, Nagio; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Ichihara, Eiki; Tabata, Masahiro; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Kanehiro, Arihiko; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2007-10-01

    A 47-year-old man who suffered from fever and dry cough visited a local clinic. His symptoms temporarily improved with oral administration of ciprofloxacin, however, he was admitted to our hospital because of exacerbation. IgM antibody for Mycoplasma pneumoniae was positive and IgM antibody titer for Chlamydophila pneumoniae showed a high value of 7.12 index. Thus, coinfection was diagnosed. The findings of chest X-ray and computed tomography were compatible with atypical pneumonia. Clarithromycin improved his condition, and 10 weeks later, antibody values for Mycoplasma pneumoniae by the particle agglutination test decreased from 10,240 times to 640 times and those by the complement-fixation test also decreased from 1024 times to 256 times. The IgM antibody for Chlamydophila pnetumoniae decreased to 0.13. This is the first case developing coinfection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae in a middle-aged patient to date.

  20. First case of visceral Leishmaniosis/HIV coinfection in Niš - southeastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniosis (VL has emerged as an important opportunistic parasitosis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. The aim of this paper is to report the first case of Leishmania/HIV coinfection in a patient from Niš (Southeastern Serbia. Microscopical examination of Giemsa-stained bone marrow (BM smears show the presence of Leishmania spp. amastigotes based on their morphological characteristics. In spite of the parasitological finding, the serological test applied gave negative results. Molecular analyses confirmed the infection and allowed us to identify the leishmania species as Leishmania infantum (100% identity. VL/HIV coinfection has important clinical, diagnostic and epidemiological implications. In fact, the failure of serological tests is expected in this condition, and the application of molecular diagnostics to the blood may offer, apart from an easy and non-invasive diagnostic opportunity, the possibility of warning about the risk of possible nosocomial infections. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41018 and br. 175034

  1. The distribution of tuberculosis in Porto Alegre: analysis of the magnitude and tuberculosis-HIV coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rarianne Carvalho Peruhype

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective Analyzing the geographical distribution of the tuberculosis (TB, its incidence and prevalence and TB-HIV coinfection in the districts of Porto Alegre from 2007 to 2011. Method An ecological, descriptive study of time series that used descriptive and geoprocessing techniques. Results In total, were recorded 3,369 incident cases and 3,998 prevalent cases of pulmonary TB. In both contexts, there was predominance of cases in males and in Caucasians. Seventeen districts showed prevalence rates above 79.2 cases/100,000 inhabitants, considering that 15 of them had incidence rates above 73.7 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The TB-HIV coinfection rates reached 67% in some districts, which is above the city average value (30%. Conclusion The distribution analysis showed that the reformulation and restructuring of policies and health services in Porto Alegre are essential.

  2. Mortality in siblings of patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    had had at least 1 HCV test were included (n=3531). In addition, 336,652 population control subjects matched for sex, age, and residency were identified from the Danish Civil Registration System. For both HIV-infected patients and population control subjects, we identified all siblings born after 1951......, with dates of death or emigration. Siblings of HIV-infected patients were classified according to the patients' HCV serostatus. Survival after age 20 years was compared among the groups of siblings. RESULTS: We identified 437 siblings of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, 1856 siblings of HIV-monoinfected patients......, and 285,509 siblings of population control subjects. Mortality was substantially higher in siblings of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients than in either siblings of HIV-monoinfected patients (mortality rate ratio [MRR], 2.97 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.98-4.45]) or siblings of control subjects (MRR, 4...

  3. Coinfection of Chlamydiae and other Bacteria in Reactive Arthritis and Spondyloarthritis: Need for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Zeidler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive (inflammatory arthritis has been known for many years to follow genital infection with the intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis in some individuals. Recent studies from several groups have demonstrated that a related bacterium, the respiratory pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae, can elicit a similar arthritis. Studies of these organisms, and of a set of gastrointestinal pathogens also associated with engendering inflammatory arthritis, have been relatively extensive. However, reports focusing on coinfections with these and/or other organisms, and the effects of such coinfections on the host immune and other systems, have been rare. In this article, we review the extant data regarding infections by multiple pathogens in the joint as they relate to engendering arthritis, and we suggest a number of research areas that must be given a high priority if we are to understand, and therefore to treat in an effective manner, such arthritides.

  4. Toxoplasma gondii coinfection with diseases and parasites in wild rabbits in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Sam; Dubey, J P; Smith, Judith E; Boag, Brian

    2015-09-01

    In wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) on an estate in Perthshire, central Scotland, the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii was 18/548 (3·3%). The wild rabbit could be a T. gondii reservoir and it has potential value as a sentinel of T. gondii in environmental substrates. Toxoplasma gondii was associated with female sex (P myxomatosis caused by the virus Myxomatosis cuniculi, the intensity of roundworm eggs, the year or season, rabbit age or distance from farm buildings. Coinfections could have been affected by gestational down regulation of type 1 T helper cells. A sudden influx or release of T. gondii oocysts might have occurred. This is the first report of T. gondii in any wild herbivore in Scotland and also the first report of lapine T. gondii as a coinfection with E. stiedae, M. cuniculi and helminths.

  5. Review of cytomegalovirus coinfection in HIV-infected individuals in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Helene Ladefoged; Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection among HIV‐infected individuals may cause end‐organ disease, which is an AIDS‐defining condition. Evidence from high‐income countries suggests that CMV may alter the outcome of HIV infection, other than causing end‐organ diseases. We reviewed literature...... on HIV and CMV coinfection in Africa. Methods: Systematic review of published studies on HIV and CMV coinfection in Africa using the PubMed database. Results: High CMV seroprevalence was found throughout Africa, exceeding 90% in most populations. Retinitis, pneumonia, and colitis were the most commonly...... was found to be associated with increased transmission and progression of HIV infection. Moreover, detectable CMV DNA was an independent predictor of HIV transmission and mortality among HIV‐infected individuals. Conclusions: Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent in Africa and a common cause of disease...

  6. Nursing consultation tool for people with human immunodeficiency virus/tuberculosis co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandra Rodrigues Feijão

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to verify the opinion of judges about a nursing consultation tool for people with co-infection by the human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis. Methods: methodological study, involving the construction of a tool based on Orem’s self-care theory and its submission for evaluation by judges experts in the area, which gave opinions about organization, clarity and relevance. Results: the instrument gained a positive evaluation for all assessment criteria, with agreement greater than 75% and Content Validity Index greater than 0.80 in most items. Following judges opinion, three items were excluded and two modified. Conclusion: the adequacy of the nursing consultation tool for people with HIV/tuberculosis co-infection was confirmed regarding organization into subdivisions and items. Minimal disagreement among judges in the analysis of the issues was noted. Although most items were evaluated positively, further validation studies will be needed.

  7. Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV co-infection in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hernández

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a complex zoonotic pathology caused by the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma cruzi. This parasite presents remarkable genetic variability and has been grouped into six discrete typing units (DTUs. The association between the DTUs and clinical outcome remains unknown. Chagas disease and co-infection with HIV/AIDS has been reported widely in Brazil and Argentina. Herein, we present the molecular analyses from a Chagas disease patient with HIV/AIDS co-infection in Colombia who presented severe cardiomyopathy, pleural effusion, and central nervous system involvement. A mixed infection by T. cruzi genotypes was detected. We suggest including T. cruzi in the list of opportunistic pathogens for the management of HIV patients in Colombia. The epidemiological implications of this finding are discussed.

  8. HIV/tuberculosis co-infection: a request for a better surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Mônica M.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing endemicity of tuberculosis resulting from causes such as immigration, poverty, a declining public health infrastructure and co-infection by HIV/Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is leading to a change in tuberculosis control programmes. One of the main reasons for the resurgence of tuberculosis is HIV infection - the risk of tuberculosis is greater in HIV patients than in the majority of the population as can be seen from numerous research projects. The need for systematic testing for HIV infection in all tuberculosis patients by undertaking confidential HIV tests on admission to a tuberculosis programme is brought out. This measure would increase the number of cases diagnosed and provide data for better surveillance of the co-infection.

  9. RSV Infection in Human Macrophages Promotes CXCL10/IP-10 Expression during Bacterial Co-Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Machado

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, a major etiologic agent of acute lower respiratory infection constitutes the most important cause of death in young children worldwide. Viral/bacterial mixed infections are related to severity of respiratory inflammatory diseases, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have previously investigated the intracellular mechanisms that mediate the immune response in the context of influenza virus/Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp co-infection using a model of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs. Here, we set up and characterized a similar model of MDMs to investigate different scenarios of RSV infection and co-infection with Sp. Our results suggest that Sp contributes to a faster and possibly higher level of CXCL10/IP-10 expression induced by RSV infection in human MDMs.

  10. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  11. Men in Feminised Workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, Kenn

    masculine than other men? Or do they rather represent a new, more tolerant and less stereotypical male gender role? If less restricted by stereotypes, are men then eager to challenge traditional dichotomised perceptions of man/masculinity and woman/femininity? By means of analyses of interviews with more...

  12. HPV and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... did not get vaccinated when they were younger Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men through age 26 years, if they ... outside of your relationship. It is important that sex partners discuss their sexual health and risk for all STIs, ... and Bisexual Men’s Health STD information and referrals ...

  13. A Few Good Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Kathleen

    1999-01-01

    Male elementary school teachers are in the minority in their schools and in their profession. Men who want to teach young children face sexism. The shortage of male public school teachers troubles child advocates. Two Florida programs recruit African-American men to teach in special education classes. (MLF)

  14. Liver fibrosis progression in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfected patients with normal aminotransferases levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Heleno de Lima Pace

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Approximately 30% of hepatitis C virus (HCV monoinfected patients present persistently normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels. Most of these patients have a slow progression of liver fibrosis. Studies have demonstrated the rate of liver fibrosis progression in hepatitis C virus-human immunodeficiency virus (HCV-HIV coinfected patients is faster than in patients infected only by HCV. Few studies have evaluated the histological features of chronic hepatitis C in HIV-infected patients with normal ALT levels. METHODS: HCV-HIV coinfected patients (HCV-RNA and anti-HIV positive with known time of HCV infection (intravenous drugs users were selected. Patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg positive or hepatitis C treatment before liver biopsy were excluded. Patients were considered to have a normal ALT levels if they had at least 3 normal determinations in the previous 6 months prior to liver biopsy. All patients were submitted to liver biopsy and METAVIR scale was used. RESULTS: Of 50 studied patients 40 (80% were males. All patients were treated with antiretroviral therapy. The ALT levels were normal in 13 (26% patients. HCV-HIV co-infected patients with normal ALT levels had presented means of the liver fibrosis stages (0.77±0.44 versus 1.86±1.38; p<0.001 periportal inflammatory activity (0.62±0.77 versus 2.24±1.35; p<0.001 and liver fibrosis progression rate (0.058±0.043 fibrosis unit/year versus 0.118±0.102 fibrosis unit/year significantly lower as compared to those with elevated ALT. CONCLUSIONS: HCV-HIV coinfected patients with persistently normal ALTs showed slower progression of liver fibrosis. In these patients the development of liver cirrhosis is improbable.

  15. Co-infections a threat in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co-infections a threat in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from topical wounds of both HIV positive and HIV negative patients. ... One hundred and four (59.4%) were S. aureus, 28(16.0%) Proteus spp, 25(14.3%) E. coli and 18(10.3) Pseudomonas spp. 59(49.2%) wounds had one bacteria, 58(48.3%) had ...

  16. Malaria and HIV co-infection and their effect on haemoglobin levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Our data showed that the total number of malaria infected patients were significantly higher in HIV sero-positive patients 47.7% (31/65) when compared with their HIV sero-negative counterparts 25.8% (262/1015) P = 0.047. The result also revealed that 25.8% (8/31) of the patients co-infected with malaria and HIV ...

  17. Review of cytomegalovirus coinfection in HIV-infected individuals in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønborg, Helene Ladefoged; Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Wejse, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection among HIV-infected individuals may cause end-organ disease, which is an AIDS-defining condition. Evidence from high-income countries suggests that CMV may alter the outcome of HIV infection, other than causing end-organ diseases. We reviewed literature on HIV and CMV coinfection in Africa. Systematic review of published studies on HIV and CMV coinfection in Africa using the PubMed database. High CMV seroprevalence was found throughout Africa, exceeding 90% in most populations. Retinitis, pneumonia, and colitis were the most commonly reported CMV manifestations in HIV-infected individuals. Among patients with pulmonary symptoms, the prevalence of CMV pneumonitis varied from 20% to over 60%, whereas CMV was found in 0% to 14% of patients with gastrointestinal manifestations. Cytomegalovirus retinitis was found in 0% to 2.6% of examined HIV-infected individuals. The diagnostics of CMV end-organ diseases were found complex and difficult to interpret in African settings. Cytomegalovirus viremia was correlated with significantly lower CD4 cell count and increase in activated and apoptosis vulnerable T-lymphocytes. Also, CMV coinfection was found to be associated with increased transmission and progression of HIV infection. Moreover, detectable CMV DNA was an independent predictor of HIV transmission and mortality among HIV-infected individuals. Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent in Africa and a common cause of disease manifestations in HIV-infected individuals among all age groups. Cytomegalovirus coinfection in HIV-infected individuals in Africa is associated with increased transmission and mortality of HIV, but it is a neglected area of research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Behavioral changes in Rattus norvegicus coinfected by Toxocara canis and Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisa Leite de Queiroz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Using an elevated plus maze apparatus and an activity cage, behavioral changes in Rattus norvegicus concomitantly infected by Toxocara canis and Toxoplasma gondii were studied, during a period of 120 days. Rats infected by Toxocara canis or Toxoplasma gondii showed significant behavioral changes; however, in the group coinfected by both parasites a behavioral pattern similar to that found in the group not infected was observed thirty days after infection, suggesting the occurrence of modulation in the behavioral response.

  19. Barriers and outcomes: TB patients co-infected with HIV accessing antiretroviral therapy in rural Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chileshe, Muatale; Bond, Virginia Anne

    2010-01-01

    The vulnerabilities that underlie barriers faced by the rural poor whilst trying to access and adhere to "free" antiretroviral treatment (ART) demand more attention. This paper highlights barriers that poor rural Zambians co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) and HIV and their households faced in accessing ART between September 2006 and July 2007, and accounts for patient outcomes by the end of TB treatment and (more sporadically) beyond October 2009. The analysis draws on findings from wider anthropological fieldwork on the converging impact of TB, HIV and food insecurity, focusing for the purpose of this paper on ethnographic case-studies of seven newly diagnosed TB patients co-infected with HIV and their six households (one household had two TB patients). Economic barriers included being pushed into deeper poverty by managing TB, rural location, absence of any external assistance, and mustering time and extended funds for transport and "special food" during and beyond the end of TB. In the case of death, funeral costs were astronomical. Social barriers included translocation, broken marriages, a sub-ordinate household position, gender relations, denial, TB/HIV stigma and the difficulty of disclosure. Health facility barriers involved understaffing, many steps, lengthy procedures and inefficiencies (lost blood samples, electricity cuts). By the end of TB treatment, outcomes were mixed; two co-infected patients had died, three had started ART and two had yet to start ART. The three on ART underwent a striking transformation in the short term. By October 2009, two more had died and three were doing well. The study advocates nutritional support and other material support (especially transport funds) for co-infected TB patients until ART is accessed and livelihood regained. More prompt diagnosis of TB and reducing steps and increasing the reach of the ART programme in rural areas are also recommended.

  20. Visceral Leishmaniasis/HIV co-infection in northeast Brazil: evaluation of outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Távora,Lara Gurgel Fernandes; Nogueira, Marina Bizerril; Gomes, Sofia Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since the beginning of the HIV burden, Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL)/HIV co-infection has been diagnosed not only in areas where VL is endemic (Latin America, India, Asia, Southern Europe), but also in North America, were it is considered an opportunistic disease. Clinical presentation, diagnostic tests sensitivity and treatment response in this population differs from VL alone. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate factors related to an unfavorable outcome in patients with VL/HIV diagnosis in a r...

  1. Soluble Adhesion Molecules in Patients Coinfected with HIV and HCV: A Predictor of Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Aldámiz-Echevarría

    Full Text Available Higher serum levels of adhesion molecules (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 are associated with advanced liver fibrosis in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus. We assessed the relationship between serum levels of adhesion molecules and liver-related events (LRE or death, in coinfected patients.We studied clinical characteristics and outcomes of 182 coinfected patients with a baseline liver biopsy (58 with advanced fibrosis and simultaneous plasma samples who were followed for median of 9 years. We used receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curves to calculate optimized cutoff values (OCV of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1, defined as the values with the highest combination of sensitivity and specificity for LRE. We used multivariate regression analysis to test the association between OCVs of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 and outcomes. The variables for adjustment were age, HIV transmission category, liver fibrosis, baseline CD4+ T-cell counts, antiretroviral therapy, and sustained virologic response (SVR.During the study period 51 patients had SVR, 19 had LRE, and 16 died. The OCVs for LRE were 5.68 Log pg/mL for sICAM-1 and 6.25 Log pg/mL for sVCAM-1, respectively. The adjusted subhazard ratio (aSHR (95% confidence interval [CI] of death or LRE, whichever occurred first, for sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 > OCV were 3.98 ([1.14; 13.89], P = 0.030 and 2.81 ([1.10; 7.19], respectively (P = 0.030.Serum levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 can serve as markers of outcome in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Therapies targeting necroinflammatory damage and fibrogenesis may have a role in the management chronic hepatitis C.

  2. Microbial translocation is correlated with HIV evolution in HIV-HCV co-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Tudesq

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT is characterized by bacterial products passing into the blood through the gut barrier and is a key phenomenon in the pathophysiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection. MT is also associated with liver damage in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV patients. The aim of the study was to assess MT in plasma of HIV-HCV co-infected patients. 16S rDNA (16 S Ribosomal DNA subunit marker and other markers of MT such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-binding protein (LBP, soluble CD14 (sCD14, intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP were used. Clinical, biological and immunological characteristics of the population were studied in order to correlate them with the intensity of the MT. We demonstrate that indirect markers of MT, LBP and CD14s, and a marker of intestinal permeability (I-FABP are significantly higher in HIV-HCV co-infected patients than in healthy controls (17.0 vs 2.6 μg/mL, p < 0.001; 1901.7 vs 1255.0 ng/mL, p = 0.018; 478.3 vs 248.1 pg/mL, p < 0.001, respectively, while a direct marker of MT (16S rDNA copies is not different between these two populations. However, plasma 16S rDNA was significantly higher in co-infected patients with long-standing HIV infections (RGM = 1.47 per 10 years, CI95% = [1.04:2.06], p = 0.03. Our findings show that in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, plasma 16S rDNA levels, directly reflecting MT, seem to be linked to the duration of HIV infection, while elevated levels of LBP and sCD14 reflect only a persistence of immune activation. The levels of these markers were not correlated with HCV evolution.

  3. prevalence and immune status of hiv/hbv co-infected pregnant women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    MICROBIOL. 14(3): 120-126 http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ajcem.v14i3.1. PREVALENCE AND IMMUNE STATUS OF HIV/HBV CO-INFECTED. PREGNANT WOMEN. Lar, 1P. M.,, Pam, 1V. K., Christopher, 1P. B., 2 Gwamzhi, L. & Mawak, 1 J. D.. 1Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Jos, Nigeria.

  4. effect of hepatitis-b virus co-infection on cd4 cell count and liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... 1). Effect of Hepatitis B virus co-infection on CD4 cell count and liver function of HIV infected patients. The mean CD4 count of all the patients was 212. ±188/µl. The mean serum levels for ALT, AST, ALP, total protein and albumin for the study population were. 17±23IU/L, 25± 24IU/L, 56± 64IU/L, 75±9g/l and.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum malaria co-infection with tick-borne relapsing fever in Dakar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Mamadou A; Kane, Baidy S; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou; Dieng, Mouhamed; Diongue, Khadim; Badiane, Aida S; Seck, Mame Cheikh; Ndiaye, Daouda

    2017-01-11

    West African tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) due to Borrelia crocidurae and malaria are co-endemics in Senegal. Although expected to be high, co-infections are rarely reported. A case of falciparum malaria and B. crocidurae co-infection in a patient from Velingara (South of Senegal) is discussed. A 28 year-old-male patient presented to Aristide Le Dantec Hospital for recurrent fever. He initially presented to a local post health of Pikine (sub-urban of Dakar) and was diagnosed for malaria on the basis of positive malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) specific to Plamodium falciparum. The patient was treated as uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Four days after admission the patient was referred to Le Dantec Hospital. He presented with fever (39 °C), soreness, headache and vomiting. The blood pressure was 120/80 mmHg. The rest of the examination was normal. A thick film from peripheral blood was performed and addressed to the parasitology laboratory of the hospital. Thick film was stained with 10% Giemsa. Trophozoite of P. falciparum was identified at parasite density of 47 parasites per microlitre. The presence of Borrelia was also observed, concluding to malaria co-infection with borreliosis. Signs of malaria can overlap with signs of borreliosis leading to the misdiagnosis of the latter. Thick and thin smear or QBC test or molecular method may be helpful to detect both Plamodium species and Borrelia. In addition, there is a real need to consider co-infections with other endemics pathogens when diagnosing malaria.

  6. Plasmodium/intestinal helminth co-infections among pregnant Nigerian women

    OpenAIRE

    AO, Egwunyenga; JA Ajayi; OPG Nmorsi; DD Duhlinska-Popova

    2001-01-01

    Hospital based studies were conducted to investigate the occurrence of Plasmodium/intestinal helminth co-infections among pregnant Nigerian women, and their effects on birthweights, anaemia and spleen size. From 2,104 near-term pregnant women examined, 816 (38.8%) were found to be infected with malaria parasites. Among the 816 parasitaemic subjects, 394 (48.3%) were also infected with intestinal helminths, 102 (12.5%) having mixed helminth infections. The prevalence of the helminth species fo...

  7. Mens mobile health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levisen, Vinie Diana Hvidbak; Castaño, Francisco Mansilla; Jensen, Camilla Skovbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Preferences Keywords: Men with little or no education, physical health, mobile health application. Types of presentations: First presentation preference: E-Poster presentations Second presentation preference: Pitch presentation Abstract Background: Men mobile health contributes knowledge of how mobile health...... applications affect the physical activity levels by men with little or no education and the frequency of how often they think and do something to promote their health. Men with little or no education have both the lowest life expectancy and longest patient delay, and there are not conducted researches...... and control group. N = 71, 20-62 years old men, little or no education, employed at industrial company. Intervention group N= 35, control group N = 36. There is performed a baseline, an 6 months intervention period, outcome measurement. The intervention: Intervention group use mobile application, registration...

  8. THE MAN CATEGORY IN PUBLIC POLICIES AND BRAZILIAN LAWS

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    Samantha Alflen Banin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the view of man as a gender category in public policies and national laws, especially those focused on violence against women. With this objective, it contextualizes the studies of feminisms and masculinities as theories and epistemology that guide the analysis of 17 official Brazilian documents selected for this study. This analysis seeks to clarify how the gendered man has been understood in various documents over the years. It discusses how the formulation of laws can provide a new accountability approach beyond the punishment of these men. It also investigates the regulation of some of the existing groups of men who have used violence against women in the country. It finalizes claiming the importance of these reflections for the debate on gender and masculinities in pursuit of a more effective system of prevention and eradication of violence against women. It discusses and argues in favor of both changing the way this category is addressed in official documents, and formalizing spaces for reflection for men who have used violence against women.

  9. The Great Impostor: Transaminitis Masking the Coinfection of Syphilis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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    Sunit Tolia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of syphilis continues to rise in the United States over the past 15 years. This disease process is classified into stages and may present with a coinfection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV. Case Report. We present a case of a 32-year-old African American male who presented with cutaneous manifestations of secondary syphilis and transaminitis. A workup revealed that the transaminitis was secondary to underlying syphilitic hepatitis in the presence of HIV coinfection. The patient had a reactive rapid plasma reagin (RPR of 1 : 64 TU and reactive Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA. Lab findings showed alkaline phosphate (ALP of 648 unit/L, aspartate aminotransferase (AST of 251 unit/L, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT of 409 unit/L. Conclusion. Syphilitic hepatitis is a recognized entity in the medical literature. It is a manifestation of secondary syphilis and it is more commonly seen in coinfected patients with both syphilis and HIV. Therefore, primary care physicians should keep infectious etiologies (e.g., syphilis and HIV in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with unexplained liver dysfunction in a cholestatic pattern.

  10. Crosstalk between HIV and hepatitis C virus during co-infection

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    Rider Paul J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An estimated one-third of individuals positive for HIV are also infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV. Chronic infection with HCV can lead to serious liver disease including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver-related disease is among the leading causes of death in patients with HIV, and individuals with HIV and HCV co-infection are found to progress more rapidly to serious liver disease than mono-infected individuals. The mechanism by which HIV affects HCV infection in the absence of immunosuppression by HIV is currently unknown. In a recent article published in BMC Immunology, Qu et al. demonstrated that HIV tat is capable of inducing IP-10 expression. Further, they were able to show that HIV tat, when added to cells, was able to enhance the replication of HCV. Importantly, the increase in HCV replication by tat was found to be dependent on IP-10. This work has important implications for understanding the effect HIV has on the outcome of HCV infection in co-infected individuals. The findings of Qu et al. may inform the design of intervention and treatment strategies for co-infected individuals. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2172/13/15.

  11. Seropositivity and Coinfection of Hepatitis B and C among Patients Seeking Hospital Care in Islamabad, Pakistan

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    Jafar Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The undertaken study was conducted to find out the seroprevalence and coinfection of HBV and HCV infection among patients seeking hospital care. A total of 845 samples were received at tertiary care hospital of Islamabad and were screened for hepatitis B and C. The ELISA was used to detect antigen for HBV and antibodies for HCV in patient serum. Among 845 collected samples, 255 (30.1% were seropositive for HBV and HCV. Out of 255 seropositive samples, 45 (5.3% were positive for HBsAg while 199 (23.5% were positive for anti-HCV. Among 255, 11 (1.3% were seropositive for both HBsAg and anti-HCV (coinfection. Among the seropositive male, HBV was more prevalent (23.8% while female patients had a high incidence of HCV (52.2%. Among the age group variable, HBV, HCV, and coinfection were found to be more common in the age groups of 21–30 (29% and 30–40 (24% years. The seropositivity for HBsAg was higher in unmarried individuals (31.2% while anti-HCV was more prevalent in married individuals (84%. The present study provides the preliminary information about high HCV and HBV prevalence. Findings from the current study will be helpful for the better management and control of viral hepatitis among patients seeking hospital care.

  12. Hepatitis E Virus Induced Acute Liver Failure with Scrub Typhus Coinfection in a Pregnant Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nipun; Sharma, Megha; Biswal, Manisha; Taneja, Sunil; Batra, Nitya; Kumar, Abhay; Dhiman, Radha K

    2017-06-01

    Coinfections contribute significantly to diagnostic challenges of acute febrile illnesses, especially in endemic areas. The confusion caused by overlapping clinical features impedes timely management. Herein, we report an unusual, previously unreported case of a pregnant woman suffering from a coinfection of scrub typhus and hepatitis E virus. A 25-year-old, 31-week pregnant woman presented with jaundice for 5 days and altered sensorium for 2 days. She had features of both viral acute liver failure (ALF) and tropical infections mimicking ALF, including hyperbilirubinemia, coagulopathy, anemia, thrombocytopenia, intravascular hemolysis, and hepatosplenomegaly. Etiological workup revealed rare coinfection of hepatitis E and scrub typhus. Despite all supportive measures, the patient succumbed to her illness (i.e., absent brainstem reflexes and intracranial bleed secondary to coagulopathy) and had poor fetal outcome, which resulted in stillbirth. ALF in a pregnant woman is a medical and obstetric emergency. It can result from varied etiologies that though differ in their incidence, mode of occurrence, and pregnancy outcome, can clinically masquerade as each other, causing diagnostic dilemma. This unusual case report highlights the significance of keeping all such possibilities in mind while managing a pregnant woman with ALF, especially in a country like India where maternal and perinatal mortality rates, the core indicators of national health, are still among the highest in the world.

  13. Status of Epstein-Barr Virus Coinfection with Helicobacter pylori in Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shyam

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is a ubiquitous human herpesvirus whose primary infection causes mononucleosis, Burkett's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, autoimmune diseases, and gastric cancer (GC). The persistent infection causes malignancies in lymph and epithelial cells. Helicobacter pylori causes gastritis in human with chronic inflammation. This chronic inflammation is thought to be the cause of genomic instability. About 45%-word population have a probability of having both pathogens, namely, H. pylori and EBV. Approximately 180 per hundred thousand population is developing GC along with many gastric abnormalities. This makes GC the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although lots of research are carried out individually for EBV and H. pylori, still there are very few reports available on coinfection of both pathogens. Recent studies suggested that EBV and H. pylori coinfection increases the occurrence of GC as well as the early age of GC detection comparing to individual infection. The aim of this review is to present status on coinfection of both pathogens and their association with GC. PMID:28421114

  14. Viral bacterial co-infection of the respiratory tract during early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brealey, Jaelle C; Sly, Peter D; Young, Paul R; Chappell, Keith J

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is an important cause of morbidity in children. Mixed aetiology is frequent, with pathogenic viruses and bacteria co-detected in respiratory secretions. However, the clinical significance of these viral/bacterial co-infections has long been a controversial topic. While severe bacterial pneumonia following influenza infection has been well described, associations are less clear among infections caused by viruses that are more common in young children, such as respiratory syncytial virus. Although assessing the overall contribution of bacteria to disease severity is complicated by the presence of many confounding factors in clinical studies, understanding the role of viral/bacterial co-infections in defining the outcome of paediatric ARI will potentially reveal novel treatment and prevention strategies, improving patient outcomes. This review summarizes current evidence for the clinical significance of respiratory viral/bacterial co-infections in young children, discusses possible mechanisms of cooperative interaction between these pathogens and highlights areas that require further investigation. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Human Coinfection with Borrelia burgdorferi and Babesia microti in the United States

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    Kristen L. Knapp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, and Babesia microti, a causative agent of babesiosis, are increasingly implicated in the growing tick-borne disease burden in the northeastern United States. These pathogens are transmitted via the bite of an infected tick vector, Ixodes scapularis, which is capable of harboring and inoculating a host with multiple pathogens simultaneously. Clinical presentation of the diseases is heterogeneous and ranges from mild flu-like symptoms to near-fatal cardiac arrhythmias. While the reason for the variability is not known, the possibility exists that concomitant infection with both B. burgdorferi and B. microti may synergistically increase disease severity. In an effort to clarify the current state of understanding regarding coinfection with B. burgdorferi and B. microti, in this review, we discuss the geographical distribution and pathogenesis of Lyme disease and babesiosis in the United States, the immunological response of humans to B. burgdorferi or B. microti infection, the existing knowledge regarding coinfection disease pathology, and critical factors that have led to ambiguity in the literature regarding coinfection, in order to eliminate confusion in future experimental design and investigation.

  16. Effects of coinfection with Pomphorhynchus bulbocolli on development of leptorhynchoides thecatus (Acanthocephala) in amphipods (Hyalella azteca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, M A; Nickol, B B

    1999-02-01

    The effect of the presence of Pomphorhynchus bulbocolli on the development of Leptorhynchoides thecatus (Acanthocephala) in amphipod intermediate hosts (Hyalella azteca) was examined. Two groups of amphipods were exposed either to eggs of both species (experimental) or only to L. thecatus eggs (control). Amphipods of both groups were dissected 39 days postexposure. The percentage of L. thecatus at the cystacanth stage and mean abundance of cystacanths and precystacanths per amphipod were determined. Contingency table analysis and Fisher's exact tests demonstrated that a significantly smaller proportion of L. thecatus reached the cystacanth stage in coinfected amphipods of the experimental group than either worms in the control group or worms in L. thecatus-only infections of the experimental group. Interspecific interaction between acanthocephalans in intermediate hosts has not been reported previously. Coinfection reduces the number of L. thecatus in amphipods available for transmission to definitive hosts. Habitat separation by eggs of L. thecatus and P. bulbocolli might reduce this effect if amphipods are less likely to become coinfected when eggs are in different microhabitats than when they are not.

  17. Prevalence and Types of Coinfections in Sleeping Sickness Patients in Kenya (2000/2009

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    J. M. Kagira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of coinfections in human African trypanosomiasis (HAT patients was investigated using a retrospective data of hospital records at the National Sleeping Sickness Referral Hospital in Alupe, Kenya. A total of 31 patients, 19 males and 12 females, were diagnosed with HAT between the years 2000 and 2009. The observed co-infections included malaria (100%, helminthosis (64.5%, typhoid (22.5%, urinary tract infections (16.1%, HIV (12.9%, and tuberculosis (3.2%. The species of helminthes observed included Ancylostoma duodenale (38.7%, Ascaris lumbricoides (45.7%, Strongyloides stercoralis (9.7%, and Taenia spp. (3.2%. The patients were also infected with Entamoeba spp. (32.3% and Trichomonas hominis (22.6% protozoan parasites. The main clinical signs observed at the point of admission included headache (74.2%, fever (48.4%, sleep disorders (45.2%, and general body pain (41.9%. The HAT patients were treated with suramin (early stage, 9/31 and melarsoprol (late stage, 22/31. In conclusion, the study has shown that HAT patients have multiple co-infections which may influence the disease pathogenesis and complicate management of HAT.

  18. Coinfection of Avibacterium paragallinarum and Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in Chickens from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Erasto, V; Falconi-Agapito, F; Luna-Galaz, G A; Saravia, L E; Montalvan-Avalos, A; Soriano-Vargas E, E; Fernández-Díaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The coinfection of Avibacterium paragallinarum and Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in two outbreaks of infectious coryza from Peru is reported. The diagnosis was confirmed by bacteriologic isolation, PCR testing, and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The susceptibility of the isolates to 12 antimicrobial agents was tested by a disk diffusion method. The isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and florfenicol and were resistant to oxacillin and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. The coinfection of Av. paragallinarum and O. rhinotracheale and the severity of clinical signs were evaluated by experimental infection of specific-pathogen-free chickens. The group inoculated with O. rhinotracheale alone presented minimal clinical signs in 3 of 10 chickens. However, the groups inoculated with both Av. paragallinarum and O. rhinotracheale induced the most-severe clinical signs compared with the group inoculated with Av. paragallinarum alone. In conclusion, coinfections with Av. paragallinarum and O. rhinotracheale may occur, and these outbreaks could be more severe than single infections. Hence, the prevention, control, and diagnosis of Av. paragallinarum with O. rhinotracheale are important in outbreaks of infectious coryza.

  19. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Coinfection of sheep with Anaplasma, Theileria and Babesia species in the Kurdistan Region, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renneker, S; Abdo, J; Bakheit, M A; Kullmann, B; Beyer, D; Ahmed, J; Seitzer, U

    2013-11-01

    Infections of small ruminants with Anaplasma, Theileria and Babesia species are widely distributed in the old world and are of great economic impact. In Iraq, data on disease occurrence in sheep caused by above-mentioned infectious agents are scarce. This study provides information on various haemoparasitic agents infecting sheep in the Kurdistan Region, Iraq, using molecular diagnostic tools. Altogether, 195 samples originating from three governorates in the Kurdistan Region, namely Duhok, Erbil and Sulaimaniya, were analysed. The following pathogens were identified: Anaplasma ovis (62.6%), Theileria ovis (14.35%), T. lestoquardi (7.7%), T. uilenbergi (5.6%) and Babesia ovis (1.5%). T. uilenbergi is detected for the first time in Iraq. Coinfection of sheep with different pathogens could be observed in this study, and it was found that 45 of 195 (23%) of the samples contained more than one pathogen. Even triple-positive samples were identified in 3% of the investigated animals. In conclusion, we confirm the coinfection of sheep with various haemoparasitic pathogen species in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Further investigations are needed to reveal the epidemiology of the diseases, the respective tick vectors, and, in the case of coinfection, pathogens' interaction and possible cross-protection. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Risk factors for TB and HIV coinfection in Scotland, 2001 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, E; Smith-Palmer, A; Wallace, L A; Blatchford, O

    2015-03-19

    The number of patients with tuberculosis (TB) increased steadily in Scotland between 2005 and 2010. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been a contributory factor to increases in TB in a number of comparable industrialised countries. This study investigated the extent of, and risk factors for, TB and HIV coinfection in Scotland from 2001 to 2010. Patients with TB in the national TB database were linked to those in the national HIV database using probabilistic data linkage. Patient records were anonymised to maintain confidentiality. From 2001 to 2010, 106/4, 097 (2.6%, 95% CI: 2.1 to 3.1) TB patients matched with HIV patients, equating to a 10-year incidence of 2.1 cases per million population. Patients with both TB and HIV were more often born outside the United Kingdom,were of black African ethnicity, had refugee status and had extra-thoracic lymph node involvement or cryptic/disseminated TB disease. Individuals with TB and HIV coinfection were younger and symptomatic for a shorter time before their diagnosis of TB, compared with TB patients without HIV. TB and HIV coinfection was relatively uncommon in Scotland in the study period. Clinicians should recognise the potential for HIV infection among TB patients and the importance of offering an HIV test to all TB patients.

  2. 36th Brazilian Workshop on Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Brandão de Oliveira, José Roberto; Barbosa Shorto, Julian Marco; Higa, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Workshop on Nuclear Physics (RTFNB, acronym in Portuguese) is organized annually by the Brazilian Physics Society since 1978, in order to: promote Nuclear Physics research in the country; stimulate and reinforce collaborations among nuclear physicists from around the country; disseminate advances in nuclear physics research and its applications; disseminate, disclose and evaluate the scientific production in this field.

  3. The new Brazilian national forest inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joberto V. de Freitas; Yeda M. M. de Oliveira; Doadi A. Brena; Guilherme L.A. Gomide; Jose Arimatea Silva; < i> et al< /i>

    2009-01-01

    The new Brazilian national forest inventory (NFI) is being planned to be carried out through five components: (1) general coordination, led by the Brazilian Forest Service; (2) vegetation mapping, which will serve as the basis for sample plot location; (3) field data collection; (4) landscape data collection of 10 x 10-km sample plots, based on high-resolution...

  4. Brazilian Studies and Brazilianists: Conceptual remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Mariano de Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept of Brazilian Studies. It does not intend to outline a defence for a new discipline, or to propose paradigms for that elusive field called ‘area studies’. It will, bring some reflections on epistemological and methodological issues realted to what it is been called Brazilian Studies.

  5. Types and myths in Brazilian thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Ianni

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available "Ideal types" elaborated by different authors and that have become emblematic, notorious or even definitive, sometimes representing myths are quite frequent in Brazilian thought. That is the case of the bandeirantes (colonial crusaders, the gaúcho, Jeca Tatu, Macunaíma, cordial man and others. It is worth contemplating this aspect of Brazilian culture and thought.

  6. Sociocultural Influences on Brazilian Children's Drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokrocki, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Reports on insights about sociocultural influences on Brazilian children's drawings, using visual anthropology to examine children's drawings that depicted what they like to do. Discusses visual anthropology, provides information on Brazilian educational influences, and presents the context and findings of the study. (CMK)

  7. Estimate of consumption of phenolic compounds by Brazilian population

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    Vanesa Gesser Corrêa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Estimate the intake of phenolic compounds by the Brazilian population. METHODS: To estimate the average per capita food consumption, micro data from the National Dietary Survey and from the Household Budget Survey from 2008 to 2009 was analyzed. The phenolic content in food was estimated from the base of Phenol-Explorer. It was chosen according to compatibility and variety of food items and usual method of preparation. RESULTS: The Brazilian population consumed, on average, 460.15 mg/day of total phenolic compounds, derived mainly from beverages (48.9%, especially coffee and legumes (19.5%. Since this analysis of classes of phenolics it was possible to observe an intake of 314 mg/day of phenolic acids, 138.92 mg/day of flavonoids and 7.16 mg/ day of other kinds of phenolics. Regarding the variables studied this present study shows that those men who live in the countryside and in the northeastern region of the country had a higher consumption of phenolic compounds. Besides, consumption was higher by adults and the elderly, the medium income classes, the population with incomplete and complete primary education and those with adequate nutrition and also overweight status. CONCLUSION: The intake of phenolic compounds can be considered low, especially where consumption of fruit and vegetables is insufficient. We can conclude that coffee and black beans were the best contributors to phenolic intake.

  8. Construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents

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    Adami Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Figure rating scales were developed as a tool to determine body dissatisfaction in women, men, and children. However, it lacks in the literature the validation of the scale for body silhouettes previously adapted. We aimed to obtain evidence for construct validity of a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents. Methods The study was carried out with adolescent students attending three public schools in an urban region of the municipality of Florianopolis in the State of Santa Catarina (SC. The sample comprised 232 10-19-year-old students, 106 of whom are boys and 126 girls, from the 5th "series" (i.e. year of Primary School to the 3rd year of Secondary School. Data-gathering involved the application of an instrument containing 8 body figure drawings representing a range of children's and adolescents' body shapes, ranging from very slim (contour 1 to obese (contour 8. Weights and heights were also collected, and body mass index (BMI was calculated later. BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using z-scores, and as a dichotomous categorical variable, representing a diagnosis of nutritional status (normal and overweight including obesity. Results Results showed that both males and females with larger BMI z-scores chose larger body contours. Girls with higher BMI z-scores also show higher values of body image dissatisfaction. Conclusion We provided the first evidence of validity for a figure rating scale for Brazilian adolescents.

  9. Brazilian Cardiorespiratory Fitness Classification Based on Maximum Oxygen Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdy, Artur Haddad; Caixeta, Ananda

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) is the most complete tool available to assess functional aerobic capacity (FAC). Maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max), an important biomarker, reflects the real FAC. Objective To develop a cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) classification based on VO2 max in a Brazilian sample of healthy and physically active individuals of both sexes. Methods We selected 2837 CEPT from 2837 individuals aged 15 to 74 years, distributed as follows: G1 (15 to 24); G2 (25 to 34); G3 (35 to 44); G4 (45 to 54); G5 (55 to 64) and G6 (65 to 74). Good CRF was the mean VO2 max obtained for each group, generating the following subclassification: Very Low (VL): VO2 105%. Results Men VL 105% G1 53.13 G2 49.77 G3 47.67 G4 42.52 G5 37.06 G6 31.50 Women G1 40.85 G2 40.01 G3 34.09 G4 32.66 G5 30.04 G6 26.36 Conclusions This chart stratifies VO2 max measured on a treadmill in a robust Brazilian sample and can be used as an alternative for the real functional evaluation of physically and healthy individuals stratified by age and sex. PMID:27305285

  10. Somatotype and anthropometry in brazilian national volleyball teams

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    Breno Guilherme de Araújo Tinoco Cabral

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The elaboration of profile characteristics that can serve as parameters in the different categories and investment in scientific studies of Brazilian volleyball have shown their importance in developing new athletes. In this sense, the objective of the descriptive study in question was to analyze important characteristics such as somatotype and anthropometry in the Brazilian under-17 and under-18 national teams, respectively. The population was composed of 33 (14 females and 19 males athletes from the aforementioned teams. We used a high-precision scale and stadiometer to verify anthropometric characteristics and Heath & Carter's method to evaluate somatotype. The men's team obtained the following mean results: Age=16.71; height=195.9cm; body weight=87.7kg; endomorphy=1.26; mesomorphy=3.18 and ectomorphy=3.8; while the women's results were: Age=15.9; height=181.6cm; body weight=67.4kg; endomorphy=3.09; mesomorphy=2.21 and ectomorphy=3.88. We can conclude from the results that the teams in question have similar characteristics to those of the high-performance adult teams, and exhibit a predominance of the ectomorphic component of the somatotype. This finding is of great importance, given the current demands of high-performance volleyball, and shows us the high level of the group studied.

  11. Brazilian Cardiorespiratory Fitness Classification Based on Maximum Oxygen Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Haddad Herdy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET is the most complete tool available to assess functional aerobic capacity (FAC. Maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max, an important biomarker, reflects the real FAC. Objective: To develop a cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF classification based on VO2 max in a Brazilian sample of healthy and physically active individuals of both sexes. Methods: We selected 2837 CEPT from 2837 individuals aged 15 to 74 years, distributed as follows: G1 (15 to 24; G2 (25 to 34; G3 (35 to 44; G4 (45 to 54; G5 (55 to 64 and G6 (65 to 74. Good CRF was the mean VO2 max obtained for each group, generating the following subclassification: Very Low (VL: VO2 105%. Results: Men VL 105% G1 53.13 G2 49.77 G3 47.67 G4 42.52 G5 37.06 G6 31.50 Women G1 40.85 G2 40.01 G3 34.09 G4 32.66 G5 30.04 G6 26.36 Conclusions: This chart stratifies VO2 max measured on a treadmill in a robust Brazilian sample and can be used as an alternative for the real functional evaluation of physically and healthy individuals stratified by age and sex.

  12. The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, P F

    2005-01-01

    The Brazilian Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory has been operating the only light source in the southern hemisphere since July 1997. Over this 7 year period, approximately 22000 hours of beam time were delivered to users from all over Brazil as well as from 10 other countries. In this article, we report on the present configuration of the 1.37 GeV electron storage ring and associated instrumentation, describe recent improvements to the light source and analyze future prespectives including the installation of insertion devices and additional beamlines.

  13. Elementary education in brazilian legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Veronese, Josiane Rose Petry; Vieira, Cleverton Elias

    2003-01-01

    The education was a present subject, directly or indirectly, in every Brazilian Constitutions. In the Federal Constitution of 1988, two aspects about education can be detached: the participation of the civil society in the elaboration of devices that regulate the national education and the treatment given to basic education, raised to the category of subjective public right. Child and Adolescent Statute practically repeats the devices of the&n...

  14. A multicentre molecular analysis of hepatitis B and blood-borne virus coinfections in Viet Nam.

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    Linda Dunford

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B (HBV infection is endemic in Viet Nam, with up to 8.4 million individuals estimated to be chronically infected. We describe results of a large, multicentre seroepidemiological and molecular study of the prevalence of HBV infection and blood-borne viral coinfections in Viet Nam. Individuals with varying risk factors for infection (n = 8654 were recruited from five centres; Ha Noi, Hai Phong, Da Nang, Khanh Hoa and Can Tho. A mean prevalence rate of 10.7% was observed and levels of HBsAg were significantly higher in injecting drug users (IDUs (17.4%, n = 174/1000 and dialysis patients (14.3%, n = 82/575 than in lower-risk groups (9.4%; p<0.001. Coinfection with HIV was seen in 28% of HBV-infected IDUs (n = 49/174 and 15.2% of commercial sex workers (CSWs; n = 15/99. HCV infection was present in 89.8% of the HBV-HIV coinfected IDUs (n = 44/49 and 40% of HBV-HIV coinfected CSWs (n = 16/40. Anti-HDV was detected in 10.7% (n = 34/318 of HBsAg positive individuals. Phylogenetic analysis of HBV S gene (n = 187 showed a predominance of genotype B4 (82.6%; genotypes C1 (14.6%, B2 (2.7% and C5 (0.5% were also identified. The precore mutation G1896A was identified in 35% of all specimens, and was more frequently observed in genotype B (41% than genotype C (3%; p<0.0001. In the immunodominant 'a' region of the surface gene, point mutations were identified in 31% (n = 58/187 of sequences, and 2.2% (n = 4/187 and 5.3% (n = 10/187 specimens contained the major vaccine escape mutations G145A/R and P120L/Q/S/T, respectively. 368 HBsAg positive individuals were genotyped for the IL28B SNP rs12979860 and no significant association between the IL28B SNP and clearance of HBsAg, HBV viral load or HBeAg was observed. This study confirms the high prevalence of HBV infection in Viet Nam and also highlights the significant levels of blood-borne virus coinfections, which have important implications for hepatitis-related morbidity and development of effective

  15. The effects of Maraviroc on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected patients

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    Enrique Ortega Gonzalez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The fibrogenesis analysis in quimeric CCR1 and CCR5 mice revealed that CCR5 mediates its pro-fibrogenic effects in hepatic cells and promoting stellate cells. The blockage of co-receptors could preserve the progression of hepatic fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Objective: To evaluate the beneficial effects on hepatic fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected patients that are on antiretroviral therapy (ART with CCR5 co-receptor antagonists. Method and materials: A multicentre, retrospective pilot study of the evaluation of hepatic fibrosis at mid- and long-term by non-invasive methods in a HIV/HCV co-infected patients cohort in the Valencian Community (Spain that received ART with a CCR5 co-receptor antagonist. The cut-off points of serum marker tests of hepatic fibrosis were: AST to Platelet Ratio Index (APRI1.5 F2; >2 Cirrhosis and Forns Index6.9>F2 fibrosis. Inclusion criteria was established for HIV/HCV co-infected patients on ART with CCR5 co-receptor antagonists that had no previous history of interferon and ribavirin treatment or those who were null-responders and received CCR5 co-receptor antagonist treatment in the previous year. Patients with HBV infection were excluded. Results: A total of 71 male patients (69% were reported. A CD4 nadir 350 cells/uL. According to genotypes, 50% were G-1a, 14% G-1b, 11% G-3 and 25% G-4. The median duration of treatment with Maraviroc (MVC was the following: 45% took it over a year, 41% over two years and 14% over three years. Before starting treatment with MVC, we observed an initial fibrosis of F0–F1 in 49% of patients, F2–F3 in 24% and F4 in 27%. The medium follow-up was of 18.45 months. Progression to a higher fibrosis level was observed in five patients, 11 patients improved at least one stage and the others were stable over time. There were 38 patients taking MVC over two years, 27 patients in this group (59.38% did not modify their fibrosis, 3 patients (11% progressed and 8 (29

  16. HCV coinfection contributes to HIV pathogenesis by increasing immune exhaustion in CD8 T-cells.

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    Rallón, Norma; García, Marcial; García-Samaniego, Javier; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cabello, Alfonso; Restrepo, Clara; Álvarez, Beatriz; García, Rosa; Górgolas, Miguel; Benito, José M

    2017-01-01

    There are several contributors to HIV-pathogenesis or insufficient control of the infection. However, whether HIV/HCV-coinfected population exhibits worst evolution of HIV-pathogenesis remains unclear. Recently, some markers of immune exhaustion have been proposed as preferentially upregulated on T-cells during HIV-infection. Herein, we have analyzed T-cell exhaustion together with several other contributors to HIV-pathogenesis that could be affected by HCV-coinfection. Ninety-six patients with chronic HIV-infection (60 HIV-monoinfected and 36 HIV/HCV-coinfected), and 20 healthy controls were included in the study. All patients were untreated for both infections. Several CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets involved in HIV-pathogenesis were investigated. Non-parametric tests were used to establish differences between groups and associations between variables. Multivariate linear regression was used to ascertain the variables independently associated with CD4 counts. HIV-patients presented significant differences compared to healthy controls in most of the parameters analyzed. Both HIV and HIV/HCV groups were comparable in terms of age, CD4 counts and HIV-viremia. Compared to HIV group, HIV/HCV group presented significantly higher levels of exhaustion (Tim3+PD1- subset) in total CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.003), and higher levels of exhaustion in CD8+HLADR+CD38+ (p = 0.04), CD8+HLADR-CD38+ (p = 0.009) and CD8+HLADR-CD38- (p = 0.006) subsets of CD8+ T-cells. Interestingly these differences were maintained after adjusting by CD4 counts and HIV-viremia. We show a significant impact of HCV-coinfection on CD8 T-cells exhaustion, an important parameter associated with CD8 T-cell dysfunction in the setting of chronic HIV-infection. The relevance of this phenomenon on immunological and/or clinical HIV progression prompts HCV treatment to improve management of coinfected patients.

  17. Canine babesiosis in northern Portugal and molecular characterization of vector-borne co-infections

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    Machado João

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protozoa and bacteria transmitted by arthropods, including ticks and phlebotomine sand flies, may cause a wide range of canine vector-borne diseases. Dogs can be simultaneously or sequentially infected with multiple pathogens. Canine babesiosis caused by Babesia canis canis and Babesia canis vogeli is known to occur in Portugal. This study assessed, by means of blood smear examination, PCR and DNA nucleotide sequencing, the presence of Babesia spp. and co-infecting agents Leishmania, Anaplasma/Ehrlichia and Hepatozoon in 45 dogs from northern Portugal clinically suspected of babesiosis. Results Forty-four dogs (98% had infection with B. canis canis and one with B. canis vogeli. Co-infections were detected in nine animals (20%. Eight dogs were found infected with two vector-borne agents: six with B. canis canis and Leishmania infantum; one with B. canis canis and Ehrlichia canis; and one with B. canis canis and Hepatozoon canis. Another dog was infected with three vector-borne pathogens: B. canis vogeli, E. canis and L. infantum. Overall, L. infantum was found in seven (16%, E. canis in two (4%, and H. canis in one (2% out of the 45 dogs with babesiosis. Almost 90% of the 45 cases of canine babesiosis were diagnosed in the colder months of October (18%, November (27%, December (20%, February (13% and March (9%. Co-infections were detected in February, March, April, May, October and November. Twenty-two (50% out of 44 dogs infected with B. canis were found infested by ticks including Dermacentor spp., Ixodes spp. and Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Mortality (9% included two co-infected dogs that died spontaneously and two with single infections that were euthanized. Conclusions Babesia canis canis is the main etiological agent of canine babesiosis in northern Portugal. A higher sensitivity of Babesia spp. detection was obtained with PCR assays, compared to the observation of blood smears. Twenty percent of the dogs were co-infected

  18. Suicide in historic cities of a Brazilian state

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    Beatriz Faria Simões

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the suicide rate in historical regions of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods: epidemiological study conducted in five historical regions of a Brazilian state. The data used were extracted from the Information Department of the National Health System. Results: the Historical Regions of Demonstrations and Wealth presented higher suicide rates when compared to the state’s rate. In 11 of the 15 years analyzed, the Region of Wealth had rates higher than that of Minas Gerais. Regarding age group, average levels of suicide were found in the age group 20-59 years in 14 years studied. We also identified higher suicide rates among men in the Historical Regions. The most used methods in the Historical Regions were hanging, strangulation and suffocation. Conclusion: the distribution of suicide cases has enabled to understand the epidemiological characteristics of suicide in the Historical Regions of Minas Gerais during the period analyzed.

  19. HIV and tuberculosis co-infection among migrants in Europe: A systematic review on the prevalence, incidence and mortality.

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    Tavares, Ana Maria; Fronteira, Inês; Couto, Isabel; Machado, Diana; Viveiros, Miguel; Abecasis, Ana B; Dias, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    International human migration has been rapidly growing. Migrants coming from low and middle income countries continue to be considerably vulnerable and at higher risk for infectious diseases, namely HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and tuberculosis (TB). In Europe, the number of patients with HIV-TB co-infection has been increasing and migration could be one of the potential driving forces. This systematic review aims to improve the understanding on the burden of HIV-TB co-infection among migrants in Europe and to assess whether these populations are particularly vulnerable to this co-infection compared to nationals. MEDLINE®, Web of Science® and Scopus® databases were searched from March to April 2016 using combinations of keywords. Titles and abstracts were screened and studies meeting the inclusion criteria proceeded for full-text revision. These articles were then selected for data extraction on the prevalence, incidence and mortality. The majority of HIV-TB prevalence data reported in the analysed studies, including extrapulmonary/disseminated TB forms, was higher among migrant vs. nationals, some of the studies even showing increasing trends over time. Additionally, while HIV-TB incidence rates have decreased among migrants and nationals, migrants are still at a higher risk for this co-infection. Migrants with HIV-TB co-infection were also more prone to unsuccessful treatment outcomes, death and drug resistant TB. However, contradicting results also showed lower mortality compared to nationals. Overall, a disproportionate vulnerability of migrants to acquire the HIV-TB co-infection was observed across studies. Such vulnerability has been associated to low socioeconomic status, poor living conditions and limited access to healthcare. Adequate social support, early detection, appropriate treatment, and adequate access to healthcare are key improvements to tackle HIV-TB co-infection among these populations.

  20. Coinfection and Mortality in Pneumonia-Related Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Patients with Bronchoalveolar Lavage: A Prospective Observational Study.

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    Kao, Kuo-Chin; Chiu, Li-Chung; Hung, Chen-Yiu; Chang, Chih-Hao; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Huang, Chung-Chi; Hu, Han-Chung

    2017-05-01

    Pneumonia is the leading risk factor of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It is increasing studies in patients with pneumonia to reveal that coinfection with viral and bacterial infection can lead to poorer outcomes than no coinfection. This study evaluated the role of coinfection identified through bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) examination on the outcomes of pneumonia-related ARDS. We performed a prospective observational study at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from October 2012 to May 2015. Adult patients were included if they met the Berlin definition of ARDS. The indications for BAL were clinically suspected pneumonia-related ARDS and no definite microbial sample identified from tracheal aspirate or sputum. The presence of microbial pathogens and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Of the 19,936 patients screened, 902 (4.5%) fulfilled the Berlin definition of ARDS. Of these patients, 255 (22.7%) had pneumonia-related ARDS and were included for analysis. A total of 142 (55.7%) patients were identified to have a microbial pathogen through BAL and were classified into three groups: a virus-only group (n = 41 [28.9%]), no virus group (n = 60 [42.2%]), and coinfection group (n = 41 [28.9%]). ARDS severity did not differ significantly between the groups (P = 0.43). The hospital mortality rates were 53.7% in virus-only identified group, 63.3% in no virus identified group, and 80.5% in coinfection identified group. The coinfection group had significantly higher mortality than virus-only group (80.5% vs. 53.7%; P = 0.01). In patients with pneumonia-related ARDS, the BAL pathogen-positive patients had a trend of higher mortality rate than pathogen-negative patients. Coinfection with a virus and another pathogen was associated with increased hospital mortality in pneumonia-related ARDS patients.

  1. Toxoplasma Co-infection Prevents Th2 Differentiation and Leads to a Helminth-Specific Th1 Response

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    Norus Ahmed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nematode infections, in particular gastrointestinal nematodes, are widespread and co-infections with other parasites and pathogens are frequently encountered in humans and animals. To decipher the immunological effects of a widespread protozoan infection on the anti-helminth immune response we studied a co-infection with the enteric nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus in mice previously infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Protective immune responses against nematodes are dependent on parasite-specific Th2 responses associated with IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IgE, and IgG1 antibodies. In contrast, Toxoplasma gondii infection elicits a strong and protective Th1 immune response characterized by IFN-γ, IL-12, and IgG2a antibodies. Co-infected animals displayed significantly higher worm fecundity although worm burden remained unchanged. In line with this, the Th2 response to H. polygyrus in co-infected animals showed a profound reduction of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and GATA-3 expressing T cells. Co-infection also resulted in the lack of eosinophilia and reduced expression of the Th2 effector molecule RELM-β in intestinal tissue. In contrast, the Th1 response to the protozoan parasite was not diminished and parasitemia of T. gondii was unaffected by concurrent helminth infection. Importantly, H. polygyrus specific restimulation of splenocytes revealed H. polygyrus-reactive CD4+ T cells that produce a significant amount of IFN-γ in co-infected animals. This was not observed in animals infected with the nematode alone. Increased levels of H. polygyrus-specific IgG2a antibodies in co-infected mice mirrored this finding. This study suggests that polarization rather than priming of naive CD4+ T cells is disturbed in mice previously infected with T. gondii. In conclusion, a previous T. gondii infection limits a helminth-specific Th2 immune response while promoting a shift toward a Th1-type immune response.

  2. Clinical disease severity of respiratory viral co-infection versus single viral infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Sandra A Asner

    Full Text Available Results from cohort studies evaluating the severity of respiratory viral co-infections are conflicting. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the clinical severity of viral co-infections as compared to single viral respiratory infections.We searched electronic databases and other sources for studies published up to January 28, 2013. We included observational studies on inpatients with respiratory illnesses comparing the clinical severity of viral co-infections to single viral infections as detected by molecular assays. The primary outcome reflecting clinical disease severity was length of hospital stay (LOS. A random-effects model was used to conduct the meta-analyses.Twenty-one studies involving 4,280 patients were included. The overall quality of evidence applying the GRADE approach ranged from moderate for oxygen requirements to low for all other outcomes. No significant differences in length of hospital stay (LOS (mean difference (MD -0.20 days, 95% CI -0.94, 0.53, p = 0.59, or mortality (RR 2.44, 95% CI 0.86, 6.91, p = 0.09 were documented in subjects with viral co-infections compared to those with a single viral infection. There was no evidence for differences in effects across age subgroups in post hoc analyses with the exception of the higher mortality in preschool children (RR 9.82, 95% CI 3.09, 31.20, p<0.001 with viral co-infection as compared to other age groups (I2 for subgroup analysis 64%, p = 0.04.No differences in clinical disease severity between viral co-infections and single respiratory infections were documented. The suggested increased risk of mortality observed amongst children with viral co-infections requires further investigation.

  3. Major Electrocardiographic Abnormalities According to the Minnesota Coding System Among Brazilian Adults (from the ELSA-Brasil Cohort Study).

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    Pinto-Filho, Marcelo M; Brant, Luisa C C; Foppa, Murilo; Garcia-Silva, Kaiser B; Mendes de Oliveira, Rackel Aguiar; de Jesus Mendes da Fonseca, Maria; Alvim, Sheila; Lotufo, Paulo A; Mill, José G; Barreto, Sandhi M; Macfarlane, Peter W; Ribeiro, Antonio L P

    2017-06-15

    The electrocardiogram is a simple and useful clinical tool; nevertheless, few studies have evaluated the prevalence of electrocardiographic abnormalities in the Latin American population. This study aims to evaluate the major electrocardiographic abnormalities according to the Minnesota coding system in Brazilian adults, stratified by gender, age, race, and cardiovascular risk factors. Data from 14,424 adults (45.8% men, age 35 to 74 years) were obtained at baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), according to standardized protocol. The electrocardiogram were obtained with the Burdick Atria 6100 machine, stored on Pyramis System, automatically coded according to the Minnesota coding system by the Glasgow University software and then manually revised. Major abnormalities were more prevalent in men than women (11.3% and 7.9%, p <0.001). These differences were consistent through the different age groups, race, and number of cardiovascular risk factors. Electrocardiographic major abnormalities were more prevalent in black participants for both men (black: 15.1%, mixed: 10.4%, white: 11.1%, p = 0.001) and women (black: 10%, mixed: 7.6%, white: 7.2%, p = 0.004). In conclusion, in this large sample of Brazilian adults, the prevalence of major electrocardiographic abnormalities was higher among men, the elderly, black, and among people with more cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Seroprevalence of Entamoeba histolytica infection among Chinese men who have sex with men.

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    Feng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Men who have sex with men (MSM were found to be one of the high-risk populations for Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica infection. Accompanied by the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV among MSM, invasive amebiasis caused by E. histolytica has been paid attention to as an opportunistic parasitic infection. However, the status of E. histolytica infection among MSM has been barely studied in mainland China. METHODS: Seroprevalance of E. histolytica was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on a cross-sectional study conducted in Beijing and Tianjin, China. Factors potentially associated with E. histolytica infection were identified by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 602 MSM were included in the study and the laboratory data on serostatus of E. histolytica were available for 599 of them (99.5%. 246 (41.1% and 51 (8.5% of the study participants were E. histolytica seropositive and HIV seropositive, respectively. Univariate analyses suggested preferred anal sex behaviors were associated with E. histolytica seropositivity. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, "only has receptive anal sex" (OR: 2.03; 95% CI: 1.22 3.37, "majority receptive anal sex" (OR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.13, 2.95, and "sadomasochistic behavior (SM" (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.04, 5.13 were found to be significantly associated with E. histolytica infection. CONCLUSIONS: High seroprevalence of E. histolytica infection was observed among MSM from Beijing and Tianjin, China. Receptive anal sex behavior and SM were identified as potential predictors. Therefore, E. histolytica and HIV co-infection needs to be concerned among MSM due to their sharing the common risk behaviors.

  5. Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I

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    Wermer syndrome; MEN I ... MEN I is caused by a defect in a gene that carries the code for a protein called menin. ... your provider if you notice symptoms of MEN I or have a family history of this condition.

  6. Comparison of postmenopausal endogenous sex hormones among Japanese, Japanese Brazilians, and non-Japanese Brazilians

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    Maciel Maria

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in sex hormone levels among populations might contribute to the variation in breast cancer incidence across countries. Previous studies have shown higher breast cancer incidence and mortality among Japanese Brazilians than among Japanese. To clarify the difference in hormone levels among populations, we compared postmenopausal endogenous sex hormone levels among Japanese living in Japan, Japanese Brazilians living in the state of São Paulo, and non-Japanese Brazilians living in the state of São Paulo. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using a control group of case-control studies in Nagano, Japan, and São Paulo, Brazil. Participants were postmenopausal women older than 55 years of age who provided blood samples. We measured estradiol, estrone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS, testosterone and free testosterone by radioimmunoassay; bioavailable estradiol by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method; and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG by immunoradiometric assay. A total of 363 women were included for the present analyses, comprising 185 Japanese, 44 Japanese Brazilians and 134 non-Japanese Brazilians. Results Japanese Brazilians had significantly higher levels of estradiol, bioavailable estradiol, estrone, testosterone and free testosterone levels, and lower SHBG levels, than Japanese. Japanese Brazilians also had significantly higher levels of bioavailable estradiol, estrone and DHEAS and lower levels of SHBG and androstenedione than non-Japanese Brazilians. Levels of estradiol, testosterone and free testosterone, however, did not differ between Japanese Brazilians and non-Japanese Brazilians. These differences were observed even after adjustment for known breast cancer risk factors. We also found an increase in estrogen and androgen levels with increasing body mass index, but no association for most of the other known risk factors. Conclusions We found higher levels of

  7. The phylogeography of African Brazilians.

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    Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Carvalho, Cláudia M B; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Bydlowski, Sérgio P; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2008-01-01

    Approximately four million Africans were taken as slaves to Brazil, where they interbred extensively with Amerindians and Europeans. We have previously shown that while most White Brazilians carry Y chromosomes of European origin, they display high proportions of African and Amerindian mtDNA lineages, because of sex-biased genetic admixture. We studied the Y chromosome and mtDNA haplogroup structure of 120 Black males from Sao Paulo, Brazil. Only 48% of the Y chromosomes, but 85% of the mtDNA haplogroups were characteristic of sub-Saharan Africa, confirming our previous observation of sexually biased mating. We mined literature data for mtDNA and Y chromosome haplogroup frequencies for African native populations from regions involved in Atlantic Slave Trade. Principal Components Analysis and Bayesian analysis of population structure revealed no genetic differentiation of Y chromosome marker frequencies between the African regions. However, mtDNA examination unraveled considerable genetic structure, with three clusters at Central-West Africa, West Africa and Southeast Africa. A hypothesis is proposed to explain this structure. Using these mtDNA data we could obtain for the first time an estimate of the relative ancestral contribution of Central-West (0.445), West (0.431) and Southeast Africa (0.123) to African Brazilians from Sao Paulo. These estimates are consistent with historical information. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Healthy Eating for Men

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    ... Men Women Home Health Wellness Healthy Aging Healthy Aging 4 Types of Foods to Help Boost Your ... clean plate, there are many negative long-term consequences. Try these rewards instead. View More Articles Freshly ...

  9. Men and Depression

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    ... in crisis? For more information Share Men and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels sad or irritable sometimes, or has ...

  10. Mens mobile health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levisen, Vinie Diana Hvidbak; Castaño, Francisco Mansilla; Jensen, Camilla Skovbjerg

    2016-01-01

    health applications in relation to fitness, heart rate, blood pressure, BMI, fat and muscle mass, BodyAge? Main messages: A CCT, that contributes with knowledge of how mobile health applications are impacting the physical activity levels among men with little or no education and frequency of how often......Abstract til: 9th European Public Health Conference – All for health – Health for All 9 – 12 November 2016. Danish title: Mænds mobile sundhed English title: Men mobile health Authors: Vinie Diana Hvidbak Levisen, Associated professor, RN, MLP Knowledge Center for Health Promotion University...... Preferences Keywords: Men with little or no education, physical health, mobile health application. Types of presentations: First presentation preference: E-Poster presentations Second presentation preference: Pitch presentation Abstract Background: Men mobile health contributes knowledge of how mobile health...

  11. Suicide in young men.

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    Pitman, Alexandra; Krysinska, Karolina; Osborn, David; King, Michael

    2012-06-23

    Suicide is second to only accidental death as the leading cause of mortality in young men across the world. Although suicide rates for young men have fallen in some high-income and middle-income countries since the 1990s, wider mortality measures indicate that rates remain high in specific regions, ethnic groups, and socioeconomic groups within those nations where rates have fallen, and that young men account for a substantial proportion of the economic cost of suicide. High-lethality methods of suicide are preferred by young men: hanging and firearms in high-income countries, pesticide poisoning in the Indian subcontinent, and charcoal-burning in east Asia. Risk factors for young men include psychiatric illness, substance misuse, lower socioeconomic status, rural residence, and single marital status. Population-level factors include unemployment, social deprivation, and media reporting of suicide. Few interventions to reduce suicides in young men have been assessed. Efforts to change help-seeking behaviour and to restrict access to frequently used methods hold the most promise. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HPV Infection in Men

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    Joel M. Palefsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While much is known about the natural history of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV infection and its consequences, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer, relatively little is known about the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and diseases in men. In part this reflects difficulties in penile sampling and visual assessment of penile lesions. Anal HPV infection and disease also remain poorly understood. Although HPV is transmitted sexually and infects the genitals of both sexes, the cervix remains biologically more vulnerable to malignant transformation than does the penis or anus in men. An understanding of male HPV infection is therefore important in terms of reducing transmission of HPV to women and improving women's health. However, it is also important due to the burden of disease in men, who may develop both penile and anal cancer, particularly among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Improved sampling techniques of the male genitalia and cohort studies in progress should provide important information on the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and disease in men, including risk factors for HPV acquisition and transmission. The impact of HPV vaccination in women on male anogenital HPV infection will also need to be assessed.

  13. Attracting men to vasectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, W R

    1998-01-01

    There is far less information available for men about vasectomy than there is available for women about comparable contraceptive services. Also, men do not have medical check-ups on a regular basis, and therefore have less contact with medical practitioners during which vasectomy could otherwise be discussed. Vasectomy needs to be promoted in order for men to learn about and accept it as their contraceptive method of choice. To that end, Marie Stopes International (MSI) launches a vasectomy promotion campaign annually which includes advertising in local newspapers and upon billboards at football stadiums. The campaigns use light-hearted and bold ideas, with some shock value. This approach helps to relax men who otherwise tend to be wary of both the surgical procedure and subsequent consequences of vasectomy. Prevailing social norms should, however, guide the content of promotional campaigns. The UK is one of only a few countries in the world where about the same proportions of men and women use sterilization; 16% of men and 15% of women have been sterilized. A MSI campaign in the UK which began during fall 1997 prompted an increase in the number of inquiries about vasectomy at the Marie Stopes Vasectomy Clinic. Promotional campaigns in developing countries have also been successful. It is also important that campaigns be put in the larger context of promoting all contraceptive methods.

  14. Dental age estimation in a Brazilian adult population using Cameriere’s method

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    Alana de Cássia Silva AZEVEDO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to develop a specific formula to estimate age in a Brazilian adult population and to compare the original formula from Cameriere to this Brazilian formula. The sample comprised 1,772 periapical radiographs from 443 subjects (219 men, 224 women that were organized into 12 groups according to sex (men or women and age (20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, and 70 years and older. The films were analyzed using the criteria described by Cameriere et al. (2004 and Adobe Photoshop®. We obtained a mean error of 8.56 (SD = 5.80 years for tooth 13, 7.99 (SD = 5.78 years for tooth 23, 8.38 (SD = 6.26 years for tooth 33, and 8.20 (SD = 6.54 years for tooth 43. When teeth were combined in the analysis, we observed lower mean errors. The Brazilian formula developed from this sample group was more accurate than Cameriere’s formula. However, other factors must be considered to improve age estimates in adults.

  15. Incidence of and temporal relationships between HIV, herpes simplex II virus, and syphilis among men who have sex with men in Bangkok, Thailand: an observational cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienkrua, Warunee; Todd, Catherine S; Chonwattana, Wannee; Wimonsate, Wipas; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Varangrat, Anchalee; Chitwarakorn, Anupong; van Griensven, Frits; Holtz, Timothy H

    2016-07-22

    High HIV incidence has been detected among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Thailand, but the relationship and timing of HIV, herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), and syphilis is unknown. This analysis measures incidence, temporal relationships, and risk factors for HIV, HSV-2, and syphilis among at-risk MSM in the Bangkok MSM Cohort Study. Between April 2006 and December 2010, 960 men negative for HIV, HSV-2, and syphilis at entry enrolled and contributed 12-60 months of follow-up data. Behavioral questionnaires were administered at each visit; testing for HIV antibody was performed at each visit, while testing for syphilis and HSV-2 were performed at 12 month intervals. We calculated HIV, HSV-2, and syphilis incidence, assessed risk factors with complementary log-log regression, and among co-infected men, measured temporal relationships between infections with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and paired t-test. The total number of infections and incidence density for HIV, HSV-2, and syphilis were 159 infections and 4.7 cases/100 PY (95 % Confidence Interval (CI): 4.0-5.4), 128 infections and 4.5/100 PY (95 % CI: 3.9-5.5), and 65 infections and 1.9/100 PY (95 % CI: 1.5-2.5), respectively. Among men acquiring >1 infection during the cohort period, mean time to HIV and HSV-2 infection was similar (2.5 vs. 2.9 years; p = 0.24), while syphilis occurred significantly later following HIV (4.0 vs. 2.8 years, p syphilis (Adjusted Hazards Ratio (AHR) = 3.49, 95 % CI: 1.89-6.42) or HIV (AHR = 2.26, 95 % CI: 1.47-3.48) acquisition during the cohort was significantly higher among men with incident HSV-2 infection. No single independent behavioral factor was common to HIV, HSV-2, and syphilis acquisition. HIV and HSV-2 incidence was high among this Thai MSM cohort. However, acquisition of HIV and co-infection with either HSV-2 or syphilis was low during the time frame men were in the cohort. Evaluation of behavioral risk factors for these infections suggests

  16. Replication Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus in Co-Infected Patients in Chinese Population.

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    Ge Yu

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infections contributes to a substantial proportion of liver disease worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and virological features of HBV-HCV co-infection.Demographic data were collected for 3238 high-risk people from an HCV-endemic region in China. Laboratory tests included HCV antibody and HBV serological markers, liver function tests, and routine blood analysis. Anti-HCV positive samples were analyzed for HCV RNA levels and subgenotypes. HBsAg-positive samples were tested for HBV DNA.A total of 1468 patients had chronic HCV and/or HBV infections. Among them, 1200 individuals were classified as HCV mono-infected, 161 were classified as HBV mono-infected, and 107 were classified as co-infected. The HBV-HCV co-infected patients not only had a lower HBV DNA positive rate compared to HBV mono-infected patients (84.1% versus 94.4%, respectively; P < 0.001. The median HCV RNA levels in HBV-HCV co-infected patients were significantly lower than those in the HCV mono-infected patients (1.18[Interquartile range (IQR 0-5.57] versus 5.87[IQR, 3.54-6.71] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P < 0.001. Furthermore, co-infected patients were less likely to have detectable HCV RNA levels than HCV mono-infected patients (23.4% versus 56.5%, respectively; P < 0.001. Those HBV-HCV co-infected patients had significantly lower median HBV DNA levels than those mono-infected with HBV (1.97[IQR, 1.3-3.43] versus 3.06[IQR, 2-4.28] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P < 0.001. The HBV-HCV co-infection group had higher ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, APRI and FIB-4 levels, but lower ALB and total platelet compared to the HBV mono-infection group, and similar to that of the HCV mono-infected group.These results suggest that co-infection with HCV and HBV inhibits the replication of both viruses. The serologic results of HBV-HCV co-infection in patients suggests more liver injury compared to HBV mono-infected patients, but is

  17. Epidemiological profile and risk factors of HIV and HBV/HCV co-infection in Fujian Province, southeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shouli; Yan, Pingping; Yang, Tianfei; Wang, Zhenghua; Yan, Yansheng

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the epidemiological features of HIV-infected subjects co-infected with HBV/HCV in Fujian Province, southeastern China, and identify the risk factors. Blood samples were collected from 2,028 HIV antibody-positive subjects in Fujian Province. Serum HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody were detected, and CD4(+) T cell count was measured. Of the 2,028 subjects, the prevalence of HIV-HBV, HIV-HCV, and HIV-HBV-HCV co-infections was 16.22%, 3.7%, and 0.79%, respectively. Man (OR = 1.912, 95% CI: 1.371-2.667), key population (OR = 0.756, 95% CI: 0.57-0.976) and detainee (OR = 0.486, 95% CI: 0.259-0.909) were risk factors of HIV-HBV co-infection, and man (OR = 2.227, 95% CI: 1.096-4.525), minority (OR = 5.04, 95% CI: 1.696-14.98), junior high school or lower education (OR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.071-5.025), intravenous drug use (OR = 38.46, 95% CI: 11.46-129.11) and detainee (OR = 5.687, 95% CI: 2.44-13.25) were risk factors of HIV-HCV co-infection. In addition, a lower mean CD4(+) T cell count was measured in HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects than in HIV-infected subjects among the untreated individuals, while in the treated populations, a higher mean CD4(+) T cell count was detected in HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects than in HIV-infected subjects. HIV co-infection with HBV or HCV, notably HIV-HBV co-infection, is widespread in southeastern China. Hepatitis virus screening should be included in monitoring of HIV infection, and HIV and hepatitis virus co-infection should be considered during the development of HIV antiretroviral therapy scheme. J. Med. Virol. 89:443-449, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Economic and social characteristics of the Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, T G

    1982-01-01

    The question of whether Brazilians have improved their economic situation since 1970 is controversial. A number of questions on the Brazilian census of 1980 dealt with the economic and social characteristics of the population. The usefulness of census data lies in their capacity to indicate trends every 10 years. Consequently, one can get some idea of whether Brazil is making progress in certain aspects of modernization or in improving the skills and living conditions of the people. Census data have limitations. They indicate averages, not specific cases. They fail to raise a number of questions about economic and social conditions that would improve understanding. Discussion is focused on population structure and the economy, income, housing, education, and health. Brazil is continuing the process of modernization by which population shifts from the primary sector (agriculture and mining) into other sectors of the economy. The 14.88% of the work force in agriculture, livestock, and fishing represent about 30% of the potentially economically active (PEA) population. 1/3 of the population is still rural, but the trend since 1940 is striking. The momentum of decline intensified in both 1960-70 and 1970-80, reflecting a process of abandoning small farms, mechanizing larger farms, and a general flow of population to the cities. All other sectors of the economy have increased the proportion of people working in them. The data of 1980 reflect a period of sustained economic growth that culminated in that year with an increase of 8%. In 1981 and 1982, Brazil had been in a recession so that in 1983 some of these figures might have changed. The dispute began when the results of the 1970 census were used to show that income was becoming more concentrated, i.e., the top percentages, in comparison with 1960, received a larger share of national income, while the lowest percentages received less. The differences in income between men and women is particularly strong in the

  19. Coinfection of Schistosoma Species with Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abruzzi, Amy; Fried, Bernard; Alikhan, Sukaina B

    2016-01-01

    Although a considerable number of studies have been undertaken to date, it is still controversial as to whether or not coinfection with schistosomiasis increases the susceptibility to or progression from Hepatitis B virus (HBV) or Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This review is a closer examination of the key studies conducted on human populations on clinical factors that were published in English between 1975 and January 2015. Our review is mainly based on tables containing the salient information, which are arranged first by study population, country of study and publication date. We provide further explanation, clarification and discussion in the text. As such, it includes both studies that have been conducted on general populations who are largely asymptomatic for clinical disease (Table 3), as well as those focussing on special populations, which are usually comprised of clinical patients. These special populations have been presented as follows: subjects with chronic liver disease or related conditions such as cirrhosis, Table 4; subjects with primary liver cancer, Table 5; subjects with schistosomiasis, Table 6; subjects with acute or chronic hepatitis resulting from HBV, Table 7 and, subjects with HCV, Table 8. We have presented studies that compared two mono-infected groups with one that is coinfected separately in Table 9, as these offer us the best basis from which to evaluate if any synergistic effects accompany coinfection. A number of factors contributed to the results reported in our tables. These included, but are not limited to: subject selection (i.e. asymptomatic cases typically drawn from the general population vs subjects presenting to a hospital or clinic with clinical disease); study design, which directly impacts our ability to infer causality (i.e. case series, cross-sectional, case-control, cohort study); use and choice of control population (i.e. apparently healthy subjects vs other hospital patients vs none); sample size, which

  20. Brazilian scientific production on herbal medicines used in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    R.D. Castro; J.A. Oliveira; Vasconcelos,L.C.; Maciel,P.P.; Brasil,V.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to critically analyze the scientific production published in specialized Brazilian journals concerning the use of medicinal plants in dentistry. A literature review was carried out using an indirect documentation technique by means of a bibliographical study. Four examiners performed independent searches in Brazilian journals of medicinal plants indexed in the database SciELO (Brazilian Journal of Pharmacognosy; Brazilian Journal of Medicinal Plants; Brazilian ...

  1. Co-infection with Influenza Viruses and Influenza-Like Virus During the 2015/2016 Epidemic Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, K; Cieślak, K; Kowalczyk, D; Brydak, L B

    2017-01-01

    Concerning viral infection of the respiratory system, a single virus can cause a variety of clinical symptoms and the same set of symptoms can be caused by different viruses. Moreover, infection is often caused by a combination of viruses acting at the same time. The present study demonstrates, using multiplex RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR, that in the 2015/2016 influenza season, co-infections were confirmed in patients aged 1 month to 90 years. We found 73 co-infections involving influenza viruses, 17 involving influenza viruses and influenza-like viruses, and six involving influenza-like viruses. The first type of co-infections above mentioned was the most common, amounting to 51 cases, with type A and B viruses occurring simultaneously. There also were four cases of co-infections with influenza virus A/H1N1/pdm09 and A/H1N1/ subtypes and two cases with A/H1N1/pdm09 and A/H3N2/ subtypes. The 2015/2016 epidemic season was characterized by a higher number of confirmed co-infections compared with the previous seasons. Infections by more than one respiratory virus were most often found in children and in individuals aged over 65.

  2. Activation of extrinsic apoptosis pathway in HCV monoinfected and HIV-HCV coinfected patients, irrespective of liver disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuth, Thijs; Van Baarle, Debbie; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Van Erpecum, Karel J; Siersema, Peter D; Arends, Joop E

    2014-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased levels of peripheral T cell apoptosis. We aimed to study whether T cell apoptosis markers indicate pathways that may contribute to clinical progression in HCV monoinfected and HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Activation of the extrinsic apoptosis pathways was measured by levels of death receptor Fas, initiator caspase 8 and effector caspases 3 and 7 activity and Annexin V binding on peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells of HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients, as well as healthy controls and HIV-infected, hepatitis B virus-infected and primary biliary cirrhosis disease controls. Association with liver fibrosis was assessed by biopsy or by transient elastography. HCV monoinfected and HIV-HCV coinfected patients displayed enhanced peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cell apoptosis. Caspase 8 activity was highest in HIV-HCV coinfection, without enhanced downstream activity of caspases 3 and 7. Level of peripheral T cell apoptosis was independent of liver fibrosis or other disease parameters in all disease groups. The extrinsic apoptosis pathway is upregulated in HCV monoinfection and HIV-HCV coinfection, but this is independent of liver disease severity.

  3. Predicting Avian Influenza Co-Infection with H5N1 and H9N2 in Northern Egypt

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    Sean G. Young

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human outbreaks with avian influenza have been, so far, constrained by poor viral adaptation to non-avian hosts. This could be overcome via co-infection, whereby two strains share genetic material, allowing new hybrid strains to emerge. Identifying areas where co-infection is most likely can help target spaces for increased surveillance. Ecological niche modeling using remotely-sensed data can be used for this purpose. H5N1 and H9N2 influenza subtypes are endemic in Egyptian poultry. From 2006 to 2015, over 20,000 poultry and wild birds were tested at farms and live bird markets. Using ecological niche modeling we identified environmental, behavioral, and population characteristics of H5N1 and H9N2 niches within Egypt. Niches differed markedly by subtype. The subtype niches were combined to model co-infection potential with known occurrences used for validation. The distance to live bird markets was a strong predictor of co-infection. Using only single-subtype influenza outbreaks and publicly available ecological data, we identified areas of co-infection potential with high accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC 0.991.

  4. Proteomics approach to understand reduced clearance of mycobacteria and high viral titers during HIV-mycobacteria co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Rakesh; Dhali, Snigdha; Rizvi, Arshad; Sankati, Swetha; Vemula, Mani Harika; Mahajan, Gaurang; Rapole, Srikanth; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-03-01

    Environmental mycobacteria, highly prevalent in natural and artificial (including chlorinated municipal water) niches, are emerging as new threat to human health, especially to HIV-infected population. These seemingly harmless non-pathogenic mycobacteria, which are otherwise cleared, establish as opportunistic infections adding to HIV-associated complications. Although immune-evading strategies of pathogenic mycobacteria are known, the mechanisms underlying the early events by which opportunistic mycobacteria establish infection in macrophages and influencing HIV infection are unclear. Proteomics of phagosome-enriched fractions from Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) mono-infected and HIV-M. bovis BCG co-infected THP-1 cells by LC-MALDI-MS/MS revealed differential distribution of 260 proteins. Validation of the proteomics data showed that HIV co-infection helped the survival of non-pathogenic mycobacteria by obstructing phagosome maturation, promoting lipid biogenesis and increasing intracellular ATP equivalents. In turn, mycobacterial co-infection up-regulated purinergic receptors in macrophages that are known to support HIV entry, explaining increased viral titers during co-infection. The mutualism was reconfirmed using clinically relevant opportunistic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium phlei that exhibited increased survival during co-infection, together with increase in HIV titers. Additionally, the catalogued proteins in the study provide new leads that will significantly add to the understanding of the biology of opportunistic mycobacteria and HIV coalition. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis impairs HIV-Specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Shivan; Govender, Pamla; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Pillay, Mona; Ghebremichael, Musie; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Porichis, Filippos; Kasprowicz, Victoria O

    2015-01-01

    The ability of antigen-specific T cells to simultaneously produce multiple cytokines is thought to correlate with the functional capacity and efficacy of T cells. These 'polyfunctional' T cells have been associated with control of HIV. We aimed to assess the impact of co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) on HIV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell function. We assessed T cell functionality in 34 South African adults by investigating the IFN-y, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-21 and IL-17 cytokine secretion capacity, using polychromatic flow cytometry, following HIV Gag-specific stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We show that MTB is associated with lower HIV-specific T cell function in co-infected as compared to HIV mono-infected individuals. This decline in function was greatest in co-infection with active Tuberculosis (TB) compared to co-infection with latent MTB (LTBI), suggesting that mycobacterial load may contribute to this loss of function. The described impact of MTB on HIV-specific T cell function may be a mechanism for increased HIV disease progression in co-infected subjects as functionally impaired T cells may be less able to control HIV.

  6. Prevalence of small ruminant lentivirus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis co-infection in Ontario dairy sheep and dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonos, Nancy; Bauman, Cathy; Menzies, Paula; Wootton, Sarah K; Karrow, Niel A

    2017-04-01

    Infection with small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) causes a variety of chronic inflammatory conditions that limit production. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is also a major production-limiting disease of sheep and goats, which causes severe inflammation of the small intestine. Previous studies have indicated that both SRLV and MAP are widespread in small ruminants in Ontario. This study estimated the prevalence of SRLV and MAP co-infection. Serum samples that were previously tested for MAP infection were re-tested for SRLV. The apparent prevalence of co-infection was low, with 3.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9 to 5.9] and 14.3% (95% CI: 11.6 to 17.5) of sheep and goats respectively, positive for both infections. However, co-infection is widespread with 36.8% (95% CI: 19.1 to 59.1) and 71.4% (95% CI: 52.8 to 84.9) of sheep and goat farms with 1 or more co-infected animals. A significant association was found between SRLV seropositivity and MAP fecal culture (P = 0.021), suggesting that co-infected goats may be more likely to shed MAP in their feces.

  7. Immunological alterations and associated diseases in mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) naturally co-infected with SIV and STLV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souquière, Sandrine; Makuwa, Maria; Sallé, Bettina; Lepelletier, Yves; Mortreux, Franck; Hermine, Olivier; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2014-04-01

    Mandrills are naturally infected with simian T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 (STLV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mnd. In humans, dual infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) may worsen their clinical outcome. We evaluated the effect of co-infection in mandrills on viral burden, changes in T-cell subsets and clinical outcome. The SIV viral load was higher in SIV-infected mandrills than in co-infected animals, whereas the STLV-1 proviral load was higher in co-infected than in mono-infected groups. Dually infected mandrills had a statistically significantly lower CD4+ T-cell count, a lower proportion of naive CD8+ T cells and a higher proportion of central memory cells. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from SIV-infected animals had a lower percentage of Ki67 than those from the other groups. Co-infected monkeys had higher percentages of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Two co-infected mandrills with high immune activation and clonal integration of STLV provirus showed pathological manifestations (infective dermatitis and generalised scabies) rarely encountered in nonhuman primates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Socio-demographic determinants of coinfections by HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses in central Italian prisoners

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    De Vito Elisabetta

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coinfections HIV/HCV/HBV are an important health issue in penitentiary communities. The aim of the study was to examine HIV, HBV and HCV coinfections determinants amongst prisoners in the jails of Southern Lazio (Central Italy, in the period 1995–2000. Methods Diagnosis of seropositivities for HIV, HBV and HCV was made using ELISA method. A multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to verify the influence of socio-demographic factors on the HIV/HBV/HCV coinfections. Results HIV/HCV, HBV/HCV and HIV/HBV coinfections were detected in 42 (4%, 203 (17.9% and 31 (2.9% inmates, respectively. These coinfections are significantly associated with the status of drug addiction (OR = 16.02; p = 0.012; OR = 4.15; p Conclusion The prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV seropositivity in jails suggests that information and education programs for inmates could be useful to reduce the spread of such infections.

  9. Hepatitis C knowledge among gay and other homosexually active men in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Toby; Hopwood, Max; Aggleton, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Gay and other homosexually active men (hereafter 'gay men') are at elevated risk of becoming infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) via injecting drug use and sexual risk practices. This paper aimed to measure HCV knowledge among gay men in Australia and whether knowledge differed according to HCV risk. In 2013, a cross-sectional, online survey of 405 Australian gay men explored the social aspects of HCV. Bivariate and multivariate linear regressions were used to examine factors associated with higher HCV knowledge. The mean age of respondents was 39.2 years (SD = 13.3), and most men (75.3%) were born in Australia. According to self-report, 32.1% were HIV-positive, 3.0% were HCV-positive and 8.9% were HIV/HCV co-infected. The mean number of correct HCV knowledge items was 8.2 (SD = 3.9; range 0-15). In a multivariate analysis, higher HCV knowledge was associated with higher educational attainment, being HCV-positive, being HIV-positive and injecting drug use. HCV knowledge among gay men was moderately good, although knowledge of testing, treatment and natural history of HCV was generally quite poor. Encouragingly, higher knowledge was reported among men at highest HCV risk. Viral hepatitis and HIV organisations, together with general practitioners and other health services, should continue to target gay men at a high risk of acquiring HCV with education and health promotion. [Lea T, Hopwood M, Aggleton P. Hepatitis C knowledge among gay and other homosexually active men in Australia. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:477-483]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. Social networks of men who have sex with men: a study of recruitment chains using Respondent Driven Sampling in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil

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    Sandra Mara Silva Brignol

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Social and sexual contact networks between men who have sex with men (MSM play an important role in understanding the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs. In Salvador (Bahia State, Brazil, one of the cities in the survey Behavior, Attitudes, Practices, and Prevalence of HIV and Syphilis among Men Who Have Sex with Men in 10 Brazilian Cities, data were collected in 2008/2009 from a sample of 383 MSM using Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS. Network analysis was used to study friendship networks and sexual partner networks. The study also focused on the association between the number of links (degree and the number of sexual partners, in addition to socio-demographic characteristics. The networks’ structure potentially facilitates HIV transmission. However, the same networks can also be used to spread messages on STI/HIV prevention, since the proximity and similarity of MSM in these networks can encourage behavior change and positive attitudes towards prevention.

  11. Criteria for central obesity in a Brazilian population: impact on metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Paulo José Bastos; Lessa, Ines; de Almeida Filho, Naomar; Magalhães, Lucélia Batista N Cunha; Araújo, Jenny

    2006-10-01

    To identify and propose the optimal waist circumference cut-off points (WCp) for the diagnosis of central obesity (CO) in a Brazilian population, so as to compare these cut-off points with those recommended by the ATPIII (WC-ATPIII), and to estimate the difference in prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome (MS) using the two criteria. Cross-sectional study conducted in a population subgroup of 1439 adults in the city of Salvador, Brazil. ROC curves of waist circumference (WC) were plotted to identify diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity. ROC curve sensitivity and specificity values >60% and the closest to each other were used to define WCp. The prevalence of MS was estimated using WCp and WC-ATPIII. Eight hundred and twenty nine women comprised 57.7% of the sample. The WCp selected were 84 cm for women and 88 cm for men. These cut-off points detected DM with a 68.7% and 70% sensitivity, and a 66.2% and 68.3% specificity, respectively. For obesity, sensitivity and specificity were 79.8% and 77.6% in women and 64.3% and 71.6% in men, respectively. Using WC-ATPIII, 88 cm (for women) and 102 cm (for men), the sensitivity was 53.3% and 26.5%, respectively, to diagnose DM. For obesity, sensitivity was 66.5% (for women) and 28.6% (for men). The prevalence of MS using WCp was 23.7%, 95%CI (21.6-25.9), whereas using WC-ATPIII it was 19.0%, 95%CI (17.1-20.9), 1.2 times higher using WCp. WC-ATPIII were inappropriate and underestimated the prevalence of MS in the population studied, particularly among men. We suggest that the WC cut-off points > 84 cm for women and > 88 cm for men should be tested in other Brazilian populations.

  12. Testing GxG interactions between coinfecting microbial parasite genotypes within hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca D Schulte

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Host-parasite interactions represent one of the strongest selection pressures in nature. They are often governed by genotype-specific (GxG interactions resulting in host genotypes that differ in resistance and parasite genotypes that differ in virulence depending on the antagonist’s genotype. Another type of GxG interactions, which is often neglected but which certainly influences host-parasite interactions, are those between coinfecting parasite genotypes. Mechanistically, within-host parasite interactions may range from competition for limited host resources to cooperation for more efficient host exploitation. The exact type of interaction, i.e. whether competitive or cooperative, is known to affect life-history traits such as virulence. However, the latter has been shown for chosen genotype combinations only, not considering whether the specific genotype combination per se may influence the interaction (i.e. GxG interactions. Here, we want to test for the presence of GxG interactions between coinfections of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis infecting the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans by combining two non-pathogenic and five pathogenic strains in all possible ways. Furthermore, we evaluate whether the type of interaction, reflected by the direction of virulence change of multiple compared to single infections, is genotype-specific. Generally, we found no indication for GxG interactions between non-pathogenic and pathogenic bacterial strains, indicating that virulence of pathogenic strains is equally affected by both non-pathogenic strains. Specific genotype combinations, however, differ in the strength of virulence change, indicating that the interaction type between coinfecting parasite strains and thus the virulence mechanism is specific for different genotype combinations. Such interactions are expected to influence host-parasite interactions and to have strong implications for coevolution.

  13. Parasite co-infections and their impact on survival of indigenous cattle.

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    Samuel M Thumbi

    Full Text Available In natural populations, individuals may be infected with multiple distinct pathogens at a time. These pathogens may act independently or interact with each other and the host through various mechanisms, with resultant varying outcomes on host health and survival. To study effects of pathogens and their interactions on host survival, we followed 548 zebu cattle during their first year of life, determining their infection and clinical status every 5 weeks. Using a combination of clinical signs observed before death, laboratory diagnostic test results, gross-lesions on post-mortem examination, histo-pathology results and survival analysis statistical techniques, cause-specific aetiology for each death case were determined, and effect of co-infections in observed mortality patterns. East Coast fever (ECF caused by protozoan parasite Theileria parva and haemonchosis were the most important diseases associated with calf mortality, together accounting for over half (52% of all deaths due to infectious diseases. Co-infection with Trypanosoma species increased the hazard for ECF death by 6 times (1.4-25; 95% CI. In addition, the hazard for ECF death was increased in the presence of Strongyle eggs, and this was burden dependent. An increase by 1000 Strongyle eggs per gram of faeces count was associated with a 1.5 times (1.4-1.6; 95% CI increase in the hazard for ECF mortality. Deaths due to haemonchosis were burden dependent, with a 70% increase in hazard for death for every increase in strongyle eggs per gram count of 1000. These findings have important implications for disease control strategies, suggesting a need to consider co-infections in epidemiological studies as opposed to single-pathogen focus, and benefits of an integrated approach to helminths and East Coast fever disease control.

  14. Promotion and Rescue of Intracellular Brucella neotomae Replication during Coinfection with Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kirby, James E

    2017-05-01

    We established a new Brucella neotomae in vitro model system for study of type IV secretion system-dependent (T4SS) pathogenesis in the Brucella genus. Importantly, B. neotomae is a rodent pathogen, and unlike B. abortus , B. melitensis , and B. suis , B. neotomae has not been observed to infect humans. It therefore can be handled more facilely using biosafety level 2 practices. More particularly, using a series of novel fluorescent protein and lux operon reporter systems to differentially label pathogens and track intracellular replication, we confirmed T4SS-dependent intracellular growth of B. neotomae in macrophage cell lines. Furthermore, B. neotomae exhibited early endosomal (LAMP-1) and late endoplasmic reticulum (calreticulin)-associated phagosome maturation. These findings recapitulate prior observations for human-pathogenic Brucella spp. In addition, during coinfection experiments with Legionella pneumophila , we found that defective intracellular replication of a B. neotomae T4SS virB4 mutant was rescued and baseline levels of intracellular replication of wild-type B. neotomae were significantly stimulated by coinfection with wild-type but not T4SS mutant L. pneumophila Using confocal microscopy, it was determined that intracellular colocalization of B. neotomae and L. pneumophila was required for rescue and that colocalization came at a cost to L. pneumophila fitness. These findings were not completely expected based on known temporal and qualitative differences in the intracellular life cycles of these two pathogens. Taken together, we have developed a new system for studying in vitro Brucella pathogenesis and found a remarkable T4SS-dependent interplay between Brucella and Legionella during macrophage coinfection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  16. Co-infection of HIV and HBV in voluntary counseling and testing center in Abidjan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouassi-M ’Bengue A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the co-infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV and immune deficiency virus (HIV among clients consulting at the Voluntary Counseling and Testing Center (VCT Center of the Institut Pasteur de C ôte d ’Ivoire (IPCI. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to June 2010 at the VCT of IPCI. All clients attending the VCT of IPCI for HIV test after having signed the informed consent form were included in the study. Venous blood samples were collected from the clients after an interview. Then the rapid tests for screening of HIV infection (Determine HIV 1/2 of Abbott and Genie II HIV-1/HIV-2, Bio-Rad were performed. As for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg test, it was performed using ELISA test system using Monolisa HBsAg Ultra-Bio-Rad. Results: Of 278 samples analyzed, 30 were positive to antibody against HIV-1, giving a seroprevalence of about 10.8%, and 35 were positive to HBsAg, giving a seroprevalence of 12.6%. As for co-infection of HIV and HBV, it was 7/278 cases about 2.5%. Conclusions: It can be concluded that co-infection of HBV and HIV is relatively low among clients consulting at the VCT of the IPCI. Serological surveillance should be systematic in various HIV testing centers in the country. The use of rapid tests for detection of HBsAg allows a lot of tests to be realized. However, the choice of these tests depends on the evaluation results in reference laboratories and situation on ground.

  17. Cellular Architecture of Spinal Granulomas and the Immunological Response in Tuberculosis Patients Coinfected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debapriya; Danaviah, Siva; Muema, Daniel M; Akilimali, Ngomu Akeem; Moodley, Prashini; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Das, Gobardhan

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and HIV are individually responsible for the most deaths worldwide among all infectious agents, and coinfection with M.tb and HIV is a significant public health challenge in the developing world. Although the lung is the primary target organ for tuberculosis (TB), M.tb can also cause extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) such as in the bones and joints. Treatment of EPTB is much more challenging than treatment of pulmonary TB. The hallmark of the host immune response against TB is the formation of organized structures called granulomas that are infiltrated with immune cells and are rich in cytokines and chemokines. Inside granulomas, the host confines the M.tb bacteria to a particular region of the organ and avoids dispersion. In this study, we analyzed immune cells in bone granulomas of patients with EPTB that are also coinfected with HIV. We found that HIV-infected TB patients have dispersed bone granulomas, with reduced T cell numbers and a concomitant increase in plasma cells. Additionally, HIV-infected patients exhibited dramatically increased serum levels of IgM and IgG1 antibodies, which is indicative of T-cell-independent B-cell activation and mucosal T-cell activation, respectively. Interestingly, we also observed that CD29+ stem cells are increased in HIV-TB coinfection, suggesting a link with HIV infection. Therefore, our work provides new insights into the architecture of spinal TB granulomas and the role of B-cells and humoral immunity against a highly infectious intracellular pathogen. We propose that our findings will inform biomarker identification for EPTB and possibly the development of related therapeutics and/or vaccines to protect HIV-infected patients against disseminated TB.

  18. Seroprevalence of HBV, HCV & HIV co-infection and risk factors analysis in Tripoli-Libya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A Daw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 1998 Libya experienced a major outbreak of multiple blood borne viral hepatitis and HIV infections. Since then, no studies have been done on the epidemic features and risk factors of HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection among the general population. METHODS: A prospective study was carried out using a multi-centre clustering method to collect samples from the general population. The participants were interviewed, and relevant information was collected, including socio-demographic, ethnic, and geographic variables. This information was correlated with the risk factors involved in the transmission of HBV, HCV and HIV. Blood samples were collected and the sera were tested for HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV using enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: A total of 9,170 participants from the nine districts of Tripoli were enrolled. The average prevalence of HBsAg was 3.7%, anti-HCV 0.9%, anti-HIV 0.15% and co-infection 0.02%. The prevalence varied from one district to another. HBV was more prevalent among those aged over 50 years and was associated with family history. Anti-HCV and anti-HIV were more prevalent among those aged 20-40 years. Intravenous drug use and blood transfusion were the main risk factors for HCV and HIV infection. CONCLUSION: HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection are relatively common in Libya. High prevalence was associated with geographic, ethnic and socioeconomic variability within the community. HCV and HIV infections among the younger age groups are becoming an alarming issue. Regulations and health care education need to be implemented and longer term follow-up should be planned.

  19. Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir for HCV in Patients Coinfected with HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naggie, Susanna; Cooper, Curtis; Saag, Michael; Workowski, Kimberly; Ruane, Peter; Towner, William J.; Marks, Kristen; Luetkemeyer, Anne; Baden, Rachel P.; Sax, Paul E.; Gane, Edward; Santana-Bagur, Jorge; Stamm, Luisa M.; Yang, Jenny C.; German, Polina; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Ni, Liyun; Pang, Phillip S.; McHutchison, John G.; Stedman, Catherine A.M.; Morales-Ramirez, Javier O.; Bräu, Norbert; Jayaweera, Dushyantha; Colson, Amy E.; Tebas, Pablo; Wong, David K.; Dieterich, Douglas; Sulkowski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Effective treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains an unmet medical need. METHODS We conducted a multicenter, single-group, open-label study involving patients coinfected with HIV-1 and genotype 1 or 4 HCV receiving an antiretroviral regimen of tenofovir and emtricitabine with efavirenz, rilpivirine, or raltegravir. All patients received ledipasvir, an NS5A inhibitor, and sofosbuvir, a nucleotide polymerase inhibitor, as a single fixed-dose combination for 12 weeks. The primary end point was a sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after the end of therapy. RESULTS Of the 335 patients enrolled, 34% were black, 55% had been previously treated for HCV, and 20% had cirrhosis. Overall, 322 patients (96%) had a sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after the end of therapy (95% confidence interval [CI], 93 to 98), including rates of 96% (95% CI, 93 to 98) in patients with HCV genotype 1a, 96% (95% CI, 89 to 99) in those with HCV genotype 1b, and 100% (95% CI, 63 to 100) in those with HCV genotype 4. Rates of sustained virologic response were similar regardless of previous treatment or the presence of cirrhosis. Of the 13 patients who did not have a sustained virologic response, 10 had a relapse after the end of treatment. No patient had confirmed HIV-1 viro-logic rebound. The most common adverse events were headache (25%), fatigue (21%), and diarrhea (11%). No patient discontinued treatment because of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for 12 weeks provided high rates of sustained virologic response in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HCV genotype 1 or 4. (Funded by Gilead Sciences; ION-4 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02073656.) PMID:26196665

  20. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1-4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A-F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011-2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12-24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV-Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV-bocavirus / bocavirus-influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12-24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis.

  1. Asymptomatic falciparum malaria and intestinal helminths co-infection among school children in Osogbo, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola Ojurongbe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria and intestinal helminths are parasitic diseases causing high morbidity and mortality in most tropical parts of the world, where climatic conditions and sanitation practices favor their prevalence. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and possible impact of falciparum malaria and intestinal helminths co-infection among school children in Kajola, Osun state, Nigeria. Methods: Fresh stool and blood samples were collected from 117 primary school children age range 4-15 years. The stool samples were processed using both Kato-Katz and formol-ether concentration techniques and microscopically examined for intestinal parasitic infections. Blood was collected by finger prick to determine malaria parasitemia using thick film method; and packed cell volume (PCV was determined by hematocrit. Univariate analysis and chi-square statistical tests were used to analyze the data. Results: The prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum, intestinal helminth infections, and co-infection of malaria and helminth in the study were 25.6%, 40.2% and 4.3%, respectively. Five species of intestinal helminths were recovered from the stool samples and these were Ascaris lumbricoides (34.2%, hookworm (5.1%, Trichuris trichiura (2.6%, Diphyllobothrium latum (0.9% and Trichostrongylus species (0.9%. For the co-infection of both malaria and intestinal helminths, females (5.9% were more infected than males (2.0% but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.3978. Children who were infected with helminths were equally likely to be infected with malaria as children without intestinal helminths [Risk Ratio (RR = 0.7295]. Children with A. lumbricoides (RR = 1.359 were also likely to be infected with P. falciparum as compared with uninfected children. Conclusions: Asymptomatic falciparum malaria and intestinal helminth infections do co-exist without clinical symp-toms in school children in Nigeria.

  2. Fatal co-infection with leptospirosis and dengue in a Sri Lankan male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Aruna; Gnanapragash, Nanthini; Ranasinghe, Gayan; Ragunathan, Murugapillai K

    2015-08-13

    Leptospirosis and dengue are endemic in countries with subtropical or tropical climates and have epidemic potential. The incidence of both these diseases peaks during monsoons and both diseases present with similar clinical manifestations making differentiation of leptospirosis from dengue difficult. It is important to distinguish leptospirosis from dengue as early antibiotic therapy in leptospirosis leads to a favourable outcome, while dengue has no specific treatment, yet early recognition is vital for close monitoring and careful fluid management. Despite the high prevalence of both these infections, co-infection of leptospirosis and dengue has not been reported previously in Sri Lanka. We present the first case of co-infection with leptospirosis and dengue in a Sri Lankan male. A 52 year old previously healthy Sri Lankan male was admitted to our facility with a history of fever for 4 days associated with headache, generalized myalgia, reduced urine output. On examination, he was rational, hypotensive, tacycardic, tacypneic and he did not have clinical evidence of fluid leakage or pneumonitis. His serology showed high titre of dengue IgG and IgM and rising titre of leptospirosis antibody. His course of illness was complicated with septic shock, acute renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation and he succumbed to his illness on the eighth day of admission. In areas where both leptospirosis and dengue are endemic, both infections should be include in the differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute febrile illness and should consider the possibility of co-infection. Leptospirosis, being a condition having definitive antibiotic therapy, should always be ruled out even if the patient is positive for dengue serology in regions endemic to both these diseases as early initiation of antibiotic therapy can reduce mortality significantly.

  3. Diagnosis of treponemal co-infection in HIV-infected West Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoojee, Yaasir; Tan, Grace; Gittins, Sandra; Sarfo, Stephen; Stephenson, Lisa; Carrington, David; Bedu-Addo, George; Phillips, Richard; Appiah, Lambert T; Chadwick, David

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the performance of two enzyme immunoassays (EIA), Murex and ICE, and the Determine TP point-of-care test (POCT) in diagnosing treponemal infection (syphilis or yaws) in patients attending a large HIV clinic in Ghana; to determine the prevalence of treponemal co-infections; and to characterise demographic and clinical features of patients with infection. Samples were tested with EIAs and rapid plasma reagin (RPR), then POCT and reference assays for Treponema pallidum to determine prevalence of active and past infection. Sensitivity and specificity of each assay were calculated and demographic and clinical characteristics of patients compared. Data were collected from case notes of patients retrospectively. Overall, 45/284 patient samples (14.8%, 95% CI, 11.1-19.4%) were Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) positive, and of these, 27 (64.3%) were RPR positive and 4 (8.9%) were treponemal IgM positive. Both EIAs and Determine TP POCT showed high sensitivities and specificities for identifying infection although RPR was less reliable. Clinical features of syphilis or yaws were rarely identified in TPPA-positive patients suggesting most had previous or late latent infection. Treatment of various intercurrent infections using short courses of antibiotics active against T. pallidum was common in the clinic. A high proportion of this HIV-infected cohort showed evidence of treponemal infection. Both EIAs as well as the POCT were practical and effective at diagnosing treponemal co-infection in this setting. RPR alone was unreliable at identifying active treponemal co-infection, however might be useful in some settings where treponemal-specific assays are unaffordable. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Co-infecting Reptarenaviruses Can Be Vertically Transmitted in Boa Constrictor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Keller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD is an often fatal disease affecting mainly constrictor snakes. BIBD has been associated with infection, and more recently with coinfection, by various reptarenavirus species (family Arenaviridae. Thus far BIBD has only been reported in captive snakes, and neither the incubation period nor the route of transmission are known. Herein we provide strong evidence that co-infecting reptarenavirus species can be vertically transmitted in Boa constrictor. In total we examined five B. constrictor clutches with offspring ranging in age from embryos over perinatal abortions to juveniles. The mother and/or father of each clutch were initially diagnosed with BIBD and/or reptarenavirus infection by detection of the pathognomonic inclusion bodies (IB and/or reptarenaviral RNA. By applying next-generation sequencing and de novo sequence assembly we determined the "reptarenavirome" of each clutch, yielding several nearly complete L and S segments of multiple reptarenaviruses. We further confirmed vertical transmission of the co-infecting reptarenaviruses by species-specific RT-PCR from samples of parental animals and offspring. Curiously, not all offspring obtained the full parental "reptarenavirome". We extended our findings by an in vitro approach; cell cultures derived from embryonal samples rapidly developed IB and promoted replication of some or all parental viruses. In the tissues of embryos and perinatal abortions, viral antigen was sometimes detected, but IB were consistently seen only in the juvenile snakes from the age of 2 mo onwards. In addition to demonstrating vertical transmission of multiple species, our results also indicate that reptarenavirus infection induces BIBD over time in the offspring.

  5. Seroprevalence of HBV, HCV & HIV co-infection and risk factors analysis in Tripoli-Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, Mohamed A; Shabash, Amira; El-Bouzedi, Abdallah; Dau, Aghnya A

    2014-01-01

    In 1998 Libya experienced a major outbreak of multiple blood borne viral hepatitis and HIV infections. Since then, no studies have been done on the epidemic features and risk factors of HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection among the general population. A prospective study was carried out using a multi-centre clustering method to collect samples from the general population. The participants were interviewed, and relevant information was collected, including socio-demographic, ethnic, and geographic variables. This information was correlated with the risk factors involved in the transmission of HBV, HCV and HIV. Blood samples were collected and the sera were tested for HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV using enzyme immunoassay. A total of 9,170 participants from the nine districts of Tripoli were enrolled. The average prevalence of HBsAg was 3.7%, anti-HCV 0.9%, anti-HIV 0.15% and co-infection 0.02%. The prevalence varied from one district to another. HBV was more prevalent among those aged over 50 years and was associated with family history. Anti-HCV and anti-HIV were more prevalent among those aged 20-40 years. Intravenous drug use and blood transfusion were the main risk factors for HCV and HIV infection. HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection are relatively common in Libya. High prevalence was associated with geographic, ethnic and socioeconomic variability within the community. HCV and HIV infections among the younger age groups are becoming an alarming issue. Regulations and health care education need to be implemented and longer term follow-up should be planned.

  6. Neymar, defender of brazilian tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Islandia Cardoso da Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to analyze how university students of Teresina-PI appropriate of the message of a report of the television show Esporte Espetacular. There was use of the technique of focus groups and analytical-descriptive method for collecting and analyzing data. The sample consisted of 24 university students, aged between 18 and 24 years. The report features Neymar as responsible to follow the "tradition" of Brazilians and to be crowned as the best player in the world. The subjects of research said that the speech conveyed by the report can reproduce and create a reality sometimes dreamlike, because objective to confer to Neymar great importance with regard to national identity.

  7. Best Practices in Brazilian Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia dos Reis Machado

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Competitive intelligence (CI is a systematic and ethical collection, analysis, dissemination and management of information about the external environment that may affect the plans, decisions and operations of the organization. Knowledge management (KM can be seen as a tool to promote organizational knowledge through the use of activities designed to identify, create, store, share and use knowledge. Companies face a challenge in the era of knowledge, it is the extraction and management of knowledge produced by people in the organization. CI and KM combined generates organizational intelligence. The exploratory study, based on literature and multicase study, we sought to identify best practices in processes of CI and KM in Brazilian companies. We identified practices related to the CI design process, the stages of the CI, the use of networks, and knowledge management. We also identified, points of attention on the internal/external organizational environment.

  8. Prevalence of TB/HIV Co-Infection in Countries Except China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: e64915

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Junling Gao; Pinpin Zheng; Hua Fu

    2013-01-01

    .... But the prevalence of TB/HIV co-infection was diversified among countries. Exploring the reasons of the diversity of TB/HIV co-infection is important for public policy, planning and development of collaborative TB/HIV activities...

  9. Major Challenges in Clinical Management of TB/HIV Coinfected Patients in Eastern Europe Compared with Western Europe and Latin America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efsen, Anne Marie W; Schultze, Anna; Post, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rates of TB/HIV coinfection and multi-drug resistant (MDR)-TB are increasing in Eastern Europe (EE). We aimed to study clinical characteristics, factors associated with MDR-TB and predicted activity of empiric anti-TB treatment at time of TB diagnosis among TB/HIV coinfected patients ...

  10. Major challenges in clinical management of TB/HIV co-infected patients in Eastern Europe compared with Western Europe and Latin America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efsen, Anne Marie; Schultze, Anna; Post, Frank

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rates of both TB/HIV co-infection and multi-drug-resistant (MDR) TB are increasing in Eastern Europe (EE). Data on the clinical management of TB/HIV co-infected patients are scarce. Our aim was to study the clinical characteristics of TB/HIV patients in Europe and Latin America (LA)...

  11. Hepatitis C viral load, genotype 3 and interleukin-28B CC genotype predict mortality in HIV and hepatitis C-coinfected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen Nygaard, Louise; Astvad, Karen; Ladelund, Steen

    2012-01-01

    : We hypothesized that hepatitis C virus (HCV) load and genotype may influence all-cause mortality in HIV-HCV-coinfected individuals.......: We hypothesized that hepatitis C virus (HCV) load and genotype may influence all-cause mortality in HIV-HCV-coinfected individuals....

  12. [Live longer and better? Estimates of healthy life expectancy in the Brazilian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargos, Mirela Castro Santos; Gonzaga, Marcos Roberto

    2015-07-01

    This study analyzed differences in healthy life expectancy in the elderly based on three health dimensions in Brazil from 1998 to 2008: disability-free life expectancy, healthy life expectancy based on self-rated health, and chronic disease-free life expectancy. The Sullivan method was used, combining life tables from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) and interval estimates of the prevalence of functional disability, self-rated health, and chronic diseases according to the Brazilian National Household Sample Survey (PNAD, 1998 and 2008). Besides the increase in life expectancy, the study showed significant and similar increases in disability-free life expectancy and healthy life expectancy based on self-rated health at almost all ages. Women had higher life expectancies than men, but expected to live longer with poor health, regardless of the indicator used to measure health. Although the studies measured health differently (making comparisons difficult), women showed a consistent disadvantage in healthy life expectancy.

  13. Sex trade among men: negotiating sex, bodies and identity categories

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    Murilo dos Santos Moscheta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial sex is a marginalized and highly stigmatized activity in Brazilian culture. In this article we aim at investigating the discursive strategies used by young men who trade sex in order to resist stigmatization and social exclusion. We interviewed 24 young men who trade sex in a medium sized city in Brazil. Discursive strategies used by the interviewees to avoid social stigma could be summarized as (1 a reduction of sexual activity to its commercial sense by employing a conceptualization of masculinity that focuses on moral values and disregards sexual intercourse, (2 an emphasis on the anatomic characteristics as a criterion to delimit sexual identification categories, and (3 a shifting of sexual systems from one based on sexual object choice to one based on sexual aim. The discussion highlights that the interviewees were actively negotiating with normative assumptions of sexuality and thus producing either its subversion or conservation.

  14. Co-infection with Schistosoma haematobium and soil-transmitted helminths in rural South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molvik, Mari; Helland, Elin; Zulu, Siphosenkosi Gift

    2017-01-01

    Schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis are among the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases and may lead to severe consequences. We assessed the extent of co-infection between Schistosoma haematobium and the soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris...... interval =1.58–2.93; plumbricoides and T. trichiura infection. We have demonstrated a highly significant correlation and overall association between urogenital...... schistosomiasis and A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura. We cautiously suggest that all S. haematobium endemic areas should be treated for STH infections....

  15. The Influence of Coinfection on Mood States in HTLV-1-Infected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Cezira Fantini Nogueira-Martins; Jorge Casseb; Augusto Cesar Penalva de Oliveira; Maria Rita Polo Gascón; Claudio Garcia Capitão

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to discuss the influence of coinfection on mood states (depression and anxiety) in Human T Lymphotropic virus type 1 HTLV-1-infected patients. A cross-sectional study was performed with a sample obtained through a nonprobabilistic technique. A total of 130 patients in treatment at the HTLV Ambulatory of Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas participated in the research, of whom 63 had HAM/TS and 67 were asymptomatic. A sociodemographic survey and the Beck Anxi...

  16. Isolation and Analysis of Rare Norovirus Recombinants from Coinfected Mice Using Drop-Based Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huidan; Cockrell, Shelley K; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Rotem, Assaf; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Chang, Connie B; Tao, Ye; Mehoke, Thomas S; Han, Yulong; Lin, Jeffrey S; Giacobbi, Nicholas S; Feldman, Andrew B; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Weitz, David A; Wobus, Christiane E; Pipas, James M

    2015-08-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are positive-sense RNA viruses that can cause severe, highly infectious gastroenteritis. HuNoV outbreaks are frequently associated with recombination between circulating strains. Strain genotyping and phylogenetic analyses show that noroviruses often recombine in a highly conserved region near the junction of the viral polyprotein (open reading frame 1 [ORF1]) and capsid (ORF2) genes and occasionally within the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) gene. Although genotyping methods are useful for tracking changes in circulating viral populations, they report only the dominant recombinant strains and do not elucidate the frequency or range of recombination events. Furthermore, the relatively low frequency of recombination in RNA viruses has limited studies to cell culture or in vitro systems, which do not reflect the complexities and selective pressures present in an infected organism. Using two murine norovirus (MNV) strains to model coinfection, we developed a microfluidic platform to amplify, detect, and recover individual recombinants following in vitro and in vivo coinfection. One-step reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was performed in picoliter drops with primers that identified the wild-type and recombinant progenies and scanned for recombination breakpoints at ∼1-kb intervals. We detected recombination between MNV strains at multiple loci spanning the viral protease, RdRP, and capsid ORFs and isolated individual recombinant RNA genomes that were present at a frequency of 1/300,000 or higher. This study is the first to examine norovirus recombination following coinfection of an animal and suggests that the exchange of RNA among viral genomes in an infected host occurs in multiple locations and is an important driver of genetic diversity. RNA viruses increase diversity and escape host immune barriers by genomic recombination. Studies using a number of viral systems indicate that recombination occurs via template switching by the

  17. HIV AND TUBERCULOSIS CO-INFECTION IN A REFERRAL CHEST HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Kataria, VK; ROSHA, D; MAUDAR, KK

    2000-01-01

    Serving personnel of Armed Forces admitted with tuberculosis between Apr 1996–1999 were evaluated for co-infection of tuberculosis and HIV. Sixty (1.06%) of tuberculosis patients were found to be HIV positive. Initial test was done by spot kits and subsequently confirmed by ELISA on two different samples. Majority of the cases were in sexually active age group 48 (80%). Alcohol and smoking was associated in 80% cases. Thirty six (60%) were sputum smear positive for AFB. Twenty eight (46.7%) g...

  18. CD4 lymphocyte dynamics in Tanzanian pulmonary tuberculosis patients with and without HIV co-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Aase; Range, Nyagosya S; Changalucha, John

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The interaction of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) on CD4 levels over time has previously been divergently reported and only in small study populations with short or no follow-up. METHODS: CD4 counts were assessed from time of diagnosis till the end of TB treatment in a cohort...... of pulmonary TB patients with and without HIV co-infection and compared with cross-sectional data on age- and sex-matched non-TB controls from the same area. RESULTS: Of 1605 study participants, 1250 were PTB patients and 355 were non-TB controls. At baseline, HIV was associated with 246 (95% CI: 203; 279...

  19. Correlation between ebv co-infection and HPV16 genome integrity in Tunisian cervical cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kahla, Saloua; Oueslati, Sarra; Achour, Mongia; Kochbati, Lotfi; Chanoufi, Mohamed Badis; Maalej, Mongi; Oueslati, Ridha

    2012-01-01

    Infection with high risk Human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is necessary but not sufficient to cause cervical carcinoma. This study explored whether multiple HR-HPV or coinfection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) influence the integration status of HPV16 genome. The presence and typing of HPV in a series of 125 cervical specimens were assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the specific primers for the HPV L1 region. As for EBV infection, the viral EBNA1 gene was used for its detection thro...

  20. Blastocystis and Schistosomiasis Coinfection in a Patient with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin R. Young

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD represent a spectrum of impaired immunity with effects on cellular immunity, soluble immune factors, and inflammation. As a result, infections due to impaired immune system responses are responsible for significant morbidity in patients with kidney disease. Because of immune dysfunction in CKD, these patients have reduced probability to clear infections and are susceptible to pathogenic effects of common organisms. We present a case of a patient with CKD coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni and Blastocystis spp. This appears to be the first reported association of Schistosoma mansoni and Blastocystis spp. in a patient with CKD.