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Sample records for brazilian blood donors

  1. HFE gene mutations and iron status of Brazilian blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C.J.L. Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the HFE and TFR2 genes have been associated with iron overload. HFE and TFR2 mutations were assessed in blood donors, and the relationship with iron status was evaluated. Subjects (N = 542 were recruited at the Hemocentro da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Iron status was not influenced by HFE mutations in women and was independent of blood donation frequency. In contrast, men carrying the HFE 282CY genotype had lower total iron-binding capacity (TIBC than HFE 282CC genotype carriers. Men who donated blood for the first time and were carriers of the HFE 282CY genotype had higher transferrin saturation values and lower TIBC concentrations than those with the homozygous wild genotype for the HFE C282Y mutation. Moreover, in this group of blood donors, carriers of HFE 63DD plus 63HD genotypes had higher serum ferritin values than those with the homozygous wild genotype for HFE H63D mutation. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HFE 282CY leads to a 17.21% increase (P = 0.018 and a 83.65% decrease (P = 0.007 in transferrin saturation and TIBC, respectively. In addition, serum ferritin is influenced by age (3.91%, P = 0.001 and the HFE 63HD plus DD genotype (55.84%, P = 0.021. In conclusion, the HFE 282Y and 65C alleles were rare, while the HFE 63D allele was frequent in Brazilian blood donors. The HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were associated with alterations in iron status in blood donors in a gender-dependent manner.

  2. Frequency of Wra antigen and anti-Wra in Brazilian blood donors

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    Janaína Guilhem Muniz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wra is a low-incidence antigen, which is antithetical to the high prevalence red blood cell antigen, Wrb. Anti-Wra is a naturally occurring antibody that is found in approximately 1-2% of blood donors. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of Wra and anti-Wra in Brazilian blood donors.METHODS: A total of 1662 Brazilian blood donors were molecularly analyzed using the SNaPshot methodology to determine the WR*A/B alleles and to predict the frequency of the Wra antigen. To detect the anti-Wra, samples from 1049 blood donors were analyzed using a gel test with Wr(a+ red blood cells. The serum was treated with dithiothreitol (DTT to determine the immunoglobulin classes. Immunoglobulin (Ig-G isotype classification was performed in a gel test using the IgG1/IgG3 card. A monocyte monolayer assay was employed to predict the clinical significance of IgG anti-Wra.RESULTS: Of the 1662 donors, only one sample had the DI*02.03 allele in heterozygous predicting the Wr(a+b+ phenotype. Anti-Wra was detected in 34 (3.24% samples, 64.7% in females and 35.3% in males. Regarding the immunoglobulin class, eight (23.5% cases of anti-Wra were classified as IgG and 26 (76.5% as IgM. Of the eight cases of IgG anti-Wra, four were IgG1, two were IgG3 and three anti-Wra were not IgG3 or IgG1, and thus probably IgG2 or IgG4. The results of the monocyte monolayer assay showed that IgG anti-Wra might be of clinical significance.CONCLUSION: This study shows a very low frequency (0.06% of the Wra antigen in Brazilian blood donors. Additionally, it shows that the frequency of anti-Wra in this population is higher than previously reported.

  3. Ancestry informative markers and complete blood count parameters in Brazilian blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela E. S. Felix

    Full Text Available A complete blood count is very useful in clinical diagnoses when reference ranges are well established for the population. Complete blood counts and allele frequencies of Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs were analyzed in Brazilians with the aim of characterizing the hematological values of an admixed population. Positive associations were observed between gender and neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, MCHC and platelet counts. No significant differences were found for age, alcohol consumption, educational status, ethnicity, smoking in respect to the complete blood count values. In general, men had higher red blood cell values, while women had higher values for white blood cells and platelets. The study of the population was highly heterogeneous with mean proportions (± SE of African, European and Amerindian ancestry being 49.0 ± 3.0%, 44.0 ± 9.0% and 7.0 ± 9.0%, respectively. Amerindian ancestry showed limited contribution to the makeup of the population, but estimated ancestral proportions were statistically significant (r = 0.9838; P<0.001. These hematologic values are similar to Afro-Americans, another admixed population.

  4. Non-detection of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA in HHV-8-seropositive blood donors from three Brazilian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Maria Claudia; Sumita, Laura Masami; de Souza, Vanda Akico Ueda Fick; Freire, Wilton S; Mayaud, Philippe; Pannuti, Claudio S

    2011-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the etiologic agent of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and the plasmablastic cell variant of multicentric Castleman disease. In endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa, blood transfusions have been associated with a substantial risk of HHV-8 transmission. By contrast, several studies among healthy blood donors from North America have failed to detect HHV-8 DNA in samples of seropositive individuals. In this study, using a real-time PCR assay, we investigated the presence of HHV-8 DNA in whole-blood samples of 803 HHV-8 blood donors from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Amazon, Bahia) who tested positive for HHV-8 antibodies, in a previous multicenter study. HHV-8 DNA was not detected in any sample. Our findings do not support the introduction of routine HHV-8 screening among healthy blood donors in Brazil. (WC = 140).

  5. Non-Detection of Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA in HHV-8-Seropositive Blood Donors from Three Brazilian Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Maria Claudia; Sumita, Laura Masami; de Souza, Vanda Akico Ueda Fick; Freire, Wilton S.; Mayaud, Philippe; Pannuti, Claudio S.

    2011-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the etiologic agent of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and the plasmablastic cell variant of multicentric Castleman disease. In endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa, blood transfusions have been associated with a substantial risk of HHV-8 transmission. By contrast, several studies among healthy blood donors from North America have failed to detect HHV-8 DNA in samples of seropositive individuals. In this study, using a real-time PCR assay, we investigated the presence of HHV-8 DNA in whole-blood samples of 803 HHV-8 blood donors from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Amazon, Bahia) who tested positive for HHV-8 antibodies, in a previous multicenter study. HHV-8 DNA was not detected in any sample. Our findings do not support the introduction of routine HHV-8 screening among healthy blood donors in Brazil. (WC = 140). PMID:21858163

  6. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion Sanguine of Geneva will be held at CERN on Tuesday 13 March 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  7. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion d'Annemasse will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  8. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tuesday 19 March 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion sanguine of Geneva If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  9. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Wednesday 13 November 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs will be held a blood donors campaign, organized by the Etablissement de Transfusion de Haute-Savoie If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  10. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Établissement de Transfusion de Rhône-Alpes will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2000 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  11. Evaluation of a high throughput method for the detection of mutations associated with thrombosis and hereditary hemochromatosis in Brazilian blood donors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Dionisio Tavares Niewiadonski

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the OpenArray platform for genetic testing of blood donors and to assess the genotype frequencies of nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs associated with venous thrombosis (G1691A and G20210A, hyperhomocysteinemia (C677T, A1298C, and hereditary hemochromatosis (C282Y, H63D and S65C in blood donors from Sao Paulo, Brazil.We examined 400 blood donor samples collected from October to November 2011. The SNPs were detected using OpenArray technology. The blood samples were also examined using a real-time PCR-FRET system to compare the results and determine the accuracy of the OpenArray method.We observed 100% agreement in all assays tested, except HFE C282Y, which showed 99.75% agreement. The HFE C282Y assay was further confirmed through direct sequencing, and the results showed that OpenArray analysis was accurate. The calculated frequencies of each SNP were FV G1691A 98.8% (G/G, 1.2% (G/A; FII G2021A 99.5% (G/G, 0.5% (G/A; MTHFR C677T 45.5% (C/C, 44.8% (C/T, 9.8% (T/T; MTHFR A1298C 60.3% (A/A, 33.6% (A/C, 6.1% (C/C; HFE C282Y 96%(G/G, 4%(G/A, HFE H63D 78.1%(C/C, 20.3% (C/G, 1.6% (G/G; and HFE S65C 98.1% (A/A, 1.9% (A/T.Taken together, these results describe the frequencies of SNPs associated with diseases and are important to enhance our current knowledge of the genetic profiles of Brazilian blood donors, although a larger study is needed for a more accurate determination of the frequency of the alleles. Furthermore, the OpenArray platform showed a high concordance rate with standard FRET RT-PCR.

  12. Frequent detection of CXCR4-using viruses among Brazilian blood donors with HIV-1 long-standing infection and unknown clinical stage: Analysis of massive parallel sequencing data

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    Rodrigo Pessôa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of viral tropism is critically important and highly recommended to guide therapy with the CCR5 antagonist, which does not inhibit the effect of X4-tropic viruses. Here, we report the prevalence of HIV-1×4 HIV strains in 84 proviral DNA massively parallel sequencing “MPS” data from well-defined non-recently infected first-time Brazilian blood donors. The MPS data covering the entire V3 region of the env gene was extracted from our recently generated HIV-1 genomes sequenced by a paired-end protocol (Illumina. Of the 84 MPS data samples, 63 (75% were derived from donors with long-standing infection and 21 (25% were lacking stage information. HIV‐1 tropism was inferred using Geno2pheno (g2p [454] algorithm (FPR=1%, 2.5%, and 3.75%. Among the 84 data samples for which tropism was defined by g2p2.5%, 13 (15.5% participants had detectable CXCR4-using viruses in their MPS reads. Mixed infections with R5 and X4 were observed in 11.9% of the study subjects and minority X4 viruses were detected in 7 (8.3% of participants. Nine of the 63 (14.3% subjects with LS infection were predicted by g2p 2.5% to harbor proviral CXCR4-using viruses. Our findings of a high proportion of blood donors (15.5% harboring CXCR4-using viruses in PBMCs may indicate that this phenomenon is common. These findings may have implications for clinical and therapeutic aspects and may benefit individuals who plan to receive CCR5 antagonists.

  13. High prevalence of HIV-1 transmitted drug-resistance mutations from proviral DNA massively parallel sequencing data of therapy-naïve chronically infected Brazilian blood donors.

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    Rodrigo Pessôa

    Full Text Available An improved understanding of the prevalence of low-abundance transmitted drug-resistance mutations (TDRM in therapy-naïve HIV-1-infected patients may help determine which patients are the best candidates for therapy. In this study, we aimed to obtain a comprehensive picture of the evolving HIV-1 TDRM across the massive parallel sequences (MPS of the viral entire proviral genome in a well-characterized Brazilian blood donor naïve to antiretroviral drugs.The MPS data from 128 samples used in the analysis were sourced from Brazilian blood donors and were previously classified by less-sensitive (LS or "detuned" enzyme immunoassay as non-recent or longstanding HIV-1 infections. The Stanford HIV Resistance Database (HIVDBv 6.2 and IAS-USA mutation lists were used to interpret the pattern of drug resistance. The minority variants with TDRM were identified using a threshold of ≥ 1.0% and ≤ 20% of the reads sequenced. The rate of TDRM in the MPS data of the proviral genome were compared with the corresponding published consensus sequences of their plasma viruses.No TDRM were detected in the integrase or envelope regions. The overall prevalence of TDRM in the protease (PR and reverse transcriptase (RT regions of the HIV-1 pol gene was 44.5% (57/128, including any mutations to the nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI and non-nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI. Of the 57 subjects, 43 (75.4% harbored a minority variant containing at least one clinically relevant TDRM. Among the 43 subjects, 33 (76.7% had detectable minority resistant variants to NRTIs, 6 (13.9% to NNRTIs, and 16 (37.2% to PR inhibitors. The comparison of viral sequences in both sources, plasma and cells, would have detected 48 DNA provirus disclosed TDRM by MPS previously missed by plasma bulk analysis.Our findings revealed a high prevalence of TDRM found in this group, as the use of MPS drastically increased the detection of these

  14. Iron deficiency among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A. S.; Pedersen, O. B.; Magnussen, K.

    2017-01-01

    and menopausal status are the strongest predictors of iron deficiency. Only little information on the health effects of iron deficiency in blood donors exits. Possibly, after a standard full blood donation, a temporarily reduced physical performance for women is observed. However, iron deficiency among blood...... donors is not reflected in a reduced self-perceived mental and physical health. In general, the high proportion of iron-deficient donors can be alleviated either by extending the inter-donation intervals or by guided iron supplementation. The experience from Copenhagen, the Capital Region of Denmark......, is that routine ferritin measurements and iron supplementation are feasible and effective ways of reducing the proportion of donors with low haemoglobin levels....

  15. Ancestry informative markers and complete blood count parameters in Brazilian blood donors Marcadores informativos de ancestralidade e parâmetros no hemograma de doadores de sangue brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela E. S. Felix

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete blood count is very useful in clinical diagnoses when reference ranges are well established for the population. Complete blood counts and allele frequencies of Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs were analyzed in Brazilians with the aim of characterizing the hematological values of an admixed population. Positive associations were observed between gender and neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, MCHC and platelet counts. No significant differences were found for age, alcohol consumption, educational status, ethnicity, smoking in respect to the complete blood count values. In general, men had higher red blood cell values, while women had higher values for white blood cells and platelets. The study of the population was highly heterogeneous with mean proportions (± SE of African, European and Amerindian ancestry being 49.0 ± 3.0%, 44.0 ± 9.0% and 7.0 ± 9.0%, respectively. Amerindian ancestry showed limited contribution to the makeup of the population, but estimated ancestral proportions were statistically significant (r = 0.9838; PO hemograma é muito útil no diagnóstico quando o intervalo de referência é adequadamente estabelecido para população. Com o objetivo de verificar os valores hematológicos em população heterogênea foi analisado o hemograma e frequências alélica de marcadores informativos de ancestralidade de brasileiros. Foi observada associação positiva entre sexo e os valores de neutrófilos, monócitos, eosinófilos, eritrócitos, hemoglobina, hematócrito, MCV, MCHC e plaquetas (IC 95%; P0,05. Os homens apresentaram valores maiores no eritrograma, enquanto no leucograma e plaquetograma foram as mulheres. Foi observado também que a população é altamente heterogênea e as médias proporcionais (±DP de ancestralidade Africana, Europeia e Ameríndia estimada foram: 49,0 ± 3,0 %, 44,0 ± 9,0% e 7,0 ± 9,0%, respectivamente. A contribuição ancestral ameríndia se

  16. Blood donor: nursing care plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The standardized nursing care plan can be used as a means through which the nurse will assess and identify the particular needs of the blood donor.To draw up the care plan, we have conducted the evaluation on the basis of the Marjory Gordon’s functional health patterns.The more prevailing diagnosis according to the NANDA taxonomy have been identified, results have been established according to the NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification taxonomy, and nursing interventions have been suggested according to the NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification taxonomy. Also, certain potential complications, which are infrequent, must be observed and controlled in the blood donation process. Our main aim with this article has been to offer to professionals resources that grant to the caring activity scientific rigor, professional recognition and an unique and valid tool to evaluate the assistance with the best levels of quality for the blood donor.

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... free Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  19. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? ... 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of ...

  3. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  4. HTLV-1/2 seroprevalence and coinfection rate in Brazilian first-time blood donors: an 11-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Tomazini Pinto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The seroprevalence and geographic distribution of HTLV-1/2 among blood donors are extremely important to transfusion services. We evaluated the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 infection among first-time blood donor candidates in Ribeirão Preto city and region. From January 2000 to December 2010, 1,038,489 blood donations were obtained and 301,470 were first-time blood donations. All samples were screened with serological tests for HTLV-1/2 using enzyme immunoassay (EIA. In addition, the frequency of coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Chagas disease (CD and syphilis was also determined. In-house PCR was used as confirmatory test for HTLV-1/2. A total of 296 (0.1% first-time donors were serologically reactive for HTLV-1/2. Confirmatory PCR of 63 samples showed that 28 were HTLV-1 positive, 13 HTLV-2 positive, 19 negative and three indeterminate. Regarding HTLV coinfection rates, the most prevalent was with HBV (51.3% and HCV (35.9%, but coinfection with HIV, CD and syphilis was also detected. The real number of HTLV-infected individual and coinfection rate in the population is underestimated and epidemiological studies like ours are very informative.

  5. BLOODR: blood donor and requester mobile application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Vamsi Krishna; El-Ocla, Hosam

    2017-01-01

    With rapid increase in the usage of social networks sites across the world, there is also a steady increase in blood donation requests as being noticed in the number of posts on these sites such as Facebook and twitter seeking blood donors. Finding blood donor is a challenging issue in almost every country. There are some blood donor finder applications in the market such as Blood app by Red Cross and Blood Donor Finder application by Neologix. However, more reliable applications that meet the needs of users are prompted. Several software technologies including languages and framework are used to develop our blood-donor web application known as BLOODR application. These technologies comprise Ruby programming language (simply known as Ruby) along with JavaScript and PostgreSQL for database are used. Ruby on Rails (simply known as Rails) is an open source Web framework that makes it possible to quickly and easily create data-based web applications. We show screenshots for the BLOODR application for different types of users including requester, donor, and administrator. Various features of the application are described and their needs of use are analyzed. If a patient needs a blood at a clinic, blood donors in vicinity can be contacted through using a clinic management service provided in this application. Registered donors will get notification for the blood requests only if their blood group is compatible with the requested blood type and in the same city/region. Then matching blood donors can go to the requesting clinic and donate. BLOODR application provides a reliable platform to connect local blood donors with patients. BLOODR creates a communication channel through authenticated clinics whenever a patient needs blood donation. It is a useful tool to find compatible blood donors who can receive blood request posts in their local area. Clinics can use this web application to maintain the blood donation activity. Future improvement of the BLOODR is explained.

  6. Milk Donor Blood Screening for HIV, Syphilis and Hepatitis B Markers in a Brazilian Human Milk Bank: Prevalence Time-trends Over the 2005- 2015 Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupek, Emil; Savi, Estela Olivo

    2017-01-01

    Human milk banking has been promoted to provide donated breast milk for at-risk children whose mothers cannot breastfeed them but this effort was hindered by the advent of HIV epidemic. To estimate the seroprevalence of HIV, syphilis and hepatitis B in the blood of human milk donors registered in a major maternity hospital in the northern region of the Santa Catarina State, Brazil. A retrospective study included serological tests for HIV, syphilis and hepatitis B screening of milk donor candidates in the 2005-2015 period. The 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the Poisson distribution. For HIV, the prevalence per 100.000 pregnant women was 155, 170 and zero over the three periods analyzed (2005-2009, 2010-2012 and 2013-2015), respectively. Syphilis prevalence per 100,000 pregnant women was 509, 460 and 1749 in the three periods analyzed. For the HBsAg marker of recent hepatitis B infection, the prevalence on the same scale was 254, 231 and 299, respectively, while the anti-HBc prevalence, a marker of lifetime risk for hepatitis B infection, was 7339 in the 2010-2012 period and 3874 in the 2013-2015 period. High prevalence of HIV, syphilis and hepatitis B was found for the 2005-2015 period among breastfeeding mothers who offered to donate their exceeding milk to a human milk bank in Brazil. Despite apparent elimination of the HIV by the end of the period, the decline was not statistically significant. There was no significant change in the acute hepatitis B prevalence over time but the increased syphilis prevalence in the most recent period was statistically significant. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Iron status of regular voluntary blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahida Vilsu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our blood bank is a regional blood transfusion centre, which accepts blood only from voluntary donors. Aim: The aim is to study iron status of regular voluntary donors who donated their blood at least twice in a year. Materials and Methods: Prior to blood donation, blood samples of 220 male and 30 female voluntary donors were collected. Control included 100 each male and female healthy individuals in the 18- to 60-year age group, who never donated blood and did not have any chronic infection. In the study and control groups, about 10% subjects consumed non-vegetarian diet. After investigation, 85 males and 56 females having haemoglobin (Hb levels above 12.5 g/dl were selected as controls. Donors were divided into ≤10, 11-20, 21-50 and> 50 blood donation categories. Majority of the donors in> 50 donation category donated blood four times in a year, whereas the remaining donors donated two to three times per year. Haematological parameters were measured on fully automatic haematology analyzer, serum iron and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC by biochemical methods, ferritin using ELISA kits and transferrin using immunoturbidometry kits. Iron/TIBC ratio x 100 gave percentage of transferrin saturation value. Statistical Analysis: Statistical evaluation was done by mean, standard deviation, pair t -test, χ2 and anova ( F -test. Results: Preliminary analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the iron profile of vegetarian and non-vegetarian subjects or controls and the donors donating < 20 times. Significant increase or decrease was observed in mean values of various haematological and iron parameters in donors who donated blood for> 20 times ( P < 0.001, compared to controls. Anaemia, iron deficiency and depletion of iron stores were more prevalent in female donors ( P < 0.05 compared to males and especially in those male donors who donated their blood for more than 20 times. Conclusion: Regular voluntary blood

  8. BLOOD DONOR HAEMATOLOGY PARAMETERS IN TWO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2005-03-03

    Mar 3, 2005 ... blood transfusion states that a donor's blood pressure, .... Differences between Nairobi and Kisumu obtained with independent samples t-test. ns, not significant (p>0.05). Table 2. Statistical analysis and comparisons of leukocyte and platelet parameters for 1394 donated units from two regional blood banks ...

  9. RESULTS OF THE SPECIAL BLOOD DONOR DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    Responding to the HUG (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève) hospitals’ urgent appeal for blood donations during this summer season, the CERN medical staff organised a day of blood donations for the Swiss bloodbank CTS on 30 July. They were supported by NOVAE (Restaurant No. 1), who provided donors with a free snack. This specially arranged campaign was a success, as the 135 volunteers included 66 first-time donors, and a total of 99 standard bags of blood were collected. (Swiss hospitals need 1300 bags every day!) The CTS and CERN’s medical staff wish to thank the donors and all others who helped make the event a success. Upcoming blood donor days at CERN: 12 November 2008 and 10 March 2009.

  10. RESULTS OF THE SPECIAL BLOOD DONOR DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    Responding to the HUG (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève) hospitals’ urgent appeal for blood donations during this summer season, the CERN medical staff organised a day of blood donations for the Swiss bloodbank CTS on 30 July. They were supported by NOVAE (Restaurant No. 1), who provided donors with a free snack. This specially arranged campaign was a success, as the 135 volunteers included 66 first-time donors, and a total of 99 standard bags of blood was collected. (Swiss hospitals need 1300 bags every day!) The CTS and CERN’s medical staff want to thank the donors and all others who helped make the event a success. Upcoming blood donor days at CERN: 12 November 2008 and 10 March 2009.

  11. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  12. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... 2:30. credihealth 146 views 2:30 Pain Control: Support for ... Jeff, peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 29,377 ...

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  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... employee, Serena Marshall, as she takes you through her blood stem cell donation experience at the National ... 31,594 views 10:58 AML Survivor meets her German stem cell donor for the first time ...

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  19. [Is syphilis test necessary in blood donors?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-López, María Rebeca F; Arenas-Esqueda, Alfonso; Ambriz-Fernández, Raúl

    2009-01-01

    A syphilis test is performed in blood donors because the national transfusion law makes it mandatory, nevertheless the blood has not been found as an important vehicle of transmission for Treponema pallidum infection. Our objective was to know the prevalence of syphilis in blood donors. we reviewed tests from blood donors of the "Banco Central de Sangre del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI" in two periods, the first from July 2001 to April 2003, and the second from March 2005 to June 2006. Both groups went through screening tests, such as VDRL or USR. and a second test for confirmation, FTA-ABS for the first group and TPHA for the second group. in the first group 111 030 blood donors were included. In this group the positive results from VDRL or USR tests were 471 (0.42 %). One hundred and ninety six were confirmed (0.17 %) with FTA-ABS. In the second group results from 80 578 blood donors were included; the positive results from VDRL or USR tests were 279 (0.34 %). In this group, only 0.08 % were confirmed for a syphilis infection.

  20. Blood donation mobile applications: are donors ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shan; Chang, Shelley; Uyeno, Kasie; Almquist, Gay; Wang, Shirong

    2016-03-01

    The rapid rise of mobile communication technologies has the potential to dramatically change and improve blood donor recruitment and retention efforts. E-mail invitations were sent to blood donors in a large metropolitan area to participate in a Web-based survey designed to gauge their readiness and interest level for a blood donation mobile application ("app"). A total of 982 ethnically diverse respondents of various age groups and prior donation experiences were surveyed. Among the respondents, 87.3% had ready access to smart phones. E-mail was chosen by 62.1% as the currently preferred method when contacted by the blood center, followed by texting (10.1%). App features desired by most respondents were the abilities to request appointments 24/7 (76.8%) and to receive appointment confirmations quickly (81.3%). Many were concerned about receiving too many alerts or messages (64.1%) or insufficient protection for personal information (53.5%). Overall, 67.7% of respondents indicated that they were likely to use a blood donation mobile app. Likelihood was not significantly different by sex or ethnicity, and the impact of education level was limited. Donors who currently made donation appointments via telephone or a website were equally likely to use such an app. However, donors older than 45 years were less likely than younger donors (p = 0.001), and donors with more than five lifetime donations were more likely than less frequent donors to use such an app (p = 0.02). In a metropolitan area, donors are very receptive to using a mobile app to manage their donations. © 2015 AABB.

  1. prevalence of cytomegalovirus antibodies in blood donors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... 86 (Supplement) December 2009. PREVALENCE OF CYTOMEGALOVIRUS ANTIBODIES IN BLOOD DONORS AT THE NATIONAL BLOOD. TRANSFUSION CENTRE, NAIROBI. D. G. Njeru, MBChB, MMed (Path), Dip. Forensic Med (SA), Registrar, Department of Human Pathology, W. O. Mwanda,. MBChB ...

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... 7,934 views 32:25 Stem Cell Basics - How Blood is Made. - Duration: 10:58. Vernon Louw ... 19. Children's Health 40,015 views 49:19 How to become a potential blood stem cell donor ...

  3. Voluntary whole-blood donors, and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors: motivation to donate, altruism and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Michael; Lattacher, Helene; Janda, Monika

    2005-10-01

    To establish if voluntary whole-blood donors and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors may differ in their motivation to donate, altruism, aggression and autoaggression. Whole-blood (n=51), platelet (n=52) and plasma donors (n=48) completed a battery of validated questionnaires while waiting to donate. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of variance and t-tests were performed to detect differences between groups as noted. Altruism (mean=40.2) was slightly higher in whole-blood donors than in platelet (mean=38.3) and plasma donors (mean=39.1) (p=0.07). Blood donors (mean=2.8) scored lower in the spontaneous aggression measure than platelet (mean=4.1) and plasma donors (mean=4.4) (p=0.01). Plasma donors (mean=4.9) had higher auto-aggression than whole-blood donors and platelet donors (mean for both groups=3.4) (p=0.01). Differences between the three groups were mediated by sociodemographic variables (MANCOVA). Whole-blood donors donated to help others, platelet and plasma donors mostly to receive the compensation. However, those platelet and plasma donors, who would continue to donate without compensation were similar in altruism and aggression to whole-blood donors. While most platelet donors and plasma donors were motivated by the compensation, those who stated that they would continue to donate without compensation had altruism and aggression scores similar to voluntary whole-blood donors.

  4. Predictors of hemoglobin in Danish blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotzé, Sebastian R; Pedersen, Ole B; Petersen, Mikkel S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that blood donors are at increased risk of iron deficiency and subsequent development of iron deficiency anemia. We aimed to investigate the effect of factors influencing hemoglobin (Hb) levels. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Initiated in 2010, the Danish Blood Donor Study...... for the prediction of Hb. RESULTS: The strongest predictors of Hb and risk of low Hb were low ferritin (iron supplementation (yes/no). No dietary factors were found to be consistently significant in multivariable models predicting Hb levels, risk of having low Hb, or risk of a decrease...

  5. Hemochromatosis Patients as Voluntary Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara E Power

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate hemochromatosis patients' suitability as blood donors as well as their perceptions and experience with the current public donation system. Participants were gathered from a list of current hemochromatosis patients (n=120 and members of the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society (n=1000. Of the 1120 surveys mailed out to these groups, 801 surveys were returned completed. The sample respondents had a mean age of 57.44 years (SD=12.73; range 19 to 87 years, and 57% were men. It was found that 20% (160 of the respondents have donated blood since their diagnosis; however, only 12% of the respondents indicated that they use voluntary blood donation as a means of maintaining their iron levels. Forty per cent of the respondents indicated that they had been refused from voluntary donation. Despite the fact that in May 2001 the Canadian Blood Services, in collaboration with the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society, began a promotion campaign to encourage hemochromatosis patients to become voluntary blood donors, the present study found that 15% of the respondents reported having been refused from the voluntary blood donation service due to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. With respect to quality of life, it was found that individuals who donate blood were generally healthier with respect to physical functioning and bodily pain, however, these findings may indicate that hemochromatosis patients who are healthier are better able to donate at public blood banks, rather than that voluntary blood donation has an effect on the donors' physical functioning over phlebotomy clinic users. These study findings suggest that although there may be other medical factors limiting individuals from donating, hemochromatosis patients are interested in being voluntary blood donors and this potential resource is currently under-used.

  6. Prevalence of malaria parasitaemia among blood donors in Owerri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia among blood donors in the Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, Imo State, was carried out between December, 2003 and April, 2004. A total of 500 blood samples were collected from blood donors consisting of 262 commercial donors and 238 relation-donors, using ...

  7. Blood Donor Deferrals by Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorace, James M.; Berman, Jules J.; Brown, Lawrence A.; Moore, G. William

    1990-01-01

    Blood collection facilities have recently witnessed a substantial increase in the number of different tests used to detect infectious disease in donor populations. These facilities are also experiencing an increasingly stringent regulatory effort on the part of the Food and Drug Administration to determine the validity of the software used to handle this information. This report describes a precedence-based inference program (PRELOG) and a modular expert system used to determine a donor's suitability for continued donations (donor deferrals), and whether the donated unit can be released for transfusion. PRELOG accepts ternary logic input, in which test results are allowed to be positive, negative, or undetermined; and allows one to assign precedence values to the logic rules. These features enable programs to be written in a shorter, more error-resistant manner. A comparison between PRELOG and PROLOG is included, and the utility of this approach in producing and validating blood bank software is discussed.

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 29,949 ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 38,921 views 49:19 Myelodysplastic Syndrome | Dr. ...

  10. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former NCI employee, Serena Marshall, as she takes you through her ...

  11. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  12. Healthy donor effect: its magnitude in health research among blood donors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsma, F.; Veldhuizen, I.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Kort, W. de; Vegt, F. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The healthy donor effect has been mentioned as a methodologic problem in blood donor health research. The aim of this study was to investigate different elements of the healthy donor effect. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: First, recent donors (<4 years registered as a donor) were compared

  13. [The blood donors' haemovigilance in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounnoughene, N; Sandid, I; Carlier, M; Joussemet, M; Ferry, N

    2013-05-01

    This work aim to present the descriptive analysis of serious adverse reactions in donors (dSAR's), which were notified in 2010 and 2011 in the French national haemovigilance database "e-FIT" (Internet secured haemovigilance reporting system). Some data, which are necessary for this analysis, also come from the regional haemovigilance coordinators' reports (RHC). The other parts of haemovigilance in the context of donation, without donors adverse reactions, such as post-donation information (PDI), adverse events occurred in the blood collection steps of the transfusion chain and epidemiology are not subject to this work analysis. This work shows that the quality of the data gradually improved since the setting up of the notification system of dSAR's. These data are particularly rich in learning lessons, but are still improving. It allows us to confirm that donor's safety, blood components quality, while preserving the blood components self-sufficiency in France, remains a priority. For these reasons, it is important to continue this haemovigilance awareness and to implement necessary actions that would be required for the protection of the donor's health and comfort during donation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  14. The blood donor identity survey: a multidimensional measure of blood donor motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Christopher R; Kowalsky, Jennifer M; France, Janis L; Himawan, Lina K; Kessler, Debra A; Shaz, Beth H

    2014-08-01

    Evidence indicates that donor identity is an important predictor of donation behavior; however, prior studies have relied on diverse, unidimensional measures with limited psychometric support. The goals of this study were to examine the application of self-determination theory to blood donor motivations and to develop and validate a related multidimensional measure of donor identity. Items were developed and administered electronically to a sample of New York Blood Center (NYBC) donors (n=582) and then to a sample of Ohio University students (n=1005). Following initial confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the NYBC sample to identify key items related to self-determination theory's six motivational factors, a revised survey was administered to the university sample to reexamine model fit and to assess survey reliability and validity. Consistent with self-determination theory, for both samples CFAs indicated that the best fit to the data was provided by a six-motivational-factor model, including amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, integrated regulation, and intrinsic regulation. The Blood Donor Identity Survey provides a psychometrically sound, multidimensional measure of donor motivations (ranging from unmotivated to donate to increasing levels of autonomous motivation to donate) that is suitable for nondonors as well as donors with varying levels of experience. Future research is needed to examine longitudinal changes in donor identity and its relationship to actual donation behavior. © 2014 AABB.

  15. Blood donation and blood donor mortality after adjustment for a healthy donor effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that blood donors experience lower mortality than the general population. While this may suggest a beneficial effect of blood donation, it may also reflect the selection of healthy persons into the donor population. To overcome this bias, we...... and Transfusion database (SCANDAT), we assessed the association between annual number of donations in 5-year windows and donor mortality by means of Poisson regression analysis. The analyses included adjustment for demographic characteristics and for an internal healthy donor effect, estimated among elderly...... donation (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.8%-20.4%). After additional adjustment for the internal healthy donor effect, each additional annual donation was associated with a 7.5% decreased mortality risk 7.5% (95% CI, 5.7%-9.4%). CONCLUSION: We observed an inverse relationship between donation frequency...

  16. Travel behavior and deferral of Dutch blood donors : Consequences for donor availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout-Krikke, Ryanne W.; Oei, Welling; Habets, Karin; Pasker-De Jong, Pieternel C M

    2015-01-01

    Background Donors returning from areas with outbreaks of infectious diseases may donate infectious blood back home. Geographic donor deferral is an effective measure to ensure the blood safety, but donor deferral may pose a threat for the blood supply especially after holiday seasons. Insight into

  17. Temporal distribution of blood donations in three Brazilian blood centers and its repercussion on the blood supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Claudia Di Lorenzo; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Liu, Emily Jing; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Leão, Silvana Carneiro; Loureiro, Paula; Wright, David; Custer, Brian; Gonçalez, Thelma Therezinha; Capuani, Ligia; Busch, Michael; Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas Carneiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Seasonal distribution of blood donation hinders efforts to provide a safe and adequate blood supply leading to chronic and persistent shortages. This study examined whether holidays, geographical area and donation type (community versus replacement) has any impact on the fluctuation of donations. Methods The numbers of blood donations from 2007 through 2010 in three Brazilian Retrovirus Epidemiological Donor Study II (REDS-II) participating centers were analyzed according to the week of donation. The weeks were classified as holiday or non-holiday. To compare donations performed during holiday versus non-holiday weeks, tabulations and descriptive statistics for weekly donations by blood center were examined and time series analysis was conducted. Results The average weekly number of donations varied according to the blood center and type of week. The average number of donations decreased significantly during Carnival and Christmas and increased during the Brazilian National Donor Week. The fluctuation was more pronounced in Recife and Belo Horizonte when compared to São Paulo and higher among community donors. Conclusion National bank holidays affect the blood supply by reducing available blood donations. Blood banks should take into account these oscillations in order to plan local campaigns, aiming at maintaining the blood supply at acceptable levels. PMID:24106441

  18. Evaluation of homocysteine in blood bank donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Rosa

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the use of plasma homocysteine levelsin blood bank donors as a risk marker for the development ofcardiovascular diseases in healthy individuals. Methods: Thirtynineblood donors were evaluated and a correlation was establishedbetween the plasma homocysteine levels and the different ageand gender groups. Results: The values of homocysteine levelswere found to be within the normal range, as expected for a healthypopulation. Only three male donors, aged between 40 and 60years, presented hyperhomocysteinemia within the risk rangefor developing cardiovascular disease. Comparing females andmales with regard to homocysteine levels, the values presentedstatistically significant differences, however of little relevance.Variance analysis did not show significant differences betweenthe considered age groups, regardless of gender, but there was aclear increase in homocysteine concentration in males betweenthe 5th and 6th decades of life. Conclusions: It was not possible tosuggest the use of plasma homocysteine levels as an early markerfor the development of cardiovascular diseases in healthy bloodbank donors, but one can speculate about a critical homocysteinelevel to be defined as a cutoff point, above which there wouldbe an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

  19. Easy come, easy go. Retention of blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, A

    2015-08-01

    Retention of blood donors has benefits over recruitment of new blood donors. Retention is defined as preventing donors from lapsing and eventually becoming inactive. This review paper discusses literature on the importance of efforts to retain donors, specifically new donors, since lapsing is most common before the fifth donation. Studies have found that intention to donate, attitudes towards blood donation and self-efficacy (does one feel capable of donating blood) are predictors of blood donation. Feelings of 'warm glow' predict donation behaviour better than altruism. The existing literature further suggests that first time donors can be retained by paying extra attention to adverse events (vasovagal reactions and fatigue). These events could be reduced by drinking water and muscle tension exercises. Feelings of anxiety (in regular donors) and stress can further prevent donors from returning. Planning donations amongst busy lives can help retention, and suggestions are given on which interventions might be helpful. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  20. Blood-borne viral infections among blood, organ and tissue donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutiya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an actual information on the detection rate of blood-borne viral infections (BBVI among blood donors, potential organ and tissue donors in Russia and other countries. The causes of differences in BBVI prevalence between blood donors and potential organ and tissue donors have been analyzed. The BBVI prevalence among potential organ donors was proved to be much higher than among blood donors due to their medical-and-social characteristics.

  1. Blood donors' helping behavior is driven by warm glow: more evidence for the blood donor benevolence hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Eamonn; Taylor, Michael; Keatley, David; Flynn, Niall; Lawrence, Claire

    2012-10-01

    The benevolence hypothesis (both donor and recipient gain) suggests that blood donors, compared to non-blood donors have a general altruistic motivational preference based on warm glow (i.e., "I donate because it makes me feel good"). With objective behavioral economics tests of altruism and warm-glow giving, this paper offers the first direct experimental test of this hypothesis. The prediction that blood donors will be motivated in general by warm glow was compared to predictions from other theoretical models: strong reciprocity and empathy. Four experiments and one prospective study examined blood donors' and nondonors' motivations for general charitable giving and blood donation. Variants of the dictator game (DG; a charity DG [CDG] and a warm-glow version of a CDG) were used to provide objective measures of altruism. Blood donors gave less than nondonors on the CDG, but gave more on the warm-glow version. Blood donors' actual donations (in the CDGs and blood donation) were associated with feelings of warm glow. There was no evidence that blood donors were motivated by strong reciprocity or empathic concerns. This paper offers objective behavioral evidence that blood donors' charitable giving and blood donation, compared to non-blood donors, is more strongly motivated by warm glow. This provides additional support for the benevolence hypothesis of blood donation. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. Prediction models for hemoglobin deferral in whole blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Each year, a relevant proportion of the invited blood donors is eventually deferred from donation because of low hemoglobin (Hb) levels. Deferrals are meant to protect donors from developing iron deficiency anemia after a blood donation, however, they may increase the risk of donor lapse, even

  3. Dengue virus exposure among blood donors in Ghana | Narkwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to limited data on dengue virus exposure among Ghanaians, we surveyed 188 healthy adult blood donors for the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies to the four serotypes of dengue. Five milliliters of peripheral blood from the blood donors were collected in plain tubes. Serum was then obtained and ELISA tests were ...

  4. Iron Deficiency In Frequent And First Time Female Blood Donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Back ground: Blood donation has a marked influence on the body iron stores especially in female blood donors . Iron deficiency anaemia is an important limiting factor for the number of donations in female regular blood donors. Aim of the study: This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency and ...

  5. The Prevalence of Syphilis Among Blood Donors in a Centralized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Syphilis is one of the mandatory transfusion transmissible infections to be tested for in any unit of blood for homologous transfusion. The paucity of voluntary blood donors in Nigeria has compelled health care providers to rely on paid and family replacement donors for blood. AIMS: This study was carried ...

  6. Seroprevalence of Treponema Pallidum in Donor Blood at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the Seroprevalence of Treponema pallidum in Donor blood at University of Benin Teaching Hospital Benin City. Materials and Method: This is a descriptive hospital based study. Donor blood supplied to the hospital blood bank was screened for syphilis. The study was conducted between February ...

  7. Prevalence of HIV positive blood donors among screened ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two thousand five hundred and thirty two (2,532) males, aged 25 – 50 years potential blood donors were randomly selected from the total number of volunteer blood donors who satisfied the initial screening criteria for donating blood, and were screened for HIV using Immunocomb II (HIV 1 and 2 Bispot) and Recombigen ...

  8. HIV Prevalence and Demographic Risk Factors in Blood Donors.

    OpenAIRE

    Zachariah, R.; Harries, A. D.; Nkhoma, W; Arendt, V; Spielmann, M P; Buhendwa, L.; Chingi, C; Mossong, J

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate HIV prevalence in various blood donor populations, to identity sociodemographic risk factors associated with prevalent HIV and to assess the feasibility of offering routine voluntary counselling services to blood donors. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Thyolo district, Malawi. METHODS: Data analysis involving blood donors who underwent voluntary counselling and HIV testing between January 1998 and July 2000. RESULTS: Crude HIV prevalence was 22%, while the age ...

  9. Blood donor well-being: a primary responsibility of blood collection agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Current FDA regulations and AABB standards do not adequately protect the well-being of blood donors. Several practices have adverse consequences for donors, including: elevated incidence of donation related reactions and injuries, iron deficiency anemia in premenopausal women, and inadequate counseling of donors to obtain medical follow-up for health risks identified during pre-donation health screening. These practices can be improved without impacting negatively on the national blood supply. In addition to revising current blood collection operations, blood centers should explore the feasibility of establishing expanded donor health screening programs and determining their effectiveness in improving donor health, donor recruitment, and donor retention.

  10. Combined cell index in assessing blood donor iron stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, T; Bingulac-Popović, J; Očić, T; Mayer, L J; Milošević, M; Jukić, I

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the appropriateness of using combined cell index (CCI) in the assessment of iron stores in blood donors. This index is calculated by the formula: red blood cell distribution width (RDW) × 104 × mean corpuscular volume (MCV)-1 × mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH)-1 . Ferritin measurement is a reliable method for estimating iron stores in blood donors. The sensitivity of red blood cell (RBC) parameters of complete blood count in detecting non-anaemic iron deficiency is significantly lower. Consequently, there were several attempts to increase the detection sensitivity by combining these parameters in different indices. This study included 1084 male and 792 female whole blood donors accepted for blood donation. For six RBC parameters with the highest level of correlation relative to ferritin [Hgb, MCV, MCH, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), RDW and CCI], diagnostic efficacy in the detection of iron depletion (ferritin stores in blood donors. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. Socio-demographic characteristics of Danish blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Kristoffer Sølvsten; Simonsen, Jacob; Sundby, Anna

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion is an essential component of a modern healthcare system. Because knowledge about blood donor demography may inform the design of strategies for donor recruitment and retention, we used nationwide registers to characterize the entire population of blood donors...... in Denmark in 2010. METHODS: The study population comprised all Danes in the age range eligible for blood donation (N = 3,236,753) at the end of 2010. From the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT) register, we identified 174,523 persons who donated blood in Danish blood banks at least once...... in 2010. The association between sociodemographic characteristics and blood donor prevalence was examined using regression models. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of blood donation was 5.4% among both women and men. The age-specific prevalence of blood donation peaked at 25 years of age (6.8%) for women...

  12. Reference range for T lymphocytes populations in blood donors from two different regions in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.L. Torres

    Full Text Available This study defined the normal variation range for different subsets of T-lymphocyte cells count in two different Brazilian regions. We analysed the T-lymphocytes subpopulations (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ in blood donors of two Brazilian cities, located in North (Belem, capital state of Para, indian background and Northeast (Salvador, capital state od Bahia, African background regions of Brazil. Results were compared according to gender, stress level (sleep time lower than 8 hours/day, smoking, and alcohol intake. Lymphocytes subpopulations were measured by flow cytometry. Five hundred twenty-six blood donors from two Brazilians cities participated in the study: 450 samples from Bahia and 76 samples from Pará. Most (60% were men, 59% reported alcohol intake, 12% were smokers, and 80% slept at least 8 h/day. Donors from Bahia presented with significantly higher counts for all parameters, compared with Para. Women had higher lymphocytes levels, in both states, but only CD4+ cells count was significantly higher than men's values. Smokers had higher CD4+ counts, but sleep time had effect on lymphocytes levels only for Para's donors (higher CD3+ and CD4+ counts. That state had also, a higher proportion of donors reporting sleep time <8 h/day. The values for CD3, CD4 and CD8+ cells count were significantly higher in blood donors from Bahia than among those from Pará. Female gender, alcohol intake, stress level, and smoking were associated with higher lymphocyte counts. The use of a single reference range for normal lymphocytes count is not appropriate for a country with such diversity, like Brazil is.

  13. Hepatitis B Viral Markers in Surface Antigen Negative Blood Donors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    The majority of the donors (55.8%) were in the age bracket 21–30 years. Most of the donors (55.9%) were unmarried. The majority had not received blood transfusion ((98.6%) nor received hepatitis B virus vaccine (95.2%) in the past. Of the 495 screened blood donors,. 457 were negative to HBsAg, HIV, HCV and syphilis).

  14. Questionnaire-Related Deferrals in Regular Blood Donors in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkon Reikvam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary donation is a key issue in transfusion medicine. To ensure the safety of blood transfusions, careful donor selection is important. Although new approaches to blood safety have dramatically reduced the risks for infectious contamination of blood components, the quality and the availability of blood components depend on the willingness to donate and the reliability of the information given by the donors about their own health, including risk behavior. As donors who are deferred by the blood bank will be less motivated to return for donation, it is important to reduce the number of deferrals. The aims of the present study were to investigate the reasons for deferral of registered donors coming to the blood bank for donation, in order to identify areas of importance for donor education—as these deferrals potentially could be avoided by better donor comprehension. Deferral related to testing of donors is not included in this study as these deferrals are dependent on laboratory results and cannot be indentified by questionnaire or interview. Data were collected from all blood donors in a period for 18 months who came for blood donation at a large university hospital in Norway. 1 163 of the 29 787 regular donors, who showed up for donation, were deferred (3.9%. The main reasons were intercurrent illness (n=182 (15.6%, skin ulcers (n=170 (14.6%, and risk behaviour (n=127 (10.9%. In a community, intercurrent illnesses, skin ulcers, and potential risk behavior are the most frequent reasons for deferral of regular donors. Strategized effort on donor education is needed, as “failure to donate” reduces donor motivation.

  15. HIV prevalence and demographic risk factors in blood donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To estimate HIV prevalence in various blood donor populations, to identity sociodemographic risk factors associated with prevalent HIV and to assess the feasibility of offering routine voluntary counselling services to blood donors. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Thyolo district, Malawi. Methods: Data ...

  16. Prevalence of haemolysins in blood donors in Nnamdi Azikiwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The presence of high titres of haemolysins (lytic antibodies) in the sera of donors could predispose to adverse blood transfusion reactions. Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of haemolysins among blood donors at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra State. Methodology: A ...

  17. A Study of Blood Donors in University of Maiduguri Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: This study was set to evaluate the usefulness of serum ALT as a surrogate marker of HCV infection in blood donors. Methodology: The study was conducted at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital between August 2002 to November 2002. Ninety-six healthy, volunteer, blood donors were screened for ...

  18. Prevalence of HBsAg Among Prospective Blood Donors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of Hepatitis B surface antigen ( HBsAg) among prospective blood donors and pregnant women in Kebbi State, Nigeria. Three hundred and sixty one (361) apparently healthy prospective blood donors were recruited and screened for HBsAg using HBsAg rapid test kit.

  19. Distribution of HIV Infections Among Blood Donors in Abia State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A five-year retrospective study on the distribution of HIV infection among blood donors was conducted at the Nigerian Christian Hospital, Onicha Ngwa. A total of 8862 prospective blood donors (comprising of 6504 males and 2358 females) were screened for HIV using the ELISA technique. Nine hundred and thirty five ...

  20. Malaria parasitaemia among blood donors in Ilorin, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of malaria parasitaemia among blood donors in Ilorin has not been documented. In this study, we determined the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia among blood donors in Ilorin, as well as, the sociodemographic and other factors associated with it. Method: This was a hospital- based cross ...

  1. Transfusion of the dangerous universal donor blood leading to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In a health-care setting in which group-identical donor blood is not always available for transfusion, group O whole blood, in the obsolete concept of its being a universal donor, is sometimes given to group A and B recipients without necessary precautions. Objectives: The objective is to draw attention to the ...

  2. Distribution of blood groups in blood donors in the blood bank of Jagdalpur, Bastar district, Chhattisgarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin A Badge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The incidence of ABO and rhesus (Rh groups varies markedly in different races, ethnic groups, and socioeconomic groups in different parts of the world. The frequencies of ABO and Rh blood groups vary from one population to another and time to time in the same region. The present study was carried out to find the distribution of blood group in rural and tribal populations of Bastar district of Chhattisgarh. Materials and Methods: The present retrospective study was carried out at late Shri Baliram Kashyap Memorial Government Medical College and Maharani Hospital blood bank, Jagdalpur, Bastar district, Chhattisgarh, India, during the 2-year period from January 2014 to December 2015. The blood collections were taken from the voluntary donors at outdoor blood donation camp and in-house blood bank as well as from replacement donors at blood bank. Totally 12,852 donors were considered medically fit and accepted for blood donation during the study period. Results: Out of the total 12,852 donors, most of the donors, i.e., 3996 (31.09% were with blood Group O followed by B (30.44%, A (24.95%, and AB (13.52%. Out of the 12,852 blood donors, majority, i.e., 12,779 (99.43% were male and 73 (0.57% were female. Maximum blood donors, i.e., 12,777 (99.42% were Rh positive while only 75 (0.58% were Rh negative. Conclusion: The knowledge of distribution of ABO and Rh blood groups at local and regional levels is helpful in effective management of blood banks and safe blood transfusion services.

  3. Bartonella spp. bacteremia in blood donors from Campinas, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Helena Urso Pitassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella species are blood-borne, re-emerging organisms, capable of causing prolonged infection with diverse disease manifestations, from asymptomatic bacteremia to chronic debilitating disease and death. This pathogen can survive for over a month in stored blood. However, its prevalence among blood donors is unknown, and screening of blood supplies for this pathogen is not routinely performed. We investigated Bartonella spp. prevalence in 500 blood donors from Campinas, Brazil, based on a cross-sectional design. Blood samples were inoculated into an enrichment liquid growth medium and sub-inoculated onto blood agar. Liquid culture samples and Gram-negative isolates were tested using a genus specific ITS PCR with amplicons sequenced for species identification. Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana antibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. B. henselae was isolated from six donors (1.2%. Sixteen donors (3.2% were Bartonella-PCR positive after culture in liquid or on solid media, with 15 donors infected with B. henselae and one donor infected with Bartonella clarridgeiae. Antibodies against B. henselae or B. quintana were found in 16% and 32% of 500 blood donors, respectively. Serology was not associated with infection, with only three of 16 Bartonella-infected subjects seropositive for B. henselae or B. quintana. Bartonella DNA was present in the bloodstream of approximately one out of 30 donors from a major blood bank in South America. Negative serology does not rule out Bartonella spp. infection in healthy subjects. Using a combination of liquid and solid cultures, PCR, and DNA sequencing, this study documents for the first time that Bartonella spp. bacteremia occurs in asymptomatic blood donors. Our findings support further evaluation of Bartonella spp. transmission which can occur through blood transfusions.

  4. Asymptomatic malaria and associated factors among blood donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood transfusion saves life of patients with severe anaemia. However, blood transfusion can transmit blood-borne parasites. Despite malaria being endemic in Tanzania, there is limited information on asymptomatic malaria among blood donors. This study determined the prevalence and associated factors of ...

  5. Blood donors and factors impacting the blood donation decision: motives for donating blood in Turkish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, Eda; Cengiz Seval, Guldane; Aktan, Zeynep; Ayli, Meltem; Palabiyikoglu, Refia

    2013-12-01

    Donations in Turkey are insufficient to cover the high transfusion needs arising from large numbers of thalassemia and sickle cell anemia patients and increasing demands for blood due to advanced surgery and cancer treatment. The most acceptable means to get blood is voluntary blood donation and the blood donor system in Turkey mostly depends on a combination of voluntary and involuntary donors. The main aim of this study is to explore the motivations of Turkish voluntary blood donors toward blood donation and to determine predictors of blood donation motivation. A cross-sectional sample survey of active blood donors in Ankara, Turkey was conducted. The sample consisted of 189 male volunteer blood donor adults. Donors filled in a self-administered questionnaire including the measures of demographic information, empathetic concern, altruism, social responsibility and blood donation motivation questionnaire during donation. Factor analysis of Blood Donation Motivation Measure with varimax rotation revealed a three-factor solution named as "values and moral duty", "positive feelings and esteem" and "self-benefit and external reasons". The results with regression analyses showed that only social responsibility had an significant effect independent of age, income, and education on blood donation motivation. These result reflects that blood donation motivation not only linked to a high degree of altruistic reasons, but also to a combination of some self-regarding motives. Additionally, feelings of empathy or altruism may be less strong at the time the decision to help, other factors may have a larger influence on helping decisions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the return rate of volunteer blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Fátima Lourençon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To convert first-time blood donors into regular volunteer donors is a challenge to transfusion services. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to estimate the return rate of first time donors of the Ribeirão Preto Blood Center and of other blood centers in its coverage region. METHODS: The histories of 115,553 volunteer donors between 1996 and 2005 were analyzed. Statistical analysis was based on a parametric long-term survival model that allows an estimation of the proportion of donors who never return for further donations. RESULTS: Only 40% of individuals return within one year after the first donation and 53% return within two years. It is estimated that 30% never return to donate. Higher return rates were observed among Black donors. No significant difference was found in non-return rates regarding gender, blood type, Rh blood group and blood collection unit. CONCLUSIONS: The low percentage of first-time donors who return for further blood donation reinforces the need for marketing actions and strategies aimed at increasing the return rates.

  7. International variation in volunteer whole blood donor eligibility criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Julie K; King, Karen E

    2010-02-01

    This study assesses international variation in volunteer whole blood donor eligibility criteria. In February 2008, Web sites of major blood collection organizations in 17 countries were queried for the volume of whole blood donations and six donor eligibility criteria: allowed donation frequency, donor age, hemoglobin (Hb), weight, and deferrals for tattoo and pregnancy/breast-feeding. The allowed frequency of whole blood donation ranged from 56 to 120 days, some with sex- and age-specific limitations. While blood collection agencies in three countries did not have an upper age limit for donation, the remainder mandated donor retirement at ages from 60 to 81 years. The minimum Hb level was 11.5 to 12.5 g/dL for women and 12.5 to 13.5 g/dL for men. Blood collection organizations in only three countries required a minimum donor weight of less than 50 kg. Tattoo and pregnancy deferrals ranged from 4 to 12 months and 6 weeks to 12 months, respectively. The volume of whole blood donations ranged from 300 to 500 mL. The percentage of total blood volume donated, the absolute grams of Hb expected to be restored per deferral period and per day of donor deferral, and the concentration of Hb expected to be restored per deferral period were calculated. International volunteer whole blood donor eligibility criteria demonstrate marked variation. These differences likely cause international variation in the prevalence of adverse donor reactions and iron deficiency anemia. The reasons underlying these dissimilarities are unclear, but may include varying cultural influences and average donor body habitus.

  8. Adverse reactions to blood donation: A descriptive study of 3520 blood donors in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C Aneke John; U Ezeh Theodora; A Nwosu Gloria; E Anumba Chika

    2017-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of adverse reactions to blood donation significantly hampers donor retention and negatively impacts on the universal availability of adequate numbers of blood donor units. Objective...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have ... 11 12 videos Play all exercise cassie shipman Leukemia Survivor Meets Bone Marrow Donor - Duration: 4:47. ...

  10. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... on the use of BMT and PBSCT, see http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/fa... If you are ... registry of volunteers willing to be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  11. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... My Personal Experience in Donating Bone Marrow/Stem cells. Be a Donor, Fight Leukemia- Bradford Pine - Duration: 2:59. Bradford Pine 36,968 views ... Loading... Loading... About Press Copyright Creators ...

  12. Negative peri-donation events among whole blood donors in a blood bank in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foluke A. Fasola

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence and sustenance of the blood bank depends on blood donors. It is imperative that the donation experience is satisfactory for the donors. Therefore this study was carried out to determine the frequency of undesirable events experienced by the blood donor as part of donor haemovigilance. This was a retrospective descriptive study of the events that occurred amongst the blood donors of the blood bank of a tertiary institution. The blood donor incident book was reviewed for the period of six months. Negative undesirable events occurred in 2% of the donor populations, of which 45.8% could not complete the blood donation process while only 16.7% completed the blood donation process. Mild vasovagal attack occurred in 0.2% of the donor population. Undisclosed deferrable risk factors/ behaviours were identified by the phlebotomist in the bleeding room which made donors unfit for donation even though they had passed the donor screening criteria. This accounted for 20.8% of those with negative experience. Guidelines are required to identify donors that are not likely to complete donation to avoid wastage of time, blood, resources and reduce undesirable experiences.

  13. The prevalence of malarial parasitaemia among blood donors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Blood serves as a vehicle for transmission of blood-borne pathogens and transfusion-associated malaria is a major concern in malaria endemic countries. The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of malaria parasite among blood donors in Zaria, Nigeria. METHODS: A total of 160 venous ...

  14. Prevalence and intensity of malaria in blood donors at Nnamdi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risk of transmission of malaria parasites through blood transfusion has been noted. A study was conducted to determine the prevalence and intensity of malaria on healthy blood donors who attended Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, from April to May 2002. Blood samples were collected ...

  15. The prevalence of syphilis among blood donors in a centralized Nigerian Blood Transfusion Service Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damulak, O D; Jatau, E; Akinga, E; Peter, G

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis is one of the mandatory transfusion transmissible infections to be tested for in any unit of blood for homologous transfusion. The paucity of voluntary blood donors in Nigeria has compelled health care providers to rely on paid and family replacement donors for blood. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of syphilis among blood donors at a centralized Transfusion Service in North Central Nigeria. Records of blood donors at the North Central Zonal Centre of the National Blood Transfusion Service in Jos, from April 2007 to March 2010 were analyzed for sero-positivity to Treponema pallidum and co-infections with other transfusion transmissible infections. 9,500 blood donors where received at the Transfusion Service Centre in Jos within the study period. The overall prevalence of syphilis among blood donors was 0.9%. New voluntary non remunerated donors constituted 69.9% with a syphilis sero-positivity of 0.9% and 0.2% co-infection. Retained voluntary non remunerated donors accounted for 19.5% with syphilis sero-positivity of 0.2%. Family replacement donors made up 10.6% of total blood units screened with a 2.0% anti-syphilis positive reaction and 1.0% co-infection. The prevalence of syphilis among blood donors in a centralized transfusion service may be low.

  16. Donating blood for research: a potential method for enhancing customer satisfaction of permanently deferred blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Daniel; Thijsen, Amanda; Garradd, Allira; Hayman, Jane; Smith, Geoff

    2017-01-01

    Each year, a large number of individuals in Australia are deferred from donating blood. A deferral may have a negative impact on donor satisfaction and subsequent word-of-mouth communication. The Australian Red Cross Blood Service (the Blood Service) is, therefore, investigating options for managing service interactions with deferred donors to maintain positive relationships. While public research institutes in Australia have established independent research donor registries, other countries provide programmes allowing deferred donors to donate blood for research via blood collection agencies. This study examined attitudes towards donating blood for research use in a sample of permanently deferred Australian donors. Donors permanently deferred because of a risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (n=449) completed a postal survey that examined attitudes towards research donation. The majority of participants were interested in donating blood for research (96%), and joining a registry of research donors (93%). Participants preferred to donate for transfusion or clinical research, and were willing to travel large distances. Results indicated that positive attitudes towards the Blood Service would be extended if the opportunity to donate blood was provided. These findings indicate a desire for continued engagement with the Blood Service despite deferral. Donating blood for research is a potential way of maintaining positive relationships with permanently deferred donors which also benefits the health research community. Through maintaining positive relationships with deferred donors, positive word-of-mouth activity can be stimulated. Further work is needed to determine the feasibility of implementing research donation through the Blood Service in Australia.

  17. Socio-demographic characteristics of Danish blood donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgdorf, Kristoffer Sølvsten; Simonsen, Jacob; Sundby, Anna; Rostgaard, Klaus; Pedersen, Ole Birger; Sørensen, Erik; Nielsen, Kaspar René; Bruun, Mie Topholm; Frisch, Morten; Edgren, Gustaf; Erikstrup, Christian; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Ullum, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is an essential component of a modern healthcare system. Because knowledge about blood donor demography may inform the design of strategies for donor recruitment and retention, we used nationwide registers to characterize the entire population of blood donors in Denmark in 2010. Methods The study population comprised all Danes in the age range eligible for blood donation (N = 3,236,753) at the end of 2010. From the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT) register, we identified 174,523 persons who donated blood in Danish blood banks at least once in 2010. The association between sociodemographic characteristics and blood donor prevalence was examined using regression models. Results The overall prevalence of blood donation was 5.4% among both women and men. The age-specific prevalence of blood donation peaked at 25 years of age (6.8%) for women and 30 years of age (5.7%) for men. Children of any age were associated with lower prevalence of blood donation among women, while the opposite was seen for men. Middle to high income groups, but not the highest income group, had fourfold higher donor prevalence than the lowest income group (6.7% compared to 1.7%). The prevalence of blood donation was considerably lower among men living with their parents (2.9%) or alone (3.9%) than among men cohabitating with a woman (6.2%). Summary Social marginalization, as indicated by low income and being a male living without a woman, was associated with lower prevalence of blood donation. However, individuals with very high incomes and women with children were underrepresented in the Danish blood donor population. PMID:28182624

  18. Tissue banking: relationship with blood donor and organ donor card status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Kenneth D; Fitzpatrick, Patricia E; Sheehan, John D

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationships among altruistic health acts may serve to aid therapeutic research advances. In this paper, we report on the links between two such behaviours-donating blood and carrying an organ donor card-and willingness to donate urological tissue to a tissue bank. Reasons for the differential willingness to do so are examined in this paper. A systematic sample of 259 new and returning attendees at a tertiary urology referral clinic in Ireland completed a self-report questionnaire in an outpatient setting. In addition to demographic details, details of known diagnosis of malignancy and family history of cancer; attitudes to tissue donation for research purposes were gauged using a 5-point Likert scale. Both blood donors and organ donor card carriers were more likely to be willing to donate tissue for research purposes. Blood donors were more likely want to know their overall results in comparison to nonblood donors and want their samples to be used for nonprofit research. Our hypothesis that being a blood donor would be a better predictor to donate urological tissue than being an organ donor card carrier borne out by the trends reported above.

  19. Restless legs syndrome, pica, and iron status in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Bryan R; Kleinman, Steven; Wright, David J; Glynn, Simone A; Rye, David B; Kiss, Joseph E; Mast, Alan E; Cable, Ritchard G

    2013-08-01

    The association of blood donation-related iron deficiency with pica or restless legs syndrome (RLS) remains poorly elucidated. This study evaluated the prevalence of RLS and pica in blood donors completing the REDS-II Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) study. RISE enrolled 2425 blood donors in a prospective cohort study; 1334 donors provided blood samples to characterize iron status and answered a questionnaire inquiring into symptoms of RLS and pica at a final visit after 15 to 24 months of follow-up. Associations between both conditions and iron status were evaluated. There were 9 and 20% of donors reporting symptoms of probable or probable/possible RLS, respectively. Iron depletion and donation intensity were not predictive of RLS. Pica was reported by 65 donors (5.5%), half of whom reported daily cravings. Prevalence of pica increased with degree of iron depletion in women (2% in iron-replete females, 13% in those with ferritin pica coexpressed in eight individuals, but no more frequently than expected by chance. RLS and pica have been associated with iron deficiency in nondonor populations. This study indicates a potentially high prevalence of RLS in frequent blood donors but shows no association with iron status or donation intensity. Low iron stores were associated with higher prevalence of pica, but only in females. Furthermore, the results are incompatible with RLS and pica sharing a common pathophysiology. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  20. Characterization of blood donors with high haemoglobin concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, K; Hasselbalch, H C; Ullum, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives  The literature contains little on the prevalence and causes of high predonation haemoglobin levels among blood donors. This study aimed to characterize and develop an algorithm to manage would-be donors with polycythaemia. Materials and Methods  Between November 2009...... and November 2011, we offered haematology consultations to blood donors with repeated haemoglobin concentration (Hb) above the WHO limit for polycythaemia vera (PV) (10·2 and 11·5 mm/16·5 and 18·5 g/dl for women and men, respectively). Investigation of such donors included Hb, haematocrit, mean cell volume......, erythropoietin, ferritin, platelet count and leucocyte count, JAK2 V617 and JAK2 exon12 analysis, as well as other routine measurements. Results  Among 46 such donors, 39 had a history of smoking, which contributes to erythrocytosis. Two had PV, five had severe hypertension, one of them because of renal artery...

  1. Incidence of Herpesvirus hominis antibodies among blood donor populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roome, A P; Montefiore, D; Waller, D

    1975-10-01

    The microneutralization test was used to determine the occurrence of antibodies to Herpesvirus hominis Type 1 and Type 2 in sera from patients attending the Special Clinic, Bristol Royal Infirmary, with proven herpes genitalis, and in sera taken from blood donors in Bath, Dursley, and Bristol, as well as from donors in three different prison populations. The findings in patients with herpes genitalis indicate that the test accurately reflects the antibody response expected in relation to the type of herpes virus isolated from the lesions. The incidence of Type 2 antibodies among the blood donors ranged from 5 per cent. for donors from the Bath area up to 60 per cent. among donors from Dartmoor prison. The findings suggested that Type 2 herpes infection could spread among longterm prison populations, and it is postulated that this may be due to both homosexual contact, and also by non-sexual contact, either directly or via fomites.

  2. The effect of World Blood Donor Day on digital information seeking and donor recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Floris J; Kreuger, Aukje L; Arbous, M Sesmu; Laeijendecker, Daphne; van Kraaij, Marian G J

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of World Blood Donor Day (WBDD) is to raise awareness for the importance of blood donation. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of WBDD on digital information seeking and donor recruitment. Google Trends data were used to quantify seeking behavior on "blood donation" and "blood donor." Differences in relative search volume (RSV) between the 3 weeks surrounding WBDD and the rest of the year were calculated. Second, mean differences in RSV were compared to assess the additional effect of hosting using translated search terms. Third, we compared the period around WBDD with the control period regarding page views of the Sanquin website and Facebook likes and number of newly registered donors in 2016. The mean RSV for "blood donation" in the period of interest was 78.6, compared to 72.1 in the control period (difference, 6.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.2-11.8). For "blood donor" this was 78.9 compared to 65.9 (difference, 12.9; 95% CI, 8.1-17.8). We found no additional effect of hosting. In the period of interest, the website of Sanquin was visited 6862 times a day and 4293 times in the control period (difference, 2569; 95% CI, 1687-3451). In June 2016, 54.6% (95% CI, 53.0-56.2) more new donors were registered compared to the control period. An international campaign like WBDD raises the awareness of blood donation and is effective in convincing people to register as blood donors. © 2017 AABB.

  3. [How healthy are our blood donors? Result of a liver screening in voluntary blood donors of Blutspendedienst Innsbruck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzer, S; Rosmanith, P; Reissigl, H

    1976-10-22

    A screening of hepatic function and HBs-antigen, made in 22344 voluntary blood donors in the bloodbank of Innsbruck, gave the following results: 0,33% HBs-AG negative donors were found to have pathological liverfunctiontests. Overweight and alcohol would be established as the most important etiological factors. 0,4% of the donors are carriers of the HBs-antigen. A control examination after 2 years showed a persistence of that antigenemia. Antigen carriers are requested to have regular examinations. Since HBs-AG positive hepatitis is not only transferred by blood and blood-constituents, it would be important to use the same screening methods applied in the blood donor organisation throughout any hospital area, to reduce the incidence of this disease.

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... DOUBLE STEMCELL (Hindi) 09039139777 - Duration: 4:26. Pharma Science 116,753 views 4:26 Stem Cell Basics - ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have ... 3:35. hemaquebec1998 8,944 views 3:35 Leukemia Survivor Meets Bone Marrow Donor - Duration: 4:47. ...

  6. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... A 60 Minutes investigation - Duration: 16:11. CBS News 361,590 views 16:11 Pain Control: Support ...

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ... YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign in to add this ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... her German stem cell donor for the first time in Germany. #priceless - Duration: 1:04. Jacque Brohawn ... Bone Marrow Transplant Patient Information: Chapter 3 - What Are Stem Cells - Duration: 3:58. HenryFordTV 20,159 ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... video will automatically play next. Up next Stem cell donation: Step by step - Duration: 3:35. hemaquebec1998 8,779 views 3:35 My Friend the Stem Cell Donor - Duration: 4:41. Annabelle Monks 6,482 ...

  10. Blood donor selection in European Union directives: room for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kort, Wim; Mayr, Wolfgang; Jungbauer, Christof; Vuk, Tomislav; Kullaste, Riin; Seifried, Erhard; Grazzini, Giuliano; De Wit, Jeroen; Folléa, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Transfusion-transmissible infections have made both blood bankers and health authorities overly cautious. The general public expects and hence reinforces this policy. To obtain a high level of blood product safety, blood and plasma donors have to meet increasingly stringent eligibility criteria; however, it is not known whether this policy translates into improved outcomes for patients. There is a risk that the management of donors does not match the ambition of greater safety for patients. European directives related to the collection process and donor selection will probably be reconsidered in the next few years. The development of European directives on donor selection and their basis in the literature were reviewed with an emphasis on the background and considerations for eligibility criteria to be included in the directives. The precautionary principle appears to be the predominant reason behind the set of eligibility criteria. However, the formal eligibility criteria, put into force in 2004, do not balance with the developments of the past decade in laboratory tests and measures that have substantially reduced actual infection risks. In no cases were the effects of eligibility criteria on the donor pool and donor well-being quantified. Regional differences in the epidemiology of transfusion-transmissible infections were not taken into consideration either. First, the Authors promote the collection of epidemiological data on the incidence and prevalence of conditions in the general population and in blood and plasma donors which could pose a risk for transfused patients, in order to use these data as a basis for decision-making in donor-selection policies. Second, the Authors suggest including allowance for differential deferral criteria throughout Europe, based on factual risk levels. There should be an accepted balance between donor and patient welfare, and also between risk to transfusion safety and risk of compromising the blood supply.

  11. Frequency and risk factors for donor reactions in an anonymous blood donor survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mindy; Osmond, Lori; Yi, Qi-Long; Cameron-Choi, Keltie; O'Brien, Sheila F

    2013-09-01

    Adverse donor reactions can result in injury and decrease the likelihood of donor return. Reaction reports captured in the blood center's database provide an incomplete picture of reaction rates and risk factors. We performed an anonymous survey, mailed to 40,000 donors in 2008, including questions about symptoms, height, weight, sex, and donation status. Reaction rates were compared to those recorded in our database. Possible risk factors were assessed for various reactions. The response rate was 45.5%. A total of 32% of first-time and 14% of repeat donors reported having any adverse symptom, most frequently bruising (84.9 per 1000 donors) or feeling faint or weak (66.2 per 1000). Faint reactions were two to eight times higher than reported in our database, although direct comparison was difficult. Younger age, female sex, and first-time donation status were risk factors for systemic and arm symptoms. In females, low estimated blood volume (EBV) was a risk factor for systemic symptoms. Only 51% of donors who consulted an outside physician also called Canadian Blood Services. A total of 10% of first-time donors with reactions found adverse effects information inadequate. This study allowed us to collect more information about adverse reactions, including minor symptoms and delayed reactions. Based on our findings of the risk factors and frequency of adverse reactions, we are implementing more stringent EBV criteria for younger donors and providing more detailed information to donors about possible adverse effects and their management. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  12. Blood donor haemovigilance in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchinda, E C; Tagny, C T; Mbanya, D

    2012-08-01

    Blood availability is an issue of concern in countries of sub-Saharan Africa where both the demand and discard rates of blood are high. Although some degree of attention is paid when transfusion reactions occur in recipients, no information is available on donor reactions in this setting. This study was carried out in order to obtain some data on adverse reactions (ARs) to blood donations. It would make it possible to monitor and improve the safety of the donation procedure, which constitutes a strategy towards increasing donor supply by encouraging first-time donors to return in the absence of any negative outcomes of donation. A hospital blood bank-based descriptive and prospective study was carried out to document ARs among 1034 blood donors from September 2010 to January 2011. A pre-structured data collection tool was used to record the signs and symptoms observed. The ARs occurred at a rate of 2.8%. The most frequent reaction was hypotension which constituted 26.62% of all ARs. Haematomas represented 18.42% while weakness and dizziness were each noted in 13.16% of donors. There was no severe vasovagal reaction. Associated factors to vasovagal reactions were first-time donor status (P = 0.004), female sex (P = 0.01) and low body weight (P = 0.02). Our results suggest that blood donation is a relatively safe procedure in our context. The frequency is higher than studies from developed countries. The association of AR with first-time blood donation needs to be verified in a larger study. However, it could suggest another benefit of regular blood donation. © 2012 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  13. hiv prevalence and demographic risk factors in blood donors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... There was a highly significant positive association of HIV prevalence with increasing urbanisation. ... blood transfusions, use of a highly sensitive screening test, and pre-donation selection of donors is important. ... given, blood was withdrawn and the person requested to return for post-test counselling.

  14. Donor Infectious Disease Testing Multinational assessment of blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Donor Infectious Disease Testing Multinational assessment of blood-borne virus testing and transfusion safety on the African continent... ... A newly formed network of African blood transfusion specialists has therefore decided to perform a baseline evaluation of serologic testing performance. Building on the experience of a ...

  15. Effect of laser irradiation of donor blood on erythrocyte shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baibekov, I M; Ibragimov, A F; Baibekov, A I

    2012-04-01

    Changes in erythrocyte shape in donor blood during storage and after irradiation with He-Ne laser and infrared laser were studied by scanning electron microscopy, thick drop express-method, and morphometry. It was found that laser irradiation delayed the appearance of erythrocytes of pathological shapes (echinocytes, stomatocytes, etc.) in the blood; He-Ne laser produced a more pronounced effect.

  16. Prevalence of filariasis among prospective blood donors at Ladoke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This fact, together with changing population demographics, increased travels with respect to rural urban migration and the problems of commercial blood donors has made it ... The modified thick smear technique described by Denham, and Giemsa and Haematoxylin stains were used to detect microfilaria in the blood.

  17. Prevalence of HIV among blood donors at Juba Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    College of Medicine, University of Juba, South Sudan. b. National Ministry of .... Female. 1(1%). 2(1%). 0. 3(3%). 6. Total. 86. 195. 34. 105. 420. Figure 1. Distribution (percent) of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis among blood donors. Table 3. Distribution of ... has also been reported in many studies done in Asia [16]. Low blood ...

  18. Digital questionnaire platform in the Danish Blood Donor Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, K S; Felsted, N; Mikkelsen, S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Danish Blood Donor Study (DBDS) is a prospective, population-based study and biobank. Since 2010, 100,000 Danish blood donors have been included in the study. Prior to July 2015 all participating donors had to complete a paper-based questionnaire. Here we describe the establishment...... of a digital tablet-based questionnaire platform implemented in blood bank sites across Denmark. METHODS: The digital questionnaire was developed using the open source survey software tool LimeSurvey. The participants accesses the questionnaire online with a standard SSL encrypted HTTP connection using...... their personal civil registration numbers. The questionnaire is placed at a front-end web server and a collection server retrieves the completed questionnaires. Data from blood samples, register data, genetic data and verification of signed informed consent are then transferred to and merged...

  19. Prevalence of Babesia antibody in a selected blood donor population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovsky, M A; Lindberg, L E; Syrek, A L; Page, P L

    1988-01-01

    Human babesiosis, a parasitic disease transmitted by the tick, Ixodes dammini, was confined previously to limited areas of the northeastern United States. It is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of transfusion. Red cells and platelets prepared from asymptomatic donors have been implicated in transfusion-transmitted cases. More cases of babesiosis are being reported as the range of the vector expands in the United States. Blood donors from an endemic area were tested for antibody to Babesia microti during the summer. Only 3.7 percent of the 779 donors were seropositive, compared with 4.7 percent (p greater than 0.05) of donors from a nonendemic area. An epidemiologic survey of seropositive and matched seronegative controls demonstrated no significant differences that would assist in screening donors.

  20. Vasovagal reactions in blood donors: risks, prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijsen, A; Masser, B

    2017-11-16

    This narrative review examines current research on risk factors, prevention methods and management strategies for vasovagal reactions (VVRs) that occur during or as a result of blood donation. VVRs are important to blood collection agencies (BCAs) as they negatively impact the number of completed collections, perceptions of the safety of blood donation and rates of donor return. There has been significant progress in understanding and preventing VVRs in blood donation in recent years, with a multitude of risk factors identified. This has resulted in many BCAs implementing evidence-based strategies, such as donor age and weight restrictions. However, the profile of our most vulnerable donors and features of the donation setting that may protect these donors from experiencing a VVR have not been identified. Furthermore, an increased number of trials of physiological and psychological prevention interventions to reduce both immediate and delayed VVRs have been reported. However, a lack of methodological consistency in operationalising interventions to reduce or prevent VVRs means that the identification of effective VVR prevention strategies remains a challenge for practitioners. Furthermore, research is still required to determine how to successfully implement prevention and management strategies into standard operating procedures within collection centres. Finally, research in the management and mitigation of the effect of VVRs is currently only suggestive of what should be done to care for the donor who reacts and how to empower those donors to return. Collectively, research into these aspects of VVRs will provide support to donors and BCAs and improve the safety of blood donation. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  1. Partial phenotyping in voluntary blood donors of Gujarat State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitrey Gajjar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Partial phenotyping of voluntary blood donors has vital role in transfusion practice, population genetic study and in resolving legal issues.The Rh blood group is one of the most complex and highly immunogenic blood group known in humans. The Kell system, discovered in 1946, is the third most potent system at triggering hemolytic transfusion reactions and consists of 25 highly immunogenic antigens. Knowledge of Rh & Kell phenotypes in given population is relevant for better planning and management of blood bank; the main goal is to find compatible blood for patients needing multiple blood transfusions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of Rh & Kell phenotype of voluntary donors in Gujarat state. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted by taking 5670 samples from random voluntary blood donors coming in blood donation camp. Written consent was taken for donor phenotyping. The antigen typing of donors was performed by Qwalys-3(manufacturer: Diagast by using electromagnetic technology on Duolys plates. Results: Out of 5670 donors, the most common Rh antigen observed in the study population was e (99.07% followed by D (95.40%, C (88.77%, c (55.89% and E (17.88%. The frequency of the Kell antigen (K was 1.78 %. Discussion: The antigen frequencies among blood donors from Gujarat were compared with those published for other Indian populations. The frequency of D antigen in our study (95.4% and north Indian donors (93.6 was significantly higher than in the Caucasians (85% and lower than in the Chinese (99%. The frequencies of C, c and E antigens were dissimilar to other ethnic groups while the ′e′ antigen was present in high frequency in our study as also in the other ethnic groups. Kell antigen (K was found in only 101 (1.78 % donors out of 5670. Frequency of Kell antigen in Caucasian and Black populations is 9% & 2% respectively. The most common Kell phenotype was K-k+, not just in Indians (96.5% but

  2. Partial phenotyping in voluntary blood donors of Gujarat State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Maitrey; Patel, Tarak; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Patel, Kruti; Shah, Mamta; Prajapati, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Partial phenotyping of voluntary blood donors has vital role in transfusion practice, population genetic study and in resolving legal issues. The Rh blood group is one of the most complex and highly immunogenic blood group known in humans. The Kell system, discovered in 1946, is the third most potent system at triggering hemolytic transfusion reactions and consists of 25 highly immunogenic antigens. Knowledge of Rh & Kell phenotypes in given population is relevant for better planning and management of blood bank; the main goal is to find compatible blood for patients needing multiple blood transfusions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of Rh & Kell phenotype of voluntary donors in Gujarat state. The present study was conducted by taking 5670 samples from random voluntary blood donors coming in blood donation camp. Written consent was taken for donor phenotyping. The antigen typing of donors was performed by Qwalys-3(manufacturer: Diagast) by using electromagnetic technology on Duolys plates. Out of 5670 donors, the most common Rh antigen observed in the study population was e (99.07%) followed by D (95.40%), C (88.77%), c (55.89%) and E (17.88%). The frequency of the Kell antigen (K) was 1.78 %. The antigen frequencies among blood donors from Gujarat were compared with those published for other Indian populations. The frequency of D antigen in our study (95.4%) and north Indian donors (93.6) was significantly higher than in the Caucasians (85%) and lower than in the Chinese (99%). The frequencies of C, c and E antigens were dissimilar to other ethnic groups while the 'e' antigen was present in high frequency in our study as also in the other ethnic groups. Kell antigen (K) was found in only 101 (1.78 %) donors out of 5670. Frequency of Kell antigen in Caucasian and Black populations is 9% & 2% respectively. The most common Kell phenotype was K-k+, not just in Indians (96.5%) but also in Caucasians (91%), Blacks (98%) and Chinese (100%). Phenotype

  3. Digital questionnaire platform in the Danish Blood Donor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgdorf, K S; Felsted, N; Mikkelsen, S; Nielsen, M H; Thørner, L W; Pedersen, O B; Sørensen, E; Nielsen, K R; Bruun, M T; Werge, T; Erikstrup, C; Hansen, T; Ullum, H

    2016-10-01

    The Danish Blood Donor Study (DBDS) is a prospective, population-based study and biobank. Since 2010, 100,000 Danish blood donors have been included in the study. Prior to July 2015 all participating donors had to complete a paper-based questionnaire. Here we describe the establishment of a digital tablet-based questionnaire platform implemented in blood bank sites across Denmark. The digital questionnaire was developed using the open source survey software tool LimeSurvey. The participants accesses the questionnaire online with a standard SSL encrypted HTTP connection using their personal civil registration numbers. The questionnaire is placed at a front-end web server and a collection server retrieves the completed questionnaires. Data from blood samples, register data, genetic data and verification of signed informed consent are then transferred to and merged with the questionnaire data in the DBDS database. The digital platform enables personalized questionnaires, presenting only questions relevant to the specific donor by hiding unneeded follow-up questions on screening question results. New versions of questionnaires are immediately available at all blood collection facilities when new projects are initiated. The digital platform is a faster, cost-effective and more flexible solution to collect valid data from participating donors compared to paper-based questionnaires. The overall system can be used around the world by the use of Internet connection, but the level of security depends on the sensitivity of the data to be collected. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 899 views 4:47 12 videos Play all exercise cassie shipman PBSC (Peripheral blood stem cell) Harvest - ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 39,345 views 49:19 Two days following ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a former NCI employee, Serena Marshall, as she takes you through her blood stem cell donation experience ... Match 29,769 views 3:28 PBSC (Peripheral blood stem cell) Harvest - Duration: 2:55. bmdpsg 5,299 ... Loading... Working... Sign in to add ...

  6. Red Blood Cell Membranes in Donors of Different Age Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an electroporation technique in order to evaluate its action on a biological membrane in donors of different age groups. It is shown that the older the donor is, the higher the rate of hemolysis is. Thus, owing to its simplicity, the electroporation technique may be clinically tested to diagnose the status of red blood cell membranes in subjects from different age groups for further studies.

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have been destroyed by high doses of ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 40,225 views 49:19 AML Survivor meets ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your opinion count. Sign in 1 Loading... Loading... Transcript The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... Loading... Rating is ... Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) ...

  10. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Jul ... Truth About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 40,225 views 49:19 How to ...

  11. Blood donor to inactive donor transition in the Basel region between 1996 and 2011: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volken, T; Buser, A; Holbro, A; Bart, T; Infanti, L

    2015-08-01

    For the prevention of blood shortages, it is essential for blood banks to design and implement donor recruitment and donor retention strategies that take into account the determinants of donor return. We studied the behaviour of first-time blood donors in the region of Basel, Switzerland, between 1996 and 2011 and described factors associated with transition from active to inactive donor in two successive first-time donor cohorts (1996-2002, 2003-2008). The risk of becoming an inactive donor was associated with being younger and female, not being a 0-negative donor and living in an urban area. Over time, hazards of becoming an inactive donor were converging for individuals living in non-urban and urban areas as were those of younger and older donors. After their first donation, 73.6% and 67.5% of males in the 1996-2002 and 2003-2008 cohorts, respectively, donated at least once in the following 24 months. The proportion of returning female donors was 71.8% and 65.4%, respectively. The increased volatility of first-time blood donors suggests that marketing actions and strategies aimed at increasing return rates should be reinforced, especially for younger and female blood donors. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  12. RECRUITMENT OF PATIENTS WITH HEREDITARY HAEMOCHROMATOSIS AS BLOOD DONORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Cukjati

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary haemochromatosis is the most common inherited disorder in white persons with prevalence of about 1 in 200. Therapeutic phlebotomy is an effective treatment for the disease and prevents its sequele. In addition to their altruism, patients with hereditary haemochromatosis have also medical and monetary incentives for blood donation. Current guidelines do not allow haemochromatosis patients to donate blood. About two thirds of patients are eligible as blood donors and about two thirds of therapeutically drawn blood is suitable for transfusion. Therapeutically drawn blood could increase the blood supply by 1.5 to 30%.Conclusions. The number of states that already accept patients with hereditary haemochromatosis as blood donors is increasing. To avoid monetary incentives they offer free phlebotomies for all patients with hereditary haemochromatosis. There have been no reports about higher incidence of transfusion reactions. In Slovenia the number of therapeutic phlebotomy is increasing. We should evaluate the possibilities for recruitment of haemochromatosis patients as blood donors also in our country. It is necessary to modify regulatory restrictions and to ensure that there is no other incentives than altruism for blood donation.

  13. Gilbert′s syndrome in healthy blood donors what next??

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra G Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Settings: This study was done in a tertiary care hospital having bed strength of more than 700 beds at SDM Medical College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Dharwad, located in Northern Karnataka. Aim: The study was done to ascertain prevalence of Gilbert′s syndrome in healthy blood donors and review the literature about feasibility of utilizing blood components from Gilbert′s syndrome donors. Materials and Methods: The study was done for 18 months and 7030 whole blood units were collected and all the units were subjected to mandatory transfusion-transmitted screening and all the plasma bags which were icteric on visual inspection were subjected to hematological and biochemical investigations to rule out other causes of hyperbilirubinemia. Results: Seven thousand and thirty units were collected and 445 (6.3% were discarded due to various reasons. Of them, 50 units (0.71% had Gilbert′s syndrome. All had unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and other hematological and liver function tests were within normal range. Statistical analysis was done to find mean, median, and standard deviation from mean and standard error of mean with lower and upper confidence limits. Conclusion: Majority of blood donors whose plasma is icteric are suffering from Gilbert′s syndrome (GS. This disease does not cause any harm to donor or patient but raises a lot of concern as many severe disorders also manifest in similar way. The available literature shows that all blood components can be used from donors suffering from GS. There should be introspection. Proper guidelines are to be framed about the use and discarding of blood components in donors with GS.

  14. Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization from healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Melda Comert; Sahin, Fahri; Saydam, Guray

    2015-08-01

    Most frequently used graft of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for allogeneic transplantation is peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) that are collected after mobilization with frequently granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Administration of the optimal dose of G-CSF while preserving the donor health is one of the most important points for sufficient PBSC mobilization and harvest. We hereby tried to summarize characteristic features, potential side effects and main topics in peripheral blood stem cell mobilization from healthy donors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A retrospective cohort study of blood hemoglobin levels in blood donors and competitive rowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P. I.; Ullum, H.; Jensen, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the distribution of blood hemoglobin levels in healthy blood donors and elite athletes, a retrospective cohort study from 2001 to 2005 of candidate blood donors and elite rowers in Denmark was performed. Eighty-five thousand eight hundred and forty-six blood donors were identified...... (36 962 males), and 3.9% of the males had a blood hemoglobin above 10.5 mM, equalling a hematocrit of 51% and, 1.6% of the females had hemoglobin above 9.7 mM, corresponding to a hematocrit above 47%. One thousand four hundred and six rowers (1116 males) were investigated and 10.4% of the males and 8.......3% of the females demonstrated values above the recommended limit for athletic competition. Thus, the prevalence of a high hemoglobin value was greater in the rowers, of both gender, than in the candidate blood donors (Phemoglobin levels in blood are seen regularly in normal...

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem ... 2:55. bmdpsg 5,299 views 2:55 Myelodysplastic Syndrome | Dr. Tony Talebi discusses "Treatment of Myelodysplastic Syndrome?" - ...

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood stem cell) Harvest - Duration: 2:55. bmdpsg 5,068 views 2:55 Does Donating Bone Marrow ... Cell Donation Experience - Duration: 4:17. Mike G 5,933 views 4:17 Bone Marrow Donation via ...

  18. Prevalence of HBV and HCV among blood donors in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejza, Hajrullah; Telaku, Skender

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis is disease of the liver caused by the infectious and non-infectious agents. The aim of study was to analyze the prevalence of HBV and HCV among voluntary blood donors in Kosovo, during 2000–2003. The data from National Center for Blood Transfusion of Kosovo were collected and analyzed through descriptive and comparative epidemiological method of retrospective study. All samples were tested by ELISA test. Out of 70348 samples of the blood donors, 3145 were positive. From overall positive samples, 2939 were HBV positive, 192 HCV positive while 14 samples were positive for both viruses. The HBV prevalence among the blood donors of Kosovo is 4.2%, which range Kosovo to the second zone according to the CDC classification of the geographical spread of the HBV infection. The HCV prevalence among the blood donors in Kosovo is 0.3%. Compared to the other European countries this level of prevalence is relatively low. Age group 30–39 years old was presented with 34.8% of cases. The higher number was among the workers, 842 or 26.8%. Based on the results we can conclude that Kosovo have the similar prevalence for HBV and HCV infections as other South East European countries. PMID:19216773

  19. Donor Cell Leukemia in Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Jennifer; Youens, Kenneth; Michalowski, Susan; Perrine, Gail; Emhart, Cassandra; Johnson, Felicia; Gerling, Amy; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Goodman, Barbara K.; Sebastian, Siby; Rehder, Catherine W.; Datto, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Donor cell neoplasms are rare complications of treatment regimens that involve stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies, myelodysplastic processes, or certain genetic or metabolic disorders. We report a case of donor cell leukemia in a pediatric patient with a history of acute myeloid leukemia that manifested as recurrent AML FAB type M5 fourteen months after umbilical cord blood transplantation. Although there was some immunophenotypic drift from the patient's original AML and their posttransplant presentation, the initial pathological impression was of recurrent disease. Bone marrow engraftment analysis by multiplex PCR of short tandem repeat markers performed on the patient's diagnostic specimen showed complete engraftment by donor cells, with a loss of heterozygosity in the donor alleles on chromosome 7. This led to the reinterpretation of this patient's disease as donor-derived leukemia. This interpretation was supported by a routine karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showing loss of chromosome 7 and a male (donor) chromosome complement in this female patient. Also noted was a loss of the patient's presenting chromosomal abnormality, t(11;19)(q23;p13). This case highlights the need for close coordination between all aspects of clinical testing for the transplant patient, including molecular engraftment studies, when distinguishing the very common complication of recurrent disease from the exceedingly rare complication of donor cell leukemia. PMID:20431036

  20. Ethical Aspects of Blood Donors and the Recipients of Their Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. M. van den Burg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To date medical care is inextricable based on blood donors and blood products. The continuing increase and intensification of tests and guidelines also results in a change in deferral and abnormal test results. Donors and recipients of their blood are faced with this information and are confronted with a kaleidoscope of thoughts and emotions. The discussion with respect to paid versus nonpaid donation is not new, but other aspects are less often discussed. We describe these other aspects for donors and recipients of their blood and hope to open the ethical discussion; if and to what extent we should have limits?

  1. Relationship between the prevalence of hemoglobin S and the ethnic background of blood donors in Paraná state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kárita C. F. Lidani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:Hemoglobin S (HbS is one of the most common inherited hematological disorders in humans. In Brazil, the sickle-cell disease (SCD has significant epidemiological importance due to its prevalence and the morbidity-mortality and, therefore, it has been identified as a matter of public health.Objective:To determine the prevalence of HbS among Asian Brazilian, Afro Brazilian, and Euro Brazilian individuals of a blood bank in Curitiba.Material and method:The study was conducted from January 2008 to December 2009, and included 83,213 donors seen at the Instituto Paranaense de Hemoterapia e Hematologia.Results and discussion:The prevalence of HbS in the studied population was 0.9%, among them, 0% Asian Brazilians, 2.7% Afro Brazilians, and 0.7% Euro Brazilians. There was a positive association, statistically significant for the sickle cell trait in Afro-descendants, with odds ratio (OR 4.01; confidence interval (CI 3.42-4.72; and 95% confidence.Conclusion:This study showed higher rates of sickle cell trait in Afro Brazilians, which corroborates data published in other Brazilian regions and states.

  2. ABO Blood Group Distribution among Voluntary Blood Donors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: ABO blood group antigens are the most important in blood transfusion service. Everyone over six months has naturally acquired antibody against the corresponding antigen absent on their red blood cell membrane. Safe blood transfusion includes the transfusion of group specific compatible units to recipients.

  3. Reference values of lead in blood and related factors among blood donors in the Western Amazon, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Carmen; Koifman, Rosalina Jorge; Fujimoto, Denys; de Oliveira Souza, Vanessa Cristina; Barbosa, Fernando; Koifman, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to (1) determine the reference value of blood lead levels (BLL) in a sample of blood donors of Rio Branco, the capital city of Acre, in the Western Brazilian Amazon, and (2) explore factors influencing lead (Pb) exposure levels. Between 2010 and 2011, blood samples were collected from universal blood donors attending the Central Hemotherapic Unit in Rio Branco with a total number of 1196. Information on characteristics of 1183 donors was obtained through questionnaires. Blood Pb concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with detection limit of 0.003 μg/L. Association between BLL and participant characteristics was examined by linear regression analysis. Reference values of BLL were calculated as the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval of the 95th percentile. Reference values of BLL were 109.5 μg/L for men, 70.7 μg/L for women, 88.9 μg/L for younger individuals (18-29 yr), 115.3 μg/L for older ones (≥30 yr), 94.2 μg/L for nonsmokers, and 164.5 μg/L for smokers. Levels of BLL were significantly higher in males, subjects older than 29 yr, non-whites, smokers, regular consumers of manioc flour, and donors practicing any activity related to paints, ceramics, pottery, fishing, or firearms. Subjects with higher education, higher income, vitamin intake use, and drinkers of bottled water displayed lower BLL. In general, BLL in men and women from Rio Branco were higher than those described in other adult populations. Prevention of exposure of this population to local sources of Pb needs to be addressed.

  4. Seroprevalence of transfusion transmitted infections among different blood group donors at Blood Bank LUMHS, Hyderabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Faheem Ahmed; Ujjan, Ikram Din; Memon, Amir Iqbal; Shaikh, Abdul Rehman; Rao, Ali Raza; Naz, Arshi

    2017-01-01

    To study the prevalence of HBsAg, Anti-HCV, HIV, Syphilis and Malaria in blood donors. This is a cross sectional descriptive study, conducted at Blood bank and Transfusion center at Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences (LUMHS) Hyderabad, during the period from January, 2014 to June, 2015. A total of 4683 blood donors were screened for HBsAg, Anti-HCV and HIV on Architect 20001 (manufactured by Abbott), employing chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). For Syphilis, VDRL ICT kits were used and Malaria parasite was screen through MP slides. Blood grouping was performed by both forward and reverse methods. This study showed a high frequency of HBsAg, VDRL and malaria positivity among the O-ve blood group donors, i.e. 3.70%, 9.25% and 0.61% respectively. Blood group B-ve individuals were commonly infected with HCV (12.5%) as compared with all other blood group donors. HIV is more commonly reported in A+ve blood group individuals. Blood group O+ve is more prevalent (37.41 %). High frequency of HCV infection in blood donors advocates implementation of strict screening policy for donors and public awareness campaigns about preventive measures to reduce the spread of this infection as well as other transfusion transmissible infections.

  5. Adverse Reactions in Allogeneic Blood Donors: A Tertiary Care Experience from a Developing Country

    OpenAIRE

    Sadia Sultan; Mohammad Amjad Baig; Syed Mohammed Irfan; Syed Ijlal Ahmed; Syeda Faiza Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Fragmented blood transfusion services along with an unmotivated blood donation culture often leads to blood shortage. Donor retention is crucial to meet the increasing blood demand, and adverse donor reactions have a negative impact on donor return. The aim of this study was to estimate adverse donor reactions and identify any demographic association.   Methods: We conducted a prospective study between January 2011 and December 2013. A total of 41,759 healthy donors were enrol...

  6. Cytomegalovirus antibodies among healthy blood donors at Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is found worldwide in all geographical locations and socio-economic groups and is the virus most frequently transmitted to a developing child before birth. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors for CMV antibodies among healthy blood donors at Lagos University ...

  7. Prevalence of Plasmodial Parasiteamia among Blood Donors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study also gives a fair representative degree of sub clinical infection rate, since donors are usually judged to be healthy. It is therefore recommended that as a duty and routine it is imperative to screen blood for infectious agents, such as malaria parasite before transfusion to avoid malaria infection of otherwise aneamic ...

  8. Prevalence of HIV positive blood donors among screened ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2006-04-03

    Apr 3, 2006 ... Department of Physiology, Obafemi Awolowo College of Health Sciences, Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching. Hospital, Sagamu ... prevalence of HIV positive donors among the screened volunteers who satisfied the criteria for blood donation was ... effect on life and socio-economic activities (Fredrikson.

  9. Seroprevalence of syphilis among blood donors in Ilorin | Olawumi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: One of the greatest values of serological test for syphilis is as a surrogate marker for lifestyle known to be associated with high risk of HIV and HCV infections. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of syphilis among blood donors in Ilorin and also the relationship between seropositivity and ...

  10. High Rates of Hepatitis B and C and HIV Infections among Blood Donors in Cameroon: A Proposed Blood Screening Algorithm for Blood Donors in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Fouelifack Ymele

    2012-01-01

    , 4.44%  (n=206, and 1.44%  (n=67, respectively. Coinfection with HIV and HBV was observed among 0.77% donors, followed by hepatitis B and C co-infection (0.21% and HIV and HCV coinfection (0.06%. Co-infection with HIV-HBV-HCV was encountered in 2 donors. The HIV, HBV, and HCV infections lead to a destruction of one out of six sets of blood collected. Conclusion. There is a need to review policies for blood collection from donors, by modifying the algorithm of blood donors testing. Pretesting potential donors using rapid tests could help to avoid collection and destruction of (infected blood.

  11. Adverse reactions to blood donation: A descriptive study of 3520 blood donors in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    OpenAIRE

    C Aneke John; U Ezeh Theodora; A Nwosu Gloria; E Anumba Chika

    2017-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of adverse reactions to blood donation significantly hampers donor retention and negatively impacts on the universal availability of adequate numbers of blood donor units. Objective: To analyze the spectrum and prevalence of adverse reactions in blood donors in a tertiary hospital-based blood bank in Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: The details of 3520 blood donors who presented for donation over a 12 months period were retrieved from the departmental archives for ana...

  12. Frequency of ABO and Rhesus blood groups among blood donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The ABO is a blood group system that is responsible for most blood transfusion reactions, transplant rejections and determining some forensic cases. The ABO and Rhesus blood group systems have been shown to show variations in different part of the world and race. Aim: The study is to show the frequency of ...

  13. Risk factors for hepatitis B and C infection among blood donors in five Chinese blood centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Guo, Nan; Yu, Qilu; Lv, Yunlai; Ma, Hongli; Yun, Zhongqiao; Yao, Fuzhu; Dong, Xiangdong; Zhu, Xiangming; Wen, Xiuqiong; Cao, Ruan; Huang, Mei; Bi, Xinhong; Zhao, Mingjiang; Tiemuer, Mei-hei-li; Li, Julin; Zhou, Zhongmin; He, Weilan; Liu, Jing; Wright, David J; Wang, Jingxing; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2015-02-01

    Few studies were conducted on hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV, respectively) risk factors among Chinese blood donors in recent years since voluntary donors replaced commercial donors. A case-control survey was conducted in HBV- or HCV-positive and -negative donors from five blood centers in China between September 2009 and April 2011. Case status was defined by having a reactive result on Monolisa HBsAg Ultra (Bio-Rad) for HBV and Ortho anti-HCV EIA 3.0 (Johnson & Johnson) for HCV. Controls were randomly selected qualified blood donors matched to cases by donation month and blood center. Specific test-seeking, medical-related, and behavioral risk factors were compared by HBV and HCV status using chi-square tests or Fisher's exact tests with Bonferroni correction. A total of 364 HBV cases, 174 HCV cases, and 689 controls completed the survey; response rates were 66.2, 47.3, and 82%, respectively. HCV-positive donors were significantly more likely to report having a blood transfusion history (23.4% vs. 3.0%, p tattoo are marginal risk factors for HCV (p values History of previous transfusion and living with illegal drug users are risk factors for HCV infection among Chinese blood donors from five regions. Test-seeking behavior is not associated with HBV or HCV infections. © 2014 AABB.

  14. The human platelet alloantigen profile in blood donors from Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, C N; Schriefer, A; Albuquerque, S R L; Perdomo, R T; Parente, A F A; Weber, S S

    2016-12-01

    Human platelet antigens (HPAs) are alloantigens derived from polymorphisms in platelet-surface glycoproteins. The occurrence of alloantibodies against HPAs can lead to platelet destruction and subsequent thrombocytopenia. Brazilians have a high rate of racial admixture, and the knowledge of HPA polymorphisms in particular donors from north Brazil, who have a large Amerindian influence, is a relevant strategy to prevent alloimmunisation. Our aim was investigate the HPA allele's frequencies in the Amazonas blood donors. We performed HPA genotyping among 200 Amazonas blood donors by microarray for 11 HPA biallelic systems, including six of the most clinically significant systems (HPA-1 to -5 and -15) and five others (HPA-6 to -9 and -11) that have been also associated with alloimmunisation, amounting to 22 HPA alleles. The obtained allele frequencies were compared with data of 38 populations worldwide to determine the hierarchical relationship and estimated the probability of mismatch platelets. The allele frequencies were 0·862 for HPA-1a, 0·137 for HPA-1b, 0·852 for HPA-2a, 0·147 for HPA-2b, 0·665 for HPA-3a, 0·335 for HPA-3b, 0·995 for HPA-4a, 0·005 for HPA-4b, 0·892 for HPA-5a, 0·107 for HPA-5b, 0·997 for HPA-9a, 0·005 for HPA-9b, 0·502 for HPA-15a and 0·497 for HPA-15b. The incompatibility risks are higher for HPA-15 and HPA-3, followed by HPA-1, -2 and -5. We found differences among populations worldwide, and it is interesting to note the indigenous and European influences in this region, reinforcing the heterogeneity in the ancestry of Brazilians. The results will be helpful in providing information for platelet transfusion to avoid alloimmunisation. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  15. STUDY ON KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE OF BLOOD DONORS TOWARDS BLOOD DONATION IN BIJAPUR DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Dilip

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Blood is the living force of our body and there is no substitute for it. It can only be replaced through blood donation. Blood donation can save millions of lives. Demand for safe blood is increasing every day because of increase in population, increased life-expectancy and urbanisation, trauma cases, major surgeries, patients with regular transfusion requirement like cases of thalassaemia, haemophilia and chemotherapy. To increase blood donor recruitment and retention, the level of knowledge and attitude of blood donors towards blood donation must be known as this affects donor’s decision of blood donation. This information helps for tailoring targeted programs and campaigns in order to recruit more people as regular voluntary blood donors. OBJECTIVE To assess the level of knowledge and attitude regarding blood donation amongst blood donors in Bijapur district, Karnataka. MATERIALS AND METHODS Blood donors registered for blood donation in B.L.D.E. University’s Shri B. M. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre’s Blood Bank, in Bijapur district were included in this study. The data was collected by filling a self-administered structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was administered to all the donors ready to participate in the study. Questionnaires were distributed at the time of registration and were collected after filling during the refreshment period. Also one-on-one individual interviews were conducted to know about the blood donation experience and willingness of donor for future donation. A scoring mechanism was used to understand the level of knowledge, a score of one was given for each correct response and zero for wrong and unaware response. RESULTS In this study, it was found that 61% of the participants had average knowledge [Cumulative score 4-6], 34% of the participants had good knowledge [Cumulative score 7-8] and 5% of participants had poor knowledge [Cumulative score 0-3] about the different

  16. Toxic Metal and Essential Trace Element Levels of Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Akinci

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Blood donors are screened for various pathogens including hepatitis and cytomegalovirus. Screening for toxic metal levels is not routine process. The aims of our study were to determine the whole blood levels of toxic metals, cadmium and lead, and levels of the trace elements iron, zinc, and copper, of non-exposed Turkish subjects and also to identify individuals living under the risk of chronic metal toxicity. Material and Method: Whole blood lead and cadmium levels were analyzed by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Metal levels were determined in the whole blood and serum samples of 211 male blood donors (aged 19 to 55; 33.71±8.69 years. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSSv16. Results: Average levels of cadmium, lead, zinc, copper and iron were found to be 1.27±0.88 µg L-1, 25.1±12.44 µg L-1, 0.97±0.16 mg L-1, 1.10±0.21 mg L-1, and 476.53±42.41 mg L-1, respectively. Donor age had a statistically significant positive correlation only with copper levels (p0.05. A statistically significant association was found between smoking and cadmium levels (p

  17. Individual, contextual and network characteristics of blood donors and non-donors: a systematic review of recent literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersma, Tjeerd W.; Bekkers, René; Klinkenberg, Elisabeth F.; de Kort, Wim L.A.M.; Merz, Eva-Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background The ageing population and recent migration flows may negatively affect the blood supply in the long term, increasing the importance of targeted recruitment and retention strategies to address donors. This review sought to identify individual, network and contextual characteristics related to blood donor status and behaviour, to systematically discuss differences between study results, and to identify possible factors to target in recruitment and retention efforts. Methods The systematic review was conducted in accordance with a predefined PROSPERO protocol (CRD42016039591). After quality assessments by multiple independent raters, a final set of 66 peer-reviewed papers, published between October 2009 and January 2017, were included for review. Results Individual and contextual characteristics of blood donor status and behaviour were categorised into five main lines of research: donor demographics, motivations and barriers, adverse reactions and deferral, contextual factors, and blood centre factors. Results on donor demographics, motivations and barriers, and contextual factors were inconclusive, differing between studies, countries, and sample characteristics. Adverse reactions and deferral were negatively related to blood donor behaviour. Blood centre factors play an important role in donor management, e.g., providing information, reminders, and (non-)monetary rewards. No studies were found on network characteristics of (non-)donors. Discussion Although individual and contextual characteristics strongly relate to blood donor status and behaviour, mechanisms underlying these relations have not been studied sufficiently. We want to stress the importance of longitudinal studies in donor behaviour, exploring the role of life events and network characteristics within blood donor careers. Increased understanding of donor behaviour will assist policy makers of blood collection agencies, with the ultimate goal of safeguarding a sufficient and matching blood

  18. Loss of volunteer blood donors because of unconfirmed enzyme immunoassay screening results. Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, H E; Korelitz, J J; Busch, M P; Williams, A E; Kleinman, S H; Gilcher, R O; Nourjah, P

    1997-02-01

    Blood donors who test repeatably reactive on enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and are not confirmed as positive are a continuing problem for blood banks. Units are discarded and donors are deferred, in spite of multiple studies indicating that such donors are very rarely infected with the transmissible agents. Few data are available, however, with which to evaluate whether the discarded units are more likely to come from particular demographic subgroups. The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study database of over 2 million allogeneic whole-blood donations collected in the years 1991 through 1993 was utilized. The prevalence of false-positive and indeterminate test results within demographic subgroups was computed for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and human T-lymphotropic virus (anti-HIV, anti-HCV, anti-HTLV, respectively) and hepatitis B surface antigen (false-positive only) as the proportion of donations that were repeatably reactive on EIA but negative or indeterminate on the confirmatory or supplemental test. Several demographic groups with increased prevalence of false-positive and indeterminate anti-HIV results were the same females, younger age groups, blacks, and first-time donors. Likewise, many of the demographic subgroups with increased prevalence of false-positive and indeterminate anti-HCV results were similar: older age groups, non-whites, lower education levels, first-time donors, donors making directed donations, and donors who had received transfusions. For anti-HTLV, by contrast, the oldest group had the highest prevalence of false-positive results but the lowest prevalence of indeterminate results: blacks had the lowest prevalence of false positive results but the highest prevalence of indeterminate results. If units that test repeatably reactive on EIA but that are not confirmed as positive are almost always from individuals not infected with the virus in question, then these results indicate that there may be sex-, race

  19. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ...). Nonetheless, some donors, especially repeat and premenopausal female donors, can develop iron deficiency, with or without anemia, from blood donation. Improved understanding of iron loss in blood donors may help reduce donor deferrals due to low hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and reduce iron deficiency that can...

  20. Frequency of ABO and Rhesus blood groups among blood donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the genetic and phenotypic frequencies of the blood group and to confirm if the population is in. Hardy-Weinberg ... percentages and the frequencies of the ABO gene and the Rh phenotypes were calculated using. Hardy- ..... cancer of stomach and the ABO blood groups. British. Medical Journal 1953;2:799. 18. Frances TF.

  1. Blood group and Rhesus antigens among Blood donors attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It is well known that the Rhesus system remains the second most clinically important blood group system after the ABO. There is no published work regarding the frequency of various Rhesus antigens among Sudanese population. Objectives: In order to minimize Rhesus allo-immunization among blood ...

  2. A retrospective cohort study of blood hemoglobin levels in blood donors and competitive rowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P.I.; Ullum, H.; Jensen, K.

    2009-01-01

    .3% of the females demonstrated values above the recommended limit for athletic competition. Thus, the prevalence of a high hemoglobin value was greater in the rowers, of both gender, than in the candidate blood donors (P

  3. Qualitative assessment of pica experienced by frequent blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansky, Melanie C; King, Melissa R; Bialkowski, Walter; Bryant, Barbara J; Kiss, Joseph E; D'Andrea, Pam; Cable, Ritchard G; Spencer, Bryan R; Mast, Alan E

    2017-04-01

    Pica, the compulsive consumption of ice or other nonnutritious substances, is associated with iron deficiency, a common negative consequence of frequent blood donation. Because of this, blood donors, such as those participating in the Strategies to Reduce Iron Deficiency (STRIDE) study, are an ideal population to explore pica and iron deficiency. STRIDE was a 2-year intervention trial to assess the effectiveness of iron supplementation for mitigating iron deficiency in frequent blood donors. Subjects completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires that included questions about pica symptoms. In-depth telephone interviews were conducted with 14 of these subjects reporting pica symptoms and eight presumed controls (casual ice chewers) to gain a deeper understanding of pica symptoms and their impact on daily life and to make a final determination on the presence of pica. Pica was confirmed in five of the 14 subjects reporting symptoms and in two of eight controls. Outcome misclassification based on the questionnaire was attributed to inadequate assessment of several pica symptoms identified during the interview. Comparison of subjects' repeated quantitative iron measurements taken throughout STRIDE with subjects' final adjudicated pica status revealed a positive relationship between development of pica and worsening iron status; the opposite was found in those whose pica symptoms resolved. Continued refinement of pica symptom questions will allow for rapid and accurate detection of pica in frequent blood donors and confirmation of successful treatment with iron supplements. © 2016 AABB.

  4. Tissue Banking: Relationship with Blood Donor and Organ Donor Card Status

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, Kenneth D.; Fitzpatrick, Patricia E.; Sheehan, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationships among altruistic health acts may serve to aid therapeutic research advances. In this paper, we report on the links between two such behaviours—donating blood and carrying an organ donor card—and willingness to donate urological tissue to a tissue bank. Reasons for the differential willingness to do so are examined in this paper. A systematic sample of 259 new and returning attendees at a tertiary urology referral clinic in Ireland completed a self-report questi...

  5. Cardiovascular and demographic characteristics in whole blood and plasma donors: results from the Donor InSight study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsma, Femke; Veldhuizen, Ingrid; de Vegt, Femmie; Doggen, Carine; de Kort, Wim

    2011-02-01

    Within blood establishments little comparative information is available about donors versus the general population. In this study, a description of the donor pool was made in terms of demographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors. The general Dutch population was used as a reference group. The Donor InSight study provided information on donors. Extensive information has been gathered by a self-administered questionnaire addressing various topics, like demographics, lifestyle, and health. Aggregated donor responses were compared with general population summary data. The study population consisted of 15,076 donors. The median age was 46.3 years and 47.3% were men. Donors were more likely to be highly educated (34.6%), married (71.7%), and of Dutch origin (97.4%), when compared to the general population. Donors were less often smokers (donors, 17.1%; general population, 31.8%), more often moderate drinkers (donors, 82.8%; general population, 74.7%), and physically more active (donors, 2.0 hr/week; general population, 1.0 hr/week). Male donors were more often moderately overweight (47.7%) than men from the general population (39.9%). In donors, 0.9% reported to have Type 2 diabetes versus 1.9% in the general population. In donors, 3.4% reported high cholesterol versus 4.6% in the general population. The study provided important knowledge about demographic distributions and cardiovascular risk factors within donors. A proper understanding of demographic characteristics of donors will help us to focus recruitment and retention strategies. The reported beneficial cardiovascular profile suggests a need for further research on the role of blood donation in cardiovascular risk reduction. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at three REDS-II blood centers in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalez, Thelma T; Sabino, Ester C; Schlumpf, Karen S; Wright, David J; Leao, Silvana; Sampaio, Divaldo; Takecian, Pedro L; Proietti, Anna B; Proitetti, Anna B; Murphy, Edward; Busch, Michael; Custer, Brian

    2012-05-01

    In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids before donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries. A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 2009. Vasovagal reactions (VVRs) along with donor demographic and biometric data were collected. Reactions were defined as any presyncopal or syncopal event during the donation process. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of VVRs. Of 724,861 donor presentations, 16,129 (2.2%) VVRs were recorded. Rates varied substantially between the three centers: 53, 290, and 381 per 10,000 donations in Recife, São Paulo, and Belo Horizonte, respectively. Although the reaction rates varied, the donor characteristics associated with VVRs were similar (younger age [18-29 years], replacement donors, first-time donors, low estimated blood volume [EBV]). In multivariable analysis controlling for differences between the donor populations in each city younger age, first-time donor status, and lower EBV were the factors most associated with reactions. Factors associated with VVRs in other locations are also evident in Brazil. The difference in VVR rates between the three centers might be due to different procedures for identifying and reporting the reactions. Potential interventions to reduce the risk of reactions in Brazil should be considered. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. Declining prevalence of hepatitis E antibodies among Danish blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Dorte K; Moessner, Belinda K; Engle, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing incidence of reported hepatitis E cases in Europe has focused attention on hepatitis E virus (HEV) and the risk of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis E. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of antibodies to HEV (anti-HEV) among Danish blood donors...... the prevalence of anti-HEV was 19.8% (p children (p = 0.01), but in multivariate analysis only age was associated...

  8. Iron stores in regular blood donors in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adediran A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adewumi Adediran,1 Ebele I Uche,2 Titilope A Adeyemo,1 Dapus O Damulak,3 Akinsegun A Akinbami,4 Alani S Akanmu1 1Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria; 2Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria; 3Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria; 4Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos State University, Ikeja, Nigeria Background: Apart from challenging the bone marrow to increase its red cell production, thereby producing more blood for the donor, regular blood donation has been shown to have several benefits, one of which is preventing accumulation of body iron which can cause free radical formation in the body. This study was carried out to assess body iron stores in regular blood donors. Methods: A total of 52 regular (study and 30 first-time (control volunteer blood donors were studied prospectively. Twenty milliliters of venous blood was drawn from each subject, 5 mL of which was put into sodium ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid specimen bottles for a full blood count, including red blood cell indices. The remaining sample was allowed to clot in a plain container, and the serum was then retrieved for serum ferritin, serum iron, and serum transferrin receptor measurement by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Mean hemoglobin and packed cell volume in the study group (13.47 ± 2.36 g/dL and 42.00 ± 7.10, respectively, P = 0.303 were not significantly higher than in the control group (12.98 ± 1.30 g/dL and 39.76 ± 4.41, respectively, P = 0.119. Mean serum ferritin was 102.46 ± 80.26 ng/mL in the control group and 41.46 ± 40.33 ng/mL in the study group (P = 0.001. Mean serum ferritin for women in the study group (28.02 ± 25.00 ng/mL was significantly lower than for women in the control group (56.35 ± 34.03 ng/mL, P = 0.014. Similarly, men in the study group had a lower

  9. Motivating Factors and Potential Deterrents to Blood Donation in High School Aged Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Finck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To ensure an adequate supply of blood, collection centers must design campaigns that successfully recruit and maintain an active donor pool. Understanding factors that motivate and deter individuals from donating may help centers develop targeted recruitment campaigns. These factors among high school aged blood donors have not yet been fully investigated. Study Design and Methods. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to student donors at high school mobile blood drives. The survey instrument asked the students to rate several potential motivating factors in their importance in the decision to donate blood and several potential deterring factors in their future decision whether or not to donate blood again. The survey also asked the students to rate the desirability of several potential incentives. Results. Motivating factors that reflected prosocial, empathetic, and altruistic thoughts and beliefs were rated highly by students. Pain from phlebotomy was most commonly chosen as potential deterrent. Movie tickets and cookies/snacks at the drive were rated as the most attractive incentives. Conclusion. High school aged blood donors are similar to other donor groups in their expressed motives for donating blood. This group may be unique in the factors that deter them from donating and in their preferences for different incentives.

  10. HIV prevalence among blood donors in a blood bank in Curitiba (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Andrade Neto

    Full Text Available There still is no cure for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Its etiologic agent is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and transmission occurs through sexual relationships, contacts with blood, and vertically (mother to child. In this study, we sought to determine the prevalence of HIV among blood donors at a blood bank in Curitiba. We studied 213,666 blood donations made from March 1, 1992, to April 25, 1999. Each potential blood donor first answered a questionnaire, submitted to a clinical examination, and filled out a self-exclusion card. Blood was collected and analyzed only from the candidates approved by the first two criteria. Two tests were used to detect HIV: ELISA for screening, and Western-Blot for confirmation. The results were analyzed statistically by determining the 95% confidence interval. Of the total number of donors, 156,942 were men, and 56,724 were women. There were 319 cases of HIV infection (244 men, 75 women. There were no significant differences between genders, or among the different age groups, or between first-donation and repeated-donation donors. There was a significant predominance of HIV infection among single individuals compared to married, widowed, and other individuals. The same occurred among married and divorced individuals compared to widowed subjects. The prevalence of HIV among blood donors was 0.149% (0.155% among men and 0.132% among women. The frequency of HIV was statistically identical among new blood donors and repeat donors. A large number of HIV-infected married women was also observed.

  11. HIV prevalence among blood donors in a blood bank in Curitiba (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Neto José Luiz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There still is no cure for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Its etiologic agent is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and transmission occurs through sexual relationships, contacts with blood, and vertically (mother to child. In this study, we sought to determine the prevalence of HIV among blood donors at a blood bank in Curitiba. We studied 213,666 blood donations made from March 1, 1992, to April 25, 1999. Each potential blood donor first answered a questionnaire, submitted to a clinical examination, and filled out a self-exclusion card. Blood was collected and analyzed only from the candidates approved by the first two criteria. Two tests were used to detect HIV: ELISA for screening, and Western-Blot for confirmation. The results were analyzed statistically by determining the 95% confidence interval. Of the total number of donors, 156,942 were men, and 56,724 were women. There were 319 cases of HIV infection (244 men, 75 women. There were no significant differences between genders, or among the different age groups, or between first-donation and repeated-donation donors. There was a significant predominance of HIV infection among single individuals compared to married, widowed, and other individuals. The same occurred among married and divorced individuals compared to widowed subjects. The prevalence of HIV among blood donors was 0.149% (0.155% among men and 0.132% among women. The frequency of HIV was statistically identical among new blood donors and repeat donors. A large number of HIV-infected married women was also observed.

  12. Haemoparasites of volunteer blood donors with National Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemoparasites are blood parasites which are endemic in Nigeria and can cause serious morbidity in humans. Understanding patterns of hemoparasites infections in humans can therefore inform about emerging diseases risks, especially in the light of climatechange. Infections due to these parasites can be asymptomatic; ...

  13. HIV and Hepatitis B seroprevalence among the nepalese blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR Kandel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV and Hepatitis B infections are public health problems in Nepal. This study was conducted based at NRCS/CBTS, with the objective of determining the HIV and HBsAg sero-prevalence in non-remunerated volunteer blood donors. Materials and Methods: A total of 66,904 units of blood collected, following donor recruitment criteriaduring March 2009-Sept. 2010 was included for analysis. All donated blood samples were subjected to screening for Transfusion transmitted infections including HIV and Hepatitis B surface antigen using standard ELISA test kits (Dade Behring, Germany. Initial reactive sera were re-tested for reconfi rmation with same test kits plus another test kit (Detect-HIV, Adaltis Inc, and Qualisa. Results: Out of 66,904 units of blood collected, 56,973 units were from male and 9,931 were from female donors. Among the total screened samples, 73 (0.10% were found to be positive for HIV, {0.11% (64/56973 in male and 0.09% (9/9931 in female}; the difference between male and female donors (?2<3.841 was statistically signifi cant. The seroprevalence of HIV was highest in age group of 30- 39 both in male and female (p<0.001. Similarly, for HBsAg, overall seroprevalence was found to be 0.47% (316/66904 {0.42% (242/56973 in male and 0.74% (74/9931 in female}. The difference was statistically signifi cant (?2<3.841. The highest HBsAg sero-prevalence(0.65% was also observed in same age group i.e. 30-39 (p<0.001 in male but highest seroprevalence (2.63% was observed inage group of ?50 in female. Conclusion: Both HIV and HBV sero-prevalence is high in adult voluntary blood donors. Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, No.1, Issue 5, 390-393 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i5.7864

  14. Vasovagal reactions in whole blood donors at 3 REDS-II blood centers in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalez, T. T.; Sabino, E. C.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Wright, D.J.; Leao, S.; Sampaio, D.; Takecian, P. L.; Carneiro-Proietti, AB; Murphy, E.; Busch, M.; Custer, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background In Brazil little is known about adverse reactions during donation and the donor characteristics that may be associated with such events. Donors are offered snacks and fluids prior to donating and are required to consume a light meal after donation. For these reasons the frequency of reactions may be different than those observed in other countries. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of eligible whole blood donors at three large blood centers located in Brazil between July 2007 and December 2009. Vasovagal reactions (VVRs) along with donor demographic and biometric data were collected. Reactions were defined as any presyncopal or syncopal event during the donation process. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of VVRs. Results Of 724,861 donor presentations, 16,129 (2.2%) VVRs were recorded. Rates varied substantially between the three centers: 53, 290 and 381 per 10,000 donations in Recife, São Paulo and Belo Horizonte, respectively. Although the reaction rates varied, the donor characteristics associated with VVRs were similar [younger age (18–29), replacement donors, first time donors, low estimated blood volume (EBV)]. In multivariable analysis controlling for differences between the donor populations in each city younger age, first-time donor status and lower EBV were the factors most associated with reactions. Conclusion Factors associated with VVRs in other locations are also evident in Brazil. The difference in VVR rates between the three centers might be due to different procedures for identifying and reporting the reactions. Potential interventions to reduce the risk of reactions in Brazil should be considered. PMID:22073941

  15. [Evaluation of the efficacy of medical screening of blood donors on preventing blood transfusion-transmitted infectious agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seck, M; Dièye, B; Guèye, Y B; Faye, B F; Senghor, A B; Toure, S A; Dieng, N; Sall, A; Toure, A O; Dièye, T N; Diop, S

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of medical screening to retain blood donors in window period by comparing the seroprevalence of infectious agents (HIV, hepatitis B and C, syphilis) in deferred versus accepted blood donors. This prospective and transversal study was performed during 4 months in the National Blood Transfusion Center in Dakar (Senegal). We conducted a convenience sampling comparing the seroprevalence of infectious agents (HIV, HBsAg, HCV and syphilis) in deferred versus accepted blood donors after medical selection. In total, 8219 blood donors were included. Medical selection had authorized 8048 donors (97.92%) and deferred donors were 171 (2.08%). The prevalence of HIV was higher in the deferred than in accepted blood donors (1.75% vs. 0.05%) (P=0.0003; OR=35.91), as well as for HBsAg (12.87% vs. 7.35%) (P=0.006; OR=1.86). HCV antibodies were present in 0.71% of accepted blood donors and 0.58% in deferred blood donors (P=0.65; OR=0.82). Only accepted donors had brought the infection of syphilis (0.34%) (P=0.56; OR=0). Medical selection is efficient to exclude blood donors at high risk of HIV transmission and to a lesser extent of HBV. However, current medical screening procedures do not allow us to exclude donors asymptomatic carriers of HCV and syphilis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection according to ABO blood group among blood donors in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukurije Zhubi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous studies have reported a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among healthy and non-healthy persons in different places. The Aim of the study is to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among Kosovo’s Blood donor associated with ABO/Rhesus blood group.Methods: 671 blood donors are tested for H. pylori antibodies and results are classifi ed by way of donation, age, gender, blood groups and education level. Serum antibodies are analyzed by Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assay test for H. pylori IgG with Biomerieux HPY-VIDAS.Results: The frequency of IgG antibody for H. pylori among healthy blood donors is 56.9%, there is not found any difference between voluntary and non-voluntary blood donors (57.4% respectively 56.3%(OR=1.05; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.43; p=0.8. H pylori IgG antibodies positive are detected in 57.0 % ( 126 of 221 of women, compared with 56.9 % ( 256 of 450 of men(OR=0.99; 95% CI 0.72 to 1.38; p=0.96. Serpositive donors are older than seronegative ones (31.9 years, respectively 29.5 years, p=0.02. Mean value of IgG antibody of H. pylori is 3.61 with no significant difference between males and females (3.72 respectively 3.44; p=0.2. The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection is similar among blood groups: O (57.4%, A (56.2%, B (59.6%, AB (51.4%, RhD positive (56.7% and RhD negative (58.3%.Conclusions: The seropositivity of H. pylori is moderately higher in the non voluntary and familiar blood donors among the total Kosovo blood donors. There is not found a significant relationship between infection with H. pylori and ABO/Rhesus blood group among blood donors.

  17. Follow-up of blood donors positive for hepatitis B surface antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink, H. W.; Wesdorp, I. C.; Grijm, R.; Hengeveld, P.; Jöbsis, A. C.; Aay, C.; Reerink-Brongers, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    From 1973 to 1977 in Amsterdam the incidence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in blood donations from new donors was 0.224 and from known donors 0.034%. 65 donors, previously found positive for HBsAg, were re-examined. Persistence of HBsAg in new donors (28 of 31) occurred significantly (p

  18. Donor Hemovigilance Programme in managing Blood Transfusion Needs: Complications of Whole Blood Donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mangwana

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemovigilance like quality systems and audits have become an integral part of Blood Transfusion Services in the developed countries and has contributed greatly to its development. Hemovigilance begins with donors and must enable the collection of information on reactions occurring during the donation of blood, selections of donors and to prevent such incidents. The aim of study was to help identify the trends of adverse events , occurring in blood donors at a tertiary-care hospital, to recommend best practices to improve donor care and safety Materials and Methods: This record-based study was conducted on all adverse events related to allogenic whole blood donations performed over 24 months. All whole blood donations were analyzed. All adverse events occurring during or at the end of the donation were noted using a standardized format and analyzed determining significance at p<0.05. Results: Overall rate was 0.3% with vasovagal reactions constituting 82%, and 18% mild syncopal reactions (p<0.001. Immediate vasovagal reaction with injury was very rare (0.007%. Vasovagal reactions showed a significant association with young age, female gender, first time donation status. Mean age of persons recording adverse effects was 30.23 ± 7.49 years as compared to those without adverse effects, 31.14 ± 8.56 years. Conclusion: Donor safety is an essential perquisite to increase voluntary blood donation. AE analysis helps in identifying the blood donors at risk of AE, applying appropriate motivational strategies, predonation counseling, care during and after donation, developing guidelines and hemovigilance programme in countries with limited resources. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i6.8993   Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, 459-463

  19. Adverse reactions to blood donation: A descriptive study of 3520 blood donors in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Aneke John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The occurrence of adverse reactions to blood donation significantly hampers donor retention and negatively impacts on the universal availability of adequate numbers of blood donor units. Objective: To analyze the spectrum and prevalence of adverse reactions in blood donors in a tertiary hospital-based blood bank in Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: The details of 3520 blood donors who presented for donation over a 12 months period were retrieved from the departmental archives for analysis. These included sociodemographic information, type of donor, type and frequency of adverse reactions to blood donation. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA computer software. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed to represent the distribution of donor characteristics (as percentages and compare reaction rates by gender and severity, respectively. Results: The prevalence of adverse reactions to blood donation was (56/3520 1.60%; this occurred more frequently in male and family replacement donors (55.35% and 100.0%, respectively. The spectrum of donor adverse reactions included anxiety 25 (44.64%, generalized body weakness 11 (19.64%, hematoma 10 (17.86%, fainting 5 (8.93%, and vomiting 5 (8.93%. Vasovagal reactions were the most frequent adverse reaction encountered among the donors (46/56; 82.14%. Conclusion: Vasovagal reactions are common adverse phenomena in our blood donor set; this has implications on transfusion safety and blood donor retention.

  20. Applying self-determination theory to the blood donation context: The blood donor competence, autonomy, and relatedness enhancement (Blood Donor CARE) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Christopher R; France, Janis L; Carlson, Bruce W; Frye, Victoria; Duffy, Louisa; Kessler, Debra A; Rebosa, Mark; Shaz, Beth H

    2017-02-01

    The Blood Donor Competency, Autonomy, and Relatedness Enhancement (Blood Donor CARE) project was designed as a practical application of self-determination theory to encourage retention of first-time donors. Self-determination theory proposes that people are more likely to persist with behaviors that are internally-motivated, and that externally-motivated behavior can evolve and become internalized given the appropriate socio-environmental conditions. According to self-determination theory, motivation to engage in blood donation may become increasingly self-determined if the behavior satisfies fundamental human needs for competence (a sense of self-efficacy to achieve specific goals), autonomy (a sense of volitional control over one's behavior), and relatedness (a sense of connection to a larger group). The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial is to examine the effect of competence, autonomy, and/or relatedness interventions on donor retention. Using a full factorial design, first-time donors will be assigned to a control condition or one of seven intervention conditions. Donation competence, autonomy, and relatedness, along with additional constructs associated with return donation, will be assessed before and after the intervention using online surveys, and donation attempts will be tracked for one-year using blood center donor databases. We hypothesize that, compared to the control condition, the interventions will increase the likelihood of a subsequent donation attempt. We will also examine intervention-specific increases in competence, autonomy, and relatedness as potential mediators of enhanced donor retention. By promoting first-time donor competence, autonomy, and relatedness our goal is to enhance internal motivation for giving and in so doing increase the likelihood of future donation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A new donor system for the patients with thalassemia: "Blood mother and blood father"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canatan Duran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Donor recruitment programs differ in countries depending on local conditions and causes. Regularly voluntary blood donation rate should be 5% of the population but it is extremely low in Turkey. In 1998, "Thalassemia flowers don′t fade" campaigning was started to get regular voluntary blood for patients with thalassemia. We would like to present results of our campaigning. Materials and Methods: The Thalassemia center was established in Antalya on the 1 st June 1994 by Ministry of Health, Turkey, because the incidence of thalassemia is very high in the Antalya region. A total of 388 patients with thalassemia were followed up regularly in the center. The annually blood requirement was approximately 5000 units per year. In 1998, a new program of blood donation for patients with thalassemia called "BLOOD MOTHER and BLOOD FATHER" was started with the support of Governor of Antalya and health management system in Antalya. Results : Between year 1998 and 2006, a total 3000 voluntary blood donors between age 18 and 65 years, of which 2160 males (72% and 840 were females (28%, had participated in this program. Conclusion: "Blood Mother and Blood Father" campaign was successful donor recruitment program for thalassemic care. After 2006, this program is now adopted and run by Turkish Red Crescent and Thalassemia Federation of Turkey for all thalassemics in Turkey.

  2. Cardiovascular and demographic characteristics in whole blood and plasma donors: Results from the Donor InSight study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsma, Femke; Veldhuizen, Ingrid; de Vegt, Femmie; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; de Kort, Wim

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within blood establishments little comparative information is available about donors versus the general population. In this study, a description of the donor pool was made in terms of demographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors. The general Dutch population was used as a

  3. Cardiovascular and demographic characteristics in whole blood and plasma donors: results from the Donor InSight study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsma, F.; Veldhuizen, I.; Vegt, F. de; Doggen, C.J.; Kort, W. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within blood establishments little comparative information is available about donors versus the general population. In this study, a description of the donor pool was made in terms of demographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors. The general Dutch population was used as a

  4. HIV-Sero- prevalence trend among blood donors in North East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although blood transfusion is one of the known therapeutic interventions that cuts across a number of clinical disciplines. It is necessary to test all intending blood donors for HIV infection before donation. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV among blood donors at Dessie Blood Bank, ...

  5. Risk Factors and Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Dutch Blood Donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, Ed; Hogema, Boris M.; Molier, Michel; Bart, Aldert; Zaaijer, Hans L.

    2016-01-01

    Blood donors unaware of Trypanosoma cruzi infection may donate infectious blood. Risk factors and the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in at-risk Dutch blood donors were studied to assess whether specific blood safety measures are warranted in the Netherlands. Birth in a country endemic for Chagas

  6. Relationship of Malaria to HBV and HIV status among Blood donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and sixty eight (368) blood donors were examined for blood parasitic infection; 95.9% were males while 4.1% were females. Gametocytes and trophozoites of Plasmodium falciparum were observed in the blood samples examined. 10.1% of the blood donors were infected with malaria; 6.5% had Hepatitis B ...

  7. Improving health profile of blood donors as a consequence of transfusion safety efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Tran, Trung Nam; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion safety rests heavily on the health of blood donors. Although they are perceived as being healthier than average, little is known about their long-term disease patterns and to which extent the blood banks' continuous efforts to optimize donor selection has resulted...... in improvements. Mortality and cancer incidence among blood donors in Sweden and Denmark was investigated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: All computerized blood bank databases were compiled into one database, which was linked to national population and health data registers. With a retrospective cohort study design, 1......,110,329 blood donors were followed for up to 35 years from first computer-registered blood donation to death, emigration, or December 31, 2002. Standardized mortality and incidence ratios expressed relative risk of death and cancer comparing blood donors to the general population. RESULTS: Blood donors had...

  8. Motivational differences between whole blood and plasma donors already exist before their first donation experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuizen, Ingrid; van Dongen, Anne

    2013-08-01

    The demand for plasma products has increased rapidly. It is therefore important to understand donating behavior by plasma donors. This study investigates whether motivational differences between whole blood and plasma donors already exist at the beginning of a donor career. New donors (n = 4861) were invited to fill out a questionnaire before their first donation (response, 61%). The questionnaire assessed variables from the Theory of Planned Behavior (intention, self-efficacy, attitude, and norms), conscientiousness, and donation anxiety. Three years later it was determined who became whole blood or plasma donor. Multivariable linear regression analyses for intention were fitted separately for whole blood and plasma donors. A logistic regression analysis was executed to estimate the effect of intention at the beginning of a donor career on becoming a plasma donor. Plasma donors had a higher intention, self-efficacy, attitude, and conscientiousness and a lower anxiety than whole blood donors. In plasma and whole blood donors, both self-efficacy and cognitive attitude were positively related to intention but with different strength (plasma, β = 0.47 and β = 0.30; whole blood, β = 0.57 and β = 0.17). Having a high level of intention increased the odds of becoming a plasma donor (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.59). Motivational differences already exist between future whole blood and plasma donors before their first donation. Although a feeling of self-efficacy is necessary for all new donors, more favorable cognitions are important for future plasma donors. Recruitment strategies for plasma donors should focus on attracting the more self-confident donors by highlighting the usefulness of plasma donation. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. Individual, contextual and network characteristics of blood donors and non-donors: a systematic review of recent literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, Tjeerd W.; Bekkers, René; Klinkenberg, Elisabeth F.; de Kort, Wim L. A. M.; Merz, Eva-Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background. The ageing population and recent migration flows may negatively affect the blood supply in the long term, increasing the importance of targeted recruitment and retention strategies to address donors. This review sought to identify individual, network and contextual characteristics

  10. Handling low hemoglobin and iron deficiency in a blood donor population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Karin; Ladelund, Steen

    2016-01-01

    complete blood count blood samples. Over time in the repeat donors, the Hb increased from 15.39 to 15.60 g/dL and 13.85 to 14.06 g/dL in male and female donors, respectively, and the proportion of donors with low Hb decreased from 0.9% to 0.3% and 3.9% to 2.7% for the male and female donors, respectively......: The change in Hb for repeat donors was followed during the first 2 years of the intervention strategy, which included measurements of F and offering intermittent iron supplementation to some of the donors. RESULTS: In 2 years, 62,663 blood donors donated 193,288 units of blood and 318 donors gave 754...

  11. Digital questionnaire platform in the Danish Blood Donor Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, K S; Felsted, N; Mikkelsen, S

    2016-01-01

    of a digital tablet-based questionnaire platform implemented in blood bank sites across Denmark. METHODS: The digital questionnaire was developed using the open source survey software tool LimeSurvey. The participants accesses the questionnaire online with a standard SSL encrypted HTTP connection using...... their personal civil registration numbers. The questionnaire is placed at a front-end web server and a collection server retrieves the completed questionnaires. Data from blood samples, register data, genetic data and verification of signed informed consent are then transferred to and merged...... collection facilities when new projects are initiated. CONCLUSION: The digital platform is a faster, cost-effective and more flexible solution to collect valid data from participating donors compared to paper-based questionnaires. The overall system can be used around the world by the use of Internet...

  12. The serological status of Solomon Island blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, R E; Faoagali, J L

    1999-09-01

    The serological status of Solomon Island blood donors in 1995 and in particular the seroprevalence of antibodies to Hepatitis B and C and prevalence of risk factors for these chronic infections was studied. A questionnaire of risk factors for Hepatitis B and C was undertaken. All blood donors had been previously screened for HIV antibody without any positive cases recorded. 598 donors had serum collected of which 36 samples (6.0%) were third generation HCV EIA antibody positive and 3 samples were RIBA positive but none were PCR positive. 25.1% of samples were positive for HBsAg and anti-HBc antibody was found in 84.4%. Elevated ALT levels (>35 U/l) were found in 6.5% of samples but there was no statistically significant association with HCV or HBsAg status. 15.4% were TPHA positive and 5.4% had RPR titers more than or equal to 1. Anti-HTLV-1 antibody was positive in 12.3% randomly selected samples. All 10 positive samples were then found to be antibody indeterminate with Western blot assay. Of the 585 samples with completed questionnaires, analysis of the relationship between anti-HCV status with tattoo status and ear piercing also failed to reach statistical significance. Consistent with other studies from tropical malaria-prone countries, a positive anti-HCV antibody test even by the third generation EIA is probably a false positive test in most cases. In addition, high prevalence rates of HBV, yaws or syphilis infection were demonstrated.

  13. Analysis of blood donor pre-donation deferral in Dubai: characteristics and reasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Shaer L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laila Al Shaer,1 Ranjita Sharma,2 Mahera AbdulRahman2 1College of Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, UAE; 2Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE Background: To ensure an adequate and safe blood supply, it is crucial to select suitable donors according to stringent eligibility criteria. Understanding the reasons for donor deferral can help in planning more efficient recruitment strategies and evaluating donor selection criteria. This study aims to define donor pre-donation deferral rates, causes of deferral, and characteristics of deferred donors in Dubai.Materials and methods: This retrospective study was conducted on all donors who presented for allogeneic blood donation between January 1, 2010, until June 30, 2013, in Dubai Blood Donation Centre, accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks. The donation and deferral data were analyzed to determine the demographic characteristics of accepted and deferred donors, and frequency analyses were also conducted.Results: Among 142,431 individuals presenting during the study period, 114,827 (80.6% were accepted for donation, and 27,604 (19.4% were deferred. The overall proportion of deferrals was higher among individuals less than 21 years old (35%, P<0.000, females (44% were deferred compared to 15% of males, P<0.0001, and first-time donors (22% were deferred vs 14% of repeat donors, P<0.0001. The main causes for a temporary deferral were low hemoglobin and high blood pressure.Discussion: The deferral rate among blood donors in Dubai is relatively high compared to the internationally reported rates. This rate was higher among first-time donors and females, with low hemoglobin as the major factor leading to a temporary deferral of donors. Strategies to mitigate deferral and improve blood donor retention are urged in Dubai to avoid additional stress on the blood supply. Keywords: blood donation, blood safety, donor deferral, selection criteria 

  14. Antibody to histo-blood group A antigen neutralizes HIV produced by lymphocytes from blood group A donors but not from blood group B or O donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Hansen, J E; Clausen, H

    1991-01-01

    Three virus isolates HTLV-IIIB/lyA, HTLV-IIIB/lyB and HTLV-IIIB/lyO, obtained by passaging and propagating the HTLV-IIIB/H9 isolate in three separate cultures of mixed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from donors of blood type A, B or O, respectively, were tested for susceptibility...... not inhibit the HTLV-IIIB/lyB or the HTLV-IIIB/lyO isolate. Specificity of the MAb-mediated inhibition was shown using A-antigen (tetrasaccharide). Thus, HIV infection of PBMC from donors with blood type A appears to induce expression of host-cell-encoded carbohydrate blood group A epitope on HIV which can...

  15. Blood donors' perceptions, motivators and deterrents in Sub-Saharan Africa - a scoping review of evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asamoah-Akuoko, Lucy; Hassall, Oliver W; Bates, Imelda

    2017-01-01

    save lives. The main deterrent to blood donation was fear due to lack of knowledge and discouraging spiritual, religious and cultural perceptions of blood donation. The main motivators for blood donation were altruism, donating blood for family and incentives. The findings support the need for targeted......Achieving an adequate blood supply in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) through donor mobilization and retention is crucial. Factors that motivate or deter blood donors vary according to beliefs and social norms. Understanding the factors that influence blood donation behaviour in SSA is vital to developing...... effective strategies to address blood donor motivation and retention. This review of 35 studies from 16 SSA countries collates available evidence concerning the perceptions, motivators and deterrents that influence blood donors in SSA. The review revealed a common understanding that blood and blood donation...

  16. Reduction of bioactive substances in stored donor blood: prestorage versus bedside leucofiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, J H; Mynster, T; Reimert, C M

    1999-01-01

    Leucocyte filtration has been suggested to improve transfusion products. We studied the effect of prestorage versus bedside leucofiltration on reduction of bioactive substances and leucocyte content in donor blood. Forty-five units of whole blood from healthy blood donors were studied...

  17. Acute HIV-1 Infection in Antigen/Antibody-negative Blood Donors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute HIV-1 Infection in Antigen/Antibody-negative Blood Donors in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... Fourth generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen (Ag)/antibody (Ab) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test used in the current screening of blood donors at the National Blood Transfusion Service ...

  18. [Acceptance by blood donors of the public blood bank in Recife, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Fábia Michelle Rodrigues; Feliciano, Katia Virginia de Oliveira; Mendes, Marina Ferreira de Medeiros

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the acceptance of blood donors concerning the donation stages (attendance, medical and nursing selection and collection) at the Recife public blood bank with emphasis on the attendance. A sample of 527 donors was obtained: each 19th person sequentially was invited to answer a questionnaire. Chi-square (x2) was used in the analysis. Of those interviewed, 81.4% were men, 81% were repeat donors, 50.3% were dissatisfied regarding the time spent in donation and 36.4% had difficulties in reaching the service. The firm acceptance given to the attendance was due mainly to the communication and the quality of treatment. Of statistical significance were women donors of higher educational level who asked for more information and men who had a more positive perception towards the selection process. The best evaluation was attributed to the collection sector. However, mention was made of impersonal treatment, persistence of doubts and the cursory nature of the medical interview. Attention focused on the donor requires that ongoing education should concentrate on the humanitarian formation of the professionals involved.

  19. Incidence, predictors and severity of adverse events among whole blood donors

    OpenAIRE

    Almutairi, Hamdan; Salam, Mahmoud; Alajlan, Abdulaziz; Wani, Faisal; Al-Shammari, Bushra; Al-Surimi, Khaled

    2017-01-01

    Background Adverse events have been reported post blood donation. Donors might refrain from donating again due to such events which lowers the blood supply in collection centers. Aim This study measured the incidence, predictors and severity of adverse events among donors of a single whole blood unit at one of the largest donation centers in Saudi Arabia. Methods A retrospective cohort was conducted in 2015 to investigate the adverse events immediately post donation. Donor characteristics suc...

  20. Prevalence of hepatitis B in the blood donors of N- W.F.P and FATA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... HBsAg or active HBV infection among the blood donors from N-W.F.P and FATA regions, and understanding the overall scenario of HBV prevalence among the blood donors from all the four provinces of Pakistan, we tested. 7148 blood donors for HBsAg or HBV DNA by ICT,. ELISA and RT-PCR, and have ...

  1. Adverse Reactions in Allogeneic Blood Donors: A Tertiary Care Experience from a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sadia; Baig, Mohammad Amjad; Irfan, Syed Mohammed; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Hasan, Syeda Faiza

    2016-03-01

    Fragmented blood transfusion services along with an unmotivated blood donation culture often leads to blood shortage. Donor retention is crucial to meet the increasing blood demand, and adverse donor reactions have a negative impact on donor return. The aim of this study was to estimate adverse donor reactions and identify any demographic association.  . We conducted a prospective study between January 2011 and December 2013. A total of 41,759 healthy donors were enrolled. Professionally trained donor attendants drew blood and all donors were observed during and following donation for possible adverse events for 20 minutes. Blood donors were asked to report if they suffered from any delayed adverse consequences.  . Out of 41,759 blood donors, 537 (1.3%) experienced adverse reactions. The incidence was one in every 78 donations. The mean age of donors who experienced adverse events was 26.0±6.8 years, and all were male. Out of 537 donors, 429 (80%) developed vasovagal reaction (VVR), 133 (25%) had nausea, 63 (12%) fainted, 35 (6%) developed hyperventilation, 9 (2%) had delayed syncope, and 9 (2%) developed hematoma. Arterial prick, nerve injury, cardiac arrest, and seizures were not observed. Donors aged less than donors also had a significant association with fainting and nausea, respectively (p adverse events was low at our tertiary center. A VVR was the predominant adverse reaction and was associated with age and weight. Our study highlights the importance of these parameters in the donation process. A well-trained and experienced phlebotomist and pre-evaluation counseling of blood donors could further minimize the adverse reactions.

  2. Adverse Reactions in Allogeneic Blood Donors: A Tertiary Care Experience from a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Sultan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fragmented blood transfusion services along with an unmotivated blood donation culture often leads to blood shortage. Donor retention is crucial to meet the increasing blood demand, and adverse donor reactions have a negative impact on donor return. The aim of this study was to estimate adverse donor reactions and identify any demographic association.   Methods: We conducted a prospective study between January 2011 and December 2013. A total of 41,759 healthy donors were enrolled. Professionally trained donor attendants drew blood and all donors were observed during and following donation for possible adverse events for 20 minutes. Blood donors were asked to report if they suffered from any delayed adverse consequences.   Results: Out of 41,759 blood donors, 537 (1.3% experienced adverse reactions. The incidence was one in every 78 donations. The mean age of donors who experienced adverse events was 26.0±6.8 years, and all were male. Out of 537 donors, 429 (80% developed vasovagal reaction (VVR, 133 (25% had nausea, 63 (12% fainted, 35 (6% developed hyperventilation, 9 (2% had delayed syncope, and 9 (2% developed hematoma. Arterial prick, nerve injury, cardiac arrest, and seizures were not observed. Donors aged less than < 30 years and weighing < 70 kg were significantly associated with VVR, hyperventilation, and nausea (p < 0.005. Undergraduates and Urdu speaking donors also had a significant association with fainting and nausea, respectively (p < 0.05.   Conclusion: The prevalence of adverse events was low at our tertiary center. A VVR was the predominant adverse reaction and was associated with age and weight. Our study highlights the importance of these parameters in the donation process. A well-trained and experienced phlebotomist and pre-evaluation counseling of blood donors could further minimize the adverse reactions.

  3. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute retrovirus epidemiology donor studies (Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study and Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II): twenty years of research to advance blood product safety and availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Steven; King, Melissa R; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L; Glynn, Simone A

    2012-10-01

    The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS), conducted from 1989 to 2001, and the REDS-II, conducted from 2004 to 2012, were National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded, multicenter programs focused on improving blood safety and availability in the United States. The REDS-II also included international study sites in Brazil and China. The 3 major research domains of REDS/REDS-II have been infectious disease risk evaluation, blood donation availability, and blood donor characterization. Both programs have made significant contributions to transfusion medicine research methodology by the use of mathematical modeling, large-scale donor surveys, innovative methods of repository sample storage, and establishing an infrastructure that responded to potential emerging blood safety threats such as xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus. Blood safety studies have included protocols evaluating epidemiologic and/or laboratory aspects of human immunodeficiency virus, human T-lymphotropic virus 1/2, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, West Nile virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 8, parvovirus B19, malaria, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, influenza, and Trypanosoma cruzi infections. Other analyses have characterized blood donor demographics, motivations to donate, factors influencing donor return, behavioral risk factors, donors' perception of the blood donation screening process, and aspects of donor deferral. In REDS-II, 2 large-scale blood donor protocols examined iron deficiency in donors and the prevalence of leukocyte antibodies. This review describes the major study results from over 150 peer-reviewed articles published by these 2 REDS programs. In 2011, a new 7-year program, the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III, was launched. The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III expands beyond donor-based research to include studies of blood transfusion recipients in the hospital setting and adds a third country, South Africa

  4. Red blood cell phenotype prevalence in blood donors who self-identify as Hispanic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheppard, Chelsea A; Bolen, Nicole L; Eades, Beth

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Molecular genotyping platforms provide a quick, high-throughput method for identifying red blood cell units for patients on extended phenotype-matching protocols, such as those with sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Most of the antigen prevalence data reported are for non-Hispanic ......CONCLUSIONS: Molecular genotyping platforms provide a quick, high-throughput method for identifying red blood cell units for patients on extended phenotype-matching protocols, such as those with sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Most of the antigen prevalence data reported are for non......-Hispanic populations. Therefore, this study sought to determine the phenotype prevalence in a single blood center's Hispanic population and to compare those results with previously reported rates in non-Hispanic donor populations. We performed a retrospective review of all serologic and molecular typing from donors....... The most prevalent probable Rh phenotypes were R1r (26.6%), R1R2 (21.5%), and R1R1 (20.7%); rr was found in 7.8 percent of donors tested. The percentage of K+ donors in this population was 2.8 percent. The most prevalent Duffy phenotypes were Fy(a+b+) (35.9%), Fy(a+b-) (35.6%), and Fy(a-b+) (27...

  5. Motivation and social capital among prospective blood donors in three large blood centers in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalez, Thelma T; Di Lorenzo Oliveira, Claudia; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara F; Moreno, Elizabeth C; Miranda, Carolina; Larsen, Nina; Wright, David; Leão, Silvana; Loureiro, Paula; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Lopes, Maria-Inês; Proietti, Fernando A; Custer, Brian; Sabino, Ester

    2013-06-01

    Studies analyzing motivation factors that lead to blood donation have found altruism to be the primary motivation factor; however, social capital has not been analyzed in this context. Our study examines the association between motivation factors (altruism, self-interest, and response to direct appeal) and social capital (cognitive and structural) across three large blood centers in Brazil. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 7635 donor candidates from October 15 through November 20, 2009. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires on demographics, previous blood donation, human immunodeficiency virus testing and knowledge, social capital, and donor motivations. Enrollment was determined before the donor screening process. Among participants, 43.5 and 41.7% expressed high levels of altruism and response to direct appeal, respectively, while only 26.9% expressed high levels of self-interest. More high self-interest was observed at Hemope-Recife (41.7%). Of participants, 37.4% expressed high levels of cognitive social capital while 19.2% expressed high levels of structural social capital. More high cognitive and structural social capital was observed at Hemope-Recife (47.3 and 21.3%, respectively). High cognitive social capital was associated with high levels of altruism, self-interest, and response to direct appeal. Philanthropic and high social altruism were associated with high levels of altruism and response to direct appeal. Cognitive and structural social capital and social altruism are associated with altruism and response to direct appeal, while only cognitive social capital is associated with self-interest. Designing marketing campaigns with these aspects in mind may help blood banks attract potential blood donors more efficiently. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. Algorithm for recall of HIV reactive Indian blood donors by sequential immunoassays enables selective donor referral for counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakral B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS pandemic brought into focus the importance of safe blood donor pool. Aims: To analyze true seroprevalence of HIV infection in our blood donors and devise an algorithm for donor recall avoiding unnecessary referrals to voluntary counseling and testing centre (VCTC. Materials and Methods: 39,784 blood units were screened for anti-HIV 1/2 using ELISA immunoassay (IA-1. Samples which were repeat reactive on IA-1 were further tested using two different immunoassays (IA-2 and IA-3 and Western blot (WB. Based on results of these sequential IAs and WB, an algorithm for recall of true HIV seroreactive blood donors is suggested for countries like India where nucleic acid testing or p24 antigen assays are not mandatory and given the limited resources may not be feasible. Results: The anti-HIV seroreactivity by repeat IA-1, IA-2, IA-3 and WB were 0.16%, 0.11%, 0.098% and 0.07% respectively. Of the 44 IA-1 reactive samples, 95.2% (20/21 of the seroreactive samples by both IA-2 and IA-3 were also WB positive and 100% (6/6 of the non-reactive samples by these IAs were WB negative. IA signal/cutoff ratio was significantly low in biological false reactive donors. WB indeterminate results were largely due to non-specific reactivity to gag protein (p55. Conclusions: HIV seroreactivity by sequential immunoassays (IA-1, IA-2 and IA-3; comparable to WHO Strategy-III prior to donor recall results in decreased referral to VCTC as compared to single IA (WHO Strategy-I being followed currently in India. Moreover, this strategy will repose donor confidence in our blood transfusion services and strengthen voluntary blood donation program.

  7. Seroepidemiological survey of hepatitis B, C, HIV and syphilis among blood donors in Bushehr-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Esmaieli

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood transmitted infections have always made problems in the use of blood and blood products. In this survey, the seroprevalence of blood-borne infections among regular, sporadic (lapsed and first-time blood donors of Bushehr city were determined. Methods: In a retrospective study, the prevalence of transfusion transmitted infections was surveyed among all donors of Bushehr city (20294 persons during March 2006 to February 2007 and infections markers for hepatitis B and C, HIV AIDS and syphilis were surveyed through screening and confirmatory tests. Results: Among 20294 who donated blood through one year in Bushehr province, 8513 were regular donors (41.94%, 2523 sporadic donors (12.43%, 9258 first-time donors (45.61% and 495 (2.40% persons were determined as self-exclusion. Of these donors, 48 (0.23% were HBsAg positive, 42 (0.20% HCV-Ab reactive, and all were negative for HIV-Ab and syphilis. We found only 0.04% HBsAg positive among regular donors. Conclusions: Blood borne infections among regular blood donors were much less than non regular donors.

  8. Malaria parasitemia in apparently healthy blood donors in north-central Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen, James G; Barnabas, Obioma; Damulak, Dapus; Ntuhun, Bala D; Lugos, M D; Nyary, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of transmissible malaria in apparently healthy blood donors in the city of Jos in north-central Nigeria. We collected blood specimens from individuals who had passed the screening criteria for blood donation. We created thin and thick blood films using the blood film template provided by the World Health Organization (WHO). The films were allowed to air dry; then, we stained them using a 3% Giemsa solution and examined them microscopically. In specimens that tested positive the malaria species was identified. The highest prevalence of malaria was in donors aged between 31 and 40 years (65.1%), whereas the lowest prevalence was in donors aged 20 years or younger (25.0%). Plasmodium falciparum was the predominant species (98.0%); the least prevalent was Plasmodium malariae (2.0%). In male donors the prevalence of malaria parasitemia was 62.0%; the prevalence in female donors was 62.5%. Among paid donors the malaria parasitemia rate was 82.3%, compared with 22.4% in volunteer donors. Donors who reported their occupation as businessperson (individual who engages in commercial trade, mostly outdoors in a market environment) had the highest prevalence, at 94.3%; students had the lowest prevalence, at 31.9%. A high percentage of blood donors in Jos, Nigeria, actually harbor malaria, which is cause for concern and more careful donor screening by healthcare professionals in that region is warranted. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  9. Legionella pneumophila Seropositivity-Associated Factors in Latvian Blood Donors

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    Olga Valciņa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous environmental exposure of humans to Legionella may induce immune responses and generation of antibodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of Legionella pneumophila serogroups (SG 1–6 in the general healthy population and identify the associated host-related and environmental risk factors. L. pneumophila SG 1–6 seroprevalence among a total of 2007 blood samples collected from healthy donors was 4.8%. Seroprevalence was higher in women (5.9% than men (3.3% and in areas with a larger number of inhabitants, ranging from 3.5% in rural regions to 6.8% in the capital, Riga. Blood samples from inhabitants of apartment buildings tested positive for L. pneumophila in more cases (5.8% compared to those from inhabitants of single-family homes (2.7%. Residents of buildings with a municipal hot water supply system were more likely to be seropositive for L. pneumophila (OR = 3.16, 95% CI 1.26–7.91. Previous episodes of fever were additionally identified as a risk factor (OR = 2.42, 95% CI 1.43–4.1. In conclusion, centralized hot water supply, female gender and previous episodes of fever were determined as the main factors associated with L. pneumophila seropositivity in our study population.

  10. Lymphocyte subset reference intervals in blood donors from northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEX J.L. TORRES

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The reference intervals for leukocytes and lymphocytes currently used by most clinical laboratories present limitations as they are primarily derived from individuals of North American and European origin. The objective this study was to determine reference values for peripheral blood B lymphocytes, T lymphocyte subsets (CD4+, CD8+, naïve, memory, regulatory, TCRαβ and TCRγδ+ and NK cells from blood donors in Salvador-Bahia, Brazil. Results: The proportion of included male subjects was 73.7% and the median ages of males (34 and females (35 were found to be similar. Absolute counts total lymphocytes subsets to both gender was 1,956 (1,060-4,186 cells and relative values 34%. The T CD4+ and T CD8+ lymphocytes relative values was 51% (20-62 and 24% (9-28, respectively. The most statistically significant finding observed was a higher percentage of B lymphocytes (p=0.03 in females. Commonly cited subset reference intervals were found to be consistent with values in several populations from different geographic areas.

  11. HIV-Sero-prevalence trend among blood donors in North East Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharew, Bekele; Mulu, Assefa; Teka, Brhanu; Tesfaye, Tigabu

    2017-09-01

    Although blood transfusion is one of the known therapeutic interventions that cuts across a number of clinical disciplines. It is necessary to test all intending blood donors for HIV infection before donation. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV among blood donors at Dessie Blood Bank, Northeast Ethiopia. A retrospective study was conducted in Dessie Blood Bank through the year 2008-2012. Sera from blood donors were tested for the detection of Anti HIV by using 4th generation ELISA. Data were abstracted from records and analyzed using Microsoft Excel sheet. From the total of 9384 screened blood samples collected, the prevalence of HIV in blood donors in the blood bank was 5.1% in the five consecutive years but the trend of HIV infection has decreased from 2008(5.2%) to 2012 (2.3%). The age groups 15-24 and 35-44 were the highest prevalence and the age group 45-54 was the lowest prevalence of HIV infection. The prevalence of HIV among female (7.9%) was higher than in male donors (4.4%). The trend of HIV infection was decreasing for both male and female blood donors. The prevalence of HIV infections among blood donors is still high in this study setting, and needs constant monitoring to evaluate prevention and control strategies to reduce the burden of transfusion-transmissible HIV infections.

  12. An update of blood donor recruitment and retention in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A healthy blood donor pool has to be well maintained in order to achieve self sufficiency in blood supply. Not only should new and young donors should be attracted and recruited into the pool so as to compensate the loss from drop out and deferred donors. At the same time, previous donors should be also actively retained to ensure they can come regularly. The status of donor recruitment and retention in Hong Kong is reviewed here to highlight the current difficulties in coping with increasing blood demand from an ageing population, stringent donor eligibility criteria and quality requirement in the blood collection. With a systemic analysis of the donation pattern, proposal is put forward to tackle the challenging problems.

  13. Impact of predictive scoring model and e-mail messages on African American blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachegowda, Lohith S; Timm, Brad; Dasgupta, Pinaki; Hillyer, Christopher D; Kessler, Debra; Rebosa, Mark; France, Christopher R; Shaz, Beth H

    2017-06-01

    Expanding the African American (AA) donor pool is critical to sustain transfusion support for sickle cell disease patients. The aims were to: 1) apply cognitive computing on donation related metrics to develop a predictive model that effectively identifies repeat AA donors, 2) determine whether a single e-mail communication could improve AA donor retention and compare retention results on higher versus lower predictive score donors, and 3) evaluate the effect of e-mail marketing on AA donor retention with culturally versus nonculturally tailored message. Between 2011 and 2012, 30,786 AA donors donated blood at least once on whom predictive repeat donor scores (PRDSs) was generated from donor-related metrics (frequency of donations, duration between donations, age, blood type, and sex). In 2013, 28% (8657/30,786) of 2011 to 2012 donors returned to donate on whom PRDS was validated. Returning blood donors had a higher mean PRDS compared to nonreturning donors (0.649 vs. 0.268; p e-mail pilot, high PRDS (≥0.6) compared to low PRDS (e-mail opening rate (p e-mail, 159% higher presentation rate (p e-mail communication has the potential to increase the efficiency of donor marketing. © 2017 AABB.

  14. Ten-year incidence of Chagas cardiomyopathy among asymptomatic Trypanosoma cruzi-seropositive former blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Ester C; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Salemi, Vera M C; Di Lorenzo Oliveira, Claudia; Antunes, Andre P; Menezes, Marcia M; Ianni, Barbara M; Nastari, Luciano; Fernandes, Fabio; Patavino, Giuseppina M; Sachdev, Vandana; Capuani, Ligia; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Carrick, Danielle M; Wright, David; Kavounis, Katherine; Goncalez, Thelma T; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara; Custer, Brian; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L

    2013-03-12

    Very few studies have measured disease penetrance and prognostic factors of Chagas cardiomyopathy among asymptomatic Trypanosoma cruzi-infected persons. We performed a retrospective cohort study among initially healthy blood donors with an index T cruzi-seropositive donation and age-, sex-, and period-matched seronegatives in 1996 to 2002 in the Brazilian cities of São Paulo and Montes Claros. In 2008 to 2010, all subjects underwent medical history, physical examination, ECGs, and echocardiograms. ECG and echocardiogram results were classified by blinded core laboratories, and records with abnormal results were reviewed by a blinded panel of 3 cardiologists who adjudicated the outcome of Chagas cardiomyopathy. Associations with Chagas cardiomyopathy were tested with multivariate logistic regression. Mean follow-up time between index donation and outcome assessment was 10.5 years for the seropositives and 11.1 years for the seronegatives. Among 499 T cruzi seropositives, 120 (24%) had definite Chagas cardiomyopathy, and among 488 T cruzi seronegatives, 24 (5%) had cardiomyopathy, for an incidence difference of 1.85 per 100 person-years attributable to T cruzi infection. Of the 120 seropositives classified as having Chagas cardiomyopathy, only 31 (26%) presented with ejection fraction <50%, and only 11 (9%) were classified as New York Heart Association class II or higher. Chagas cardiomyopathy was associated (P<0.01) with male sex, a history of abnormal ECG, and the presence of an S3 heart sound. There is a substantial annual incidence of Chagas cardiomyopathy among initially asymptomatic T cruzi-seropositive blood donors, although disease was mild at diagnosis.

  15. Ten-Year Incidence of Chagas Cardiomyopathy Among Asymptomatic Trypanosoma cruzi–Seropositive Former Blood Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Ester C.; Ribeiro, Antonio L.; Salemi, Vera M.C.; Di Lorenzo Oliveira, Claudio; Antunes, Andre P.; Menezes, Marcia M.; Ianni, Barbara M.; Nastari, Luciano; Fernandes, Fabio; Patavino, Giuseppina M.; Sachdev, Vandana; Capuani, Ligia; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Carrick, Danielle M.; Wright, David; Kavounis, Katherine; Goncalez, Thelma T.; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara; Custer, Brian; Busch, Michael P.; Murphy, Edward L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Very few studies have measured disease penetrance and prognostic factors of Chagas cardiomyopathy among asymptomatic Trypanosoma cruzi–infected persons. Methods and Results We performed a retrospective cohort study among initially healthy blood donors with an index T cruzi–seropositive donation and age-, sex-, and period-matched seronegatives in 1996 to 2002 in the Brazilian cities of São Paulo and Montes Claros. In 2008 to 2010, all subjects underwent medical history, physical examination, ECGs, and echocardiograms. ECG and echocardiogram results were classified by blinded core laboratories, and records with abnormal results were reviewed by a blinded panel of 3 cardiologists who adjudicated the outcome of Chagas cardiomyopathy. Associations with Chagas cardiomyopathy were tested with multivariate logistic regression. Mean follow-up time between index donation and outcome assessment was 10.5 years for the seropositives and 11.1 years for the seronegatives. Among 499 T cruzi seropositives, 120 (24%) had definite Chagas cardiomyopathy, and among 488 T cruzi seronegatives, 24 (5%) had cardiomyopathy, for an incidence difference of 1.85 per 100 person-years attributable to T cruzi infection. Of the 120 seropositives classified as having Chagas cardiomyopathy, only 31 (26%) presented with ejection fraction <50%, and only 11 (9%) were classified as New York Heart Association class II or higher. Chagas cardiomyopathy was associated (P<0.01) with male sex, a history of abnormal ECG, and the presence of an S3 heart sound. Conclusions There is a substantial annual incidence of Chagas cardiomyopathy among initially asymptomatic T cruzi–seropositive blood donors, although disease was mild at diagnosis. PMID:23393012

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection rate in volunteer blood donors from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Hepatitis G virus (HGV) antibody seroprevalence studies overestimate the true infection rate. No data exist on the incidence of HCV or its clinical features in blood donors of sub-Saharan Africa. Aims. To establish the true incidence of HCV infection in volunteer blood donors in the Western Gape, and compare.

  17. Prevalence of Hepatitis-B Surface Antigen among Blood Donors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information is scarce on the prevalence of Hepatitis-B Virus (HBV) infection among blood donors in Taraba State. Hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBsAg) ELISA [Gudans Industrial Hong 2 Kou, China] was used to determine the prevalence of HBsAg among 804 blood donors aged between 11 and 65 years in Federal Medical ...

  18. Infectivity of blood products from donors with occult hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allain, Jean-Pierre; Mihaljevic, Ivanka; Gonzalez-Fraile, Maria Isabel

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is identified in 1:1000 to 1:50,000 European blood donations. This study intended to determine the infectivity of blood products from OBI donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Recipients of previous donations from OBI donors were investigated...

  19. Diversity and origin of hepatitis B virus in Dutch blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, M. H. G. M.; Zaaijer, H. L.

    2004-01-01

    Two considerations led us to study the genetic diversity and origin of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Dutch blood donors. Firstly, an HBV-infected Dutch blood donor was found negative by four assays used commonly for detection of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). How variable is HBsAg among HBV infected

  20. The effect of pre-donation hypotension on whole blood donor adverse reactions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Nele S; Cusack, Leila; De Buck, Emmy; Compernolle, Veerle; Vandekerckhove, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    Blood services are reliant upon healthy blood donors to provide a safe and adequate supply of blood products. Inappropriate variables contained within blood donor exclusion criteria can defer potentially appropriate donors. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the effect of low pre-donation blood pressure, as compared with normal blood pressure, on adverse events in allogeneic whole blood donors. A systematic review was performed using highly sensitive search strategies within five databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, and Web of Science) from inception date until April 12, 2013. Out of 8305 records, 10 observational studies were identified that addressed the question. Five of these studies (with a combined total of 1,482,020 donations and 2903 donors) included either a statistical analysis or an appropriate study design that controlled for possible confounding factors. Based on the currently available evidence, hypotension has not been shown to be an independent predictive factor for donor complications. However, the overall quality of evidence was rather limited and rated 'low,' using the GRADE approach. In conclusion there is currently no evidence that hypotensive blood donors have a greater risk for donor adverse events compared with their normotensive counterparts. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study (REDS-III): A research program striving to improve blood donor and transfusion recipient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Steven; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L; Shan, Hua; Ness, Paul; Glynn, Simone A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study -III (REDS-III) is a 7-year multicenter transfusion safety research initiative launched in 2011 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Study design The domestic component involves 4 blood centers, 12 hospitals, a data coordinating center, and a central laboratory. The international component consists of distinct programs in Brazil, China, and South Africa which involve US and in-country investigators. Results REDS-III is using two major methods to address key research priorities in blood banking/transfusion medicine. First, there will be numerous analyses of large “core” databases; the international programs have each constructed a donor/donation database while the domestic program has established a detailed research database that links data from blood donors and their donations, the components made from these donations, and data extracts from the electronic medical records of the recipients of these components. Secondly, there are more than 25 focused research protocols involving transfusion recipients, blood donors, or both that are either in progress or scheduled to begin within the next 3 years. Areas of study include transfusion epidemiology and blood utilization; transfusion outcomes; non-infectious transfusion risks; HIV-related safety issues (particularly in the international programs); emerging infectious agents; blood component quality; donor health and safety; and other donor issues. Conclusions It is intended that REDS-III serve as an impetus for more widespread recipient and linked donor-recipient research in the US as well as to help assure a safe and available blood supply in the US and in international locations. PMID:24188564

  2. Attitudes about organ and tissue donation among the general public and blood donors in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P K; Lin, C K; Lam, P K; Szeto, C C; Lau, J T; Cheung, L; Wong, M; Chan, A Y; Ko, W M

    2001-06-01

    The cadaveric organ and tissue donation rate in Hong Kong is not satisfactory; 1 million blood donors are registered and more than 300,000 are active. However, the current attitudes toward organ and tissue donation in the general public and blood donors of Hong Kong are unknown. Random general public (n = 1018) and blood donors (n = 1227) of Chinese origin, with age ranging from 16 to 60 years, were interviewed using a standard verified questionnaire that examines attitudes and knowledge of organ and tissue donation. The mean age of the general public and blood donors were 32.6 and 28.9 years, respectively. Of the general public, 44.4% were men and among blood donors, 60% were men. About 56% of both groups thought that organ donation is an obligation of citizens. Blood donors were more aware than the general public about the types of organs that can be donated. When compared with the general public, a significantly higher percentage of blood donors were willing to donate their organs (81% vs 53%), had heard about organ donation cards (98.3% vs 89.5%), and had signed the cards (49.9% vs 22.6%). About 70% of both groups who had signed a card were carrying it. Thirty-nine percent of the general public and 17% of blood donors had not decided whether they would donate. For blood donors, 49.7% were willing to donate their relatives' organs, compared with 41.8% of the general public. Most individuals in both groups would not object to their relatives' decision to donate. About two thirds of individuals in both groups disagreed with the concept of an opt-out law, though only 20% of the general public and 14.4% of blood donors would refuse donation if an opt-out law were in practice. This study shows that blood donors have better knowledge of organ donation and are more willing to donate their organs and sign an organ donation card than the general public. However, a substantial proportion of blood donors have not signed a donor card. It would be useful to design promotion

  3. Seroprevalence of HBV and HCV in blood donors: A study from regional blood transfusion services of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, B R; Ghimire, P; Kandel, S R; Rajkarnikar, M

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis B and hepatitis C are significant health problems that might involve the late sequel of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A high prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in blood donors poses an increased risk of window period transmission through blood transfusion. The present study aimed to know the seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among blood donors in regional blood transfusion services of Nepal. This was a retrospective study conducted among blood donors in Banke (5,211), Morang (5,351), and Kaski (5,995) blood transfusion services. Serum samples were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV antibodies using rapid enzyme immunoassays. The donors information was collected via the donor record register through their respective blood transfusion services. The software "Winpepi ver 3.8" was used for statistical analysis. The seroprevalence rate of HBV was highest in the Banke (1.2%) followed by Biratnagar (0.87%) and Kaski (0.35%) (P 0.05). The seroprevalence of HBV was significantly higher than HCV in all three blood transfusion services. The burden of HBV as well as HCV seems to be higher in male donors (P > 0.05). The study revealed that the seroprevalence of HBV was alarmingly higher in two of the three blood transfusion services. Implementation of community-based preventive measures and improved strategies for safe blood supply might prove useful to decrease the seroprevalence.

  4. Analysis of occult hepatitis B virus infection among blood donors in Tangshan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAO Xiao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection (OBI among the volunteer blood donors in Tangshan, China. MethodsEnzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect serum HBV markers in the blood donors. Nucleic acid test (NAT was performed in the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg-negative blood samples to detect HBV DNA, and Roche reagent was used to measure the viral load of HBV DNA in NAT-positive samples. ResultsAmong the HBsAg-negative blood samples of 116 741 blood donors, 39 (0.033% had positive results in NAT, and 35 (0.029% were confirmed with OBI. The viral load of HBV DNA was less than 102 IU/ml in 97.1% of the blood donors with OBI. Of the blood donors with OBI, 27 (77.1% were positive for at least one of hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb, hepatitis B e antigen, hepatitis B e antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb, and 8 (22.9% were negative for all serum HBV markers. Of the 27 positive blood donors, 22 (81.5% were positive for HBcAb, and 15 (55.6% were positive for HBsAb. ConclusionOBI occurs in some HBsAg-negative blood donors in Tangshan, and the viral load of HBV DNA is low. NAT is effective in increasing the detection rate of HBV infection.

  5. Evaluation of the TEG® platelet mapping™ assay in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinbrüchel Daniel A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monitoring of antiplatelet therapy in patients at cardiovascular risk is difficult because existing platelet function tests are too sophisticated for clinical routine. The whole blood TEG® Platelet Mapping™ assay measures clot strength as maximal amplitude (MA and enables for quantification of platelet function, including the contribution of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP and thromboxane A2 (TxA2 receptors to clot formation. Methods In 43 healthy blood donors, the analytical (CVa and inter-individual variability (CVg of the TEG® Platelet Mapping™ assay were determined together with platelet receptor inhibition in response to arachidonic acid (AA and ADP. Results The CVa of the assay for maximal platelet contribution to clot strength (MAThrombin was 3.5%, for the fibrin contribution to clot strength (MAFibrin 5.2%, for MAAA 4.5% and for MAADP it was 6.6%. The MAThrombin CVg was 2.8%, MAFibrin 4.7%, MAAA 6.6% and for MAADP it was 26.2%. Females had a higher MAThrombin compared to males (62.8 vs. 58.4 mm, p = 0.005. The platelet TxA2 receptor inhibition was 1.2% (range 0–10% and lower than for the ADP receptor (18.6% (0–58%; p Conclusion The high variability in ADP receptor inhibition may explain both the differences in response to ADP receptor inhibitor therapy and why major bleeding sometimes develops during surgery in patients not treated with ADP receptor inhibitors. An analytical variation of ~5 % for the TEG® enables, however, for routine monitoring of the variability in ADP receptor inhibition and of antiplatelet therapy.

  6. Individual, contextual and network characteristics of blood donors and non-donors: a systematic review of recent literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, Tjeerd W.; Bekkers, Rene; Klinkenberg, Elisabeth F.; De Kort, Wim L.A.M.; Merz, Eva-Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background The ageing population and recent migration flows may negatively affect the blood supply on the long-term, increasing the importance of targeted recruitment and retention strategies to address donors. This review sought to identify individual, network and contextual characteristics related

  7. Seroepidemiology of infection with Toxoplasma gondii in healthy blood donors of Durango, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrada-Martínez Sergio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii infection in blood donors could represent a risk for transmission in blood recipients. There is scarce information about the epidemiology of T. gondii infection in blood donors in Mexico. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence of T. gondii infection and associated socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics in a population of healthy blood donors of Durango City, Mexico. Methods Four hundred and thirty two blood donors in two public blood banks of Durango City, Mexico were examined for T. gondii infection between August to September 2006. Blood donors were tested for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies by using enzyme-linked immunoassays (Diagnostic Automation Inc., Calabasas, CA, USA. Socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics from each participant were also obtained. Results Thirty two (7.4% of 432 blood donors had IgG anti-T. gondii antibodies. Eight (1.9% of them had also IgM anti-T. gondii antibodies. Multivariate analysis using logic regression showed that T. gondii infection was associated with the presence of cats at home (adjusted OR = 3.81; 95% CI: 1.45–10.01. The age group of 45–60 years showed a significantly higher frequency of T. gondii infection than the group of 25–34 years (p = 0.02. Blood donors without education had a significantly higher frequency of infection (15.8% than those with 13–19 years of education (4.5% (p = 0.04. Other characteristics of blood donors including male gender, consumption of undercooked meat or blood transfusion did not show an association with infection. Conclusion The prevalence of T. gondii infection in healthy blood donors of Durango City, Mexico is lower than those reported in blood donors of south and central Mexico, and is one of the lowest reported in blood donors worldwide. T. gondii infection in our blood donors was most likely acquired by contact with cats. Prevalence of infection increased with age and decreased

  8. Donor Tracker: An Innovative Real-Time Tracking System for Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. In Mauritius, caravans are sent around the island to collect blood from volunteers. This ensures that storage of pints of blood does not get depleted. However, in cases of urgent requirement of fresh blood, for instance an open heart surgery, it is very hard to quickly find a blood donor. The problem is even worse if ...

  9. Pattern of Blood Donors in Jos. | Damulak | Jos Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood donors are categorized into voluntary, paid, family replacement, autologous, directed and therapeutic. Superior safety has long been identified with voluntary and autologous blood donations. The setting up of the centralized blood transfusion service centre is to source blood from prospective voluntary ...

  10. Motivational factors for blood donation in first-time donors and repeat donors: a cross-sectional study in West Pomerania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemnig, A; Konerding, U; Hron, G; Lubenow, N; Alpen, U; Hoffmann, W; Kohlmann, T; Greinacher, A

    2017-08-07

    This study aimed to analyse motivational factors for blood donation in different donor groups. As the demographic change will result in a decrease of the population in age groups of blood donors, the risk of blood product shortage increases. During a 12-month period, every sixth blood donor presenting at the blood donation centre of the University Hospital was asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire assessing motivational factors for blood donation. Despite the formalised enrolment protocol, frequent donors were over-represented in the study cohort, which was adjusted by weighting donors with different numbers of donations per year in such a way that the distribution of numbers of donations per year was the same in the sample as in the donor population. Of 2443 participants, 14·3% were first-time and 85·3% repeat donors. To "help other people" (>90%) and receiving "medical assessment of my blood values" (63-69%) were the strongest motivational factors in all donor groups. Receiving remuneration (49·2% vs 38·1%) was more important for repeat donors than for first-time donors, whereas it was the opposite for "being taken by a friend to the donor clinic" (47·0% vs 15·5%). A potentially important observation is that 33·9% of frequent donors reported feeling physically better after blood donation compared to infrequent donors (29·5%). Identification of motivational factors can lead to the design of targeted motivation campaigns for blood donation. The underlying cause of the perceived well-being after blood donation requires further studies. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. The healthy donor effect impacts self-reported physical and mental health - results from the Danish Blood Donor Study (DBDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A S; Skytthe, A; Erikstrup, C

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: This study aimed at quantifying the healthy donor effect by comparing self-perceived mental and physical health between blood donors and non-donors. BACKGROUND: In theory, the selection process known as the healthy donor effect should result in better self-perceived, health-related quality...... of life in donors than in non-donors. METHODS: The Short Form-12 data from the Danish Twin Registry (DTR) was compared with the data from the Danish Blood Donor Study (DBDS). Data on age, sex and smoking status were included in the analyses. The multivariable linear regression analysis was stratified...... by sex and age group intervals. Outcome variables were the mental component score (MCS) and the physical component score (PCS). RESULTS: A total of 28 982 and 36 913 participants from the DTR and the DBDS, respectively, were included in this study. Younger donors had higher MCS than non-donors, whereas...

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of blood centers in the screening of blood donors for viral markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogbe, Elliot Eli; Arthur, Fareed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Blood transfusion still remains a life saving intervention in almost all healthcare facilities worldwide. Screening of blood donors/blood units is done in almost every blood bank facility before the blood units/blood components are transfused to prevent transfusion-transmissible infections. The kind of testing kits or the methods used by a facility and the technical expertise of the personnel greatly affects the screening results of a facility. This study was aimed at evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of five hospital-based blood bank testing facilities (Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital KNUST, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Agogo, Bekwai and Sunyani) that used rapid immunochromatograhic assays (RIA) in screening blood donors/blood units in Ghana. Methods Blood samples (300) from the five testing facilities and their screening results for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using RIAs were obtained. All the samples were then analysed for the three viral markers using 3rd generational enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit as the gold standard. Results The mean false positive for HBsAg was 2.2% with Bekwai testing facility having the highest of 4.4%. For HCV, the mean false positive was 2.8% with Agogo and Bekwai testing facilities having the highest of 8.7% respectively. For HIV screening, the mean false positive was 11.1% with Bekwai testing facility having the highest of 28.0%. The mean false negative for the facilities were 3.0% for HBV, 75.0% for HCV and 0.0% for HIV with KATH having the highest of 6.3% for HBV, Bekwai having the highest of 100% for HCV and no facility showing false negative for HIV. Mean sensitivity of the screening procedure for the facilities was 97.0%, 25.0% and 100.0% whilst the mean specificity was 97.8%, 97.2% and 88.9% for HBV, HCV and HIV respectively. Statistical comparison among the testing facilities showed no

  13. Are lapsed donors willing to resume blood donation, and what determines their motivation to do so?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Anne; Abraham, Charles; Ruiter, Robert A C; Schaalma, Herman P; de Kort, Wim L A M; Dijkstra, J Anneke; Veldhuizen, Ingrid J T

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the possibility of rerecruiting lapsed blood donors. Reasons for donation cessation, motivation to restart donation, and modifiable components of donation motivation were examined. We distinguished between lapsed donors who had passively withdrawn by merely not responding to donation invitations and donors who had contacted the blood bank to actively withdraw. A cross-sectional survey was sent to 400 actively lapsed donors and to 400 passively lapsed donors, measuring intention to restart donation and psychological correlates of restart intention. The data were analyzed using multiple regression analyses. The response rate among actively lapsed donors was higher than among passively lapsed donors (37% vs. 25%). Actively lapsed donors typically ceased donating because of physical reactions, while passively lapsed donors quit because of a busy lifestyle. Nonetheless, 51% of actively lapsed responders and 80% of passively lapsed responders were willing to restart donations. Multiple regression analysis showed that, for passively lapsed donors, cognitive attitude was the strongest correlate of intention to donate in the future (β=0.605, pattitude (β=0.239, pattitude was also the strongest correlate of intention (β=0.601, pattitude (β=0.345, pattitudes and self-efficacy could further raise such intentions. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  14. Motivation in Italian whole blood donors and the role of commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani, Marco; Strepparava, Maria Grazia

    2011-12-01

    The literature contains numerous reports on motivation in blood donors, although none of these are specific to blood donation in Italy and almost all of them focus on altruism and the desire to help others. Altruism is important, but a comprehensive analysis of donor motivation should examine all the factors affecting the decision to donate, including commitment to voluntary blood donor organizations. The aims of this paper are to verify if the motivational factors that influence the choice to donate blood in Italy are generally consistent with the findings from other countries reported in the literature and to focus on commitment to donor organizations as an additional factor. A sample of 895 whole blood donors completed a self-report questionnaire containing questions about: reasons for beginning to donate, people who influenced this choice, and level of commitment to voluntary blood donor organizations. The most frequently reported reasons for giving blood for the first time were "to help others" (56%), "influence of family/friends" (22%), and "social/moral obligation" (11.2%); commitment did not vary as a function of the leading motivation reported. Differences emerged between males, who more frequently reported having been influenced by parents and friends, and females, who referred more often to altruistic motives. The opportunity to check one's own state of health also played an important role (6.9%), especially for male donors. Overall, however, the decision to donate was primarily a personal choice (41.3%), although influence was also attributed to relatives (21.8%), friends (22.3%), and voluntary blood donor organizations (21.8%). The reported level of commitment to the donor organization was positively correlated with the number of total and annual donations made and number of new donors recruited.

  15. Prevalence of Occult Hepatitis C Virus Infection among Blood Donors in Jiangsu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Chen, Xian; Zhu, Shaowen; Mao, Ping; Zhu, Shanshan; Liu, Yanchun; Huang, Chengyin; Sun, Jun; Zhu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, only 1 donor blood sample was found to be anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) negative and HCV RNA positive, as detected by nucleic acid testing. In occult HCV infection (OCI), HCV RNA is found in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We investigated the prevalence of OCI among blood donors. We collected 513 samples from 334 eligible and 179 deferred donors, including 55 anti-HCV-positive, 113 alanine aminotransferase (ALT)-elevated, and 11 hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive blood donors. PBMCs were isolated, the 5'-untranslated region of HCV RNA was amplified by reverse transcription nested PCR, and the genotype of the core region was determined. No HCV RNA was detected among the eligible samples. Among the deferred donors, 15 (27.2%) had detectable HCV RNA in 55 anti-HCV PBMC specimens. HCV RNA was detected in 1 (9.1%) HBsAg-positive and 9 (8%) ALT-elevated samples. The prevalence of OCI in the blood donors was 2.2% (10/458). HCV genotypes were determined in 10 subjects, indicating that 2 (20.0%) were subtype 2a, 7 (70.0%) were 1b, and 1 (10%) was 6a. This study showed that OCI does exist among Chinese blood donors. However, to determine the epidemiology and outcome of this HCV infection, further follow-up with more participants and patients receiving blood components with OCI is needed. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in blood donors in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yağcı, Münci; Yegin, Zeynep Arzu; Yenicesu, İdil; Suyanı, Elif; Ulu, Bahar Uncu; İnci, Kamil; Çetin, Zeynep; Yılmaz, Zeynep; Kurşunoğlu, Nevruz; Özkurt, Zübeyde Nur

    2017-06-05

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a precursor state of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with peripheral lymphocytosis below 5 × 10(9)/l. The diagnostic criteria exclude the presence of lymphadenopathy, organomegaly, infections, autoimmune diseases or any sign of a lymphoproliferative disorder. This prospective study was designed in order to evaluate the frequency of MBL in blood donors in Turkey. The diagnosis of MBL was identified by flow cytometry method based on the International Familial CLL Consortium Report. A total of 999 volunteers [median age 34 (18-78) years; male/female: 705/294] were included in the study. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis was demonstrated in 18 cases (1.8%). A total of 16 cases (1.6%) was evaluated as CLL-like MBL, while 2 (0.2%) had a non-CLL-like phenotype. The subjects were divided into three groups according to age, as 60 years. The prevalence of MBL was 1.1% below 40 years, 0.6% between 40 and 60 years and 0.1% in cases over 60 years, without statistical significance (p > 0.05). The sensitivity of the flow cytometry method is essential and may be responsible for the variations in the prevalence of MBL in different populations which can also be attributed to study design, higher detection rates in the elderly and families with genetic predisposition to CLL. Large population-based studies and standardized laboratory methods are needed to determine the potential risk factors of progression to CLL, including molecular markers and genetic profile.

  17. Antibody to histo-blood group A antigen neutralizes HIV produced by lymphocytes from blood group A donors but not from blood group B or O donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Hansen, J E; Clausen, H

    1991-01-01

    for virus neutralization by the monoclonal antibody (MAb) AH16 directed against the blood group A epitope. MAb AH16 was previously shown to inhibit cell-free virus infection using HTLV-IIIB propagated in H9 cells. AH16 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of the HTLV-IIIB/lyA isolate but did...... not inhibit the HTLV-IIIB/lyB or the HTLV-IIIB/lyO isolate. Specificity of the MAb-mediated inhibition was shown using A-antigen (tetrasaccharide). Thus, HIV infection of PBMC from donors with blood type A appears to induce expression of host-cell-encoded carbohydrate blood group A epitope on HIV which can...

  18. Non-compliance to infectious disease deferral criteria among Hong Kong's blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S S; Cheung, E K H; Leung, J N S; Lee, C K

    2017-07-01

    Donor screening alone cannot eliminate the risk of transfusion-transmitted HIV infection. Donor deferral according to established criteria is a supplemental strategy, which has focused largely on men who have sex with men (MSM). A study was conducted to determine the compliance of non-MSM donors with such criteria and examine its implications on blood safety. Chinese donors who have just donated blood at blood donor centres in Hong Kong were recruited. Based on the contents of the routinely administered predonation Health Screening Questionnaires, participants were requested to complete a survey to assess their practice of deferrable risk behaviours and lifestyle encounters, using tablet computers. Over an 8-week period in mid-2016, 1614 donors (male-to-female ratio 1·23) had enrolled in the survey, accounting for 40% of donors giving blood on the survey days. The proportion of respondents who gave blood despite having deferrable HIV risk was 5%: MSM 1·2% (of the male donors); non-MSM risk behaviours 2·6%; risky lifestyle encounters 2·1%. If inconsistent declaration and suspected risk behaviours were included, the total non-compliance rate became 10·8%. Male donors had a higher prevalence of deferrable behavioural risk, even after excluding MSM. Unawareness and non-acceptability were main reasons for non-compliance. The non-compliance rate of donors to deferral was high, although the ultimate infection risk might be small in the presence of universal screening. Simplification of questionnaires, focus on time-limited deferral and a reduction of deferral items may improve the deferral mechanism without compromising blood safety. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Italian blood donors: prevalence and molecular defect characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffi, D; Pasquino, M T; Mandarino, L; Tortora, P; Girelli, G; Meo, D; Grazzini, G; Caprari, P

    2014-04-01

    In the countries with high G6PD deficiency prevalence, blood donors are not routinely screened for this genetic defect. G6PD deficiency is often asymptomatic, blood donors may be carriers of the deficiency without being aware of it. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among the Italian blood donors. From October 2009 to April 2011, 3004 blood donors from a large hospital transfusion centre were screened for G6PD deficiency using differential pH-metry and the characterization of G6PD mutations was performed on G6PD-deficient subjects. The haematological features of G6PD-deficient and normal donors were also compared. Thirty-three subjects (25 men and 8 women) with low G6PD activity were identified, corresponding to 1·1% of the examined blood donor population. The frequencies of class II severe alleles (Mediterranean, Valladolid, Chatham and Cassano) and class III mild alleles (Seattle, A- and Neapolis) were 48% and 43%, respectively. The haematological parameters of G6PD- donors were within normal range; however, the comparison between normal and G6PD- class II donors showed significant differences. In Italy, the presence of blood donors with G6PD deficiency is not a rare event and the class II severe variants are frequent. The identification of G6PD-deficient donors and the characterization of the molecular variants would prevent the use of G6PD-deficient RBC units when the haemolytic complications could be relevant especially for high risk patients as premature infants and neonates and patients with sickle cell disease submitted to multiple transfusions. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  20. Using Blood Donor-Derived ABO and RhD Blood Groups Helps to Detect Wrong Blood in Tube Errors in Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Yazer, Mark H; Sprogøe, Ulrik

    2017-11-01

    Comparing the ABO and RhD group of a recipient's current pre-transfusion sample against their historical group is an important means of detecting wrong blood in tube (WBIT) errors. This study investigated the utility of using the donor ABO and RhD group as the historical check for recipients. A single database stores serological information on blood donors, pregnant women, and patients throughout southern Denmark. A donor ABO and RhD group can be the historical blood group should that donor later require a transfusion. This database was searched to determine how often the ABO and RhD group on a recipient's current pre-transfusion sample was discrepant with their historical donor-derived blood group. During about 21 years, ABO and RhD groupings were performed on 76,455 blood donors and on 424,697 patients. There were 13,630/424,697 (3.2%) patients who had their donor-derived ABO and RhD group used as the historical comparison with the current sample; 6/13,630 (0.04%) of the current pre-transfusion samples on these patients were discrepant with the donor-derived historical group because of WBIT errors. Seven other discrepancies with the donor-derived blood group were also found. Accessing the donor-derived ABO and RhD group can be an important safeguard against WBIT-mediated mistransfusions.

  1. A behavior model for blood donors and marketing strategies to retain and attract them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covadonga Aldamiz-echevarria

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: analyze and propose a theoretical model that describes blood donor decisions to help staff working in blood banks (nurses and others in their efforts to capture and retain donors.METHODS: analysis of several studies on the motivations to give blood in Spain over the last six years, as well as past literature on the topic, the authors' experiences in the last 25 years in over 15 Non Governmental Organizations with different levels of responsibilities, their experiences as blood donors and the informal interviews developed during those 25 years.RESULTS: a model is proposed with different internal and external factors that influence blood donation, as well as the different stages of the decision-making process.CONCLUSION: the knowledge of the donation process permits the development of marketing strategies that help to increase donors and donations.

  2. Risk of cancer after blood transfusion from donors with subclinical cancer: a retrospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Reilly, Marie

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although mechanisms for detection of short-term complications after blood transfusions are well developed, complications with delayed onset, notably transmission of chronic diseases such as cancer, have been difficult to assess. Our aim was to investigate the possible risk of cancer...... transmission from blood donors to recipients through blood transfusion. METHODS: We did a register-based retrospective cohort study of cancer incidence among patients who received blood from donors deemed to have a subclinical cancer at the time of donation. These precancerous donors were diagnosed......, and essentially complete, population and health-care registers. The risk of cancer in exposed recipients relative to that in recipients who received blood from non-cancerous donors was estimated with multivariate Poisson regression, adjusting for potential confounding factors. FINDINGS: Of the 354 094 transfusion...

  3. Serial follow-up of repeat voluntary blood donors reactive for anti-HCV ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhury N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Voluntary non-remunerated repeat blood donors are perceived to be safer than the first time blood donors. This study was planned for follow-up of previous hepatitis C virus (HCV test results of anti-HCV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA reactive repeat blood donors. The aim was to suggest a protocol for re-entry of the blood donors who are confirmed HCV negative by nucleic acid test (NAT and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA. A group of repeat voluntary donors were followed retrospectively who became reactive on a cross sectional study and showed HCV reactivity while donating blood regularly. Material and Methods: A total of 51,023 voluntary non remunerated blood donors were screened for anti-HCV ELISA routinely. If anybody showed positivity, they were tested by two ELISA kits (screening and confirmatory and then confirmed infection status by NAT and or RIBA. The previous HCV test results of repeat donors reactive by anti-HCV ELISA were looked back from the records. Data of donors who were repeat reactive with single ELISA kit (in the present study were analyzed separately from those reactive with two ELISA kits (in the present study. Results: In this study, 140 (0.27% donors who were reactive by anti HCV ELISA were included. Out of them, 35 were repeat voluntary donors and 16 (11.43% were reactive with single ELISA kit. All 16 donors were reactive by single ELISA kit occasionally in previous donations. Their present ELISA positive donations were negative for HCV NAT and RIBA. A total of 19 (13.57% donors were reactive with two ELISA kits. In their previous donations, the donors who were reactive even once with two ELISA kits were consistently reactive by the same two ELISA kits in their next donations also. Conclusion: Donor sample reactive by only single ELISA kit may not be considered as infectious for disposal as they were negative by NAT and or RIBA. One time ELISA positivity was found probably due to ELISA kit

  4. Risk factors for HIV seropositivity among first-time blood donors in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, W; Mvere, D; Shamu, R; Katzenstein, D

    1998-03-01

    Factors associated with an increased likelihood of HIV infection among newly recruited blood donors in Zimbabwe are identified. Their feasibility as criteria for exclusion from donation is assessed. A self-administered survey including demographic and behavioral questions was completed by 1199 first-time, volunteer blood donors in Harare, Zimbabwe. Methods for subject recruitment and laboratory screening followed usual blood bank protocols. Fifteen percent of subjects were HIV positive. Factors significantly associated with HIV seropositivity at the pblood safety and reducing operating costs worldwide. Identification of efficient donor selection criteria requires knowledge of the local epidemiology of HIV infection and the asking of questions that are likely to be answered accurately.

  5. Evaluation of the analytical performances of a portable, 18-parameter hemometric system using capillary blood samples for blood donor enrolment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierelli, L; Zennaro, F; Patti, D; Miceli, M; Iudicone, P; Mannella, E

    2010-02-01

    Blood donor enrolment process is frequently based on the sole capillary haemoglobin (Hb) evaluation while platelet donors by apheresis also requires platelet (Plt) count. The 'sole Hb' approach prevents a complete donor evaluation and does not allow Plt donor enrolment. To extend blood counts before donations, we evaluated the performances of a multiparametric counter using capillary blood. The ABX Micros 60 (Micros 60) blood analyzer was employed on capillary blood and compared with venous counts by a reference counter (Coulter AcT 5diff) in a first series of 416 donors and in a second series of 136, after a 3-month period of routine use of this study counter. An average of 50 microl of capillary blood was collected whose 10 microl had been aspirated by Micros 60. High correlations were found between capillary counts using Micros 60 and venous counts using the reference counter. Mean Plt counts differed of 37 x 10(9)/l less for capillary approach in the first series of comparisons, but decreased to 10 x 10(9)/l less in the second series due to a greater expertise of operators in capillary sampling. All other parameters were accurate and never reached clinical relevance albeit they showed statistically significant differences. Data on Micros 60 demonstrated that capillary predonation counts may represent a feasible and effective approach to realize an accurate enrolment process of blood and Plt donors.

  6. Parasitological Profile of Perstans filariasis among Blood Donors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Filariasis transmission occurs during blood transfusion which poses a serious menace to the recipient of the blood and reduces blood availability in ... harbor filarial worms in their blood and there is a tendency to infect the recipients through blood transfusion thereby spreading ..... a topic in tropical medicine Blood Transfus.

  7. Characteristics of donors who do or do not return to give blood and barriers to their return

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, A.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.; Kort, W.L.A.M.M. de; Baaren, R.B. van; Veldhuizen, I.J.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background In the Netherlands about 50% of whole blood donors return to give blood after an invitation to donate. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of donor return behaviour and to gain insight into the barriers to blood donation reported by the donors themselves. Materials and

  8. Prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia among blood donors in Sokoto, North Western, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhari Hauwa Ali

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the prevalence and socio-demographic factors associated with iron deficiency anaemia among blood donors in Sokoto, North Western, Nigeria using a combination of haemoglobin haematocrit and serum ferritin measurements. Methods: One hundred and fifty consecutively recruited whole blood donors, comprising of 148 (98.7% family replacement donors and 2 (1.3% voluntary non-remunerated donors aged 18-60 years and mean age 39±21 years constituted the subjects for this study. The full blood count was carried out using Mythic 22 CT fully automated haematology analyser (Orphee SA, Switzerland. Serum was tested for ferritin using a human ferritin enzyme immunoassay kitACCU Diag™ ELISA Ferritin kit (Diagnostic Automation/Cortez Diagnostic Inc. California, USA. Results: The prevalence of anaemia (haemoglobin<11.0 g/dL was evident in 24 (16% and iron deficiency anaemia (serum ferritin<12 ng/mL+haemoglobin<11 g/dL in 5 (10% of donors. The haemoglobin and ferritin levels was significantly lower among regular voluntary remunerated blood donors (13.50±0.00 and 34.88±0.00 compared to family replacement donors (14.10±2.40 and 74.12±45.20 respectively (P=0.01 and 0.05 respectively. The mean haemoglobin and ferritin level was compared among donors based on gender. The haemoglobin and ferritin was significantly higher among male donors (14.20±2.00, 78.02±49.10 compared to female donors (12.35±2.5 and 42.20±32.13 (P=0.01. The mean haemoglobin and ferritin level was compared among donors based on occupational groups. The haemoglobin and ferritin was significantly higher among civil servants compared to farmers and students (P=0.01. Conclusions: Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent among blood donors in Sokoto, North Western, Nigeria. There is need to include routine ferritin in the blood donor testing protocol in the area to enable the diagnosis of donors with latent iron deficiency anaemia to facilitate iron supplementation for

  9. Polymerase chain reaction and blood culture in blood donors screened by ELISA test for Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Tieko Kinoshita-Yanaga

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate, through blood culture and PCR, the results of the ELISA for Chagas' disease in the screening of blood donors in the public blood-supply network of the state of Paraná, Brazil, and to map the epidemiological profile of the donors with respect to their risk of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. The negative and positive results of the ELISA were confirmed by blood culture and PCR for 190/191 individuals (99.5%. For one individual (0.5%, the ELISA was inconclusive, blood culture and IIF were negative, and IHA and PCR positive. Three individuals (1.6% were positive for T. cruzi on all the tests. Donors were predominantly female, and natives of Paraná, of rural origin, had observed or been informed of the presence of the vector in the municipalities where they resided, had never received a blood transfusion, had donated blood 1 to 4 times, and reported no cases of Chagas' disease in their families. We concluded that PCR and blood culturing have excellent potential for confirming the results of the ELISA, and that candidate blood donors with negative or positive tests have a similar risk of infection by T. cruzi, indicating that the ELISA test is sufficiently safe for screening blood prior to use.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar, pela hemocultura e PCR, os resultados do teste ELISA utilizado para doença de Chagas na triagem de doadores de sangue na rede pública do Estado do Paraná, Brasil, e traçar o perfil epidemiológico dos doadores quanto ao risco de infecção pelo Trypanosoma cruzi. Os resultados negativos e positivos do ELISA foram confirmados pela hemocultura e PCR em 190/191 indivíduos (99,5%. Para um indivíduo (0,5%, o teste de ELISA foi inconclusivo, hemocultura e IFI foram negativas, HAI e PCR foram positivas. Três indivíduos (1,6% foram positivos para T. cruzi em todos os testes. A maioria dos doadores era do sexo feminino, oriundos do Estado do Paraná, de origem rural, tinham

  10. Seroprevalence of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection among blood donors from Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, J; Deng, J H; Hettler, E; Harrison, C; Grady, J J; Korte, L G; Alexander, J; Montalvo, E; Jenson, H B; Gao, S J

    2001-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a gammaherpesvirus recently discovered among AIDS patients with Kaposi's sarcoma, is a potential candidate for screening in blood and plasma donors. While a number of studies have assessed KSHV infection among U.S. blood donors, larger-scale population-based studies would be necessary to develop more refined estimates of the magnitude and variation of KSHV infection across different geographic regions of the U.S. blood supply. The goal of the present study, therefore, was to determine the seroprevalence of KSHV infection and to assess demographic correlates of KSHV infection among south Texas blood donors. KSHV infection was determined using specific serologic assays that measure antibodies to KSHV latent and lytic antigens. The overall seroprevalence of KSHV in Texas blood donors (15.0%) is substantially higher than previously reported among blood donor and general population samples in the United States. This high rate of KSHV infection persisted across most of the sociodemographic subgroups under study but was particularly elevated among participants with less than a high school education. The infection rate also increased linearly with age. The elevated infection rate reported in the present study suggests that screening methods to detect KSHV infection in blood donors should be considered. In view of the etiologic role of KSHV for several malignancies, it would be important for future studies to directly assess the risk of KSHV transmission via blood transfusion.

  11. Asymptomatic infection by Leishmania infantum in blood donors from the Balearic Islands (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Cristina; Fisa, Roser; López-Chejade, Paulo; Serra, Teresa; Girona, Enrique; Jiménez, Mteresa; Muncunill, José; Sedeño, Matilde; Mascaró, Martín; Udina, Maria; Gállego, Montserrrat; Carrió, Jaume; Forteza, Alejandro; Portús, Montserrat

    2008-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania infantum is a zoonotic disease endemic throughout the Mediterranean basin. The existence of asymptomatic human infection entails the risk of transmission by blood transfusion. The prevalence of Leishmania infection was studied in 1437 blood donors from the Balearic Islands (Majorca, Formentera, and Minorca) using immunologic (Western blot [WB] and delayed-type hypersensitivity [DTH]), parasitologic (culture), and molecular (nested polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) methods. In addition, the efficiency of leukoreduction by filtration to remove the parasite was tested by nested PCR in the red blood cell (RBC) units. Leishmania antibodies were detected in 44 of the 1437 blood donors tested (3.1%). A sample of 304 donors from Majorca was selected at random. L. infantum DNA was amplified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) in 18 of the 304 (5.9%), and cultures were positive in 2 of the 304 (0.6%). DTH was performed on 73 of the 304 donors and was positive for 8 of them (11%). Of the 18 donors with positive L. infantum nested PCR, only 2 were seropositive. All the RBC samples tested (13 of 18) from donors with a positive PBMNC nested PCR yielded negative nested PCR results after leukodepletion. Cryptic Leishmania infection is highly prevalent in blood donors from the Balearic Islands. DTH and L. infantum nested PCR appear to be more sensitive to detect asymptomatic infection than the serology. The use of leukodepletion filters appears to remove parasites from RBC units efficiently.

  12. Organ Donation Registration and Decision-Making Among Current Blood Donors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, Eva-Maria; van den Hurk, Katja; de Kort, Wim L. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the Netherlands, there is a constant shortage in donor organs, resulting in long waiting lists. The decision to register as organ donor is associated with several demographic, cultural, and personal factors. Previous research on attitudes and motivations toward blood and organ

  13. Organ donation registration among current blood donors in The Netherlands. Personal, cultural and network determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, E.M.; van den Hurk, Katja; De Kort, Wim L.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the Netherlands, there is a constant shortage in donor organs, resulting in long waiting lists. The decision to register as organ donor is associated with several demographic, cultural, and personal factors. Previous research on attitudes and motivations toward blood and organ

  14. Recruitment and retention of blood donors in four Canadian cities: an analysis of the role of community and social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, André; Matthews, Ralph; Fiddler, Jay

    2013-12-01

    This study approaches the decision to donate blood as a dynamic process involving interplay between blood donors' personal motives, donors' social contexts, and the donor recruitment and retention activities of blood collection agencies. Data were gathered from four blood donation clinics using in-depth interviews with Canadian Blood Services employees, donors, and nondonors in 25 organizations participating in Life Link, a donor recruitment program that supports organizations to educate employees about the benefits of blood donation. Further data were obtained from ethnographic observations of blood collection and donor recruitment activities. Thematic analysis resulted in three umbrella themes: leveraging social networks, embedding the clinic in the community, and donating blood and social reciprocity. Donor recruitment activities at all four clinics enhanced awareness of blood donation in the workplace by using experienced donors to motivate their coworkers in making a first-time donation. Clinic employees reported varying success in improving awareness of blood donation in the broader community, in part because of varying employee engagement in community-wide activities and celebrations. Altruistic motives were mentioned by experienced donors, who also identified a desire to reciprocate to their community as another strong motive. This study contextualizes donor recruitment and retention as involving activities that tie blood donation to meaningful aspects of donors' social networks and community. The findings point to the need for further analyses of the institutional dimensions of blood donation to develop effective strategies beyond appeals to altruism. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Causes of discontinuity of blood donation among donors in Shiraz, Iran: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Kasraian

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The adequacy of blood depends on blood donation rates and numbers of blood donors. To prepare adequate blood supplies, it is essential to investigate the barriers and factors that stop individuals from donating. This study aimed to identify the causes of lapsed donation at our center. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study of volunteer blood donors in Shiraz, Iran. METHODS: We selected 850 donors who had donated between January 1, 2005 and June 1, 2005, but had not donated again by June 2008. The participants were recruited by letter and telephone, and were interviewed using a specially designed questionnaire that contained items on demographic characteristics, donor motivations and reasons for not returning to donate. We used the chi-square test to identify associations between lapsed donor characteristics and reasons for declining to donate. RESULTS: The greatest motivation for donation was altruism. The most frequent reasons for lapsed donation were lack of time because of work and self-exclusion for medical reasons. Among first-time donors, the most frequent reasons were unsuitability for donation and lack of time. CONCLUSIONS: The reasons for not returning to donate are varied and may correlate with demographic characteristics. In this study, the main reason for not returning was lack of time. Changing donation hours so that donors can donate after work, providing mobile teams at workplaces, and shortening the duration of the donation process may help increase repeat donation rates.

  16. Seroprevalence of HTLV -I/II amongst Blood Donors in Osogbo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HTLV type I/II is a blood borne infection that can be transmitted via blood transfusion. Objective: To determine the seroprevalence of human T – lymphotropic virus among blood donors in Osogbo, Nigeria. Methods: Diagnosis of Human T. Lymphotropic virus antigen was carried out on 372 serum samples ...

  17. No evidence of West Nile virus infection in Dutch blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, M. H. G. M.; Sjerps, M. S.; de Waal, M.; Reesink, H. W.; Cuypers, H. T. M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: West Nile virus (WNV) can be transmitted by transfusion through infected blood components. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of WNV infection among Dutch blood donors to assess whether WNV is a possible threat for the Dutch blood supply. MATERIALS AND METHODS:

  18. Acute HIV-1 Infection in Antigen/Antibody-negative Blood Donors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of acute HIV infection among HIV antigen/antibody negative blood donors. This was a cross-sectional blood donation based facility study conducted at Eastern Zone Blood Transfusion Services in Dar es Salaam from December 2009 to April 2010. Apparently healthy ...

  19. Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization and collection from elderly patients and elderly healthy donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Sinem Civriz; Ilhan, Osman

    2015-08-01

    The impact of age on peripheral blood stem cell mobilization has been reported with contradictory results. We aimed to revise these data about stem cell mobilization in elderly patients and healthy donors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Genotyping and mutational analysis of occult hepatitis B virus infection in blood donors of Shaoxing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Lie-Yong; Fu, Li-Qiang; Fang, Fang; Zhuang, Pei-Fen

    2011-12-01

    To assess the molecular biological characteristics of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected blood donors in Shaoxing. 8692 blood donors were screened using ELISA. The occult HBV infection was determined by DNA analysis among the HBsAg negative subjects. DNA sequencing and mutational analysis were further performed in the HBV DNA positive samples. The overall situation of occult HBV infection was hereby evaluated and the possible underlying mechanisms discussed. Among the 8644 HBsAg negative subjects out of 8692 blood donors, 8 were HBV DNA positive. The occult HBV infection rate was 0.92 per thousand (8/8692). Among the 8 samples, 6 were genotype C (75%) and 2 genotype B (25%). In addition, a specific mutation in "a" epitope was observed in 7 OBI virus strains by amino acid analysis. There were occult HBV infected among blood donors in Shaoxing, which is probably associated with the gene mutation of HBV virus.

  1. Mechanism of altruism approach to blood donor recruitment and retention: a review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, E

    2015-08-01

    Why do people donate blood? Altruism is the common answer. However, altruism is a complex construct and to answer this question requires a systematic analysis of the insights from the biology, economics and psychology of altruism. I term this the mechanism of altruism (MOA) approach and apply it here for understanding blood donor motivation. The answer also has enormous implications for the type of interventions we choose to adopt as a society. A MOA approach so far shows that blood donors are a mixture of (i) warm-glow givers (donation is emotionally rewarding) and (ii) reluctant altruists (cooperate rather than defect when free-riding is high). Donors also show 'saintly sinning' with the extra 'moral currency' form blood donation allowing them to be less generous in other contexts. The MOA approach suggests why financial incentives, in terms of gifts/lottery tickets, are effective and suggests a number of novel interventions for donor recruitment: 'voluntary reciprocal altruism' and 'charitable incentivisation'. The MOA approach also highlights the need for an intervention developed specifically for recipients to allow them to show their gratitude to donors and for society to celebrate blood donation. It is suggests a 'Monument to Blood Donors' will achieve this. The approach suggests a number of novel research questions into (i) donor self-selection effects, (ii) conditional cooperation and (iii) construct overlap with Theory of Planned Behaviour (e.g. affective attitudes and warm-glow). The MOA offers a powerful way to understand blood donor motivations around altruism and develop theoretically driven interventions. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  2. Geographical distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in blood donors: an international collaborative survey.

    OpenAIRE

    McOmish, F; Yap, P L; Dow, B C; Follett, E A; Seed, C; Keller, A J; Cobain, T J; Krusius, T; Kolho, E; Naukkarinen, R; Lin, C.; Lai, C; Leong, S.; Medgyesi, G A; Hejjas, M

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of infection with the six classified major genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was investigated in 447 infected volunteer blood donors from the following nine countries: Scotland, Finland, The Netherlands, Hungary, Australia, Egypt, Japan, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Viral sequences in plasma from blood donors infected with HCV were amplified in the 5'-noncoding region and were typed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Electrophoresis of DNA fragments produced by c...

  3. Knowledge about HIV-AIDS among first-time and regular voluntary non-remunerated blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ripal; Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Shah, Priti; Tulsiani, Sunita; Harimoorthy, V; Choudhury, N

    2007-10-01

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is one of the serious public health problems in India. AIDS education has been considered as one of the main intervention for control. Sexual route is the major route of transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV); however, approximately 2.5% is transmitted through blood and blood products. The present study was carried out to know the level of awareness about HIV infection and blood donation among first time (190) and repeat (310) voluntary donors of all age groups. One pre-structured questionnaire was circulated among altruistic blood donors. About 96.6% donors want to become repeat donors. Majority of the donors had good knowledge about routes of HIV transmission. According to 97.4% donors, it is transmitted by sexual route, according to 87.4% of donors by sharing needle, according to 85% of donors by blood transfusion and 82.4% of donors believe through vertical transmission. However, 32.4% of the donors, still believe that HIV infection could be transmitted through blood donation. Intense motivational program among donors is needed to remove this myth. Regular donors were convinced the importance of regular and repeat blood donation. They came forward to donate blood for the cause of humanity (80.6%) and the sense of pride (27.79%). First time donors were less motivated by the cause of humanity (56.21%) and volunteered because of peer pressure (26.03%) and motivated by relative or friend. Donors were very alert about precaution to be taken for protecting themselves from danger of HIV infection and priority wise use of safe sexual practice (90%), disposable needles (61.43%) and receive tested blood (45.71%) whenever required. When in need of blood for relatives the donors will give priority to the quality (64.65%) and properly tested blood from voluntary blood donors (86.7%).

  4. Assessing Acceptability of Short Message Service Based Interventions towards Becoming Future Voluntary Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All blood bank services, especially those of developing countries, face a major shortfall of blood donations due to lack of voluntary blood donors. Our study aims to evaluate the acceptability of Short Message Service based interventions towards becoming voluntary blood donors among medical university students of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods. A total of 350 medical students were approached in medical universities of Karachi, Pakistan, using a nonprobability convenient sampling technique. Data collectors administered a self-made questionnaire to each participant using an interview based format. All data was recorded and analyzed on SPSS 16. Results. 350 participants, having a mean age of 21.47 ± 1.36, were included in our study with 30.6% (107/350 being males and 69.4% (243/350 being females. 93.4% (327/350 of participants agreed that donating blood was healthy, but only 26% had donated blood in the past with 79.1% donating voluntarily. 65.7% (230/350 of the participants agreed to take part in Short Message Service based behavioral interventions to become voluntary blood donors with 69.7% (244/350 also agreeing that Short Message Service reminders will promote them to donate blood more often. Conclusion. With university students willing to become voluntary blood donors, Pakistani blood banks can carry out Short Message Service based interventions to encourage them to donate blood.

  5. Blood donor haematology parameters in two regions of Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in Kenya and to assess the potential role of automated haematology in National blood bank process control. Design: A cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: Two regional blood banks - Nairobi and its environs (Blood Transfusion Services, Nairobi) and Western Region (National Blood Transfusion Services, Kisumu).

  6. Seroprevalence of HBV and HCV in blood donors: A study from regional blood transfusion services of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective : Hepatitis B and hepatitis C are significant health problems that might involve the late sequel of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A high prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV in blood donors poses an increased risk of window period transmission through blood transfusion. The present study aimed to know the seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV among blood donors in regional blood transfusion services of Nepal. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study conducted among blood donors in Banke (5,211, Morang (5,351, and Kaski (5,995 blood transfusion services. Serum samples were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and anti-HCV antibodies using rapid enzyme immunoassays. The donors information was collected via the donor record register through their respective blood transfusion services. The software "Winpepi ver 3.8" was used for statistical analysis. Results: The seroprevalence rate of HBV was highest in the Banke (1.2% followed by Biratnagar (0.87% and Kaski (0.35% (P < 0.0001. The seroprevalence of HCV was highest in the Morang (0.26% followed by Kaski (0.16% and Banke (0.11% (P > 0.05. The seroprevalence of HBV was significantly higher than HCV in all three blood transfusion services. The burden of HBV as well as HCV seems to be higher in male donors (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The study revealed that the seroprevalence of HBV was alarmingly higher in two of the three blood transfusion services. Implementation of community-based preventive measures and improved strategies for safe blood supply might prove useful to decrease the seroprevalence.

  7. West Nile virus lineage 2 infection in a blood donor from Vienna, Austria, August 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, C; Hourfar, M K; Stiasny, K; Aberle, S W; Cadar, D; Schmidt-Chanasit, J; Mayr, W R

    2015-03-01

    Eastern Austria is neighbouring regions with ongoing West Nile virus (WNV) transmissions. Three human WNV infections had been diagnosed during the past decade in Austria. The Austrian Red Cross Blood Service (ARC-BS) started a first voluntary screening for WNV in blood donors from Eastern Austria by Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) in June 2014. This is also the most extensive WNV surveillance programme in humans in Austria so far. In August 2014, one autochthonous WNV infection was detected in a blood donor from Vienna. By now, one in 67,800 whole blood donations was found to be positive for WNV RNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An academic-based hospital donor site: do physicians donate blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, William A; Jeffus, Susanne; Wehrli, Gay

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this prospective, cross-sectional study were to characterize blood donors in an academic-based hospital donor center, to determine whether physicians donate, and to elucidate the donation impetus. A confidential survey was issued to presenting, potential donors over 200 weekdays. Three questions were asked: their role at the institution, if and when they had previously donated blood, and what prompted the current donation. The majority of the 687 respondents were institution-affiliated (73.5%) and 79.3% had previously donated, with a median of 3 mo since the prior donation. Only 21 (3.1%) respondents were physicians. The predominant reasons for donor presentation were an appointment, knowing it had been 8 wk since the last donation, and contact by the blood center to donate. This study shows the dearth of physician blood donors and a strong cohort of institution-affiliated repeat donors. Physicians represent a potential, stable, and sustainable donor pool; further studies are needed to establish physician recruitment programs.

  9. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and sickle cell trait among blood donors in Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alabdulaali Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Blood donation from glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient and sickle cell trait (SCT donors might alter the quality of the donated blood during processing, storage or in the recipient′s circulatory system. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency and SCT among blood donors coming to King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH in Riyadh. It was also reviewed the benefits and risks of transfusing blood from these blood donors. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1150 blood samples obtained from blood donors that presented to KKUH blood bank during the period April 2006 to May 2006. All samples were tested for Hb-S by solubility test, alkaline gel electrophoresis; and for G6PD deficiency, by fluorescent spot test. Results: Out of the 1150 donors, 23 (2% were diagnosed for SCT, 9 (0.78% for G6PD deficiency and 4 (0.35% for both conditions. Our prevalence of SCT and G6PD deficiency is higher than that of the general population of Riyadh. Conclusion: We recommend to screen all units for G6PD deficiency and sickle cell trait and to defer donations from donors with either of these conditions, unless if needed for special blood group compatibility, platelet apheresis or if these are likely to affect the blood bank inventory. If such blood is to be used, special precautions need to be undertaken to avoid complications in high-risk recipients.

  10. Zika virus RNA detection in asymptomatic blood donors during an outbreak in the northeast region of São Paulo State, Brazil, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavov, Svetoslav N; Hespanhol, Marta R; Rodrigues, Evandra S; Levi, José E; Ubiali, Eugênia M A; Covas, Dimas T; Kashima, Simone

    2017-12-01

    In 2015, there was a large Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in Brazil. The proportion of asymptomatic infections is very high, and it is possible for transfusion-transmitted ZIKV (TT-ZIKV) infection to occur. The prevalence of asymptomatic ZIKV infection among Brazilian blood donors during this epidemic outbreak is unknown. Plasma samples obtained between October 2015 and May 2016 from 1393 volunteer blood donors were tested for ZIKV RNA. The viral load was quantified using an in-house standard curve. Additionally, positive ZIKV RNA samples were tested for anti-ZIKV immunoglobulin (Ig)M and anti-ZIKV IgG. Of the 1393 blood samples, ZIKV RNA was detected in 37 (n = 37/1393; 2.7%). The median infection viral load detected was 7714 copies/mL (ranging from 135-124,220 copies/mL). The majority of the positive samples (70.3%) exhibited a viral load of approximately 103 copies/mL. Six samples that were positive for ZIKV RNA were also positive for anti-ZIKV IgM and IgG (n = 6/37; 13.5%). This is the first study evaluating the prevalence of ZIKV RNA among Brazilian blood donors, which was relatively high and might lead to TT-ZIKV infection. It is unclear whether the simultaneous presence of anti-ZIKV IgM and IgG in RNA-positive donations or the viral load influences transfusion transmission of the infection. This study also adds to the global understanding of ZIKV prevalence in blood donors during outbreaks and the transfusion impact of the infection. © 2017 AABB.

  11. Transfusion Transmissible Infections Among Walk-In Blood Donors at Kisumu Regional Blood Transfusion Centre, Kisumu County, Kenya, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamamba, Dominic; Onyango, Dickens; Oyugi, Elvis; Kanyina, Evalyne; Obonyo, Mark; Githuku, Jane; Ransom, James

    2017-11-08

    Transfusion transmissible infections (TTIs) are threats to blood safety. This study investigated TTIs among volunteer blood donors at the Kisumu Regional Blood Transfusion Centre (KRBTC) in Kenya. We performed a retrospective record review of blood donor registers at KRBTC, 2015. Walk-in donors accepted for donation were analyzed to determine prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and syphilis. Descriptive and associative statistics were calculated using Microsoft Excel and Open-Epi software. The records of a total of 3690 walk-in donors were reviewed, and 2046 were included in the analysis. Mean age was 30 ± 9.6 years, 76% male, 51% married, and 80% were Kisumu residents. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis was 2.4%, 3.1%, 2.3%, and 1%, respectively. HBV was the most common TTI among the volunteers. KRBTC should be proactive and address issues of donor self-exclusion, strict adherence to donor selection criteria, and vaccination.

  12. Risk-behavior reporting by blood donors with an automated telephone system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Richard; Lam, Tai Hing; Hedley, Anthony

    2006-02-01

    Donor risk-behavior assessment is important for blood safety. Few evaluations of automated telephone systems for eliciting risk exposure among voluntary blood donors have been reported. A modified risk-behavior questionnaire was presented after donation via an automated telephone polling system to 805 of 15,092 Hong Kong Chinese voluntary blood donors. Risk-behavior rates were compared to those of all other donors (14,287) simultaneously completing the questionnaire in a pencil-and-paper format. The telephone group included proportionally more women (46.3% vs. 44.9%), previous donors (93.3% vs. 83.6%), and sexually inactive donors (66.5% vs. 71.2%) with lower educational achievement (60.7% vs. 54.5%). The telephone group demonstrated fewer missing data (mean 1.3%, range 0.4%-3.1% vs. mean 9.8%, range 8.0%-14.2%) and more complete demographic detailing, probably accounting for the demographic differences. The telephone group reported higher prevalence rates of needle or syringe sharing (1.5% vs. 0.3%), homosexual and/or bisexual intercourse (4.1% vs. 1.3%), knowing or suspecting that partner had intercourse with another during past year (12.4% vs. 8.5%), and future intention to use blood donation as a means to test for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; 19.1% vs. 13.7%). There was no difference in knowledge of the HIV window period or proportions visiting or using condoms with commercial sex workers between telephone and pencil-and-paper groups. This survey with automated telephone screening of potential blood donors revealed increased reporting of risk exposure relative to commonly used paper-and-pencil methods. This raises questions of possible underreporting of risk among blood donors screened by paper questionnaire and perhaps face-to-face interview.

  13. Sero - Prevalence of Viral Transfusion-transmissible Infections amongst voluntary Blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashida Elrashid Mohamed Ali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the Sero-prevalence of viral transfusion-transmissible Infectious diseases among blood donors, namely immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and C transmissible infections (TTIs like HBV, HCV. HIV (Human immune viruses.. sero-prevalence of viral transmissible infections. The donated blood for specific antibodies for infections agents. Can largely reduce the risk of TTIs, virus among blood donors. The study was carried out in the blood bank at Khartoum Teaching Hospital, centre, Sudan. Screening of blood samples for hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV Antibodies were done using (ELISA enzyme link immunoassay. The study included (1184 voluntary Blood donors, all were males. The overall prevalence of viral transfusion transmissible Infections were (11.84%. The sero-prevalence for antibody against HIV (6 and hepatitis C Virus was positive in 8 (0.06 and (0.08% donors respectively while HBsAg was detected in 98 (9.8% donors.  situation that need for strict criteria for selection of blood donors and also methods of laboratory assays. Services are high in Sudan due to the endemicity of infections like malaria, nutritional problem and obstetrical emergencies associated with blood loss. Little is known about the level of these infections in Sudan so; this study was conducted to investigate the sero-prevalence of transfusion transmissible viral infectious diseases in particular human B and hepatitis Immunodeficiency, hepatitis C viruses. The mode of transmission for HIV, HBV and HCV is the same and includes unsafe Sexual sharp materials Contact, using contaminated with body fluid, mother to Child and transfusion of blood and blood Products.

  14. Adverse reactions in voluntary whole blood donors: Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Whole blood donation, generally considered as a safe procedure, may be sometimes associated with adverse reactions and injuries of variable severity during or after the blood donation process. There are few reports of adverse events related to blood donation in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

  15. Comparison of Stored Umbilical Cord Blood and Adult Donor Blood: Transfusion Feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Sahyoun-tokan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the storage properties of red blood cell (RBC concentrates of umbilical cord blood (UCB and adult donor blood (ADB, and to evaluate the feasibility of UCB-RBC concentrate as an autologous source for blood transfusion in very low birth weight (VLBW preterm neonates. METHODS: In all, 30 newborn (10 preterm, 20 full term UCB and 31 ADB units were collected. RBC concentrates were stored and compared with regard to pH, potassium (K+, 2,3-biphosphoglycerate (2-3-BPG, adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP, plasma Hb, and bacterial contamination on d 1, 21, and 35 of storage. RESULTS: The K+ level increased with time and differed significantly between storage d 1 and 21, and between storage d 1 and 35 in both the UCB and ADB units. Initial and d 21 K+ levels were higher in the UCB units than in the ADB units. The 2,3-BPG level did not differ significantly between the UCB-PRC and ADB-PRC samples. After 35 d of storage both UCB-PRC and ADB-PRC samples exhibited significant differences from the initial free Hb, intracellular ATP, and pH values. Significant differences in intracellular ATP and pH were also observed between the UCB-PRC and ADB-PRC samples. CONCLUSION: The volume of harvested and prepared UCB-PRC can be used for some of the blood transfusions required during the neonatal period and thus may decrease the number of allogeneic transfusions, especially in preterm newborns. The hematological and biochemical changes that occurred in UCB during storage were comparable with those observed in ADB, and do not pose a risk to the immature metabolism of neonates. UCB-RPC prepared and stored under standard conditions can be a safe alternative RBC source for transfusions in VLBW newborns.

  16. Context and social perceptions of blood donation in donors found positive for human immunodeficiency virus in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, Alice; Danic, Bruno; Santos, Aurélie; Martinaud, Christophe; Woimant, Geneviève; Laperche, Syria; Tiberghien, Pierre; Jauffret-Roustide, Marie; Pillonel, Josiane

    2017-09-01

    In France, information collected during postdonation interviews showed that a majority of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected donors were not eligible to donate as per donor selection criteria. In the interest of blood safety, this study aimed to explore the mechanisms of noncompliance with blood donor selection criteria, notably the permanent deferral of men who have sex with men (MSM). Semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 32 blood donors found positive for HIV between mid-2011 and 2014. Topics such as the experience and motivations for donating blood, understanding of selection criteria, sexual risk management, and opinions on donor selection were discussed. Transcripts were analyzed inductively. More than 50% of study participants were noncompliant with donor selection criteria. Reasons for nondisclosure of risk factors in the predonation questionnaire or the predonation interview included stigma, test-seeking motivations, symbolic attachment to blood donation, and context of donation. Compliance to donor criteria was seen as secondary by donors who reaped personal benefits from the symbolism of their donation. Donors lacked self-reflexivity in their assessment of risky sexual behavior. The "window period" and the underlying epidemiologic arguments for donor selection criteria were poorly understood. Nearly all participants disapproved of the permanent ban on blood donations from MSM. This study demonstrated the need for more communication on the epidemiologic basis for donor selection criteria and on the window period to facilitate donor compliance. These findings have already advanced improvements to predonation documents, in a larger context of 2016 donor selection criteria revision. © 2017 AABB.

  17. Brazilian blood donation eligibility criteria for dermatologic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambier, Carlos Gustavo; Pereira, Caroline Silva; Prado Júnior, Benedito de Pina Almeida; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2012-01-01

    A focused and commented review on the impact of dermatologic diseases and interventions in the solidary act of donating blood is presented to dermatologists to better advise their patients. This is a review of current Brazilian technical regulations on hemotherapeutic procedures as determined by Ministerial Directive #1353/2011 by the Ministry of Health and current internal regulations of the Hemotherapy Center of Ribeirão Preto, a regional reference center in hemotherapeutic procedures. Criteria for permanent inaptitude: autoimmune diseases (>1 organ involved), personal history of cancer other than basal cell carcinoma, severe atopic dermatitis or psoriasis, pemphigus foliaceus, porphyrias, filariasis, leprosy, extra pulmonary tuberculosis or paracoccidioidomycosis, and previous use of etretinate. Drugs that impose temporary ineligibility: other systemic retinoids, systemic corticosteroids, 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors, vaccines, methotrexate, beta-blockers, minoxidil, anti-epileptic, and anti-psychotic drugs. Other conditions that impose temporary ineligibility: occupational accident with biologic material, piercing, tattoo, sexually transmitted diseases, herpes, and bacterial infections, among others. Thalidomide is currently missing in the teratogenic drugs list. Although finasteride was previously considered a drug that imposed permanent inaptitude, according to its short halflife current restriction of 1 month is still too long. Dermatologists should be able to advise their patients about proper timing to donate blood, and discuss the impact of drug withdrawal on treatment outcomes and to respect the designated washout periods.

  18. The heterogeneous HLA genetic composition of the Brazilian population and its relevance to the optimization of hematopoietic stem cell donor recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabreti-Oliveira, R A; Nascimento, E; Fonseca, C G; Santos, M A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecular variation across the Brazilian population in order to determine possible regional differences, which would be highly relevant to optimizing donor recruitment strategies in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and understanding the population genetic background of this heterogeneous country. HLA data of 551 HSCT donors from five Brazilian regions were characterized by high-resolution DNA alleles at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 loci and compared with other populations in Brazil and worldwide populations. Allele and haplotype frequencies were estimated. The analysis was performed to assess Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) among different loci in each recruitment center. Genetic variation was explored through genetic distance analyzed by using a new algorithm based on linear algebra, taking into account geographic regions of Brazil. The results indicated a heterogeneous genetic composition of the Brazilian population, such that HLA allele and haplotype frequencies exhibit different distributions among Brazilian regions, which has important implications for donor matching. In addition, a pronounced differentiation was observed by the absence of clustering of the regional populations in the reduced-dimension space. These data may be useful for increasing donor recruitment with more genetic representativeness in the Brazilian Volunteer Bone Marrow Donors Registry (REDOME). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Absence of Serological Evidence of West Nile Virus in Blood Donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne virus that circulates among avians, but can also affect other species, particularly humans and horses. The virus is transmissible via blood transfusion. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of the West Nile virus among blood donors in Nigeria. Materials and ...

  20. Seroprevalence study of HTLV-1 and 2 in prospective blood donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was an association between Sexually transmitted Diseases (STD) and previous blood transfusion with HTLV positivity. No pregnant women tested positive to HTLV. There were no cases of co-infection of HIV with HTLV. Conclusion: The results suggest low prevalence of HTLV in blood donors and pregnant women in ...

  1. Screening of blood donors for chronic Coxiella burnetii infection after large Q fever outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, Ed; Hogema, Boris M.; Molier, Michel; Zaaijer, Hans L.

    2014-01-01

    The Netherlands experienced major Q fever outbreaks from 2007 through 2009. An increasing number of human chronic Q fever cases has been reported in the affected area. Blood donors unaware of chronic Coxiella burnetii infection might be infectious for transfusion recipients. Local blood donations

  2. HIV-Sero- prevalence trend among blood donors in North East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... to the community that increase the disease burden, and can pose additional financial burden for diagnosis and treatment of these diseases.20,21 To ensure the safety and adequacy of the national blood supply in Ethiopia, mo- bilization and recruitment of low-risk, non-remunerated blood donors and ...

  3. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeven, Loan R; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K; Kemper, Peter; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-08-04

    Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion recipients are linked. This paper describes the design of the data warehouse, challenges and illustrative applications. Quantitative data on blood donors (eg, age, blood group, antibodies) and products (type of product, processing, storage time) are obtained from the national blood bank. These are linked to data on the transfusion recipients (eg, transfusions administered, patient diagnosis, surgical procedures, laboratory parameters), which are extracted from hospital electronic health records. Expected scientific contributions are illustrated for 4 applications: determine risk factors, predict blood use, benchmark blood use and optimise process efficiency. For each application, examples of research questions are given and analyses planned. The DTD project aims to build a national, continuously updated transfusion data warehouse. These data have a wide range of applications, on the donor/production side, recipient studies on blood usage and benchmarking and donor-recipient studies, which ultimately can contribute to the efficiency and safety of blood transfusion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. P. falciparum malaria prevalence among blood donors in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouriba, B; Diarra, A B; Douyon, I; Diabaté, D T; Kamissoko, F; Guitteye, H; Baby, M; Guindo, M A; Doumbo, O K

    2017-06-01

    Malaria parasite is usually transmitted to humans by Anopheles mosquitoes but it can also be transmitted through blood transfusion. Usually malaria transmission is low in African urban settings. In West Africa where the P. falciparum is the most predominant malaria species, there are limited measures to reduce the risk of blood transfusion malaria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of P. falciparum malaria carriage among blood donors in the National Blood Center of Bamako, capital city of Mali. The study was conducted using a random sample of 946 blood donors in Bamako, Mali, from January to December 2011. Screening for malaria was performed by thick smear and rapid diagnostic test (RDT). Blood group was typed by Beth-Vincent and Simonin techniques. The frequency of malaria infection was 1.4% by thick smear and 0.8% by the RDT. The pick prevalence of P. falciparum malaria was in rainy season, indicating a probable high seasonal risk of malaria by blood transfusion, in Mali. The prevalence of P. falciparum infection was 2% among donors of group O the majority being in this group. There is a seasonal prevalence of malaria among blood donors in Bamako. A prevention strategy of transfusion malaria based on the combination of selection of blood donors through the medical interview, promoting a voluntary low-risk blood donation and screening all blood bags intended to be transfused to children under 5, pregnant women and immune-compromised patients during transmission season using thick smear will reduce the risk of transfusion malaria in Mali. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Sero-prevalence of brucellosis among blood donors in Ahvaz, Southwest Iran

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    Abdolhussein Shakurnia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify sero-prevalence of brucellosis among blood donors in Ahvaz city, Southwest Iran. Methods: A total number of 1 450 serum samples from blood donation were collected and were screened for the presence of brucella antibody. Rose Bengal Plate Test, Standard Agglutination Test (SAT, and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME agglutination were tested in the sample. SAT dilution ≥1/80 and 2ME agglutination ≥1/40 were considered positive. Results: Sero-prevalence of brucellosis among the blood donors was 0.70%, 0.34%, and 0.20% by Rose Bengal Plate Test, SAT, and 2ME respectively. Conclusions: Considering the 1/80 titer of SAT as the criteria of contamination with brucella, routine screening of sero-prevalence of brucella in blood donors is not recommended in this area.

  6. Associations of health status with subsequent blood donor behavior-An alternative perspective on the Healthy Donor Effect from Donor InSight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hurk, Katja; Zalpuri, Saurabh; Prinsze, Femmeke J.; Merz, Eva-Maria; de Kort, Wim L. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    In donor health research, the 'Healthy Donor Effect' (HDE) often biases study results and hampers their interpretation. This refers to the fact that donors are a selected 'healthier' subset of a population due to both donor selection procedures and self-selection. Donors with long versus short donor

  7. [Prevalence of and risk factors for hepatitis C in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladrón-de Guevara, Laura; Gómez, Nicolás; Vázquez-Cantarell, Mariana; García-Méndez, Sergio; Di Silvio, Mauricio

    2002-01-01

    Determine hepatitis C prevalence and risk factors in blood donors from the Blood Bank at the Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre ISSSTE, in Mexico City. A total of 41,957 blood donors were included in the study was done from January 1996 to August 2000. To study risk factors, a case-control study cases were defined as blood donors with repeatedly positive anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) ELISA test. Controls were defined as blood donors with negative anti-HCV ELISA test. All cases were interviewed a second time on HCV infection-associated risk factors. Odd ratio (OR) and confidence interval 95% (CI 95%) were calculated for each risk factoring in a univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed subsequents to determine the independent contribution or each risk factor. HCV crude total prevalence was 0.84%. Risk factors were found in 36.16% anti-HCV-positive blood donors. During the second interview, 30% of sero-positive blood donors recalled one or more risk factors they previously denied. The most important risk factors, found were as follows sexual relations with prostitutes (OR 7.48, CI 95% 1.43-38.92) transfusion (OR 6, CI 95% 2.62-13.72); nasal cocaine use (OR 8.89, CI 95%, 1.01-86.89); dental surgery (OR 8.89, CI 95% 1.01-86.89) and contact with hepatitis-infected subject (OR 3.01, CI 95% 1.17-7.70). Other risk factors did not show a significant association. In this study, we found a crude total prevalence of 0.84%, very close to the prevalence reported in Mexican population by the National Center for Blood Transfusion.

  8. [Prevalence for seropositivity for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-López, María Rebeca F; Zavala-Méndez, Celia; Arenas-Esqueda, Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    Despite utilizing different actions to render blood safe for transfusions, we continue to have the risk of transmitting some viral infections. For this reason, it is important to determine prevalence of infections due to HIV and hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses in blood donors. Previous studies from Mexico indicate that HIV prevalence is 0.01 to 0.13%, while it is 0.11 to 1.22% for hepatitis B, and for hepatitis C, prevalence is 0.47 to 1.47%. We are checking the results of the screening tests (ELISA 3rd generation and chemiluminescent immunoassays) from blood donors studied at the Central Blood Bank (Banco Central de Sangre) at the Mexican Institute of Social Security's (IMSS) Twentieth First Century National Medical Center in Mexico City from 1995 to 2002. Reactive results were studied by confirmatory tests, Western Blot for HIV, AgHBs neutralization test for hepatitis B, and RIBA-HCV3.0 for hepatitis C. Reactive results from 513,062 blood donors confirmed for HV were 0.07%, reactive results and confirmation of hepatitis B from 511,733 blood donors were 0.13%, and reactive results and confirmation of hepatitis C from 511,115 blood donors were 0.31%. Rates obtained are low when compared with results of previous studies in Mexico for HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. It may be possible than these low rates indicate the positive impact obtained from preventive actions, better strategies of detection of blood donors with high risk, and the advantage of working with a fully automated test system with state-of-the-art technology.

  9. Blood donor deferral: time for change? An evidence-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borra V

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vere Borra,1 Giovani Vandewalle,1 Hans Van Remoortel,1 Veerle Compernolle,1,2 Emmy De Buck,1 Philippe Vandekerckhove1–31Belgian Red Cross-Flanders, Mechelen, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Ghent, Ghent, 3Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, KU Leuven, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: Donor selection remains an important part in the safety of the blood supply all over the world. Yet, donor deferral criteria seem to be strongly based on the precautionary principle protecting safety and quality, and on supply and expense considerations. This review therefore provides an overview of the available evidence on donor exclusion criteria, as well as on their cost-effectiveness, for the most frequent reasons of donor deferral in our region. PubMed was queried to retrieve primary research studies, systematic reviews, and health technology assessments (HTAs concerning donor exclusion criteria. With a similar approach, HTAs about the different blood-banking safety interventions were included. Reasons for donor deferral were recorded via the blood bank information system of the Belgian Red Cross-Flanders. Seven systematic reviews were identified: four on donor safety (hypotension, hypertension/type 2 diabetes, epilepsy, and higher age and three on recipient safety (hemochromatosis, men who have sex with men, and endoscopy. Forty-three low-quality observational studies were included, as well as 16 HTAs: three about donor exclusion criteria and 13 cost-utility analyses about blood-banking safety interventions. In general, the available evidence for deferral reasons was of low quality, and for 60% of the top 30 reasons for excluding donors, no evidence was found. Blood banking shows its unique position as many safety measures far exceed the normally accepted cost of €50,000/quality-adjusted life-years. The historical model based on the precautionary principle and on supply and expense considerations provides adequate supplies of

  10. Tattoos and transfusion-transmitted disease risk: implications for the screening of blood donors in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio de A. Nishioka

    Full Text Available Having a tattoo has been associated with serological evidence of hepatitis B and C viruses, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infections and syphilis; all of these are known to be transmissible by blood transfusion. These associations are of higher magnitude for individuals with nonprofessionally-applied tattoos and with two or more tattoos. Tattoos are common among drug addicts and prisoners, conditions that are also associated with transfusion-transmitted diseases. We examined the implications of these associations for the screening of blood donors in Brazil. Numbers of individuals who would be correctly or unnecessarily deferred from blood donation on the basis of the presence of tattoos, and on their number and type, were calculated for different prevalence situations based on published odds ratios. If having a tattoo was made a deferral criterion, cost savings (due to a reduced need for laboratory testing and subsequent follow-up would accrue at the expense of the deferral of appropriate donors. Restricting deferral to more `at-risk' sub-groups of tattooed individuals would correctly defer less individuals and would also reduce the numbers of potential donors unnecessarily deferred. Key factors in balancing cost savings and unnecessary deferrals include the magnitude of the pool of blood donors in the population, the prevalence of individuals with tattoos and the `culture' of tattoos in the population. Tattoos can therefore be an efficient criterion for the screening of blood donors in certain settings, a finding that requires corroboration from larger population-based studies.

  11. Knowledge, Attitudes and Motivations Among Blood Donors in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalez, Thelma T.; Sabino, Ester C.; Chen, Sanny; Salles, Nanci Alves; Chamone, Dalton A. F.; McFarland, Willi; Murphy, Edward L.

    2013-01-01

    Recruiting safe, volunteer blood donors requires understanding motivations for donating and knowledge and attitudes about HIV. We surveyed 1,600 persons presenting for blood donation at a large blood bank in São Paulo, Brazil using a self-administered, structured questionnaire, and classified motivations into three domains as well as categorizing persons by HIV test-seeking behavior. Motivations, in descending order, and their significant associations were: “altruism”: female gender, volunteer donor and repeat donor status; “direct appeal”: female gender, repeat donor status and age 21–50 years; “self-interest”: male gender, age under 20 years, first-time donor status and lower education. HIV test-seekers were more likely to give incorrect answers regarding HIV risk behavior and blood donation and the ability of antibody testing to detect recent HIV infections. Altruism is the main motivator for blood donation in Brazil; other motivators were associated with specific demographic subgroups. HIV test-seeking might be reduced by educational interventions. PMID:18389356

  12. Blood donation and cardiovascular disease. Addressing the healthy donor effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peffer, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the possible protective effect of frequent blood donation on cardiovascular disease was studied. Previous research has shown that high iron stores could have damaging effects on developing cardiovascular disease, and that blood donation lowers iron stores. Lowering iron stores

  13. Hepatitis C virus antibodies among blood donors in Jos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the hepatitis agents known to be transmitted through blood and blood products. Hepatitis C virus has been implicated as a major cause of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. This study was, therefore, undertaken with the objective of determining the ...

  14. Hepatitis B Viral Markers in Surface Antigen Negative Blood Donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 20 who were anti-HBc positive, seven had tattoo/traditional marks on their body and one had previous history of blood transfusion. Conclusion: This study has shown that some potential blood units containing HBV are being transfused to patients unknowingly by screening for HBsAg only. Screening for other markers ...

  15. Malaria Infection Among Blood Donors in Onitsha Urban, Southeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood safety is a major issue of global concern in transfusion medicine especially in developing countries, where national blood transfusion policies and services as well as financial resources are lacking or inadequate. Transfusion-transmitted malaria is a potential health hazard but is often neglected in many malarious ...

  16. Hepatitis B Viral Markers in Surface Antigen Negative Blood Donors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    seven had tattoo/traditional marks on their body and one had previous history of blood transfusion. CONCLUSION: This study has shown that some potential blood units containing HBV are being transfused to patients unknowingly by screening for HBsAg only. Screening for other markers of hepatitis B virus may increase ...

  17. Transfusion safety in francophone African countries: an analysis of strategies for the medical selection of blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagny, Claude Tayou; Kouao, Maxime Diané; Touré, Hamane; Gargouri, Jalel; Fazul, Ahamada Said; Ouattara, Siaka; Anani, Ludovic; Othmani, Habiba; Feteke, Lochina; Dahourou, Honorine; Mbensa, Guy Olivier; Molé, Simplice; Nébié, Yacouba; Mbangue, Madeleine; Toukam, Michel; Boulahi, Mahommed Ould; Andriambelo, Lalatiana Valisoa; Rakoto, Olivat; Baby, Mounirou; Yahaya, Rakia; Bokilo, Amelia; Senyana, Florent; Mbanya, Dora; Shiboski, Caroline; Murphy, Edward L; Lefrère, Jean Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The goal of selecting a healthy blood donor is to safeguard donors and reduce the risks of infections and immunologic complications for recipients. To evaluate the blood donor selection process, a survey was conducted in 28 blood transfusion centers located in 15 francophone African countries. Data collected included availability of blood products, risk factors for infection identified among blood donor candidates, the processing of the information collected before blood collection, the review process for the medical history of blood donor candidates, and deferral criteria for donor candidates. During the year 2009, participating transfusion centers identified 366,924 blood donor candidates. A mean of 13% (range, 0%-36%) of the donor candidates were excluded based solely on their medical status. The main risk factors for blood-borne infections were having multiple sex partners, sexual intercourse with occasional partners, and religious scarification. Most transfusion centers collected this information verbally instead of having a written questionnaire. The topics least addressed were the possible complications relating to the donation, religious scarifications, and history of sickle cell anemia and hemorrhage. Only three centers recorded the temperature of the blood donors. The deferral criteria least reported were sickle cell anemia, piercing, scarification, and tattoo. The medical selection process was not performed systemically and thoroughly enough, given the regional epidemiologic risks. It is essential to identify the risk factors specific to francophone African countries and modify the current medical history questionnaires to develop a more effective and relevant selection process. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkla, Sip; Peppelman, Malou; Van Der Raadt, Jori; Atsma, Femke; Novotný, Vera M J; Van Kraaij, Marian G J; Joosten, Irma; Bosman, Giel J C G M

    2014-04-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The susceptibility of red blood cells to stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage. Phosphatidylserine exposure may, therefore, constitute a link between donor variation and the quality of red blood cell concentrates. In order to examine the relationship between storage parameters and donor characteristics, the percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was measured in red blood cell concentrates during storage and in fresh red blood cells from blood bank donors. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was compared with red blood cell susceptibility to osmotic stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure in vitro, with the regular red blood cell concentrate quality parameters, and with the donor characteristics age, body mass index, haemoglobin level, gender and blood group. Phosphatidylserine exposure varies between donors, both on red blood cells freshly isolated from the blood, and on red blood cells in red blood cell concentrates. Phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage time, and is correlated with stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. Increased phosphatidylserine exposure during storage was found to be associated with haemolysis and vesicle concentration in red blood cell concentrates. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells showed a positive correlation with the plasma haemoglobin concentration of the donor. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells is a parameter of red blood cell integrity in red blood cell concentrates and may be an indicator of red blood cell survival after transfusion. Measurement of phosphatidylserine exposure may be useful in the selection of donors and

  19. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkla, Sip; Peppelman, Malou; van der Raadt, Jori; Atsma, Femke; Novotný, Vĕra M.J.; van Kraaij, Marian G.J.; Joosten, Irma; Bosman, Giel J.C.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The susceptibility of red blood cells to stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage. Phosphatidylserine exposure may, therefore, constitute a link between donor variation and the quality of red blood cell concentrates. Materials and methods In order to examine the relationship between storage parameters and donor characteristics, the percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was measured in red blood cell concentrates during storage and in fresh red blood cells from blood bank donors. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was compared with red blood cell susceptibility to osmotic stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure in vitro, with the regular red blood cell concentrate quality parameters, and with the donor characteristics age, body mass index, haemoglobin level, gender and blood group. Results Phosphatidylserine exposure varies between donors, both on red blood cells freshly isolated from the blood, and on red blood cells in red blood cell concentrates. Phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage time, and is correlated with stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. Increased phosphatidylserine exposure during storage was found to be associated with haemolysis and vesicle concentration in red blood cell concentrates. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells showed a positive correlation with the plasma haemoglobin concentration of the donor. Discussion The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells is a parameter of red blood cell integrity in red blood cell concentrates and may be an indicator of red blood cell survival after transfusion. Measurement of phosphatidylserine

  20. Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Using Reticulocyte Indices in Dogs Enrolled in a Blood Donor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, D S; Friedrichs, K R; Bach, J F

    2015-01-01

    People donating blood more than twice annually are at risk of developing iron deficiency. Little is known about the iron status of dogs enrolled in blood donor programs. Dogs donating blood ≥6 times annually will show evidence of iron deficiency based on their reticulocyte indices. Thirteen dogs enrolled in a blood donor program donating ≥6 times over the preceding 12 months and 20 healthy nondonor control dogs. Prospective observational study. Mature red blood cell (RBC) indices, reticulocyte indices, serum iron, serum ferritin, and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) were compared between groups. Packed cell volume (median 47%, range 40-52%, P blood donor dogs. No statistically significant differences were noted in the mature RBC indices between groups. Both reticulocyte mean corpuscular volume (median 88.8 fL, range 83.4-95.5 fL, P = .03) and reticulocyte hemoglobin content (median 24.6 pg, range 23.1-26.6 pg, P blood donor group. Serum iron and ferritin were similar between groups; however, TIBC was significantly higher in the control group (median 403 μg/dL, range 225-493 μg/dL, P = .02). The findings in dogs donating ≥6 times annually suggest the presence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis in this population. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. A motivational interview promotes retention of blood donors with high internal motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Christopher R; France, Janis L; Carlson, Bruce W; Himawan, Lina K; Kessler, Debra A; Rebosa, Mark; Shaz, Beth H; Madden, Katrala; Carey, Patricia M; Slepian, P Maxwell; Ankawi, Brett; Livitz, Irina E; Fox, Kristen R

    2017-10-01

    Based on the hypothesis that self-determined motivation is associated with an increased likelihood of future behavior, the present study examined the ability of a motivational interview to promote internal motivation for giving blood and future donation attempts. A sample of 484 recent whole-blood and double red blood cell donors (62.4% female; age = 30.2 ± 11.8 years) were randomly assigned to either a telephone-delivered motivational interview or a control call approximately 6 weeks after donating. Several weeks before the call and again 1 week after the call, participants completed the Blood Donor Identity Survey, a multidimensional measure of donor motivation, to derive indices of amotivation, external motivation, and internal motivation to give blood. Repeat donation attempts were tracked using blood center records. Relative to controls, participants in the motivational interview group showed a shift toward more self-determined motivation, as indicated by significant decreases in amotivation (p = 0.01) and significant increases in external (p = 0.009) and internal (p = 0.002) motivation. Furthermore, those with initially high levels of autonomous motivation were more likely to make a donation attempt in the subsequent year if they completed the motivational interview (71.1%) versus the control call (55.1%). Motivational interviewing is a potentially useful strategy to enhance retention of existing blood donors, particularly among those who express a greater sense of internal motivation for giving. © 2017 AABB.

  2. Seroprevalence of Cytomegalovirus in blood donors in the northwest of Iran

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    Jamal Eivazi-Ziaei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytomegalovirus (CMV is the causal agent of infection in immunocompromised patients andtransplant recipients, or those patients who receive blood transfusion frequently. Seroprevalence of CMV has beenreported to be highest in South America, Africa, and Asia, and lowest in Western Europe and United States. Datareferring to the prevalence of anti-CMV antibody among healthy people in Iran is scanty, but its incidence may reach100% among blood donors and recipients, likely due to condensed population and socio-economic status. METHODS: The blood specimens of 200 volunteer donors were tested through ELISA for anti-CMV immunoglobulinG (IgG and immunoglobulin M (IgM antibodies in our hospital. RESULTS: According to these analyses, 98.5% and 85% of the specimens were found to be positive for anti-CMV IgGand IgM antibodies, respectively. This study shows that like other regions, anti-CMV seropositivity is high in Iran andblood transfusion is an important route of CMV spread. CONCLUSIONS: Since up to 95% of blood donors in Iran are seropositive for CMV, it would seem superfluous toscreen blood donors for CMV, as few seronegative blood units would be available for transfusion. Leukoreductioncould be a more appropriate and cost-effective prevention of transmission of CMV through infected blood in Iran.

  3. Effectiveness of blood donor questionnaire directed at risk factor for transfusion transmitted infections in Pakistani population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuzhat Salamat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deferring blood donors who admit to high-risk behavior on questioning are likely to eliminate those in window period for transfusion transmitted infections (TTI. However, many questions have been implemented in some countries as part of donor history questionnaire, based on precautionary principle and not on evidence, and can result in increased donor losses. This study aims to identify effective risk-directed questions having high predictive value, in local context which can form part of blood donor deferral policies. For this, a case control study in a hospital blood bank having donation services was carried out prospectively over a period of three years. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty donors, who were repeatedly reactive for HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV with EIA, and syphilis with TPHA, were the cases. Eight hundred and eighty four controls were the donors who tested negative for all TTI test. All donors answered seven hepatitis risk directed questions and their responses and reactivity status for TTI were used for statistical analysis with SPSS ver. 15. Results: Positive predictive value for history of jaundice at any age for HBsAg was 20%, while PPV for history of surgery in previous six months for both HBsAg and anti-HCVHCV was also around 20%, based on pretest probability of 7%. The post-test probability for these questions was around 30%. Odds ratios with 95% CI did not reveal any significant association of hepatitis with any of seven questions. Donor losses after deferring on basis of two questions were 5.3% per year, while deferral rate after all seven questions was 20%. Conclusions: Donors should be permanently deferred if there is history of jaundice at any age, while deferral period after surgery should be one year. Other risk-directed questions should not be used to defer donors. Donor deferral policies should be evidence based and questions with proven efficacy should be made part of donor history

  4. Blood donor notification and counseling: Our experience from a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvershi Kotwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the response rate of transfusion-transmissible infection (TTI-reactive donors after notification of their abnormal test results for the year 2012. Materials and Methods: This study is an observational descriptive study performed in our department over a period of 1 year. We evaluated the response rate of TTI-reactive donors after notification of their abnormal test results over 1 year as per the existing strategy (three telephonic and two postal communications. Results: During the study period, among the annual donation of 15,322 units, 464 blood donors were found to be seroreactive. Of these 464 seroreactive cases, 47 were HIV positive, 284 were reactive for Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, 49 were Hepatitis C (HCV positive and 84 were VDRL reactive. The TTI-reactive donors (464 for various markers were contacted: 229 (49.4% telephonically and the remaining 235 (50.6% not contacted on phone were informed by post. Of the 229 contacted donors, the response rate was 98.2% as only 225 donors reported (221 on the first, three on second and one on the third call for one to one counseling. The remaining four non-responders were - one HIV and three HBsAg reactive. The remaining 235 (50.6% reactive donors did not respond to any communication. Conclusion: Donor notification and post-donation counseling are an essential aspect of the blood bank that entails provision of information on serological status, assess the impact of test results on the donor and finally referral for medical care. As in our data only 49.4% of the blood donors could be contacted successfully, incomplete demographic details was the major limiting factor in communicating with rest. Of the 229 contacted donors, the response rate was 98.2%. A large majority (94.75% of the notified donors in our study contacted their health care provider when given clear instructions to do so. These results are encouraging because they indicate that a major element of the

  5. Re-donation intentions among experienced blood donors: does gender make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Janis L; France, Christopher R; Himawan, Lina K

    2008-04-01

    Path analysis was used to examine sex differences in motivation for repeat donation among experienced blood donors. Results confirm the importance of constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior (e.g., donation attitude, subjective norm, personal moral norm, and donation self-efficacy) and of prior donation experience (e.g., vasovagal symptoms, overall satisfaction) as significant predictors of donation intention. Importantly, the findings also indicate that a consideration of sex differences in donor motivations results in a better prediction model and suggests a framework of possible avenues where interventions could be expected to improve donor return rates.

  6. Application of information technology may increase the efficacy of Confidential Unit Exclusion (CUE) in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalian, Mehrdad; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    Confidential Unit Exclusion (CUE) refers to a procedure by which a blood donor designates confidentially whether his or her blood might not be safe for transfusion. It applies to situations in which an individual who is not eligible for blood donation in terms of blood safety feel pressured by others to donate his or her blood. A potential problem in the CUE system is misunderstanding of the procedure and its significance by blood donors as well as the lack of their confidence regarding the confidentiality of their private information. Since the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) provides a secure and confidential atmosphere, it is expected the application of ICT have a positive impact on the efficacy of CUE system.

  7. Female donors and donors who are lighter than their recipient are less likely to meet the CD34+ cell dose requested for peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billen, Annelies; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Szydlo, Richard M; Shaw, Bronwen E

    2014-11-01

    It is of clinical relevance to recognize donors who are unlikely to meet the requested stem cell dose for transplantation, as this group may benefit from an alternative mobilization regimen. This study was performed to evaluate the frequency of unrelated donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collections that meet the target yield and the impact of donor factors on this. All sequential PBSC collections facilitated by the national registry (n = 323) from January through December 2011 were analyzed. Donor factors analyzed included age, sex, weight, and presence of a central line. In univariate analyses, we found that reaching the target yield was significantly associated with a higher donor weight (85.6 kg vs. 75.3 kg, p meeting the transplant physician's requested dose. New strategies to improve mobilization in such donors are needed. These findings may also impact future donor recruitment strategies. © 2014 AABB.

  8. Improving blood donor recruitment and retention: integrating theoretical advances from social and behavioral science research agendas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Eamonn; France, Christopher R; Abraham, Charles; Ditto, Blaine; Sheeran, Paschal

    2007-11-01

    Increasing blood donor recruitment and retention is of key importance to transfusion services. Research within the social and behavioral science traditions has adopted separate but complementary approaches to addressing these issues. This article aims to review both of these types of literature, examine theoretical developments, identify commonalities, and offer a means to integrate these within a single intervention approach. The social and behavioral science literature on blood donor recruitment and retention focusing on theory, interventions, and integration is reviewed. The role of emotional regulation (anticipated anxiety and vasovagal reactions) is central to both the behavioral and the social science approaches to enhancing donor motivation, yet although intentions are the best predictor of donor behavior, interventions targeting enactment of intentions have not been used to increase donation. Implementation intentions (that is, if-then plans formed in advance of acting) provide a useful technique to integrate findings from social and behavioral sciences to increase donor recruitment and retention. After reviewing the literature, implementation intention formation is proposed as a technique to integrate the key findings and theories from the behavioral and social science literature on blood donor recruitment and retention.

  9. Mortality among blood donors seropositive and seronegative for Chagas disease (1996-2000) in São Paulo, Brazil: A death certificate linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuani, Ligia; Bierrenbach, Ana Luiza; Pereira Alencar, Airlane; Mendrone, Alfredo; Ferreira, João Eduardo; Custer, Brian; P Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz; Cerdeira Sabino, Ester

    2017-05-01

    Individuals in the indeterminate phase of Chagas disease are considered to have mortality rates similar to those of the overall population. This study compares mortality rates among blood donors seropositive for Chagas disease and negative controls in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. This is a retrospective cohort study of blood donors from 1996 to 2000: 2842 seropositive and 5684 seronegative for Chagas disease. Death status was ascertained by performing probabilistic record linkage (RL) with the Brazil national mortality information system (SIM). RL was assessed in a previous validation study. Cox Regression was used to derive hazard ratios (HR), adjusting for confounders. RL identified 159 deaths among the 2842 seropositive blood donors (5.6%) and 103 deaths among the 5684 seronegative (1.8%). Out of the 159 deaths among seropositive donors, 26 had the 10th International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) indicating Chagas disease as the underlying cause of death (B57.0/B57.5), 23 had ICD-10 codes (I42.0/I42.2/I47.0/I47.2/I49.0/I50.0/I50.1/ I50.9/I51.7) indicating cardiac abnormalities possibly related to Chagas disease listed as an underlying or associated cause of death, with the others having no mention of Chagas disease in part I of the death certificate. Donors seropositive for Chagas disease had a 2.3 times higher risk of death due to all causes (95% Confidence Interval (95% CI), 1.8-3.0) than seronegative donors. When considering deaths due to Chagas disease or those that had underlying causes of cardiac abnormalities related to Chagas disease, seropositive donors had a risk of death 17.9 (95% CI, 6.3-50.8) times greater than seronegative donors. There is an excess risk of death in donors seropositive blood for Chagas disease compared to seronegative donors. Chagas disease is an under-reported cause of death in the Brazilian mortality database.

  10. Structural Changes in the Surface of Red Blood Cell Membranes during Long-Term Donor Blood Storage

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    V. V. Moroz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study changes in the surface of red blood cell membranes of donor blood at the macro- and ultrastructural level during its storage for 30 days and to evaluate the functional state of the red blood cell membrane during the whole storage period. Material and methods. The investigation was conducted on human whole blood and packed red blood cells placed in the specialized packs containing the preservative CPDA-1, by using calibrated electroporation and atomic force microscopy and measuring plasma pH. Conclusion. The long-term, up to 30-day, storage of whole blood and packed red blood cells at 4°C was attended by lower plasma pH and increased hemolysis rate constant during calibrated electroporation and by the development of oxidative processes. The hemolysis rate constant was also higher in the packed red blood cells than that in the whole blood. On days 5—6, the membrane structure showed defects that developed, as the blood was stored, and caused irreversible cell membrane damage by day 30. Key words: donor blood, red blood cell membranes, atomic force microscopy.

  11. Adverse reactions in whole blood donors: an Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Chintamani; Pujani, Meenu; Pahuja, Sangeeta; Jain, Manjula

    2011-01-01

    Whole blood donation is generally considered to be a safe procedure, but occasionally adverse reactions of varying severity may occur during or at the end of the collection. The aim of the study was to estimate the frequency and type of adverse events occurring during blood donation and to assess the practices which would help to minimise them. This retrospective single-centre study was conducted from June 2007 to November 2009 at a regional blood transfusion centre. All whole blood donations made at the centre were analysed. All adverse events occurring during or at the end of donation were noted using a standardised format. Overall 113 adverse events were reported in relation to 19,045 donations, resulting in an overall adverse event rate of 0.6%, that is, an incidence of 1 in every 166 donations. Presyncopal symptoms, in other words vasovagal reactions of mild intensity, were the most commonly observed adverse reactions and accounted for approximately 70% of all adverse reactions noted. Only 0.6% of blood donations were complicated by adverse events and most of these events were presyncopal symptoms. Our study reinforces the fact that blood donation is a very safe procedure which could be made even more event-free by following certain friendly, reassuring and tactful practices.

  12. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibody detection in blood donors in the Southern Brazil

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    A.B. Araújo

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' Disease, is a widely spread protozoa in America. Blood transfusion is the secondly most important way of acquiring the infection. In blood banks, tests are performed to eliminate potentially infected blood. This study aimed to evaluate the positivity for T. cruzi in blood samples of donor's candidates in Southern Brazil. The study was based on a sampling containing all blood donors of Hemopel - a Pelotas City Blood Center, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, from 2004 to 2005. Serological study was performed using ELISA Chagatest. Sampling containing values ± 20% cut off were evaluated using ELISA Chagatek, ELISA Alka/Adaltis, IHA Chagatest and IIF Imunocruzi. TESA-Blot was used as a confirmatory procedure in situations where blood samples showed conflicting results. From 4,482 samples collected in 2004 and 2005, the reactivity for anti-T. cruzi was 0.96% (43. Among those, 21 cases (0.47% were confirmed as positive - most of them were female, with low school level and averaging 47.2% years old. Interestingly, the blood donors are not aware of being contaminated and this fact makes it difficult for controlling the disease. Chagas' Disease was one of the main reasons for discarding blood bags through serological control in Southern Brazil. Sampling reactivity showed variation among the different techniques used for anti-T. cruzi research. In order to obtaining more secure and conclusive results, more than one diagnostic technique must be used.

  13. Association between blood lead and blood pressure: a population-based study in Brazilian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Lopes, Ana Carolina Bertin de; Silbergeld, Ellen Kovner; Navas-Acien, Ana; Zamoiski, Rachel; Martins, Airton da Cunha; Camargo, Alissana Ester Iakmiu; Urbano, Mariana Ragassi; Mesas, Arthur Eumann; Paoliello, Monica Maria Bastos

    2017-03-14

    Environmental lead exposure among adults may increase blood pressure and elevate the risk of hypertension. The availability of data on blood lead levels (BLL) in adult Brazilian population is scarce and population-based studies are important for screening the population exposure and also to evaluate associations with adverse health effects. The goal of this study was to examine the association of BLL with blood pressure and hypertension in a population-based study in a city in Southern Brazil. A total of 948 adults, aged 40 years or older, were randomly selected. Information on socioeconomic, dietary, lifestyle and occupational background was obtained by orally administered household interviews. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured according to the guidelines VI Brazilian Guidelines on Hypertension. BLL were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were performed to evaluate associations of BLL with SBP and DBP, and with the chance of hypertension and of elevated SBP and DBP. The geometric mean of BLL was 1.97 μg/dL (95%CI:1.90-2.04 μg/dL). After multivariable adjustment, participants in the quartile 4 of blood lead presented 0.06 mm/Hg (95%CI, 0.04-0.09) average difference in DBP comparing with those in quartile 1. Participants in the 90th percentile of blood lead distribution had 0.07 mmHg (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.11) higher DBP compared with those participants in the 10th percentile of blood lead. The adjusted OR for hypertension was 2.54 (95% CI, 1.17-5.53), comparing the highest to the lowest blood lead quartiles. Compared with participants in the 10th percentile of blood lead, participants in the 90th percentile presented higher OR for hypertension (OR: 2.77; 95% CI, 1.41 to 5.46). At low concentrations, BLL were positively associated with DBP and with the odds for hypertension in adults aged 40 or older. It is important to enforce lead

  14. [GBV-C/HGV and TTV infection markers in Polish blood donors and haemophilia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabarczyk, Piotr; Brojer, Ewa; Windyga, Jerzy; łopaciuk, Stanisław; Klukowska, Anna; Mikulska, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Viruses GBV-C/HGV and TTV were identified in patients with hepatitis of unknown etiology. Aim of our study was to assess the frequency of infection markers of these viruses in blood donors and haemophilia patients treated with virucidaly activated and non inactivated blood products. Material and methods. TTV DNA (by PCR using primers to coding ORFI and non-coding region NC) and GBV-C/HGV (RNA by RT-PCR and anti-E2 by EIA) were tested in blood donors (200 for TTV and 219 for GBV-C/HGV), 122 haemophilia patients treated in the past with non inactivated blood products and in 20 haemophilia children treated exclusively with inactivated clotting preparations. Results RNA GBV-C/HGV were identified in 3,2%; 23,7% and in 0%, respectively blood donors, adult and children haemophilia patients. Antibody anti-E2 were found in 23,6%; 37% i 25% of studied groups respectively. DNA TTV was detected most frequently by NC than ORF1 primers: in 78% vs.10% of blood donors, 100% vs 43,5% of adult haemophilia patients and in 95% vs. 15% young haemophiliacs. Conclusions Haemophilia patients were at risk of GBV-C/HGV and TTV infection. Following implementation of viral inactivation methods in the process of clotting factor concentrates production, the risk for GBV-C/HGV transmission was significantly reduced and in less extant for TTV.

  15. Trend and prevalence of transfusion transmitted infections among blood donors in rural teaching institute, south India

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    MS Leena

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The magnitude of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI varies from country to country depending on TTI’s load in that particular population. The aim of the study was to study the trend and prevalence of sero-markers among blood donors in one of the tertiary health center in south India. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed from 2004 to 2010 in a blood bank of teaching hospital in South India. All blood donors who presented to blood bank during the study period were included. Data regarding demography and serological tests were collected on predesigned proforma. Results: There were a total of 6939 blood donors during study period. Out of these, 94(1.35% were positive for sero-markers for TTIs. The number of blood donors as well as sero-positivity increased from year 2004 to 2010. Conclusions: Trend and sero-prevalence of TTIs increased over period of time. Sero-positivity for TTIs decreased from year 2004 to 2010. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i3.6022 JPN 2012; 2(3: 203-206

  16. A retrospective analysis of false-positive infectious screening results in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Michelle T; Bruhn, Roberta; Kaidarova, Zhanna; Custer, Brian S; Murphy, Edward L; Bloch, Evan M

    2016-02-01

    False-positive infectious transfusion screening results remain a challenge with continued loss of both donors and blood products. We sought to identify associations between donor demographic characteristics (age, race, sex, education, first-time donor status) and testing false positive for viruses during routine blood donation screening. In addition the study assessed the prevalence of high-risk behaviors in false-positive donors. Blood Systems, Inc. donors with allogeneic donations between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2012, were compared in a case-control study. Those with a false-positive donation for one of four viruses (human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], human T-lymphotropic virus [HTLV], hepatitis B virus [HBV], and hepatitis C virus [HCV]) were included as cases. Those with negative test results were controls. For a subset of cases, infectious risk factors were evaluated. Black race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with HCV and HTLV false-positive results. Male sex and lower education were associated with HCV false positivity, and age 25 to 44 was associated with HTLV false positivity. First-time donors were more likely to be HCV false positive although less likely to be HBV and HTLV false positive. No significant associations between donor demographics and HIV false positivity were observed. A questionnaire for false-positive donors showed low levels of high-risk behaviors. Demographic associations with HCV and HTLV false-positive results overlap with those of true infection. While true infection is unlikely given current testing algorithms and risk factor evaluation, the findings suggest nonrandom association. Further investigation into biologic mechanisms is warranted. © 2015 AABB.

  17. Trends in Transfusion Transmitted Infections Among Replacement Blood Donors in Karachi, Pakistan

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    Syed Mohammad Irfan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of Hepatitis-B, Hepatitis-C and Human Immunodeficiency infections in replacement blood donors. METHODS: From January 2004 to December 2011, 108,598 apparently healthy donors donated blood at our Blood Bank. Screening was done by Microparticle Enzyme Immuno Assay (MEIA method on Axsym System (Abbott Diagnostic, USA and in year 2011 by Chemiluminescent Immunoassay (CIA method on Architect i2000 (Abbott Diagnostic, USA. From 2010 onward, HIV reactive donors were advised for confirmatory tests and reported back with the results. RESULTS: Of the 108,598 total donors, 108,393 (99.8% were replacement donors with a mean age of 28.92 (17-55 years. Of this, only 164 (0.15% were females. Among the replacement donors, 4,906 (4.5% were found to be reactive for Hepatitis-B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus. All the reactive patients, except one, were males. HbsAg was positive in 2,068 (1.90% and anti-HCV in 2832 (2.61% donors, while 111 (0.10% were positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Co-infectivity was observed in 103 (0.09% cases. The prevalence appeared to be higher in younger age group (17-30 yrs. Only 16.6% cases should be patients returned with results of the confirmatory tests for HIV and were found positive. CONCLUSION: Hepatitis-B and C sero-prevalence in our series of replacement donors appears high compared to most studies from neighboring countries and relatively low in comparison to earlier studies from Pakistan. Prevalence of HIV, however, appears low and turn out of HIV positive cases for confirmatory tests is low.

  18. Evidence of meaningful levels of Trypanosoma cruzi in platelet concentrates from seropositive blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancino-Faure, Beatriz; Fisa, Roser; Riera, Cristina; Bula, Ibeth; Girona-Llobera, Enrique; Jimenez-Marco, Teresa

    2015-06-01

    According to the reported cases of transfusion-acquired Trypanosoma cruzi infection, the risk of T. cruzi transfusion transmission appears to be higher with platelet (PLT) products than with other blood components. The aim of this study was to investigate by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) the parasitic load detected in leukoreduced plasma and PLT concentrates collected by apheresis from seropositive T. cruzi blood donors and compare them with peripheral whole blood (WB). During 2011 to 2013, a prospective study was carried out in a group of blood donors originating from Chagas-endemic areas but who are now living on the island of Majorca, Spain. Leukoreduced plasma and PLT concentrates were collected by apheresis from seropositive blood donors with detectable parasitemias in peripheral WB. Seropositivity was found in 23 of 1201 donors studied (1.9%), and T. cruzi DNA with less than 1 parasite equivalent/mL was detected in peripheral WB in 60.86% (14 of 23) of these. The study in blood components obtained by apheresis from these donors showed that T. cruzi DNA with a mean ± SD parasitic load of 5.33 ± 6.12 parasite equivalents/mL was detected in 100% of the PLT concentrate samples. Parasite DNA was undetectable in the extract taken from plasma collected from donors with a positive qPCR in peripheral WB. The higher parasitic load found in PLT concentrates compared to plasma and peripheral WB would explain the higher transfusion transmission risk of Chagas disease associated with PLT transfusions described in the reported cases of transfusion-acquired T. cruzi infection. © 2015 AABB.

  19. Cost and effectiveness comparison of two methods for screening potential blood donors for anaemia in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, A; Worrall, E; Que, T N; Bates, I

    2011-06-01

    To compare the cost and effectiveness of Copper Sulphate (CS) and HemoCue (HC) methods for screening blood donors for anaemia. Robust information from developing countries about cost and effectiveness of anaemia screening methods for blood donors is scarce. In such countries there are widespread shortages of blood, so the most cost-effective method should maximise blood supply without compromising donor safety. Economic data (e.g. staff time, equipment and buildings) were collected from direct observation of procedures and purchase data from Hanoi's Central Blood Bank administrative department. A framework for comparing the cost and effectiveness of anaemia screening methods was developed and a cost per effective (i.e. usable and accurate) test was generated for each method. Samples from 100 potential donors from the Hanoi Central Blood Bank (static) and 198 from two mobile units were tested. The mean probability of an ineffective anaemia test was 0·1 (0·05-0·2). The average cost of an HC test was $0·75 (static $0·61 and mobile $0·89) and a CS test was $0·31 (static $0·17 and mobile $0·45). The difference between static and mobile units was predominantly due to transport costs; the difference between the two methods was predominantly due to the HC microcuvettes. In this setting the CS yields greater value for money than the HC method for screening blood donors. The relative cost and effectiveness of CS and HC may be different in places with higher staff turnover, lower test accuracy, higher anaemia prevalence or lower workload than in Vietnam. © 2010 Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. Transfusion Medicine © 2010 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  20. Techniques used for the screening of hemoglobin levels in blood donors: current insights and future directions

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    Chaudhary R

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rajendra Chaudhary,1 Anju Dubey,2 Atul Sonker3 1Department of Transfusion Medicine, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Transfusion Medicine, T.S. Misra Medical College and Hospital, 3Department of Transfusion Medicine, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India Abstract: Blood donor hemoglobin (Hb estimation is an important donation test that is performed prior to blood donation. It serves the dual purpose of protecting the donors’ health against anemia and ensuring good quality of blood components, which has an implication on recipients’ health. Diverse cutoff criteria have been defined world over depending on population characteristics; however, no testing methodology and sample requirement have been specified for Hb screening. Besides the technique, there are several physiological and methodological factors that affect accuracy and reliability of Hb estimation. These include the anatomical source of blood sample, posture of the donor, timing of sample and several other biological factors. Qualitative copper sulfate gravimetric method has been the archaic time-tested method that is still used in resource-constrained settings. Portable hemoglobinometers are modern quantitative devices that have been further modified to reagent-free cuvettes. Furthermore, noninvasive spectrophotometry was introduced, mitigating pain to blood donor and eliminating risk of infection. Notwithstanding a tremendous evolution in terms of ease of operation, accuracy, mobility, rapidity and cost, a component of inherent variability persists, which may partly be attributed to pre-analytical variables. Hence, blood centers should pay due attention to validation of test methodology, competency of operating staff and regular proficiency testing of the outputs. In this article, we have reviewed various regulatory guidelines, described the variables that affect the measurements and compared the validated

  1. Analysis of adverse events and predisposing factors in voluntary and replacement whole blood donors: A study from north India

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    Naveen Agnihotri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of awareness and community motivation, compounded with fragmented blood transfusion services in our country, Often leads to shortage of blood. Donor recruitment and retention are essential for ensuring adequate blood supply. However, adverse events (AEs in donors have a negative impact on donor return. Aims and Objectives: The present study was aimed to assess the frequency of AEs in whole blood donors and analyze the predisposing factors for AEs. Material and Methods: The study was conducted on allogeneic whole blood donors over a period of 14 months, i.e., from January 2002 to February 2003. A total of 37,896 donors were monitored for any AEs: 22587 (59.6% were voluntary donors (VD and 15,309 (40.4% were replacement donors (RD. Results: Overall reaction rate was 2.5% with vasovagal reactions constituting 63.5% and hematomas 35.0% of all reactions. Vasovagal reactions showed a significant association with young age, lower weight, first time donation status, female gender, and nature of blood donation camps. Amongst male donors, RDs had more reactions (P=0.03 than VDs. Majority of donors (85% with vasovagal reactions admitted to some fear or anxiety prior to donation. Hematoma formation occurred significantly more when less trained staff performed phlebotomy. Conclusion: Donor safety is an essential prerequisite to increase voluntary blood donation. AE analysis helps in identifying the blood donors at risk of donor reactions and adopting appropriate donor motivational strategies, pre-donation counseling, and care during and after donation.

  2. A novel strategy for screening blood donors for syphilis at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkodie, F; Ullum, H; Owusu-Dabo, E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To implement and describe a novel syphilis screening strategy for blood donors. BACKGROUND: The seroprevalence of syphilis in blood donors is often high in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) although the proportion of infectious donations is probably low. Syphilis screening may...... with an anti-treponemal rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and blood collected irrespective of the result. Units screening negative for syphilis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B and C were released to stock. RDT screen-positive units were re-tested with rapid plasma reagin (RPR) - units testing...... to a positive syphilis screen. CONCLUSION: In other LMIC, this novel strategy can contribute to improving blood safety without jeopardising blood supply....

  3. Exploring the pattern of blood donor beliefs in first-time, novice, and experienced donors: differentiating reluctant altruism, pure altruism, impure altruism, and warm glow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Eamonn; Atsma, Femke; de Kort, Wim; Veldhuizen, Ingrid

    2012-02-01

    Using constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior and theories of altruism, this article explores how multiple motivations and beliefs for blood donation are clustered and change across the donor career. In so doing important distinctions, for blood donation, between impure altruism, pure altruism, and warm glow are explored. Measures of intentions, cognitive and affective attitudes, role merger, pure altruism, trust, self-efficacy, subjective and moral norms, and habit formation were assessed in a sample of 12,580 whole blood donors. Analyses showed that a distinction between first-time, novice (one to four donations), and experienced donors (five or more donations) is justified. Principal components analysis and confirmatory factor analytic Multiple-Indicator Multiple-Causal models were used to compare models across these groups. A cognition-behavior (CB) factor, including intentions, was common to all groups. First-time and novice donors were marked by a newly identified motivational factor: "reluctant altruism" (i.e., the motivation to donate because of a lack of trust in others). First-time donors exhibited an impure altruism factor whereas for experienced donors warm glow and pure altruism factors were observed. For first-time donors impure altruism and reluctant altruism were both associated with the CB factor in females and impure altruism only in males. For both sexes reluctant altruism was associated of the CB factor in novice donors and warm glow and pure altruism for experienced donors. New avenues for intervention are suggested by the emergence of reluctant altruism for novice donors and warm glow for experienced donors. The importance of distinguishing aspects of altruism is highlighted. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  4. The attitude of Canadian university students toward a behavior-based blood donor health assessment questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Stephanie L; Lam, Cindy T Y; Lin, Yahui T; Wong, Deborah J; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro; Chin-Yee, Ian

    2011-04-01

    In Canada, all men who have sex with men (MSM) are indefinitely deferred from donating blood. The purpose of this study was to determine the acceptability of an alternative behavior-based donor health questionnaire among Canadian university students. Further we sought to determine the perception of blood safety associated with specific risk behaviors. Questions found on the Canadian Blood Services' donor health assessment questionnaire as well as from studies assessing high-risk behavior for human immunodeficiency virus infection were included. For each question participants were asked to rate the acceptability, comfort in answering, perceived effect on blood safety, and whether the question would deter them from donating blood. Data were analyzed using nonparametric tests. A total of 741 students participated in the study. Questions regarding sexual practices of the donor were rated less important for blood safety compared to those assessing for sexually transmitted infections, sex for money, and injection drug use (30%-62% vs. 69%-95% unsafe). A total of 24.4% of students rated both questions on MSM status and a behavior-based alternative as equally unacceptable. We found an inverse correlation between perception of safety and acceptability of questions. Our findings suggest that a behavior-based screening modification is unlikely to change opinions or satisfy those who object to the MSM current policy in place. Acceptability of these questions might be related to a poor understanding of the effect of sexual practices on blood supply safety. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  5. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in Trypanosoma cruzi seropositive and seronegative former blood donors.

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    Antonio L Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Blood donor screening leads to large numbers of new diagnoses of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, with most donors in the asymptomatic chronic indeterminate form. Information on electrocardiogram (ECG findings in infected blood donors is lacking and may help in counseling and recognizing those with more severe disease.To assess the frequency of ECG abnormalities in T.cruzi seropositive relative to seronegative blood donors, and to recognize ECG abnormalities associated with left ventricular dysfunction.The study retrospectively enrolled 499 seropositive blood donors in São Paulo and Montes Claros, Brazil, and 483 seronegative control donors matched by site, gender, age, and year of blood donation. All subjects underwent a health clinical evaluation, ECG, and echocardiogram (Echo. ECG and Echo were reviewed blindly by centralized reading centers. Left ventricular (LV dysfunction was defined as LV ejection fraction (EF<0.50%.Right bundle branch block and left anterior fascicular block, isolated or in association, were more frequently found in seropositive cases (p<0.0001. Both QRS and QTc duration were associated with LVEF values (correlation coefficients -0.159,p<0.0003, and -0.142,p = 0.002 and showed a moderate accuracy in the detection of reduced LVEF (area under the ROC curve: 0.778 and 0.790, both p<0.0001. Several ECG abnormalities were more commonly found in seropositive donors with depressed LVEF, including rhythm disorders (frequent supraventricular ectopic beats, atrial fibrillation or flutter and pacemaker, intraventricular blocks (right bundle branch block and left anterior fascicular block and ischemic abnormalities (possible old myocardial infarction and major and minor ST abnormalities. ECG was sensitive (92% for recognition of seropositive donors with depressed LVEF and had a high negative predictive value (99% for ruling out LV dysfunction.ECG abnormalities are more frequent in seropositive than in seronegative blood donors

  6. Electrocardiographic Abnormalities in Trypanosoma cruzi Seropositive and Seronegative Former Blood Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Antonio L.; Sabino, Ester C.; Marcolino, Milena S.; Salemi, Vera M. C.; Ianni, Barbara M.; Fernandes, Fábio; Nastari, Luciano; Antunes, André; Menezes, Márcia; Oliveira, Cláudia Di Lorenzo; Sachdev, Vandana; Carrick, Danielle M.; Busch, Michael P.; Murphy, Eduard L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood donor screening leads to large numbers of new diagnoses of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, with most donors in the asymptomatic chronic indeterminate form. Information on electrocardiogram (ECG) findings in infected blood donors is lacking and may help in counseling and recognizing those with more severe disease. Objectives To assess the frequency of ECG abnormalities in T.cruzi seropositive relative to seronegative blood donors, and to recognize ECG abnormalities associated with left ventricular dysfunction. Methods The study retrospectively enrolled 499 seropositive blood donors in São Paulo and Montes Claros, Brazil, and 483 seronegative control donors matched by site, gender, age, and year of blood donation. All subjects underwent a health clinical evaluation, ECG, and echocardiogram (Echo). ECG and Echo were reviewed blindly by centralized reading centers. Left ventricular (LV) dysfunction was defined as LV ejection fraction (EF)<0.50%. Results Right bundle branch block and left anterior fascicular block, isolated or in association, were more frequently found in seropositive cases (p<0.0001). Both QRS and QTc duration were associated with LVEF values (correlation coefficients −0.159,p<0.0003, and −0.142,p = 0.002) and showed a moderate accuracy in the detection of reduced LVEF (area under the ROC curve: 0.778 and 0.790, both p<0.0001). Several ECG abnormalities were more commonly found in seropositive donors with depressed LVEF, including rhythm disorders (frequent supraventricular ectopic beats, atrial fibrillation or flutter and pacemaker), intraventricular blocks (right bundle branch block and left anterior fascicular block) and ischemic abnormalities (possible old myocardial infarction and major and minor ST abnormalities). ECG was sensitive (92%) for recognition of seropositive donors with depressed LVEF and had a high negative predictive value (99%) for ruling out LV dysfunction. Conclusions ECG abnormalities are more frequent in

  7. Prevalence of celiac disease among blood donors in São Paulo: the most populated city in Brazil

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    Marília Lage Alencar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Celiac disease is a permanent enteropathy caused by the ingestion of gluten, which leads to an immunemediated inflammation of the small intestine mucosa. The prevalence of celiac disease varies among different nations and ethnic backgrounds, and its diversity is determined by genetic and environmental factors. São Paulo city is one of the largest cities in the world, with a vast population and an important history of internal migratory flow from other Brazilian regions, as well as immigration from other, primarily European, countries, resulting in significant miscegenation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of adults with undiagnosed celiac disease among blood donors of São Paulo by collecting information on the ancestry of the population studied. METHODS: The prevalence of celiac disease was assessed by screening for positive IgA transglutaminase and IgA endomysium antibodies in 4,000 donors (volunteers in the Fundação Pró-Sangue Blood Center of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. The antibody-positive subjects were asked to undergo a small bowel biopsy. RESULTS: Of the 4,000 subjects, twenty-four had positive tests, although both antibody tests were not always concordant. For example, ten subjects were positive for IgA tissue transglutaminase only. In twenty-one positive patients, duodenal biopsies were performed, and the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed in fourteen patients (Marsh criteria modified by Oberhuber. In this group, 67% claimed to have European ancestry, mainly from Italy, Portugal and Spain. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of celiac disease is at least 1:286 among supposedly healthy blood bank volunteers in São Paulo, Brazil.

  8. Screening blood donors for malaria parasite in Sudan | Ali ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In countries where malaria is endemic, its transmission is a hazard of blood transfusion and could lead to serious if not fatal complications. To assess the likely importance of transfusion induced malaria in Sudan; a descriptive cross sectional facility based study was carried out. Material and Methods: A total ...

  9. Socio-demographic characteristics of Danish blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Kristoffer Sølvsten; Simonsen, Jacob; Sundby, Anna

    2017-01-01

    .7% compared to 1.7%). The prevalence of blood donation was considerably lower among men living with their parents (2.9%) or alone (3.9%) than among men cohabitating with a woman (6.2%). Summary: Social marginalization, as indicated by low income and being a male living without a woman, was associated...

  10. Prevalence of Rh Phenotypes among Blood Donors in Kano, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Rh antigens have been reported to cause acute and delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions apart from the dreadful Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn. The aim of this study was determine the prevalence of Rh phenotypes that would serve as a baseline data towards provision of safe blood transfusion ...

  11. Asymptomatic malaria and associated factors among blood donors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.Mirambo

    During blood donation, samples were collected from each participant. Malaria parasites were detected microscopically from Giemsa .... Backward stepwise elimination logistic regression model was used to determine the predictors for .... Annals of Biological Research. 1:72-75. Bartonjo, G. (2013) Prevalence and factors ...

  12. Prevalence of HIV among blood donors at Juba Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method and Materials: This is a retrospective study that involved the abstraction of data from registers at the blood bank. Data were collected onto data sheets and entered into a computer database. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Version 20 Software. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant.

  13. High levels of neutralizing IL-6 autoantibodies in 0.1% of apparently healthy blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Pia; Svenson, Morten; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    as the vaccination-induced IL-6-deficient mice. Such donors might be IL-6 deficient, and if so, IL-6 seems be dispensable for several months in otherwise healthy individuals. Such highly positive donors also explain why normal human IgG for pharmaceutical use may contain high anti-IL-6 activity. Finally, transfusion...... avidly to their IgG, and their plasma strongly neutralized IL-6 in vitro. Slightly elevated concentrations of IL-6 exclusively in the form of IL-6-IgG complexes were present in their circulation. The complexes did not contain soluble IL-6 receptors. Titers of 0.1% of the blood donors were as positive...... deficiency. Here, we examined aAb-IL-6 in 4,230 blood donors. Stable low titers of aAb-IL-6 were found in 9% of the donors, while 1% had titers ranging from 64 to greater than 10,000. Such aAb-IL-6-positive donors appeared normal with no overt signs of pathology. Natural and recombinant forms of IL-6 bound...

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Blood Donor’s Status of HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis in this Region of Marathwada, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangrao H. Deshpande

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims & Objectives: Blood transfusion can cause the transmission of infections to recipients. This is an important mode of infection. The aim of study was to assess the prevalence of such type of infections among blood donors and to compare the seroprevalence of transfusion transmitted diseases in voluntary donors and replacement donors. Retrospective study of five years from Jan. 2007 to Dec. 2011 was done. This study was conducted at Blood bank, MIMSR Medical College Latur, Govt. Medical College, Latur and Bhalchandra Blood bank, Latur. Material & Methods: Total 10, 4925 donors were tested. Donors were screened for seroprevalence of HIV, HBC, HCV and Syphilis. Screening of HIV, HBV & HCV was done by ELISA method & Syphilis was screened by RPR type. Results: The comparison of seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV & Syphilis in voluntary donors and replacement donors showed significant difference only for HIV in the years 2007, 2010, and 2011. Conclusion: The seroprevalence of transfusion transmitted diseases in the study is very low or negligible in voluntary donors as compared to replacement donors. There was a declining trend of seroprevalence for all the disease screened. But in our study the difference is not significant, which indicates that the selection of donors is of low quality. The selection of high quality voluntary donors should be achieved by creation of awareness by education of the prospective donor populations.

  15. Knowledge, attitude, and beliefs of young, college student blood donors about Human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Dubey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Young people, who tend to be healthy, idealistic, and motivated, are an excellent pool of potential voluntary unpaid blood donors. Recruiting and retaining young blood donors improves the long term safety and sufficiency of a country′s blood supply. Knowledge, attitude, and beliefs about Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV should play an important role in prevention of disease transmission. Materials and Methods: This study was a questionnaire based survey, conducted to explore the levels of knowledge, attitude, and beliefs about HIV in young college student blood donors. Results: The results showed that the proportion of participants with comprehensive knowledge of HIV prevention and transmission was lesser than expected. Increase in education level and male gender was found to be significantly associated with high HIV-related knowledge. The responses on the different aspects of HIV-related attitude were also varied and there is still stigma associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS even in the educated groups. Discussion: There was a spectrum of myths and misperceptions emphasizing the need of education that recognizes the social context of attitude towards HIV. Results from this study may contribute to the development of appropriate educational and training material for this group of donors which in turn, may assist in achieving the elusive goal of safe blood supply in future.

  16. Seroprevalence of Anti-Toxoplasma Gondii Antibodies in Healthy Voluntary Blood Donors from Mashhad City, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarean, Mehdi; Shafiei, Reza; Gholami, Maryam; Fata, Abdolmajid; Rahmati Balaghaleh, Mansour; Kariminik, Ashraf; Tehranian, Farahnaz; Hasani, Ali; Akhavan, Arash

    2017-07-01

    The present investigation aims to evaluate the prevalence of IgM and IgG anti-T. gondii antibodies and the associated risk factors among healthy blood donors in Mashhad city, Razavi Khorasan province, Iran. We screened a total of 500 serum samples by census method from apparently healthy blood donors of the Mashhad Blood Transfusion Organization (MBTO) for IgG and IgM anti-T. gondii antibodies by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that 29.6%, 25%, 1.4%, and 3.2% of tested donors were positive for anti-T. gondii antibodies, only IgG antibody, both IgM and IgG, and IgM antibody alone, respectively. Several risk factors which were significantly related to T. gondii seropositivity in the univariate analysis at P < 0.05 included female gender (OR = 3.222, P < 0.001), age more than 40 years (P = 0.026), and sausage/hot dog consumption (OR = 4.472, P < 0.001). The results of this study can be a warning for blood transfusion organizations to pay special attention to toxoplasmosis among blood donors and also design screening programs for prevention of transfusion-transmitted toxoplasmosis.

  17. Epidemiological trends of HIV-1 infection in blood donors from Catalonia, Spain (2005-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bes, Marta; Piron, Maria; Casamitjana, Natàlia; Gregori, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Ribera, Esteban; Quer, Josep; Puig, Lluís; Sauleda, Sílvia

    2017-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) subtype B is predominant in Spain. However, the recent arrival of immigrant populations has increased the prevalence of non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes and transmitted drug-resistance mutations in blood donors from the Catalonian region (northeastern Spain). HIV-1-positive blood donors identified in Catalonia from 2005 to 2014 were included. Demographic variables and risk factors for HIV-1 acquisition were recorded. HIV-1 subtyping was carried out by HIV-1 DNA polymerase region sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses were performed using the neighbor-joining method. During the study period, 2.8 million blood donations were screened, and 214 HIV-1-positive donors were identified, yielding an overall prevalence of 7.7 per 100,000 donations (89% men; mean age, 34 ± 10 years). Most HIV-1-positive donors were native to Spain (81%), and 61% were regular blood donors. When risk factors were known, 62% reportedly were men who had sex with men. HIV-1 subtyping was possible in 176 HIV-1-positive individuals: 143 (81%) had HIV-1 subtype B, and 33 (19%) had non-B subtypes. Most HIV-1 non-B subtypes were circulating recombinant forms (n = 20; 61%). Factors associated with HIV-1 subtype B were male sex (p = 0.007) and men who had sex with men (p < 0.001). The overall prevalence of transmitted drug-resistance mutations was 14%. Non-B subtypes, circulating recombinant forms, and transmitted drug-resistance mutation sequences circulate among HIV-1-positive blood donors in Catalonia. Continuous local epidemiological surveillance is required to implement optimal prevention strategies for controlling transfusion-transmitted HIV and to improve health policies regarding HIV infection. © 2017 AABB.

  18. Sumatriptan increases the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected individuals and healthy blood donors in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    2000-01-01

    responsible for regulation of the intracellular levels of cAMP. In a preliminary study sumatriptan increased the proliferative responses of PBMC to a polyclonal activator in vitro in 9 of 10 HIV-seropositive individuals (p=0.007), and in 7 of 9 healthy blood donors (p=0.05). This was probably due...

  19. Distribution of Dengue Virus Types 1 and 4 in Blood Components from Infected Blood Donors from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Añez, Germán; Heisey, Daniel A R; Chancey, Caren; Fares, Rafaelle C G; Espina, Luz M; Souza, Kátia P R; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Krysztof, David E; Foster, Gregory A; Stramer, Susan L; Rios, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease caused by the four dengue viruses (DENV-1 to 4) that can also be transmitted by blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The distribution of DENV in the components of blood from infected donors is poorly understood. We used an in-house TaqMan qRT-PCR assay to test residual samples of plasma, cellular components of whole blood (CCWB), serum and clot specimens from the same collection from blood donors who were DENV-RNA-reactive in a parallel blood safety study. To assess whether DENV RNA detected by TaqMan was associated with infectious virus, DENV infectivity in available samples was determined by culture in mosquito cells. DENV RNA was detected by TaqMan in all tested blood components, albeit more consistently in the cellular components; 78.8% of CCWB, 73.3% of clots, 86.7% of sera and 41.8% of plasma samples. DENV-1 was detected in 48 plasma and 97 CCWB samples while DENV-4 was detected in 21 plasma and 31 CCWB samples. In mosquito cell cultures, 29/111 (26.1%) plasma and 32/97 (32.7%) CCWB samples were infectious. A subset of samples from 29 donors was separately analyzed to compare DENV viral loads in the available blood components. DENV viral loads did not differ significantly between components and ranged from 3-8 log10 PCR-detectable units/ml. DENV was present in all tested components from most donors, and viral RNA was not preferentially distributed in any of the tested components. Infectious DENV was also present in similar proportions in cultured plasma, clot and CCWB samples, indicating that these components may serve as a resource when sample sizes are limited. However, these results suggest that the sensitivity of the nucleic acid tests (NAT) for these viruses would not be improved by testing whole blood or components other than plasma.

  20. Dengue viremia in blood donors in Northern India: Challenges of emerging dengue outbreaks to blood transfusion safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhana Mangwana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backdround: Emerging infectious diseases pose threats to the general human population; including recipients of blood transfusions. Dengue is spreading rapidly to new areas and with increasing frequency of major outbreaks. Screening blood for dengue antigens in dengue-endemic countries would be costly and should, therefore, be recommended only after careful assessment of risk for infection and cost. Aim: A prospective study was conducted to establish the magnitude of the threat that dengue poses to blood safety where it is sporadic with seasonal variations, to quantify risk and to assess that whether screening is feasible and cost-effective. Materials and Methods: Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 antigen test was done on 1709 donations during dengue outbreak in the months August to November 2013 as an additional test using Bio-Rad Platelia Dengue NS1AG test kit which is one step sandwich format microplate enzyme immunoassay using murine monoclonal antibodies for capture and revelation. Chi-square test was used to find statistical significance. Results and Conclusions: Majority cases were whole blood, replacement, male donors with 76.10% donors in <35 years age group. About 17.85% were single donor platelet donations. NS1 antigen in all donors was negative. In the past, dengue affected mainly children who do not donate blood. With the changing trend, mean age of infection increased affecting the population that does donate blood, further reducing blood donation pool. Further studies need to be done in different geographic regions of the country during dengue transmission season to establish maximum incidence of viremic donations, rates of transfusion transmission and clinical consequences in recipients. If risk is found to be substantial, decision will be taken by the policymakers at what threshold screening should be instituted to ensure safe blood transfusion.

  1. Does the Presence of a Measurable Blood Alcohol Level in a Potential Organ Donor Affect the Outcome of Liver Transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Tarek I.; Gavaler, Judith S.; Fishkin, David; Gordon, Robert; Starzl, Thomas E.; Van Thiel, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The widespread application of hepatic transplantation has created a tremendous demand for donor organs. An assessment of donor parameters is thought to be important in selecting good donors; however, the criteria utilized have not been standardized. This study was performed to determine the effect of a measurable donor blood alcohol level on graft survival. Fifty-two patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation at the University of Pittsburgh were included in the study. Twenty-five patients received liver grafts from donors having a blood alcohol level between 0.04 and 0.4 g/l with a mean of 0.17 g/l. Twenty-seven patients received a liver graft from a donor who had no measurable blood alcohol. There were no differences between these two groups of donors regarding the time of initial hospitalization until the time of donation. Graft failure within the first 30 days was 24% for those receiving an organ from an alcohol-positive donor as compared with 22.2% in those receiving an organ from an alcohol negative donor. The recipient mortality rate was 16% and 11%, respectively. No relationships between the donor blood alcohol level and organ performance, frequency of primary graft nonfunction, or number of episodes of acute cellular rejection were evident. Based upon these data, the presence of a measurable blood alcohol level in a donor should not mitigate against organ donation. PMID:2058808

  2. [Hepatitis B and C among volunteer non-remunerated blood donors in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabinda, J M; Miyanga, S A; Misingi, P; Ramazani, S Y

    2014-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the global prevalence of hepatitis B and C among voluntary blood donor. In the study, 1079 blood donors were included. The investigation was carried out from 1 January till 31 December 2010 in the central Blood Bank of Bukavu in DRC. The median age of sample was 26 years. In total, 72.4% among them were male sex and 54.5% of new blood donors. The prevalence of hepatitis B was 4.2% and hepatitis C was found in 3.8% case the coinfection VHB and VHC with 2.2%. VHB was prevalent in blood donor group of less than 30 years (5.0%), new blood donor (5.1%), in medical profession (7.1%) and in the male sex group (5.1%) and was significantly according to the sex (P=0.01) and the place of residence (P=0.002). A strong association was showed between the rural medium and hepatitis B OR 3,1 (1.4-6.5) and VHC OR 2.9 (1.3-6.5). After estimation with logistic regression a higher risk of seropositivity of VHB found in blood donor sex male group, married group, blood donor coming from the rural middle and having less than 30 years. For blood safety, a particular attention must be laid in the selection of donor before a blood donation and in donation in reagent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Mobilization and engraftment of peripheral blood stem cells in healthy related donors >55 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlló, Cristina; Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Grífols, Joan-Ramon; Juncà, Jordi; Morgades, Mireia; Ester, Anna; Rodríguez, Inés; Vives, Susana; Batlle, Montserrat; Guardia, Ramon; Ferrà, Christelle; Gallardo, David; Millá, Fuensanta; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2014-03-01

    The increasing scarcity of young related donors has led to the use of older donors for related allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). This study analyzed the influence of age on the results of mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) in healthy donors as well as on the engraftment and outcome of HSCT. A retrospective analysis from a single center was performed comparing the results of PBSC mobilization from related healthy donors according to their age. The study included 133 consecutive related donors. The median age was 50 years (range, 4-77 years); 70 (53%) donors were males, and 44 (33%) were >55 years old. All donors were mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for 5 days. The peak CD34(+) cell count in peripheral blood was higher in younger than in older donors (median, 90.5 CD34(+) cells/μL [range, 18-240 CD34(+) cells/μL] versus 72 CD34(+) cells/μL [range, 20-172.5 CD34(+) cells/μL], P = 0.008). The volume processed was lower in younger than in older donors (16,131 mL [range, 4424-36,906 mL] versus 18,653 mL [range, 10,003-26,261 mL], P = 0.002) with similar CD34(+) cells collected (579.3 × 10(6) cells [range, 135.14 × 10(6)-1557.24 × 10(6) cells] versus 513.69 × 10(6) cells [range, 149.81 × 10(6)-1290 × 10(6) cells], P = 0.844). There were no differences in time to recovery of neutrophils and platelets or in the incidences of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, overall survival, non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence. Donors >55 years old mobilized fewer CD34(+) cells and required a greater volume to collect a similar number of CD34(+) cells. The outcome of HSCT was not influenced by donor age. Donor age should not be a limitation for related allogeneic HSCT. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of hepatitis A viral RNA and antibodies among Chinese blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, P; Su, N; Lin, F Z; Ma, L; Wang, H J; Rong, X; Dai, Y D; Li, J; Jian, Z W; Tang, L H; Xiao, W; Li, C Q

    2015-12-09

    Like other developing countries, China was reported to have a relatively high seroprevalence of anti-hepatitis A antibodies (anti-HAV). However, no studies have evaluated the prevalence of anti-HAV and HAV RNA among voluntary blood donors with or without elevated serum alanine transaminase (ALT) levels. Anti-HAV antibodies were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was carried out for detection of HAV RNA. In the current study, we analyzed a total of 450 serum samples with elevated ALT levels (≥40 U/L) and 278 serum samples with non-elevated ALT levels. Seroprevalence rates of anti-HAV were 51.6% in donors with elevated ALT and 41.4% in donors with non-elevated ALT; however, none of the samples was positive for HAV RNA. The results of our study showed lower seroprevalence rates of anti-HAV in blood donors (irrespective of ALT levels) than those in published data on Chinese populations. Although donors with elevated ALT had statistically higher prevalence rates of anti- HAV than did those with non-elevated ALT, none of the serum samples had detectable levels of the active virus. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the transmission of hepatitis A by blood transfusion will occur rarely.

  5. Hepatitis E in blood donors: investigation of the natural course of asymptomatic infection, Germany, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Tanja; Diekmann, Juergen; Eberhardt, Matthias; Knabbe, Cornelius; Dreier, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Asymptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections have been found in blood donors from various European countries, but the natural course is rarely specified. Here, we compared the progression of HEV viraemia, serostatus and liver-specific enzymes in 10 blood donors with clinically asymptomatic genotype 3 HEV infection, measuring HEV RNA concentrations, plasma concentrations of alanine/aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase and bilirubin and anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG antibodies. RNA concentrations ranged from 77.2 to 2.19×10(5) IU/mL, with viraemia lasting from less than 10 to 52 days. Donors showed a typical progression of a recent HEV infection but differed in the first detection of anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG and seropositivity of the antibody classes. The diagnostic window between HEV RNA detection and first occurrence of anti-HEV antibodies ranged from eight to 48 days, depending on the serological assay used. The progression of laboratory parameters of asymptomatic HEV infection was largely comparable to the progression of symptomatic HEV infection, but only four of 10 donors showed elevated liver-specific parameters. Our results help elucidate the risk of transfusion-associated HEV infection and provide a basis for development of screening strategies. The diagnostic window illustrates that infectious blood donors can be efficiently identified only by RNA screening. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  6. The prevalence of hepatitis A virus and parvovirus B19 in source-plasma donors and whole blood donors in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, T; Li, C; Zhang, Y; Wang, Y; Wu, B; Ke, L; Liu, G; Li, L; Liu, Y; Liu, Z

    2015-12-01

    To compare the prevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and human parvovirus B19 (B19V) between source-plasma (SP) donors and whole blood (WB) donors. In China, source plasma is in severe shortage while plasma recovered from WB is in surplus. Thus, the government is considering transferring the recovered plasma (RP) to produce plasma derivatives. HAV and B19V are two pathogens threatening the safety of plasma-based derivatives. However, there is no data about if transferring of the RP to produce plasma derivatives will increase the risk of HAV and B19V infection. Thus, we compared the prevalence of HAV and B19V between SP donors and WB donors in this study. A total of 5030 samples from SP donors and 5040 samples from WB donors were collected. All the samples were tested for HAV RNA and B19V DNA and tested for HAV IgM by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The prevalence of B19V DNA was 0.06% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0-0.09%) in WB donors and 0.079% (95% CI, 0-0.12%) in SP donors, respectively. No significant difference was found in the prevalence of B19V DNA between SP donors and WB donors. The prevalence of anti-HAV IgM in SP donors was 0.079% whereas no WB donor sample was found anti-HAV IgM reactive. The transfer of RP to producing plasma derivatives will not increase the risk of transmission of HAV and B19 through plasma products. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  7. Defining and measuring blood donor altruism: a theoretical approach from biology, economics and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R; Ferguson, E

    2014-02-01

    While blood donation is traditionally described as a behaviour motivated by pure altruism, the assessment of altruism in the blood donation literature has not been theoretically informed. Drawing on theories of altruism from psychology, economics and evolutionary biology, it is argued that a theoretically derived psychometric assessment of altruism is needed. Such a measure is developed in this study that can be used to help inform both our understanding of the altruistic motives of blood donors and recruitment intervention strategies. A cross-sectional survey (N = 414), with a 1-month behavioural follow-up (time 2, N = 77), was designed to assess theoretically derived constructs from psychological, economic and evolutionary biological theories of altruism. Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) variables and co-operation were also assessed at time 1 and a measure of behavioural co-operation at time 2. Five theoretical dimensions (impure altruism, kinship, self-regarding motives, reluctant altruism and egalitarian warm glow) of altruism were identified through factor analyses. These five altruistic motives differentiated blood donors from non-donors (donors scored higher on impure altruism and reluctant altruism), showed incremental validity over TPB constructs to predict donor intention and predicted future co-operative behaviour. These findings show that altruism in the context of blood donation is multifaceted and complex and, does not reflect pure altruism. This has implication for recruitment campaigns that focus solely on pure altruism. © 2013 The Authors. Vox Sanguinis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. on behalf of International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  8. Elevated blood selenium levels in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemire, Mélanie; Mergler, Donna; Fillion, Myriam; Passos, Carlos José Sousa; Guimarães, Jean Rémy Davée; Davidson, Robert; Lucotte, Marc

    2006-07-31

    Contaminated fish poses a difficult challenge throughout the world, on the one hand, fish is a very nutritious food source, while on the other hand it accumulates many toxic substances, including mercury (Hg). As part of our efforts in the Brazilian Amazon to maximize nutritional input from fish consumption, a dietary mainstay, and minimize toxic risk, we have been studying the role of selenium (Se), an essential element, that may influence the distribution of Hg in the body and influence Hg neurotoxicity. Se, which is naturally present in the soil, is ingested through consumption of various foods, notably fish, mammals and certain plants. The objectives of the present study were: (i) evaluate whole blood Se (B-Se) and Hg (B-Hg); (ii) characterize B-Se variations with respect to socio-demographic and dietary variables; and (iii) examine the relation between B-Se and B-Hg. A total of 236 persons from six riparian communities of the Tapajós River Basin, a tributary of the Amazon, participated in this study. Whole blood Se and Hg were measured and interview administered questionnaires were used to obtain data on socio-demographic variable, smoking and drinking habits, and fish and fruit consumption. The results show that B-Se are in the upper normal range (median=284.3 microg/L, range=142.1-2029.3 microg/L). No individuals presented B-Se deficiency, but 9 participants from the same extended family had relatively high B-Se levels, potentially a threat to their health. B-Se varied between communities, was significantly higher among alcohol drinkers and farmers, but not associated with age, sex or tobacco consumption. A significant positive relation between B-Se and B-Hg was noted, independently of the overall fish consumption. B-Se increased with consumption of Peacock bass (Cichla sp.), a piscivorous fish species, and coconut pulp (Cocos nucifera L.). The B-Se intercommunity variations may reflect geographic differences in local soil Se levels as well as traditional

  9. Evaluation of the TEG® platelet mappingTM assay in blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsen, Louise; Wiinberg, Bo; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads Jens

    2007-01-01

    for quantification of platelet function, including the contribution of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thromboxane A2 (TxA2) receptors to clot formation. Methods In 43 healthy blood donors, the analytical (CVa) and inter-individual variability (CVg) of the TEG® Platelet MappingTM assay were determined together...

  10. Dengue Virus Transmission by Blood Stem Cell Donor after Travel to Sri Lanka; Germany, 2013

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-09-22

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the article, Dengue Virus Transmission by Blood Stem Cell Donor after Travel to Sri Lanka; Germany, 2013.  Created: 9/22/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/8/2014.

  11. Sero-prevalence of hepatitis C virus among blood donors in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), one of the causative agents of viral hepatitis was investigated. One hundred and sixty-seven (167) blood samples from donors which were sero-negative to hepatitis B virus markers were screened for presence of HCV IgM antibodies using a third generation. ELISA kit. Out of the ...

  12. Surface antigen-negative hepatitis B virus infection in Dutch blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout-Krikke, R. W.; Molenaar-de Backer, M. W. A.; van Swieten, P.; Zaaijer, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) is a reliable marker for HBV infection, but HBsAg-negative forms of HBV infection occur. The introduction of HBV DNA screening of Dutch blood donors, which were not preselected for absence of HBV core antibodies, enabled the characterization of

  13. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeven, Loan R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/410959243; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818208; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817961; Kemper, Peter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325854742; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion

  14. Diversity and origin of hepatitis C virus infection among unpaid blood donors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, Thijs J. W.; Koppelman, Marco H. G. M.; van der Bij, Akke K.; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Cuijpers, H. Theo M.; van der Poel, Cees L.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Bruisten, Sylvia M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve transfusion policy and to increase understanding of the spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the general population, HCV infections among voluntary Dutch blood donors were examined with molecular epidemiologic techniques. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: During 6 years, 1997 through

  15. [Hepatitis B and delta: the prevalence of seroepidemiological markers in volunteer blood donors and their families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Muñoz, M T; Bustamante-Calvillo, M E; Guiscafré-Gallardo, J P; Muñoz, O

    1991-01-01

    41 volunteer blood donors and his relatives were studied in order to know about the prevalence of hepatitis B and D virus infections in selected groups. Frequency of HBsAg+ carriers was 0.34 per cent in the Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea and 0.15 per cent in the Banco Central de Sangre, IMSS. Most of the HBsAg+ blood donors were 21 to 40 years old (87.8%); 21.9 per cent had IgM antibodies against HBc and just 2.4 per cent were HBeAg positive. Forty one (26.9%) of 152 relatives had one or more of the HBV markers, 3.9 per cent were HBsAg carriers and 1.3 per cent were HBeAg positive. In the infected relatives group 36.6 per cent were ancestory or brothers and just 14.6 per cent of wives were infected. None of the HBsAg+ blood donors or his relatives had antibodies against delta agent. These results support the fact that the frequency of asymptomatic carriers of HBsAg in the volunteer blood donors group is similar to he frequency in the general population and identifies the group of relatives as those with the highest risk to acquire HBV infection.

  16. Prevalence Of Hepatitis B And C Virus Amongst Blood Donors And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate incidences of both Hepatitis B and C Virus and serum activity of alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) amongst ... The possible use of raised ALT activities in areas where HCV screening is not available to disqualify donors from donating blood still lacks the ability to rule out 1% of ...

  17. Hepatitis E virus seroepidemiology: a post-earthquake study among blood donors in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish C. Shrestha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As one of the causative agents of viral hepatitis, hepatitis E virus (HEV has gained public health attention globally. HEV epidemics occur in developing countries, associated with faecal contamination of water and poor sanitation. In industrialised nations, HEV infections are associated with travel to countries endemic for HEV, however, autochthonous infections, mainly through zoonotic transmission, are increasingly being reported. HEV can also be transmitted by blood transfusion. Nepal has experienced a number of HEV outbreaks, and recent earthquakes resulted in predictions raising the risk of an HEV outbreak to very high. This study aimed to measure HEV exposure in Nepalese blood donors after large earthquakes. Methods Samples (n = 1,845 were collected from blood donors from Kathmandu, Chitwan, Bhaktapur and Kavre. Demographic details, including age and sex along with possible risk factors associated with HEV exposure were collected via a study-specific questionnaire. Samples were tested for HEV IgM, IgG and antigen. The proportion of donors positive for HEV IgM or IgG was calculated overall, and for each of the variables studied. Chi square and regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with HEV exposure. Results Of the donors residing in earthquake affected regions (Kathmandu, Bhaktapur and Kavre, 3.2% (54/1,686; 95% CI 2.7–4.0% were HEV IgM positive and two donors were positive for HEV antigen. Overall, 41.9% (773/1,845; 95% CI 39.7–44.2% of donors were HEV IgG positive, with regional variation observed. Higher HEV IgG and IgM prevalence was observed in donors who reported eating pork, likely an indicator of zoonotic transmission. Previous exposure to HEV in Nepalese blood donors is relatively high. Conclusion Detection of recent markers of HEV infection in healthy donors suggests recent asymptomatic HEV infection and therefore transfusion-transmission in vulnerable patients is a risk in

  18. Erythrocyte Alloimmunization and Autoimmunization among Blood Donors and Recipients visiting a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Daljit; Bains, Lovenish; Kandwal, Manoj; Parmar, Indu

    2017-03-01

    The ultimate aim of pretransfusion testing is the acceptable survival of donor red cells in recipient's body and antibody detection plays a critical role in achieving the same. The cornerstone of antibody detection method is detecting an unexpected antibody as against the expected antibodies of ABO blood group system. Autoantibodies can also interfere with the detection of clinically significant alloantibodies. To study the frequency of alloantibodies and autoantibodies in the healthy blood donors and patient population visiting our hospital. The Column Agglutination Technology (CAT) was used for ABO RhD blood grouping, Direct Antiglobulin Test (DAT), Autocontrol (AC), Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT) and red cell antibody screening and the unexpected reactions in any of these tests were recorded for further evaluation. Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid (EDTA) blood samples were used for all these tests for both blood donors and admitted patients. The CAT was exercised for the blood grouping (using ABD-Reverse Diluent cassettes) and antibody screening (using 0.8% Surgiscreen, Ortho Clinical Diagnostics Limited, USA and Low Ionic Strength Saline Ortho BLISS with AHG cassettes) on the automated immunohaematology platform ORTHO AutoVue® Innova system (Ortho Clinical Diagnostics Limited, USA). Among all blood donors (n=6350), seven (0.11%) donors had showed unexpected reaction. Of these, four had positive antibody screen (three having naturally occuring antibodies 2=anti-M, 1=anti-Lea and 1=inconclusive) and the other three had positive DAT. Of all the patient samples (n=6136) screened for irregular red cell antibodies, four (0.06%) patients were found to have unexpected reaction revealing one (0.02%) with anti-M antibody and the other three (0.05%) had autoantibodies in their serum. The combined prevalence for both blood donor and recipient population (n=12,486) was found to be 0.11% at our center. The alloimmunisation among patient population was found to be lower

  19. Frequencies of DEA blood types in a purebred canine blood donor population in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

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    Vanessa Sinnott Esteves

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of canine immunohematology is very important for veterinary transfusion medicine. The objective of this study was to determine the DEA blood type frequencies in a purebred canine blood donor population from Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. One hundred clinically healthy purebred dogs were chosen, 20 dogs from each breed (Great Dane, Rottweiler, Golden Retriever, German Shepherd and Argentine Dogo. Blood samples were taken in ACD-A tubes and the MSU hemagglutination tube test (MI, USA was used to determine the blood types. The studied population presented general frequencies of 61% for DEA 1.1, 22% for DEA 1.2, 7% for DEA 3, 100% for DEA 4, 9% for DEA 5 and 16% for DEA 7. A significant association was found between breeds and certain combinations of blood types in this population. The results are in agreement with the literature since most part of the canine population studied was positive for DEA 1.1, the most antigenic blood type in dogs. Differences were found among the studied breeds and those should be considered when selecting a blood donor. The knowledge of blood types frequencies and their combinations in different canine populations, including different breeds, is important because it shows the particularities of each group, helps to keep a data bank of local frequencies and minimizes the risks of transfusion reactions.

  20. Contribution of the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS to research on blood transfusion safety in Brazil

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    Paula Loureiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS program was established in the United States in 1989 with the purpose of increasing blood transfusion safety in the context of the HIV/AIDS and human T-lymphotropic virus epidemics. REDS and its successor, REDS-II were at first conducted in the US, then expanded in 2006 to include international partnerships with Brazil and China. In 2011, a third wave of REDS renamed the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III was launched. This seven-year research program focuses on both blood banking and transfusion medicine research in the United States of America, Brazil, China, and South Africa. The main goal of the international programs is to reduce and prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other known and emerging infectious agents through transfusion, and to address research questions aimed at understanding global issues related to the availability of safe blood. This article describes the contribution of REDS-II to transfusion safety in Brazil. Articles published from 2010 to 2013 are summarized, including database analyses to characterize blood donors, deferral rates, and prevalence, incidence and residual risk of the main blood-borne infections. Specific studies were developed to understand donor motivation, the impact of the deferral questions, risk factors and molecular surveillance among HIV-positive donors, and the natural history of Chagas disease. The purpose of this review is to disseminate the acquired knowledge and briefly summarize the findings of the REDS-II studies conducted in Brazil as well as to introduce the scope of the REDS-III program that is now in progress and will continue through 2018.

  1. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality

    OpenAIRE

    Dinkla, Sip; Peppelman, Malou; van der Raadt, Jori; Atsma, Femke; Novotný, Vĕra M.J.; van Kraaij, Marian G.J.; Joosten, Irma; Bosman, Giel J.C.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The susceptibility of red blood cells to stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage. Phosphatidylserine exposure may, therefore, constitute a link between donor variation and the quality o...

  2. Donor body mass index is an important factor that affects peripheral blood progenitor cell yield in healthy donors after mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Burns, Kevin M; Babic, Aleksandar; Carrum, George; Kennedy, Martha; Segura, Francisco J; Garcia, Salvador; Potts, Sandra; Leveque, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The use of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation has rapidly expanded in recent years. Currently, several sources of HPCs are available for transplantation including peripheral blood HPCs (PBPCs), cord blood cells, and marrow cells. Of these, PBPC collection has become the major source of HPCs. An important variable in PBPC collection is the response to PBPC mobilization, which varies significantly and sometime causes mobilization failure. A retrospective study of 69 healthy donors who underwent PBPC donation by leukapheresis was performed. All of these donors received 10 μg/kg/day or more granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for 5 days before PBPC harvest. Donor factors were evaluated and correlated with mobilization responses, as indicated by the precollection CD34 count (pre-CD34). Donors with a pre-CD34 of more than 100 × 10(6) /L had higher body mass index (BMI) compared with donors whose pre-CD34 was 38 × 10(6) to 99 × 10(6) /L or less than 38 × 10(6) /L (32.0 ± 1.04 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 ± 0.93 kg/m(2) vs. 25.9 ± 1.27 kg/m(2) , respectively; p donors with high BMIs had higher pre-CD34 on a per-kilogram-of-body-weight basis compared with donors with low BMIs. BMI is an important factor that affects donor's response to mobilization and consequently the HPC yield. This effect may be due to a relatively high dose of G-CSF administered to donors with higher BMI or due to the presence of unknown intrinsic factors affecting mobilization that correlate with the amount of adipose tissue in each donor. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. Serological survey of Leishmania infection in blood donors in Salvador, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, Kiyoshi F; Figueiredo, Virgínia; Celes, Fabiana S; Cristal, Juqueline R; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel; de Oliveira, Camila I

    2014-07-30

    Visceral Leishmaniasis is endemic to Brazil, where it is caused by Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi). Following parasite inoculation, individuals may experience asymptomatic infection, raising the possibility of parasite transmission through the transfusion of contaminated blood products. In the present work, we evaluated the prevalence of asymptomatic Leishmania infection among blood donors in Salvador, northeastern Brazil. Peripheral blood was collected from 700 blood donors attending the Blood Bank of Bahia (HEMOBA/SESAB), from January to September 2010. We evaluated anti-Leishmania serology by ELISA, employing Soluble Leishmania Antigen (sensitivity 90% and specificity 95%). The presence of parasite DNA was determined by qPCR, targeting a single copy gene (G6PD), and by end-point PCR, targeting multiple targets, namely a segment located in the Leishmania rRNA locus (ITS) and the conserved region of kinetoplastid DNA (kDNA) minicircles. The blood-donor population was comprised of 74.5% of males with a mean age of 34 years. Anti-Leishmania serology by ELISA was positive in 5.4% (38/700) individuals. One individual was also positive for Chagas' disease and another tested positive for Syphilis. Employing qPCR, parasite DNA was not found in any of 38 seropositive samples. However, by ITS PCR, 8/38 (21%) samples were positive and this positivity increased to 26/38 (68%) when we targeted kDNA amplification. Agreement between both techniques (ITS and kDNA PCR) was fair (kappa = 0.219). These results indicate that asymptomatic infection is present among the blood donor population of Salvador, a finding that warrants a broader discussion regarding the need to implement specific screening strategies.

  4. Prevalence of HLA antibodies in remotely transfused or alloexposed volunteer blood donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaiya, Ram M.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Wright, David J.; Steele, Whitney R.; Kleinman, Steven H.; Busch, Michael P.; Norris, Philip J.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Rios, Jorge A.; Carey, Patricia; Glynn, Simone A.

    2010-01-01

    Background HLA antibody testing of previously transfused or pregnant donors may help reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). However, the prevalence of HLA antibodies in transfused donors has not been well characterized. Methods Transfusion and pregnancy history was obtained from consenting donors. HLA Class I & II antibody testing was performed by multi-antigen bead Luminex platform. Cut off values for class I & II antibodies used normalized background ratio of 10.8 and 6.9 respectively. Linear probability models were used to evaluate potential associations between HLA alloimmunization and donor characteristics. Results 7,920 donors (2,086 males and 5,834 females) were tested. HLA antibody prevalence did not significantly differ between 895 transfused (1.7%) and 1138 non-transfused males (1.0%), [odds ratio (OR) 1.75; 95% CI 0.80, 3.82]. Prevalence in 45 transfused nulliparous females (4.4%, 95% CI 0.1%, 11.8%) was not statistically different from the 1.6% prevalence in 1732 non-transfused nulliparous females (odds ratio 2.94, 95% CI 0.68, 12.74). Transfused parous females had higher prevalence than non-transfused counterparts (p=0.004), odds ratio 1.39 (95% CI 1.07, 1.80). In a linear probability model, the estimated additive risk of transfusion-induced alloimmunization was only 0.8% (95% CI -0.2%, 1.8%), (p=0.10). Donor transfusion history showed that 58% of transfusions occurred >10 years previously. Conclusion Transfused volunteer blood donors do not appear to have a significantly higher prevalence of HLA antibodies than their non-transfused counterparts. Thus, in an effort to reduce TRALI risk, ascertaining past history of transfusion and testing these donors for HLA antibodies is not necessary. PMID:20070615

  5. Evaluation of HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and VDRL test results in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Ağalar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The most frequently encountered complication in the transfusion of blood and blood products are transmitted infections from these products. Infections caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV remain the leading most important health problems in the transfusion of blood and blood products worldwide. Therefore, screening tests such as HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV, and RPR or VDRL for Treponema pallidum are mandatory tests to look at before transfusion of blood and blood products. In this study, the screening tests results of blood donors examined were evaluated and the results were compared with the results of the other blood banks stated in our country.Materials and methods: Screening tests results of a total of 784 blood donors, which have been admitted the Kırıkkale University Hospital Blood Center for blood donation between January 2003 and December 2004, evaluated retrospectively. Blood samples which taken from blood donors before blood donation were investigated for HBsAg, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV tests with chemiluminescense (ELISA method by automated analyzer. VDRL screening test was investigated by commercial test kit.Results: A total of 734 (93.7% of 784 blood donors were male and 50 (6.3% were female. HBsAg was positive in 11 (1.4% blood donors and anti-HCV in 2 (0.2% blood donors. None of the blood donors were found to anti-HIV and VDRL seropositivity.Conclusions: Seropositivity rates of HBsAg and anti-HCV were lower than that of Turkey in general. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (4: 416-419

  6. [How to reduce the prevalence of HIV-positive blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, G; Hernández, T; Quiros, A M; Maio, A; García, L

    1998-12-01

    Despite abolishing the policy of giving the results of the serological test as a way to promote blood donation, and also after improving the predonation questionnaire, we still have a high prevalence of HIV positive blood donors. In this paper we try to analyze, interviewing the HIV positive blood donors in our Counselling Clinic from January 1995 to December 1996, why they were accepted. We asked the HIV positive blood donors to fill a form with the following questions: identification, kind and frequency of blood donation, HIV high risk behaviour, awareness of predonation serological status, willingness toward blood donation, awareness of how dangerous the transfusion of HIV contaminated blood is. For the screening we used Abbott HIV1/HIV 3rd generation plus EIA, test and HIV-1 Western Blot Cambridge, Biotest, Worcester MA, for confirmatory assays. During the evaluation period, 53,338 blood donors were attended, 130 (0.24%) were confirmed HIV positive. Only 18/130 (13.84%) assisted to the Counselling Clinic. The mean age was 33.27 +/- 5.35 years old, all males, 15 singles and 3 with stable couples. 6/18 (33.33%) could have been discarded because of physical appearance or because of theirs jobs. "Voluntary Donation" was higher than in the control group (p = 0.0001). Homo/bisexual and promiscuous behaviour (p = 0.0003) were the predominant high risk factors, in this group 55.55% had more than one risk factor. The association with HBV and syphilis was high (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0005). 5/18 (27.77%) knew they were HIV positive; 3/18 (16.66%) had the suspicion they were HIV positive and 10/18 (55.55%) did not know it; however the risk factors were the same in those groups. In the knew/suspicion group the main reasons for blood donation were: Performing the test once more, 6; failure in the predonation questionnaire, 1; family pressure, 1. In the group that ignored their HIV positivity: ignorance of belonging to a high-risk group, 6; lack of confidence in the

  7. ABO blood group and risk of cancer: A register-based cohort study of 1.6 million blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Senthil K; Hwang, Jinseub; Rostgaard, Klaus; Nyrén, Olof; Ullum, Henrik; Pedersen, Ole B V; Erikstrup, Christian; Melbye, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Pawitan, Yudi; Edgren, Gustaf

    2016-10-01

    The associations between ABO blood group and cancer risk have been studied repeatedly, but results have been variable. Consistent associations have only been reported for pancreatic and gastric cancers. We estimated associations between different ABO blood groups and site-specific cancer risk in a large cohort of healthy blood donors from Sweden and Denmark. A total of 1.6 million donors were followed over 27 million person-years (20 million in Sweden and 7 million in Denmark). We observed 119,584 cancer cases. Blood groups A, AB and B were associated either with increased or decreased risk of cancer at 13 anatomical sites (p≤0.05), compared to blood group O. Consistent with assessment using a false discovery rate approach, significant associations with ABO blood group were observed for cancer of the pancreas, breast, and upper gastrointestinal tract (mouth, salivary glands, pharynx, esophageal adenocarcinoma and stomach). Our study reconfirms the association between ABO blood group and cancer risk and exact underlying mechanisms involved needs further research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hepatitis B core antibody testing in Indian blood donors: A double-edged sword!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R N Makroo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until lately, anti-HBc antibodies were considered an effective marker for occult Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection and have served their role in improving blood safety. But, with the development of advanced tests for HBV DNA detection, the role of anti-HBc in this regard stands uncertain. Materials and Methods: Anti-HBc and HBsAg ELISA and ID-NAT tests were run in parallel on donor blood samples between April 1, 2006 and December 31, 2010 at the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi. A positive ID-NAT was followed by Discriminatory NAT assay. Results: A total of 94 247 samples were tested with a total core positivity rate of 10.22%. We identified nearly 9.17% of donors who were reactive for anti-HBc and negative for HBsAg and HBV DNA. These are the donors who are potentially non-infectious and may be returned to the donor pool. Conclusion: Although anti HBc testing has a definite role in improving blood safety, centers that have incorporated NAT testing may not derive any additional benefit by performing anti-HBc testing, especially in resource-limited countries like ours.

  9. Significance of isolated hepatitis B core antibody in blood donors from São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALMEIDA NETO Cesar de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical significance of isolated anti-HBc is still a challenge. To elucidate the real importance of this finding in our blood donors, an investigation algorithm was tested. One hundred and twelve isolated anti-HBc seropositive blood donors underwent clinical evaluation and retesting of HBV markers. Those who presented repeatedly reactive isolated anti-HBc, received a single dose of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine to verify anti-HBs early response. A HBV-DNA determination by PCR was done for those who did not test positive to anti-HBs after vaccine. The level of anti-HBc was recorded as a ratio of the sample-to-cut-off values (S:C ratio in 57 candidates at donation. Comparing true and false-positive anti-HBc results, the different S:C ratios of them were statistically significant and when less than 2, implying in a false-positive result probability over 80%. A high percent of false-positive results (16.07% was verified after anti-HBc retesting. HBV immunity was characterized in 49.11%, either by anti-HBs detection in retesting (15.18%, or after a single dose HBV vaccination (33.93%. HBV-DNA was negative in all tested donors. In conclusion, this algorithm was useful to clarify the meaning of isolated anti-HBc in most of our blood donors.

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Seroprevalence of Brucellosis among Blood Donors of Satara District, Maharashtra

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    Smita Mangalgi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgroind: In endemic area for brucellosis background levels of antibodies are found in healthy populations. Aims & Objectives: Theaim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of anti-brucella antibodies and base line titres among the blood donors.Materials and Methods: 321 blood samples were collected from blood donors. Serological tests - Rose Bengal Plate Agglutination Test(RBPT, Standard Tube Agglutination Test (STAT and 2-Mercaptoethanol Agglutination Test (2ME, were carried out on all the blood samples. Results: Seroprevalence of brucellosis in blood donors was 5.91%, 3.11 % and 0.62% by RBPT, STAT and 2ME respectively. History of animal exposure and occasional raw milkingestion was observed in 137 individuals residing in rural area. Conclusion: Brucellosis might be common in rural population who comein contact with infected animals and or consume raw milk. For the diagnosis of brucellosis RBPT test should be used only for screening purpose and the positive results should be confirmed by STAT and 2ME tests. Titres of 160 IU and above for STAT and 80 IU and above for 2ME test can be considered significant for diagnostic purpose.

  11. Frequency of HIV type 2 infections among blood donor population from India: A 10-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannangai R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In India, HIV-2 epidemic is alongside with HIV-1. Blood banks are introducing nucleic acid testing (NAT for screening. The limitation of NAT systems is the inability to detect HIV-2. Materials and Method : An analysis of HIV screening of a blood bank at a tertiary care center from 1998 to 2007 was carried out. Results : A total of 175026 donors were screened by serological assays and 789 were reactive for HIV antibody. Only 478 (61% were confirmed positive by Western blot/immunoblot. There were 465 (97.2% donations positive for HIV-1, 6 (1.3% for HIV-2 (monotypic infection and 7 (1.5% for HIV-1 and HIV-2 (dual infection. Conclusion : We show the presence of HIV-2 infection among the blood donors and the need for incorporating HIV-2 detection also in the NAT systems.

  12. Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Reilly, Marie; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    -response comparisons within a cohort of Swedish and Danish blood donors. METHODS: We used a nested case-control study design, in which case patients were defined as all donors who were diagnosed with a malignancy between their first recorded blood donation and study termination (n = 10866). Control subjects (n...... = 107140) were individually matched on sex, age, and county of residence. Using conditional logistic regression, we estimated relative risks of cancer according to number of blood donations made or estimated iron loss 3-12 years before a case patient was diagnosed with cancer. All statistical tests were...... two-sided. RESULTS: No clear association was observed between number of donations and risk of cancer overall. However, between the lowest ( 90th percentile, > 2.7 g) categories of estimated iron loss, there was a trend (P(trend)

  13. Donor Tag Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Donor Tag Game Donor Tag Game This feature requires version 6 or later of ... of Needles LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Make a ...

  14. Comprehensive description of blood microbiome from healthy donors assessed by 16S targeted metagenomic sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Païssé, Sandrine; Valle, Carine; Servant, Florence; Courtney, Michael; Burcelin, Rémy; Amar, Jacques; Lelouvier, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the blood of healthy humans is not as sterile as previously supposed. The objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive description of the microbiome present in different fractions of the blood of healthy individuals. The study was conducted in 30 healthy blood donors to the French national blood collection center (Établissement Français du Sang). We have set up a 16S rDNA quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay as well as a 16S targeted metagenomics sequencing pipeline specifically designed to analyze the blood microbiome, which we have used on whole blood as well as on different blood fractions (buffy coat [BC], red blood cells [RBCs], and plasma). Most of the blood bacterial DNA is located in the BC (93.74%), and RBCs contain more bacterial DNA (6.23%) than the plasma (0.03%). The distribution of 16S DNA is different for each fraction and spreads over a relatively broad range among donors. At the phylum level, blood fractions contain bacterial DNA mostly from the Proteobacteria phylum (more than 80%) but also from Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. At deeper taxonomic levels, there are striking differences between the bacterial profiles of the different blood fractions. We demonstrate that a diversified microbiome exists in healthy blood. This microbiome has most likely an important physiologic role and could be implicated in certain transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections. In this regard, the amount of 16S bacterial DNA or the microbiome profile could be monitored to improve the safety of the blood supply. © 2016 AABB.

  15. Seroprevalence and diagnosis of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafesse, Tadesse Bekele; Gebru, Addis Adera; Gobalee, Semgne; Belay, Gosaye Degu; Belew, Molla Teferi; Ataro, Demelash; Ebrahim, Belay Ali; Shebeshi, Getachew Mekonnon; Yimam, Yonas

    2017-01-01

    Blood transfusion is one of the most important therapeutic options of life-saving intervention for recipients who are in diseased or non-diseased conditions with severe blood loss. However, it is associated with certain risks which can lead to adverse consequences that may cause acute or delayed complications and bring the risk of transfusion-transmissible infections including HIV, Hepatitis B & C and Syphilis. So, there might be a fatal risk instead of life saving. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive and reliable tabulation of available data on seroprevalence and diagnosis of HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis infections among blood donors. We searched studies reporting the prevalence rate of HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis infections among blood donors that were published between October 2009 and June 2016, using databases of PubMed, Scopus, MEDLINE, Elsevier, ScienceDirect, EBSCO, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Web of Science with keywords: ``Hepatitis C Virus'', ``Hepatitis B Virus'', ``HIV'', ``Syphilis'', ``Seroprevalence'', and ``blood donor''. The seroprevalence of HBV and HCV was highest in African countries as compared to others continents, predominantly the West African region with a range of 10.0% to 14.96% and 1.5% to 8.69%, respectively, while the overall seropositivity of HIV and syphilis infection show a significant declining pattern through successive years globally, even though relatively higher prevalence rate was observed among older age and those with low level of education. There is a problem during selection, diagnoses and screening process in developing nations primarily due to shortage of sensitive screening test kits, highly qualified human resource and lack of proper standard operating procedures and hence, the safety of blood and blood products are the primary threats in the region. Proper clinical diagnosis and screening method should be applied during blood donation and therefore, all the donated blood should be screened properly for

  16. Exploring the pattern of blood donor beliefs in first-time, novice, and experienced donors: differentiating reluctant altruism, pure altruism, impure altruism, and warm glow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferguson, E.; Atsma, F.; Kort, W. de; Veldhuizen, I.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior and theories of altruism, this article explores how multiple motivations and beliefs for blood donation are clustered and change across the donor career. In so doing important distinctions, for blood donation, between impure altruism,

  17. Risk factors for retrovirus and hepatitis virus infections in accepted blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Brian; Kessler, Debra; Vahidnia, Farnaz; Leparc, German; Krysztof, David E; Shaz, Beth; Kamel, Hany; Glynn, Simone; Dodd, Roger Y; Stramer, Susan L

    2015-05-01

    Risk factor surveillance among infected blood donors provides information on the effectiveness of eligibility assessment and is critical for reducing risk of transfusion-transmitted infection. American Red Cross, Blood Systems, Inc., New York Blood Center, and OneBlood participated in a case-control study from 2010 to 2013. Donors with serologic and nucleic acid testing (NAT) or NAT-only confirmed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), or serology-confirmed human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infections (cases) and donors with false-positive results (controls) were interviewed for putative behavioral and demographic risks. Frequencies and adjusted odds ratios (AORs) from multivariable logistic regression analyses for each exposure in cases compared to controls are reported. In the study, 196 HIV, 292 HBV, 316 HCV, and 198 HTLV cases, and 1587 controls were interviewed. For HIV, sex with an HIV+ person (AOR, 132; 95% confidence interval [CI], 27-650) and male-male sex (AOR, 62; 95% CI, 27-140) were primary risk factors. For HBV, first-time donor status (AOR, 16; 95% CI, 10-27), sex with an injection drug user (IDU; AOR, 11; 95% CI, 5-28), and black race (AOR, 11; 95% CI, 6-19) were primary. For HCV, IDU (AOR, 42; 95% CI, 13-136), first time (AOR, 18; 95% CI, 10-30), and a family member with hepatitis (AOR, 15; 95% CI, 6-40) were primary. For HTLV, sex with an IDU (AOR, 22; 95% CI, 10-48), 55 years old or more (AOR, 21; 95% CI, 8-52], and first time (AOR, 15; 95% CI, 9-24) were primary. Despite education efforts and risk screening, individuals with deferrable risks still donate; they may fail to understand or ignore or do not believe they have risk. Recipients have potential transfusion-transmitted infection risk because of nondisclosure by donors. © 2014 AABB.

  18. Comparative infectious serology testing of pre- and post-mortem blood samples from cornea donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkemeyer, I; Pruss, A; Kalus, U; Schroeter, J

    2012-08-01

    Defined serological blood tests of deceased cornea donors are required to minimize the risk of viral infections of a transplant recipient as much as possible. Haemolysis, autolysis and bacterial contamination, may produce significant changes of post-mortem blood samples, which may lead to false serological test results. Pre- and post-mortem findings from the same cornea donors of the University Tissue Bank of the Charité in the years 2004-2009 (n = 487) were retrospectively analyzed and compared. The test results from pre-mortem blood samples were defined as the reference for the post-mortem blood test. Of 487 cornea donors, there were a total of 21 cases (4.3%) with discrepancies between serological test results from pre- and post-mortem blood samples. Of these, 7 values referred to the HBsAg-testing, 3 to the anti-HBs-, 1 to the anti-HBcIgG + IgM-, 1 to the anti-HCV-, 4 to the anti-HIV 1/2- and 5 to the TPLA-findings. False negative results within post-mortem serology occurred in 4 of 487 cases (0.8%). False positive results within the post-mortem blood samples occurred at a much more frequent rate, with 17 of 487 cases (3.5%). Discrepancies between serological pre- and post-mortem blood tests occur mainly due to the use of non-validated test systems. Therefore, it seems reasonable to test pre- and post-mortem blood samples serologically, whenever possible, at the same time, regardless of the sample age. Positive results, regardless of the sample type, should always be retested with validated confirmation tests (e.g. NAT), in order to differentiate between false and true positive results.

  19. Clinical and epidemiological profile of female blood donors with positive serology for viral hepatitis B

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    Janaína Luz Narciso-Schiavon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION:Since women are frequently the minority among blood donors worldwide, studies evaluating this population usually reflect male features. We assessed the features of female blood donors with positive serology for HBV and compared them with those of men.METHODS The study comprised consecutive blood donors referred to a specialized liver disease center to be evaluated due to HBsAg- and/or anti-HBc-positive tests.RESULTS: The study encompassed 1,273 individuals, 219 (17.2% of whom were referred due to positive HBsAg test and 1,054 (82.8% due to reactive anti-HBc test. Subjects' mean age was 36.8±10.9 years, and 28.7% were women. Female blood donors referred for positive HBsAg screening tests demonstrated higher prevalence of healthcare workers (9.3% vs 2.5% and lower prevalence of sexual risk behaviors (15.1% vs 41.1% and alcohol abuse (1.9% vs 19.8% compared to men. Women had lower ALT (0.6 vs 0.8×ULN, AST (0.6 vs 0.8×ULN, direct bilirubin (0.2 vs 0.3mg/dL, and alkaline phosphatase (0.5 vs 0.6×ULN levels and higher platelet count (223,380±50,293 vs 195,020±53,060/mm3. Women also had a higher prevalence of false-positive results (29.6% vs 17.0%. No differences were observed with respect to liver biopsies. Female blood donors referenced for reactive anti-HBc screening tests presented similar clinical, epidemiological, and biochemical characteristics to those reported for positive HBsAg screening tests and similarly had a higher prevalence of false-reactive results.CONCLUSIONS: Compared to men, female blood donors with positive HBsAg and/or anti-HBc screening tests demonstrated higher prevalence of professional risk and false-positive results and reduced alteration of liver chemistry.

  20. Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Among Blood Donors in Bushehr, South of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Behrouz; Mazloom Kalimani, Farnaz; Pourfatolah, Ali Akbar; Azimzadeh, Masoud; Mankhian, Alireza; Akbarzadeh, Samad; Hajiani, Gholamreza; Kooshesh, Faramarz; Khamisipour, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    Although so far several studies have determined the hepatitis E virus (HEV) prevalence in some parts of Iran, no data exists regarding the HEV seroprevalence in Bushehr province as the southernmost point in Iran yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of anti-HEV IgG among the blood donors in Bushehr. A total of 628 blood donor samples were collected from September to October 2013, after obtaining informed written consents, and analyzed for the presence of anti-HEV IgG using commercial HEV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. All the samples were tested by two ELISA kits and evaluated for liver function test. Overall, 105 (16.7%) blood samples were positive for HEV-specific-IgG antibodies, while 523 (83.8%) were negative. The presence of anti-HEV IgG was not associated with gender; however, it was correlated with age. It was indicated that the anti-HEV prevalence increases by age and there was a significant difference between the age groups regarding HEV seropositivity. High HEV seroprevalence (16.7%) was observed among the blood donors in Bushehr province. It appears that exposure to HEV increases with age; although, more people should be examined.

  1. Usutu Virus Antibodies in Blood Donors and Healthy Forestry Workers in the Lombardy Region, Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percivalle, Elena; Sassera, Davide; Rovida, Francesca; Isernia, Paola; Fabbi, Massimo; Baldanti, Fausto; Marone, Piero

    2017-09-01

    Usutu virus (USUV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, is known to circulate at low prevalence in Northern Italy, and has been reported to cause overt infection. USUV was first reported in Europe in 2001, but a retrospective study showed that it has been present in Italy at least since 1996. Seroprevalence data for USUV antibodies in sera are being collected in different European countries, showing circulation at low prevalence in human populations. Interestingly, two consecutive studies in Northern Italy indicate a possible increase in the presence of the virus, from 0% to 0.23% seroprevalence in blood donors. In this study, antibodies against USUV were measured in 3 consecutive blood samples collected from October 2014 to December 2015 from 33 forestry workers in the Po river valley, while samples from 200 blood donors from the same geographical area were tested in parallel. Neutralizing and IgG antibodies were found in six forestry workers (18.1%) and in two blood donors (1%). Our results indicate that USUV circulation in the examined area, part of a highly populated region in Northern Italy, is higher than expected. Healthy subjects exhibit a higher prevalence than what was found in a previous report in an adjoining region (0.23%), while the population at risk shows a much higher prevalence value (18.1%).

  2. Hepatitis B, HIV, and Syphilis Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women and Blood Donors in Cameroon

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    Jodie Dionne-Odom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We estimated seroprevalence and correlates of selected infections in pregnant women and blood donors in a resource-limited setting. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of laboratory seroprevalence data from pregnant women and voluntary blood donors from facilities in Cameroon in 2014. Rapid tests were performed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen, syphilis treponemal antibodies, and HIV-1/2 antibodies. Blood donations were also tested for hepatitis C and malaria. Results. The seroprevalence rates and ranges among 7069 pregnant women were hepatitis B 4.4% (1.1–9.6%, HIV 6% (3.0–10.2%, and syphilis 1.7% (1.3–3.8% with significant variability among the sites. Correlates of infection in pregnancy in adjusted regression models included urban residence for hepatitis B (aOR 2.9, CI 1.6–5.4 and HIV (aOR 3.5, CI 1.9–6.7. Blood donor seroprevalence rates and ranges were hepatitis B 6.8% (5.0–8.8%, HIV 2.2% (1.4–2.8%, syphilis 4% (3.3–4.5%, malaria 1.9%, and hepatitis C 1.7% (0.5–2.5%. Conclusions. Hepatitis B, HIV, and syphilis infections are common among pregnant women and blood donors in Cameroon with higher rates in urban areas. Future interventions to reduce vertical transmission should include universal screening for these infections early in pregnancy and provision of effective prevention tools including the birth dose of univalent hepatitis B vaccine.

  3. Hepatitis B, HIV, and Syphilis Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women and Blood Donors in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne-Odom, Jodie; Mbah, Rahel; Rembert, Nicole J; Tancho, Samuel; Halle-Ekane, Gregory E; Enah, Comfort; Welty, Thomas K; Tih, Pius M; Tita, Alan T N

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated seroprevalence and correlates of selected infections in pregnant women and blood donors in a resource-limited setting. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of laboratory seroprevalence data from pregnant women and voluntary blood donors from facilities in Cameroon in 2014. Rapid tests were performed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen, syphilis treponemal antibodies, and HIV-1/2 antibodies. Blood donations were also tested for hepatitis C and malaria. Results. The seroprevalence rates and ranges among 7069 pregnant women were hepatitis B 4.4% (1.1-9.6%), HIV 6% (3.0-10.2%), and syphilis 1.7% (1.3-3.8%) with significant variability among the sites. Correlates of infection in pregnancy in adjusted regression models included urban residence for hepatitis B (aOR 2.9, CI 1.6-5.4) and HIV (aOR 3.5, CI 1.9-6.7). Blood donor seroprevalence rates and ranges were hepatitis B 6.8% (5.0-8.8%), HIV 2.2% (1.4-2.8%), syphilis 4% (3.3-4.5%), malaria 1.9%, and hepatitis C 1.7% (0.5-2.5%). Conclusions. Hepatitis B, HIV, and syphilis infections are common among pregnant women and blood donors in Cameroon with higher rates in urban areas. Future interventions to reduce vertical transmission should include universal screening for these infections early in pregnancy and provision of effective prevention tools including the birth dose of univalent hepatitis B vaccine.

  4. [Prevalence of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in blood bank donors from the IMSS General Hospital in Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ligonio, Angel; Ramírez-Sánchez, Michaía Elián; González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; López-Monteon, Aracely

    2006-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in blood donors from Hospital General Regional (HGRO) of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS per its abbreviation in Spanish). Between October 2001 and January 2002, blood samples were collected from voluntary donors at the blood bank of the Hospital General Regional of IMSS in Orizaba; Veracruz, Mexico. The samples were assayed for anti-T. cruzi by ELISA, Western blot and IFI, using a recombinant protein (MBP::Hsp70), and crude extract from epimastigotes. A total of 420 blood donors were studied; two of them were seropositive for ELISA,Western blot and IFI, with a seroprevalence of 0.48%. Some blood donors at the HGRO hospital were seropositive for T. cruzi, showing the risk of contamination by blood transfusion. Routine serologic screening with highly sensitive and specific immunological techniques are needed.

  5. High levels of neutralizing IL-6 autoantibodies in 0.1% of apparently healthy blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Pia; Svenson, Morten; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    as the vaccination-induced IL-6-deficient mice. Such donors might be IL-6 deficient, and if so, IL-6 seems be dispensable for several months in otherwise healthy individuals. Such highly positive donors also explain why normal human IgG for pharmaceutical use may contain high anti-IL-6 activity. Finally, transfusion......IL-6-specific autoantibodies (aAb-IL-6) have been reported in diseased and healthy individuals. We recently established a model for aAb-IL-6 in different mouse strains, based on vaccination with immunogenic IL-6 analogues, in which titers of aAb-IL-6 above 1,000 resulted in an in vivo IL-6...... deficiency. Here, we examined aAb-IL-6 in 4,230 blood donors. Stable low titers of aAb-IL-6 were found in 9% of the donors, while 1% had titers ranging from 64 to greater than 10,000. Such aAb-IL-6-positive donors appeared normal with no overt signs of pathology. Natural and recombinant forms of IL-6 bound...

  6. Hepatitis C virus infection in blood donors from the state of Puebla, Mexico

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    Contreras-Mioni Laura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, 130 million persons are estimated to be infected with HCV. Puebla is the Mexican state with the highest mortality due to hepatic cirrhosis. Therefore, it is imperative to obtain epidemiological data on HCV infection in asymptomatic people of this region. The objective of present study was to analyze the prevalence of antibodies and genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV in blood donors from Puebla, Mexico. Results The overall prevalence was 0.84% (515/61553. Distribution by region was: North, 0.86% (54/6270; Southeast, 1.04% (75/7197; Southwest, 0.93% (36/3852; and Central, 0.79% (350/44234. Ninety-six donors were enrolled for detection and genotyping of virus, from which 37 (38.5% were HCV-RNA positive. Detected subtypes were: 1a (40.5%, 1b (27.0%, mixed 1a/1b (18.9%, undetermined genotype 1 (5.4%, 2a (2.7%, 2b (2.7%, and mixed 1a/2a (2.7%. All recovered donors with S/CO > 39 were HCV-RNA positive (11/11 and presented elevated ALT; in donors with S/CO Conclusions HCV prevalence of donors in Puebla is similar to other Mexican states. The most prevalent genotype is 1, of which subtype 1a is the most frequent.

  7. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in blood donors from Veracruz State, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Romano, Pablo; Cámara-Contreras, Mireya; Bravo-Sarmiento, Elidé; López-Balderas, Nayali

    2015-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas disease. Of the Mexican states, Veracruz is among the most affected by this sickness. However, the actual epidemiologic situation of this disease is not well understood. This study sought to determine the prevalence and risk factors for Chagas disease among Veracruzan blood donors. Blood donors from Centro Estatal de la Transfusion Sanguinea de Veracruz were included. Blood units were serologically scrutinized for T. cruzi antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To identify risk factors, demographic data were collected from the medical records of positive donors and a representative sample of healthy donors. A total of 87,232 donations were analyzed, and the mean prevalence of T. cruzi was found to be 0.5%. The identified risk factors were living as a couple and in a rural area, having a low level of education, being a farmer, dwelling in a house with earthen or wooden walls and a tile or thatch roof, living with domestic animals, recognition of or exposure to triatomine bugs, and residing in the Huasteca region. An increase of rural-living donors infected with T. cruzi was observed in the past 3 years of the study period. The prevalence to Chagas disease has not decreased in the past decade and the disease appears to be spreading in rural areas of Veracruz. This increases the risk of T. cruzi transfusion-transmitted infection, not only in Veracruz and Mexico, but also in other nonendemic countries that receive immigrants from Veracruz State. © 2014 AABB.

  8. Post-donation telephonic interview of blood donors providing an insight into delayed adverse reactions: First attempt in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Aseem K; Aggarwal, Geet; Dara, Ravi C; Arora, Dinesh; Srivastava, Khushboo; Raina, Vimarsh

    2017-04-01

    Blood donor experiences both immediate adverse reactions (IAR) and delayed adverse reactions (DAR). With limited published data available on the incidence of DAR, a study was conducted to estimate incidence and profile of DAR through telephonic interview. Study was conducted over a 45-day period for consecutive volunteer whole blood donations at tertiary care hospital. Donors were divided into first-time, repeat and regular and were monitored for IAR. They were given written copy of post-donation advice. Donors were contacted telephonically three weeks post-donation and enquired about general wellbeing and specific DAR in accordance with a standard n international (International Society of Blood Transfusion) standard format. Donors participated in the study of which 1.6% donors experienced an IAR. Much larger number reported DAR (10.3% vs.1.6% pdonors (age donors (>50 years). First time (12.3%) and repeat donors (13.5%) had similar frequency of DAR but were lower among regular donors (6.7%). DARs are more common than IAR and are of different profile. Post-donation interview has provided an insight into donor experiences and can be used as a valuable tool in donor hemovigilance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk Factors for Bartonella species Infection in Blood Donors from Southeast Brazil.

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    Pedro Paulo Vissotto de Paiva Diniz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria from the genus Bartonella are emerging blood-borne bacteria, capable of causing long-lasting infection in marine and terrestrial mammals, including humans. Bartonella are generally well adapted to their main host, causing persistent infection without clinical manifestation. However, these organisms may cause severe disease in natural or accidental hosts. In humans, Bartonella species have been detected from sick patients presented with diverse disease manifestations, including cat scratch disease, trench fever, bacillary angiomatosis, endocarditis, polyarthritis, or granulomatous inflammatory disease. However, with the advances in diagnostic methods, subclinical bloodstream infection in humans has been reported, with the potential for transmission through blood transfusion been recently investigated by our group. The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with Bartonella species infection in asymptomatic blood donors presented at a major blood bank in Southeastern Brazil. Five hundred blood donors were randomly enrolled and tested for Bartonella species infection by specialized blood cultured coupled with high-sensitive PCR assays. Epidemiological questionnaires were designed to cover major potential risk factors, such as age, gender, ethnicity, contact with companion animals, livestock, or wild animals, bites from insects or animal, economical status, among other factors. Based on multivariate logistic regression, bloodstream infection with B. henselae or B. clarridgeiae was associated with cat contact (adjusted OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.1-9.6 or history of tick bite (adjusted OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.3-13.4. These risk factors should be considered during donor screening, as bacteremia by these Bartonella species may not be detected by traditional laboratory screening methods, and it may be transmitted by blood transfusion.

  10. Adverse reactions in blood and apheresis donors: experience from two Italian transfusion centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocco, Isabella; Franchini, Massimo; Garozzo, Giovanni; Gandini, Anna Rosa; Gandini, Giorgio; Bonomo, Pietro; Aprili, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Blood and apheresis donations are widely considered to be safe with a low incidence of adverse reactions and injuries; however, data reported in the medical literature on the prevalence of adverse events in donors and studies on the predictive risk factors for donor reactions are limited and contradictory. From January 2002 to December 2006 we recorded every adverse reaction verified during 240,596 consecutive blood and apheresis donations (183,855 homologous whole blood donations, 6,669 autologous whole blood donations, 38,647 plasmapheresis, 2,641 plateletpheresis and 8,784 multicomponent donations) at the Italian Transfusion Centres of Verona and Ragusa,. Using a special, pre-arranged form within the quality system, a total of 686 adverse reactions (related to 0.28% of all donations) were recorded. Vasovagal reactions, mostly of mild intensity, were the most commonly observed adverse reactions, with a frequency of 0.20% (487/ 240,596). The frequency of the vasovagal reactions varied according to the different types of donation, being 0.19% (346/183,855) for homologous whole blood donations, 0.24% (16/6,669) for autologous whole blood donations, 0.16% (63/38,647) for plasmapheresis, 0.68% (18/2,641) for plateletpheresis and 0.49 (43/8,784) for multicomponent donations. Citrate toxicity was reported in 0.38% (189/50,072) of apheresis donations. Severe adverse reactions were very rare, as they occurred in 0.004% of the donations (10/240,596). In conclusion, the results of our 5-year survey document that apheresis and blood donation are safe procedures for the donor with a low incidence of adverse reactions; the adverse reactions that did occur were mostly mild and resolved rapidly.

  11. Improving detection of celiac disease patients: a prospective study in iron-deficient blood donors without anemia in north Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Renato; Da Ponte, Alessandro; Tabuso, Maria; Mazzucato, Mario; De Re, Valli; Caggiari, Laura; Fornasarig, Mara; Maiero, Stefania; Orzes, Enrico; Canzonieri, Vincenzo

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of celiac disease in asymptomatic iron-deficient blood donors without anemia. Between the period February 2004 and January 2006, iron-deficient male donors with serum ferritin less than 30 ng/ml and female donors with serum ferritin less than 10 ng/ml were screened for immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antitissue transglutaminase antibodies and donors with positive antibody titers were referred for endoscopy with multiple biopsies of the second/third part of duodenum. The frequency of celiac disease in iron-deficient blood donors without anemia and the predictive value of ferritin levels were analyzed. Of the 1679 blood donors, 579 (34.4%) were identified as iron deficient and screened for celiac disease. 290 (50%) were men (mean age: 39 years; range: 19-65) and 289 (50%) were women (mean age: 37 years; range: 19-63). Thirteen donors (2.2%) were positive for serum IgA antitissue transglutaminase antibodies, of whom six were men (2.0%) and seven were women (2.4%). 10 donors of 13 (1.7%) at histology presented alterations in the mucosal architecture according to the modified Marsh classification (Marsh I-III). Low ferritin level was not predictive for celiac disease (median serum ferritin level in celiac donors 14.7 ng/ml and in nonceliac donors 15.8 ng/ml, Wilcoxon test: P not significant). The prevalence of celiac disease among iron-deficient blood donors without anemia was 1.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease in our population of asymptomatic iron-deficient blood donors without anemia was 1.7%. We suggest screening for celiac disease in iron-deficient individuals without anemia to increase diagnosis of asymptomatic celiac disease.

  12. Brazilian propolis promotes immunomodulation on human cells from American Tegumentar Leishmaniasis patients and healthy donors infected with L. braziliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Thomazelli, Ana Paula Fortes; Tomiotto-Pellissier, Fernanda; da Silva, Suelen Santos; Panis, Carolina; Orsini, Tatiane Marcusso; Cataneo, Allan Henrique Depieri; Miranda-Sapla, Milena Menegazzo; Custódio, Luiz Antonio; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia Hideko; Bordignon, Juliano; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Sforcin, José Maurício; Pavanelli, Wander Rogério; Conchon-Costa, Ivete

    2017-01-01

    American Tegumentar Leishmaniasis (ATL) is an infectious disease caused by Leishmania parasites with ineffective treatment. The properties of propolis have been studied in different experimental studies, however, few works have investigated the effects of propolis on human-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in leishmaniasis models. Thus, we investigate the immunomodulatory effects of propolis treatment on PBMC from ATL patients and on PBMC from healthy donors infected with Leishmania braziliensis. Our data demonstrate that propolis pretreatment shows immunomodulatory effects on both healthy donors and ATL patients adherent cells, increasing IL-4 and IL-17 and decreasing IL-10, in either the presence or absence of the L. braziliensis infection, demonstrating that propolis contributes with the decrease of the inflammation and could also contribute with parasite control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tissue perfusion in neonates undergoing open-heart surgery using autologous umbilical cord blood or donor blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasovskyi, K; Fedevych, O; McMullan, D M; Mykychak, Y; Vorobiova, G; Zhovnir, V; Yemets, I

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluates the hemoglobin-oxygen relationship and tissue perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in neonates undergoing open-heart surgery using autologous umbilical cord blood or donor blood components. We compared perioperative hematocrit (Hct), fetal hemoglobin (HbF), p(50)O(2), pH, pCO(2), serum lactate, duration of mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay in neonates undergoing open-heart surgery using autologous umbilical cord blood (Group I, N=45) or donor blood components (Group II, N=65). The groups were similar with respect to diagnosis, weight, type of procedure, duration of CPB and duration of myocardial ischemia. Mean p(50)O(2) was significantly lower in Group I during CPB (19.7 vs. 22.3 mmHg, p=0.004) and at the end of CPB (20.1 vs. 22.8 mmHg, p=0.003). Median peak lactate during CPB was higher in Group I (4.8 vs. 2.2 mmol/l, pblood, tissue oxygen delivery appears to be preserved in neonates who undergo open-heart surgery using autologous umbilical cord blood. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity and hepatitis B surface antigenemia (HBSAG) among blood donors in Benin city, Edo state, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umolu, Patience Idia; Okoror, Lawrence Ehis; Orhue, Philip

    2005-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B virus are blood borne pathogens that can be transmitted through blood transfusion and could pose a huge problem in areas where mechanisms of ensuring blood safety are suspect. This study became necessary in a population where most of the blood for transfusion is from commercial blood donors. A total of 130 donors comprising 120 commercial donors and 10 voluntary donors were tested for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B surface antigen in Benin city using Immunocomb HIV - 1 and 2 Biospot kit and Quimica Clinica Aplicada direct latex agglutination method respectively. Thirteen (10%) samples were HIV seropositive and 7(5.8%) were HBsAg positive. The age bracket 18 - 25years had the highest numbers of donors and also had the highest number of HBsAg positive cases (7.8%) while the age group 29 - 38years had highest number of HIV seropositive cases. High prevalence of HIV antibodies and Hepatitis B surface antigen was found among commercial blood donors. Appropriate and compulsory screening of blood donors using sensitive methods, must be ensured to prevent post transfusion hepatitis and HIV.

  15. Modelling antecedents of blood donation motivation among non-donors of varying age and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, K P H; Abraham, C; Ruiter, R A C; Veldhuizen, I J T; Dehing, C J G; Bos, A E R; Schaalma, H P

    2009-02-01

    Understanding blood donation motivation among non-donors is prerequisite to effective recruitment. Two studies explored the psychological antecedents of blood donation motivation and the generalisability of a model of donation motivation across groups differing in age and educational level. An older well-educated population and a younger less well-educated population were sampled. The studies assessed the role of altruism, fear of blood/needles and donation-specific cognitions including attitudes and normative beliefs derived from an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Across both samples, results showed that affective attitude, subjective norm, descriptive norm, and moral norm were the most important correlates of blood donation intentions. Self-efficacy was more important among the younger less well-educated group. Altruism was related to donation motivation but only indirectly through moral norm. Similarly, fear of blood/needles only had an indirect effect on motivation through affective attitude and self-efficacy. Additional analyses with the combined data set found no age or education moderation effects, suggesting that this core model of donation-specific cognitions can be used to inform future practical interventions recruiting new blood donors in the general population.

  16. SALMON SOFT ROE DNA ON BLOOD CELLS SECRETION OF CYTOKINES IN HEALTHY DONORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Fedjanina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Salmon soft roe DNA influence on healthy donors blood cells secretion of early hemopoietic factors (IL-3, GM-CSF, TNFα as well as biologically active substance influence on cytokine balance of Тh1 and Тh2 responses (IFNγ, IL-10 in vitro was studied. It is established, that DNA has modulatory effect on secretion of all investigated cytokines - IL-3, GM-CSF, TNFα, INFγ and IL-10 by blood cells of healthy donors, increases their initially low concentration, reduces initially high and does not have essential influence at an average level of their secretion. Under action of DNA IFNγ level (stimulation index=3,3 increases more significantly than IL-10 level (stimulation index =1,9. Thus, salmon soft roe DNA possesses immunomodulatory properties.

  17. Genetic factors influencing ferritin levels in 14,126 blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Erik; Rigas, Andreas S; Thørner, Lise W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many biologic functions depend on sufficient iron levels, and iron deficiency is especially common among blood donors. Genetic variants associated with iron levels have been identified, but the impact of genetic variation on iron levels among blood donors remains unclear. STUDY DESIGN...... containing protein gene (BTBD9-associated with restless legs syndrome; rs9357271); and in the Transferrin gene (TF; rs2280673 and rs1830084). Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of each SNP on ferritin levels and the risk of iron deficiency (ferritin .../mL). RESULTS: In HFE, the G-allele of rs1800562 was associated with lower iron stores in both sexes. This was also true for the C-allele of rs179945, but in men only. Also, the T-allele of TMPRSS6 rs855791 was negatively associated with iron stores in men. Homozygocity for C in rs1799945 was associated...

  18. Implications of a switch to a 100% apheresis platelet supply for patients and for blood donors: a risk benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, T; Alt-Mayer, T; Greinacher, A; Bux, J

    2016-11-01

    A 100% apheresis platelet supply is considered to increase transfusion safety by lowering donor exposures for transfusion recipients. We performed a risk benefit analysis to contrast the reduction of donor exposures and the risk of contaminated blood products in the nation-wide inventory with the donor risks associated with a switch to a 100% apheresis platelet supply in Germany. Donor exposures and the number of contaminated blood products resulting from HIV-like, HBV-like, HCV-like pathogens and two theoretical agents with infection rates of 10 and 1000 in 100 000, respectively, were calculated for a 100% apheresis platelet supply in Germany based on the 2006-2012 hemovigilance reports. These numbers were compared with the current mixed platelet supply of pooled and apheresis platelets. Moreover, additional donation time and apheresis donor complications resulting from a 100% apheresis platelet supply were estimated. Per million total blood products (red cells, platelets, fresh frozen plasma), a 100% apheresis platelet supply would reduce donor exposures by 87 100 and the number of contaminated blood products ranging from 0·8 to 871·1. On the other hand, this requires additional 29 478 apheresis donations, 3·4 years additional donor time, and would be associated with 58 additional donor complications, respectively. A 100% apheresis platelet supply would reduce donor exposures and the number of contaminated blood products in the inventory, but would increase apheresis complications in donors. Potential risks for patients must be carefully weighed against the risks for donors, dependent on the specific pathogen scenario. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  19. Blood donors' positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections: the Serbian Military Medical Academy experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučetić, Dušan; Kecman, Gorica; Ilić, Vesna; Balint, Bela

    2015-10-01

    Members of armed forces worldwide are considered to be very susceptible to sexually transmitted infections, thus falling into a high-risk group of blood donors regarding transfusion-transmissible infections. In the Serbian Military Medical Academy a significant number (44% for the period 2005-2013) of blood donations were from members of the Serbian Army. The aim of this study was to determine the significance of military blood donors for the safety of blood transfusion. Between January 2005 and December 2013, a total of 155,479 blood donations were tested for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis using serological assays (enzyme immunoassays, chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay and western blot) and molecular testing (polymerase chain reaction analysis). The percentage of blood donations positive for transfusion-transmissible infections in the estimated period was 0.38%, and the percentage of HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis positive blood donations was 0.20%, 0.12%, 0.005% and 0.06%, respectively. During that period, the percentage of all transfusion-transmissible infections, and in particular of HBV and HCV, declined significantly. In contrast, the percentage of HIV and syphilis positive blood donations remained unchanged. Higher rates of positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections in blood donations from members of the Serbian Army were not found, especially after mandatory military service was abolished in 2009. The reported rate of positivity for transfusion-transmissible infections in blood donations from the Military Medical Academy was considered low. This information is of great significance for further implementation of public health measures.

  20. Assessing ABO/Rh Blood Group Frequency and Association with Asymptomatic Malaria among Blood Donors Attending Arba Minch Blood Bank, South Ethiopia

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    Getaneh Alemu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Determination of the various ABO/Rh blood group distributions and their association with malaria infection has paramount importance in the context of transfusion medicine and malaria control. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2015, to assess ABO/Rh blood groups distribution and their association with asymptomatic malaria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Blood grouping was done using monoclonal antibodies. Thin and thick blood films were examined for Plasmodium parasites. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results. A total of 416 blood donors participated with median age of 22±0.29 (median ± standard error of the mean. Distribution of ABO phenotypes, in decreasing order, was O (175, 42.1%, A (136, 32.7%, B (87, 20.9%, and AB (18, 4.3%. Most of them were Rh+ (386, 92.8%. The overall malaria prevalence was 4.1% (17/416. ABO blood group is significantly associated with malaria infection (P=0.022. High rate of parasitemia was seen in blood group O donors (6.899, P=0.003 compared to those with other ABO blood groups. Conclusion. Blood groups O and AB phenotypes are the most and the least ABO blood groups, respectively. There is significant association between ABO blood group and asymptomatic malaria parasitemia.

  1. Comparing prevalence of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Beta Thalassemia Trait in microcytic and non-microcytic blood donors: suggested algorithm for donor screening

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    Tiwari Aseem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of microcytosis in donors and Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA and Beta-Thalassemia trait (BTT in microcytic and non-microcytic donors has not been studied in India. The present study aims at finding the same. Materials and Methods: Initially 925 donor samples were evaluated on cell-counter. Of these, 50 were found to be microcytic. These were subjected to Ferritin and HbA2 determination. Subsequently, an additional 51, age-and-sex matched non-microcytic donor samples were selected to serve as controls. These were subjected to the same tests. Results: The prevalence of microcytosis was 5.4% (50/925. Among the microcytic donors, 52% were IDA, 36% BTT, 8% both, and 4% none. In case of non-microcytic donors 29.4% were IDA, 3.9% BTT, and 66.7% none. Conclusions: The study revealed a high prevalence of IDA and BTT in blood donors and a higher probability of finding these in the microcytic samples. This prompted authors to suggest an algorithm for screening of blood donors for IDA and BTT. The algorithm recommends doing an hemogram on all donor samples, routinely. Ferritin could be done only in microcytic samples. At levels lower than15 ng/ml, it is diagnosed as IDA, and therefore, HPLC is performed only for non-IDA samples with Ferritin levels higher than 15 ng/ml. By employing this algorithm, a substantial number of IDA and BTT could be diagnosed while keeping the number of Ferritin tests small and the number of HPLC tests even smaller and thus making it cost efficient.

  2. Genotype analysis of hepatitis C virus among blood donors and inmates in Metro Manila, The Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Y; Barzaga, N G; Alipio, A; Soetjipto; Doi, H; Ishido, S; Hotta, H

    1996-01-01

    Antibodies against hepatitis C virus (HCV) were detected in 18 (2.3%) of 800 sera from commercial blood donors and 23 (4.6%) of 502 sera from inmates in Metro Manila, the Philippines. The difference in the antibody prevalence between the two groups was statistically significant (P Vietnam and Indonesia, and also distinct from those in the Far East including Taiwan, Mainland China and Japan.

  3. Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are frequent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Nørgaard, Astrid; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are potentially life-threatening. Due to screening, transmission of infectious diseases has decreased; however, the risk is still present. Various immune reactions are common including simple allergic reactions as well as devastating...... conditions such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and circulatory overload in patients with heart disease. Knowledge of the clinical signs of transfusion-related complications is important for clinicians in order to provide the best possible treatment....

  4. [Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are frequent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Nørgaard, Astrid; Burcharth, Jakob; Larsen, Rune; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-03-31

    Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are potentially life-threatening. Due to screening, transmission of infectious diseases has decreased; however, the risk is still present. Various immune reactions are common including simple allergic reactions as well as devastating conditions such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and circulatory overload in patients with heart disease. Knowledge of the clinical signs of transfusion-related complications is important for clinicians in order to provide the best possible treatment.

  5. Risk of Exposure to Zika Virus and Impact on Cord Blood Banking and Adult Unrelated Donors in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The Canadian Blood Services Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Zachary; Morris, Gail; Campbell, Todd; Mostert, Karen; Dibdin, Nicholas; Fearon, Margaret; Elmoazzen, Heidi; Mercer, Dena; Young, Kimberly; Allan, David

    2017-12-15

    Zika virus has emerged as a potential threat to the Canadian blood supply system. Stem cell donors within Canadian Blood Services' Cord Blood Bank (CBB) and OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network (OM) now undergo screening measures designed to reduce the risk of Zika virus transmission. The impact these screening measures have on cord blood and unrelated adult stem cell donations is currently unknown. Among 146 donor workups initiated by OM between July 2016 and May 2017, 102 were completed and 44 workups were canceled. There were 17 potential donors (11.6%) with a risk of Zika virus exposure identified by the donor questionnaire (13 completed, 4 canceled workups). None of the workups involved a donor diagnosed with confirmed Zika virus within the past 6 months. Only 1 of the 44 canceled workups (and only 1 of 4 cases with a risk of Zika transmission) was canceled because of the risk of Zika transmission, and a backup donor was selected. Canadian Blood Services' CBB identified 25 of 875 cord blood units (2.9%) from women who donated their infants' cord blood and underwent screening that otherwise met the initial cell number thresholds for banking and had at least 1 risk factor for exposure to Zika virus. No women were diagnosed with Zika virus at any point of their pregnancy. All 25 units were discarded. Unrelated donors at OM have a higher incidence of a risk of exposure to Zika virus compared with cord blood donors. Only rarely did transplant centers cancel donor workups due to potential Zika virus exposure. The impact of screening for Zika virus exposure risk on cord blood banking was minor. Continued vigilance and surveillance is recommended. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimating the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in blood donors and pregnant women in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabae, Koji; Satoh, Hiroshi; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Tanaka-Taya, Keiko; Okabe, Nobuhiko; Oishi, Kazunori; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Seroepidemiological study of parvovirus B19 has not taken place for some 20 years in Japan. To estimate the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in Japan among blood donors and pregnant women in this century, a seroepidemiological survey and statistical modeling of the force of infection were conducted. The time- and age-specific seroprevalence data were suggestive of strong age-dependency in the risk of infection. Employing a piecewise constant model, the highest forces of infection of 0.05 and 0.12 per year were observed among those aged 0-4 and 5-9 years, respectively, while estimates among older individuals were less than 0.01 per year. Analyzing the antigen detection data among blood donors, the age-specific proportion positive was highest among those aged 30-39 years, agreeing with the presence of dip in seroprevalence in this age-group. Among pregnant women, up to 107 fetal deaths and 21 hydrops fetalis were estimated to have occurred annually across Japan. Seroepidemiological profiles of PVB19 infection in Japan was characterized with particular emphasis on the risk of infection in blood donors and the burden of infection among pregnant women. When a vaccine becomes available in the future, a similar seroepidemiological study is expected to play a key role in planning the appropriate immunization policy.

  7. Syphilis detection: evaluation of serological screening and pilot reverse confirmatory assay algorithm in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommese, Linda; Paolillo, Rossella; Sabia, Chiara; Costa, Dario; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Iannone, Carmela; Esposito, Antonella; Schiano, Concetta; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    Serological assays are still considered the most useful tests in the diagnosis of syphilis. Since no single serological assay is able to provide a satisfactory result, in our laboratory we have evaluated the usefulness of a commercially-available immunoblot to diagnose syphilis infection among blood donors. From October 2012 to June 2013, 4572 blood donors were screened for syphilis with an automated chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). To confirm the presence of treponemal antibodies, CMIA-reactive sera were tested by standard Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA). In addition, an alternative confirmatory test - the immunoblot INNO-LIA assay was introduced in our laboratory. Since two additional positives among CMIA-reactive-TPHA-negative samples were found, we concluded that the INNO-LIA immunoblot allowed a better detection of syphilis compared to TPHA. A confirmatory strategy based on the use of two treponemal assays could meet the screening requirements for blood donors as well as in our centre. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Estimating the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in blood donors and pregnant women in Japan.

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    Koji Nabae

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seroepidemiological study of parvovirus B19 has not taken place for some 20 years in Japan. To estimate the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in Japan among blood donors and pregnant women in this century, a seroepidemiological survey and statistical modeling of the force of infection were conducted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The time- and age-specific seroprevalence data were suggestive of strong age-dependency in the risk of infection. Employing a piecewise constant model, the highest forces of infection of 0.05 and 0.12 per year were observed among those aged 0-4 and 5-9 years, respectively, while estimates among older individuals were less than 0.01 per year. Analyzing the antigen detection data among blood donors, the age-specific proportion positive was highest among those aged 30-39 years, agreeing with the presence of dip in seroprevalence in this age-group. Among pregnant women, up to 107 fetal deaths and 21 hydrops fetalis were estimated to have occurred annually across Japan. CONCLUSIONS: Seroepidemiological profiles of PVB19 infection in Japan was characterized with particular emphasis on the risk of infection in blood donors and the burden of infection among pregnant women. When a vaccine becomes available in the future, a similar seroepidemiological study is expected to play a key role in planning the appropriate immunization policy.

  9. Gender differences and frequency of whole blood donation in Italian donors: even though I want to, I cannot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani, Marco; Strepparava, Mariagrazia; Giussani, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    Women are under-represented among blood donors and this difference is particularly strong in Italy. This study explore the reasons for the gender gap using a sample of donors who had stopped donating at least two years previously and analyzing the role of frequency of donation. No significant gender differences emerged between the reasons provided by subjects but Italy was the country with the longest prescribed interval between whole blood donations for women. The gender gap is related to the lengthy interval between successive donations of whole blood and reducing this interval could help increase the proportion of women donors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Knowledge about hepatitis B and C viruses and HIV among blood donors in Casablanca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutayeb, H; Aamoum, A; Benchemsi, N

    2006-09-01

    A survey was conducted in the Casablanca Regional Blood Transfusion Centre from February to May 2002. A questionnaire was given to 1750 blood donors from different groups of society to asses the knowledge of the public about hepatitis B and C and human immunodeficiency viruses. The responses indicated that the mechanism of HIV transmission was well known to the public: 85% gave correct answers. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses were less well understood: 60% and 54% gave correct answers respectively. Our study suggests that the public needs to be better informed about hepatitis B and C virus transmission.

  11. Blood donors--Serious adverse reactions (SAR) 2010-2014 EFS Châteauroux, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, A; Sapey, T; Bacanu, M; Py, J-Y; Dehaut, F

    2015-06-01

    In 2013, the national French incidence of serious adverse reactions (SAR) was 155.7 per 100,000 donations and 82% of SAR were grade 2 (French classification of SAR related to blood donors) The purpose of our study was to describe the profile of blood donator candidate which had a SAR in our center. The study contains all the SAR superior to grade 1 occurred on the site EFS Châteauroux (site and mobile blood collection) from January 2010 to October 31, 2014. We analyzed 37 parameters from the e-fit files (e-site French blood vigilance) and In-log software. We identified 82 SAR for 72,553 blood donations (incidence: 113.02 SAR per 100,000 donations). Forty-one men and 41 women, middle age 39 years (18-66). Average height: 1.68 m (1.49-1.85); average weight: 68 kg (50-98); body mass index (kg/m(2)): 24,13(18.6-31.9). All donors were Caucasian and 30% unemployed. We found 74 vasovagal syncope (VVS), 5 hematomas, 2 arterial injuries and an adverse reaction to citrate. In 90%, the SAR was immediate and of grade 2 in 85% of cases. Thirty-seven percent of SAR were first donation in connection with whole blood in 87% of cases. Regarding the seniority of donors, the number of average donations (whole blood, plasma, platelets) was 16.5. An SAR determined the stop of blood donation in 65% of cases with nearly 80% stoppage if it was a first donation. Seventy-three percent of SAR as a VVS took place during blood collection or within 5 minutes following the end of the donation. Sixty-one percent were men. Forty-four percent of cases were a first donation and 83% occurred in mobile blood collection. Average age was 36 years. The result was a permanent stop of all type of donations in 76% of cases. Twenty-seven percent of SAR as a VVS took place beyond 5 minutes after the end of the donation. Seventy-five percent were women. Thirty percent of cases were a first donation and 95% of SAR occurred in mobile blood collection. Average age was 42 years. The result was a permanent stop of

  12. Translation strategies, contradiction, and the theory of social representations: Why discussing needles may improve blood donor retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Gail; Hayman, Jane; Gamble, Marguerite; Smith, Geoff; Hall, Rob

    2017-06-01

    Retaining blood donors is a cost-effective way of ensuring a safe blood supply, yet despite the plethora of research, only 5.1% of the eligible population in Australia donate blood and 40% of these do not make a second donation. We offer an alternative to traditional approaches by conceptualizing blood donation within social representations theory as socially derived symbolic knowledge with a specific focus on cognitive polyphasia and Guimelli's (1998) normative and functional dimensions. An online survey, completed by 703 residents from NSW Australia, comprised a blood donation word association task, Likert-style questions constructed from previous word association data and contextualized blood donation statements. Individual difference scaling analysis revealed all donor groups (including non-donors) associated blood donation with a few central, albeit contradictory ideas/beliefs. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis performed on a split data set of the Likert-style items reiterated this finding. Interpreted through Guimelli's dichotomy, all donor groups were aware of these contradictory normative and functional ideas/beliefs but when explicitly asked, it was the functional aspect that differentiated the groups. We argue the key to retaining donors is understanding the interdependence between how blood donation is socially understood at the societal level of discourse and donor behaviour. Translational strategies for recruitment and retention are discussed. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Impact of Physical Activity Interventions on Blood Pressure in Brazilian Populations

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    Vivian Freitas Rezende Bento

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High blood pressure is associated with cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of mortality in the Brazilian population. Lifestyle changes, including physical activity, are important for lowering blood pressure levels and decreasing the costs associated with outcomes. Objective: Assess the impact of physical activity interventions on blood pressure in Brazilian individuals. Methods: Meta-analysis and systematic review of studies published until May 2014, retrieved from several health sciences databases. Seven studies with 493 participants were included. The analysis included parallel studies of physical activity interventions in adult populations in Brazil with a description of blood pressure (mmHg before and after the intervention in the control and intervention groups. Results: Of 390 retrieved studies, eight matched the proposed inclusion criteria for the systematic review and seven randomized clinical trials were included in the meta-analysis. Physical activity interventions included aerobic and resistance exercises. There was a reduction of -10.09 (95% CI: -18.76 to -1.43 mmHg in the systolic and -7.47 (95% CI: -11.30 to -3.63 mmHg in the diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: Available evidence on the effects of physical activity on blood pressure in the Brazilian population shows a homogeneous and significant effect at both systolic and diastolic blood pressures. However, the strength of the included studies was low and the methodological quality was also low and/or regular. Larger studies with more rigorous methodology are necessary to build robust evidence.

  14. Comparison of three noninvasive methods for hemoglobin screening of blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardin, Sergey; Störmer, Melanie; Radojska, Stela; Oustianskaia, Larissa; Hahn, Moritz; Gathof, Birgit S

    2015-02-01

    To prevent phlebotomy of anemic individuals and to ensure hemoglobin (Hb) content of the blood units, Hb screening of blood donors before donation is essential. Hb values are mostly evaluated by measurement of capillary blood obtained from fingerstick. Rapid noninvasive methods have recently become available and may be preferred by donors and staff. The aim of this study was to evaluate for the first time all different noninvasive methods for Hb screening. Blood donors were screened for Hb levels in three different trials using three different noninvasive methods (Haemospect [MBR Optical Systems GmbH & Co. KG], NBM 200 [LMB Technology GmbH], Pronto-7 [Masimo Europe Ltd]) in comparison to the established fingerstick method (CompoLab Hb [Fresenius Kabi GmbH]) and to levels obtained from venous samples on a cell counter (Sysmex [Sysmex Europe GmbH]) as reference. The usability of the noninvasive methods was assessed with an especially developed survey. Technical failures occurred by using the Pronto-7 due to nail polish, skin color, or ambient light. The NBM 200 also showed a high sensitivity to ambient light and noticeably lower Hb levels for women than obtained from the Sysmex. The statistical analysis showed the following bias and standard deviation of differences of all methods in comparison to the venous results: Haemospect, -0.22 ± 1.24; NBM, 200 -0.12 ± 1.14; Pronto-7, -0.50 ± 0.99; and CompoLab Hb, -0.53 ± 0.81. Noninvasive Hb tests represent an attractive alternative by eliminating pain and reducing risks of blood contamination. The main problem for generating reliable results seems to be preanalytical variability in sampling. Despite the sensitivity to environmental stress, all methods are suitable for Hb measurement. © 2014 AABB.

  15. Prevalence of Antibody to Hepatitis C Virus in Saudi Blood Donors

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    Bandar Al-Knawy

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV was retrospectively determined using a second generation enzyme immunoassay in 3868 blood donors from the southern part of Saudi Arabia in an area with high prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. Of 3354 Saudis, 48 (1.43% were seropositive for anti-HCV. A high prevalence (43 of 204, 21.08% of anti-HCV was observed among Egyptian donors compared with Saudis (1.43% and other nationalities (eight of 310, 2.58%. Furthermore, the prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies was observed to increase with age, peaking in the 25 to 34 year age group. From this and other studies conducted in different regions of Saudi Arabia, the prevalence of anti-HCV among Egyptian donors appears to range from 19.2 to 24.5%, and among Saudi donors appears to range from 1.00 to 1.7%, a rate similar to that reported from western countries; this latter rate does not seem to be influenced by the high prevalence of HBV infection in this region.

  16. Distribution of ABO and Rh types in voluntary Blood donors in Jharkhand area as a study conducted by RIMS, Ranchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anu; Srivastava, Ramesh Kumar; Deogharia, Kabita S; Singh, Kranti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    This study was done to know the distribution and frequencies of blood groups among blood donors attending voluntary blood donation camps organized by the Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS), Ranchi, Jharkhand so that demand and supply ratio of the four blood groups can be maintained so that no patient dies due to lack of a particular blood group. Up till now about 400 red cells antigen have been identified. The majority follow Mendelian inheritance. The ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood group system are most important for blood transfusion purposes, parental testing, legal medicine, and in population genetic study. This study was conducted to determine and compare the frequency and distribution of ABO and Rh blood groups among voluntary blood donors attending blood donation camps in Jharkhand organized by RIMS. The aim is to know the demand and supply ratio of a particular blood group in light of their distribution in the society so that no patient dies due to the deficient supply of blood. It is a retrospective study carried out at blood bank. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted at Blood bank, RIMS, Ranchi, Jharkhand, over a period of 4 years from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2015. Blood group of the blood donors was determined by commercially available standard monoclonal antisera by test tube agglutination technique accompanied by reverse grouping. Out of 20,455 subjects, 18,717 (91.73%) were male and 1738 (8.27%) were female subjects. The ABO blood group present was B (35.15%) followed by O (34.73%), A (22.09%), and AB (8.03%) in blood donors while in Rh system, (96.46%) donors were Rh +ve and (3.54%) donors were Rh -ve. The study has a significant implication regarding the inventory management of blood bank and transfusion services for the indoor patients of RIMS and for emergency supply to other hospitals of Jharkhand in dire need of blood. The knowledge of distribution of blood group is very important for blood banks and transfusion services

  17. Ascertainment of iron deficiency and depletion in blood donors through screening questions for pica and restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Barbara J; Yau, Yu Ying; Arceo, Sarah M; Hopkins, Julie A; Leitman, Susan F

    2013-08-01

    Pica and restless legs syndrome (RLS) are associated with iron depletion and deficiency. The presence of pica and RLS was prospectively assessed in blood donors. During a 39-month period, 1236 donors deferred for fingerstick hemoglobin (Hb) level of less than 12.5 g/dL and 400 nondeferred "control" donors underwent health screening and laboratory testing (complete blood count, ferritin, iron, transferrin). Pica and RLS were assessed by direct questioning. Deferred donors and iron-deficient control donors were given 325 mg of ferrous sulfate daily for 60 days. Reassessments were performed and additional iron tablets dispensed at subsequent visits. Pica was reported in 11% of donors with iron depletion or deficiency, compared with 4% of iron-replete donors (p pica) was most common and often of extraordinary intensity. Female sex, younger age, and lower mean cell volume and transferrin saturation values were strongly associated with pica. Donors with pica given iron reported a marked reduction in the desire to consume the nonnutritive substance by Days 5 to 8 of therapy, with disappearance of symptoms by Days 10 to 14. RLS was reported in 16% of subjects with iron depletion or deficiency compared with 11% of iron-replete donors (p = 0.012). Iron replacement generally resulted in improvement of RLS symptoms; however, at least 4 to 6 weeks of iron therapy was necessary. The presence of pica is associated with a high probability of iron depletion or deficiency in blood donors; however, RLS lacks a strong correlation in this population. Screening questions for pagophagia may be useful in the ascertainment of iron deficiency in donors and may identify those who would benefit from oral iron. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinkla, S.; Peppelman, M.; Raadt, J. van der; Atsma, F.; Novotny, V.M.J.; Kraaij, M.G.J. van; Joosten, I.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The

  19. Post - prandial rise of microvesicles in peripheral blood of healthy human donors

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    Mam Keriya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microvesicles isolated from body fluids are membrane - enclosed fragments of cell interior which carry information on the status of the organism. It is yet unclear how metabolism affects the number and composition of microvesicles in isolates from the peripheral blood. Aim To study the post - prandial effect on microvesicles in isolates from the peripheral blood of 21 healthy donors, in relation to blood cholesterol and blood glucose concentrations. Results The average number of microvesicles in the isolates increased 5 hours post - prandially by 52%; the increase was statistically significant (p = 0.01 with the power P = 0.68, while the average total blood cholesterol concentration, average low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (LDL-C and average high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration (HDL-C all remained within 2% of their fasting values. We found an 11% increase in triglycerides (p = 0.12 and a 6% decrease in blood glucose (p Conclusions In a population of healthy human subjects the number of microvesicles in isolates from peripheral blood increased in the post - prandial state. The increase in the number of microvesicles was affected by the fasting concentration of cholesterol and correlated with the decrease in blood glucose.

  20. Time trend of the prevalence of hepatitis E antibodies among farmers and blood donors: a potential zoonosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer B; Engle, Ronald E; Hjort, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    of serum samples obtained from blood donors 20 years apart. METHODS: Samples from 291 Danish farmers and 169 blood donors that were collected in 1983 and samples from 461 blood donors that were collected in 2003 were tested for anti-HEV. Relevant information on HEV exposure was collected by self...... groups (P serum samples obtained in 2003, age, contact with horses, and the presence of antibody to hepatitis A virus were associated with the presence of anti-HEV in multivariate analysis. Among farmers, only age was independently associated with the presence of anti......BACKGROUND: Antibody to hepatitis E virus (anti-HEV) is prevalent in Western countries, where clinical hepatitis E is rarely reported. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-HEV among Danish blood donors and Danish farmers. In addition, we compared the prevalence among 2 sets...

  1. Hepatitis E virus IgG seroprevalence in HIV patients and blood donors, west-central Poland

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    Maciej Bura

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: Wielkopolska Region in west-central Poland is an area hyperendemic for HEV infection. In this part of Poland, the exposure of HIV-positive persons to this virus is not greater than that of healthy blood donors.

  2. Skin Recurrence of Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Postumbilical Cord Blood Transplant despite Complete Donor Chimerism

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    Rahul Pawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Allogeneic stem cell transplant is the treatment of choice for systemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL which provides graft-versus-lymphoma effect. Herein we discuss a case of recurrence of CTCL skin lesions after cord blood transplant in a patient who continued to have 100% donor chimerism in bone marrow. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old female with history of mycosis fungoides (MF presented with biopsy proven large cell transformation of MF. PET scan revealed multiple adenopathy in abdomen and chest suspicious for lymphoma and skin biopsy showed large cell transformation. She was treated with multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Posttherapy PET scan showed resolution of lymphadenopathy. Later she underwent ablative preparative regimen followed by single cord blood transplant. Bone marrow chimerism studies at day +60 after transplant showed 100% donor cells without presence of lymphoma. However 5 months after transplant she had recurrence of MF with the same genotype as prior skin lesion. Bone marrow chimerism study continued to show 100% donor cells. Conclusion. A differential graft-versus-lymphoma effect in our case prevented lymphoma recurrence systemically but failed to do so in skin. We hypothesize that this response may be due to presence of other factors in the bone marrow and lymph node microenvironments preventing recurrence in these sites.

  3. Epidemiologic study of chronic hepatitis B virus infection in male volunteer blood donors in Karachi, Pakistan

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    Adil Salman

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The magnitude of chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV varies substantially between the countries. A better understanding of incidence and/ or prevalence of HBV infection and associated risk factors provides insight into the transmission of this infection in the community. The purpose of this investigation was to estimate the prevalence of and to identify the risk factors associated with chronic infection with HBV, as assessed by HBV surface antigen (HBsAg positivity, in asymptomatic volunteer male blood donors in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods Consecutive blood donations made at the two large blood banks between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2002 were assessed to estimate the prevalence of HBsAg positivity. To evaluate the potential risk factors, a case-control study design was implemented; cases (HBsAg positives and controls (HBsAg negatives, were recruited between October 15, 2001 and March 15, 2002. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was administered through trained interviewers to collect the data on hypothesized risk factors for HBV infection. Sera were tested for HBsAg using commercially available kits for enzyme linked Immunosorbant assay-III. Results HBsAg prevalence in the male volunteer blood donors was 2.0 % (7048/351309. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that after adjusting for age and ethnicity, cases were significantly more likely than controls to have received dental treatment from un-qualified dental care provider (adjusted odds ratio (OR = 9.8; 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.1, 46.1, have received 1–5 injections (adjusted OR = 3.3; 95% CI: 1.1, 9.6, more than 5 injections (adjusted OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.4, 12.7 during the last five years or have received injection through a glass syringe (adjusted OR = 9.4; 95% CI: 2.6, 34.3. Injury resulted in bleeding during shaving from barbers (adjusted OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1, 4.8 was also significant predictor of HBsAg positivity. Conclusion

  4. Molecular characterization of hepatitis C virus genotype 6 subtypes in Thai blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistayanarain, Anchalee; Chaiwong, Suriya

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype is important for identifying effective antiviral therapy, evaluating pathogenic severity, and tracking transmission routes. In Thailand, HCV genotypes 3 and 1 are the most common. We have previously demonstrated an increasing appearance of genotype 6 in HCV infections in Thailand. However, only limited epidemiological data on genotype 6 in Thailand are available. This study aimed to characterize HCV genotype 6 among apparently healthy Thai blood donors. In total, 240 blood samples were collected from Phitsanulok Regional Blood Center, Phitsanulok, Thailand. RNA was reverse transcribed and amplified by the nested polymerase chain reaction. HCV genotyping was performed by direct sequencing and phylogenetic tree analysis of core sequences. Amino acid polymorphism of various subtypes of HCV genotype 6 was investigated. Of the 240 samples, 192 were successfully sequenced for the core region and 84 were determined to be of HCV genotype 6 by phylogenetic analysis. The most prevalent HCV-6 subtypes were 6f > 6n > 6c > 6i. Amino acid sequences of the partial core region among these four subtypes differed by one to seven residues. For HCV-6, the subtype 6f was commonly found in Thai blood donors. Comparison of core protein from various HCV-6 subtypes showed substantial polymorphisms, which may form the basis of future studies using samples from patients with clear HCV histories. This feature can be applied to therapies tailored to particular genotype variants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Bacterial Contamination of Blood DNA Samples is Associated with Donor's Health Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Hong, Eun-Jung; Shim, Sung-Mi; Kim, Jun-Woo; Bae, Geun-Ryang; Cho, Yoon Shin; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Han, Bok-Ghee

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial contamination often occurs in human blood DNA samples, possibly due to bacteremia or an inappropriate procedure during sample preparation. This study aimed at analyzing the clinical significance of bacterial DNA contamination in human blood DNA samples and to assess its influence on experimental data. DNA samples (N = 1359) were randomly selected from population-based cohort samples to determine bacterial DNA contamination by polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing. Bacterial DNA contaminated samples (N = 150) were then assessed for experimental quality of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip data, compared with uncontaminated DNA samples (N = 1209). DNA sequencing data showed that a major source of bacterial contaminants was derived from Alcaligenes species. The occurrence of bacterial DNA contaminations was significantly associated with some clinical variables including a postprandial glucose level at 60 min, % body fat, and waist-to-hip ratio. It was also found that there was no difference of SNP call rates between bacterial DNA contaminated samples and uncontaminated DNA samples. This study showed that bacterial DNA contamination in human blood samples was related to donor's health condition, suggesting that the occurrence of bacterial DNA contamination may provide useful health information of blood donors and a potential tool for human disease genomics.

  6. An analysis of first-time blood donors return behaviour using regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheiri, S; Alibeigi, Z

    2015-08-01

    Blood products have a vital role in saving many patients' lives. The aim of this study was to analyse blood donor return behaviour. Using a cross-sectional follow-up design of 5-year duration, 864 first-time donors who had donated blood were selected using a systematic sampling. The behaviours of donors via three response variables, return to donation, frequency of return to donation and the time interval between donations, were analysed based on logistic regression, negative binomial regression and Cox's shared frailty model for recurrent events respectively. Successful return to donation rated at 49·1% and the deferral rate was 13·3%. There was a significant reverse relationship between the frequency of return to donation and the time interval between donations. Sex, body weight and job had an effect on return to donation; weight and frequency of donation during the first year had a direct effect on the total frequency of donations. Age, weight and job had a significant effect on the time intervals between donations. Aging decreases the chances of return to donation and increases the time interval between donations. Body weight affects the three response variables, i.e. the higher the weight, the more the chances of return to donation and the shorter the time interval between donations. There is a positive correlation between the frequency of donations in the first year and the total number of return to donations. Also, the shorter the time interval between donations is, the higher the frequency of donations. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  7. Seroprevalence of hepatitis viruses and risk factors in blood donors of Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Balderas, Nayali; Bravo, Elide; Camara, Mireya; Hernandez-Romano, Pablo

    2015-03-15

    Hepatitis B and C are among the most important transfusion-transmitted infections and sources of liver diseases worldwide. In Veracruz, Mexico, liver diseases are important causes of mortality, and the prevalence reports of these viruses are scarce. This study sought to determine the prevalence of these infections in blood donors, in order to increase the safety of blood products in this region. A retrospective study was performed on blood donors who attended the Veracruz State Blood Transfusion Center from 2006 to 2010. All samples were screened for transfusion-transmitted infections. The prevalence rates of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) were determined, and demographic data obtained from clinical records were used to evaluate risk factors. A total of 56,377 donors were serologically screened; of them, 403 were seropositive for HCV (357 men and 46 women), and 61 were positive for HBsAg (52 men and 9 women). The overall prevalence rates were 0.72% (0.63%-0.76%) for HCV and 0.11% (0.08%-0.14%) for HBsAg. The risk factors for HBsAg positivity were being a cattleman and living in the Huasteca Baja region, whereas those for HCV were being a fisherman, living in the Papaloapan region, and having an elementary-level or lower education. This is the first study to show that being a fisherman is a risk factor for HCV. The implementation of nucleic acid test technology will help to identify the real risks for transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C in Veracruz.

  8. Low Seroprevalence of West Nile Virus in Blood Donors from Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, Maria; Plasencia, Antoni; Fleta-Soriano, Eric; Martinez, Ana; Martinez, Javier P; Torner, Nuria; Sauleda, Silvia; Meyerhans, Andreas; Escalé, Josefina; Trilla, Antoni; Pumarola, Tomás; Martinez, Miguel Julian

    2015-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging arbovirus first recognized in Europe in the 1950s. Since then, outbreaks have been reported in several European countries. In 2010, the first WNV outbreak was recorded in Spain, affecting the southern part of the country. We conducted a seroprevalence study in the Catalonia region (northeastern Spain), an area considered at high risk of arbovirus transmission. A total of 800 serum samples from blood donors were collected and screened for antibodies against WNV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by a microneutralization assay. More than 50 samples tested positive by ELISA, but only one sample contained neutralizing antibodies against WNV and was obtained from a donor native of Pakistan. The low seroprevalence detected may serve as reference baseline data for monitoring WNV activity in our region in future years.

  9. Plasmodium genome in blood donors at risk for malaria after several years of residence in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assennato, Sonny Michael; Berzuini, Alessandra; Foglieni, Barbara; Spreafico, Marta; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Prati, Daniele

    2014-10-01

    At present, the main risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM) in nonendemic countries is chronic, asymptomatic immigrants from malaria-endemic areas. Semi-immune donors may carry undetected parasitemia. This study examines Plasmodium infection in at-risk blood donors in Northern Italy. Plasma samples from 97 candidate donors and 80 controls were tested for malarial antibodies using a commercial enzyme immunoassay. The conserved 18S rRNA and the mitochondrial genes of Plasmodium were amplified to detect and quantify parasite genomes (copies/mL). Plasmodium species were identified with a species-specific nested polymerase chain reaction. Parasitemic samples were further tested by amplification of polymorphic repetitive regions in MSP-1 Block 2, MSP-2 Block 3, and glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) confirmed by sequencing. Three of 83 seropositive (3.6%) and one of 14 seronegative at-risk candidate donors carried Plasmodium genome (4 × 10(3) -8.5 × 10(4) copies/mL): two P. falciparum, one P. malariae (seronegative sample), and one coinfection with P. malariae and P. ovale. Alleles of MSP-1 (MAD20 and K1), MSP-2 (3D7 and FC27), and GLURP were amplified from Sample 261. In Sample 282 only one allele in MSP-2 (FC27) and GLURP was amplified. No alleles were detected in Samples 283 and 331. Immigrants from endemic countries might carry infectious Plasmodium after 2 to 5 years of continuous residence in Italy. Serologic screening may miss donors carrying P. malariae. Permanent exclusion or screening for both antibodies and genome are needed to prevent TTM. © 2014 AABB.

  10. Transfusion transmittable infections - Seroprevalence among blood donors in a tertiary care hospital of Delhi

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    Sangeeta Pathak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Transfusion transmittable infections (TTI continue to be a major threat to safe transfusion practices. Blood is one of the major sources of transmission of infectious diseases viz. human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, syphilis, malaria, and many other infections in India. Screening assays for the infectious diseases with excellent sensitivity and specificity helps to enhance the safety of the blood transfusions reducing the diagnostic window period as much as possible. Aims: The present study was designed to determine the seroprevalence of TTIs viz., HIV, HCV, and HBV, among the blood donors in Max Super Specialty Hospital, New Delhi, India based on dual testing strategy using high sensitive screening assays such as enhanced chemiluminescence assay and nucleic acid testing (NAT. Materials and Methods: A total of 41207 blood units collected from the donors (both voluntary and replacement donors were screened for the TTI s, viz., anti HIV 1 and 2 antibody, anti HCV antibody, anti HBcore antibody, and HBsAg by enhanced chemiluminescence assay on VITROS ® ECiQ immunodiagnostics system. NAT was performed using Roche Cobas ® TaqScreen MPX assay, which can detect simultaneously HIV 1 (groups M and O, HIV-2, HCV, and HBV on Roche Cobas ® s201 system. Results: The seroprevalence of HIV, HBsAg, anti HBcore antibody, and HCV based on enhanced chemiluminescence assay was found to be 0.25, 0.2, 7.06, and 0.7%, respectively. A total number of 6587 samples from July 2010 to December 2010 were tested on NAT, of which 3 samples were reactive for HBV in NAT; this was missed by enhanced chemiluminescence assay. Conclusions: Based on the seroprevalence study of infectious diseases viz., HIV, HBV, and HCV, we conclude that screening of blood and blood components by dual testing strategy using high sensitivity serological assay like enhanced chemiluminescence technology and NAT helps in detecting the

  11. Prospective evaluation of 2% (w/v alcoholic chlorhexidine gluconate as an antiseptic agent for blood donor arm preparation

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    Sweta Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A prospective study was undertaken to evaluate the use of 2% (w/v alcoholic chlorhexidine gluconate (2% AlcCHG in donor arm preparation, to monitor the contamination rate of blood products after the collection and to find incidence of transfusion associated bacteremia. Settings and Design: Optimal skin antisepsis of the phlebotomy site is essential to minimize the risk of contamination. Food and Drug Administration (FDA in India has recommended antisepsis with three-step regimen of spirit-10% povidone iodine-spirit for donor arm antisepsis, but not with chlorhexidine, which is recommended by many other authors. Material and Methods: A total of 795 donors were studied from July 2011 to January 2012. Spirit-10% povidone iodine-spirit was used for 398 donors and 2% AlcCHG was used for 397 donors with the two-step method for arm antisepsis. Swabs were collected before and after use of antiseptic agents for all the donors. All the blood products collected from donors with growth in post-antisepsis swabs were cultured. A total of 123 various blood products were cultured irrespective of the method and result of antisepsis was observed. A total of seven patients had mild transfusion reaction. The transfused blood products, blood and urine specimen of the patients who had transfusion reaction were also cultured. Results: Seven donors out of 398 donors had growth in post-antisepsis swab with spirit-10% povidone iodine-spirit protocol and three donors out of 397 donors had growth in post-antisepsis swab with 2% AlcCHG protocol. All blood products collected from donors who had growth in post-antisepsis swabs when cultured had no growth. There was no contamination of blood products. Conclusions: Two percent (w/v alcoholic chlorhexidine gluconate with two-step protocol can be used as an antiseptic agent for donor arm preparation without considerable cost difference. It is at par with spirit 10% povidone iodine spirit protocol as suggested by FDA in India

  12. [Reference values for the blood coagulation tests in Mexico: usefulness of the pooled plasma from blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada-Contreras, Adriana; Moreno-Hernández, Manuel; Castillo-Torres, Noemi Patricia; Souto-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Hernández-Juárez, Jesús; Ricardo-Moreno, María Tania; Sánchez-Fernández, Maria Guadalupe de Jesús; García-González, América; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The blood coagulation system maintains the blood in a liquid state and bleeding and thrombosis are the manifestations of its malfunction. Blood coagulation laboratory evaluates the physiology of this system. To establish both, the reference values for several tests performed at the blood coagulation laboratory as well as the utility of the pooled plasma to perform these assays. MATERIAL AND: In this descriptive, cross-sectional, randomized study, we collected plasma from Mexican Mestizos. Each pooled plasma was prepared with the plasma from at least 20 blood donors. We performed screening and special tests and the Levey-Jennings graphs were built and interpreted after each pass. Results of the tests were analyzed and their distribution was established using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. To establish the reference values we used 95% confidence intervals. We collected 72 pooled plasmas. The distribution for PT, APTT, and TT tests was abnormal. Although the PT test showed a bimodal distribution it was normal for factor VII. The reference values for the hemostatic, anticoagulant, and fibrinolytic factors were different from those suggested by the manufacturers. We established the reference values for the blood coagulation tests in the adult Mexican population. We have shown that the pooled plasma must be used for the screening tests. We suggest that each clinical laboratory should establish its own reference values (at least for the screening tests). To reach this objective, we encourage the use of the pooled plasma.

  13. Prevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 among blood donors from Mashhad, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Gholamin, Mehran; Tabatabaee, Abbas; Farid, Reza; Houshmand, Massoud; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2003-06-01

    The city of Mashhad is the capital of Khorasan, the northeastern province of Iran, which has been recognized as an area where human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is endemic. All serum samples from blood donors are routinely screened for HTLV-1 by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the present study, 28,926 donors (81.86% male and 18.14% female) with a mean age of 32 years (range, 18 to 65 years) were screened in a 6 months period (July to December 1999). Of these donors in the primary screening, 228 (0.78%) tested positive by ELISA. The positive samples were confirmed by Western blot (WB) analysis. The WB results indicated that, of 228 positive ELISA specimens, 91.2% (208 specimens) were HTLV-1, 4.82% (11 specimens) were HTLV, 3.5% (8 specimens) were indeterminate, and 0.44% (1 specimen) was not confirmed. HTLV refers to samples in which the complete viral antigen banding patterns on WB strips were not present. In order to further evaluate the detection methodologies used, the HTLV-1-seropositive samples, the indeterminant samples, and/or HTLV samples were examined and confirmed by PCR. The HTLV samples were determined to be HTLV-1, the remaining samples were indeterminant, and the negative sample could not be confirmed for HTLV-1 by PCR. The prevalence of HTLV-1 infection in our study was 0.77% among blood bank donors, which reconfirms the city of Mashhad as an area where the virus is endemic compared to other regions in the world. The incidence was correlated with increasing age, and it was higher in females than in males.

  14. Potassium Concentration in Blood of Brazilian Athletes Using NAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Luciana; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Lourenço, Thiago F.; Nunes, Lázaro A. S.; Macedo, Denise V.

    2011-08-01

    In this study the potassium levels in blood were determined in male athletes, age 18 to 26 years, before, during and after the tread mill exercise protocol using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA). These data are important to check the potassium imbalance in blood during the period of competition preparation.

  15. Low prevalence of Leishmania donovani infection among the blood donors in kala-azar endemic areas of Bangladesh

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    Huda M Mamun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a major public health problem in Bangladesh with the highest disease burden in the Mymensingh District. The disease is transmitted by sand fly bites, but it may also be transmitted through blood transfusions. No information is available about the prevalence of Leishmania infection among blood donors in Bangladesh; therefore we aimed to investigate this question. Methods The study was carried out in the Blood Transfusion Department of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital. One thousand one hundred and ninety five adult healthy blood donors attending in this department were enrolled in the study from August 2010 to April 2011. After obtaining written consent, socio-demographic data and a detailed health history were collected. The medical officer in the unit performed a complete physical examination to exclude any acute or chronic diseases, which was followed by sero-diagnosis for exposure to Leishmania by rK39 strip test using finger prick blood. Blood donors with a positive rK39 strip test underwent a PCR test for detection of leishmania DNA in their peripheral blood buffy coat. Results Eighty two percent of enrolled blood donors were male (n=985 and 18% (n=210 were female. The mean age of blood donors was 27 years (SD, 7.95 years. The majority of donors were literate and had mid-to-higher socioeconomic condition reflected by household conditions reported by the subject. Only 2.6% had a family member with VL in the past. Three blood donors were positive for leishmania infection by rK39 strip test (0.3%, 95%CI, 0.05%-0.73%. None of these 3 had active leishmania infection as demonstrated by PCR analysis. During six months of follow up, neither rK39 positive (n=3 nor rK39 negative (n=1192 donors developed VL. Conclusion The prevalence of Leishmania donovani infection among blood donors attending the Blood Transfusion Department of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital was very low. Therefore the chance

  16. [Single-donor (apheresis) platelets and pooled whole-blood-derived platelets--significance and assessment of both blood products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzler, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    The transfusion efficacy of ATK, which contain fully functional platelets, is beyond all doubt. The equivalence of ATK and PTK has been subject of many studies. Some of those studies show the superiority of ATK's, while others do not, but there have been no studies that demonstrated a superiority of PTK's. The superiority of platelets stored in plasma and in third generation additive solution was demonstrated in clinical studies; therefore, it cannot be said that all the platelet concentrates on the German market are equivalent in efficacy. Of decisive importance, above all, is the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections with known pathogens, or those not yet discovered. This risk is different for ATK compared to PTK. Taking this difference in risk and the difference in donor exposure of transfused patients into account, it can definitely be said that ATK and PTK are not equivalent. In 2012, the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) published a mathematical risk model for different platelet concentrates and assessed the risk of transmitting known pathogens such as HIV, HCV, and HBV. The risk was higher for PTK compared to ATK. The relative risks for PTK derived from 4BCs were 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.1-2.4) for HIV, 2.7 (95%--CI: 2.5-3.0) for HCV, and 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.8-3.7) for HBV. At the present time, these are the relative risks of transfusion-transmitted infections with the traditional pathogens for PTK compared to ATK. In addition to the RKI assessed risks, there is the theoretical risk of a new, unknown agent, transmitted through blood exposure. The magnitude of this risk is hardly predictable for PTK. The experience gathered so far, especially in the last three decades, with the emergence of HIV, prions, and West Nil virus, shows that the biological nature of a next transfusion-transmissible infectious agent cannot be predictable. This agent, if we think at a conventional sexually transmissible agent with nucleic acid and long latent period, would spread first in areas with

  17. Cell salvage and donor blood transfusion during cesarean section: A pragmatic, multicentre randomised controlled trial (SALVO.

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    Khalid S Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Excessive haemorrhage at cesarean section requires donor (allogeneic blood transfusion. Cell salvage may reduce this requirement.We conducted a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (at 26 obstetric units; participants recruited from 4 June 2013 to 17 April 2016 of routine cell salvage use (intervention versus current standard of care without routine salvage use (control in cesarean section among women at risk of haemorrhage. Randomisation was stratified, using random permuted blocks of variable sizes. In an intention-to-treat analysis, we used multivariable models, adjusting for stratification variables and prognostic factors identified a priori, to compare rates of donor blood transfusion (primary outcome and fetomaternal haemorrhage ≥2 ml in RhD-negative women with RhD-positive babies (a secondary outcome between groups. Among 3,028 women randomised (2,990 analysed, 95.6% of 1,498 assigned to intervention had cell salvage deployed (50.8% had salvaged blood returned; mean 259.9 ml versus 3.9% of 1,492 assigned to control. Donor blood transfusion rate was 3.5% in the control group versus 2.5% in the intervention group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42 to 1.01, p = 0.056; adjusted risk difference -1.03, 95% CI -2.13 to 0.06. In a planned subgroup analysis, the transfusion rate was 4.6% in women assigned to control versus 3.0% in the intervention group among emergency cesareans (adjusted OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.99, whereas it was 2.2% versus 1.8% among elective cesareans (adjusted OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.38 to 1.83 (interaction p = 0.46. No case of amniotic fluid embolism was observed. The rate of fetomaternal haemorrhage was higher with the intervention (10.5% in the control group versus 25.6% in the intervention group, adjusted OR 5.63, 95% CI 1.43 to 22.14, p = 0.013. We are unable to comment on long-term antibody sensitisation effects.The overall reduction observed in donor blood transfusion associated with the

  18. Allogeneic donor peripheral blood "stem cell" apheresis: prospective comparison of two apheresis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauninger, Susanne; Bialleck, Heike; Thorausch, Kristin; Felt, Tom; Seifried, Erhard; Bonig, Halvard

    2012-05-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells, collected by white blood cell apheresis, are used for more than 80% of allogeneic and most autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. Optimal donor and recipient outcomes require maximized stem cell collection efficiency and minimized non-target cell contamination. Therefore, improved apheresis technology is desirable. The safety and feasibility of apheresis collections with the novel, electronics-assisted apheresis system Spectra Optia v.5.0 (CaridianBCT) were recently demonstrated. An unpublished optimization trial had furthermore determined that different settings than manufacturer-installed default might result in improved apheresis yields. The first prospective comparison of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell apheresis with the Spectra Optia versus the COBE Spectra (CaridianBCT) mononuclear cell (MNC) in a routine clinical setting is reported here; "optimized" machine settings were used. Assessed variables included collection efficiency, product characteristics, donor outcomes, and frequency of operator interventions. Outcomes were additionally compared with historical data from the Spectra Optia in default mode. The mean CD34+ cell collection efficiency CE1 was 7.9% greater with the Spectra Optia than with the COBE Spectra MNC. Variability of outcomes was equally great. Reduced platelet (PLT) attrition necessitated 90% fewer autologous PLT reinfusions. Spectra Optia products contained 50% fewer red blood cells, but 50% more granulocytic lineage cells. Less operator input was required, although 26% of Spectra Optia apheresis procedures required triggering of the first chamber flush. Apheresis yield and collection efficiency were also markedly greater than in default-mode Spectra Optia collections. Using optimized machine settings, peripheral blood stem cell apheresis outcomes with the automated apheresis system Spectra Optia exceed results with the COBE Spectra MNC or the

  19. Blood Donor Test-Seeking Motivation and Prior HIV Testing Experiences in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Blatyta, Paula F; Santos, Fernanda M; Montebello, Sandra; Esposti, Sandra P D; Hangai, Fatima N; Salles, Nanci Alves; Mendrone, Alfredo; Sabino, Ester C; McFarland, Willi; Gonçalez, Thelma T

    2015-09-01

    HIV test-seeking behavior among blood donors has been observed worldwide and may pose a threat to the safety of the blood supply. We evaluated current test-seeking motivations and prior alternative HIV testing experiences among blood donors in São Paulo, Brazil. All candidate or potential blood donors were consecutively approached and recruited to participate in the study upon presentation at Fundação Pró-Sangue Hemocentro, the largest blood bank in Brazil. Participants were recruited between August 2012 and May 2013 after they were screened for donor eligibility. Questionnaires were administered through audio computer-assisted self-interview. Among 11,867 donors, 38 % previously tested for HIV apart from blood donation, of whom 47.7 % tested at public facilities and 2.7 % acknowledged getting tested for HIV as the primary reason for donating. Dissatisfaction with prior alternative testing experience was reported by 2.5 % of donors. Current test-seeking motivation was associated with dissatisfaction with prior alternative testing experience and testing at a public alternative facility. The most common reasons for dissatisfaction were too long of a wait to get tested and for results, counseling was too long, lack of privacy, and low confidence in the equipment and accuracy of the test. Lack of awareness about the availability of free and confidential public HIV testing services as well as dissatisfaction with past HIV testing and counseling experiences motivate some individuals to test at blood banks. Test-seeking behavior among blood donors may be best addressed by improving alternative testing programs, particularly with respect to time delays, privacy and perceptions about test accuracy. Educational campaigns on safe blood donation and HIV testing for diagnosis, risk counseling and referral to care are also needed for the general public and for health care providers.

  20. Phenotype frequencies of blood group systems (Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, MNS, P, Lewis, and Lutheran) in blood donors of south Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahar, Manoj A; Patel, Rajnikant D

    2014-01-01

    This is the first study on phenotype frequencies of various blood group systems in blood donors of south Gujarat, India using conventional tube technique. A total of 115 "O" blood group donors from three different blood banks of south Gujarat were typed for D, C, c, E, e, K, Jk(a), Le(a), Le(b), P1, M, and N antigens using monoclonal antisera and k, Kp(a), Kp(b), Fy(a),Fy(b), Jk(b), S,s, Lu(a), and Lu(b) antigens were typed using polyclonal antisera employing Indirect Antiglobulin Test. Antigens and phenotype frequencies were expressed as percentages. From the 115 blood donor samples used for extended antigen typing in the Rh system, e antigen was found in 100% donors, followed by D [84.35%], C [81.74%], c [56.32%], and E [21.74%] with DCe/DCe (R1 R1, 40.87%) as the most common phenotype. k was found to be positive in 100% of donors and no K+k- phenotype was found in Kell system. For Kidd and Duffy blood group system, Jk(a+b+) and Fy(a-b-) were the most common phenotypes with frequency of 52.17% and 48.69%, respectively. In the MNS system, 39.13% donors were typed as M+N+, 37.39% as M+N-, and 23.48% as M-N+. S+s+ was found in 24.35% of donors, S+s- in 8.69%, and S-s+ as the commonest amongst donors with 66.96%. No Lu(a+b+) or Lu(a+b-) phenotypes were detected in 115 donors typed for Lutheran antigens. A rare Lu(a-b-) phenotype was found in 2.61% donors. Data base for antigen frequency of various blood group systems in local donors help provide antigen negative compatible blood units to patients with multiple antibodies in order to formulate in-house red cells for antibody detection and identification and for preparing donor registry for rare blood groups.

  1. Phenotype frequencies of blood group systems (Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, MNS, P, Lewis, and Lutheran in blood donors of south Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj A Kahar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This is the first study on phenotype frequencies of various blood group systems in blood donors of south Gujarat, India using conventional tube technique. Material and Methods: A total of 115 "O" blood group donors from three different blood banks of south Gujarat were typed for D, C, c, E, e, K, Jk a , Le a , Le b , P 1 , M, and N antigens using monoclonal antisera and k, Kp a , Kp b , Fy a ,Fy b , Jk b , S,s, Lu a , and Lu b antigens were typed using polyclonal antisera employing Indirect Antiglobulin Test. Antigens and phenotype frequencies were expressed as percentages. Results: From the 115 blood donor samples used for extended antigen typing in the Rh system, e antigen was found in 100% donors, followed by D [84.35%], C [81.74%], c [56.32%], and E [21.74%] with DCe/DCe (R 1 R 1 , 40.87% as the most common phenotype. k was found to be positive in 100% of donors and no K+k- phenotype was found in Kell system. For Kidd and Duffy blood group system, Jk(a+b+ and Fy(a-b- were the most common phenotypes with frequency of 52.17% and 48.69%, respectively. In the MNS system, 39.13% donors were typed as M+N+, 37.39% as M+N-, and 23.48% as M-N+. S+s+ was found in 24.35% of donors, S+s- in 8.69%, and S-s+ as the commonest amongst donors with 66.96%. No Lu(a+b+ or Lu(a+b- phenotypes were detected in 115 donors typed for Lutheran antigens. A rare Lu(a-b- phenotype was found in 2.61% donors. Conclusion: Data base for antigen frequency of various blood group systems in local donors help provide antigen negative compatible blood units to patients with multiple antibodies in order to formulate in-house red cells for antibody detection and identification and for preparing donor registry for rare blood groups.

  2. Transfusion-transmissible viral infections among blood donors at the North Gondar district blood bank, northwest Ethiopia: A three year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biadgo, Belete; Shiferaw, Elias; Woldu, Berhanu; Alene, Kefyalew Addis; Melku, Mulugeta

    2017-01-01

    Transfusion-transmissible viral infections, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), remain a major public health problem in developing countries. The prevalence of these viral infections among blood donors may reflect the burden of these diseases among populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the sero-prevalence of transfusion-transmissible viral infections among blood donors. A retrospective study was conducted using data obtained from registration books of blood donors from the Ethiopian North Gondar District Blood Bank from 2010 to 2012. Descriptive statistics, such as percentages, medians and interquartile ranges were computed. A binary logistic regression model was fitted to identify factors associated with each viral infection. The odds ratio with a 99% confidence interval was calculated. A p-value < 0.01 was considered statistically significant. A total of 6,471 blood donors were included in the study. Of these, 5,311 (82.1%) were male, and 382 (5.9%) were voluntary blood donors. Overall, 424 (6.55%) of the blood donors were sero-reactive for at least one transfusion-transmissible viral infection. Of all study participants, 233 (3.6%) were sero-reactive for HBV, 145 (2.24%) were sero-reactive for HIV, and 51 (0.8%) were sero-reactive for HCV. Four (0.062%) of the study's participants were co-infected: 3 (75%) with HBV-HCV and 1 (25%) with HIV-HBV-HCV. Being a farmer, unemployed or employed donor was significantly associated with transfusion-transmissible viral infections compared to being a student donor. The prevalence of transfusion-transmissible viral infections is substantial and has increased overtime. Hence, it demands more vigilance in routine screening of donated blood prior to transfusion. Further community-based studies to identify societal risk factors are necessary.

  3. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of rubella seronegative females in the zambian blood donor community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaba, Mazyanga L; Monze, Mwaka; Babaniyi, Olusegun A; Siziya, Seter; Michelo, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Rubella is an acute, contagious viral infection caused by a teratogenic enveloped single-stranded RNA virus, rubella virus, a member of the togaviridae family. Though causing generally mild infections in children and adults, it is a disease of public health importance in pregnant women causing major problems including abortions, miscarriages, and congenital rubella syndrome in more than 20% of the susceptible population. This study was carried out to determine the characteristics associated with rubella seronegativity among female blood donors in Zambia. Rubella-specific IgG antibody levels were measured in the blood serum. Proportions were compared using the Chi-squared test at the 5% significance level, and magnitudes of associations were determined using the odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval. Of the 124 female blood donors tested for rubella IgG 46.0% were aged total of 10 (8.1%) participants were seronegative to rubella IgG antibodies. No factors were associated with seronegativity. Protection against rubella through natural infection appears inadequate to protect the population, increasing the risk of CRS.

  5. Characterization of rubella seronegative females in the Zambian blood donor community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyanga Lucy Mazaba

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rubella is an acute, contagious viral infection caused by a teratogenic enveloped single-stranded RNA virus, rubella virus, a member of the togaviridae family. Though causing generally mild infections in children and adults, it is a disease of public health importance in pregnant women causing major problems including abortions, miscarriages and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in more than twenty per cent of the susceptible population. This study was carried out to determine the characteristics associated with rubella seronegativity amongst female blood donors in Zambia. Rubella-specific IgG antibody levels were measured in the blood serum. Proportions were compared using the Chi-squared test at the 5% significance level, and magnitudes of associations were determined using the odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval. Of the 124 female blood donors tested for rubella IgG 46.0% were aged less than 20 years. Overall, 66.7% of the participants had never been married. More than half (62.1% of the participants resided in rural areas of the country. Of the 114 participants with recorded level of education, 50.1% had at–least completed secondary school. Out of 43 participants with recorded current employment status, 44.2% were not working for pay. A total of 10 (8.1% participants were sero-negative to rubella IgG antibodies. No factors were associated with seronegativity. Protection against rubella through natural infection appears inadequate to protect the population, increasing the risk of CRS.

  6. Seroprevalence and risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection among blood donors in Serbia: A multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Nikola; Delic, Dragan; Markovic-Denic, Ljiljana; Jovicic, Milica; Popovic, Natasa; Bojovic, Ksenija; Simonovic Babic, Jasmina; Svirtlih, Neda

    2015-07-01

    The epidemiological characteristics of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have not yet been described in Serbia. To determine the prevalence of anti-HCV-positive individuals among first-time blood donors and the risk factors for hepatitis C transmission. A multicentre case-control study nested within a prospective cohort study was conducted at 10 main transfusion centres in Serbia in 2013 and 27,160 blood donors who gave blood for the first time were included. Blood donors with confirmed anti-HCV positivity and seronegative controls were enrolled to determine the risk factors. Of 27,160 blood donors 52 were anti-HCV-positive; seroprevalence was 0.19%. By univariate analysis, marital status, educational level, drug use, previous transfusion, tattooing, non-use of condoms and number of sexual partners, were risk factors for hepatitis C. In the final multivariate analysis, three factors remained independently predictive: drug use, tattooing and previous blood transfusion. In total, 87.5% of cases had at least one of the risk factors for HCV transmission; 20.9% presumed that they knew when the infection occurred. HCV seroprevalence in Serbia is higher than in developed European countries. Preventive measures need to be directed towards drug use and tattooing facilities. The admission questionnaire for blood donors should be improved. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Various functions of PBMC from colon cancer patients are not decreased compared to healthy blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    The immune surveillance hypothesis suggests impaired immune responses to participate in development of cancer. This may partly be due to increased amounts of PGE2 and histamine, which inhibit cellular immunity. These effects are mediated by cAMP, which is increased and thereby may down-regulate I...... no difference in levels of intracellular cAMP, IL-2 mRNA expression, IL-2R mRNA expression, or proliferative responses of PBMC from colon cancer patients compared to healthy blood donors. There was no effect of the immune modulating agents on PBMC from colon cancer patients....

  8. Minor allele frequency of myeloproliferative neoplasm mutations in the Irish blood donor population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titmarsh, Glen J; McKay, Gareth J; Lawler, Mark; Anderson, Lesley A; McMullin, Mary Frances

    2016-09-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are rare diseases that include classic entities; polycythaemia vera, essential thrombocythaemia and primary myelofibrosis. In this short report, minor allele frequencies of common MPN mutations are compared between the Irish blood donor population and other populations of European descent using data from the Haplotype Map project. The Affymetrix array 6.0 platform was utilised identifying nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and six proxy SNPs. The variability of allele frequencies for MPN mutations could account for the different incidence rates seen between populations of European ancestry, giving a better understanding of the genetic predisposition to MPNs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. West Nile Virus (WNV seroprevalence in a blood donors group of Milan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Lunghi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A seroprevalence study for anti West Nile virus was carried out among 864 healthy blood donors living in the metropolitan area of Milan by using a commercially available ELISA method. In addition, the performance of a novel ELISA assay for WNV antibodies was assessed. The sero-prevalence rate of WNV antibodies was 0.57% thus showing that WNV is likely circulating also in this up to now unknown area. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the novel ELISA were 99.9% and 45.4%, respectively, well comparable with that of the chosen reference immunoenzimatic method.

  10. Characteristics of antibody responses in West Nile virus-seropositive blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Paul J; Prince, Harry E; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Lanciotti, Robert; Tobler, Leslie H; Busch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is now endemic in the United States. Protection against infection is thought to be conferred in part by humoral immunity. An understanding of the durability and specificity of the humoral response is not well established. We studied the magnitude and specificity of antibody responses in 370 WNV-seropositive blood donors. We also recalled 18 donors who were infected in 2005 to compare their antibody responses at 6 months following infection versus at 5 years postinfection. There were no significant differences in IgG antibody levels based on age, sex, or recent infection (as evidenced by IgM positivity). Specific antibody responses by viral plaque reduction neutralization testing (PRNT) were seen in 51/54 subjects evaluated. All donors who were seropositive in 2005 remained seropositive at 5 years and maintained neutralizing antibodies. IgG levels at 5 years postinfection showed fairly minimal decreases compared with the paired levels at 6 months postinfection (mean of paired differences,-0.54 signal-to-cutoff ratio (S/CO) units [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.86 to -0.21 S/CO units]) and only minimal decreases in PRNT titers. WNV induces a significant antibody response that remains present even 5 years after infection.

  11. Emerging infectious disease outbreaks: estimating disease risk in Australian blood donors travelling overseas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, A; Hoad, V C; Seed, C R; Flower, R Lp; Harley, R J; Herbert, D; Faddy, H M

    2018-01-01

    International travel assists spread of infectious pathogens. Australians regularly travel to South-eastern Asia and the isles of the South Pacific, where they may become infected with infectious agents, such as dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV) and Zika (ZIKV) viruses that pose a potential risk to transfusion safety. In Australia, donors are temporarily restricted from donating for fresh component manufacture following travel to many countries, including those in this study. We aimed to estimate the unmitigated transfusion-transmission (TT) risk from donors travelling internationally to areas affected by emerging infectious diseases. We used the European Up-Front Risk Assessment Tool, with travel and notification data, to estimate the TT risk from donors travelling to areas affected by disease outbreaks: Fiji (DENV), Bali (DENV), Phuket (DENV), Indonesia (CHIKV) and French Polynesia (ZIKV). We predict minimal risk from travel, with the annual unmitigated risk of an infected component being released varying from 1 in 1·43 million to risk of severe consequences ranging from 1 in 130 million to infectious disease outbreak areas to source plasma collection provides a simple and effective risk management approach. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  12. Temperature-dependent haemolytic propensity of CPDA-1 stored red blood cells vs whole blood - Red cell fragility as donor signature on blood units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Anastasiadi, Alkmini T; Karadimas, Dimitrios G; Zeqo, Redisa A; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Pappa, Olga D; Papatzitze, Olga A; Stamoulis, Konstantinos E; Papassideri, Issidora S; Antonelou, Marianna H; Kriebardis, Anastasios G

    2017-09-01

    To preserve cellular integrity and avoid bacterial growth, storage and transfer of blood and blood products follow strict guidelines in terms of temperature control. We evaluated the impact of ineligible warming of whole blood donations on the quality of blood components. One-hundred and twenty units of whole blood (WB) from eligible blood donors were collected in CPDA-1 and stored at 4±2 °C. During shipment to the blood processing centre, a gradual warming up to 17 °C was recorded within a period of less than eight hours. The warmed units were processed to packed red blood cells (PRBCs) or stored as WB units at 4±2 °C. In-bag haemolysis, osmotic fragility (mean corpuscular fragility, MCF) and bacterial growth were assessed in blood and blood components throughout the storage period. Normal basal and early storage levels of haemolysis were recorded in both PRBC and WB units. Thereafter, PRBCs exhibited higher average in-bag haemolysis and MCF index compared to the WB units throughout the storage. Moreover, 14.3 and 52.4% of the PRBC units exceeded the upper permissible limit of 0.8% haemolysis at the middle (1.220±0.269%) or late (1.754±0.866%) storage period, respectively. MCF index was similar in all PRBCs at the middle of storage but significantly lower in the non-haemolysed compared to the haemolysed units of PRBCs on the last days. The fragility of stored RBCs was proportional to the donor-related values of day 2 samples (r=0.861, punits of PRBCs. Transient, gradient warming of whole blood from 4 to 17 °C led to increased incidence of in-bag haemolysis in PRBC but not in WB units. Haemolysis is a multi-parametric phenotype of stored blood, and MCF is a donor-related and highly dynamic measure that can, in part, predict the storage lesion.

  13. Donating umbilical cord blood to a public bank or storing it in a private bank: knowledge and preference of blood donors and of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screnci, Maria; Murgi, Emilia; Pirrè, Guglielma; Valente, Elisabetta; Gesuiti, Paola; Corona, Francesca; Girelli, Gabriella

    2012-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a source of stem cells for allogeneic haematopoietic transplantation in paediatric and adult patients with haematological malignancies and other indications. Voluntary donation is the basis for the success of unrelated UCB transplantation programmes. In the last few years a growing number of private banks offer their services to expectant parents, to store UCB for future use. The debate concerning UCB donation and private preservation has been ongoing for several years. The aims of this single centre study were to explore knowledge about UCB stem cells and attitudes towards voluntary UCB donation or private UCB preservation among both blood donors and pregnant women. This study was conducted at the "Sapienza" University of Rome. Two types of anonymous questionnaires were prepared: one type was administered to 1,000 blood donors while the other type was distributed to 300 pregnant women. Most blood donors as well as the majority of pregnant women had some general knowledge about UCB (89% and 93%, respectively) and were aware of the possibility of donating it (82% and 95%). However, the level of knowledge regarding current therapeutic use resulted generally low, only 91 (10%) among informed blood donors and 69 (31%) among informed pregnant women gave a correct answer. The survey revealed a preference for voluntary donation both among blood donors (76%) and among pregnant woman (55%). Indeed, a minority of blood donors (6.5%) and of pregnant women (9%) would opt to store UCB for private use. The study raises the following considerations: (i) the large support for UCB donation expressed by blood donors and by pregnant women suggests that UCB preservation does not represent an obstacle to the expansion of UCB donation and to development of unrelated transplantation programmes; (ii) information about UCB donation and preservation should be carefully given by professionals and institutions.

  14. Occurrence of Leishmania infantum Parasitemia in Asymptomatic Blood Donors Living in an Area of Endemicity in Southern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Fichoux, Yves; Quaranta, Jean-François; Aufeuvre, Jean-Pierre; Lelievre, Alain; Marty, Pierre; Suffia, Isabelle; Rousseau, Deborah; Kubar, Joanna

    1999-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniosis (VL) due to Leishmania infantum (L. chagasi) is a lethal disease if untreated, but asymptomatic L. infantum infections have been reported previously. A better understanding of parasite transmission, dissemination, and survival in the human host is needed. The purpose of this study was to assess whether L. infantum circulated in peripheral blood of subjects with no history of VL. Sera from 565 blood donors were screened by Western blotting to detect Leishmania-specific antibodies and identify individuals with probable past exposure to Leishmania. Seropositivity was found in 76 donors whose buffy coats were examined by PCR and direct culture. The parasite minicircle kinetoplast DNA was amplified from blood samples of nine donors. Promastigotes were detected by culture in blood samples from nine donors. Only two donors were PCR and culture positive. These results indicate that L. infantum circulates intermittently and at low density in the blood of healthy seropositive individuals, who thus appear to be asymptomatic carriers. Implications for the safety of blood transfusion are discussed. PMID:10325353

  15. Predictors for non-compliance of notified hepatitis C virus-positive blood donors with recommendation to seek medical counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzman, H; Green, M S; Shinar, E

    2009-01-01

    Notification of blood donors represents the commonest method of informing asymptomatic individuals of abnormal test results indicating exposure to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Such notification is therefore important from both health and economic perspectives. This study aimed to identify predictors for non-compliance of HCV-positive blood donors with the National Blood Services recommendation to seek medical counselling. The current research is a cross-sectional study. Telephone interviews were conducted with 201 blood donors identified as HCV positive following blood donation during 2001-2002 (40% response rate). About 25% of all the notified blood donors did not seek any counselling; 29% (44/150) of those who requested medical advice from their primary care physicians (general practitoner's) were not referred to specialists. Age, alcohol consumption and non-practice of health-promoting behaviour were independent predictors of non-compliance with the blood services' recommendation. In particular, smoking (odds ratio, 2.0; 95% confidence interval 1.0-4.2) and not undergoing professional teeth cleaning (odds ratio 2.8; 95% confidence interval 1.3-6.1) were found to be significant predictors of non-compliance. The study provides essential data regarding the extent and risk factors for non-compliance of HCV-positive blood donors with recommendation to seek medical advice. Our results can assist in identifying blood donors who would not seek counselling, based on demographic factors and past exposure to risk factors for HCV. Improvements in the notification process and additional training of general practitoners regarding the management of HCV disease are needed.

  16. Red blood cell phenotype prevalence in blood donors who self-identify as Hispanic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheppard, Chelsea A; Bolen, Nicole L; Eades, Beth

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Molecular genotyping platforms provide a quick, high-throughput method for identifying red blood cell units for patients on extended phenotype-matching protocols, such as those with sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Most of the antigen prevalence data reported are for non-Hispanic ...

  17. Hepatitis B surface antigen variants in voluntary blood donors in Nanjing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-lin Yang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV is still one of the serious infectious risks for the blood transfusion safety in China. One plausible reason is the emergence of the variants in the major antigenic alpha determinant within the major hydrophilic region (MHR of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, which have been assumed to evade the immune surveillance and pose a challenge to the disease diagnosis. It is well documented that some commercial ELISA kits could detect the wild-type but not the mutant viruses. The high prevalence of HBV in China also impaired the application of nucleic acid testing (NAT in the improvement of blood security. Molecular epidemiological study of HBsAg variations in China is still limited. This study was designed to identify the prevalence of mutations in the HBsAg in voluntary blood donors in Nanjing, China. Methods A total of 20,326 blood units were enrolled in this study, 39 donors were positive for HBV S gene in the nested-PCR. Mutations in the major hydrophilic region (MHR; aa 99-169 were identified by direct sequencing of S region. Results Among of 20,326 blood units in the Red Cross Transfusion Center of Nanjing from October 2008 to April 2009, 296 samples (1.46%, 296/20,326 were HBsAg positive in the 2 successive rounds of the ELISA test. In these HBsAg positive units, HBV S gene could be successfully amplified from 39 donors (13.18%, 39/296 in the nested-PCR. Sequence analysis revealed that 32 strains (82.1%, 32/39 belong to genotype B, 7 strains (17.9%, 7/39 to genotype C. Besides well known G145R, widely dispersed variations in the MHR of S region, were observed in 20 samples of all the strains sequenced. Conclusions HBV/B and HBV/C are dominant in Nanjing, China. The mutations in the MHR of HBsAg associated with disease diagnosis are common.

  18. Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in volunteer blood donors from Chengdu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tianxiang; Zhao, Xin; Luo, Yijia; Hong, Ying; Li, Shuping; Fu, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant pathogen of global concern. The virus is usually spread through blood contact, such as transfusion, hemodialysis and injection of illegal drugs. HCV genotypes have a geographic distribution in different areas. In this paper, we focus on the distribution of HCV genotypes from volunteer blood donors in Chengdu. The prevalence of genotypes was analyzed using phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic trees were constructed based on the HCV core and NS5B regions from 313 sequences. HCV sequences were classified into six subtypes, and HCV genotypes were determined with the following results: 1b in 283, 2a in 14, 3b in seven, 3a in three, 6a in five and 6u in one. Subtype 1b was the most common and accounted for approximately 90.41 % (283/313), and a virus of subtype 6u was isolated for the first time from the Chengdu area. Genotypes 4 and 5 were not detected.

  19. Potassium evaluation in blood of Brazilian athletes using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, L.; Zamboni, C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nunes, L.A.S.; Lourenco, T.F.; Macedo, D. Vaz de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Full text: According to nutrition sources an athlete needs per day at least one gram of potassium for keeping the correct mineral balance in the organism. Its deficiency or even instantaneous low concentration in blood can diminish the athlete performance originating nervous irritability, muscular weakness, and mental disorientation and in more several causes cardiac arrhythmias. In this study the K levels in blood were determined in athletes submitted to constant load exercise at treadmill at LABEX (Laboratorio de Bioquimica do Exercicio - UNICAMP, Brazil) using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA). The blood samples were collected from male athletes, age 18 to 26 years, before and after the physical training. Immediately after the collection an amount of 10 micro liters of whole blood was transferred to the filter paper and dried for a few minutes using an infrared lamp. To determine the concentration of potassium each sample was irradiated in the nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, 2-4MW, pool type) at IPEN and was gamma counted using an HPGe Spectrometer of High Energy Resolution. The concentrations of the selected element, 1525keV related to the potassium activated {sup 42}K, were calculated using in -house software. The potassium levels were evaluated before and after the physical exercise and the data were compared with the normal range. (author)

  20. Preoperative predictors of blood component transfusion in living donor liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R N Makroo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Extensive bleeding associated with liver transplantation is a major challenge faced by transplant surgeons, worldwide. Aims: To evaluate the blood component consumption and determine preoperative factors that predict the same in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT. Settings and Design: This prospective study was performed for a 1 year period, from March 2010 to February 2011. Materials and Methods: Intra- and postoperative utilization of blood components in 152 patients undergoing LDLT was evaluated and preoperative patient parameters like age, gender, height, weight, disease etiology, hemoglobin (Hb, hematocrit (Hct, platelet count (Plt, total leukocyte count (TLC, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, international normalized ratio (INR, serum bilirubin (T. bilirubin, total proteins (T. proteins, albumin to globulin ratio (A/G ratio, serum creatinine (S. creatinine, blood urea (B. urea, and serum electrolytes were assessed to determine their predictive values. Univariate and stepwise discriminant analysis identified those factors, which could predict the consumption of each blood component. Results: The average utilization of packed red cells (PRCs, cryoprecipitates (cryo, apheresis platelets, and fresh frozen plasma was 8.48 units, 2.19 units, 0.93 units, and 2,025 ml, respectively. Disease etiology and blood component consumption were significantly correlated. Separate prediction models which could predict consumption of each blood component in intra and postoperative phase of LDLT were derived from among the preoperative Hb, Hct, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD score, body surface area (BSA, Plt, T. proteins, S. creatinine, B. urea, INR, and serum sodium and chloride. Conclusions: Preoperative variables can effectively predict the blood component requirements during liver transplantation, thereby allowing blood transfusion services in being better prepared for surgical procedure.

  1. Hepatitis B virus nucleic acid testing in Chinese blood donors with normal and elevated alanine aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jing-Xing; Huang, Yi; Yao, Fu-Zhu; Lv, Yun-Lai; Li, Ju-Lin; Wen, Guo-Xin; Wen, Xiu-Qiong; Liu, Jiang; Dong, Xiang-Dong; Ma, Hong-Li; Zhou, Zhong-Min; Bi, Xin-Hong; Tu, Lin; King, Melissa; Nelson, Kenrad; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2011-12-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) is currently not a routine donor test in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current residual risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission and the value of ALT testing in preventing HBV infection. From January 2008 to September 2009, a total of 5521 qualified donations by routine screening and 5034 deferred donations due to elevated ALT alone were collected from five blood centers. Samples were tested for HBV DNA by triplex individual-donation (ID)-NAT (ULTRIO assay, on the TIGRIS system, Novartis Diagnostics). HBV NAT-reactive samples were further analyzed by HBV serology, alternative NAT, and viral load and were diluted to simulate if they could be detected in a minipool-NAT. There was no significant difference in the HBV NAT-yield rate between the qualified donations group (5/5521) and the deferred donations group (4/5034). Of these nine potential HBV-yield cases, one donor (11%) was a possible HBV window-period donor, one (11%) was a chronic HBV carrier, and seven (78%) had probable or confirmed occult HBV infections. Of seven potential HBV-yield cases quantified, the viral loads were less than or equal to 70.0 IU/mL. Minipool testing (minipools of 4, 8, and 16 donations) would miss 43% to 79% of the nine HBV-yield donations. Based on our findings in qualified donations, we estimate that the nationwide implementation of ID-NAT testing for HBV DNA in China would detect an additional 9964 viremic donations per year. ALT testing seems to have no significant value in preventing transfusion-transmitted HBV infection. ID-NAT versus simulated minipool-NAT using the ULTRIO test demonstrates the benefit to implement a more sensitive NAT strategy in regions of high HBV endemicity. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. Postoperative Compensatory Changes and Blood Flow Parameter of the Preserved Kidney in Elderly Living Related Donors Evaluated by Doppler Ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, O; Nakamura, Y; Yokoyama, T; Kihara, Y; Iwamoto, H; Kawachi, S

    2016-04-01

    Elderly kidney donors have recently become more common in living related kidney transplantation in Japan. Therefore, it is important to evaluate whether kidney function in elderly donors after nephrectomy is preserved over long periods of time. Doppler ultrasonography measurement is practical for donors after nephrectomy because it involves simple and noninvasive examinations. Doppler ultrasonography can detect compensatory hypertrophy and blood flow parameters, namely resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI), of the preserved kidney in living donors. Our study included 58 donors, divided into 2 groups according to age; the elderly donor group was comprised of those 65 years old or older. We measured length, width, and short diameter of the preserved kidney using Doppler ultrasonography, and calculated kidney volume. The elderly group was comprised of 13 patients. In this group, the median preserved kidney volume was 145.0 cm(3) (101.8-193.5) before nephrectomy, and 127.6 cm(3) (99.0-183.4) and 145.5 cm(3) (141.3-148.6) at 1 and 12 months after nephrectomy, respectively. We did not observe significant compensatory hypertrophy in the preserved kidneys of elderly donors postoperatively. Both the mean PI and RI values of elderly donors increased progressively after nephrectomy. No compensatory hypertrophy occurred in the preserved kidneys of elderly donors, although the PI and RI did increase in these donors. Our results indicate that nephrectomy caused nephrosclerosis in the preserved kidneys of elderly donors and that prevention of hypertension may be important after nephrectomy in elderly donors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Definition of the upper reference limit of glycated albumin in blood donors from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellia, Chiara; Zaninotto, Martina; Cosma, Chiara; Agnello, Luisa; Lo Sasso, Bruna; Bivona, Giulia; Plebani, Mario; Ciaccio, Marcello

    2017-11-27

    Glycated Albumin (GA) has been proposed as a short-term indicator of glycemic homeostasis. The aim of this study is to describe the distribution of GA in a large sample of blood donors from Italy to evaluate whether demographic features, namely age and sex, could influence GA levels and define specific reference limits. The study included 1334 Italian blood donors. GA was measured using an enzymatic method (quantILab Glycated Albumin, IL Werfen, Germany). The upper reference limit (URL) was calculated using the non-parametric percentile method. A modest, although significant, increase of GA was observed in relation to age (pdifferences were more pronounced (pdifferences were documented based on sex (12% [11.3-12.8] in males; 12.2% [11.4-13.1] in females; p=0.01). After excluding individuals with fasting plasma glucose ≥7 mmol/L, the calculated GA URL was 14.5% (95% CI: 14.3-14.7). Subjects with GA>14.5% presented a mean age of 48.4±12.2 years, 66.7% were males and the mean glucose was 6.88±2.5 mmol/L. GA in Caucasians shows a similar increasing trend at older ages documented in other ethnicities. The definition of the URL in this population could be useful for both clinical studies, which will clarify the role of GA for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes, and will encourage the introduction of GA in clinical practice.

  4. Case-control study of immediate and delayed vasovagal reactions in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbey, D; Fillet, A-M; Jbilou, S; Tiberghien, P; Djoudi, R

    2016-10-01

    Vasovagal reactions (VVRs) are the most common adverse events associated with blood donations. To assess the relative importance of VVR risk factors, a retrospective case-control study of severe immediate and delayed VVRs was performed. Vasovagal reactions were defined as immediate when occurring at the transfusion site and as delayed when occurring outside the transfusion site and within 24 h following donation. VVRs with probable or certain imputability and moderate to death severity were considered. One control/case was drawn randomly from among donors without VVR. Explanatory variables (sex, age, body mass index (BMI), donation status, type of phlebotomy) as well as the matching variables (donation region, date) and the interaction term (sex and BMI) were integrated into the multivariate model. In French hemovigilance data collected from 2011 to 2013, 8410 immediate and 833 delayed VVRs occurred among 8 834 214 donations. In multivariate analysis, occurrence of immediate VVR was strongly associated with first-time donation (OR 4·34; 95% CI: 3·93-4·79, P donor is at risk of delayed VVR. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. Distribution of Hepatitis B virus genotypes among healthy blood donors in eastern part of North India

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    Kumar Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We evaluated the distribution HBV genotypes among non-remunerated healthy blood donors in eastern North India. Materials and Methods: During screening of donated blood, 176 consecutive HBsAg positive, samples comprised the study. HBV-DNA was quantitative detected in 150 samples by PCR. HBV genotype was determined by identifying genotype-specific DNA band using nested PCR. Results: Majorities were of age group 31-40 yrs (65.3%. Males (92.7% outnumbered females (7.3% and were HbeAg-negative HBsAg carriers. Over all, genotype-A was the most prevalent (54% followed by D (21.3%. We did not find genotype-G and H. Districts under study, divided into four zones: Zone-I genotype-A was most common (62.3% followed by D (18.8%; Zone-II genotype-C (41.2% was more frequent followed by D (20.6% and A (17.7%. Zone-III in adjoining Bihar state close to Zone-I, A was more prevalent (81.8% followed by B and C (9.1%. In Zone-IV adjoining Zone- II had genotype-A (100% only. Genotype-D had more sporadic distribution. Genotype-E and F were prevalent in Zone I and II (3/150, 2%. Conclusions: Among blood donors HBV genotype-A followed by D was the most prevalent in eastern North India. Genotype-A had pattern of distribution signifying common focus, while D was more sporadic and C had single large pocket (Zone-II probably common focus but restricting to particular area. Evidences are suggestive of association of HBV genotype in liver dysfunction. An effective treatment and preventive strategies based of genotypes will reduce the disease burden and increase the blood safety.

  6. Impact of blood manufacturing and donor characteristics on membrane water permeability and in vitro quality parameters during hypothermic storage of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshalani, Abdulrahman; Howell, Anita; Acker, Jason P

    2018-02-01

    Several factors have been proposed to influence the red blood cell storage lesion including storage duration, blood component manufacturing methodology, and donor characteristics [1,18]. The objectives of this study were to determine the impact of manufacturing method and donor characteristics on water permeability and membrane quality parameters. Red blood cell units were obtained from volunteer blood donors and grouped according to the manufacturing method and donor characteristics of sex and age. Membrane water permeability and membrane quality parameters, including deformability, hemolysis, osmotic fragility, hematologic indices, supernatant potassium, and supernatant sodium, were determined on day 5 ± 2, day 21, and day 42. Regression analysis was applied to evaluate the contribution of storage duration, manufacturing method, and donor characteristics on storage lesion. This study found that units processed using a whole blood filtration manufacturing method exhibited significantly higher membrane water permeability throughout storage compared to units manufactured using red cell filtration. Additionally, significant differences in hemolysis, supernatant potassium, and supernatant sodium were seen between manufacturing methods, however there were no significance differences between donor age and sex groups. Findings of this study suggest that the membrane-related storage lesion is initiated prior to the first day of storage with contributions by both blood manufacturing process and donor variability. The findings of this work highlight the importance of characterizing membrane water permeability during storage as it can be a predictor of the biophysical and chemical changes that affect the quality of stored red blood cells during hypothermic storage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Infectivity of blood components from donors with occult hepatitis B infection - results from an Australian lookback programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, C R; Maloney, R; Kiely, P; Bell, B; Keller, A J; Pink, J

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that transfused blood components from donors with occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) are potentially infectious. This study reports the results of an Australian lookback programme for the period subsequent to the commencement of individual donation HBV NAT in July 2010 and estimates the HBV transmission rate for components from two categories of donors, confirmed OBI and HBV inconclusive (anti-HBc reactive with non-discriminated NAT result). Using the results of lookback investigations, we estimated HBV transmission rates by donor category and type of component transfused based on the prevalence of antibodies to HBV core antigen (anti-HBc) in recipients adjusted for the estimated prevalence in the general population. After subtracting the background anti-HBc rate, we derived an adjusted transmission rate (all components) with lower and upper bounds as follows: 0·85% (0·00-2·35%) for OBI donors, 2·83% (1·23-4·33%) for inconclusive donors and 1·81% (0·21-3·31%) for total (OBI and inconclusive) donors. The median adjusted transmission rate for total donors was higher (but not statistically) for plasma (3·01%) than RCCs (2·86%), but there was no evidence of transmission for cryoprecipitate or platelets (0% for both components). Our lookback study suggests a low (0·2-3·3%) but measurable rate of HBV transmission in Australia associated with donors with OBI and supports published evidence that at least some blood component types from OBI donors, including a proportion undetectable by ID-NAT can transmit HBV by transfusion. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  8. Prevalence of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 among blood donors in Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Márcia Poinho EncarnaçÃo de; Gato, Cynara Melo; Maciel, Lucinei Alves; Lalwani, Pritesh; Costa, Cristóvão Alves; Lalwani, Jaila Dias Borges

    2017-12-21

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2) is endemic in Brazil, but few studies have investigated the seroprevalence of HTLV and its subtypes among blood donors in the capital city Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. To estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 and to identify circulating subtypes among blood donors in Manaus. Blood donors (2001-2003) were screened for HTLV-1/2 antibodies by ELISA. Positive results were confirmed and subtyped by Western blot assays. Prevalence rates were calculated and compared with demographic data. Among the 87,402 individuals screened, 116 (0.13%) were seropositive for HTLV-1/2. A second sample (76/116) was collected and retested by HTLV-1/2 ELISA, of which only 41/76 were positive. Western blot confirmed HTLV infection in 24/41 retested blood donors [HTLV-1 (n=16), HTLV-2 (n=5) and HTLV-untypable (n=3)]. HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are prevalent among blood donors in Manaus. However, additional studies are needed to comprehend the epidemiology of HTLV-1/2 in Amazonas not only to understand the pathophysiology of the disease providing adequate medical assistance, but also to reduce or block virus transmission.

  9. Prevalence of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 among blood donors in Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Poinho EncarnaçÃo de Morais

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2 is endemic in Brazil, but few studies have investigated the seroprevalence of HTLV and its subtypes among blood donors in the capital city Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. Aim: To estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 and to identify circulating subtypes among blood donors in Manaus. Materials and Methods: Blood donors (2001-2003 were screened for HTLV-1/2 antibodies by ELISA. Positive results were confirmed and subtyped by Western blot assays. Prevalence rates were calculated and compared with demographic data. Results: Among the 87,402 individuals screened, 116 (0.13% were seropositive for HTLV-1/2. A second sample (76/116 was collected and retested by HTLV-1/2 ELISA, of which only 41/76 were positive. Western blot confirmed HTLV infection in 24/41 retested blood donors [HTLV-1 (n=16, HTLV-2 (n=5 and HTLV-untypable (n=3]. Discussion: HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are prevalent among blood donors in Manaus. However, additional studies are needed to comprehend the epidemiology of HTLV-1/2 in Amazonas not only to understand the pathophysiology of the disease providing adequate medical assistance, but also to reduce or block virus transmission.

  10. Absence of detectable XMRV and other MLV-related viruses in healthy blood donors in the United States.

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    Shixing Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preliminary studies in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS patients and XMRV infected animals demonstrated plasma viremia and infection of blood cells with XMRV, indicating the potential risk for transfusion transmission. XMRV and MLV-related virus gene sequences have also been detected in 4-6% of healthy individuals including blood donors in the U.S. These results imply that millions of persons in the U.S. may be carrying the nucleic acid sequences of XMRV and/or MLV-related viruses, which is a serious public health and blood safety concern. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain evidence of XMRV or MLV-related virus infection in the U.S. blood donors, 110 plasma samples and 71 PBMC samples from blood donors at the NIH blood bank were screened for XMRV and MLV-related virus infection. We employed highly sensitive assays, including nested PCR and real-time PCR, as well as co-culture of plasma with highly sensitive indicator DERSE cells. Using these assays, none of the samples were positive for XMRV or MLV-related virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with those from several other studies, and demonstrate the absence of XMRV or MLV-related viruses in the U.S. blood donors that we studied.

  11. Evaluation of three methods for hemoglobin measurement in a blood donor setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblit, J; Abreu, C R; Szterling, L N; Kutner, J M; Hamerschlak, N; Frutuoso, P; Paiva, T R; Ferreira, O C

    1999-05-06

    The hemoglobin (Hb) level is the most-used parameter for screening blood donors for the presence of anemia, one of the most-used methods for measuring Hb levels is based on photometric detection of cyanmetahemoglobin, as an alternative to this technology, HemoCue has developed a photometric method based on the determination of azide metahemoglobin. To evaluate the performance of three methods for hemoglobin (Hb) determination in a blood bank setting. Prospective study utilizing blood samples to compare methods for Hb determination. Hemotherapy Service of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, a private institution in the tertiary health care system. Serial blood samples were collected from 259 individuals during the period from March to June 1996. Test performances and their comparisons were assessed by the analysis of coefficients of variation (CV), linear regression and mean differences. The CV for the three methods were: Coulter 0.68%, Cobas 0.82% and HemoCue 0.69%. There was no difference between the mean Hb determination for the three methods (p>0.05). The Coulter and Cobas methods showed the best agreement and the HemoCue method gave a lower Hb determination when compared to both the Coulter and Cobas methods. However, pairs of methods involving the HemoCue seem to have narrower limits of agreement (+/- 0.78 and +/- 1.02) than the Coulter and Cobas combination (+/- 1.13). The three methods provide good agreement for hemoglobin determination.

  12. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in American Red Cross adult blood donors, 2000-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Geary W; Mair, David C; Lange, Cleston C; Harrington, Laura M; Church, Timothy R; Goldberg, Corinne L; Herron, Ross M; Hanna, Hank; Nobiletti, John B; Rios, Jorge A; Reagen, William K; Ley, Carol A

    2017-08-01

    In 2015, thirteen per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), and perfluorodecanoate (PFDA) were analyzed in human plasma that were collected from a total of 616 American Red Cross male and female blood donors (ages 20-69) at 6 regional blood collection centers. Plasma samples were analyzed using a validated solvent precipitation-isotope dilution direction-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. The data were analyzed in conjunction with prior cross-sectional investigations [2000-2001 (n =645), 2006 (n =600), and 2010 (n =600)] to determine PFAS trends. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric mean serum (2000-2001) and plasma (2006, 2010, 2015) concentrations (ng/mL) were, respectively: PFHxS (2.3, 1.5, 1.3, 0.9); PFOS (35.1, 14.5, 8.4, 4.3); PFOA (4.7, 3.4, 2.4, 1.1); PFNA (0.6, 1.0, 0.8, 0.4); and PFDA (0.2, 0.3, 0.3, 0.1). The percentage decline in these geometric mean concentrations from 2000-2001 to 2015 were: PFHxS (61%); PFOS (88%); PFOA (77%); PFNA (33%); and PFDA (50%). The results indicate a continued decline of PFHxS, PFOS, and PFOA concentrations in American Red Cross blood donors. For the remaining PFAS measured in 2015, including the shorter chain perfluoroalkyls perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS) and perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), the majority of samples were below the lower limit of quantitation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular characterization, distribution, and dynamics of hepatitis C virus genotypes in blood donors in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Mónica Viviana Alvarado; Romano, Camila Malta; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Gutiérrez, Maria Fernanda; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a frequent cause of acute and chronic hepatitis and a leading cause for cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is classified in six major genotypes and more than 70 subtypes. In Colombian blood banks, serum samples were tested for anti-HCV antibodies using a third-generation ELISA. The aim of this study was to characterize the viral sequences in plasma of 184 volunteer blood donors who attended the "Banco Nacional de Sangre de la Cruz Roja Colombiana," Bogotá, Colombia. Three different HCV genomic regions were amplified by nested PCR. The first of these was a segment of 180 bp of the 5'UTR region to confirm the previous diagnosis by ELISA. From those that were positive to the 5'UTR region, two further segments were amplified for genotyping and subtyping by phylogenetic analysis: a segment of 380 bp from the NS5B region; and a segment of 391 bp from the E1 region. The distribution of HCV subtypes was: 1b (82.8%), 1a (5.7%), 2a (5.7%), 2b (2.8%), and 3a (2.8%). By applying Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation, it was estimated that HCV-1b was introduced into Bogotá around 1950. Also, this subtype spread at an exponential rate between about 1970 to about 1990, after which transmission of HCV was reduced by anti-HCV testing of this population. Among Colombian blood donors, HCV genotype 1b is the most frequent genotype, especially in large urban conglomerates such as Bogotá, as is the case in other South American countries. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Increased mortality associated with HTLV-II infection in blood donors: a prospective cohort study

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    Smith James W

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HTLV-I is associated with adult T-cell leukemia, and both HTLV-I and -II are associated with HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. Several published reports suggest that HTLV-I may lead to decreased survival, but HTLV-II has not previously been associated with mortality. Results We examined deaths among 138 HTLV-I, 358 HTLV-II, and 759 uninfected controls enrolled in a prospective cohort study of U.S. blood donors followed biannually since 1992. Proportional hazards models yielded hazard ratios (HRs for the association between mortality and HTLV infection, controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, age, income, educational level, blood center, smoking, injection drug use history, alcohol intake, hepatitis C status and autologous donation. After a median follow-up of 8.6 years, there were 45 confirmed subject deaths. HTLV-I infection did not convey a statistically significant excess risk of mortality (unadjusted HR 1.9, 95%CI 0.8–4.4; adjusted HR 1.9, 95%CI 0.8–4.6. HTLV-II was associated with death in both the unadjusted model (HR 2.8, 95%CI 1.5–5.5 and in the adjusted model (HR 2.3, 95%CI 1.1–4.9. No single cause of death appeared responsible for the HTLV-II effect. Conclusions After adjusting for known and potential confounders, HTLV-II infection is associated with increased mortality among healthy blood donors. If replicated in other cohorts, this finding has implications for both HTLV pathogenesis and counseling of infected persons.

  15. Successful unintentional ABO-incompatible renal transplantation: Blood group A1B donor into an A2B recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Stratta, Robert J; Farney, Alan C; Pomper, Gregory J

    2014-05-01

    To report a successful unintentional transplantation of a deceased donor kidney from an "incompatible" A1B donor into a recipient who was blood group A2B with unsuspected preformed anti-A1 antibodies. The donor and recipient were both typed for ABO antigens. The recipient was tested for ABO and non-ABO antibodies. The recipient was typed for HLA class I and class II antigens, including HLA antibody screen. The T-and B-flow cytometry crossmatch test was performed using standard protocol. The donor-recipient pair was a complete six-antigen human leukocyte antigen mismatch, but final T- and B-flow cytometry cross-match tests were compatible. The recipient was a 65-year-old woman with a medical history of end-stage renal disease secondary to diabetic nephropathy who underwent kidney transplantation from a 46-year-old brain-dead standard criteria donor. The recipient's RBCs were negative with A1 lectin, and the recipient was thus typed as an A2 subgroup. Anti-A1 could be demonstrated in the recipient's plasma. The donor's RBCs were positive with A1 lectin, thereby conferring an A1 blood type. It is safe to transplant across the A1/A2 blood group barrier provided that the preformed antibodies are not reactive at 37°C and with anti-human globulin.

  16. Hepatitis C genotype distribution in patient and blood donor samples in South Africa for the period 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabdial-Sing, N; Chirwa, T; Thaver, J; Smuts, H; Vermeulen, M; Suchard, M; Puren, A J

    2016-11-01

    There are limited molecular epidemiological studies of hepatitis C at a national level in South Africa. The introduction of newer treatment modalities for hepatitis C requires knowledge of the genotypes as these may have different prognostic and therapeutic implications. This retrospective study describes genotype distributions of patients attending specialist clinics and a blood donor group studied during the period 2008-2012 in South Africa. Residual samples from diagnostic viral load testing from specialist clinics in South Africa (n=941) and from the South African National Blood Service (n=294) were analysed quantitatively by real-time PCR and genotyped using the Versant line probe assay or sequencing. Genotype 1 was predominant in blood donors (34%), whilst genotype 5a was prevalent in patients (36%). In the blood donor group, genotype 4 was detected for the first time. Genotype 2 was rare in the patient group and not detected in blood donors. Genotype 1 was the predominant genotype in the younger age groups (less than 30 years), whereas genotype 5a was found at higher proportions in the older age groups for both the patient and blood donor groups, comprising more than 60% of genotypes in those older than 50 years. Genotypes 1 and 5 were at highest proportions across all provinces compared to other genotypes. In blood donors, genotype 1 was predominant among Caucasians (43%) and genotype 5a among Blacks (54%). Such information is required for planning the impact on the health sector with regard to newly emerging therapies for hepatitis C and burden of disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Levels of ochratoxin A in blood from Norwegian and Swedish blood donors and their possible correlation with food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuvander, A; Paulsen, J E; Axberg, K; Johansson, N; Vidnes, A; Enghardt-Barbieri, H; Trygg, K; Lund-Larsen, K; Jahrl, S; Widenfalk, A; Bosnes, V; Alexander, J; Hult, K; Olsen, M

    2001-12-01

    Blood levels of ochratoxin A were determined in 406 Scandinavian blood donors (206 from Oslo, Norway, and 200 from Visby on the island of Gotland, Sweden), using an HPLC method. In connection with the blood collection, the subjects were asked to fill in a food questionnaire to obtain individual dietary information relevant to ochratoxin A exposure. The mean plasma level of ochratoxin A was 0.18 ng/ml in Oslo and slightly higher, 0.21 ng/ml (P=0.046) in Visby. There was no correlation between plasma levels of ochratoxin A and the estimated total dietary intake of ochratoxin A based on consumption data and levels in food (retrieved from the literature), neither was the plasma level of ochratoxin A correlated with the total amount of food consumed. However, consumption of several foods, including cereal products, wine, beer and pork, were to some minor degree related to high plasma levels of ochratoxin A. The strongest correlations (correlation coefficient r>0.4; P<0.001) were observed for women in relation to the consumption of beer or medium brown bread. Correlation analysis of combinations of two or more food categories did not result in any statistically significant correlation.

  18. Evaluation of positive and false-positive results in syphilis screening of blood donors in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandes, V S; Silva, S G C; Motta, I J F; Velarde, L G C; de Castilho, S R

    2017-06-01

    We propose to analyse the positive and false-positive results of treponemal and nontreponemal tests in blood donors from Brazil and to evaluate possible factors associated with the results of treponemal tests. Treponemal tests have been used widely for syphilis screening in blood banks. The introduction of these tests in donor screening has caused an impact and a loss of donors who need to be assessed. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study of syphilis screening and confirmatory test results of blood donors that were obtained before and after adopting a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). A comparative analysis was performed using a second sample drawn from positive donors. The possible factors associated with CLIA-positive or CLIA-false-positive results were investigated in a subgroup. Statistical tests were used to compare the proportions and adjusted estimates of association. The reactivity rate increased from 1·01% (N = 28 158) to 2·66% (N = 25 577) after introducing the new test. Among Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL)- and CLIA-confirmed results, the false-positive rates were 40·5% (N = 180) and 37·4% (N = 359), respectively (P = 0·5266). Older donors (OR = 1·04; P = 0·0010) and donors with lower education levels (OR = 6·59; P = 0·0029) were associated with a higher risk of positivity for syphilis. CLIA represents an improvement in blood bank serological screening. However, its use in a healthy population appears to result in high rates of false positives. Identifying which characteristics can predict false positives, however, remains a challenge. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  19. Occult Hepatitis B virus infection in previously screened, blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: implications for blood transfusion and stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olotu, Amadin A; Oyelese, Adesola O; Salawu, Lateef; Audu, Rosemary A; Okwuraiwe, Azuka P; Aboderin, Aaron O

    2016-05-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission through blood transfusion is reduced by screening for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). However this method cannot detect the presence of occult hepatitis B virus infection. This study sought to determine the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection among blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. For the first time in Nigeria we employed an automated real-time PCR- method to investigate the prevalence of occult HBV in blood donors. Blood donors screened with HBsAg immunochromatographic rapid test kits at the blood transfusion units of two hospitals and found to be negative were recruited into the study. Questionnaires to elicit risk factors for HBV infection were administered and then 10 ml of blood was collected from each donor. Plasma samples obtained from these HBsAg negative blood donors were screened again for HBsAg using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, and those found negative were screened for the presence of total antibody to the HBV core antigen (anti-HBc) using ELISA method. Those positive to anti-HBc were then tested for HBV DNA, using an automated real-time PCR method. Five hundred and seven blood donors found HBsAg negative by immunochromatographic rapid test kits at both blood transfusion units, were tested for HBsAg using ELISA and 5 (1 %) were HBsAg positive. The 502 found negative were tested for anti-HBc and 354 (70.5 %) were found positive implying previous exposure to HBV and 19 (5.4 %) of the 354 anti-HBc positive had HBV DNA signifying occult HBV infection. No risk factors were found to be associated with the presence of HBV DNA among those who tested positive. Occult HBV infection exists in blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria and the use of HBsAg alone for screening prospective donors will not eliminate the risk of HBV transmission in blood transfusion or stem cell transplantation.

  20. False-negative testing errors in routine viral marker screening of blood donors. For the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, M P; Watanabe, K K; Smith, J W; Hermansen, S W; Thomson, R A

    2000-05-01

    The contribution of testing errors to the risk of virus transmission by transfusion depends on the rate of false-negative testing errors and the prevalence of infected seropositive donations. Although the false-negative testing error rate has been estimated at 0.1 to 1 percent on the basis of proficiency studies, it has not previously been measured in routine donor screening. A 1991 to 1995 database containing 5,153,153 donations from 1.5 x 10(6) donors (including autologous donors) was searched to identify donors who tested seropositive for HIV, HCV, HTLV-I or II and who attempted subsequent donations. The false-negative rate in routinely screened follow-up donations was determined, and false-negative cases were investigated to identify the cause. Subsequent donations (n = 2015) by 1224 donors with confirmed-positive results were identified. Eleven (0.5%) of these donations did not react in EIA. Ten of the 11 false-negative cases were attributable to borderline-reactive donations. On subsequent donations, there were borderline-nonreactive results on HTLV-I (2 cases), first-generation HCV (5 cases), and second-generation HCV (3 cases) EIAs. The final case was strongly reactive for HCV in a second-generation EIA on two donations (signal-to-cutoff [S:C] ratio >3.5), followed by a baseline nonreactive result on a third donation (S:C = 0.05). False-negative testing results occur infrequently during routine infectious-disease donor screening. Although most false-negative results occurred with borderline-reactive HTLV-II samples and/or early-generation HCV EIAs, frank technical errors (e.g., sample mixup or failure to add sample to EIA well) also occur at a low rate (0.05%; 95% CI, 0-1.5%). Process enhancements designed to reduce errors (e.g., enhanced automation of data management and testing systems and process controls for EIAs) are warranted to detect and prevent false-negative results.

  1. Low transfusion transmission of hepatitis E among 25,637 single-donation, nucleic acid-tested blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harritshøj, Lene H.; Holm, Dorte K.; Sækmose, Susanne G.

    2016-01-01

    was investigated among Danish blood donors, and the prevalence of HEV transfusion-transmitted infection (TTI) was investigated among recipients. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Samples from 25,637 consenting donors collected during 1 month in 2015 were screened retrospectively using an individual-donation HEV RNA......BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E virus genotype-3 (HEV-gt-3) causes autochthonous infections in western countries, with a primary reservoir in animals, especially pigs. HEV transfusion transmission has been reported, and HEV-gt-3 prevalence is high in some European countries. The prevalence of HEV RNA...... nucleic acid test with a 95% detection probability of 7.9 IU/mL. HEV-positive samples were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and genotyped. Transmission was evaluated among recipients of HEV RNA-positive blood components. Phylogenetic analyses compared HEV sequences from blood donors...

  2. [Prevalence of VHB and VHC serological markers among blood donors in the capital state of Veracruz, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Ureña, Joaquín; Vásquez-Fernández, Francisco; Pérez-Sosa, Julio A; Cortazar-Benitez, Luis F; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Ruvalcaba-Rojas, Oscar A; Torres-Medina, Verónica; Ocejo-Rodríguez, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Chronic liver disease has a high mortality among the Mexican population. However epidemiological data on hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) infection in the southeast areas of the country is limited. Our objective was to report the prevalence of blood markers of HBV and HCV among blood donors from the capital city of Veracruz, Mexico. Between January and December 2005 we analyzed the results of the screening tests used to detect serological markers of HBV and HCV infection (HBsAg and anti-HCV). We included demographic data of blood donors from the State Center for Blood Transfusion of the capital city of Veracruz. We reviewed 8,650 blood donor reports and found a prevalence of 0.057% and 1.1% for AgsHB and anti-HCV respectively. Only 2.97% of all individuals with a positive test had been previously screened for hepatic viruses. Results from our study indicate that the central and southeast regions of the state of Veracruz have a high anti-HCV prevalence among blood donors when compared with results from other states in Mexico. Further studies should evaluate risk factors in regions with high HCV seropositivity.

  3. Revaluing donor and recipient bodies in the globalised blood economy: transitions in public policy on blood safety in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Helen; Kent, Julie; Farrell, Anne-Maree

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of blood has a long history, but its apparent stability belies the complexity of contemporary practices in this field. In this article, we explore how the production, supply and deployment of blood products are socially mediated, drawing on theoretical perspectives from recent work on 'tissue economies'. We highlight the ways in which safety threats in the form of infections that might be transmitted through blood and plasma impact on this tissue economy and how these have led to a revaluation of donor bodies and restructuring of blood economies. Specifically, we consider these themes in relation to the management of recent threats to blood safety in the United Kingdom. We show that the tension between securing the supply of blood and its products and ensuring its safety may give rise to ethical concerns and reshape relations between donor and recipient bodies.

  4. A state of acquired IL-10 deficiency in 0.4% of Danish blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos Rieper, Carina; Galle, Pia; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2010-01-01

    Autoantibodies against a variety of growth factors and cytokines are present in preparations of pooled normal human IgG, such as IVIg. The present study demonstrated that healthy Danish blood donors produced high concentrations of anti-IL-10 IgG antibodies that bound IL-10 with extremely high...... avidity. The antibodies were of IgG class, polyclonally derived and acted as competitive IL-10 inhibitors in vitro, substantially inhibiting cellular IL-10 receptor binding and neutralizing IL-10 activity in vitro. The antibodies failed to bind viral forms of IL-10 or other members of the human IL-10...... family (IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24, IL-26, IL-28A, IL-28B, IL-29). The production of anti-IL-10 antibodies was stable from months to years, and high positive donors were likely to acquire a state of IL-10 deficiency in the circulation during this period. Anti-IL-10 antibodies were readily measurable even...

  5. Who donates? Cross-country and periodical variation in blood donor demographics in Europe between 1994 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittock, Nathan; Hustinx, Lesley; Bracke, Piet; Buffel, Veerle

    2017-11-01

    Ageing European populations put pressure on national blood supplies, increasing the need for blood and donor base rejuvenation. Therefore, we investigate how European countries' blood donor populations differ and how they have evolved over the last 2 decades. Previous comparative research, based on 1994 Eurobarometer data, indicate that the typical donor is an educated, middle-aged, white, married male. Other sociodemographic and socioeconomic corre