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  1. Mineralogy and petrography of Caithness Flagstones used in sorption experiments by Harwell Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralogy and petrography of a suite of samples taken from the Caithness Flagstones are described. Samples were collected from core material obtained from a borehole beneath DNE Dounreay, Highland Region, and are duplicates of those used in sorption experiments by Harwell Laboratories. The geological background of the samples is described, with particular emphasis on the development of lithologically distinct facies within the laminated lacustrine sediments examined in this study. Optical examination reveals distinctive sedimentary structures and petrofabrics associated with different lithofacies. Lithofacies type is also reflected in mineralogical variation within the sequence. Highly-laminated, deeper-water facies rocks are typified by the presence of ferroan-dolomite cement, with relatively high clay and organic matter contents. Detrital quartz and feldspar are more abundant in the shallow water facies and the carbonate assemblage in these rocks is dominated by calcite. Though total clay content varies with facies, the distribution of clay mineral species remains largely identical. There is a complex pattern of carbonate and pyrite diagenesis within these sediments. (author)

  2. Chemical Mineralogy, Geochemical Characterization and Petrography of the Cambumbia Stock, Northern Andes, South America, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lequerica, Salvador; María Jaramillo Mejía, José; Concha Perdomo, Ana Elena; Jimenez Quintero, Camilo

    2013-04-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes, South America. The goals of this study were to characterize the mineral chemistry, the geochemical composition and the petrography of the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenesis. We collected 41 samples, selected 28 for thin section petrographic analysis, 14 for whole rock elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS and 4 for chemical mineralogy by LA-ICP(JEOL JXA-8200). Petrographically the samples were classified as 30 % hornblende-gabbro, 30% pyroxene-gabbros, 10% diorites, 10% olivine-gabbro, 7% gabbronorites, 7% tonalities and 3% norite, 3% wehrlite, the rock varies from medium to coarse hipidiomorfic and holocristaline texture, with local microporfiritic texture. Spot elemental chemical analysis of the some minerals in 4 samples show the range of the major elemental composition is plagioclase (labradorite), clinopyroxene (augite), horblende (magnesiohornblende), olivine (fayalite())Chemical mineralogy shows the variety of minerals in this rock, essential minerals correspond to bytownite, augite, magnesio-honblende, fallaite and titanite. We conclude base on the SiO2 Vs Total Alkalis graph that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2, Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Carnian - Upper Triassic). Petrographic geochemical and geochronology comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (located about 25 km to the north-west) and with U/Pb age 231 ± 8 may postulate a possible genetic link between them. These ages are

  3. Petrography and geochronology of the Sao Jose dos Quatro Marcos granitoids, southwestern Mato Grosso, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An area of about 400Km2 was mapped in the region of Sao Jose dos Quatro Marcos, southwestern State of Mato Grosso, western Brazil. Various granitoid rocks were recognized, intrusive into basement gneisses, and mapped as two distinct units, one of massive late granitoids (mostly 3a and 3b granites) and one of foliated granitoids, with oriented mafic minerals, consisting mainly of tonalites and, to a lesser degree, of granodiorites. The sequence of intrusion is from tonalites to granodiorites to late granites. Magmatic textures are usually preserved in the rocks, with the exception of some clearly recrystallized samples. Field aspects, as well as petrography and mineralogy, suggest a genetic relationship between the various granitoid types, showing overall features commonly cited as typical of 'I' lineages. A Rb/Sr whole-rock isochron obtained from 3b granites (six points) shows an age of 1,472 +- 19 Ma, and Sr8786 initial ratio of 0.7037 +- 0.0004; a nine point isochron (adding two tonalites and one granodiorite) yelds similar results (age of 1,505 +- 20 Ma, initial ratio of 0.7029+- 0.0003). The obtained ages confirm the existence of a thermal-magmatic event at about 1,500 Ma at the southern border of the Amazon Craton. (author)

  4. Mineralogy and petrography of samples of Permo-Triassic sedimentary strata from Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralogy and petrography of Permo-Triassic sediments from Cumbria are described. The samples are duplicates of those selected for sorption experiments by Harwell Laboratory and are considered representative of Permo-Triassic strata underlying the BNFL Sellafield site. The regional geological context of the samples is briefly discussed. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the St Bees Sandstone and Eden Shales samples are predominantly composed of quartz with minor feldspar, gypsum and hematite. The clay assemblage is formed of dioctahedral mica and trioctahedral chloride with minor kaolinite. Diagnostic testing also reveals the presence of corrensite, a regularly interstratified chlorite-smectite, in one of the samples. Possible diagenetic processes responsible for corrensite formation, including the alteration of originally deposited smectite by magnesium-rich pore waters, are discussed. Modelling of the diffraction profile indicates that the chlorite and corrensite are iron-rich species. Back scattered electron microscopy shows the samples to be typical red bed sediments exhibiting framework grain dissolution, the breakdown and replacement of unstable ferromagnesian minerals being accompanied by the precipitation of hematite and anatase. Particle-size analysis shows similar distributions for the St Bees Sandstone samples but a greater proportion of clay material in the Eden Shales. (author)

  5. Mineralogy and Petrography of MIL 090001, a Highly Altered CV Chondrite from the Reduced Sub-Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    2011-01-01

    MIL 090001 is a large (greater than 6 kg) CV chondrite from the reduced subgroup (CV(sub red)) that was recovered during the 2009-2010 ANSMET field season [1]. The CV(sub red) subgroup meteorites retain primitive characteristics and have escaped the Na and Fe meta-somatism that affected the oxidized (CV(sub ox)) subgroups. MIL 090001 is, however, reported to be altered [1], and thus a major objective of this study is to characterize its mineralogy and petrography and the extent of the alteration.

  6. Ceramic petrography, mineralogy and typology of Eneolithic pottery from Krašnja, Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Žibrat Gašparič

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present newly excavated Eneolithic pottery from the site at Krašnja near Lukovica in central Slovenia. The material was AMS 14C dated and is contemporaneous with archaeological sites from the Ljubljansko barje region in Slovenia. The vessels were reconstructed and then various types of pots, dishes, cups, and beakers were analysed using petrography and the X-ray diffraction method. Additionally, the clay remains of walls and the floor of an Eneolithic kiln excavated at the site were also analysed. The results show that Eneolithic potters used different fab- rics to make vessels, and mostly one recipe with added calcite. The raw source material probably came from a nearby valley to the south of the site at Krašnja.

  7. Petrography, mineralogy, and chemistry of calcite-silica deposits at Exile Hill, Nevada, compared with local spring deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical, mineralogic, and petrographic analyses of siliceous calcretes from Exile Hill east of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, indicate that pedogenic processes alone account for the formation of the calcretes. These calcretes have been interpreted by some observers as evidence of seismically triggered eruptions of deep water. Such an origin could have important consequences if Yucca Mountain is developed as an unsaturated site for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. At odds with this hypothesis are the absence of features that should be present at fault-fed springs (e.g., fissure-ridge mounds with microterraces) and the preservation within root casts of delicate pedogenic microfossils, such as calcified filaments and needle-fiber calcites. Mineral-chemical evidence of pedogenic origin is found in heavy-mineral concentrations, reflected in Fe and Sc enrichments. These concentrations, which occur in the most massive of the vein calcretes, require derivation of detritus from a mixture of weathered and eolian materials that occur in the overlying B soil horizons, as opposed to direct incorporation of adjacent unweathered bedrock. Carbonate and silica abundances and accumulation rates are well within the scope of pedogenic processes. Calcium is derived from rainwater or eolian sources, whereas silica is derived in part by dissolution of local volcanic glasses or from dissolution of unstable silica minerals that are abundant in the local tuffs. In contrast with local deposits that are of spring or seep origin, the siliceous calcretes at Yucca Mountain are pedogenic in origin as well as evolution and provide no evidence in support of conjectured spring activity

  8. Petrography, mineralogy, and chemistry of calcite-silica deposits at Exile Hill, Nevada, compared with local spring deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaniman, D.T.; Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    Chemical, mineralogic, and petrographic analyses of siliceous calcretes from Exile Hill east of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, indicate that pedogenic processes alone account for the formation of the calcretes. These calcretes have been interpreted by some observers as evidence of seismically triggered eruptions of deep water. Such an origin could have important consequences if Yucca Mountain is developed as an unsaturated site for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. At odds with this hypothesis are the absence of features that should be present at fault-fed springs (e.g., fissure-ridge mounds with microterraces) and the preservation within root casts of delicate pedogenic microfossils, such as calcified filaments and needle-fiber calcites. Mineral-chemical evidence of pedogenic origin is found in heavy-mineral concentrations, reflected in Fe and Sc enrichments. These concentrations, which occur in the most massive of the vein calcretes, require derivation of detritus from a mixture of weathered and eolian materials that occur in the overlying B soil horizons, as opposed to direct incorporation of adjacent unweathered bedrock. Carbonate and silica abundances and accumulation rates are well within the scope of pedogenic processes. Calcium is derived from rainwater or eolian sources, whereas silica is derived in part by dissolution of local volcanic glasses or from dissolution of unstable silica minerals that are abundant in the local tuffs. In contrast with local deposits that are of spring or seep origin, the siliceous calcretes at Yucca Mountain are pedogenic in origin as well as evolution and provide no evidence in support of conjectured spring activity.

  9. Distribution, Mineralogy, Petrography, Provenance and Significance of Permian Ash-Carrying Deposits in the Paraná Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moacyr Vianna Coutinho

    Full Text Available The study of thin sections taken from drill core samples and outcrops in southern Brazil has demonstrated the occurrenceof repeated ash fall episodes during the Permian period between 280 and 245 Ma. Scattered or concentrated altered volcanicglass shards were detected in strata of Permian sedimentary rocks of the Rio Bonito and Tatui Formations. The shardcarryingsediment is usually a silty or cherty mudstone with variable amounts of calcrete calcite. Burial and alteration ofunstable glass debris led to the development of analcite and less commonly, calcite, silica minerals, zeolites or montmorillonite.Sources of explosive Permian volcanism, responsible for ample ash falls have been sought in South Africa, in the AndeanCordillera and along the Paraná Basin margin. A swarm of rhyolitic centers described in the Cordillera Frontal and in theCentral Argentinian Provincia de La Pampa (Patagonia is here proposed as the most adequate Permian source. In that area,volcanoes must have expelled ashes that traveled thousands of kilometers before settling in deltaic or shallow marineenvironments. Twenty-three occurrences of Permian shard-carrying sediments have been plotted in a Paraná Basin map. Thenumber of ash-carrying sediments decreases northeastward. The authors envisage dense clouds originated in Patagoniatraveling NE, depositing progressively smaller quantities of ashes but reaching Australia in pre-drift Gondwana. Shardcarrying sediments must be distinguished from “tonstein”, ash fall or ash flow tuffs, also recorded in the Permian Gondwana,which would indicate closer ash source area.

  10. Petrography of gypsum-bearing facies of the Codó Formation (Late Aptian, Northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson D.S. Paz

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available An original and detailed study focusing the petrography of evaporites from the Late Aptian deposits exposed in the eastern and southern São Luís-Grajaú Basin is presented herein, with the attempt of distinguishing between primary and secondary evaporites, and reconstructing their post-depositional evolution. Seven evaporites phases were recognized: 1. chevron gypsum; 2. nodular to lensoidal gypsum or anhydrite; 3. fibrous to acicular gypsum; 4. mosaic gypsum; 5. brecciated gypsum or gypsarenite; 6. pseudo-nodular anhydrite or gypsum; and 7. rosettes of gypsum. The three first phases of gypsum display petrographic characteristics that conform to a primary nature. The fibrous to acicular and mosaic gypsum were formed by replacement of primary gypsum, but their origin took place during the eodiagenesis, still under influence of the depositional setting. These gypsum morphologies are closely related to the laminated evaporites, serving to demonstrate that their formation was related to replacements that did not affect the primary sedimentary structures. The pseudo-nodular anhydrite or gypsum seems to have originated by mobilization of sulfate-rich fluids during burial, probably related to halokinesis. The rosettes of gypsum, which intercept all the other gypsum varieties, represent the latest phase of evaporite formation in the study area, resulting from either intrastratal waters or surface waters during weathering.Neste trabalho, é apresentado um estudo original e detalhado enfocando os aspectos petrográficos dos evaporitos de depósitos aptianos superiores expostos no sul e leste da Bacia de São Luís-Grajaú. O objetivo é o estabelecimento de critérios que permitam distinguir entre evaporitos primários e secundários, além da reconstrução de sua evolução pós-deposicional. Sete fases de evaporitos foram reconhecidas: 1. gipsita em chevron; 2. gipsita ou anidrita nodular a lenticular; 3. gipsita fibrosa a acicular; 4. gipsita em

  11. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20080144 Ma Guohua(Southwest University of Science and Technology,Mianyang 621002,China);Peng Tongjiang A Study of Chrysotile Asbestos Nanotube Synthesized by Hydrothermal Reaction(Journal of Mineralogy and Petrology,ISSN1001-6872,CN51-1143/TD,27(1),2007,p.40-45,2 illus.,2 photos,11 refs.)

  12. Petrography and chemistry of basalts from the Carlsberg ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D

    The petrography of the basalts collected in dredge hauls from the Carlsberg Ridge (3 degrees 37'N and 64 degrees 07'E) show systematic variations in their textural and mineralogical assemblages, from an outermost vitreous glassy to a holocrystalline...

  13. Mineralogical aspects of Morro de Seis Lagos deposit (Amazonas, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Lucy; Almeida, Marcelo; Silveira, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    The alkaline body Morro dos Seis Lagos, situated in the northwest Amazonian region, is a Nb bearing deposit formed by thick lateritic regolith as circular geological feature about 5 km in diameter. The host rock of this deposit is an intensely weathered siderite carbonatite. The alkaline intrusion body was formed during the late Mesozoic and enriched during the Cenozoic by process of denudation of the surrounding rocks and formation of lateritic cover with thickness in the order of hundreds of meters. In this process, enrichment of Nb, Fe, Ti, Mn, P and rare earth elements (REE) occurred where the lateritic regolith represents the major Nb mineralization, with estimated inferred reserves of 2.9 billion ton@ 2.8 % Nb2O5, one of the largest deposits of Nb in the world. The mineralogical composition of the lateritic regolith has the predominance of the goethite and hematite, followed by oxy - hydroxides of Mn, Ti - Nb oxides, pyrochlore, cerianite and phosphates. The lateritic regolith samples showed high contents of Fe2O3 40 %, and is followed by elevated Th concentration, which locally has concentration higher than (18%). Another REE mineral is the cerianite. The main manganese minerals are hollandite, romanechite (BaMn9O16[OH4] - mixtures of manganese oxides) and amorphous Mn oxy - hydroxides. The higher concentration of MnO2 (about 40 %) is restricted to manganesiferous range, where manganese minerals occur as layers and filling voids, indicating strong remobilization by later process.

  14. Contributions to the mineralogy, petrography and metallogeny of the Itataia phosphorus-uranium deposit, state of Ceara, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphorus-uranium mineralization of the Itataia deposit is unique. Most of the uranium is contained in the collophane (uraniferous fluorapatite) obtained through the transformation of metamorphic apatite of the country rocks (Itataia Group). A graphite-rich pelitic metasediment origin for the uranium and phosphorus is suggested. Initially, the rocks were subjected to isoclinal and homoclinal folding associated with overthrusting and regional metamorphism of the high amphibolite facies with some migmatization. The mineralization is epigenetic and dominated by sodium-rich metasomatic fluids. The mobilized quartz-feldspathic migmatites were transformed into collophane-albite-episyenites. The considerably thick markbles provided the conditions favoring an increase in the fluids pH which caused the precipitation of collophane concentrated in pockets and stockworks. (Author)

  15. Clay fraction mineralogy of a Cambisol in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay minerals having a 2:1 (tetrahedral:octahedral sheet) structure may be found in strongly weathering soils only if the local pedo-climatic environment prevents them from further weathering to other minerals such as iron oxides. The clay minerals impart important chemical properties to soils, in part by virtue of changes in the redox state of iron in their crystal structures. Knowing the chemical nature of soil clays is a first step in evaluating their potential reactivity with other soil constituents and processes, such as the chemical decomposition of organic substrates to be potentially used in environmental remediation. The purpose of this work was to characterize the iron oxides and iron-bearing clay minerals from a B horizon of a Cambisol developed on tuffite in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. The iron oxides of this NaOH-treated clay-fraction were found to contain mainly maghemite (γFe2O3) and superparamagnetic goethite (αFeOOH). Kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), smectite, and minor portions of anatase (TiO2) were identified in the CBD-treated sample.

  16. Clay fraction mineralogy of a Cambisol in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastacio, A. S.; Fabris, J. D., E-mail: jdfabris@ufmg.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Stucki, J. W. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences (United States); Coelho, F. S.; Pinto, I. V. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Campus - Pampulha, Department of Chemistry (Brazil); Viana, J. H. M. [Embrapa Milho e Sorgo (Brazil)

    2005-11-15

    Clay minerals having a 2:1 (tetrahedral:octahedral sheet) structure may be found in strongly weathering soils only if the local pedo-climatic environment prevents them from further weathering to other minerals such as iron oxides. The clay minerals impart important chemical properties to soils, in part by virtue of changes in the redox state of iron in their crystal structures. Knowing the chemical nature of soil clays is a first step in evaluating their potential reactivity with other soil constituents and processes, such as the chemical decomposition of organic substrates to be potentially used in environmental remediation. The purpose of this work was to characterize the iron oxides and iron-bearing clay minerals from a B horizon of a Cambisol developed on tuffite in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. The iron oxides of this NaOH-treated clay-fraction were found to contain mainly maghemite ({gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and superparamagnetic goethite ({alpha}FeOOH). Kaolinite (Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}), smectite, and minor portions of anatase (TiO{sub 2}) were identified in the CBD-treated sample.

  17. Uranium mineralization in the Lower Proterozoic Moeda Formation, Brazil: a mineralogical-scale study of the uranium budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metamorphosed medium- and coarse-grained siliciclastics of the Moeda Formation, Moeda-Gandarela, Brazil, are host to variable amounts of uranium mineralization. Host rock petrography identifies three generations of quartz: recognition of these multiple generations of quartz is essential to the understanding of the uranium budget. Uranium titanates, uraninite and uranium-thorium-phosphate minerals are the main carriers of uranium: subordinate carriers include uranothorite, coffinite and crandallite-group minerals. Textural and geochemical studies indicate a complex history, during which, uranium, along with titanium, thorium and rare-earth-elements, has been mobilised and extensively redistributed. (author)

  18. Petrography and Metamorphism of the Metasedimentary Country-Rocks of the Jacurici Valley Chromitite-Hosting Mafic-Ultramafic Complexes, Bahia, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane A. Del Lama

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deal with on the metasedimentary country-rocks of the chromite-bearing ultramafic rocks that occur in the “Jacurici River Valley Chromium District” northeastern Bahia, Brazil. This region presents a complex geologic-petrologic framework of rocks that were intensely deformed, metamorphosed and transformed by metasomatic processes, making it difficult to interpret their volutionary/metamorphic record. Although the metasedimentary country rocks have also been affected by such processes, it is possible to distinguish evidence of a previous high-grade metamorphism that affected them. Thermobarometric data for the observed mineralogical associations indicate P-T conditions around 750-800ºC and 7-8 kb for the metamorphic peak, based mainly on the presence of olivine in marbles and the cordierite-garnet-sillimanitespinel association in aluminous gneisses.

  19. The mineralogy department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document aims at making known to CEA geologists the main activity fields of the Mineralogy department by briefly recalling the principles of the implemented methods. It addresses the following methods: petrography, mineral microscopy and metallogeny, mineralogical analysis, autoradiography, thermal analysis, analytical chemistry, chromatography on paper, spectrographic methods (emission spectrography, atomic absorption spectrography), X rays (X ray diffraction, X fluorescence spectroscopy), the techniques of study of radioactive equilibriums or nuclear geology, analysis by neutron activation, and data processing in geology

  20. Mineralogical characterization of the argillaceous material from the Municipality of Santa Barbara, Para, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work were investigated mineralogical phases in a material with argillaceous characteristic of the region of Genipauba, Santa Barbara, State of Para. Characterization of the collected sample was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The results of the assays indicate the presence of the clay minerals like kaolinite and muscovite, as well as minerals as quartz and anatase. (author)

  1. Mineralogical characterization of historical portuguese wall tiles of Sao Luis, Maranhao, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portuguese wall tiles from centuries, XVII, XVIII and XIX, found in Sao Luis Maranhao has been studied by X-ray diffraction, in order to interpret the possible raw material and burning temperature. The mineral phases, Quartz, Wollastonite, Calcite and Gehlenite were identified in all samples. Based on the results it is possible to affirm that the main raw materials used to manufacture this materials was probably mixtures of kaolinite clay and calcite. Based on the mineralogical information it was also possible to state that burning temperature of this wall tiles was lower than 1000 deg C. (author)

  2. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of elbaites from the Alto Quixaba pegmatite, Seridó province, NE Brazil

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    Ferreira Ana C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Alto Quixaba pegmatite, Seridó region, northeastern Brazil, is a 60º/80ºSW-trending subvertical dike discordantly intruded into biotite schists of the Upper Neoproterozoic Seridó Formation. It has three distinct mineralogical and textural zones, besides a replacement body that cuts the pegmatite at its central portion and in which occur, among other gem minerals, colored elbaites. Elbaites usually occur as prismatic crystals, elongate according to the c-axis, with rounded faces and striations parallel to this axis. Optically, crystals are uniaxial negative with strong pleochroism; refractive index extraordinary axis = 1.619-1.622 and ordinary axis = 1.639-1.643, birefringence between 0.019 and 0.021, average relative density of 3.07, and the following unit cell parameters: ao = 15.845 Å, co = 7.085 Å and V = 1540.476 Å. There is alkali deficiency in the X site of 12-17%. The elbaites are relatively enriched in MnO (1.69 to 2.87% and ZnO (up to 2.98%.

  3. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of elbaites from the Alto Quixaba pegmatite, Seridó province, NE Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana C M; Ferreira, Valderez P; Soares, Dwight R; Vilarroel-Leo, Hugo S

    2005-12-01

    The Alto Quixaba pegmatite, Seridó region, northeastern Brazil, is a 60 degrees/80 degrees SW-trending subvertical dike discordantly intruded into biotite schists of the Upper Neoproterozoic Seridó Formation. It has three distinct mineralogical and textural zones, besides a replacement body that cuts the pegmatite at its central portion and in which occur, among other gem minerals, colored elbaites. Elbaites usually occur as prismatic crystals, elongate according to the c-axis, with rounded faces and striations parallel to this axis. Optically, crystals are uniaxial negative with strong pleochroism; refractive index extraordinary axis = 1.619-1.622 and ordinary axis = 1.639-1.643, birefringence between 0.019 and 0.021, average relative density of 3.07, and the following unit cell parameters: ao = 15.845 A, co = 7.085 A and V = 1540.476 A. There is alkali deficiency in the X site of 12-17%. The elbaites are relatively enriched in MnO (1.69 to 2.87%) and ZnO (up to 2.98%). PMID:16341446

  4. Petrography and geochronology (U/Pb-Sm/Nd) the Passagem Granite, Pensamiento Granitoid Complex, Paragua Terrane, SW Amazon Craton, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Passagem granite includes stocks, plugs and dikes located in the Ricardo Franco hill - Vila Bela da Santissima Trindade region - state of Mato Grosso, central Brazil. The Passagem Granite is included in the Paragua terrane - SW Amazonian Craton. It consists of isotropic monzogranite, sienogranite and more rarely granodiorites with leucocratic dark gray to white color. These rocks range from hypidomorphic inequigranular to xenomorphic texture, fine to medium grained. Biotite is the only primary mafic present as essential phase and characterize an expanded slightly acid sequence formed by a sub-alkaline magmatism of high-potassium calc-alkaline, slightly peraluminous composition from arc magmatic tectonic environment during a post-collisional period. Mechanism of fractional crystallization of plagioclase, biotite, titanite, apatite and zircon associated with simultaneous crustal assimilation are suggested for the evolution of these rocks. The results support the hypothesis of a post-collisional magmatism in the Paragua terrane at 1284 +- 20 Ma corresponding to the crystallization age of the Passagem granite. This paper propose that Passagem Granite represents as an extension in Brazilian terrane of the Pensamiento Granitoid Complex. (author)

  5. Mineralogy and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of an Unusual Hibonite-Perovskite Refractory Inclusion from Allende

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Snead, C.; Rahman, Z.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Hibonite-rich Ca- and Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are among the earliest formed solids that condensed in the early nebula. We discovered an unusual refractory inclusion from the Allende CV3 chondrite (SHAL) containing an approx 500 micron long single crystal of hibonite and co-existing coarse-grained perovskite. The mineralogy and petrography of SHAL show strong similarities to some FUN inclusions, especially HAL. Here we report on the mineralogy, petrography, mineral chemistry and oxygen isotopic compositions in SHAL.

  6. Petrography, structure and geochemistry of nepheline syenites from the Pocos de Caldas alkaline massif, states of Minas Gerais and Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subcircular Mid-Cretaceous Pocos de Caldas alkaline massif, states of Minas Gerais and Sao Paulo, southern Brazil, covers over 800 Km2, and has as its main rock types phonolites and nepheline syenites, with subordinate amounts of pyroclastic rocks. Nepheline syenites consist mainly of K-feldspar, nepheline and pyroxene, varying both in texture and 'rare-metal silicates' content. A useful petrographic division is that which classifies the rocks into agpaitic and non-agpaitic (miaskitic or intermediate) types. The latter varieties, characterized by the absence of rare-metal silicates, are predominant by far; agpaitic types are easily recognized by the presence of eudialyte and other rare-metal silicates. Both petrographic and, as far as possible, structural descriptions as well are given for most of the mapped nepheline syenite bodies; many bodies show subhorizontal or moderately-dipping contacts with their country rocks. Chemically, these rocks show, on the whole, high alkaline contents (12-15%) and commonly very high K2O abundances. Chemical as well as additional isotopic and geochronological (Rb/Sr) data suggest that the asthenosphere is the source of parental magmas for the Pocos de Caldas nepheline syenites. The same arguments are used to reject, as unlikely, the magmatic activity interval (over 30 m.y.) given by previously published K/Ar ages. Simple structural models of the crust lithosphre in the Parana Basin area, coupled with the westward plate movement, suggest that irregularities at the asthenosphere-lithosphere decoupling surface are probable sites for melting of asthenospheric (and lithospheric) rocks induced by pressure relief. (D.J.M.)

  7. Provenance and sedimentary environments of the Proterozoic São Roque Group, SE-Brazil: Contributions from petrography, geochemistry and Sm-Nd isotopic systematics of metasedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique-Pinto, R.; Janasi, V. A.; Tassinari, C. C. G.; Carvalho, B. B.; Cioffi, C. R.; Stríkis, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    The Proterozoic metasedimentary sequences exposed in the São Roque Domain (Apiaí Terrane, Ribeira Belt, southeast Brazil) consist of metasandstones and meta-felspathic wackes with some volcanic layers of within-plate geochemical signature (Boturuna Formation), a passive margin turbidite sequence of metawackes and metamudstones (Piragibu Formation), and volcano-sedimentary sequences with MORB-like basalts (Serra do Itaberaba Group; Pirapora do Bom Jesus Formation). A combination of zircon provenance studies in metasandstones, whole-rock geochemistry and Sm-Nd isotopic systematics in metamudstones was used to understand the provenance and tectonic significance of these sequences, and their implications to the evolution of the Precambrian crust in the region. Whole-rock geochemistry of metamudstones, dominantly from the Piragibu Formation, points to largely granitic sources (as indicated for instance by LREE-rich moderately fractionated REE patterns and subtle negative Eu anomalies) with some mafic contribution (responding for higher contents of Fe2O3, MgO, V, and Cr) and were subject to moderate weathering (CIA - 51 to 85). Sm-Nd isotope data show three main peaks of Nd TDM ages at ca. 1.9, 2.1 and 2.4 Ga; the younger ages define an upper limit for the deposition of the unit, and reflect greater contributions from sources younger than the >2.1 Ga basement. The coincident age peaks of Nd TDM and U-Pb detrital zircons at 2.1-2.2 Ga and 2.4-2.5 Ga, combined with the possible presence of a small amount of zircons derived from mafic (gabbroid) sources with the same ages, as indicated by a parallel LA-ICPMS U-Pb dating study in metapsammites, are suggestive that these were major periods of crustal growth in the sources involving not only crust recycling but also some juvenile addition. A derivation from similar older Proterozoic sources deposited in a passive margin basin is consistent with the main sedimentary sequences in the São Roque Domain being broadly coeval and

  8. Petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical and paleo environmental characterization of radioactive anomaly associated to carbonate rocks from Jandaira formation of high cretaceous from Potiguar basin - Rio Grande do Norte - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jandaira Formation (Turonian/Maastrichtian - Potiguar Basin, Brazil) presents an anomalous radioactive marker in the upper part of its carbonatic section. This marker of 3-20 m in thickness, comprises an area of about 3500 Km2 and shows a radioactivity of 470 UAPI, against a background of 20 UAPI on the Gamma Ray Log. In the effort of characterizing this marker, petrological, mineralogical, geological and paleontological, analyses were made in ditch samples of selected 23 wells. This marker is composed by bioclastics packstones to mudstones, mainly constituted of planktonic and bentonic forams, deposited in relatively deep water. Chemical analysis of the P 205 richest samples, the ones show that they are also enriched on U, F, As, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Se, V, Y, Yb and on all rare-earth elements. The origin of the radioactive anomaly is due to the presence of sedimentary phosphates (phosphorite) made-up of uraniferous coloform apatite. (author)

  9. Applied mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, W.C.; Hausen, D.M.; Hagni, R.D. (eds.)

    1985-01-01

    A conference on applied mineralogy was held and figures were presented under the following headings: methodology (including image analysis); ore genesis; exploration; beneficiations (including precious metals); process mineralogy - low and high temperatures; and medical science applications. Two papers have been abstracted separately.

  10. Beach rocks characterization from the southern coast of Pernambuco state based on petrography and isotopic evidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study is restricted to the occurence of three lines of beachrocks located between the Maracaipe river and Sirinhaem river, southern coast of Pernambuco state. The mineralogy and petrography, made it possible the characterization of three types of cements (micrite envelope, acicular crust and intergranular cryptocrystalline). They correspond to diagenetics microfacies which are set in different diagenetics environment. X-ray analysis, as well as sup(13)C/ sup(12)C e sup(18) O/ sup(16) O isotope analysis, show evidence of a dominantly marine precipitating fluid with a subordinate fresh water influence on a second cement generation. (author)

  11. Mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of the Pocos de Caldas analogue study sites, Minas Gerais, Brazil; II. Morro do Ferro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waber, M. [Bern Univ., Mineralogisch-Petrographisches Inst., Switzerland (Switzerland)

    1991-01-01

    The thorium-rare-earth element deposit at Morro do Ferro is of supergene origin and was formed under lateritic weathering conditions. The ore body forms shallow NW-SE elongated argillaceous lenses that extend from the top of the hill downwards along its south-eastern slope. The deposit is capped by a stockwork of magnetite veins which have protected the underlying, highly argillaceous host rock from excessive erosion. The surrounding country rocks comprise a sequence of subvolcanic phonolite intrusions that have been strongly altered by hydrothermal and supergene processes. From petrological, mineralogical and geochemical studies and mass balance calculations, it is inferred that the highly weathered host rock was originally carbonatic in composition and was initially enhanced in thorium and rare-earth elements compared to the surrounding silicate rocks. Intrusion of the carbonatite produced fenitic alteration of the surrounding phonolites, consisting of an early potassic alteration followed by a vein-type Th-REE mineralization with associated fluorite, carbonate, pyrite and zircon. Subsequent lateritic weathering has completely destroyed the carbonatite, forming a residual supergene enrichment of Th and REEs. Initial weathering of the carbonatite leading to solutions enriched in carbonate and phosphate may have appreciably restricted the dissolution of the primary Th-REE phases. Strongly oxidic weathering has resulted in a fractionation between cerium and the other light rare-earth elements. Ce{sup 3+} is oxidized to Ce{sup 4+} and retained together with thorium by secondary mineral formation and adsorption on poorly crystalline iron- and aluminium-hydroxides. In contrast, the trivalent LREEs are retained to a lesser degree and are thus more available for secondary mineral formation and adsorption at greater depths down the weathering column. (author) figs., tabs., 60 refs.

  12. Mineralogical and textural evidences of melt transfer in a granulite from the Paleoproterozoic Itabuna-Salvador-Curaça belt (Salvador da Bahia, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Philippe; Santos de Souza, Jailma; Barbosa, Johildo; Bourque, Hugo; Floess, David

    2014-05-01

    In pelitic rocks, the effect of melt transfer (loss and/or gain) on phase relations can be successfully predicted via phase equilibrium modeling and more particularly using pseudosections with bulk composition as a variable (e.g. White et al., 2001). One of the most obvious effect of melt loss is the dehydration of the rock that limits further melting and favors the preservation of peak metamorphic assemblage. However, in most cases, melt loss has a limited effect that can be hardly seen mineralogically. Indeed, composition of phases like garnet, cordierite or plagioclase, that are first-order metamorphic phase, will not be affected significantly by melt loss. Therefore, evidences of melt extraction must be evidenced texturally. The goal of this contribution is to present an example where both mineralogical and textural evidences of melt extraction have been inferred. The studied sample is a pelitic granulite from the Paleoproterozoic Itabuna-Salvador-Curaça belt (Salvador da Bahia, Brazil). It is located in the city of Salvador da Bahia, next to the Farol da Bara. Structurally, it is located in a steeply deeping high strain zone that could have play a major role on the segregation and transfer of melt. The gneissic foliation is marked by a compositional banding with centimer-wide quartzo-feldspathic leucosomes in a garnet-bearing granulite. Leucosomes are almost systematically surrounded by a darker layer that is quartz-undersaturated and enriched in spinel and primatic sillimanite. This silica undersaturation is interpreted as the effect of extreme melt extraction and was modeled using phase diagram section. An interesting feature of the rock is that garnet grain size decreases and the number of garnet grains increases in the melanosome away from the leucosome. Furthermore, the type, amount and shape of inclusions in garnet, chemical composition and zoning in garnet also varies greatly and continuously across the gneissic foliation. Texturally, the presence of

  13. Ore mineralogy of the Serra Pelada Au-Pd-Pt deposit, Carajás, Brazil and implications for ore-forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Gabriel V.; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Lobato, Lydia M.; Wall, Vic

    2016-01-01

    Serra Pelada is a world-class hydrothermal Au-Pd-Pt deposit located at the eastern border of the Amazon craton, northern Brazil. The rocks at Serra Pelada have experienced intense tropical weathering for about 70 Ma, but drill core samples preserve the primary mineralogy and hydrothermal alteration features, with extreme grades of Au, Pd and Pt individually reaching hundreds of parts per million (ppm) by weight. Mineralization at Serra Pelada occurs in hydrothermally altered metasiltstones and dolomitic metasandstones at the hinge zone of a recumbent syncline, comprising zones of hematite, chlorite-carbon, argillic, and siliceous alteration. The main hydrothermal gangue minerals are quartz, kaolinite, sericite, amesite, hematite, monazite, florencite and variable amounts of highly reflective carbonaceous matter. Hydrothermal carbon input is evident from precipitated carbon occurring along crenulation planes and veinlets associated with the precious metals. Ore and accessory minerals include a variety of sulphide, selenide, arsenide, sulphate and oxide minerals, including gold with variable metal contents, palladian gold, fischesserite, sudovikovite, sperrylite, selenian braggite, isomertieite, mertieite-II and secondary Au-Pt-Pd alloys. The composition of fischesserite varies from the ideal formula (Ag3AuSe2) towards a more Ag-rich composition, indicating a disordered solid solution form that is stable only above 260 °C, consistent with the high thermal maturity of associated carbonaceous matter approaching graphite. Primary ore and gangue minerals at Serra Pelada comprise a suite of elements that are best transported in oxidising conditions and precipitated upon reduction. This suggests that fluid mixing between a highly oxidised (metal carrier) and a reduced fluid was a key process for high-grade noble metal precipitation at Serra Pelada.

  14. Ore mineralogy of the Serra Pelada Au-Pd-Pt deposit, Carajás, Brazil and implications for ore-forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Gabriel V.; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Lobato, Lydia M.; Wall, Vic

    2016-08-01

    Serra Pelada is a world-class hydrothermal Au-Pd-Pt deposit located at the eastern border of the Amazon craton, northern Brazil. The rocks at Serra Pelada have experienced intense tropical weathering for about 70 Ma, but drill core samples preserve the primary mineralogy and hydrothermal alteration features, with extreme grades of Au, Pd and Pt individually reaching hundreds of parts per million (ppm) by weight. Mineralization at Serra Pelada occurs in hydrothermally altered metasiltstones and dolomitic metasandstones at the hinge zone of a recumbent syncline, comprising zones of hematite, chlorite-carbon, argillic, and siliceous alteration. The main hydrothermal gangue minerals are quartz, kaolinite, sericite, amesite, hematite, monazite, florencite and variable amounts of highly reflective carbonaceous matter. Hydrothermal carbon input is evident from precipitated carbon occurring along crenulation planes and veinlets associated with the precious metals. Ore and accessory minerals include a variety of sulphide, selenide, arsenide, sulphate and oxide minerals, including gold with variable metal contents, palladian gold, fischesserite, sudovikovite, sperrylite, selenian braggite, isomertieite, mertieite-II and secondary Au-Pt-Pd alloys. The composition of fischesserite varies from the ideal formula (Ag3AuSe2) towards a more Ag-rich composition, indicating a disordered solid solution form that is stable only above 260 °C, consistent with the high thermal maturity of associated carbonaceous matter approaching graphite. Primary ore and gangue minerals at Serra Pelada comprise a suite of elements that are best transported in oxidising conditions and precipitated upon reduction. This suggests that fluid mixing between a highly oxidised (metal carrier) and a reduced fluid was a key process for high-grade noble metal precipitation at Serra Pelada.

  15. Syn-collisional peraluminous magmatism in the Rio Doce region: mineralogy, geochemistry and isotopic data of the Neoproterozoic Urucum Suite (eastern Minas Gerais State, Brazil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalini Junior, Herminio Arias [Ouro Preto Univ., MG (Brazil). Escola de Minas. Dept. de Geologia]. E-mail: nalini@degeo.ufop.br; Bilal, Essaid [Ecole de Mines de Saint Etienne (France); Neves, Jose Marques Correia [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias

    2000-03-01

    The Urucum Suite granitoids (Rio Doce region southeastern Brazil) contains four main facies: megafeldspar granites, deformed medium-to-coarse-grained granites, tourmaline, and pegmatitic facies. they intrude both the staurolite-garnet-muscovite-biotite schist of the Sao Tome formation (Rio Doce Group) and the Galileia metaluminous suite (596{+-}4 Ma). Detailed structural studies suggest that the Urucum Suite emplaced during an important dextral strike-slip movement (D{sub 1} phase) of the Brasiliano orogeny (650-450 Ma). Modal and chemical mineralogical variations suggest an evolution from the megafeldspar facies to the pegmatitic facies. Whole-rock geochemistry indicates the peraluminous character of the Urucum suite granitoids, the evolution from the megafeldspar facies granites to pegmatite facies granites to pegmatitic facies granites and suggests the syn-collisional character of this suite. U-Pb zircon (582{+-} 2 Ma) and monazite (576-573 {+-}4 Ma) data indicate that the Urucum Suite emplaced during the Brasiliano orogeny. The peraluminous nature of the Suite and isotopic rich character in the Rb-Sr ({sup 87} Sr/{sup 86} Sr = 0.7114 to 0.7165) and Sm Nd (eNd{sub (T)} = -7.4 and -8.2) systems indicate that it formed by partial melting of older intermediate to felsic crustal sources. Based on early Proterozoic model-ages (2.3 to 1.8 Ga) and on 2.0 ga U-Pb inherited signature, granitoids of the Suite are probably derived from a rocks with a long crustal residence (Transamazonian basement), without extensive mantle contribution. (author)

  16. Syn-collisional peraluminous magmatism in the Rio Doce region: mineralogy, geochemistry and isotopic data of the Neoproterozoic Urucum Suite (eastern Minas Gerais State, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Urucum Suite granitoids (Rio Doce region southeastern Brazil) contains four main facies: megafeldspar granites, deformed medium-to-coarse-grained granites, tourmaline, and pegmatitic facies. they intrude both the staurolite-garnet-muscovite-biotite schist of the Sao Tome formation (Rio Doce Group) and the Galileia metaluminous suite (596±4 Ma). Detailed structural studies suggest that the Urucum Suite emplaced during an important dextral strike-slip movement (D1 phase) of the Brasiliano orogeny (650-450 Ma). Modal and chemical mineralogical variations suggest an evolution from the megafeldspar facies to the pegmatitic facies. Whole-rock geochemistry indicates the peraluminous character of the Urucum suite granitoids, the evolution from the megafeldspar facies granites to pegmatite facies granites to pegmatitic facies granites and suggests the syn-collisional character of this suite. U-Pb zircon (582± 2 Ma) and monazite (576-573 ±4 Ma) data indicate that the Urucum Suite emplaced during the Brasiliano orogeny. The peraluminous nature of the Suite and isotopic rich character in the Rb-Sr (87 Sr/86 Sr = 0.7114 to 0.7165) and Sm Nd (eNd(T) = -7.4 and -8.2) systems indicate that it formed by partial melting of older intermediate to felsic crustal sources. Based on early Proterozoic model-ages (2.3 to 1.8 Ga) and on 2.0 ga U-Pb inherited signature, granitoids of the Suite are probably derived from a rocks with a long crustal residence (Transamazonian basement), without extensive mantle contribution. (author)

  17. Contribution to chemical-mineralogical study of carbonatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary chemical-mineralogical study of carbonatites from Jacupiranga (SP,Brazil) and Alto Pinheiros (SC,Brazil) enabled not only to ratify hypotheses previously described by Brazilian researchers but also made clear certain aspects related to the geochemistry of carbonatites concerning their occurrence, the probable genesis of these species and their chemical and mineralogical characteristics.(Author)

  18. Process mineralogy IX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruk, W.; Hagni, R.D.; Pignolet-Brandom, S.; Hausen, D.M. (eds.) (Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    54 papers are presented under the headings: keynote address; process mineralogy applications to mineral processing; process mineralogy applications to gold; process mineralogy applications to pyrometallurgy and hydrometallurgy; process mineralogy applications to environment and health; and process mineralogy applications to synthetic materials. Subject and author indexes are provided. Three papers have been abstracted separately.

  19. Mineralogical characterization of the argillaceous material from the Municipality of Santa Barbara, Para, Brazil; Caracterizacao mineralogica de material argiloso proveniente do municipio de Santa Barbara, Para, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrando, E.A., E-mail: edemarino@ufpa.b [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Maraba, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia de Materiais. Lab. de Materiais Ceramicos; Sheller, T.; Angelica, R.S. [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Geologia. Inst. de Geociencias; Neves, R.S. [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica. Inst. de Tecnologia

    2009-07-01

    In the present work were investigated mineralogical phases in a material with argillaceous characteristic of the region of Genipauba, Santa Barbara, State of Para. Characterization of the collected sample was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The results of the assays indicate the presence of the clay minerals like kaolinite and muscovite, as well as minerals as quartz and anatase. (author)

  20. Mineralogical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralogy of WC-series cores from the project area uranium deposit in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico was studied with respect to the deposit and to the paleohydrologic and present hydrologic gradients. Bulk clay analyses, authigenic clay coatings on detrital grains, sulfur minerals, ferric oxide minerals, carbonate minerals, and detrital magnetite-ilmenite were investigated. Among the clays, chlorite/illite seem to offer some indication of the deposit location. More frequent clay coatings are found in the favorable ore horizon along the paleogradient than along the present gradient. Barite is more abundant in the favorable horizon and near ore than elsewhere. Pyrite and other sulfide minerals are relatively sparse in and near the deposit compared to areas away from the deposit. More than two generations of ferric oxide minerals are present in the area and these are deleted in samples nearest ore down the present gradient. Carbonate minerals aremore abundant in lower parts of the favorable zone. 8 figures, 2 tables

  1. The Nussir copper deposit: petrology, mineralogy, geochemistry and distribution of ore mineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Mun, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    The geology, petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry of the Nussir copper deposit in Finnmark, Northern Norway were studied during writing this thesis. The Nussir deposit of copper is a sedimentary-hosted hydrothermal deposit affected by low grade methamorphism and ductile deformation. The copper mineralization includes chalcopyrite, chalcocite, bornite, covellite, and digenite. The deposit contains also economically interesting trace elements, such as silver, gold, and PGE. The deposit show...

  2. Chemical, mineralogical and ceramic properties of clays from Northern Santa Catarina, Brazil; Caracterizaco fisico-quimica de argilas da regiao norte de Santa Catarina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, S.L.; Bloot, E.L.; Folgueras, M.V., E-mail: sivaldo@joinville.udesc.b [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC/CCT), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas; Hotza, D. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC/EQA), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Clay materials crop out in the northern Santa Catarina mining district were investigated in order to assess their potential in the ceramic industry. Four different clays (A, B, C and D) were selected. Their chemical composition was obtained by Xray fluorescence and their mineralogy by X-ray diffraction, coupled with numerical rational analysis. Their thermal behaviour was studied by differential thermal analysis. Technological testing consisted in a simulation of the industrial processing performed at a laboratory scale. The test pieces were obtained by pressing and fired in the range of 850-1200 deg C. In each case their technological properties were studied. The main mineralogical phases detected were kaolinite, quartz and mica. Hematite and feldspars may be present in the clays. The clays show two groups of particle sizes almost equally frequent in the range of 1 to 60 {mu}m. The northern Santa Catarina clays are suitable for the production of bricks and earthenware in the 900- 1100 deg C range. (author)

  3. Mineralogical and structural transformations related to alterations in hydrothermal and climatological conditions of basic vulcanic rocks from northern Parana (Ribeirao Preto region, SP, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed studies of the basic vulcanic rocks of northern Parana basin (Region of Ribeirao Preto, SP) reveled that these rocks were affected by pre-meteoric activity (hydrothermal alteration) before being exposed to the supergene system of alteration linked to the lithosphere/atmosphere interface. Mineralogical and structural transformation are studied. The appearance of sequential crystalline-chemical paragenesis in zones suggest that the hydrothermal activity occurred during two successives processes of alteration: the expulsion of the water from the rock during the later stages of magma cooling and the continous process of dissolution of the rock wall and the ionic diffusion involving the rock sistem of structural voids. The hydro-thermal action was followed by weathering action developing a thin 'front' of superficial alteration. This alteration system, can lead to the formation of three major levels of alteration horizons and superficial accumulations: alterites, glebular and suil surface materials. (C.D.G.)

  4. Mineralogy of diamonds from the Juina Kimberlite Province, SW Amazon Craton, Brazil: cathodoluminescence, infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen content, and carbon and nitrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralogy of 234 primary and alluvial diamonds from the Juina kimberlite Province has been investigated. The majority of diamonds exhibit low CL intensity and typical blue-sky color. Internal features are rare. The spectra classification of diamonds yields 82% of Type II stones (N-free and a minor amount of highly aggregated Type I diamonds. δ13C in Type II diamonds varies from - 3 to - 26.3% and in Type I from -3.4% - 13.8%. δ15 N in Type I diamonds ranges from +2.2 to - 14.0% and the N content, from 3.85 to 613.74 at.ppm. C and N isotopic compositions are compared to worldwide occurrences and to deep diamond assemblages. The incorporation of N by deep diamonds and the contribution of subducted terrains of the SW border of the Amazon Craton on the formation of the light 13 C diamonds are briefly discussed. (author)

  5. Sedimentological, textural, mineralogical and geochemical study of surface sediments and suspension material in Baia da Ribeira, Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geochemistry dispersion of the metals in aquatic environment is related to the physical chemistry proprieties of these elements as to their interaction by sorption on and desorption from solid particles. These interaction must be understood within the environmental dynamic, with its hydrological, sedimentological, chemical, physical and biological processes that may take the toxic elements (stables metals and radionuclides) to the bio alimentary chain. It was observed at the Ribeira Bay, its hydrodynamic behaviour through the suspension material and particulate organic carbon dispersion. And, through the textural, mineralogical and chemical parameters it was observed the behaviour of the geochemistry processes of the sedimentary materials and the influence that they may submit to the metals dispersion. (author)

  6. Behaviour of zirconium in the weathering of granulites from Salvador-BA/Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weathering related to mineralogy with chemical analysis of Zr in granulites and their weathered equivalents in Salvador - Brazil, is studied. The mineralogical and petrographical characteristics were correlated with analyses for K,Al and Zr. The fresh rocks are quartz-rich pyroxene granulites, the weathered samples were submitted to bromoform and electromagnetic separations to recovery nearly pure zircon from the fraction coarser than 50 micros. These zircons were classified by color, size and shape. Proportions between different colors of zircon were correlated with petrography of fresh granulites. Studies of zircons resistent to acid attack indicated, that the darker colors were due to iron oxide staining. Chemical analyses for Zr in fresh rocks presented values higher than the values corresponding to zircon observed in thin sections, sugesting the presence of Zr as a trace element in ferromagnesian silicates. In the weathered rocks, Zr values are much higher than those corresponding to recovered zircon. Comparisons of K2O, Al2O3 and Zr values in fresh and weathered rocks indicated a loss of K2O, and a gain of Zr by weathering. However, maximum losses of K2O do not coincide with maximum gains of Zr. (author)

  7. FTIR-spectroscopic measurements of beryls of various sources and the geological mineralogical and gemmological characterization of diamonds of the Espinhago-range (Minas Gerais, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work international material of beryl was analyzed by FTIR-spectroscopy, electron microprobe, analytical scanning microscopy, moisture evolution analyzer and fluorine sensitive electrode. The FTIR-spectroscopic measurements and the determination of analytical water content reveal a logarithmic correlation between the beryl water content and the intensity of the H2O-combination band at 5275 cm-1, using unpolarized IR-light. In addition, the intensities of the 3990 - 3970 cm-1,-, 3234 cm-1 and 3345 cm-1-bands, measured with polarized IR-light parallel to the c-axis, are linearly correlated to the content of the alkali metals. Probably these bands correspond to fundamental (1st overtone of H2O-II/3234 cm-1- and 3345 cm-1) and combination (alkaliO-H...OH2-II/ 3990 - 3970 cm-1) modes of bending vibrations. Beryl was deuterated at various temperature. No absorption were detected in the region at around 2390 cm-1, 2470 cm-1 and 2940 cm-1, which would prove an assignment related to the present of hydrogen. If alkali-hydroxide grouping in beryl-channel-positions is indeuterable, the model of fundamental and combination modes seems to be valid. The band at 3990 - 3970 cm-1 can also be assigned to the combination mode of alkali-oxygen (alkali (6),(12)-O-bonds) vibrations and the normal modes of the H2O- II -molecule. The three integral absorption coefficients - α5267 (H2O-II)t α5275 (H2O-I) and α2358 (CO2) - were used to subdivide the beryls into groups. The Espinhago-Diamond-Province reflects an interesting geologic history from Precambrian placer- to recent alluvial deposits. Mineralogical and gemmological features, in combination with geological aspects reflect the many reworking processes which affected Espinhago diamonds in time and space: the characteristics of diamond populations in their specific geologic environment represent the natural selection, which eliminated stones of low quality during geologic history. (author)

  8. Mineralogical and field aspects of magma fragmentation deposits in a carbonate phosphate magma chamber: evidence from the Catalão I complex, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Carlos Cordeiro; Brod, José Affonso; Junqueira-Brod, Tereza Cristina; Gaspar, José Carlos; Petrinovic, Ivan Alejandro

    2005-03-01

    The Catalão I carbonatite complex, central Brazil consists of ultramafic silicate rocks with subordinate carbonatite and associated phoscorite, nelsonite, and monazitite. In the Lagoa Seca area, lacustrine sediments discordantly overlie a 15-m thick unit of horizontally layered alkaline rocks that consist of a basal apatitite/nelsonite overlain by monazitite. The unit contains cylindrical to conic pipes filled with breccia, limited at the top by a discordance and at the bottom by phoscorites and carbonatites. X-ray diffraction and microprobe studies show that the pipes are filled dominantly by gorceixite and ilmenite, with subordinate apatite, calcite, pyrochlore, baryte, anatase, vivianite, and quartz and rare perovskite. This assemblage has possible primary phases and common alteration products of late-stage phoscorite-series rocks, such as carbonate nelsonites. The lower and intermediate portions of some pipes are fine grained, with cross- and coarsening-upward bedding. These structures are typical of diluted particulate flows (e.g. surges), which suggests that magma fragmentation occurred inside the chamber. The rocks and structures described here seem to represent an extreme case in which surge-like deposits formed within a conduit or even inside the magma chamber, implying that surge processes may develop at higher-than-atmospheric pressures.

  9. Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technological advances by newly industrialized countries (NICs) have become a central concern of the recent literature on the political economy of development. Striking a fatal blow to dependency thinking, in so far as it had diagnosed a structural barrier to technological development, these countries have absorbed foreign technology and have developed a very impressive domestic technological capacity. Moreover, their exports have evolved from a traditional reliance on raw materials and unprocessed goods to include increasingly sophisticated manufactured goods and technology itself. The capabilities, motivations, and structures behind nuclear exports must be examined in light of these secular trends. This paper reports on this exploratory analysis of the country's emergence as a nuclear supplier which focuses on six major areas: the balance of motivations and constraints underlying Brazil's nuclear export potential; areas of extant capabilities that would allow the country to play a significant role as a nuclear supplier; formal and informal structures beneath nuclear export policy; patterns of nuclear trade as reflected in past transactions; prospects for continuity and change; generalizability of findings to other emerging suppliers

  10. Ore Petrography Using Optical Image Analysis: Application to Zaruma-Portovelo Deposit (Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Berrezueta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical image analysis (OIA supporting microscopic observation can be applied to improve ore mineral characterization of ore deposits, providing accurate and representative numerical support to petrographic studies, on the polished section scale. In this paper, we present an experimental application of an automated mineral quantification process on polished sections from Zaruma-Portovelo intermediate sulfidation epithermal deposit (Ecuador using multispectral and color images. Minerals under study were gold, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, pyrite, pyrrhotite, bornite, hematite, chalcocite, pentlandite, covellite, tetrahedrite and native bismuth. The aim of the study was to quantify the ore minerals visible in polished section through OIA and, mainly, to show a detailed description of the methodology implemented. Automated ore identification and determination of geometric parameters predictive of geometallurgical behavior, such as grade, grain size or liberation, have been successfully performed. The results show that automated identification and quantification of ore mineral images are possible through multispectral and color image analysis. Therefore, the optical image analysis method could be a consistent automated mineralogical alternative to carry on detailed ore petrography.

  11. Petrography and Geochemistry of Lunar Meteorite Miller Range 13317

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Korotev, R. L.

    2016-01-01

    Miller Range (MIL) 13317 is a 32-g lunar meteorite collected during the 2013-2014 ANSMET (Antarctic Search for Meteorites) field season. It was initially described as having 25% black fusion crust covering a light- to dark-grey matrix, with numerous clasts ranging in size up to 1 cm; it was tenta-tively classified as a lunar anorthositic breccia. Here we present the petrography and geochemistry of MIL 13317, and examine possible pairing relationships with previously described lunar meteorites.

  12. Mineralogy of the Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Herrin, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Rumble, D.; Steele, A.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.; Le, L.; Robinson, G. A.

    2009-01-01

    Mineralogy & Petrography: Almahata Sitta, deriving from the asteroid 2008 TC3, is a coarse-grained- to porous, fine-grained, fragmental breccia with subrounded mineral fragments and olivine aggregates embedded in a cataclastic matrix of ureilitic material. Mineral fragments include polycrystalline olivine, low-calcium, pigeonite, and augite. Abundant carbonaceous aggregates containing graphite, microdiamonds and aliphatics. Kamacite, Cr-rich troilite, silica and schreibersite are abundant. The compositional range of the silicates is characteristic of the ureilites as a group, but unusually broad for an individual ureilite. The dense lithology is typical for ureilites, but the porous lithology is anomalous. In the porous lithology pore walls are largely coated by crystals of olivine. Classification: Almahata Sitta is an anomalous, polymict eucrite. Anomalous features include large compositional range of silicates, high abundance and large size of pores, crystalline pore wall linings, and fine-grained texture. Tomography reveals that the pores define thin, discontinuous "sheets" connected in three dimensions, suggesting that they outline grains that have been incompletely welded together. The crystals lining the pore walls are probably vapor phase deposits. Therefore Almahata Sitta may represent an agglomeration of coarse- to fine-grained, incompletely reduced pellets formed during impact, and subsequently welded together at high temperature.

  13. Mineralogy and cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    In recent years there has been an escalation in the number of mineralogical studies involving cultural heritage materials. A number of factors have contributed to this exponential growth, including the shrinking budgets in traditional research fields, which forced the expansion of applications of mineralogical methods to novel research areas. Mineralogy as a discipline is traditionally connected to geology, petrology, and geochemistry, although it also has the strong tendency to embody the methods and techniques of modern crystallography and advanced materials science. Arguably, this makes it ideally suited and well equipped to meet the demanding challenges posed by archaeometric analysis and conservation problems. A few case studies linking mineralogy and archaeometry are discussed. PMID:21138159

  14. Mineralogy and crystallography of uranium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krivovichev, S.V.; Plášil, Jakub

    Winnipeg MB : Mineralogical Association of Canada, 2013 - (Burns, P.; Sigmon, G.), s. 15-119 ISBN 978-0-921294-53-5. - (Mineralogical Association of Canada Short Course Series. 43) Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranium * mineralogy * crystallography Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  15. Mineralogy of bismutotanitalite from Northeastern. Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismutotantalite samples were identified in the Carnauba dos Dantas pegmatites (State of Rio Grande do Norte). The study of the various species includes the optical characteristics and determination of X-ray fluorescence and diffraction whose results allowed to show the existence of ordered and disordered Bismutotantalites. The degree of ''order-disorder'' has been ascribed to the complex chemical composition and possible diadoch exchange between the Bi,-Fe, -Sn, -Mn and Ta ions under influence of the varying physical and chemical conditions during the development of the pegmatite. (author)

  16. Hanford basalt flow mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineralogy of the core samples from five core wells was examined in some detail. The primary mineralogy study included an optical examination of polished mounts, photomicrographs, chemical analyses of feldspars, pyroxenes, metallic oxides and microcrystalline groundmasses and determination from the chemical analyses of the varieties of feldspars, pyroxenes and metallic oxides. From the primary mineralogy data, a firm understanding of the average Hanford basalt flow primary mineralogy emerged. The average primary feldspar was a laboradorite, the average pyroxene was an augite and the average metallic oxide was a solid solution of ilmenite and magnetite. Secondary mineralization consisted of vug filling and joint coating, chiefly with a nontronite-beidellite clay, several zeolites, quartz, calcite, and opal. Specific flow units also were examined to determine the possibility of using the mineralogy to trace flows between core wells. These included units of the Pomona, the Umatilla and a high chromium flow just below the Huntzinger. In the Umatilla, or high barium flow, the compositional variation of the feldspars was unique in range. The pyroxenes in the Pomona were relatively highly zoned and accumulated chromium. The high chromium flow contained chromium spinels that graded in chromium content into simple magnetites very low in chromium content. A study of the statistical relationships of flow unit chemical constituents showed that flow unit constituents could be roughly correlated between wells. The probable cause of the correlation was on-going physical-chemical changes in the source magma

  17. Mineralogy: A Historical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews changing concepts of the origins, properties, and classification of minerals. Emphasis is placed on developments of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, during which time the interwoven advances of chemistry, physics, crystallography, and high-temperature, high-pressure studies transformed mineralogy from a qualitative to a…

  18. Environmental Mineralogical Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Basic properties, including surface absorption, porous filtration, ion exchange, heat effect and chemical solubility of environmental mineralogical materials, are widely applied to the pollution prevention environment improvement. The pollunian prevenition environmenr means the quality improvement of surface water, groundwater, river, lake and ground reservoir: the improvement of soil, the disposal of nuclear waste, the purification of domestic sewage, the collection of smoke and dust and the treatment of waste water. The prospective investigation and utilization of environmental mineralogical materials have been dealt with in more detail by the author of this paper with emphases on the prevention and control of soil contamination by heavy metals, on the quality im provement and treatment of surface water and groundwater,and on the collection of smoke and dust arising from burning coals.

  19. Comparison among chemical, mineralogical and physical analysis from alluvial clays from counties of Southwest of Minas Gerais state (Brazil); Comparacao entre as analises quimicas, mineralogicas e tecnologicas das argilas aluvionares de alguns municipios do sudoeste de Minas Gerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar Junior, L.A., E-mail: lineo.gaspar@unifal-mg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIALFENAS), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias da Natureza; Varajao, A.F.D.C. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Escola de Minas; Souza, M.H.O. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Departamento de Geografia; Moreno, M.M.T. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia

    2011-07-01

    The studied area is located in the southwestern portion of Minas Gerais State, encompassing the counties of Alfenas, Areado, Machado, Poco Fundo, Campestre, Serrania, Monte Belo, Bandeira do Sul, Botelhos and Cabo Verde. This region is dominated by strongly weathered pre-cambrian rocks in association with colluvial-alluvial sediments. The present work consisted in a comparison among the mineralogical (X-Ray Diffraction), textural (Laser Granulometry), chemical (X-Ray Fluorescence) and technological (mechanical resistance, water absorption, etc, made in specimen tests) properties of the clays collected on potteries located in these counties. The mineralogical and chemical analysis displayed the kaolinitic nature of the clays from this region, showing also small amount of interlayered clays and large amount of quartz. The best results of physical analysis were obtained for clays from the counties of Cabo Verde and Monte Belo due to the presence of lower values of SiO{sub 2} (quartz) associated with a finer particle size distribution. (author)

  20. Petrography and geochronology (U/Pb-Sm/Nd) the Passagem Granite, Pensamiento Granitoid Complex, Paragua Terrane, SW Amazon Craton, Mato Grosso, Brazil; Petrologia e geocronologia (U/Pb-Sm/Nd) do Granito Passagem, Complexo Granitoide Pensamiento, SW do Craton Amazonico (MT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Gisely Carmo de, E-mail: giselycarmo@hotmail.co [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (ICET/UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Geociencias; Sousa, Maria Zelia Aguiar de, E-mail: mzaguiar@terra.com.b [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso(ICET/UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Dept. de Recursos Minerais; Ruiz, Amarildo Salina; Matos, Joao Batista de, E-mail: asruiz@gmail.co, E-mail: jmatos@cpd.ufmt.b [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (ICET/UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Dept. de Geologia Geral

    2010-09-15

    The Passagem granite includes stocks, plugs and dikes located in the Ricardo Franco hill - Vila Bela da Santissima Trindade region - state of Mato Grosso, central Brazil. The Passagem Granite is included in the Paragua terrane - SW Amazonian Craton. It consists of isotropic monzogranite, sienogranite and more rarely granodiorites with leucocratic dark gray to white color. These rocks range from hypidomorphic inequigranular to xenomorphic texture, fine to medium grained. Biotite is the only primary mafic present as essential phase and characterize an expanded slightly acid sequence formed by a sub-alkaline magmatism of high-potassium calc-alkaline, slightly peraluminous composition from arc magmatic tectonic environment during a post-collisional period. Mechanism of fractional crystallization of plagioclase, biotite, titanite, apatite and zircon associated with simultaneous crustal assimilation are suggested for the evolution of these rocks. The results support the hypothesis of a post-collisional magmatism in the Paragua terrane at 1284 +- 20 Ma corresponding to the crystallization age of the Passagem granite. This paper propose that Passagem Granite represents as an extension in Brazilian terrane of the Pensamiento Granitoid Complex. (author)

  1. Petrography and Sulphur Isotope Studies of Pyrites in the Muteh Gold Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Abdollahi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Muteh mining district is located in 70 km northeast of Golpaygan city within the Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic belt. There are 2 gold mines, 7 gold occurrences and numerous mineral indices in the Muteh gold district. There are few researches on Muteh gold district, but a detailed model is not clear yet. The aim of this study is to determine mineralogy of gold-bearing rocks and the role of these rocks in concentration of gold and to improve our knowledge about Muteh model. Approach: Detailed fieldwork carried out at different scales at the Muteh district. About 50 outcrops samples examined petrographically. Fifteen samples containing veinlets of sulfides and quartz selected for H, O and S stable isotope analysis. Petrography characterized by optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-Ray powder Diffraction (XRD analysis. Results: Geological studies indicated that the study area show a major poly-phase metamorphism. Since the latest metamorphism was weaker than the earlier ones, the older rocks were affected by more intense metamorphism. The metamorphic rocks mainly consist of schists, quartzite, marble, amphibolite and gneisses. These rocks show two foliations (S1 and S2. The S2 foliation is the major phase in the metamorphic rocks. Pyrite is the most abundant and the important gold-bearing mineral at the study area. Based on evidences of deformation (S2 and crystallization, three main types of pyrites can be distinguished in the Muteh deposit: (1 pre-tectonic or gold bearing pyrite (2 syn-tectonic or disseminated pyrites along the foliation of the host rocks. (3 pyrite aggregates in the host rocks or in the metamorphic segregation quartz veins crosscutting the foliation of the host rocks. The sulfur isotope studies were carried out on pyrites within quartz veinlets, biotite schist and meta-volcanic rocks at the Muteh deposit. Five available data are highly variable even from the same types of hosted rocks

  2. Development of coal petrography applied in technical processes at the Bergbau-Forschung/DMT during the last 50 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steller, Monika; Arendt, Paul; Kuehl, Helmut [Deutsche Montan Technologie GmbH ? Mining Service Division?Essen (Germany)

    2006-06-06

    The paper deals with the activities of the Bergbau-Forschung Coal Petrography Laboratory in Essen (Germany), which, under the influence of Marie-Therese Mackowsky, developed into a stronghold of the industrial application of coal petrology. In 1979, the formerly independent Section for Mineralogy and Petrology was merged with the Chemistry Section. This synergy has widened the research limits and resulted in higher efficiency of projects being carried out within both units. Since 1990, after transforming Bergbau-Forschung into DMT GmbH, a worldwide competition within hard coal and hard coal-based coke markets, together with the switch of the industry towards alternative energy sources, have significantly lowered the importance of the domestic coal mining industry. This in turn resulted in reduction of coal research programs. However, it is stressed that, in spite of transformations of the applied coal petrology experienced during the past 50 years, some achievements are still as applicable as ever. Among them, the method of predicting coke strength using maceral analysis and coal types, published by Mackowsky and Simonis [Mackowsky, M.-Th., Simonis, W., 1969. Die Kennzeichnung von Kokskohlen fur die mathematische Beschreibung der Hochtemperaturverkokung im Horizontalkammerofen bei Schuttbetrieb durch Ergebnisse mikroskopischer Analysen. Gluckauf-Forschungshefte 30, 25-27], is still in use today. The second part of this paper presents some examples of coal petrography applications, which are still important in carbonization processes. Mackowsky discovered that the pyrolytic components were influencing the coke homogeneity in coke ovens and affected coke quality parameters such as CRI and CSR. These highly graphitic layers and lenses prevent gasification of the inner zones of coke lumps, thus lowering the reactivity of metallurgical coke. Moreover, it also seems possible to predict wall load and maximum internal gas pressure as to prevent coke ovens from damage

  3. Development of coal petrography applied in technical processes at the Bergbau-Forschung/DMT during the last 50 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the activities of the Bergbau-Forschung Coal Petrography Laboratory in Essen (Germany), which, under the influence of Marie-Therese Mackowsky, developed into a stronghold of the industrial application of coal petrology. In 1979, the formerly independent Section for Mineralogy and Petrology was merged with the Chemistry Section. This synergy has widened the research limits and resulted in higher efficiency of projects being carried out within both units. Since 1990, after transforming Bergbau-Forschung into DMT GmbH, a worldwide competition within hard coal and hard coal-based coke markets, together with the switch of the industry towards alternative energy sources, have significantly lowered the importance of the domestic coal mining industry. This in turn resulted in reduction of coal research programs. However, it is stressed that, in spite of transformations of the applied coal petrology experienced during the past 50 years, some achievements are still as applicable as ever. Among them, the method of predicting coke strength using maceral analysis and coal types, published by Mackowsky and Simonis [Mackowsky, M.-Th., Simonis, W., 1969. Die Kennzeichnung von Kokskohlen fur die mathematische Beschreibung der Hochtemperaturverkokung im Horizontalkammerofen bei Schuttbetrieb durch Ergebnisse mikroskopischer Analysen. Gluckauf-Forschungshefte 30, 25-27], is still in use today. The second part of this paper presents some examples of coal petrography applications, which are still important in carbonization processes. Mackowsky discovered that the pyrolytic components were influencing the coke homogeneity in coke ovens and affected coke quality parameters such as CRI and CSR. These highly graphitic layers and lenses prevent gasification of the inner zones of coke lumps, thus lowering the reactivity of metallurgical coke. Moreover, it also seems possible to predict wall load and maximum internal gas pressure as to prevent coke ovens from damage

  4. Petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry of Cretaceous sediment samples from western Khorat Plateau, Thailand, and considerations on their provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminpanya, Seriwat; Duangkrayom, Jaroon; Jintasakul, Pratueng; Hanta, Rattanaphorn

    2014-04-01

    At Mo Hin Khao on the western flank of Khorat Plateau, Thailand, the Phra Wihan Formation reveals litharenite and sublitharenite with some subarkose and arkose. A cuesta in the eroded sedimentary sequence exhibits spectacular rock pillars of considerable geotourist potential. The rock sequence is high in silica (SiO2 67-98 wt%) and contains quartz, mica, magnetite, chert fragments and accessory minerals such as zircon and tourmaline and amphibole species. These accessory minerals suggest felsic rocks, such as granite, granodiorite and pegmatite, were sources for the sandstones. Geochemical analyses of the sedimentary sequence suggest that source rocks may lie in the passive continental margin, before sediment transport and deposition in the Khorat Basin by rivers flowing across a large flood plain. Many depositional sequences/episodes formed thick beds of cross bedded clastic rocks. A high average maturity index (>5) indicates sedimentary reworking/recycling. Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) values range from 47 to 98, suggesting variable chemical weathering within the source area rocks, largely representing moderate to high degrees of weathering. The average CIA value of these sediments (78) suggests that relatively extreme alteration factors were involved.

  5. Mineralogical characterization of mine waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Mineral characterization in mine waste is critical for prediction of metal leaching. • Analytical methods and examples are reviewed, including advanced techniques. • Quantitative mineralogy is described as a promising new method. • Example shows that understanding secondary arsenic minerals improves risk assessment. - Abstract: The application of mineralogical characterization to mine waste has the potential to improve risk assessment, guide appropriate mine planning for planned and active mines and optimize remediation design at closed or abandoned mines. Characterization of minerals, especially sulphide and carbonate phases, is particularly important for predicting the potential for acidic drainage and metal(loid) leaching. Another valuable outcome from mineralogical studies of mine waste is an understanding of the stability of reactive and metal(loid)-bearing minerals under various redox conditions. This paper reviews analytical methods that have been used to study mine waste mineralogy, including conventional methods such as X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and advanced methods such as synchrotron-based microanalysis and automated mineralogy. We recommend direct collaboration between researchers and mining companies to choose the optimal mineralogical techniques to solve complex problems, to co-publish the results, and to ensure that mineralogical knowledge is used to inform mine waste management at all stages of the mining life cycle. A case study of arsenic-bearing gold mine tailings from Nova Scotia is presented to demonstrate the application of mineralogical techniques to improve human health risk assessment and the long-term management of historical mine wastes

  6. The Blue Angel. I - The mineralogy and petrogenesis of a hibonite inclusion from the Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J. T.; Meeker, G. P.; Huneke, J. C.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1982-04-01

    Results are presented of a mineralogical and petrological examination of a relatively large hibonite-containing inclusion in the Murchison chondrite called the Blue Angel. Mechanisms of formation and modification of hibonite-rich inclusions are investigated. Evidence is found that modifying processes occurred before the inclusion was incorporated into its present location, which indicates a sequence of aqueous and metamorphic alteration followed by disruption and relithification of the protometeoritic material. The mineral chemistry and petrography of the Blue Angel is consistent with a three stage formation history, and extensive alteration of Ca-Al-rich inclusions may have occurred by aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism followed by explosive mixing processes on a parent body.

  7. Petrography and petrogenesis of some Indian basaltic achondrites derived from the HED parent body: Insights from electron microprobe analyses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajesh K Srivastava

    2013-06-01

    Three Indian achondrites, viz., Bholghati howardite, Lohawat howardite and Pipliya Kalan eucrite and two other achondrites, viz., Bé ré ba eucrite and Johnstown diogenite are studied for their petrography and mineral chemistry. All these achondrites are derived from the HED parent body. Both Bholghati and Lohawat howardites are polymict breccias and contain pieces of eucrites and diaogenites (lithic clasts), pyroxene and minor olivine as mineral clasts, and small proportion of ilmenite and pure iron metal. Eucrite clasts are noncumulate basaltic in nature, whereas diogenite clasts are mostly composed of orthopyroxene with minor clinopyroxene and anorthite. Both howardite samples contain orthopyroxene, pigeonite and augite. Notable characteristics observed in Lohawat howardite include crystallization of orthoenstatite first at a high-temperature followed by ferrosilite, pigeonite olivine and augite from a basaltic melt. Piplia Kalan eucrite is noncumulate, unbrecciated and basaltic in nature and display ophitic/sub-ophitic or hypidiomorphic textures. It contains ∼60% pyroxenes (clinoenstatite and pigeonite) and ∼40% plagioclase feldspars (bytownite to anorthite). The observed mineralogy in the Piplia Kalan eucrite suggests its crystallization from a high-temperature basaltic melt crystallized at low pressure. Two other achondrite samples, viz., Bé ré ba eucrite and Johnstown diogenite are also studied. The Bé ré ba eucrite shows cumulate nature which is probably formed by small-degree melts of ilmenitebearing gabbro, whereas the Johnstown diogenite crystallized from a slow cooling of a Ca-poor basaltic melt derived from cumulates formed from the magma ocean, similar to the origin of the noncumulate eucrites.

  8. Evolução geoquímica e mineralógica em perfis de alteração sobre rochas serpentinizadas no sudoeste de Minas Gerais Geochemical and mineralogical evolution in alteration profiles on serpentinized rocks in southwestern Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Vidal-Torrado

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a evolução geoquímica e mineralógica em três perfis distintos de alteração de rochas serpentinizadas que ocorrem nas imediações dos municípios de Alpinópolis e Fortaleza de Minas, no sudoeste do Estado de Minas Gerais, sob regimes de umidade e de temperatura údico e térmico, respectivamente. Nas condições atuais, o grau de evolução química e mineralógica é moderado em relação ao desenvolvido sobre outros tipos de rochas básicas e ultrabásicas da mesma área, caracterizando-se por uma importante perda de Na e Mg e, em menor proporção, de Ca e Si. O Al (localmente também o Fe é o elemento menos móvel dos sistemas. O K é escasso no material de origem e nas zonas de alteração, e ocorre enriquecimento desse elemento nos horizontes superficiais por aporte externo. Os minerais primários mais facilmente intemperizáveis, como o talco, a tremolita e a clorita trioctaédrica, são abundantes ainda na fração argila desses solos tropicais com composição mineralógica pouco comum, mas são todos termodinamicamente instáveis. Do ponto de vista geoquímico, o processo de alteração atual pode ser definido como uma bissialitização, que pode coincidir com ferruginização, com formação de minerais trioctaédricos secundários por transformação direta de estrutura e também por neoformação, todos coexistindo com os minerais primários residuais. No entanto, as fases de maior evolução, em volumes com drenagem mais eficiente, tendem à monossialitização, com formação de caulinitas de diferentes graus de cristalinidade. A assembléia mineralógica existente evidencia a metaestabilidade e o caráter incipiente do sistema pedogenético.The geochemical and mineralogical evolution was studied in three different alteration profiles of ultramafic (serpentine rocks near Alpinópolis and Fortaleza de Minas, in southwestern Minas Gerais State (Brazil. Soil moisture and temperature regimes are udic and thermic

  9. Petrography of the pegmatites from Rio das Mortes Valley, Southeast Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lithium-tin-tantalum bearing pegmatites of the Sao Joao del Rei region are characterized by various perticularites: oder age, probably Uruacuan, Therefore they are older than most of the pegmatites of Minas Gerais; large size of bodies; unusual zoning; abnormaly high lithium content. These pegmatites are constitued by a granitoid core with more 25% of spodumene and an important aplitic border zone - the high lithium content may by explain a holmquistite - bearing contact metamorphism zone. Preliminary X-ray fluorescence data indicated a content of 1.3 to 2.4% of Rb in the potassium minerals. A crystallization model for the pegmatites is finally outlined. (author)

  10. Mineralogical and geochemical aspects of the sedimentary zeolite occurrences in the Parnaiba Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the petrographical and mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis through electronic microprobe realized in zeolites contained in the Corda Formation sandstones, in the northwestern portion of the Parnaiba Basin, Brazil. The data presented here update and complete the information propagated by Rezende and Angelica (1995) and Angelica et al. (1995)

  11. Atributos químicos, mineralógicos e micromorfológicos de horizontes coesos de latossolos e argissolos dos tabuleiros costeiros do estado de Alagoas Mineralogy and micromorphology of cohesive horizons in oxisols and ultisols of the coastal tablelands of Alagoas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Almeida Lima Neto

    2010-04-01

    importance, the formation of these horizons has not been fully explained. The objective of this study was a chemical, mineralogical and micromorphological characterization of cohesive soils of the Coastal Tablelands in Northeast Brazil, to understand their pedogenesis and identify properties for the definition of the cohesive character by the Brazilian System of Soil Classification. The following four soil profiles were morphologically characterized: a Yellow Argisol (Ultisol, a Gray Argisol (Ultisol and two Yellow Latosols (Oxisols. Samples from cohesive and non cohesive horizons were taken for chemical analysis of Fe, Al and Si extracted by DCD, oxalate, CaCl2 and hot water, mineralogy by X ray diffraction, and micromorphological characterization. The Fe contents in the soils were low and kaolinite with a moderate to high degree of structural disorder predominated in all studied soil horizons. No increase in Al and Si extracted by DCB and oxalate was observed in the cohesive horizons, indicating the absence of cementation in its genesis. Results of the mineralogical and micromorphological characterization suggest two distinct phases in the genesis of the cohesive character. The first step was determined by clay illuviation, clogging the soil pores, and later iron loss, destroying the soil structure and resulting in a direct adjustment with kaolinite particles.

  12. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.; Orta, M.M.; Alba, M.D.; Alvero, R.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Chain, P.; Escudero, A.; Naranjo, M.; Pavon, E.; Trillo, J.M.; Vejsada, J.; Vokal, A.; Zadvernyuk, H.P.; Fedorenko, Y.G.; Zlobenko, B.P.; Koromyslichenko, T.I.; Battaglia, S.; Cervelli, M.; Millot, R.; Girard, J.P.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Escudero, A.; Gonzalez-Carrascosa, T.; Hurtado, S.; Pavon, E.; Villa, M.; Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Rabung, Th.; Dahn, R.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Vancluysen, J.; Credoz, A.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M.; Raynal, J.; Petronin, J.C.; Trotignon, L.; Pokrovsky, O.; Jacquier, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Vuillaume, A.L.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Ly, J.; Page, J.; Savoye, S.; Pitsch, H.; Jacques, D.; Wang, L.; Galunin, E.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Vidal, M.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Andre, L.; Pauwels, H.; Azaroual, M.; Albrecht, A.; Romero, M.A.; Aerts, S.; Boven, P.; Van Geet, M.; Boever, P. de; Alonso, U.; Albarran, N.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Guillaume, D.; Jacquot, E.; Tournassat, Ch.; Lerouge, C.; Brendle, J.; Greneche, J.M.; Touzelet, St.; Blanc, Ph.; Gaucher, E.C.; Thoenen, T.; Klinkenberg, M.; Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.; Liu, D.J.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Weber, T.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Bildstein, O.; Combarieu, G. de; Frugier, P.; Menut, D

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 52 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of natural sorbents immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cement; the chemical stability of rare-earth silicate; the mineralogical heterogeneity of Rokle bentonite and radionuclide adsorption: A case study for cesium; the rheological and sorption properties of clay-polymer composites; the clay mineral interactions with leachate solutions in landfills; the lithium isotope fractionation during adsorption onto mineral surfaces; the sorption of Sr{sup 2+} onto mixed smectite / illite clays; Eh and pH in the pore water of compacted bentonite; the chemical interaction of {sup 152}Eu with the clay barrier; the modeling of the acid-base surface chemistry of Montmorillonite; a time resolved laser fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of lanthanide/actinide sorption on clay minerals: influence of carbonate complexation; the structure elucidation and occurrence of Tc(IV) pyrogallol complexes; the geochemistry of Se(0) under boom clay conditions; an experimental and modelling study of pure secondary silicate minerals reactivity in geological CO{sub 2} sequestration conditions; an experimental evaluation of a retention model for major groundwater elements on the Tournemire argillite; modelling the long term interaction of cementitious pore water with Boom clay; the sorption-desorption of radionuclides and analogues in clays suitable for barriers; the modelling of the Redox evolution in the tunnel backfill of a high level nuclear waste repository; the reactivity of nitrates in the different storage compartments of type-b wastes; an investigation into the biodiversity of sulphate reducing bacteria in Boom clay; the colloid generation mechanisms from compacted bentonite under different geochemical conditions; the experimental reduction of aqueous sulphate by hydrogen in the context of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; cation exchanged Fe(II) and Sr as compared to other divalent cations

  13. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This session gathers 52 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of natural sorbents immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cement; the chemical stability of rare-earth silicate; the mineralogical heterogeneity of Rokle bentonite and radionuclide adsorption: A case study for cesium; the rheological and sorption properties of clay-polymer composites; the clay mineral interactions with leachate solutions in landfills; the lithium isotope fractionation during adsorption onto mineral surfaces; the sorption of Sr2+ onto mixed smectite / illite clays; Eh and pH in the pore water of compacted bentonite; the chemical interaction of 152Eu with the clay barrier; the modeling of the acid-base surface chemistry of Montmorillonite; a time resolved laser fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of lanthanide/actinide sorption on clay minerals: influence of carbonate complexation; the structure elucidation and occurrence of Tc(IV) pyrogallol complexes; the geochemistry of Se(0) under boom clay conditions; an experimental and modelling study of pure secondary silicate minerals reactivity in geological CO2 sequestration conditions; an experimental evaluation of a retention model for major groundwater elements on the Tournemire argillite; modelling the long term interaction of cementitious pore water with Boom clay; the sorption-desorption of radionuclides and analogues in clays suitable for barriers; the modelling of the Redox evolution in the tunnel backfill of a high level nuclear waste repository; the reactivity of nitrates in the different storage compartments of type-b wastes; an investigation into the biodiversity of sulphate reducing bacteria in Boom clay; the colloid generation mechanisms from compacted bentonite under different geochemical conditions; the experimental reduction of aqueous sulphate by hydrogen in the context of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; cation exchanged Fe(II) and Sr as compared to other divalent cations (Ca, Mg) in the

  14. Petrography, Geochemistry and Petrogenesis of Volcanic Rocks, NW Ghonabad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Zirjanizadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The study area is located in NW Gonabad, Razavi Khorasan Province, northern Lut block and eastern Iran north of the Lut Block. Magmatism in NW Gonabad produced plutonic and volcanic rock associations with varying geochemical compositions. These rocks are related to the Cenozoic magmatic rocks in Iran and belong to the Lut Block volcanic–plutonic belt. In this study, petrogenesis of volcanic units in northwest Gonabad was investigated. The volcanic rocks are andesites/trachyandesites, rhyolites, dacites/ rhyodacites and pyroclastics.These rocks show porphyritic, trachytic and embayed textures in phenocrysts with plagioclase, sanidine and quartz (most notably in dacite and rhyolite, hornblende and rare biotite. The most important alteration zones are propylitic, silicification and argillic.Four kaolinite- bearing clay deposits have been located in areas affectedby hydrothermal alteration of Eocene rhyolite, dacite and rhyodacite. Analytical techniques Five samples were analyzed for major elements by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF and six samples were analyzed for trace elements using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS in the Acme Laboratories, Vancouver (Canada.Sr and Nd isotopic compositions were determined for four whole-rock samples at the Laboratório de GeologiaIsotópica da Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal. Results Petrography. The rocks in this area are consist of trachyte, andesite/ trachyandesite, dacite/ rhyodacite, principally as ignimbrites and soft tuff. The textures of phenocrysts are mainly porphyritic, glomerophyric, trachytic and embayed textures in plagioclase, hornblende and biotite. The groundmasses consist of plagioclase and fine-grainedcrystals of hornblende. Plagioclase phenocrysts and microlitesare by far the most abundant textures in andesite - trachyandesites (>25% and in size from 0.01 to 0.1mm. Euhedral to subhedral hornblende phenocrysts areabundant (3-5%and 0.1 to 0

  15. Petrography and sedimentology of Paleogene formations from Nathorstland, Spitsbergen: A diagenetic study of sedimentary facies associations

    OpenAIRE

    Vilberg, Anne Karin

    2011-01-01

    The studied Paleogene successions in the Central Basin Spitsbergen, comprises the Grumantbyen Formation, the Bjørnsonfjellet Member, Battfjellet Formation and the uppermost Aspelin toppen Formation. The objectives have been to describe the petrography and diagenesis relative to sedimentary facies associations. Another minor objective was to compare the reservoir quality of core and outcrop data. This have been done by description,facies interpretation and sampling from the Sysselmannsbreen co...

  16. Petrography Of The Basement Complex Of Maddhapara Mining (Production Level) Dinajpur District, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Md. Saidul; Quamruzzaman, Chowdhury; Monir, Md. Minhaj Uddin; Jahan, Sakura; Begum, Momtaj

    2014-01-01

    This research work deals with the petrography of the Palaeoproterozoic Basement Complex (production level) Maddhapara Granite mining project area, Dinajpur district, Bangladesh. Tectonically the study area is a continuation of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ), where the Basement Complex is overlain by the Tertiary thin to moderate sediment sequence. The present study has been performed on the basis of collected samples which are taken from the production level at the elevation of about...

  17. Method development in automated mineralogy

    OpenAIRE

    Sandmann, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The underlying research that resulted in this doctoral dissertation was performed at the Division of Economic Geology and Petrology of the Department of Mineralogy, TU Bergakademie Freiberg between 2011 and 2014. It was the primary aim of this thesis to develop and test novel applications for the technology of ‘Automated Mineralogy’ in the field of economic geology and geometallurgy. A “Mineral Liberation Analyser” (MLA) instrument of FEI Company was used to conduct most analytical studies. T...

  18. Mineralogy of the Mercurian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Nittler, Larry R.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Weider, Shoshana Z.; Evans, Larry R.; Frank, Elizabeth A.; McCoy, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited Mercury for four years until April 2015, revealing its structure, chemical makeup, and compositional diversity. Data from the mission have confirmed that Mercury is a compositional end-member among the terrestrial planets. The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on board MESSENGER provided the first detailed geochemical analyses of Mercury's surface. These instruments have been used in conjunction with the Neutron Spectrometer and the Mercury Dual Imaging System to classify numerous geological and geochemical features on the surface of Mercury that were previously unknown. Furthermore, the data have revealed several surprising characteristics about Mercury's surface, including elevated S abundances (up to 4 wt%) and low Fe abundances (less than 2.5 wt%). The S and Fe abundances were used to quantify Mercury's highly reduced state, i.e., between 2.6 and 7.3 log10 units below the Iron-Wustite (IW) buffer. This fO2 is lower than any of the other terrestrial planets in the inner Solar System and has important consequences for the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury, its surface mineralogy and geochemistry, and the petrogenesis of the planet's magmas. Although MESSENGER has revealed substantial geochemical diversity across the surface of Mercury, until now, there have been only limited efforts to understand the mineralogical and petrological diversity of the planet. Here we present a systematic and comprehensive study of the potential mineralogical and petrological diversity of Mercury.

  19. Sediments of Afonso Bezerra belt-Macaiba (meridional border of Potiguar basin, RN, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralogy of sediments from Potiguar basin, Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil, is investigated and its origin is determined. Usual sedimentologic methods and X-ray diffraction were used. (M.C.K.)

  20. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090143 Cao Ke (Research Center for Tibeten Plateau Geology, School of Earth Sciences and Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083, China); Li Xianghui Cretaceous Clay Minerals and Paleoclimate in Sichuan Basin (Acta Geologica Sinica, ISSN0001-5717, CN11-1951, 82(1), 2008, p.115-123, 3 illus., 3 tables, 30 refs., with English abstract)

  1. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20150124Ji Liming(Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources Research of Gansu Province,Lanzhou 730000,China);Ma Xiangxian Relationship between Methane Adsorption Capacity of Clay Minerals and Micropore Volume(Natural Gas Geoscience,ISSN1672-1926,CN62-1177/TE,25(2),2014,p.141-152,7illus.,4tables,21refs.)Key words:clay minerals The pore size,surface area and methane adsorption isotherm of clay-rich rocks are measured.Clay minerals mainly contain micropore of 3~100nm,and have two main in-

  2. MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140697Gao Wenyuan(College of Resources and Civil Engineering,Northeastern University,Shenyang 110819,China);Huang Fei The Influence of Different Iron-Sulfur Ratios on Pyrite Formation under Thermal Sulfurization Condition(Earth Science Frontiers,ISSN1005-2321,CN11-3370/P,20(3),2013,p.131-137,6illus.,3tables,19refs.)Key words:pyrite,crystallization

  3. Reflectance spectroscopy and asteroid surface mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffey, Michael J.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1989-01-01

    Information available from reflectance spectroscopy on the surface mineralogy of asteroids is discussed. Current spectral interpretive procedures used in the investigations of asteroid mineralogy are described. Present understanding of the nature and history of asteroids is discussed together with some still unresolved issues such as the source of ordinary chondrites.

  4. Petrography and geochemistry of rocks from the sor-rondane mountains, droning Maude land, eastern Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamyu rock specimens, were collected from the sor-rondane mountains and Breid Bay area of Drojnning Maud land, eastern Antarctica, during the 2nd Pakistan Antarctic Expedition, 1992-93. Petrography and geochemical studies suggest that the rocks are essentially of igneous origin. The samples dredged from ocean bottom include olivine basalt, amygdaloidal volcanics, dacites and rhyodacites. A majority of these rocks are calc-alkaline and formed by the fraction of olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase +- titanomagnetite. Most of these rocks apparently formed in an island arc or continental margin set up. However, volcanics showing ocean floor basalt character are also present. A metamorphosed and deformed basement consisting of amphibolites, calc-silicate rocks and gneisses is intrude by under formed or only slightly deformed granites with a minor arkosic sandstone cover. The granites are chemically distinguished as I-type, originate at deeper crystal level by collisional/subduction related processes during organic environments. (author)

  5. Application of coal petrography to the evaluation of magnetically separated dry crushed coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, L.A.; Hise, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    In the present study the open gradient magnetic separation method has been used to beneficiate the -30 + 100 mesh fraction of two high volatile bituminous coals. The evaluation of the effectiveness of the magnetic separation for cleaning these coals is the subject of this paper. Coal petrography in combination with scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the magnetically separated coal fractions. These analyses revealed that the majority of the pyrite and non-pyrite minerals were concentrated in the positive magnetic susceptibility fractions. The bulk of the starting samples (approx. 80 weight percent) were located in the negative magnetic susceptibility fractions and showed significant reductions in pyrite and non-pyritic minerals. The magnetic separation appears to effectively split the samples into relatively clean coal and refuse.

  6. Lithostratigraphic units, petrography and chemical composition of the Mitu migmatitic complex in the surroundings of Mitu, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitu complex migmatites rocks correlates with the province of Rio Negro - Juruena (Brazil). Mitu on the plategeologic 443 in an area of 1,115 km2 approximately where divided into three units called monzogranite of Mitu, pringamosa's granofels and gneiss Del Yi; units with macroscopic textural and structural differences, and similar mineralogical composition. The rocks from Mitu's monzogranite are classified petrographically as monzogranite with syenogranites, granodiorites and subordinated quartz feldspar granofels. The pringamosa's granofels groups, granofels and gneisses with homophonous migmatitic structures, nebulite, ophthalmic, schlieren and banded, of granitic composition and gneiss del Yi groups quartz tube feldspathic gneisses with biotite and large porphyroblasts alkaline feldspar by way of augen together with quartz-feldspar granofels bands with biotite. The essential minerals found in these units are quartz, potassium feldspar (microcline), plagioclase (andesine-oligoclase) and biotite. Accessory minerals are apatite, zircon, monazite, opaque, rutile, allanite, fluorite and hastingsite. Rocks from Mitu's migmatites complex are high potassium sub-alkaline, metaluminous and peraluminous affinity; correspond to grains of a type affinity ferrous and magnetite series, with enrichment of REE in samples with monazite.

  7. Petrography and geochemistry evidence for supra-subduction ophiolites in Makran, SE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Daniela; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Bouilhol, Pierre; Omrani, Jafar

    2010-05-01

    Ophiolites archive tectonic and chemical processes from crystallization of the oceanic lithosphere to accretion during obduction and/or continental collision. The variety of ophiolites has shown that they form in various geotectonic settings and experience complex petrological and geochemical histories during their evolution. We present new results on the structure, petrography, geochemistry and geochronology of the Remeshk/Mokhtaramabad and Fannuj/Maskutan ophiolitic complexes in Makran (Southeast Iran), which have been very scarcely studied before this work. A detailed map and cross sections illustrate temporal and structural relationships between the different lithologies. The extensive ultramafic complexes comprise a lower, harzburgite-dominated unit with few lherzolites overlain by dunites. Pyroxene-bearing peridotites show typical features of tectonized mantle deformed at sub-solidus conditions. The olivine chemistry (xMg = 0.90-0.92, NiO content of 0.4-0.47wt%) indicates that the ultramafic rocks represent an ophiolitic upper mantle. Most dunites are characterized by cumulate textures in olivine and a slightly lower xMg = 0.87-0.89 and NiO content of 0.25-0.35wt%. Dunites are locally impregnated by plagioclase-rich melts with minor amounts of clinopyroxene. They were intruded by gabbroic dykes marking the transition zone between mantle and crust. The gabbroic sequence displays increasingly differentiated rocks originated from the same magma source in the following order: troctolite - olivine gabbro - gabbro - anorthositic dykes - diabase. These rocks were later intruded by plagiogranites and hornblende-gabbros. Petrography and geochemistry show oceanic features of a shallow environment for some lithologies; other lithologies indicate a supra-subduction environment, in particular the late-Cretaceous calc-alkaline pillow lavas that yield a clear arc signal. Advanced trace element analyses and geochronology will constrain the evolution of the Tethys

  8. Vesta Mineralogy: VIR maps Vesta's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradina, A.; DeSanctis, M.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, T.; Carraro, F.; Cartacci, M.; Filacchione, G.; Fonte, S.; Magni, G.; Noschese, R.; Tosi, F.; Barucci, A.; Federico, C.; Frigeri, A.; Fulchigoni, M.; Langevin, Y.; Marchi, S.; Palomba, E.; Turrini, D.; McCord, T.; McFadden, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2011-01-01

    The Dawn mission will have completed Survey orbit around 4 Vesta by the end of August 2011. We present a preliminary analysis of data acquired by the Visual and InfraRed Spectrometer (VIR) to map Vesta mineralogy. Thermal properties and mineralogical data are combined to provide constraints on Vesta's formation and thermal evolution. delivery of exogenic materials, space weathering processes, and origin of the howardite. eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites.

  9. Mineralogical conversion of asbestos containing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) is to demonstrate a thermal-chemical mineralogical asbestos conversion unit at the Hanford Site, which converts non-radiological asbestos containing materials (ACMs) into an asbestos-free material. The permanent thermal-chemical mineralogical conversion of ACMs to a non-toxic, non-hazardous, potentially marketable end product should not only significantly reduce the waste stream volumes but terminate the open-quotes cradle to graveclose quotes ownership liabilities

  10. Mеthods for investigation in environmental mineralogy

    OpenAIRE

    Sijakova-Ivanova, Tena

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This paper shows the methods used in investigation in environmental mineralogy. Significant methods used in mineralogical examination are: ICP-AS-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, IR-Infrared spectroscopy, DTA-differential thermal analysis,TGA-thermogravimetric analysis, EPR–electron paramagnetic resonance, FMR-ferromagnetic resonance, TEM- transmission electron microscopy, SEM- EDS scanning electron microscopy with energy disperzive spectroscopy, CBED-converg...

  11. Mineralogy of the rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper contains mineralogic properties of the rare earth elements (REE). Notes are given on total REE abundances, distribution patterns, and modes of occurrence. References are confined as far as possible to papers containing usable REE data. The minerals are grouped alphabetically within each major cationic group. The paper includes an alphabetic table of mineral names, chemical formulas, crystal system and section number. It functions as a handy entrance to the mineralogic and bibliographic paper. (G.J.P.)

  12. Characterization of Mineralogy Across Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capria, M. T.; Capaccioni, F.; Carraro, F.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Magni, G.; Marchi, S.; Palomba, E.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; McCord, T. B.; McFadden, L. A.; McSween, H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-01-01

    Dawn VIR spectra are characterized by pyroxene absorptions and no clear evidence for abundant other minerals are observed at the scale of the present measurements. Even though Vesta spectra are dominated by pyroxenes, spectral variation at regional and local scales are evident and distinct color units are identified. Although almost all of the surface materials exhibit spectra like those of howardites, some large units can be interpreted to be material richer in diogenite (based on pyroxenes band depths and band centers) and some others like eucrite-rich howardite units. VIR data strongly indicate that the south polar region (Rheasilvia) has its own spectral characteristics, indicating the presence of Mg-pyroxene-rich terrains (diogenite-like), while the equatorial areas have swallower band depths and average band centers at slightly longer wavelengths, consistent with more eucrite rich materials. Vesta surface shows considerable diversity at smaller scales (tens of km), in terms of spectral reflectance and emission, band depths and slopes. Many bright and dark spots are present on Vesta. Dark spots have low reflectance at visible wavelengths and are spectrally characterized by shallower 1 and 2 micron bands with respect the surrounding terrains. Bright materials have high reflectance and are often spectrally characterized by deep pyroxenes absorption bands. Vesta presents complex geology/topography and the mineral distribution is often correlated with geological and topographical structures. Ejecta from large craters have distinct spectral behaviors, and materials exposed in the craters show distinct spectra on floors and rims. VIR reveals the mineralogical variation of Vesta s crustal stratigraphy on local and global scales. Maps of spectral parameters show surface and subsurface unit compositions in their stratigraphic context. The hypothesis that Vesta is the HED parent body is consistent with, and strengthened by, the geologic and spectral context for pyroxene

  13. MINERALOGIA E QUÍMICA DE SOLO DE VÁRZEA E SUAS SUSCEPTIBILIDADES NO PROCESSO DE TERRAS CAÍDAS NA COMUNIDADE DO DIVINO ESPÍRITO SANTO-AM / Mineralogy and chemistry of the lowland soil and its sensibilities in the process of lands falls in community Divino Espírito Santo (Amazonas, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane Campos Magalhães

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study about the mineralogical and chemical lowland soils generate information to compose a current survey about the susceptibility of lowland soil to process Fallen Lands. With this purpose we studied five profiles the banks of the Solimões River, located in the municipality of Iranduba (AM. The information obtained allowed to determine the Neosoil Fluvic the study area has favorable conditions for cultivation with an average pH of 6.2, with high levels of Ca, Mg, K, P, micronutrients and zero Al content, with high levels of C and M. O. in the first layer and a decrease in depth. Thus, Neosoil Fluvic was characterized as Tb eutrophic, with base saturation above 50%, with good CTC. The mineralogy was homogeneous in all profiles, with a predominance of primary minerals: Quartz, Albite and rutile, with low proportions of clay minerals Muscovite, Kaolinite, Muscovite-Illite interstratified and Illite.

  14. The ceramic artifacts in archaeological black earth (terra preta) from lower Amazon region, Brazil: mineralogy Artefatos cerâmicos em sítios arqueológios com terra preta na região do baixo Amazonas, Brasil: mineralogia

    OpenAIRE

    Marcondes Lima da Costa; Dirse Clara Kern; Alice Helena Eleotério Pinto; Jorge Raimundo da Trindade Souza

    2004-01-01

    Several archaeological black earth (ABE) sites occur in the Amazon region. They contain fragments of ceramic artifacts, which are very important for the archaeological purpose. In order to improve the archaeological study in the region we carried out a detailed mineralogical and chemical study of the fragments of ceramic artifacts found in the two ABE sites of Cachoeira-Porteira, in the Lower Amazon Region. Their ceramics comprise the following tempers: cauixi, cariapé, sand, sand +feldspars,...

  15. Geochemistry and mineralogy of the older (> 40 ka) ignimbrites in the Campanian Plain, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Raia, Federica; Rolandi, Giuseppe; Jackson, John C.; de Vivo, Benedetto

    2010-05-01

    The Campanian Plain in southern Italy has been volcanically active during the last 600 ka. The largest and best known eruption at 39 ka formed the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI), which has the largest volume (~310 km3) and the greatest areal extent. However, significant, but scattered deposits of older ignimbrites underlie the CI and document a long history of trachytic eruptions. We examined the geochemistry and mineralogy of 11 older ignimbrite strata by optical petrography, electron microprobe, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and various whole-rock geochemical techniques. Strata at Durazzano (116.1 ka), Moschiano (184.7 ka), Seiano Valley A (245.9 ka), Seiano Valley B (289.6 ka), Taurano 7 (205.6 and 210.4 ka), Taurano 9 (183.8 ka), and Taurano 14 (157.4 ka) have been previously dated by the 40Ar/39Ar technique (Rolandi et al., 2003, Min. & Pet., 79) on hand-picked sanidine. The older ignimbrites are trachytic, but are highly altered with LOI from 8 to 17 wt%. Whole-rock compositions reflect variable element mobility during weathering; TiO2, Al2O3, Fe-oxide, and CaO tend to be enriched relative to average CI composition, whereas Na2O and K2O are depleted. X-ray diffraction identified major chabazite, kaolinite, and illite-smectite alteration products in some samples. The phenocryst mineralogy in all of the strata is typical for trachyte magma and consists of plagioclase (~An80 to ~An40), potassium feldspar (~Or50 to ~Or80), biotite (TiO2 = ~4.6 wt%, BaO = ~0.70 wt%, F = ~0.65 wt%), diopside (~Ca47Mg48Fe5 to ~Ca48Mg34Fe18), titanomagnetite, and uncommon Ca-amphibole. Relatively immobile trace elements Zr, Hf, Nb, and Th display similar abundance, linear trends, and ratios as those measured in the Campanian Ignimbrite: Th/Hf = ~4, Zr/Hf = ~50, and Zr/Nb = ~6. The similarity of trace element systematics and phenocryst mineralogy among the Campanian Ignimbrite and the older ignimbrites suggests that the magmagenesis processes and parental source have

  16. Mineralization and leaching process in the Jian copper deposit, northeastern Fars province: Application of petrography and stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Moore

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One of the first principles in the formation of a reserve is mineralogical, construction and mineral textures studies and investigation of paragenetic relations in the ore minerals. In addition, to petrographic studies, isotopic investigates have wide applications in economic geology. In general, copper isotope variability in primary (high temperature mineralization forms a tight cluster, in contrast to secondary mineralization, which has a much larger isotope range. A distinct pattern of heavier copper isotope signatures is evident in supergene samples, and a lighter signature characterizes the leached cap and oxidation-zone minerals. This relationship has been used to understand oxidation–reduction processes (Hoefs, 2009. Also for a better understanding of the origin of the Jian Cu deposit, this research focuses on the origin and composition of the fluid and elucidation of its evolution during the mineralization process. In order to achieve this end, field observations, vein petrography, microthermometry of fluid inclusions and stable isotope analyses of veins and minerals were investigated. The present study also compares high and low temperature sulfide samples in an attempt to document and explain diagnostic δ65Cu ranges in minerals from the Jian deposit. Materials and methods The samples were taken from different depths to measure Cu isotope variations within each reservoir. Mineralogical composition was determined using X-ray diffractometry. In addition, chromatographic separation was carried out on all samples (except for native Cu samples in a clean lab and was conducted as outlined in Mathur et al. (Mathur et al., 2009. These samples were measured into a Multicollector Inductively-Coupled-Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS, the Micro mass Isoprobe at the University of Arizona in low resolution mode using a microconcentric nebulizer to increase sensitivity for the samples with lower concentrations of copper. Preparation

  17. Petrography and mineral chemistry of carbonatites and mica-rich rocks from the Araxa Complex (Alto Paranaiba Province, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Araxa complex (16 km2) comprises carbonatites forming a central core and a complex network of concentric and radial dykes as well as small veins; additionally, it includes mica-rich rocks, phoscorities and lamprophyres. Fenites also occur and rare represented by Proterozoic quartzites and schists of the Araxa Group. The petrographic study of 130 borehole samples indicates that the complex is basically made up by two rock-types, carbonatites and mica-rich rocks, and subordinately by a third unit of hybrid composition. Carbonatites range chemically in composition, the most abundant type being magnesio-carbonatites. Dolomite and calcite correspond to the chief constituents, but other carbonate phases, including the Ce-group RE minerals, are also recognized. phosphates and oxides are widespread accessories whereas silicate minerals consist of olivine, clinopyroxene, mica and amphibole. Mica-rich rocks are represented by abundant glimmeritic rocks and scare cumulitic phlogopite-, olivine-and diopside-bearing pyroxenites. Hybrid rocks mainly contain phlogopite and tetraferriphlopite as cumulus and intercumulus phases, respectively; carbonate minerals may also be found. Chemical data indicate that the carbonatities are strongly enriched in REE and have lower contents of Nb, Zr, V, Cr, Ni and Rb compared to the mica-rich rocks. The higher K, Nb and Zr contents of the latter rocks are believed to be related to metasomatic processes (glimmeritization) of the pyroxenites. Similar REE patterns for carbonatites and mica-rich rocks seem to suggest that they are related to a single parental magma, possibly of ijolitic composition. Steep LREE/HREE fractionation and high ΣREE content of some carbonatite samples would be explained by hydrothermal and supergenic processes. (author)

  18. Petrography and mineral chemistry of carbonatites and mica-rich rocks from the Araxa Complex (Alto Paranaiba Province, Brazil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traversa, Gianbosco; Morbidelli, Lucio; Ronca, Sara [Roma Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze della Terra; Gomes, Celso B.; Ruberti, Excelso [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias].E-mail: cgomes@usp.br; Brotzu, Piero [Napoli Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze della Terra; Buraglini, Nicoletta [Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienza della Terra; Principato, Maria Speranza [Milano Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienza della Terra

    2001-03-01

    The Araxa complex (16 km{sup 2}) comprises carbonatites forming a central core and a complex network of concentric and radial dykes as well as small veins; additionally, it includes mica-rich rocks, phoscorities and lamprophyres. Fenites also occur and rare represented by Proterozoic quartzites and schists of the Araxa Group. The petrographic study of 130 borehole samples indicates that the complex is basically made up by two rock-types, carbonatites and mica-rich rocks, and subordinately by a third unit of hybrid composition. Carbonatites range chemically in composition, the most abundant type being magnesio-carbonatites. Dolomite and calcite correspond to the chief constituents, but other carbonate phases, including the Ce-group RE minerals, are also recognized. phosphates and oxides are widespread accessories whereas silicate minerals consist of olivine, clinopyroxene, mica and amphibole. Mica-rich rocks are represented by abundant glimmeritic rocks and scare cumulitic phlogopite-, olivine-and diopside-bearing pyroxenites. Hybrid rocks mainly contain phlogopite and tetraferriphlopite as cumulus and intercumulus phases, respectively; carbonate minerals may also be found. Chemical data indicate that the carbonatities are strongly enriched in REE and have lower contents of Nb, Zr, V, Cr, Ni and Rb compared to the mica-rich rocks. The higher K, Nb and Zr contents of the latter rocks are believed to be related to metasomatic processes (glimmeritization) of the pyroxenites. Similar REE patterns for carbonatites and mica-rich rocks seem to suggest that they are related to a single parental magma, possibly of ijolitic composition. Steep LREE/HREE fractionation and high {sigma}REE content of some carbonatite samples would be explained by hydrothermal and supergenic processes. (author)

  19. Virtual Petrography (ViP) - A virtual microscope for the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgo, Simon; Heup, Torsten; Urai, Janos L.; Berlage, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Virtual Microscopy has advanced in recent years to a powerful versatile tool in the life sciences with many applications in research and teaching. We present the first virtual microscopy platform especially designed for geoscience applications. It was developed in a collaboration between RWTH Aachen University and Fraunhofer FIT under consideration of the demands of modern petrography. The system consists of a fully automated polarisation microscope that can scan entire thin sections in very high resolution under various polarisation and illumination conditions to capture and digitise all information that could be extracted from the section with classical polarised microscopy. The data is processed to extract the polarisation behaviour of each pixel as continuous functions that are fitted for each pixel based on images taken under different polarisation angles. This information is stored in a newly developed format that allows fast access and offers a very good degree of compression. The datasets can be viewed with a virtual microscopy software (TileViewer) that is easy to operate and allows fluent zooming and browsing through the thin section as well as rotation of the polarisers and switching between illumination conditions. The viewer software is platform independent and requires no special hardware, rather it operates well on a standard laptop. Besides navigation and image adjustments the TileViewer Software offers the possibility to create annotations, visualise the data based on certain characteristics (for example extinction direction), and offers a basic module for image segmentation. For further analysis the data can be exported to Matlab, ArcGis or other image analysis environments. The information density of each dataset (including the extinction behaviour) and the high resolution over very large continuous areas allows for new methods of automated and semi-automated analysis that was not possible before with single image acquisition and analysis

  20. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, S. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Experimental and analytical data on magnetic mineralogy was provided as an aid to the interpretation of magnetic anomaly maps. An integrated program, ranging from the chemistry of materials from 100 or more km depth within the Earth, to an examination of the MAGSAT anomaly maps at about 400 km above the Earth's surface, was undertaken. Within this framework, a detailed picture of the pertinent mineralogical and magnetic relationships for the region of West Africa was provided. Efforts were directed toward: (1) examining the geochemistry, mineralogy, magnetic properties, and phases relations of magnetic oxides and metal alloys in rocks demonstrated to have originated in the lower crust of upper mantle, (2) examining the assumption that these rocks portray the nature of their source regions; and (3) examining the regional geology, tectonics, gravity field and the MAGSAT anomaly maps for West Africa.

  1. Petrography and Geochemistry of Peridotite Xenoliths from Hannuoba and Significance for Lithospheric Mantle Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The compositions of the whole rocks and trace elements of minerals in peridotites can reflect the characteristics of the lithospheric mantle. The nature and evolution of the Cenozoic lithospheric mantle beneath Hannuoba (汉诺坝), located on the north edge of the intra-North China orogenic belt,are discussed based on the in-situ LAM-ICPMS detected trace element compositions of clinopyroxenes in the Hannuoba peridotitic xenoliths combined with detailed petrography and geochemistry studies. The Hannuoba lithospheric mantle was formed by different partial meltings of the primitive mantle. Most of the samples reflect the partial melting degree of lower than 5% with a few samples of 15%-20%.Major element compositions of the whole rocks and geochemical compositions of clinopyroxenes reveal the coexistence of both fertile and depleted mantle underneath the Hannuoba region during the Cenozoic.This was probably caused by the asthenospheric mantle replacing the aged craton mantle through erosion,intermingling and modification. Our conclusion is further supported by the existence of both carbonatitic magmatic material and silicate melt/fluid metasomatism as magnified by the trace elements of the clinopyroxenes from the Hannuoba lithospheric mantle.

  2. Mineralogy and the mobility of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various types of uranium deposits occur in Southern Africa, such as pegmatite deposits at Rossing, ancient placer deposits in the Witwatersrand, sratabound deposits in the Karoo and deposits associated with alkaline complexes such as Phalaborwa and Pilanesberg. This paper shortly deals with the mineralogy of uranium minerals and the behaviour of uranium during oxidation and transport

  3. Mineralogy of Eolian Sands at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. N.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T. F.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Chipera, S. J.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Fendrich, K. V.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Yen, A. S.; Sarrazin, P. C.; Treiman, A. H.; Craig, P. I.; Lapotre, M. G. A.; Edgett, K. S.; Gellert, R.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Des Marais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring outcrop and regolith in Gale crater since August 6, 2012. During this exploration, the mission has collected 10 samples for mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), using the CheMin instrument. The CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity uses a CCD detector and a Co-anode tube source to acquire both mineralogy (from the pat-tern of Co diffraction) and chemical information (from energies of fluoresced X-rays). A detailed description of CheMin is provided in [1]. As part of the rover checkout after landing, the first sample selected for analysis was an eolian sand deposit (the Rocknest "sand shadow"). This sample was selected in part to characterize unconsolidated eolian regolith, but primarily to prove performance of the scoop collection system on the rover. The focus of the mission after Rocknest was on the consolidated sediments of Gale crater, so all of the nine subsequent samples were collected by drilling into bedrock com-posed of lithified sedimentary materials, including mudstone and sandstone. No scoop samples have been collected since Rocknest, but at the time this abstract was written the mission stands poised to use the scoop again, to collect active dune sands from the Bagnold dune field. Several abstracts at this conference outline the Bagnold dune campaign and summarize preliminary results from analyses on approach to the Namib dune sampling site. In this abstract we review the mineralogy of Rocknest, contrast that with the mineralogy of local sediments, and anticipate what will be learned by XRD analysis of Bagnold dune sands.

  4. New insights into the mineralogy of the Atlantis II Deep metalliferous sediments, Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurila, Tea E.; Hannington, Mark D.; Leybourne, Matthew; Petersen, Sven; Devey, Colin W.; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    The Atlantis II Deep of the Red Sea hosts the largest known hydrothermal ore deposit on the ocean floor and the only modern analog of brine pool-type metal deposition. The deposit consists mainly of chemical-clastic sediments with input from basin-scale hydrothermal and detrital sources. A characteristic feature is the millimeter-scale layering of the sediments, which bears a strong resemblance to banded iron formation (BIF). Quantitative assessment of the mineralogy based on relogging of archived cores, detailed petrography, and sequential leaching experiments shows that Fe-(oxy)hydroxides, hydrothermal carbonates, sulfides, and authigenic clays are the main "ore" minerals. Mn-oxides were mainly deposited when the brine pool was more oxidized than it is today, but detailed logging shows that Fe-deposition and Mn-deposition also alternated at the scale of individual laminae, reflecting short-term fluctuations in the Lower Brine. Previous studies underestimated the importance of nonsulfide metal-bearing components, which formed by metal adsorption onto poorly crystalline Si-Fe-OOH particles. During diagenesis, the crystallinity of all phases increased, and the fine layering of the sediment was enhanced. Within a few meters of burial (corresponding to a few thousand years of deposition), biogenic (Ca)-carbonate was dissolved, manganosiderite formed, and metals originally in poorly crystalline phases or in pore water were incorporated into diagenetic sulfides, clays, and Fe-oxides. Permeable layers with abundant radiolarian tests were the focus for late-stage hydrothermal alteration and replacement, including deposition of amorphous silica and enrichment in elements such as Ba and Au.

  5. Petrography, Mineral Chemistry and Geothermobarometry of Andalusite- Bearing Schists North of Azna (Northern Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Abdollahi Silabi

    2016-07-01

    deformation that hasproduced the current morphologyof the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone (Shabanian Borujeni, 2008. In this paper we focused on petrography and mineral chemistry and thermodynamic conditions of the metapelites. Materials and methods The chemical compositions of minerals were determined by a CAMECA SX100 electron microprobe (EMP at Universität Stuttgart (Germany. The instrument is equipped with five wavelength dispersive spectrometers. The beam current and acceleration voltage were 15 nA and 15 kV, respectively. v Discussion and Results The Azna regional metamorphic rocks include quartz-feldspar schists, mica schists, andalusite-bearing schists and quartzites. The Azna metapelites are schists, containing quartz, feldspars, andalusite, muscovite, biotite, muscovite, chlorite and garnet, in variable proportions, characterized byporphyroblastic and lepidoblastic textures. Based on mineralogy, minerals of these rocks contain andalusite, garnet, feldspar, muscovite, biotite, quartz and chlorite. Microprobe analyses show that the mineral compositions are as follows: White micas in the andalusite-bearing schists are muscovite, plagioclases are albite-oligoclase, garnets are almandine-spessartine with weak chemical zoning and biotites are siderophylite-annite. Based on geothermobarometry, these rocks formed in the hornblende-hornfels facies and the low pressure part of the amphibolite facies,with temperatures about 562-692 °C and pressures1.07-4.12 kbar. After the regional metamorphism of these rocks,granitoidintrusions causedthermal metamorphism of these rocks and the formation of andalusite-bearing schists. Acknowledgments The authors wish to thank the Office of Graduate Studies of the University of Isfahan for their support. We also thank Prof. Hans-JoachimMassonne, who played major roles during the microprobe analysis of minerals at the InstitutfürMineralogie und Kristallchemie, Universität Stuttgart (Germany. References Aghanabati, A., 2004. Geology of Iran. Geological

  6. Petrography and mineral chemistry of wehrlites in contact zone of gabbro intrusions and mantle peridotites of the Naein ophiolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ghaseminejad

    2014-10-01

    , banded meta-chert, and succession of schist and marble (Davoudzadeh, 1972; Jabbari, 1997; Pirnia Naeini, 2006; Torabi, 2012; Shirdashtzadeh, 2006. In this ophiolite, the leucogabbro intrusions crosscut all other rock units. Materials and Methods Mineralogical analyses were conducted by wavelength-dispersive EPMA (JEOL JXA-8800R at the Cooperative Centre of Kanazawa University (Japan. The analyses were performed under an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and a beam current of 15 nA. JEOL software using ZAF corrections was employed for data reduction. Natural and synthetic minerals of known composition are used as standards. The Fe3+ content in minerals was estimated by assuming mineral stoichiometry. Results In the contact zone of leucogabbros and mantle peridotites of the Naein ophiolite, wehrlite and olivine clinopyroxenite are formed. Rock-forming minerals of these wehrlites are olivine (chrysolite, clinopyroxene (diopside, Cr-spinel, serpentine, amphibole (tremolite and tremolitic hornblende, epidote and magnetite. Comparison of mineral chemistry of olivine, clinopyroxene and chromian spinel in wehrlites and mantle peridotites indicate that chemical composition of clinopyroxene and olivine in these rocks are different, but chemistry of Cr-spinels in harzburgite and wehrlite are nearly same. Discussion According to the resistance of Cr-spinel against the metamorphism and alteration, it can be concluded that the wehrlites in contact zone of gabbros and mantle peridotites are formed at the expense of harzburgite. Olivine and clinopyroxene of wehrlites are formed by serpentine metamorphism and interaction of serpentine and calcium of gabbro, respectively. Field study of the research area shows that the leucogabbro intrudes the harzburgite. This research shows that after the serpentinization of mantle harzburgite, the gabbro intrusions crosscut the serpentinized peridotites, and wehrlite and olivine clinopyroxenite formed in the contact zone. Acknowledgements The authors thank

  7. Linkages between mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys from the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. J.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Breves, E. A.; Dyar, M. D.; Jamieson, J. W.; Hannington, M. D.; Dahle, H.; Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Lilley, M. D.; Baross, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Rock and fluid samples were collected from three hydrothermal chimneys at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge to evaluate linkages among mineralogy, fluid chemistry, and microbial community composition within the chimneys. Mössbauer, midinfrared thermal emission, and visible-near infrared spectroscopies were utilized for the first time to characterize vent mineralogy, in addition to thin-section petrography, X-ray diffraction, and elemental analyses. A 282°C venting chimney from the Bastille edifice was composed primarily of sulfide minerals such as chalcopyrite, marcasite, and sphalerite. In contrast, samples from a 300°C venting chimney from the Dante edifice and a 321°C venting chimney from the Hot Harold edifice contained a high abundance of the sulfate mineral anhydrite. Geochemical modeling of mixed vent fluids suggested the oxic-anoxic transition zone was above 100°C at all three vents, and that the thermodynamic energy available for autotrophic microbial redox reactions favored aerobic sulfide and methane oxidation. As predicted, microbes within the Dante and Hot Harold chimneys were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic aerobes of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria and sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria. However, most of the microbes within the Bastille chimney were most closely related to mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobes of the Deltaproteobacteria, especially sulfate reducers, and anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea. The predominance of anaerobes in the Bastille chimney indicated that other environmental factors promote anoxic conditions. Possibilities include the maturity or fluid flow characteristics of the chimney, abiotic Fe2+ and S2- oxidation in the vent fluids, or O2 depletion by aerobic respiration on the chimney outer wall.

  8. Clasts petrography of post-glacial deposits in the Lubusz Elevation, western Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Ewelina

    2010-05-01

    Clasts petrography of post-glacial deposits in the Lubusz Elevation, western Poland Ewelina Lipka Department of Geomorphology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland This study presents petrographic composition of post-glacial deposits in the Lubusz Elevation. Also parent areas and possible general ice-flow directions of those deposits were determined on the basis of clasts petrography. This contribution concerns the Lubusz Elevation, located in western Poland. This area is situated within the range of the Poznan Phase, which is the second stage of the Weichselian Ice Sheet in Poland. The author aimed at revealing a spatial tendency in petrographic composition of post-glacial deposits that comprise the Poznan Phase marginal zone. This petrographic composition became also a basis to determine parent areas and possible general ice-flow directions of the analysed deposits. The data set was collected from post-glacial deposits of varied lithology (superficial glacial till and glaciofluvial deposits) across the Poznan Phase marginal zone (end moraine, hinterland and foreland). Gravels of 4-10 and 20-60 mm fractions of both glacial till and glaciofluvial deposits were petrographically analysed. Also indicator and statistical erratics were recognised within the 20-60 mm fraction. All analysed deposits, disregarding either place of their occurance (end moraine, hinterland or foreland) or lithology (glacial till or glaciofluvial deposits) were found to consist mainly of crystalline rocks. Among end moraine and hinterland deposits (apart from crystalline rocks) Palaeosoic limestones, Palaeosoic sandstones and flints are present in significant amounts. Foreland deposits consist mainly (beside crystalline rocks) of Palaeosoic sandstones and flints. More Palaeosoic sandstones and flints and less quartz grains were observed among 20-60 mm fraction gravels comparing to those of 4-10 mm fraction. Significant percentage of flints in all analysed samples was found remarkable. It

  9. Petrography and composition of Martian regolith breccia meteorite Northwest Africa 7475

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Axel; Korotev, Randy L.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Irving, Anthony J.; Moser, Desmond E.; Barker, Ivan; Rumble, Douglas

    2015-02-01

    The Northwest Africa (NWA) 7475 meteorite is one of the several stones of paired regolith breccias from Mars based on petrography, oxygen isotope, mineral compositions, and bulk rock compositions. Its inventory of lithic clasts is dominated by vitrophyre impact melts that were emplaced while they were still molten. Other clast types include crystallized impact melt rocks, evolved plutonic rocks, possible basalts, contact metamorphosed rocks, and siltstones. Impact spherules and vitrophyre shards record airborne transport, and accreted dust rims were sintered on most clasts, presumably during residence in an ejecta plume. The clast assemblage records at least three impact events, one that formed an impact melt sheet on Mars ≤4.4 Ga ago, a second that assembled NWA 7475 from impactites associated with the impact melt sheet at 1.7-1.4 Ga, and a third that launched NWA 7475 from Mars ~5 Ma ago. Mildly shocked pyroxene and plagioclase constrain shock metamorphic conditions during launch to >5 and <15 GPa. The mild postshock-heating that resulted from these shock pressures would have been insufficient to sterilize this water-bearing lithology during launch. Magnetite, maghemite, and pyrite are likely products of secondary alteration on Mars. Textural relationships suggest that calcium-carbonate and goethite are probably of terrestrial origin, yet trace element chemistry indicates relatively low terrestrial alteration. Comparison of Mars Odyssey gamma-ray spectrometer data with the Fe and Th abundances of NWA 7475 points to a provenance in the ancient southern highlands of Mars. Gratteri crater, with an age of ~5 Ma and an apparent diameter of 6.9 km, marks one possible launch site of NWA 7475.

  10. Petrography and P-T estimates of burial stage of eclogites from Kreuzeck Massif, Eastern Alps, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, eclogites and eclogites facies rocks are interpreted as oceanic and/or continental crustal material buried to mantle depths. These rocks provide important information on the early stage of orogenic processes. Some cases allow us to determine according to the textures and microfabrics establish the eclogitic and post-eclogitic deformation history from burial by subduction to subsequent exhumation. The purpose of this contribution is petrography and P-T estimates of the burial stage of eclogites from the Polinik structural complex in Kreuzeck massif, Eastern Alps in Austria.

  11. Mineralogical characterization of uranium yellow cake concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium yellow cake concentrates have been analyzed and characterized mineralogically by means of differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectra and wet chemical methods. On the basis of mineralogical methods of characterization, the following four major structural types of yellow cake may be classified: Uranyl Hydroxide Hydrate, UO2(OH)2nH2O; Basic Uranyl Sulfate Hydrate, (UO2)x(SO4)y(OH)s(x-y).nH2O; Sodium Para-Uranate, Na5U7O24 and Uranyl Peroxide Hydrate, UO4.nH2O. In this paper conditions of yellow cake preparation and characterization are described, along with discussion of significance of structural types to the physical and chemical properties of yellow cake production

  12. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge ORDAZ GARGALLO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of the chemistry and mineralogy. The text clearly supports the new contributions of Lavoisier and other supporters of experimentation as a scientific method, which agrees with Jovellanos’ ideas about the development of the «useful» sciences for the progress of the countries.

  13. Mineralogy and Surface Composition of Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Thomas, Cristina A; Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Burbine, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Methods to constrain the surface mineralogy of asteroids have seen considerable development during the last decade with advancement in laboratory spectral calibrations and validation of our interpretive methodologies by spacecraft rendezvous missions. This has enabled the accurate identification of several meteorite parent bodies in the main asteroid belt and helped constrain the mineral chemistries and abundances in ordinary chondrites and basaltic achondrites. With better quantification of spectral effects due to temperature, phase angle, and grain size, systematic discrepancies due to non-compositional factors can now be virtually eliminated for mafic silicate-bearing asteroids. Interpretation of spectrally featureless asteroids remains a challenge. This paper presents a review of all mineralogical interpretive tools currently in use and outlines procedures for their application.

  14. Mineralogical characterization of West Chestnut Ridge soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphological, physicochemical, and mineralogical properties of the soils and residua from the proposed site of the Central Waste Disposal Facility were characterized. The proposed site is underlain by cherty dolostones, limestones, and shales of the Knox Group covered by a thick residuum. Three diagnostic horizons from four soil profiles and six samples from residuum cores were selected for mineralogical analysis. The coarse fractions (gravel and sand) of the samples included different types of chert, iron-manganese oxide nodules, and quartz. The samples were high in clay content (except those from the A and E horizons) and low in pH and base saturation. The clay fractions were composed of varying amounts of kaolinite, mica, vermiculite, aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, amorphous iron and aluminum oxides, gibbsite, and quartz. Aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite is the major component in surface horizons, but kaolinite becomes dominant in subsurface horizons of the soils. Degradation of kaolinite and formation of aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite and iron and aluminum oxides are pronounced chemical weathering processes in the surface soils. The aluminum hydroxy interlayering of vermiculite reduces cation exchange and selective sorption capacities of soils. In the residua, micaceous minerals free of aluminum hydroxy interlayering, kaolinite, and amorphous iron and aluminum oxides are major components in the clay fraction. The sorption ratios of 137Cs, 90Sr, 60Co, and the uranium isotopes expected to be in the radioactive wastes should be very high for the clays having such mineralogical composition. The low acid-buffering capacity (base saturation) of the residua suggest that the fragile chemical and mineralogical equilibria can be easily broken if an extreme chemical condition is imposed on the residua

  15. Analisis Mineralogi Batuan Gua Lakasa, Buton.

    OpenAIRE

    Massinai, Muhammad Altin; Rahmat, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Gua Lakasa merupakan salah satu gua di Buton yang berpotensi dengan kandungan mineral-mineral yang bernilai ekonomis. Penelitian di Gua Lakasa bertujuan menentukan jenis-jenis batuan dan mineral pembentuk speleothem /ornament gua. Metode penelitian yang digunakan adalah analisis mineralogi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa Gua Lakasa merupakan gua batugamping (karst).Jenis-jenis batuan yang terdapat di Gua Lakasa berupa dolomite, fosil gampingan, batugamping kompak dan konglomerat, sedangk...

  16. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy

    OpenAIRE

    Ordaz Gargallo, Jorge; Manuel GUTIÉRREZ CLAVEROL; Lorenzo Álvarez, Elena de

    2012-01-01

    An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca) is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of t...

  17. The Mineralogy of Comet Wild 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The nature of cometary solids is of fundamental importance to our understanding of the early solar nebula and protoplanetary history. Samples of Comet Wild 2, provided by the Stardust Mission, have now been examined in terrestrial labs for two years, and are very surprising! Here we describe mainly the critical phases olivine, pyroxene and Fe-Ni sulfides in Wild 2 grains, as a guide to the general mineralogy of the returned comet samples.

  18. X-ray computed microtomography integrated to petrography for the three-dimensional study of rock porosity; A microtomografia computadorizada de raios x integrada a petrografia no estudo tridimensional de porosidade em rochas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Neto, Joss Manoel dos; Fiori, Alberto Pio; Lopes, Angela Pacheco; Pinto-Coelho, Cristina Valle; Vasconcellos, Eleonora Maria Gouvea; Silva, Gabriel Fischer da [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Marchese, Clarice; Secchi, Rodrigo, E-mail: jmreis@ufpr.br, E-mail: fiori@ufpr.br, E-mail: angelalopes@ufpr.br, E-mail: cristinavpc@ufpr.br, E-mail: eleonora@ufpr.br, E-mail: fischergab@hotmail.com, E-mail: clamarchese@hotmail.com, E-mail: rosecchi@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia. Lab. de Analise de Minerais e Rochas

    2011-09-15

    The porosity contained in rocks is object of study by geoscientists due to the various genetic implications of these features. However, what have been motivating the search for new analytical techniques to study pores are the petrophysical analyses. The experimental techniques for porosity analysis, such as mercury or gas injection, allow a quantitative approach, but do not allow the visualization of the porous framework. Petrographic analysis by optical microscopy allows the visualization and quantification of intergranular pores, but it is restricted to the two-dimensional space and quantifications are less representative. Technological advances in X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT) allowed three-dimensional analysis of pore geometry in microscale, in addition to automated volume measurements. The analyses of marble, quartzite, sandstone and dolomite breccia represented in this work and performed under the Project Falhas/ PETROBRAS/UFPR, show the shape, size, connectivity, tortuosity, pore volume and distribution in these rocks, demonstrating the differences in the rocks' porous frameworks. The integration of micro-CT to petrography allows the identification of mineral phases with attenuation of contrasting X-rays, placing the incidence of porosity in the mineralogical context in three dimensions, in addition to the contribution to the consistency of the method. Although the resolution is limited in the X-ray microtomography that was used (the Skyscan model 1172), which does not reach the smallest pore size of some rocks, the integration of both techniques provides new information, of extreme importance for the research about micro-features related to the pores in rocks, helping in genetic interpretations and significantly contributing for the analyses of reservoirs. (author)

  19. Ages constraints in pegmatite province related to charnockitic host rocks in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    De Mello, Fernando Machado; Bilal, Essaïd

    2012-01-01

    Cambrian-Neoproterozoic granitoids suites in southeastern Brazil are the main host rocks of largest pegmatite field of Brazil, the Eastern Pegmatite Province. The P-Li-Nb pegmatites group represent the richest in precious stones like Beryl, Aquamarine, Topaz and Tourmaline. Two types of pegmatites are characterized by their mineralogical characteristics and tectonic and magmatic relations. The first group formed during compressive event about 582 Ma and the second pegmatite group was formed b...

  20. Mineralogical Analyses of a Precambrian Stromatolite

    OpenAIRE

    OHARA, Soji; Unno, Wasaburo; Tanaka, Masami; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Tanizawa, Kyoji

    1992-01-01

    [Abstract] Stromatolite is the fossil of the marine life of Infra-Cambrian era (ca.650-800Ma), having layered structure similar to the annual ring of woods. The mineralogy of these ring structures are studied by means of X-ray fluorescence analysis, IR (infra-red) absorption analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis. Dark-colored rings and light brown-colored intermediates are found to be consist of CaCO_3(Calcite) and Ca(FeMg)(CO_3)_2(Ankerite), respectively. Magnesium of chrolophyl origin is ...

  1. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sanchez

    2004-09-07

    The purpose of this report is to provide a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the mineral abundance within the geologic framework model domain. The mineralogic model enables project personnel to estimate mineral abundances at any position, within the model region, and within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The model provides the abundance and distribution of 10 minerals and mineral groups within 22 stratigraphic sequences or model layers in the Yucca Mountain area. The uncertainties and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.4. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7.

  2. Diphyllobothriasis, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello; Piana de Andrade, Victor; Lucas, Maria da Conceição; Fung, Liang; Gagliardi, Sandra Maria B.; Santos, Sandra Rosalem P.; Mendes, Caio Marcio Figueiredo; Eduardo, Maria Bernadete de Paula; Dick, Terry

    2005-01-01

    Cases of human diphyllobothriasis have been reported worldwide. Only 1 case in Brazil was diagnosed by our institution from January 1998 to December 2003. By comparison, 18 cases were diagnosed from March 2004 to January 2005. All patients who became infected ate raw fish in sushi or sashimi.

  3. Organic petrography:An approach for identification of maceral groups in Gheshlagh coal area, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Rabani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Maceral is a term to introduce organic components visible under a microscope (Stopes, 1935. The physical and chemical characteristics of macerals such as elemental composition, moisture content, hardness, density and petrographic characteristics differ. The differences in the physical and chemical characteristics of macerals are reflected in their industrial behavior.(Parkash, 1985. Petrographic analysis provides information on the various physical components of coals (Suwarna and Hemanto, 2007 and determination of quality of coal, coalification rate, composition and characteristics of coke and paleoenvironmental deposition (Taylor et al., 1998. Sampling and methodology Coal samples were collected from freshly mined coal from 11 coal seams of 4 active coal mines (Cheshlagh, Zemestan Yourt, Narges Chal and Cheshmehsaran for organic petrography in the Gheshlagh coal deposits. All samples were collected and stored in plastic bags to prevent contamination and weathering. Samples were prepared for microscopic analysis by reflected light following ASTM Standard procedure D2797-04. For microscopic study, coal samples were crushed to1-mm size fraction (18 mesh size, mounted in epoxy resin and polished. Three polished samples were prepared for each coal seam. The petrographic composition was obtained by maceral analyses under standard conditions (ISO 7404/3, 2009, for maceral analysis. Maceral point counting (based on 400 points analyses were performed using an Olympus BX51 reflected light microscope. The terminology used to identify and describe the organic matter particles is the one proposed by the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology (ICCP, 1998; ICCP, 2001; Scott and Glasspool, 2007; Taylor et al., 1998; Stach et al., 1982; Hower et al., 2009; Hower and Wagner, 2012. Organic petrography of theGheshlagh coal seams The vitrinite maceral group is dominant in all coal seams (66.2 to 87.2 vol.% and includes collodetrinite

  4. Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in a medieval mine dump

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filippi, Michal; Drahota, Petr; Machovič, Vladimír; Böhmová, Vlasta

    Szeged: University of Szeged, 2010 - (Zaharia, L.). Roč. 6, - (2010), s. 344-344 ISSN 0324-6523. [General Meeting of the International Mineralogical Association /20./. 21.08.2010-27.09.2010, Budapest] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : arsenic * mine dump * mineralogy * mobility Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  5. Topographical mineralogy of the Bamble sector, south Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Zwaan, J.C.; Touret, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Bamble sector of southern Norway is a classic high grade metamorphic gneiss region, which provided specimens to many mineralogical collections all over the world. The topographical mineralogy of this area is described and reviewed. All minerals known to occur in the area are listed according to

  6. Technological mineralogy study on uranium ores in Yunji ore deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the study of the types and features of technological mineralogy in Yunji uranium ore deposit, the factors influencing the heap leaching are researched, and uranium occurrence state is found out. The technological mineralogy data are provided for predicting, improving, and controlling the uranium ore heap leaching process. (authors)

  7. Topographical mineralogy of the Bamble sector, south Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Nijland, T.G.; Zwaan, J.C.; Touret, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Bamble sector of southern Norway is a classic high grade metamorphic gneiss region, which provided specimens to many mineralogical collections all over the world. The topographical mineralogy of this area is described and reviewed. All minerals known to occur in the area are listed according to Strunz’ classification.

  8. Geology, petrography and geochronology of meridional and oriental regions from Morungaba complex, SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Morungaba Granitoid Complex, covering about 330 km2, crops out as an elongate irregular Massif trending SW-NE, in the southeast part of the State of Sao Paulo, southeast Brazil. Major constituents are biotite granitoids with subordinate diorites. Over thirty facies types, each with distinctive structural-petrographic features, were recognized during detailed mapping of part of the Massif (about 200 km2), and mapped as groups of facies. Geochronological Rb/Sr data for several groups of associated facies are also presented. (author)

  9. Environmental mineralogy - Understanding element behavior in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental Mineralogy has developed over the past decade in response to the recognition that minerals are linked in many important ways with the global ecosystem. Minerals are the main repositories of the chemical elements in Earth's crust and thus are the main sources of elements needed for the development of civilization, contaminant and pollutant elements that impact global and local ecosystems, and elements that are essential plant nutrients. These elements are released from minerals through natural processes, such as chemical weathering, and anthropogenic activities, such as mining and energy production, agriculture and industrial activities, and careless waste disposal. Minerals also play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of the elements, sequestering elements and releasing them as the primary minerals in crustal rocks undergo various structural and compositional transformations in response to physical, chemical, and biological processes that produce secondary minerals and soils. These processes have resulted in the release of toxic elements such as arsenic in groundwater aquifers, which is having a major impact on the health of millions of people in South and Southeast Asia. The interfaces between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions are the locations of most chemical reactions that control the composition of the natural environment, including the composition of natural waters. The nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to the disposition of high-level nuclear waste, is also intimately related to minerals. A fundamental understanding of these processes requires molecular-scale information about minerals, their bulk structures and properties such as solubility, their surfaces, and their interactions with aqueous solutions, atmospheric and soil gases, natural organic matter, and biological organisms. Gaining this understanding is further complicated by the presence of natural, incidental, and manufactured nano-particles in the environment, which

  10. The ceramic artifacts in archaeological black earth (terra preta from lower Amazon region, Brazil: mineralogy Artefatos cerâmicos em sítios arqueológios com terra preta na região do baixo Amazonas, Brasil: mineralogia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcondes Lima da Costa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several archaeological black earth (ABE sites occur in the Amazon region. They contain fragments of ceramic artifacts, which are very important for the archaeological purpose. In order to improve the archaeological study in the region we carried out a detailed mineralogical and chemical study of the fragments of ceramic artifacts found in the two ABE sites of Cachoeira-Porteira, in the Lower Amazon Region. Their ceramics comprise the following tempers: cauixi, cariapé, sand, sand +feldspars, crushed ceramic and so on and are composed of quartz, clay equivalent material (mainly burned kaolinite, feldspars, hematite, goethite, maghemite, phosphates, anatase, and minerals of Mn and Ba. Cauixi and cariapé, siliceous organic compounds, were found too. The mineralogical composition and the morphology of their grains indicate a saprolite (clayey material rich on quartz derived from fine-grained felsic igneous rocks or sedimentary rocks as source material for ceramic artifacts, where silica-rich components such cauixi, cariapé and/or sand (feldspar and rock fragments were intentionally added to them. The high content of (Al,Fe-phosphates, amorphous to low crystalline, must be product of the contact between the clayey matrix of pottery wall and the hot aqueous solution formed during the daily cooking of animal foods (main source of phosphor. The phosphate crystallization took place during the discharge of the potteries put together with waste of organic material from animal and vegetal origin, and leaving to the formation of the ABE-soil profile.Sítios arqueológicos com Terra Preta, denominados de Terra Preta de Índio ou ainda Terra Preta Arqueológica (TPA são muito freqüentes na Amazônia. As TPA geralmente contém fragmentos de vasos cerâmicos, por vezes abundantes, além de líticos, que são materiais de grande importância para os estudos arqueológicos. Para consubstanciar esses estudos, realizou-se pesquisas mineralógicas e químicas em

  11. Teores de metais pesados e caracterização mineralógica de solos do Cemitério Municipal de Santa Cândida, Curitiba (PR Heavy metal contents and mineralogical characterization of soils from the Santa Cândida Municipal Cemetery, in Curitiba (PR, brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Jurema Barros

    2008-08-01

    , em parte determinadas pelo material de origem, não apresentaram relação de causa e efeito com metais pesados nas áreas estudadas.The metal pieces of coffins, such as handles and adornments, are considered the main source of soil heavy metal contamination. Other sources of pollutants are the products used in the body embalming, wood preservatives and fluids released from body decomposition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clay fraction mineralogy and heavy metal contents of soils from Santa Cândida Municipal Cemetery, in Curitiba (PR, and estimate the contamination risk. The samples were collected at three depths (0-20, 20-80 and 80-120 cm at seven selected points, representing two parent materials (granite/gneiss and claystone and two burial modalities (unmarked graves and mausoleum area. The clay fraction was studied by X ray diffractometry and thermal analysis, and Fe and Al contents were determined, after acid ammonium oxalate (amorphous Fe and Al oxides and sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (crystalline Fe oxides extractions, by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS. The total and exchangeable heavy metal contents were determined by AAS, after sample digestion with concentrated HF and BaCl2 1 mol L-1 solution, respectively. The predominance of kaolinite and occurrence of vermiculite with Al-hydroxy interlayers and smectite determined the high values of soil CEC. Heavy metal contents were higher in the mausoleum area, where the highest Cr and Pb contents were found (516.3 and 260.2 mg kg-1, respectively. The lower metal contamination in the area of unmarked graves may be attributed to simpler burial practices, with less potential heavy metal sources, such as wood preservatives and metal parts of coffins. No cause-effect relation was observed between the chemical and mineralogical soil characteristics, in part determined by the parent material, and the heavy metal contents in the studied area.

  12. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the Jurassic coals from the Gheshlagh mine, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Shamanian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Alborz structural zone in northern Iran is the host of a number of important coal deposits. The Gheshlagh coal mine is one of them, which is located 35 km southeast of Azadshahr. Coal bearing strata in the Gheshlagh mining district occur in the middle part of the Lower Jurassic Shemshak Formation which consists mainly of shales, siltstones and sandstones. The Geshlagh coals have a low sulfur content and a low ash yield. The ash content of coal and its geochemical character depends on the environment of deposition and subsequent geological history (Yazdi and Esmaeilnia, 2004. The purpose of this study was to investigate the texural and mineralogical characteristcs of the Ghashlagh coals and to identify the geochemistry of the major and trace elements and their relationship to specific mineralogical components. These results are necessary to improve the understanding of coal characterization and to relate the mineralogy of different materials to their potential for producing acidic or alkaline mine waters associated with mining and preparation processes. Materials and methods About 20 samples were collected from the main coal seams. These samples were taken from fresh faces of the mine to avoid weathered surfaces and get fresh samples. The petrography of the samples was carried out by the conventional microscopic methods at the Golestan University. Mineralogical analyses were done by a X-ray diffractometer equipped with a CuKα tube and monochrometer (XRD Philips PW 1800 at the Kansaran Binaloud Company. The coal samples were initially crushed to less than 200 μm and homogenized. Then, 50 g from each sample was heated to 525 oC according to the United States Geological Survey procedure(Bullock et al., 2002. The concentration of the major and trace elements in the resulting ash samples was determined using a wavelength Xray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF Philips PW1480 at the Kansaran Binaloud Company. Results The Coal

  13. Surface chemistry and mineralogy. [of planet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Clark, B. C.; Waenke, H.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulated knowledge on the chemistry and mineralogy of Martian surface materials is reviewed. Pertinent information obtained by direct analyses of the soil on Mars by the Viking Landers, by remote sensing of Mars from flyby and orbiting spacecraft, by telescopic observations from earth, and through detailed analyses of the SNC meteorites presumed to be Martian rocks are summarized and analyzed. A compositional model for Mars soil, giving selected average elemental concentrations of major and trace elements, is suggested. It is proposed that the fine surface materials on Mars are a multicomponent mixture of weathered and nonweathered minerals. Smectite clays, silicate mineraloids similar to palagonite, and scapolite are suggested as possible major candidate components among the weathered minerals.

  14. Petrography and geochemistry of Paleocene-Eocene limestones in the Ching-dar syncline, eastern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Halimeh Hashemi Azizi; Gholamreza Mirab Shabestari; Ahmadreza Khazaei

    2014-01-01

    The Ching-dar syncline is located to the west of the city of Birjand, in the east of Iran. The ca. 500 m thick studied section at the eastern flank of the syncline contains a sequence of almost continuous shallow-marine limestones that exhibit no major sedimentary breaks or evidence for volcanic activity. Skeletal grains consist of large benthic foraminifera and green algae whereas non-skeletal grains are mostly peloids and intraclasts. They were deposited on a shallow-marine carbonate ramp. The limestones have undergone extensive diagenetic processes with varying intensities, the most important of which are micritization, cementation, compaction (chemical and mechanical), internal filling and stylolitization. Chemical analysis of the limestone samples revealed high calcium and low magnesium content. Major and minor element values were used to determine the original carbonate mineralogy of these lime-stones. Petrographic evidence and elemental values indicate that calcite was the original carbonate mineral in the limestones of the Ching-dar syncline. The elemental composition of the Ching-dar car-bonates also demonstrates that they have stabilized in a meteoric phreatic environment. Variation of Sr/Ca vs. Mn values suggests that diagenetic alteration occurred in an open geochemical system.

  15. Magnetic mineralogy of the Mercurian lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Becky; Feinberg, Joshua; Johnson, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Mercury and Earth are the only inner solar system planets with present-day core-dynamo magnetic fields, in contrast to the past fields of Mars and the Moon and the absence of evidence for a past or present field at Venus. Recently, the MESSENGER mission also measured magnetic fields from lithospheric magnetization on Mercury for the first time. These fields are consistent with remanent magnetization held by rocks exposed to an ancient, internally generated planetary magnetic field. However, the conditions for magnetization in the lithosphere of Mercury are unique among terrestrial planets, and the mechanisms for the acquisition (induced versus remanent) and alteration of magnetization are still unknown. We investigate the physical and chemical environment of Mercury's crust, past and present, to establish the conditions in which magnetization may have been acquired and subsequently modified. Three factors are particularly crucial to the determination of crustal composition and iron mineralogy: the temperature profile of the lithosphere and its evolution over time, redox conditions in the planet's crust and mantle, and the iron content of the lithosphere. We explore potential mechanisms for remanence acquisition and alteration on Mercury, whose surface environment is distinct from that of other inner solar system planets in that it is both very hot and highly reducing. The long-term thermal history of Mercury's crust plays an important role in the longevity of any crustal magnetization, which may be subject to remagnetization through thermal, viscous, and shock mechanisms. This thermal and compositional framework isused to constrain plausible candidate magnetic mineralogies, which can then be analyzed in terms of their capacity to acquire and retain magnetic remanence that is detectable from satellite orbit. We propose a suite of minerals and materials that could be carriers of remanence in the lithosphere of Mercury, including iron alloys, silicides, and sulfides.

  16. Mineralogia e química dos sedimentos de fundo do médio e baixo Madeira e de seus principais tributários: Amazonas - Brasil Mineralogy and chemistry of bottom sediments of the middle and lower Madeira River and its main tributaries: Amazonas - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mireide Andrade Queiroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar a variação composicional e mineralógica dos sedimentos de fundo transportados pelos grandes rios da Amazônia, com nascentes nos Andes provenientes de rochas cratônicas. O estudo foi realizado com base em análises granulométricas, mineralógicas e químicas, incluindo isótopos de Pb, no rio Madeira e seus tributários. O conjunto de dados mostra que os sedimentos de fundo do rio Madeira são granulométrica, mineralógica e quimicamente distintos de seus principais tributários. Os sedimentos do rio Madeira são mais arenosos; têm maior quantidade de quartzo; menor conteúdo de Al2O3, Fe2O3, K2O, MgO, Na2O, PF, TiO2, P2O5, MnO e elementos-traço; e a maturidade aumenta de montante para jusante. Dentre os sedimentos dos tributários, os rios Machado e secundariamente o rio Marmelos são os que mais se aproximam da composição dos sedimentos do rio Madeira, enquanto que o Jamari com sedimentos com maior proporção de TiO2, Zr, Y, Nb, Ga, Hf, U, Ta e ETR, é o mais distinto. Apesar do ambiente de intenso intemperismo e erosão, em condições tropicais úmidas, a que estão submetidas as rochas drenadas pela bacia do rio Madeira, os valores das razões Th/Co, Th/Pb, Th/Yb, Al/Pb, Zr/Co e a composição isotópica de Pb indicam fontes distintas para os sedimentos de fundo estudados. Os sedimentos do rio Madeira são provenientes, principalmente, de rochas máficas, enquanto que os sedimentos de seus tributários têm como fonte essencialmente rochas félsicas.This study reports the granulometric, mineralogic and chemical analyses, including Pb isotope, carried out on the bottom sediments of the Madeira River, whose headwaters are in the Andes Mountain, and its tributaries that come from the cratonic region, in order to investigate the compositional variation of the sediments transported by the major rivers of the Amazon. The analytical data show that the bottom sediments of the Madeira River have

  17. Mineralogical sources of groundwater fluoride in Archaen bedrock/regolith aquifers: mass balances from the Peninsular Granite Complex, southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Bethan; Burgess, William; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2014-05-01

    Fluoride in groundwater-sourced drinking water is a widespread concern in India, particularly in the granitic gneiss bedrock/regolith catchments of Andhra Pradesh, one of the most severely affected states. Mobilisation of F- to groundwater is ultimately the consequence of bedrock weathering and regolith development, yet in crystalline bedrock/regolith terrain of the Peninsular Granite Complex, which constitutes a strategically important aquifer environment in India, uncertainties persist in relation to the relative contribution of the different F-bearing minerals and their distribution between the bedrock and the regolith. Even the relative significance of the bedrock and regolith as sources of fluoride to groundwater is disputed, as are explanations of seasonal and/or secular trends in groundwater F-. There are important implications for management of the groundwater resource. Understanding the mechanisms and progress of chemical weathering of the granitic gneiss is key to these questions, ie how effectively is F removed from its primary source(s) as the bedrock weathers? And, to what extent is F- flushed from the weathering profile and/or re-sequestered by secondary mineral phases as the regolith develops? To address these questions we have applied optical petrography, XRD, scanning electron microprobe analysis, whole-rock chemical analysis and leaching experiments to samples of bedrock and regolith from two catchments in Andhra Pradesh. We have quantified the distribution of F between its individual mineralogical sources, and between bedrock and regolith. Experiments show there is no straightforward relationship between whole-rock F content and leached [F-]; in some instances regolith samples leach higher F- concentrations than the fresh granitic gneiss. Results shed light on conflicting conceptual models of F release to groundwater in gneissic bedrock/regolith aquifers. Accounting for groundwater [F-], simple estimates of groundwater flux in the catchments

  18. Sulfur Mineralogy at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R.V.; Golden, D.C.; Sutter, B.; Clark, B.C.; Boynton, W.V.; Hecht, M.H.; Kounaves, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout mission landed at the northernmost location (approx.68deg N) of any lander or rover on the martian surface. This paper compares the S mineralogy at the Phoenix landing site with S mineralogy of soils studied by previous Mars landers. S-bearing phases were not directly detected by the payload onboard the Phoenix spacecraft. Our objective is to derive the possible mineralogy of S-bearing phases at the Phoenix landing site based upon Phoenix measurements in combination with orbital measurements, terrestrial analog and Martian meteorite studies, and telescopic observations.

  19. The petrography of the Jurassic core from the Harwell research site. Part 1: Kimmeridge Clay, Corallian Beds and Oxford Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed examination by mineralogical and petrological techniques has enabled a detailed characterisation of the lithologies of the Oxford Clay, Corallian Beds and the Kimmeridge Clay beneath the Harwell Research Site. Information obtained has revealed the nature of the bulk mineralogy, pore-types, pore-surface mineralogy and post-depositional alteration of the rocks. Diagenesis has played an important part in determining the mineralogy, porosity and fabric of the rocks and has had the greatest variation of effects in the Corallian Beds, determining the phases now in contact with groundwater. It is these authigenic phases that are of key interest in assessing the behaviour of radionuclides which may be released into the local groundwater systems. The importance of the different pore-types characterised during this investigation and of the mineral phases lining these potential pathways for groundwater movement are discussed in detail at the end of this report. Diagenesis has reduced primary porosity in many of the Corallian rocks by calcite precipitation. In such rocks where a cohesive cement is present, groundwater flow must occur along large-scale fractures and more slowly along intercrystalline grain-boundary cracks. (author)

  20. Mineralogical microanalysis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mineralogical analysis of lung tissue was conducted on 25 samples from patients who had been diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low magnification and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) was used. In all samples, the surface silicon/sulfur (Si/S) ratio was calculated. The Si/S ratio for 25 samples of normal lung and 6 samples of pneumoconiotic lung was also determined (upper limit of normal Si/S ratio = 0.3). The difference between the Si/S ratio in the group with IPF and group with normal lung tissue was significantly significant (p less than .007, Wilcoxon test). Six of 12 patients with a previous diagnosis of IPF and a Si/S ratio greater than 0.3 had an exposure history that could imply inhalation of silica/silicates, and the correct diagnosis for these patients is most probably pneumoconiosis. The silica/silicate deposits detected in patients with IPF, and who had a ratio and no past exposure to dusts, could be either a cause or an effect of the disease

  1. Mineralogical microanalysis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monso, E.; Tura, J.M.; Marsal, M.; Morell, F.; Pujadas, J.; Morera, J. (Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona (Spain))

    1990-05-01

    A mineralogical analysis of lung tissue was conducted on 25 samples from patients who had been diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low magnification and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) was used. In all samples, the surface silicon/sulfur (Si/S) ratio was calculated. The Si/S ratio for 25 samples of normal lung and 6 samples of pneumoconiotic lung was also determined (upper limit of normal Si/S ratio = 0.3). The difference between the Si/S ratio in the group with IPF and group with normal lung tissue was significantly significant (p less than .007, Wilcoxon test). Six of 12 patients with a previous diagnosis of IPF and a Si/S ratio greater than 0.3 had an exposure history that could imply inhalation of silica/silicates, and the correct diagnosis for these patients is most probably pneumoconiosis. The silica/silicate deposits detected in patients with IPF, and who had a ratio and no past exposure to dusts, could be either a cause or an effect of the disease.

  2. Olivine-dominated Asteroids: Mineralogy and Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Juan A; Kelley, Michael S; Cloutis, Edward A; Bottke, William F; Nesvorný, David; Lucas, Michael P; Hardersen, Paul S; Gaffey, Michael J; Abell, Paul A; Corre, Lucille Le

    2013-01-01

    Olivine-dominated asteroids are a rare type of objects formed either in nebular processes or through magmatic differentiation. The analysis of meteorite samples suggest that at least 100 parent bodies in the main belt experienced partial or complete melting and differentiation before being disrupted. However, only a few olivine-dominated asteroids, representative of the mantle of disrupted differentiated bodies, are known to exist. Due to the paucity of these objects in the main belt their origin and evolution have been a matter of great debate over the years. In this work we present a detailed mineralogical analysis of twelve olivine-dominated asteroids. Within our sample we distinguish two classes, one that we call pure-olivine asteroids and another referred to as olivine-rich asteroids. For the pure-olivine asteroids the olivine chemistry was found to range from ~ Fo49 to Fo70, consistent with the values measured for brachinites and R chondrites. In the case of the olivine-rich asteroids we determined thei...

  3. Mineralogy of halloysites and their interaction with porphyrine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašutová, V.; Bezdička, Petr; Lang, Kamil; Hradil, David

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2013), s. 243-250. ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : organoclays * mineralogy * porphyrine * CEC Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.434, year: 2013

  4. New mineralogical phases identified by Moessbauer measurements in Morasko meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojnarowska, A., E-mail: aga_wojnarowska@interia.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Dziel, T. [Radioisotope Centre POLATOM (Poland); Galazka-Friedman, J. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Karwowski, L. [University of Silesia, Institute of Earth Sciences (Poland)

    2008-09-15

    For Moessbauer studies of the Morasko meteorite three different samples were isolated: troilite, kamacite and taenite. Investigated spectra revealed new mineralogical phases: taenite, tetrataenite and antitaenite. That is first such identification in meteorite found in Poland.

  5. About the mineralogical composition of Estonian oil shale ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of previous research about the mineralogical composition of Estonian oil shale ash focused on using X-ray diffractometry, problems related to oil shale combustion, and utilization of oil shale ashes were analysed. (author)

  6. Present methods for mineralogical analysis of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most promising methods of mineralogic analysis of uranium and uranium-containing minerals, ores and rocks are considered. They include X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy methods. Principle physical basis and capabilities of each method are described; examples of its practical application are presented. Comparative characteristic of method for mineralogic analysis of radioactive ores and their reprocessing products is given. Attention is paid to the equipment and various devices for analysis

  7. Mineralogical characteristic of fluorite from Sivec, Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Sijakova-Ivanova, Tena; Mircovski, Vojo

    2014-01-01

    Mineralogy of fluorite from Sivec is presented in this paper including physical properties and chemical composition. Several samples of fluorite were analysed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM is especially useful because is non-destructive method and it gives elemental, mineralogical and morphological data at the same time. From the results it can be concluded that the fluorite is colorless, light purple or dark purple. Fluorite has an attractive vitreous luster. Crystal System is c...

  8. Brazil; Selected Issues Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2015-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper examines infrastructure investment in Brazil. Brazil has inferior overall infrastructure quality relative to almost all its export competitors. Brazil’s infrastructure endowment ranks low by international standards, and its low quality affects productivity, market efficiency, and competitiveness. Areas in which Brazil’s competitiveness has lagged include, but are not limited to, education, innovation, governance, and justice. Brazil’s infrastructure gap has be...

  9. Dust mineralogical composition to study Iron nutrient solubility (FERATMO+ project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafon, Sandra; Journet, Emilie; Desboeufs, Karine; Chevaillier, Servanne; Caquineau, Sandrine; Nowak, Sophie; Ausset, Patrick; Rajot, Jean-Louis; Laurent, Benoit

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dust emitted into the atmospherebywind erosionin aridareas andsemi-aridareas,are composed ofa complex mixture ofvarious minerals.The nature and the relative abundance of the mineralogical species as well as the way they are mixed together have been shown to be influent factors of the different environmental impacts.ForHNLC("high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll") or oligotrophicoceanic regions, mineral dust can be a main sourceof nutrients inputs, especially Fe. Indeed, the fraction of dissolvedFe in wet dust deposition during precipitationcan allowthe development of oceanic biota, increasing the sequestration of atmosphericCO2in the ocean.Measurements of thedissolved fractionofFeshow thatthistermvaries greatly,from 0.01% to80%. Nowadays, large uncertainties on the quantification of dust biogeochemical and chemical impacts are due to the remaining misunderstanding on dust aerosol intrinsicproperties and notably their mineralogical composition.In the framework of the FERATMO+ project, we focus on the understanding of processes that controlled the dust Fe bioavailability in relation with the dust mineralogy. Recently a new generator system has been developed in LISA especially to study the size resolved mineralogical fractionation ("Générateurd'AérosolMinéralEnLaboratoire", GAMEL). Investigations by XRD methods of the mineralogical composition of pure minerals as well as dust aerosols generated from only some grams of desert soils are presented with a focus on Fe. Moreover, the effect of the mineralogical composition on the Fe solubility is also investigated by lab studies.

  10. Petrography, age, and paleomagnetism of basaltic lava flows in coreholes at Test Area North (TAN), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The petrography, age, and paleomagnetism were determined on basalt from 21 lava flows comprising about 1,700 feet of core from two coreholes (TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2) in the Test Area North (TAN) area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Paleomagnetic studies were made on two additional cores from shallow coreholes in the TAN area. K-Ar ages and paleomagnetism also were determined on nearby surface outcrops of Circular Butte. Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 416 samples from four coreholes and on a single site in surface lava flows of Circular Butte. K-Ar ages were measured on 9 basalt samples from TAN CH No. 1 and TAN CH No. 2 and one sample from Circular Butte. K-Ar ages ranged from 1.044 Ma to 2.56 Ma. All of the samples have reversed magnetic polarity and were erupted during the Matuyama Reversed Polarity Epoch. The purpose of investigations was to develop a three-dimensional stratigraphic framework for geologic and hydrologic studies including potential volcanic hazards to facilities at the INEL and movement of radionuclides in the Snake River Plain aquifer

  11. Petrology and geochronology of the Cacapava do Sul batholith, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The batholith of Cacapava do Sul, Brazil, is composed of granitic rocks represented by leucogranites, syenogranites, monzogranites and granodiorites, arranged in a complex way. These rocks represent a calcalkaline suite of compressional tectonic setting. The general characteristics described with respect to it's petrography, chemical composition and geological setting show similarities with mesozone plutons. The pluton intruded the metamorphic rocks of the Vacacai Formation and the type of emplacement mechanism was forceful. According to the Rb-Sr total rock isochron age determinations, its consolidation took place throughout the Cambrian period. This result agrees with previous K-Ar age determinations. The intrusion occurred at the end of the Brasiliano orogenic cycle, when the metamorphic and folding phenomena had already ceased and the morphogenesis was in progress, since the temperature for radiometric argon retention was reached rapidly. (D.J.M.)

  12. Investigations on SYNROC mineralogy. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress reports are presented for the following projects: (1) factors influencing the leaching performance of hollandiate; (2) incorporation of uranium and rare earths into zirconolite; (3) reconnaissance studies of the stability relations of Ca-Ti-Al phases in SYNROC C formulations; (4) immobilization of highly aluminous sludges; (5) SYNROC D formulations produced by sintering in air; (6) crystallization behavior of interstitial glass in SYNROC D formulations. Some of the highlights are: (1) leaching performance of all hollandites irrespective of preparation technique, can be improved by hot-pressing under specific controlled redox conditions, below Ni-NiO; (2) there is no satisfactory crystal-chemical reason why the leaching performance of Ti3+-bearing hollandite should be superior to that of Al3+ hollandite; (3) experiments have shown that the zirconolite lattice can accept up to 30% rare earths (Sm2O3) before becoming destabilized in favor of pyrochlore or a related f.c.c. structure; (4) SYNROC zirconolites will therefore be well below their saturation limits in rare earths and trivalent actinides; (5) experiments have established that the Ca-Ti-Al phase (CTA) is compatible with perovskite, hollandite and zirconolite; (6) magnetoplumbite-type phases coexists with hollandite, perovskite, zirconolite and Fe-bearing pseudobrookite, but do not coexist with the CTA phase CaTi3Al8O19; (7) experiments demonstrated that it is not possible to convert highly aluminous sludges to a waste form comprising zirconolite, perovskite, spinel and nepheline plus corundum, by adding appropriate minimum amounts of the inert SYNROC additives (CaO, TiO2, ZrO2, SiO2); (8) sintering of SYNROC D in air at temperatures just above the solidus (1200 to 12500C) produced a dense compact ceramic, but the optimum SYNROC-D mineralogy was not produced

  13. Datafile: Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is as yet little to show for the enormous investment made by Brazil over the past 20 years in nuclear power and the fuel cycle. The only nuclear power plant (657MWe PWR) in operation has had a poor performance record and the two reactors (1309MWe PWRs) under construction are more than ten years behind the original schedule. Aspirations of building commercial fuel cycle facilities have proved extremely optimistic. In the latest reorganization of the industry, the construction and operation of nuclear power stations is entrusted to the national utility and the various civilian/military R and D efforts in the fuel cycle are being integrated under civilian supervision. This should lead to greater accountability and efficiency in the future. (author)

  14. Augen gneisses versus Augen gneisses from the Jaguaribeana Belt, northeastern region from Brazil: stratigraphy, geochemistry and U-Pb ages; Augen gnaisses versus Augen gnaisses da faixa Jaguaribeana, NE do Brasil: estratigrafia, geoquimica e idades U-Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Jaziel Martins; Silva, Elvis Roberto da [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Bertrand, Jean Michel [Savoie Univ., 73 - Chambery (France). Lab. de Geodynamique; Leterrier, Jacques [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 54 - Nancy (France). Centre de Recherches Petrographiques et Geochimiques

    1997-12-31

    The Jaguaribeana Belt is located at Borborema Province, Ceara State, Brazil and this study aims to present Uranium-Lead (U-Pb) data and the augen gneisses petrographic and geochemical study of the Jaguaribe Belt, and to realize comparisons between these and the augen gneisses from the Oros Belt. It describes the geological characteristics of this region, the augen gneisses petrography and geochemical data and the U-Pb method results for a discussion about the augen gneisses from the Oros and Jaguaribe Belt 10 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Microstructure, porosity and mineralogy around fractures in Olkiluoto bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuva, J. (ed.); Myllys, M.; Timonen, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland); Kelokaski, M.; Ikonen, J.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Lindberg, A. [GTK Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Aaltonen, I.

    2012-01-15

    3D distributions of minerals and porosities were determined for samples that included waterconducting fractures. The analysis of these samples was performed using conventional petrography methods, electron microscopy, C-14-PMMA porosity analysis and X-ray tomography. While X-ray tomography proved to be a very useful method when determining the inner structure of the samples, combining tomography results with those obtained by other methods turned out to be difficult without very careful sample preparation design. It seems that the properties of rock around a water-conducting fracture depend on so many uncorrelated factors that no clear pattern emerged even for rock samples with a given type of fracture. We can conclude, however, that a combination of different analysis methods can be useful and used to infer novel structural information about alteration zones adjacent to fracture surfaces. (orig.)

  16. Diagenetic Mineralogy at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, David; Blake, David; Bristow, Thomas F.; Chipera, Steve; Gellert, Ralf; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard; Rampe, E. B.; Rapin, William

    2015-01-01

    Three years into exploration of sediments in Gale crater on Mars, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has provided data on several modes and episodes of diagenetic mineral formation. Curiosity determines mineralogy principally by X-ray diffraction (XRD), but with supporting data from thermal-release profiles of volatiles, bulk chemistry, passive spectroscopy, and laser-induced breakdown spectra of targeted spots. Mudstones at Yellowknife Bay, within the landing ellipse, contain approximately 20% phyllosilicate that we interpret as authigenic smectite formed by basalt weathering in relatively dilute water, with associated formation of authigenic magnetite as in experiments by Tosca and Hurowitz [Goldschmidt 2014]. Varied interlayer spacing of the smectite, collapsed at approximately 10 A or expanded at approximately 13.2 A, is evidence of localized diagenesis that may include partial intercalation of metal-hydroxyl groups in the approximately 13.2 A material. Subsequent sampling of stratigraphically higher Windjana sandstone revealed sediment with multiple sources, possible concentration of detrital magnetite, and minimal abundance of diagenetic minerals. Most recent sampling has been of lower strata at Mount Sharp, where diagenesis is widespread and varied. Here XRD shows that hematite first becomes abundant and products of diagenesis include jarosite and cristobalite. In addition, bulk chemistry identifies Mg-sulfate concretions that may be amorphous or crystalline. Throughout Curiosity's traverse, later diagenetic fractures (and rarer nodules) of mm to dm scale are common and surprisingly constant and simple in Ca-sulfate composition. Other sulfates (Mg,Fe) appear to be absent in this later diagenetic cycle, and circumneutral solutions are indicated. Equally surprising is the rarity of gypsum and common occurrence of bassanite and anhydrite. Bassanite, rare on Earth, plays a major role at this location on Mars. Dehydration of gypsum to bassanite in the

  17. Ceramic raw materials from the State of Maranhão, Brazil. Part 1: chemical and mineralogical characterization and technological properties of clays from São Luis, Rosário, Pinheiro and Mirinzal Matérias-primas cerâmicas do Estado do Maranhão. Parte 1: caracterização químico-mineralógica e propriedades tecnológicas de argilas dos municípios de São Luís, Rosário, Pinheiro e Mirinzal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Rivas Mercury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work involved the characterization of clays collected in the municipalities of São Luis, Rosário, Pinheiro and Mirinzal (state of Maranhão, Brazil, based on specific mass, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity (CEC, particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction (XRD, differential thermal analysis (DTA, thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTA and Atterberg limits. Technological tests for ceramic applications were also carried out on compacts pressed under 20 MPa and heat-treated at 850, 950, 1050, 1150 and 1250ºC. Our results indicated that two of the clays composed of kaolinite, quartz, and anatase with high plasticity limits, have excellent properties and can be used in the whiteware industry. The other ones are red-firing clays and have a mineralogical composition of quartz, kaolin, feldspar, montmorillonite, hematite and goethite. The latter showed low and moderate values of plasticity, which makes them suitable for the production of heavy clay products.Nesse trabalho, foram caracterizadas algumas argilas coletadas nos municípios de São Luís, Rosário, Pinheiro e Mirinzal. A caracterização foi realizada através dos ensaios de difração de raios X, massa específica real, capacidade de troca de cátions (CTC, área superficial, distribuição granulométrica, análise química, análise térmica (TG-DTA e limites de Atterberg. Ensaios tecnológicos de retração linear, antes e após a queima, absorção de água e tensão de ruptura a flexão, em três pontos, foram realizados em corpos de prova prensados uniaxialmente a 20 MPa e tratados termicamente em 850, 950, 1050, 1150 e 1250ºC. Os resultados obtidos permitiram identificar duas argilas de queima branca, constituídas de quartzo, caolim, feldspato e anatásio, com excelentes propriedades para uso em cerâmica branca. As restantes são queima vermelha e possuem composição mineralógica de quartzo, caolim, feldspato, montmorilonita, hematita e goetita. Estas

  18. The petrography, geochemistry, petrogenesis, and geochronology of the Singo Granite, Western Central Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for all other Ugandan granites/granitoids, information regarding the geochemical characteristics, petrogenesis, tectonic setting, classification, and formation age of the Singo granite is limited, or in some cases, lacking. In this study, field relationships and modern petrographic, geochemical, and geochronogical techniques were employed to obtain more information for the Singo granite on the above topics. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and neutron activation analysis were used to obtain whole-rock major and trace element abundances, electron microprobe and a scanning electron microscope for mineral chemistry and thermal ionization mass spectrometry for isotopic ratio measurements and age determinations of selected samples from the Singo granite. The results show that the Singo granite is a batholithic body intruded into sediments that have experienced low-grade regional and contact metamorphism. It occurs in a number of texturally and compositionally different subtypes: (a) a pink, very coarse-grained, and porphyritic granite (PPG), (b) a pinkish gray very coarse-grained granite, (c) a pinkish gray medium-grained granite, (d) a pinkish fine/aplitic to medium-grained muscovite granite (MG), and (e) a fine- to medium-grained biotite granite (BG). The PPG forms the largest part of the Singo batholith and the phenocrysts occasionally show magmatic flow alignment. The BG has mafic enclaves, is richer in biotite, calcic plagioclase, and zircon relative to other varieties, and forms most of the pluton margin, but is occasionally found within the main body itself. The Singo granite, therefore, shows zonation in texture, colour, and mineral composition. The mineralogy is generally uniform: K-feldspar, plagioclase (An0.4-38.3), quartz, biotite, muscovite and opaques. K-feldspars, plagioclase and quartz constitute both the phenocrysts and the matrix. Minor phases include zircon, apatite, sphene, monazite, xenotime, opaques and thorite, most of which are inclusions in

  19. The role of process mineralogy in mineral beneficiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic feasibility of mineral beneficiation or ore extraction depends on a number of factors amongst which process mineralogy plays a significant role. Mineralogy influences comminution required to liberate the desired mineral. Physical property contrast between ore and gangue minerals influence process selection. Ore texture affects recovery. Rheological properties of the minerals in aqueous medium and the probable ionic composition of the slurry or leach liquor can be fairly predicted from mineralogy. The effect of mineralogy in mineral beneficiation and ore extraction with special reference to atomic minerals is discussed. Some typical case studies on mineral deposits hosting atomic and other minerals are presented and process flow-sheets are discussed keeping economics, by-product recovery and mineral conservation in perspective. These include the sandstone type uranium deposit of Domiasiat, Meghalaya, uranium deposits of Singhbhum Shear Zone, carbonatites of Sung Valley, Meghalaya and the cassiterite and columbite-tantalite bearing pegmatites of Bastar, Madhya Pradesh. It is also pointed out that process mineralogy bridges the gap between the mining geologist and the metallurgist and helps in obtaining maximum recovery of metallic or non-metallic minerals, from a given deposit. (author)

  20. Relationship between macrofauna, mineralogy and exchangeable calcium and magnesium in Cerrado Oxisols under pasture Relações entre macrofauna, mineralogia, cálcio e magnésio trocáveis em Latossolos do Cerrado sob pastagem

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Rodolfo Siqueira Vendrame; Robélio Leandro Marchão; Osmar Rodrigues Brito; Maria de Fátima Guimarães; Thierry Becquer

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the relationship between macrofauna, mineralogy and exchangeable calcium and magnesium in Cerrado Oxisols under pasture. Twelve collection points were chosen in the Distrito Federal and in Formosa municipality, Goiás state, Brazil, representing four soil groups with varied levels of calcium + magnesium and kaolinite/(kaolinite + gibbsite) ratios. Soil macrofauna was collected in triplicate at each collection point, and identified at the level of taxono...

  1. Field characteristics, petrography, and geochronology of the Hohonu Batholith and the adjacent Granite Hill Complex, North Westland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed geological mapping, petrography, geochemistry and geochronological studies in the Hohonu Batholith, North Westland, have identified 10 granitoid plutons emplaced during three intrusive episodes. The earliest episode is represented by a single dated Paleozoic pluton, Summit Granite (new) (381.2 ± 7.3 Ma), which is correlated with a discrete pulse of Mid-Late Devonian plutonism recognised in the Karamea Batholith. The undated Mount Graham Granite (new) is also likely to be Paleozoic, based on chemical and petrographic characteristics. The bulk of the batholith (seven plutons) was emplaced in the mid Cretaceous (114-109 Ma) and comprises two related, yet distinct, geochemical suites, which correlate with the previously defined Rahu Suite. The plutons identified are (from north to south): Pah Point Granite; Jays Creek Granodiorite (new); Uncle Bay Tonalite; Te Kinga Monzogranite; Deutgam Granodiorite; Turiwhate Granodiorite (new); and Arahura Granite (new). Mid-Cretaceous plutonism in the Western Province is considered to be the result of crustal thinning and extension following overthickening during collision of the Early Cretaceous Median Tectonic Zone volcanic arc. Late Cretaceous alkaline activity is represented by the emplacement of the A-type French Creek Granite at 1.7 ± 1.8 Ma, contemporaneous with intrusion of a major swarm of doleritic-lamprophyric dikes - the Hohonu Dike Swarm. These events correlate with the first appearance of oceanic crust in the Tasman Sea. The Granite Hill Complex is a suite of amphibolite facies gneisses occurring as an uplifted wedge between the Alpine Fault nd the Hohonu Batholith. These gneisses are considered to represent an extension of the Fraser Complex to the south. A detailed understanding of their geological affinities and history is yet to be established. (author). 66 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Mineralogy of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report characterizes the mineralogy of the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation based on studies of samples from cores of eight boreholes surrounding the WIPP repository. This investigation has three main goals: to obtain accurate modal compositions of all the samples selected; to investigate both the lateral and vertical variation of the mineralogy of the Culebra unit; and, to characterize water-bearing fracture surfaces in particular detail. The Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation is mineralogically and texturally heterogeneous, both vertically and horizontally. Although the predominant mineral is dolomite, important constituents of the formation are clay, quartz, gypsum, and calcite. Trace minerals include halite, phyllosilicates of metamorphic origin, feldspar, and pyrite. 24 refs., 90 figs., 27 tabs

  3. X-ray Spectroscopy and Magnetism in Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainctavit, Philippe; Brice-Profeta, Sandrine; Gaudry, Emilie; Letard, Isabelle; Arrio, Marie-Anne

    The objective of this paper is to present the kind of information that can be gained in the field of mineralogy from the use of x-ray magnetic spectroscopies. We review some of the questions that are unsettled and that could benefit from an interdisciplinary approach where magnetism, spectroscopy and mineralogy could be mixed. Most of the attention is focused on iron and some other 3d transition elements. The mineralogy of planetary cores and its relation with known meteorites are exemplified. The various oxide phases in the mantle and the nature of iron in these phases is also underlined. The presence of transition elements in insulating minerals and its relation with macroscopic properties such as the color of gemstones are reviewed. Finally an introduction to paleomagnetism is given with a special attention to nanomaghemites.

  4. Biochemical Education in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, F.

    1988-01-01

    Described are discussions held concerning the problems of biochemical education in Brazil at a meeting of the Sociedade Brazileira de Bioquimica in April 1988. Also discussed are other visits that were made to universities in Brazil. Three major recommendations to improve the state of biochemistry education in Brazil are presented. (CW)

  5. Contributions to the petrography, geochemistry and geochronology (U-Pb and Sm-Nd) of the Paleoproterozoic effusive rocks from Iricoume Group, Amazonian Craton, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Suelen Nonata de Souza; Nascimento, Rielva Solimairy Campelo do, E-mail: suelen-marques@hotmail.com, E-mail: rielva@ufam.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Souza, Valmir da Silva; Dantas, Elton Luiz, E-mail: vsouza@unb.br, E-mail: elton@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Valerio, Cristovao da Silva, E-mail: cristovao@igeo.ufrr.br [Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias

    2014-07-01

    The southernmost region of the Guyana shield, Amazonian craton, hosts large record of Paleoproterozoic effusive rocks of the Iricoume Group. They present remarkably well-preserved igneous textures and structures. The SiO{sub 2} contents reveal a bimodal association marked by a compositional gap between acid (SiO{sub 2} > 67 wt%) and intermediate (SiO{sub 2} < 57.7 wt%) rocks. The acid effusive rocks are rhyolites to rhyodacites with high SiO{sub 2}, alkali, Rb, Zr, Nb + Ta, La + Ce and 104 Ga/Al content and low Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3tot}, TiO{sub 2}, CaO, Sr and Co content. They exhibit subalkaline, metaluminous-to-peraluminous compositions, and geochemically compatible to A-type magmatism emplaced in post-collisional to within-plate tectonic settings. The intermediate rocks are andesitic/basalt to andesite relatively high contents of TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3total}, MgO, CaO, Sr and Co; low SiO{sub 2}, K{sub 2}O, Rb, Zr, Nb + Ta, La + Ce. They have subalkaline and metaluminous geochemical composition and plot on within-plate basalt field. The acid rocks crystallized at 1882 ± 11 Ma in U-Pb analyses for LA-MC-ICPMS zircon data. The Sm-Nd isotopic data on all rocks reveal a Nd TDM model ages between 2.59 and 2.16 Ga and ε{sub Nd}(t) values between -5.78 and 0.03, indicate that the magmatic evolution was related to the reworking of older Paleoproterozoic at the Rhyacian-Siderian period, continental crust (Transamazonian crust-forming event) with some mixing with a limited amount mantle-derived magmas or with contamination by Archean crust. The petrographic, geochemical and geochronological data presented in this paper suggest a within-plate to post-collisional tectonic setting for the Iricoume volcanism, involving lower crust uplift and generation of basalt magma in an extensional regime. (author)

  6. Petrography and mineral chemistry of carbonatites and mica-rich rocks from the Araxá complex (Alto Paranaíba Province, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRAVERSA GIANBOSCO

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Araxá complex (16 km² comprises carbonatites forming a central core and a complex network of concentric and radial dykes as well as small veins; additionally, it includes mica-rich rocks, phoscorites and lamprophyres. Fenites also occur and are represented by Proterozoic quartzites and schists of the Araxá Group. The petrographic study of 130 borehole samples indicates that the complex is basically made up by two rock-types, carbonatites and mica-rich rocks, and subordinately by a third unit of hybrid composition. Carbonatites range chemically in composition, the most abundant type being magnesiocarbonatites. Dolomite and calcite correspond to the chief constituents, but other carbonate phases, including the Ce-group RE minerals, are also recognized. Phosphates and oxides are widespread accessories whereas silicate minerals consist of olivine, clinopyroxene, mica and amphibole. Mica-rich rocks are represented by abundant glimmeritic rocks and scarce cumulitic phlogopite-, olivine- and diopside-bearing pyroxenites. Hybrid rocks mainly contain phlogopite and tetraferriphlogopite as cumulus and intercumulus phases, respectively; carbonate minerals may also be found. Chemical data indicate that the carbonatites are strongly enriched in REE and have lower contents of Nb, Zr, V, Cr, Ni and Rb compared to the mica-rich rocks. The higher K, Nb and Zr contents of the latter rocks are believed to be related to metasomatic processes (glimmeritization of the pyroxenites. Similar REE patterns for carbonatites and mica-rich rocks seem to suggest that they are related to a single parental magma, possibly of ijolitic composition. Steep LREE/HREE fractionation and high sigmaREE content of some carbonatite samples would be explained by hydrothermal and supergenic processes.

  7. Petrography of auriferous conglomerates in the Fortuna formation of the group Aguapei in Pau-A-Pique deposits in the Mato Grosso district, in the centre of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold anomalies in the Pau a-Pique deposits are present in anastomossed shear zones near the contact between the Group Aguapei conglomerates and the Tonalito Alvorada. These high-strain zones are subparallel to the regional shearing NW - SE, and they have a brittle-ductile structures. The gold ore is exploted from veins and disseminations in the conglomerates that were affected by hydrothermal alteration. The main hydrothermal minerals in the mineralized layer are quartz, tourmaline, pyrite, biotite, chlorite and white mica. These hydrothermal minerals present textures that indicate their post-tectonic growth due the circulation of mineralizing fluids in the late shearing stages. (author)

  8. Contributions to the petrography, geochemistry and geochronology (U-Pb and Sm-Nd) of the Paleoproterozoic effusive rocks from Iricoume Group, Amazonian Craton, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The southernmost region of the Guyana shield, Amazonian craton, hosts large record of Paleoproterozoic effusive rocks of the Iricoume Group. They present remarkably well-preserved igneous textures and structures. The SiO2 contents reveal a bimodal association marked by a compositional gap between acid (SiO2 > 67 wt%) and intermediate (SiO2 2, alkali, Rb, Zr, Nb + Ta, La + Ce and 104 Ga/Al content and low Fe2O3tot, TiO2, CaO, Sr and Co content. They exhibit subalkaline, metaluminous-to-peraluminous compositions, and geochemically compatible to A-type magmatism emplaced in post-collisional to within-plate tectonic settings. The intermediate rocks are andesitic/basalt to andesite relatively high contents of TiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3total, MgO, CaO, Sr and Co; low SiO2, K2O, Rb, Zr, Nb + Ta, La + Ce. They have subalkaline and metaluminous geochemical composition and plot on within-plate basalt field. The acid rocks crystallized at 1882 ± 11 Ma in U-Pb analyses for LA-MC-ICPMS zircon data. The Sm-Nd isotopic data on all rocks reveal a Nd TDM model ages between 2.59 and 2.16 Ga and εNd(t) values between -5.78 and 0.03, indicate that the magmatic evolution was related to the reworking of older Paleoproterozoic at the Rhyacian-Siderian period, continental crust (Transamazonian crust-forming event) with some mixing with a limited amount mantle-derived magmas or with contamination by Archean crust. The petrographic, geochemical and geochronological data presented in this paper suggest a within-plate to post-collisional tectonic setting for the Iricoume volcanism, involving lower crust uplift and generation of basalt magma in an extensional regime. (author)

  9. On the relationship between luminescence excitation spectra and feldspar mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1996-01-01

    Feldspar minerals can be used as naturally occurring radiation dosemeters, with dose assessment commonly using luminescence techniques. Since many feldspars contain radioactive K-40, knowledge of the mineralogy of the luminescent samples being measured is of high importance. Most feldspars contain...... more than trace amounts of highly luminescent Fe3+ impurities, and this article examines the relationship between features of the luminescence excitation spectrum of this ion with sample mineralogy. It is demonstrated that there is a near linear correspondence between the plagioclase feldspar...

  10. MINERALOGICAL FEATURES OF ULTRAMAFIC HYPOXENOLITHS IN ALKALI-RICH PORPHYRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xianfan; YANG Zhengxi; LIU Jiaduo; ZHANG Chengjiang; WU Dechao; LI Youguo

    2003-01-01

    Ultramafic hypoxenoliths found in the alkali-rich porphyry in the Liuhe Village, Heqing, Yunnan,China, are of great significance in understanding the origin and evolution of the porphyry. This paper discusses the mineralogical features of the hypoxenoliths. It shows that the xenoliths are characterized by the upper mantle rocks modified to certain extent by the enriched mantle fluid metasomatism in the mantle environment, with the enriched mantle property of Iow-degree partial melting. This constitutes the important mineralogical evidence for the petrogenesis and mineralization of alkali-rich porphyry.

  11. Evaluation of cryolite from pitinga (Amazonas-Brazil) as a source of hydrogen fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Jéssica F. Paulino; Reiner Neumann; Júlio C. Afonso

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the use of cryolite from the Pitinga Mine (Amazonas state, Brazil) as raw material in hydrogen fluoride production. Samples were initially characterized by chemical and mineralogical analyses. They presented low silica content (< 4 wt.%). After milling, cryolite samples were digested with concentrated sulfuric acid under stirring (200 rpm) and variable temperature, time and liquid to solid ratio conditions. Under the best experimental conditions (140 °C, 3-5 h), 96 wt.% of ...

  12. Phosphate sequence study of Boqueirâo pegmatite (Rio Grande Do Norte State, Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Amores, S.; de Brito, S.; Espallargas, R.; Fontan, F.; Melgarejo i Draper, Joan-Carles

    2014-01-01

    The Boqueirão pegmatite is located in the Borborema Pegmatite Province in the state of Rio Grande do Norte (NE Brazil) hosted by Neoproterozoic taconglomerates of Equador Formation. The pegma tite occurs as a concentric body displaying characteristic units according their mineralogy. The border and wall zones are composed by quartz, microcline and muscovite often displaying skeletal and graphic textures with accessory tourmaline and garnet. The intermediate zone is divided in two distinct sub...

  13. Mineralogy of the Lunar Crust in Spatial Context: First Results from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, C. M.; Boardman, J.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R.; Combe, J-P; Green, R.; Goswami, J. N.; Head, J. W., III; Hicks, M.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R.; Kramer, G.; Kumar, S.; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T. B.; Mustard, J.; Nettles, J.; Petro, N.; Runyon, C.; Staid, M. I.; Sunshine, J.; Taylor, L.; Tompkins, S.; Varanasi, P.

    2009-01-01

    India's Chandrayaan-1 successfully launched October 22, 2008 and went into lunar orbit a few weeks later. Commissioning of instruments began in late November and was near complete by the end of the year. Initial data for NASA's Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) were acquired across the Orientale Basin and the science results are discussed here. M 3 image-cube data provide mineralogy of the surface in geologic context. A major new result is that the existence and distribution of massive amounts of anorthosite as a continuous stratigraphic crustal layer is now irrefutable.

  14. Petrography and zircon U-Pb isotopic study of the Bayanwulashan Complex: Constrains on the Paleoproterozoic evolution of the Alxa Block, westernmost North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sujuan; Hu, Jianmin; Ren, Minghua; Gong, Wangbin; Liu, Yang; Yan, Jiyuan

    2014-11-01

    The Bayanwulashan Metamorphic Complex (BMC) exposes along the eastern margin of the Alxa Block, the westernmost part of the North China Craton (NCC). BMC is principally composed of metamorphic rocks with amphibole plagiogneiss, biotite plagioclase gneiss and granitic gneiss. Our research has been focused on the petrography and zircon U-Pb geochronology of the BMC to better understand the evolution of the Alxa Block and its relationship with the NCC. Evidences from field geology, petrography, and mineral chemistry indicate that two distinct metamorphic assemblages, the amphibolite and greenschist facies, had overprinted the preexisting granitic gneiss and suggest that the BMC experienced retrograde metamorphic episodes. The LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages reveal that the primary magmatic activities of BMC were at ca. 2.30-2.24 Ga and the two metamorphic events were at ca. 1.95-1.91 Ga and ca. 1.88-1.85 Ga respectively. These ages indicate that BMC initially intruded during Paleoproterozoic, not as previously suggested at Archean period. The Early Paleoproterozoic metamorphic records and the magmatic thermochronological data in BMC exhibit different evolution paths between the Alxa Block and the NCC. The Alxa Block was most likely an independent Early Paleoproterozoic terrain. Following different amalgamation processes, The Alxa Block combined with Western Block at ca. 1.95 Ga and then united with NCC at ca. 1.85 Ga.

  15. On the relationship between luminescence excitation spectra and feldspar mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1996-01-01

    Feldspar minerals can be used as naturally occurring radiation dosemeters, with dose assessment commonly using luminescence techniques. Since many feldspars contain radioactive K-40, knowledge of the mineralogy of the luminescent samples being measured is of high importance. Most feldspars contain...

  16. Mineralogy and geochemistry of density-separated Greek lignite fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, lignite samples were collected from the Ptolemais region, northern Greece, homogenized, crushed to less than I nun, and separated in three density fractions using heavy media. The mineralogical investigation of the density fractions showed a predominance of pyrite in the light fractio

  17. The Composition of 433 Eros: A Mineralogical-Chemical Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, T. J.; Gaffey, M.; Bell, J. F., III; Boynton, W. V.; Burbine, T. H.; Chapman, C. R.; Cheng, A.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.; Gorenstein, P.

    2001-01-01

    We report on an effort with the Near-Infrared Spectrometer/Multi-Spectral Imager (NIS/MSI) and X-ray/Gamma-ray Spectrometer (XGRS) teams to synthesize our data sets to constrain the relationship between Eros and meteorites; the mineralogy, abundances and compositions of Eros; and the processes that formed Eros. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Models as an Aid to Courses in Crystallography and Mineralogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, K. T.

    1983-01-01

    Three models used in teaching crystallography/mineralogy at the University of Technology (Papua, New Guinea) are described. These include stereographic projection model, optical indicatrix models for Istropic/Anisotropic minerals, and model showing effect of anisotropic minerals under crossed polars. Photographs of the models are also included.…

  19. Mineralogy and geochemistry of bauxite and bentonite deposits from Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Muchangos, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Results of mineralogical and geochemical studies of bauxites, kaolinitic clays and bentoniteS from Mozambique are presented in this thesis. The bauxite and kaolinitic clay deposits in Penhalonga area (in the central western part of Mozambique) are associated with Precambrian magmatic rocks and the b

  20. Mineralogical controls on dust emissions in the Bodele Depression, Chad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface mineralogy is critical in the understanding of aeolian processes, however its role in dust production is currently underestimated. Recent research indicates that discrepancies between predicted and observed dust loads by dust models may be attributed to inadequacies within their associated d...

  1. Mineralogy and Petrology of New Antarctic Nakhlite MIL 03346

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, G.; Schwandt, C.

    2005-01-01

    Among the approx.1300 meteorites returned from Antarctica by the 2003-2004 ANSMET expedition was a 715g nakhlite, MIL 03346, recovered from the Miller Range. Samples of this meteorite were distributed to investigators on December 16, 2004. We were allocated PTS MIL 03346,63,100. This abstract is our preliminary report on the mineralogy and petrology of this important new sample.

  2. Variations in the Fe mineralogy of bright Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott; Mustard, John; Erard, Stephane; Geissler, Paul; Singer, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Bright regions on Mars are interpreted as 'soil' derived by chemical alteration of crustal rocks, whose main pigmentary component is ferric oxide or oxyhydroxide. The mineralogy and mineralogic variability of ferric iron are important evidence for the evolution of Martian soil: mineralogy of ferric phases is sensitive to chemical conditions in their genetic environments, and the spatial distributions of different ferric phases would record a history of both chemical environments and physical mixing. Reflectance spectroscopic studies provide several types of evidence that discriminate possible pigmentary phases, including the position of a crystal field absorption near 0.9 microns and position and strengths of absorptions in the UV-visible wavelength region. Recent telescopic spectra and laboratory measurements of Mars soil analogs suggest that spectral features of bright soil can be explained based on a single pigmentary phase, hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), occurring in both 'nanophase' and more crystalline forms. Here we report on a systematic investigation of Martian bright regions using ISM imaging spectrometer data, in which we examined spatial variations in the position and shape of the approximately 0.9 microns absorption. We found both local and regional heterogeneities that indicate differences in Fe mineralogy. These results demonstrate that bright soils do not represent a single lithology that has been homogenized by eolian mixing, and suggest that weathering of soils in different geologic settings has followed different physical and chemical pathways.

  3. Skeletal mineralogy of bryozoans: Taxonomic and temporal patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Abigail M.; Key, Marcus M., Jr.; Gordon, Dennis P.

    2006-10-01

    Skeletal carbonate mineralogy of 1183 specimens of marine bryozoans from the literature was examined for phylogenetic patterns in order to elucidate the effects of bryozoan mineralogy on geochemical and paleoenvironmental analysis. Colonies are composed of calcite (66% of specimens), aragonite (17% of specimens) or various mixtures of the two (17% specimens) (phylum mean = 72.9 wt.% calcite, n = 1051). When calcite is present, it ranges from 0.0 to 13.7 wt.% MgCO 3 (mean = 5.0 wt.% MgCO 3, n = 873). Most (61%) calcitic specimens are formed of intermediate-Mg calcite (4 to 8 wt.% MgCO 3), others (28%) of low-Mg calcite (0 to 4 wt.% MgCO 3), and few of high-Mg calcite (> 8 wt.% MgCO 3). The phylum occupies at least 63% of the theoretical mineralogical "space" available to biomineralisation. Most of this variation occurs in the class Gymnolaemata, order Cheilostomata, suborder Neocheilostomata. Fossil and Recent stenolaemate taxa are generally low- to intermediate-Mg calcite (mean = 99.7 wt.% calcite, 2.6 wt.% MgCO 3, 17% of available biomineral space). Variability among families is related in a general way to first appearance datum: families younger than 100 Ma display greater mineralogical complexity than older ones. The cheilostome infraorder Flustrina includes unusual free-living aragonitic families, dual-calcite skeletons (mainly low-Mg calcite, but with secondary high-Mg calcite), and some genera with considerable mineralogical variability. Families (e.g., Membraniporidae and Phidoloporidae) and species (e.g., Schizoporella unicornis) with the highest degree of variability have potential for environmental correlations with mineralogy, paleoenvironmental interpretation, and possibly molecular investigation for potential cryptic species. Stenolaemate families, genera and species with low variability, on the other hand, are well-suited for geochemical work such as stable isotope analysis. Variability in the skeletal mineralogy of bryozoans suggests that they may be

  4. Some not so obvious reasons to teach optical mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, M. E.

    2004-12-01

    Hands-on, interactive, critical thinking, interdisciplinary, spiral learning, and 3-D visualization are familiar words in pedagogy, while Becke lines, dispersion staining, grain mounts, sign of elongation, extinction angle, and optical indicatrix are words seldom used in today's geosciences curriculum. However, the teaching of these seemingly rather historical optical methods, and proper training in the use of the polarized (not petrographic) light microscope (PLM), will by themselves lead to improved learning of our students. And this, if for no other reason, might warrant the inclusion of a semester-long optical mineralogy course. However, another $70 billion per year concern in the U.S. also warrants inclusion of optical mineralogy in a geosciences curriculum. That dollar amount (which would be approximately 10% of annual petroleum sales in the U.S.) centers around the cost spent (wasted?) on asbestos litigation in the U.S. Unfortunately, because we no longer teach PLM skills in the geosciences curriculum, many of the microscopists, regulators, and "expert" witnesses involved in the asbestos issue have little or no formal training in mineralogy or optical mineralogy. This, in turn, often leads to formulation of regulations that make little sense (e.g., that quartz, the most abundant mineral species in the earth's crust is now listed as a human carcinogen) and unsolved mineralogical issues (e.g., OSHA deregulated high-aspect ratio amphibole cleavage fragments in 1994 but did not propose a method to distinguish them from amphibole fibers). The current asbestos issues often deal with tremolite contamination in chrysotile or talc. There are simple PLM methods that we could teach whereby thousands of particles could be screened in minutes to find these possible contaminates, whereas electron beam or X-ray diffraction methods require orders of magnitude more time and cost - and this is only one of many examples. Finally, one might also argue that since minerals

  5. Petrography and geochemistry of Oligocene bituminous coal from the Jiu Valley, Petrosani basin (southern Carpathian Mountains), Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J. [U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Hower, James C. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); Stucker, J.D. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); O' Keefe, Jennifer M.K. [Morehead State University, Morehead, KY, 40351 (United States); Tatu, Calin A. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Immunology, Clinical Laboratory No. 1, Pta. E. Murgu No. 2, RO-1900 Timisoara (Romania); Buia, Grigore [University of Petrosani, Department of Geology, University St. 20, RO-2675 Petrosani (Romania)

    2010-05-01

    Belt samples of Oligocene (Chattian) bituminous coal from 10 underground mines located in the Jiu Valley, Hunedoara County, Petrosani basin, Romania, have been examined and analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, major-, minor- and trace-element chemistry, organic petrography, and vitrinite reflectance. The mineral chemistry and mode of occurrence of trace elements also have been investigated using SEM and electron microprobe techniques. Twenty coal beds occur in the Jiu Valley and most of the samples are from bed no. 3, the most productive bed of the Dilja-Uricani Formation of Oligocene age. The Petrosani basin, oriented SW-NE, is 48-km long, 10-km wide at the eastern part and 2-km wide at the western part. The coal mines are distributed along the center of the valley generally following the Jiu de Vest River. Reflectance measurements indicate that the rank of the coals ranges from high-volatile B to high-volatile A bituminous. Overall, rank decreases from the southwest to the northeast. In bed no. 3, R{sub max} varies from 0.75% in the northeast to 0.93% in the southwest. Although, most Oligocene coals in Romania and adjacent countries are lignite in rank, the Jiu Valley bituminous coals have been affected by regional metamorphism and attending hydrothermal fluids related to the Alpine orogenic event. The coals are all dominated by vitrinite; resinite and funginite are important minor macerals in most of the coals. Pyrite and carbonate generally dominate the mineral assemblages with carbonate more abundant in the northwest. Siderite occurs as nodules and masses within the macerals (generally vitrinite). Dolomite and calcite occur as fracture fillings, plant-cell fillings, and in other authigenic forms. Late-stage fracture fillings are siderite, dolomite, calcite, and ankerite. In one instance, two populations of siderite ({proportional_to} 35 and {proportional_to} 45 wt.% FeO) plus ankerite fill a large fracture. Late-stage pyrite framboid alteration is Ni

  6. Radiopharmacy education in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Ralph Santos-Oliveira; Marta De Souza Albernaz

    2014-01-01

    The number of schools of pharmacy has been increasing each year in Brazil. From 2002 to 2013 over 300 new schools were opened in Brazil with a final number of 415 schools of pharmacy in operation around the country. Of these schools, only 28 schools offer a course in radiopharmacy (7.77%). However, the demand for such trained professionals has grown exponentially in Brazil, especially following amendment 49 (February 2006) that broke the monopoly on the production, distribution, and marketing...

  7. Mineralogical Characterization of Goethite- Lateritic Ore & its Implication on Beneficiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirlipta P. Nayak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical characterization of ore has to get due attention before any attempt for its processing and has become almost inevitable these days because of the increasing demand of the ore. Mineral processing technology is evolved to separate and recover ore minerals from gangue in a commercially viable method and is mainly based upon the process of mineral liberation and the process of mineral separation. A very lean grade iron ore sample was collected from Barsua iron ore deposits assaying 38.19% Fe, 9.48%SiO2, 19.97 Al2O3 and 15.01LOI. From characterization studies it is revealed that the sample contains huge quantity of goethite which is partially weathered, interlocked with hematite and gangue minerals like kaolinite, gibbsite at different proportion. Mineralogical studies conclude that the final concentrate product quality depends upon the presence of goethite.

  8. CLAY MINERALOGY OF INSOLUBLE RESIDUES IN MARINE EVAPORITES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodine, Marc W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Insoluble residues from three sequences of Paleozoic marine evaporites (Retsof salt bed in western New York, Salado Formation in south-eastern New Mexico, and Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation in southeastern Utah) are rich in trioctahedral clays. Chlorite (clinochlore), corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite-trioctahedral smectite), talc, and illite (the only dioctahedral clay) are the dominant clay minerals; serpentine, discrete trioctahedral smectite (saponite), and interstratified talc-trioctahedral smectite are sporadically abundant. These clay-mineral assemblages differ chemically and mineralogically from those observed in most continental and normal marine rocks, which commonly contain kaolinite, dioctahedral smectite (beidellite-montmorillonite), illite, mixed-layer illite-dioctahedral smectite, and, in most cases, no more than minor quantities of trioctahedral clay minerals. The distinctive clay mineralogy in these evaporite sequences suggests a largely authigenic origin. These clay minerals are thought to have formed during deposition and early diagenesis through interaction between argillaceous detritus and Mg-rich marine evaporite brines.

  9. Petrology and mineralogy of the Y-793605 martian meteorite

    OpenAIRE

    Yukio, Ikeda

    1997-01-01

    Yamato-793605 is a lherzolitic shergottite and very similar in texture and mineralogy to other two lherzolitic shergottites, ALHA77005 and LEW88516,but is not a pair with the latter two. It consists mainly of olivine, pyroxene, maskelynite, chromite, ilmenite, and pyrrhotite. Small silicate inclusions occur in olivine and pyroxene. Olivine has a wide compositional range from Fo_ to Fo_, that included in pyroxene is more magnesian, and that in contact with maskelynite is more ferroan. Chromite...

  10. Fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site. SDM-Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed investigations of the fracture mineralogy and altered wall rock have been carried out as part of the site characterisation programme between 2003 and 2007 at Forsmark. The results have been published in a number of P-reports and in contributions to scientific journals. This report summarises and evaluates the data obtained during the detailed fracture mineralogical studies. The report includes descriptions of the identified fracture minerals and their chemical composition. A sequence of fracture mineralisations has been distinguished and provides information of the low to moderate temperature (brittle) geological and hydrogeological evolution at the site. Special focus has been paid to the chemical and stable isotopic composition of calcite to obtain palaeohydrogeological information. Chemical analyses of bulk fracture filling material have been carried out to identify possible sinks for certain elements and also to reveal the presence of minor phases rich in certain elements which have not been possible to detect by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Statistical analysis of the mineralogy in fractures outside deformation zones (i.e. within fracture domains FFM01, FFM02, FFM03 and FFM06) have been carried out concerning variation of fracture mineral distribution at depth and in different fracture domains. Uranium contents and uranium-series isotopes have been analysed on fracture coating material from hydraulically conductive fractures. Such analyses are also available from the groundwaters and the results are combined in order to reveal recent (< 1 Ma) removal/deposition of uranium in the fracture system. The redox conditions in the fracture system have been evaluated based on mineralogical and chemical indicators as well as Moessbauer analyses

  11. Mineralogy affects geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability of zinc

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Ramon M.; Schaider, Laurel A.; Donaghey, Thomas C; Shine, James P.; Brain, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    We correlated mineralogical and particle characteristics of Zn-containing particles with Zn geoavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioavailability following gavage and intranasal (IN) administration in rats. We compared samples of Zn/Pb mine waste and five pulverized pure-phase Zn minerals ( hydrozincite > hemimorphite > zincite ≈ smithsonite ≫ sphalerite. We found significant correlations among geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability. In particular, Zn bioavailability post-gava...

  12. Mineralogy and chemical compositions of Colomera (IIE) silicate inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, W.; H. Takeda; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    Irons of groups lAB and IIE contain silicate inclusions. In IAB irons, these inclusions are basically chondritic, but in IIE they vary from chondritic to highly differentiated [1,2]. In this work, we present detailed studies of mineralogy and trace-element geochemistry of eight silicate inclusions from Colomera with the goal of better understanding early planetary differentiation and possible genetic relationships between iron and stony meteorites.

  13. Fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); MacKenzie, Angus B. (SUERC, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride (United Kingdom)); Suksi, Juhani (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-08-15

    Detailed investigations of the fracture mineralogy and altered wall rock have been carried out as part of the site characterisation programme between 2003 and 2007 at Forsmark. The results have been published in a number of P-reports and in contributions to scientific journals. This report summarises and evaluates the data obtained during the detailed fracture mineralogical studies. The report includes descriptions of the identified fracture minerals and their chemical composition. A sequence of fracture mineralisations has been distinguished and provides information of the low to moderate temperature (brittle) geological and hydrogeological evolution at the site. Special focus has been paid to the chemical and stable isotopic composition of calcite to obtain palaeohydrogeological information. Chemical analyses of bulk fracture filling material have been carried out to identify possible sinks for certain elements and also to reveal the presence of minor phases rich in certain elements which have not been possible to detect by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Statistical analysis of the mineralogy in fractures outside deformation zones (i.e. within fracture domains FFM01, FFM02, FFM03 and FFM06) have been carried out concerning variation of fracture mineral distribution at depth and in different fracture domains. Uranium contents and uranium-series isotopes have been analysed on fracture coating material from hydraulically conductive fractures. Such analyses are also available from the groundwaters and the results are combined in order to reveal recent (< 1 Ma) removal/deposition of uranium in the fracture system. The redox conditions in the fracture system have been evaluated based on mineralogical and chemical indicators as well as Moessbauer analyses

  14. Mineralogical characterisation and processing of some industrial minerals from Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the mineralogical characterisation and processing of several industrial minerals collected by Dr DJ Morgan in October 1991 during a visit to Uganda (Visit report WG/91/31R). The industrial minerals included raw materials (see Table 1) from African Ceramics Ltd (Mutaka kaolin, feldspar and ball clay) and samples collected by the Geological Survey and Mines Department Uganda (the remaining kaolin, talc and diatomite). The aim of this study was to assess thei...

  15. Mineralogical Characterization of Goethite- Lateritic Ore & its Implication on Beneficiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nirlipta P. Nayak

    2014-01-01

    Mineralogical characterization of ore has to get due attention before any attempt for its processing and has become almost inevitable these days because of the increasing demand of the ore. Mineral processing technology is evolved to separate and recover ore minerals from gangue in a commercially viable method and is mainly based upon the process of mineral liberation and the process of mineral separation. A very lean grade iron ore sample was collected from Barsua iron ore deposi...

  16. Mineralogy of iron microbial mats from Loihi Seamount

    OpenAIRE

    BrandyMarieToner; ThelmaSBerquó; F. MarcMichel; AlexisSTempleton; KatrinaJEdwards

    2012-01-01

    Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings – freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents – where ever opposing Fe(II)-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted t...

  17. Mineralogy of Iron Microbial Mats from Loihi Seamount

    OpenAIRE

    Toner, Brandy M.; Berquó, Thelma S.; Michel, F. Marc; Sorensen, Jeffry V.; Templeton, Alexis S.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings – freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents – where ever opposing Fe(II)-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted to ...

  18. Mineralogy and cooling history of magnesian lunar granulite 67415

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Masamichi

    1993-01-01

    Apollo granulite 67415 was investigated by mineralogical techniques to gain better understanding of cooling histories of lunar granulities. Cooling rates were estimated from chemical zoning of olivines in magnesian granulitic clasts by computer simulation of diffusion processes. The cooling rate of 10 deg C/yr obtained is compatible with a model of the granulite formation, in which the impact deposit was cooled from high temperature or annealed, at the depth of about 25 m beneath the surface.

  19. Mineralogy affects geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We correlated mineralogical and particle characteristics of Zn-containing particles with Zn geoavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioavailability following gavage and intranasal (IN) administration in rats. We compared samples of Zn/Pb mine waste and five pulverized pure-phase Zn minerals (65Zn. We assessed geoavailability using sequential extractions and bioaccessibility using in vitro extraction tests simulating various pH and biological conditions. Zn in vivo bioavailability and in vitro bioaccessibility decreased as follows: mine waste > hydrozincite > hemimorphite > zincite ≈ smithsonite >> sphalerite. We found significant correlations among geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability. In particular, Zn bioavailability post-gavage and post-IN was significantly correlated with bioaccessibility in simulated phagolysosomal fluid and gastric fluid. These data indicate that solid phase speciation influences biological uptake of Zn and that in vitro tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability in exposure assessment and effective remediation design. Highlights: •Zinc particle mineralogy influences bioaccessibility and bioavailability. •Zn bioavailability via gavage was 1.2–1.6 times higher than via intranasal route. •Zn particle geoavailability correlates with bioaccessibility. •In vitro bioaccessibility tests can predict in vivo Zn bioavailability. •Metal speciation and geochemical alterations can impact Zn bioavailability. -- Zinc mineralogy influences in vitro bioaccessibility and in vivo bioavailability and in vitro extraction tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability from particles

  20. Petrography, Geochemistry and Proposed Genesis of Ordovician Oolitic Iron Formation Members of the Lashkarak Formation, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoore Maghsoudloo Mahalli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Oolitic iron formations are sedimentary rocks with >5 vol.% oolites and >15 wt.% iron, corresponding to 21.4 wt.% Fe2O3 (Young, 1989; Petranek and Van Houten, 1997; Mucke and Farshad, 2005. In Iran, new iron oolite-bearing members have been identified in the Lashkarak Formation (lower-middle Ordovician in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh sections, eastern Alborz (Ghobadi Pour et al., 2011. At present, the mineralogy and geochemistry of these members are not known. Consequently, research reported here was conducted to reveal the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Ordovician oolitic iron formationmembers and to discuss their genesis and economic importance. Materials and Analyses Field geology and sampling was carried out to collect 25 samples from the ooliticiron formation members in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh section in eastern Alborz. Samples were prepared for polished-thin sections (n=10, XRD analysis (n=15. Whole-rock chemical analysis (n=15 by XRF for major elements and by ICP-ES for trace elements was performed by laboratories at the SarCheshmeh copper mine complex, Kerman, Iran. One sample was analyzed by SEM at the Wales Museum, UK. Results Microscopic studies show that the oolitic iron formation members are hosted by carbonate argillite rocks. They are mainly composed of oolites rather than pisoliths (small bodies somewhat larger and more irregular than oolites, whereas oolites have mainly ellipsoidal forms and locally spherical shapes. Most (6 oolites show banding with a central core. Simple oolites without a core are scarce. Mineralogically, oolites are mainly chamositic and hematitic in composition; goethite, pyrite and glauconite occur in traces and siderite is absent. Quartz, calcite and zircon are accessory minerals which are present in the groundmass. Geochemically, TFeO % of the oolitic iron formation horizons ranges from 8 to 48 % with an average of 21%. The CaO content ranges from 2 to 37% and

  1. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  2. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy Notas inéditas de Jovellanos sobre mineralogía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge ORDAZ GARGALLO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of the chemistry and mineralogy. The text clearly supports the new contributions of Lavoisier and other supporters of experimentation as a scientific method, which agrees with Jovellanos’ ideas about the development of the «useful» sciences for the progress of the countries.Se presenta y analiza un manuscrito inédito de Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos sobre la historia de la mineralogía, que redactó durante su cautiverio en el Castillo de Bellver (Palma de Mallorca. En el escrito considera de gran importancia los conocimientos químicos como fuente de otras ramas del saber científico y sus aplicaciones en distintos ámbitos de la agricultura, minería e industria. El autor hace una síntesis histórica repasando los hombres de ciencia que en mayor medida contribuyeron al avance de la química y la mineralogía. El texto apoya claramente las nuevas aportaciones de Lavoisier y otros químicos partidarios de la experimentación como método científico, y es acorde con las ideas de Jovellanos acerca del cultivo de las ciencias «útiles» para el progreso de los pueblos.

  3. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy Notas inéditas de Jovellanos sobre mineralogía

    OpenAIRE

    Ordaz Gargallo, Jorge; Manuel GUTIÉRREZ CLAVEROL; Lorenzo Álvarez, Elena de

    2012-01-01

    An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca) is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of t...

  4. Mineralogic considerations for uranium in-situ leach mining: a preliminary study of uranium and associated mineralogy of roll-front uranium deposits in Wyoming and Nebraska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary mineralogic studies via SEM of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits in Wyoming and Nebraska have revealed subtle mineralogic differences that may affect the success of carbonate in-situ leach mining. Mineralogic conditions of interest to the in-situ miner include uranium speciation, associated mineralogy, and uranium accessibility. Thin sections of core samples from operating mines, exploration projects, and pre- and post-carbonate leach testing have provided a wide range of ore body conditions examined in this ongoing study. To date, analyses of cores from active mine sites have provided insight into areas of poor uranium recovery, due to petrologic and mineralogic constraints. Studies of exploration targets, and subsequent in-house leach testing, have been used to characterize uranium-lixiviant-sandstone host interactions. In addition to current research, continued studies may include viability studies of ore body mineability to refinement of restoration processes. (author)

  5. Rare earth elements and titanium in plants, soils and groundwaters in the alkaline-ultramafic complex of Salitre, MG, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Ceccantini, G.; Figueiro, A.M.G.; Sondag, Francis; Soubiès, François

    1997-01-01

    The contents of Rare Earth Elements (REE) and titanium in various species of plants, in groundwaters and in soils from the ultramafic complex of Salitre, MG, Brazil, were determined. Due to the particular mineralogy of the bedrock, REE and Ti present high concentrations in the soils. The transfer factors of the REE from soil to plants were calculated, giving values ranging from 0.0001 to 0.0028, much lower than the values reported elsewhere in Brazil. Furthermore, as suggested by other author...

  6. Pedotransfer functions to estimate retention and availability of water in soils of the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    André da Costa; Jackson Adriano Albuquerque; Jaime Antônio de Almeida; Adriano da Costa; Rodrigo Vieira Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Studies on water retention and availability are scarce for subtropical or humid temperate climate regions of the southern hemisphere. The aims of this study were to evaluate the relations of the soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties with water retention and availability for the generation and validation of continuous point pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for soils of the State of Santa Catarina (SC) in the South of Brazil. Horizons of 44 profiles were sampled in areas under diff...

  7. Distribution and petrography of the mesozoic basic dykes of the San Gregorio de Polanco, Parana magmatic province, Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tectonomagmatic events developed in the lower Cretaceous, predating the South Atlantic Ocean opening, generated an intensive magmatic activity that covered an important surface of the South American platform (Parana-Etendeka Magmatic Province). Both the instability and rupture of the continental crust, as well as magma rising are registered by the presence of basic intrusions (dykes and sills), and lava flows located in the central-north portion of Uruguay. This paper deals with a detailed petrologic study focused on the San Gregorio de Polanco Dyke Swarm (Department of Tacuarembo). As result of semidetailed geological mapping, 17 dyke segments with 12km length and 20m width maximum have been identified. These dykes are concentrated in four main geographic zones named: Achar, San Gregorio de Polanco, La Paloma and San Jorge. The dykes define parallel to sub parallel trends, with a zig-zag pattern (N140°-170° and N080°-110°) controlled by basement lineaments. Their mineralogy includes calcic plagioclases (labradorite and andesine), calcic clinopyroxene (augite-pigeonite), opaques minerals (two populations), olivine; glass and apatite as accessories. In turn, the SEM-EDS analyses of the opaque minerals (modal 15%) of both populations allowed their classification as titanomagnetite correspondent to different crystallisation stages. The first population of titanomagnetite would correspond to the main crystallisation stage while the second one would be generated by partial dissolution of the former under low oxygen fugacity conditions and temperatures around 450°C

  8. Brazil : Eradicating Child Labor in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2001-01-01

    The report reviews evidence of child labor in Brazil, and the Government's efforts to eradicate its worst forms, by examining background assessments of ongoing programs for its prevention. It seeks to identify promising strategies, addressing the needs of highly vulnerable children in urban areas, engaged in activities such as drug commerce, prostitution, or other dangerous activities. One...

  9. Sensitivity analysis of alkaline plume modelling: influence of mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of a disposal facility for radioactive waste in clayey geological formation, an important modelling effort has been carried out in order to predict the time evolution of interacting cement based (concrete or cement) and clay (argillites and bentonite) materials. The high number of modelling input parameters associated with non negligible uncertainties makes often difficult the interpretation of modelling results. As a consequence, it is necessary to carry out sensitivity analysis on main modelling parameters. In a recent study, Marty et al. (2009) could demonstrate that numerical mesh refinement and consideration of dissolution/precipitation kinetics have a marked effect on (i) the time necessary to numerically clog the initial porosity and (ii) on the final mineral assemblage at the interface. On the contrary, these input parameters have little effect on the extension of the alkaline pH plume. In the present study, we propose to investigate the effects of the considered initial mineralogy on the principal simulation outputs: (1) the extension of the high pH plume, (2) the time to clog the porosity and (3) the alteration front in the clay barrier (extension and nature of mineralogy changes). This was done through sensitivity analysis on both concrete composition and clay mineralogical assemblies since in most published studies, authors considered either only one composition per materials or simplified mineralogy in order to facilitate or to reduce their calculation times. 1D Cartesian reactive transport models were run in order to point out the importance of (1) the crystallinity of concrete phases, (2) the type of clayey materials and (3) the choice of secondary phases that are allowed to precipitate during calculations. Two concrete materials with either nanocrystalline or crystalline phases were simulated in contact with two clayey materials (smectite MX80 or Callovo- Oxfordian argillites). Both

  10. Focus on Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-11-01

    Brazil, the largest country in South America with a population of almost 140 million, has been plagued since the early 1980s by high foreign debt (approximately US$121 billion at present) and hyperinflation (nearly 600 percent over the past 12 months). These factors, in combination with the slower than anticipated growth in electricity demand, have been instrumental in curtailing nuclear power development in the country. Following recommendations advanced in a commissioned study for improving Brazil`s nuclear program, Brazilian President Jose Sarney announced on August 31st the restructuring of the country`s nuclear industry.

  11. The chemistry and mineralogy of Mars soil and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.

    1991-01-01

    A single geological unit consisting of fine, apparently weathered soil material is covering large portions of the surface of Mars. This soil material has been thoroughly homogenized by global dust storms and it is plausible to assume that Mars dust is strongly correlated with it. The chemical-elemental composition of the soil was directly measured by the Viking Landers. Positive detection of Si, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, Ti, S, Cl, and Br was achieved. Analyses of the SNC meteorites, a group of meteorites that has been suggested to be ejected Martian rocks, supply additional elemental-concentration data, broadening considerably the chemical data-base on the surface materials. A composition model for Mars soil, giving selected average elemental concentrations of major and trace elements, was recently suggested. It was constructed by combining the Viking Lander data, the SNC meteorite analyses, and other analyses. The mineralogy of the surface materials on Mars has not been directly measured yet. By use of various indirect approaches, including chemical correspondence to the surface analyses, spectral analogies, simulations of Viking Lander experiments, analyses of the SNC meteorites and various modeling efforts, the mineralogical composition was constrained to some extent. No direct analyses of soil reactivity have been done yet. Indirect evidence, mostly from the Viking biology experimental results, suggests that the soil probably has a slightly acidic reaction and is generally oxidized. Unambiguous identification of the Mars soil minerals by direct mineralogical analyses, and non-disturbed or in-situ measurements of the soil's reactivity, are of primary importance in future Mars research.

  12. Petrography, palynology, and paleoecology of the Lower Pennsylvanian Bon Air coal, Franklin County, Cumberland Plateau, southeast Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Stephen A.; Saussy, Frederick L. [Department of Forestry and Geology, University of the South, Sewanee, TN 37383 (United States); Eble, Cortland F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, 228 MMRB, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0107 (United States); Hower, James C. [Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511-8433 (United States)

    2006-05-03

    Stratigraphy, palynology, petrography, and geochemistry of the Bon Air coal from the Armfield, Dotson, Rutledge, and Shakerag mine sites of Franklin County, Tennessee suggest that Bon Air seams at all sites were small (=1.0 mile, 1.6 km), spatially distinct paleomires that evolved from planar to domed within the fluviodeltaic Lower Pennsylvanian Raccoon Mountain Formation. Of observed palynoflora, 88?97% are from lycopsids prevalent in the Westphalian. Densosporites palynomorphs of small lycopsids (e.g., Omphalophloios) dominate at the shale-hosted Armfield site, while Lycospora palynoflora of large arboreous lycopsids (especially Lepidodendron, with lesser Lepidophloios harcourtii and Lepidophloios hallii) dominate where intercalated siltstone/sandstone/shale hosts the coal (all other sites). Palynoflora of other lycopsids (Sigillaria and Paralycopodites), tree ferns, seed ferns, small ferns, calamites, and cordaites are generally minor. Genera of clastic-associated Paralycopodites are most common in Shakerag's coal (=10%), yet quite rare in Rutledge or Dotson coals. Overall, the palynomorph assemblages suggest that the Bon Air paleomires were forest swamps, and Early Pennsylvanian in age (Westphalian A, Langsettian). Dominant macerals at all sites are vitrinites, with fine collodetrinite (from strongly decomposed plant debris) more common than coarser collotelinite (from well-preserved plant fragments), and with lesser inertinites (fusinite and semifusinite) and liptinites (dominantly sporinite). Shakerag's coal has greatest abundance (mineral-matter-free) of collotelinite (up to 47%) and total vitrinite (74?79%) of any sites, but lowest liptinite (12?14.5%) and inertinite (7?11%). The Dotson and Rutledge seams contain moderate liptinite (21?23%) and highest inertinite (36?37%), lowest vitrinite (=41%), and lowest collotelinite (13?15%). Armfield's seam has relatively high liptinite (26?28%) and vitrinite (56.5?62%), but rather low inertinite (12

  13. Mineralogy of dust deposited during the Harmattan season in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Changling; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik; Awadzi, Theodore W.

    2007-01-01

    In Ghana, a dust-laden Harmattan wind blows from the Sahara in the period November to March. Some of the dust is trapped in the vegetation, in lakes and other inland waters, and a little on the bare land, whereas the rest of the dust is blown further away to the Ivory Coast or out into the Atlantic...... Ocean. In this project, we studied samples of dust and topsoils in various agroecological zones, from the north to the south of Ghana, focussing mainly on the mineralogy of these materials. Some data about grain sizes and morphology of the samples are also presented. Feldspars, together with quartz, are...

  14. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  15. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  16. Mineralogy and chemistry of conventional and fluidised bed coal ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulovský P

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Coal combustion residues represent very abundant inorganic waste materials. The change from conventional combustion of powdered North Bohemian brown coal to its combustion in fluidised bed boilers in several Czech power and heating plants calls for detailed mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of the combustion residues. The main differences between fly ashes from both combustion systems result from different burning temperatures and differing systems of desulphurisation (coeval with combustion / post-combustion. Both these factors influence the chemical and phase compositions as well as the speciation of trace elements. The study further shows that the validity of the surface enrichment model (Linton et al. 1975 can be limited.

  17. Moon Mineralogy Mapper: Unlocking the Mysteries of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, Cassandra

    2006-01-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) is a state-of-the-art high spectral resolution imaging spectrometer that will characterize and map the mineral composition of the Moon. The M3 instrument will be flown on Chandrayaan-I, the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) mission to be launched in March 2008. The Moon is a cornerstone to understanding early solar system processes. M3 high-resolution compositional maps will dramatically improve our understanding about the early evolution of the terrestrial planets and will provide an assessment of lunar resources at high spatial resolution.

  18. Mineralogy and Petrology of COMET WILD2 Nucleus Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Bland, Phil; Bradley, John; Brearley, Adrian; Brennan, Sean; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald; Butterworth, Anna; Dai, Zurong; Ebel, Denton

    2006-01-01

    The sample return capsule of the Stardust spacecraft will be recovered in northern Utah on January 15, 2006, and under nominal conditions it will be delivered to the new Stardust Curation Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center two days later. Within the first week we plan to begin the harvesting of aerogel cells, and the comet nucleus samples they contain for detailed analysis. By the time of the LPSC meeting we will have been analyzing selected removed grains for more than one month. This presentation will present the first results from the mineralogical and petrological analyses that will have been performed.

  19. Nano-mineralogy of suspended sediment during the beginning of coal rejects spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civeira, Matheus S; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; Teixeira, Elba C; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultrafine and nanometric sediment inputs into river systems can be a major source of nutrients and hazardous elements and have a strong impact on water quality and ecosystem functions of rivers and lakes regions. However, little is known to date about the spatial distribution of sediment sources in most large scale river basins in South America. The objective of this work was to study the coal cleaning rejects (CCRs) spill that occurred from a CCRs impoundment pond into the Tubarão River, South Brazil, provided a unique occasion to study the importance and role of incidental nanoparticles associated with pollutant dispersal from a large-scale, acute aquatic pollution event. Multifaceted geochemical research by X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS, and Raman spectroscopy, provided an in-depth understanding of importance of a nano-mineralogy approach of Aqueous Pollution Scenarios. The electron beam studies showed the presence of a number of potentially hazardous elements (PHEs) in nanoparticles (amorphous and minerals). Some of the neoformed ultrafine/nanoparticles found in the contaminated sediments are the same as those commonly associated with oxidation/transformation of oxides, silicates, sulfides, and sulfates. These data of the secondary ultra/nanoparticles, puts in evidence their ability to control the mobility of PHEs, suggesting possible presentations in environmental technology, including recuperation of sensitive coal mine. The developed methodology facilitated the sediment transport of the catchment providing consistent results and suggesting its usefulness as a tool for temporary rivers management. PMID:26688250

  20. Petrography of isotopically-dated clasts in the Kapoeta howardite and petrologic constraints on the evolution of its parent body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed mineralogic and petrographic data are presented for four isotopically-dated basaltic rock fragments separated from the howardite Kapoeta. Clasts C and rho have been dated at approximately 4.55 AE and approximately 4.60 AE respectively, and Clast rho contains 244Pu and 129I decay products. These are both igneous rocks that preserve all the features of their original crystallization from a melt. They thus provide good evidence that the Kapoeta parent body produced basaltic magmas shortly after its formation ( 40Ar/39Ar age. This sample is extensively recrystallized, and the ages are interpreted as a time of recrystallization, and not the time of original crystallization from a melt. Clast B has yielded a Rb-Sr age of approximately 3.63 AE, and an 40Ar/39Ar age of > approximately 4.50 AE. This sample is moderately recrystallized, and the Rb-Sr age probably indicates a time of recrystallization, whereas the 40Ar/39Ar age more closely approaches the time of crystallization from a melt. Thus, there is no clearcut evidence for 'young' magmatism on the Kapeota parent body. The FeO and MnO contents of all pyroxenes in Kapeota fall near a line with FeO/MnO approximately 35, suggesting that the source rocks are fundamentally related. The FeO/MnO value in lunar pyroxenes (approximately 60) is distinct from that of the pyroxenes in Kapoeta. Anorthositic rocks were not observed in Kapoeta, suggesting that plagioclase was not important in the evolution of the Kapoeta parent body, in contrast to the Moon. Both objects appear to have originated in chemically-distinct portions of the solar system, and to have undergone differentiation on different time scales involving differing materials. (author)

  1. Energy in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prepare the Gross Domestic Product increase of 4 % in the next years, it is necessary to increase the capacity in Brazil. The government decided actions in favor of the installed capacity growth speeding up and planed investments. This document takes stock on the energy situation in Brazil, the human, political and geographical constraints and the decided measures in favor the energy development. (A.L.B.)

  2. Brazil Agriculture Policy Review

    OpenAIRE

    Quiroga, Jose; Brooks, Jonathan; Melyukhina, Olga

    2005-01-01

    In June 2005, OECD members met with senior government officials from Brazil to discuss Brazilian agricultural policies and future directions, as a part of a comprehensive agricultural policy review. Ongoing dialogue with Brazil on policy issues is important to fostering a better understanding of global challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. Results of the review will be published by the OECD in 2005. This policy note provides a preview of key findings.

  3. Allelopathic research in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Reigosa; Anabele Stefânia Gomes; Alfredo Gui Ferreira; Fabian Borghetti

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review allelopathy studies conducted in Brazil or involving plant species that occur in the country. Conceptions and misconceptions associated with allelopathy, as well as some international criteria to be applied in allelopathic research, are presented and discussed. We observed a sharp increase in the number of papers on this subject conducted in Brazil between 1991 and 2010. However, most studies are conducted under laboratory conditions, lack a clear hypothesis or a so...

  4. Uranium deposits of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil is a country of vast natural resources, including numerous uranium deposits. In support of the country's nuclear power program, Brazil has developed the most active uranium industry in South America. Brazil has one operating reactor (Angra 1, a 626-MWe PWR), and two under construction. The country's economic challenges have slowed the progress of its nuclear program. At present, the Pocos de Caldas district is the only active uranium production. In 1990, the Cercado open-pit mine produced approximately 45 metric tons (MT) U3O8 (100 thousand pounds). Brazil's state-owned uranium production and processing company, Uranio do Brasil, announced it has decided to begin shifting its production from the high-cost and nearly depleted deposits at Pocos de Caldas, to lower-cost reserves at Lagoa Real. Production at Lagoa Real is schedules to begin by 1993. In addition to these two districts, Brazil has many other known uranium deposits, and as a whole, it is estimated that Brazil has over 275,000 MT U3O8 (600 million pounds U3O8) in reserves

  5. Mineralogical, Chemical, and Optical Interrelationships of Airborne Mineral Dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, J. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Pincock, S. L.; Jayanty, R. K. M.; Casuccio, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the project was to provide information on the mineralogical, chemical and physical interrelationships of re-suspended mineral dust samples collected as grab samples from global dust sources. Surface soil samples were collected from about 65 desert sites, including the southwestern USA (12), Mali (3), Chad (3), Morocco (1), Canary Islands (8), Cape Verde (1), Djibouti (1), Afghanistan (3), Iraq (6), Kuwait (5), Qatar (1), UAE (1), Serbia (3), China (5), Namibia (3), Botswana (4), Australia (3), and Chile (1). The 38 μm, characterized by optical microscopy. We will be presenting results on the optical measurements, also showing the relationship between single scattering albedo (SSA) at three different wavelengths, and chemical as well as mineralogical content and interdependencies of the entrained dust samples. Examples showing the relationships between the single scattering albedos of airborne dusts, and iron (Fe) in hematite, goethite, and clay minerals (montmorillonite, illite, palygorskite), will be discussed. Differences between the clay minerals in samples from Mali and those from other localities are demonstrated. We intend establishing a data base for applications in climate modeling, remote sensing, visibility, health (medical geology), ocean fertilization, and damage to equipment.

  6. Coupling among Microbial Communities, Biogeochemistry, and Mineralogy across Biogeochemical Facies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegen, James C; Konopka, Allan; McKinley, James P; Murray, Chris; Lin, Xueju; Miller, Micah D; Kennedy, David W; Miller, Erin A; Resch, Charles T; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2016-01-01

    Physical properties of sediments are commonly used to define subsurface lithofacies and these same physical properties influence subsurface microbial communities. This suggests an (unexploited) opportunity to use the spatial distribution of facies to predict spatial variation in biogeochemically relevant microbial attributes. Here, we characterize three biogeochemical facies-oxidized, reduced, and transition-within one lithofacies and elucidate relationships among facies features and microbial community biomass, richness, and composition. Consistent with previous observations of biogeochemical hotspots at environmental transition zones, we find elevated biomass within a biogeochemical facies that occurred at the transition between oxidized and reduced biogeochemical facies. Microbial richness-the number of microbial taxa-was lower within the reduced facies and was well-explained by a combination of pH and mineralogy. Null modeling revealed that microbial community composition was influenced by ecological selection imposed by redox state and mineralogy, possibly due to effects on nutrient availability or transport. As an illustrative case, we predict microbial biomass concentration across a three-dimensional spatial domain by coupling the spatial distribution of subsurface biogeochemical facies with biomass-facies relationships revealed here. We expect that merging such an approach with hydro-biogeochemical models will provide important constraints on simulated dynamics, thereby reducing uncertainty in model predictions. PMID:27469056

  7. Strategies and Technologies for In Situ Mineralogical Investigations on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. R.; Bratton, C.; Koppel, L.; Hecht, M.; Metzger, E.

    1999-01-01

    Surface landers on Mars (Viking and Pathfinder) have not revealed satisfying answers to the mineralogy and lithology of the planet's surface. In part, this results from their prime directives: Viking focused on exobiology, Pathfinder focused on technology demonstration. The analytical instruments on board the landers made admirable attempts to extract the mineralogy and geology of Mars, as did countless modeling efforts after the missions. Here we suggest a framework for elucidating martian, or any other planetary geology, through an approach that defines (a) type of information required, (b) explorational strategy harmonious with acquisition of these data, (c) interpretation approach to the data, (d) compatible mission architecture, (e) instrumentation for interrogating rocks and soil. (a) Data required: The composition of a planet is ordered at scales ranging from molecules to minerals to rocks, and from geological units to provinces to planetary-scale systems. The largest ordering that in situ compositional instruments can attempt to interrogate is rock type "aggregate" information. This is what the geologist attempts to identify first. From this, mineralogy can be either directly seen or inferred. From mineralogy can be determined elemental abundances and perhaps the state of the compounds as being crystalline or amorphous. Knowledge of rock type and mineralogy is critical for elucidating geologic process. Mars landers acquired extremely valuable elemental data, but attempted to move from elements to aggregates, but this can only be done by making many assumptions and sometimes giant leaps of faith. Data we believe essential are elements, minerals, degree of ordering of compounds, and the aggregate or rock type that these materials compose. (b) Explorational strategy: A lander should function as a surrogate geologist. Of the total landscape, a geologist sees much, but gives detailed attention to an infinitesimally small amount of what is seen. To acquire

  8. Automated mineralogical logging of coal and coal measure core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Fraser; Joan Esterle; Colin Ward; Ruth Henwood; Peter Mason; Jon Huntington; Phil Connor; Reneta Sliwa; Dave Coward; Lew Whitbourn [CSIRO Exploration & Mining (Australia)

    2006-06-15

    A mineralogical core logging system based on spectral reflectance (HyLogger{trademark}) has been used to detect and quantify mineralogies in coal and coal measure sediments. The HyLogger{trademark} system, as tested, operates in the visible-to-shortwave infrared spectral region, where iron oxides, sulphates, hydroxyl-bearing and carbonate minerals have characteristic spectral responses. Specialized software assists with mineral identification and data display. Three Phases of activity were undertaken. In Phase I, carbonates (siderite, ankerite, calcite) and clays (halloysite, dickite) were successfully detected and mapped in coal. Repeat measurements taken from one of the cores after three months demonstrated the reproducibility of the spectral approach, with some spectral differences being attributed to variations in moisture content and oxidation. Also, investigated was HyLogger{trademark} ability to create a 'brightness-profile' on coal materials, and these results were encouraging. In Phase II, geotechnically significant smectitic clays (montmorillonite) were detected and mapped in cores of clastic roof and floor materials. Such knowledge would be useful for mine planning and design purposes. In Phase III, our attempts at determining whether phosphorus-bearing minerals such as apatite could be spectrally detected were less than conclusive. A spectral index could only be created for apatite, and the relationships between the spectrally-derived apatite-index, the XRD results and the analytically-derived phosphorus measurements were ambiguous.

  9. Thermodynamic modeling of mineralogical phases formed by continuous casting powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A great amount of mineralogical phases were predicted and represented in stability phase diagrams, which were obtained by the use of the thermodynamic software FACTSage considering both the chemical composition and the melting temperature of the mould flux. Melting-solidification tests on commercial mould flux glasses for thin slab casting of steel revealed the existence of cuspidine (Ca4Si2O7F2) as the main mineralogical phase formed during the flux solidification by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). This phase directly influences the heat transfer phenomena from the strand to the mould and it is obtained with higher fluorite content (22% CaF2). Cuspidine is desirable only in fluxes to produce medium carbon (included peritectic grade) steels, because it reduces the heat flux from the strand to the mould, thus controlling the shrinkage rate during the flux solidification. The experimental results are in agreement with those obtained by the thermodynamic software. The stability phase diagrams could be used as an important tool in the flux design for continuous casting process.

  10. Characterizing the Mineralogy of Potential Lunar Landing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Carle; Head, James W., III; Mustard, Jack; Boardman, Joe; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger; Green, Rob; Head, James W, III; McCord, Thomas B.; Mustard, Jack; Runyon, Cassandra; Staid, Matt

    2006-01-01

    Many processes active on the early Moon are common to most terrestrial planets, including the record of early and late impact bombardment. The Moon's surface provides a record of the earliest era of terrestrial planet evolution, and the type and composition of minerals that comprise a planetary surface are a direct result of the initial composition and subsequent thermal and physical processing. Lunar mineralogy seen today is thus a direct record of the early evolution of the lunar crust and subsequent geologic processes. Specifically, the distribution and concentration of specific minerals is closely tied to magma ocean products, lenses of intruded or remelted plutons, basaltic volcanism and fire-fountaining, and any process (e.g. cratering) that might redistribute or transform primary and secondary lunar crustal materials. The association of several lunar minerals with key geologic processes is illustrated in Figure 1. The geologic history of potential landing sites on the Moon can be read from the character and context of local mineralogy.

  11. Mineralogy of interplanetary dust particles from the 'olivine' infrared class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Buseck, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy observations establish that olivine is abundant and the predominant silicate phase in three interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from the 'olivine' infrared spectra category. Two of the particles have microstructures resembling those of most nonhydrous chondritic IDPs, consisting of micron to submicron grains together with a matrix composed of amorphous carbonaceous material and sub-500 A grains. In addition to olivine these particles respectively contain enstatite and magnetite, and pentlandite plus Ca-rich clinopyroxene. The third IDP consists mostly of olivine and pyrrhotite with little or no matrix material. Olivine grains in this particle contain prominent solar-flare ion tracks with densities corresponding to a space-exposure age between 1000 to 100,000 years. Although the three particles have olivine-rich mineralogies in common, other aspects of their mineralogies and microstructures suggest that they experienced different formation histories. The differences between the particles indicate that the olivine infrared spectral category is a diverse collection of IDPs that probably incorporates several genetic groups.

  12. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M and O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M and O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components

  13. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Lum

    2002-02-12

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M&O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1

  14. Seismogenic faulting in the Meruoca granite, NE Brazil, consistent with a local weak fracture zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Ana Catarina A; De Oliveira, Paulo H S; Ferreira, Joaquim M; Bezerra, Francisco H R; Fuck, Reinhardt A; Do Nascimento, Aderson F

    2014-12-01

    A sequence of earthquakes occurred in 2008 in the Meruoca granitic pluton, located in the northwestern part of the Borborema Province, NE Brazil. A seismological study defined the seismic activity occurring along the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault, a 081° striking, 8 km deep structure. The objective of this study was to analyze the correlation between this seismic activity and geological structures in the Meruoca granite. We carried out geological mapping in the epicentral area, analyzed the mineralogy of fault rocks, and compared the seismically-defined Riacho Fundo fault with geological data. We concluded that the seismically-defined fault coincides with ∼E-W-striking faults observed at outcrop scale and a swarm of Mesozoic basalt dikes. We propose that seismicity reactivated brittle structures in the Meruoca granite. Our study highlights the importance of geological mapping and mineralogical analysis in order to establish the relationships between geological structures and seismicity at a given area. PMID:25590704

  15. Prediction of potential compressive strength of Portland clinker from its mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svinning, K.; Høskuldsson, Agnar; Justnes, H.

    2010-01-01

    mineralogy was described by patterns from X-ray diffraction analysis in the 20-regions 29.88-30.70 degrees and 32.90-34.10 degrees (using CuK alpha-radiation). It has been shown that prediction of potential compressive strength of clinker up to 28 d from the observed variation in the mineralogy gave a...

  16. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of iron concretions of some Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical and physical analyses of concretionary materials were carried out, with the purpose of getting chemical and mineralogical characteristics of concretions found in some Brazilian soils in different ecosystems spectrophotometry was used for the chemical characterization, and x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy for the mineralogical characterization of the materials studied. (A.R.H.)

  17. Mineralogy of Burning-Coal Waste Piles in Collieries of the Czech Republic : (chapter 5)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žáček, V.; Skála, Roman

    Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2015 - (Stracher, G.; Prakash, A.; Sokol, E.), s. 110-159. (3: Case Studies - Coal Fires). ISBN 978-0-444-59509-6 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : burning * coal * waste piles * pyrometamorphism * sublimate * mineralogy * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  18. Comparative mineralogical characteristics of red soils from South Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Yaneva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to compare mineralogical composition of red soils, formed on marbles in South Bulgaria. We used mineralogical analysis of heavy and light mineral fraction in immersion under polarizing microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis of bulk sample and clay fraction. Three test polygons, located in South Bulgaria were examined: Petrovo, Nova Lovcha and Dobrostan, which are characterized with different latitude, altitude, and exposition. Three or more sites from each polygon were sampled and analyzed. The red soils are formed on white and gray calcite and calcite-dolomite marbles, impure silicate-rich marbles and only in one site – on marble breccias. We determined the following mineral phases in red soils: calcite, dolomite, quarts, and feldspars, mica, illite-type mica, illite, smectite, vermiculite-smectite, and kaolinite. Heavy minerals are represented by amphibole, titanite and epidote, and minor amounts of zircon, garnet, tourmaline, rutile, pyroxene, andalusite, kyanite, sillimanite and apatite. Opaque minerals are predominantly goethite and hematite. Plant tissue is abundant in light fraction from the uppermost soil horizons. Analyses of heavy mineral fraction show presence of metamorphic and igneous minerals which indicate participation of weathering products from other rock types in the nearby area. The types of heavy minerals in soils depend more on composition of parent rocks and geomorphic position than on climate type. Soils from Nova Lovcha show similar composition, but the quantity of goethite and hematite significantly increase in soil from plain. Typical high-metamorphic minerals as andalusite, kyanite and sillimanite present only in Nova Lovcha, while garnet dominates in Petrovo and opaque minerals - in Dobrostan. Red soils, formed on slopes, where erosion prevails over accumulation, contain more illite, smectite and vermiculite-smectite, and very few or no kaolinite, whereas the kaolinite is dominant in soils

  19. Mineralogical analysis of clays in hardsetting soil horizons, by X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction using Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffraction and spectroscopic techniques have been shown to be suitable for obtaining physical and mineralogical properties in polycrystalline soil samples, and also in their precursor compounds. For instance, the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy allows obtaining the elemental composition of an investigated sample, while the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique permits obtaining qualitative and quantitative composition of the soil minerals through the Rietveld method (RM). In this study Yellow Latosol (Oxisol), Yellow Argisol (Ultisol) and Gray Argisol (Ultisol) soil samples, classified as “hardsetting soils”, extracted from areas located at Northeast and Southeast of Brazilian coast were investigated. The soils and their fractions were analyzed in an EDX-700 and an XRD-6000 (Cu Kα radiation). XRF results indicate high percentages of Si and Al, and small percentage of Fe and Ti in the investigated samples. The DRX data and RM indicate that there was a predominance of kaolinite and halloysite minerals (kaolin group minerals) in the clay fractions, which are presumably responsible for the formation of kaolinitic plasma in these soils. Also, the obtained results showed that the XRF, XRD techniques and RM were very helpful for investigating the mineralogical composition of a hardsetting soil. - Highlights: ► Elemental composition of soil samples through X-Ray fluorescence. ► Mineralogical quantification through X-ray diffraction and Rietveld method. ► Oxisol and Ultisol, Brazil ‘Barreiras’ formation. ► High amounts of Si and Al oxides and low amounts of Fe and Ti oxides. ► Predominance of kaolinite in the clay fraction

  20. Characterization of fluids associated to mineral paragenesis of uraniferous albitites and their gnessic embedding rocks from Lagoa da Rabicha Uranium Deposit, Lagoa Real, BA, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil has now the seventh largest uranium reserve in the world. The Lagoa Real Uranium Province (PULR) is located in central-south region of Bahia State. Along a helical structure, north-south oriented, with approximately 33 km long, there are 34 known uranium mineralized areas. In its central-south portion is located anomaly 03 (AN03), named Lagoa da Rabicha, discovered and mapped by NUCLEBRAS (Brazilian Nuclear Enterprises), in the 80s. The Cachoeira Mine (AN13), located in northern PULR, is currently the only uranium mine in production in Brazil and even in South America. Nowadays it is observed a growth in energy demand in Brazil and also worldwide and studies and research applied to the petrogenetic uranium deposits are relevant both to be able to increase their potential for exploration and to assist in the possible future occurrences discovery. In recent years, fluid inclusions analysis (FI) have been widely used to study the genesis of uranium deposits in PULR and even thought there are still doubts about the uranium mineralization metallogenesis at Lagoa Real. Therefore, this work aimed to study the minerals and fluids associated with Lagoa da Rabicha albitites uraniferous and gneissic host rocks. In this way it was prepared an overview of the fluids found in this sector, establishing a comparison with several authors' studies in this and others Lagoa Real anomalies, trying to show the solutions evolution, at the same time that happened the uraninite precipitation. Petrography, electronic microprobe, laser ablation (LA-ICP-MS) and fluid inclusion studies were the applied methodologies. The fluids inclusions assemblages present in pyroxene, garnet and plagioclase, the main mineralogical constituents, were studied. The older fluid was found in aegirine-augite pyroxene and had aquo-saline composition (without carbonic phases) with Ca, Fe and Mg, 9-13 wt% NaCl salinities and homogenization temperatures between 220 and 290 deg C. Concomitantly, occurred a

  1. Synthesis, Properties and Mineralogy of Important Inorganic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warner, Terence Edwin

    The synthesis of high quality material is an essential step in the process of obtaining meaningful information about the material’s properties, and therefore, is an important link between physics and chemistry. Semiconductors; superconductors; solid-electrolytes; glasses; pigments; dielectric, fe...... chemistry; inorganic chemistry; solid state chemistry; solid state physics; materials chemistry; and mineralogy; and so they will not be repeated here. To this respect, the various footnotes refer the reader to a selection of relevant texts.......The synthesis of high quality material is an essential step in the process of obtaining meaningful information about the material’s properties, and therefore, is an important link between physics and chemistry. Semiconductors; superconductors; solid-electrolytes; glasses; pigments; dielectric......, ferroelectric, thermoelectric, luminescent, photochromic and magnetic materials; are technologically important classes of material, that are represented by numerous inorganic phases. Yet how many of us are aware of their precise chemical compositions, and have sufficient knowledge to actually make them...

  2. Mineralogy and geochemistry of atmospheric particulates in western Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam; Mirnejad, Hassan; Feiznia, Sadat; McQueen, Ken G.

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates the mineralogy and physico-chemical properties of atmospheric particulates collected at Abadan (southwestern Iran) near the Persian Gulf coast and Urmia (northwestern Iran) during ambient and dust events over 6 months (winter 2011; spring 2012). Particle sizes collected were: TSP (total suspended particulates); PM10 (particulates calcareous soils of the region. SEM observations indicated a wide range of particle morphologies over the 1-50 μm size range, with spherical, platy, cubic, elongate and prismatic shapes and rounding from angular to rounded. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis of TSP samples from both sites for non-dusty periods indicated that the sampled mineral suite contained Al, Mg, Na, Cl, P, S, Ca, K, Fe, Ti, and Si, mostly reflecting calcite, quartz, aluminosilicates, clays, gypsum and halite. Additionally, As, Pb, Zn, Mn, Sc, Nd, W, Ce, La, Ba and Ni were detected in TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected during dust events.

  3. Roles of Mineralogical Phases in Aqueous Carbonation of Steelmaking Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huining Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical phases of steelmaking slags have significant influences on the carbonation of the slags. In this paper, the effects of temperature and reaction time on the conversion of calcium-related phases and the carbonation degree of a slag sample were studied. The experimental conditions were a liquid-to-solid ratio of 20 mL/g, a carbon dioxide flow rate of 1 L/min and a slag particle size of 38–75 μm. The results show that the optimum carbonation temperature and reaction time are 60 °C and 90 min, respectively, and calcite phase content is about 26.78% while the conversion rates of Ca3Al2O6, CaSiO3, Ca2SiO4 and free CaO are about 40%, 42.46%, 51% and 100%, respectively, and the carbon dioxide sequestration efficiency is about 170 g/kg slag.

  4. Environmental Mineralogy of the Kursk Iron Ore Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posukhova, Tatiana V.; Riakhovskaya, Sofiya K.

    The development of new technologies is one of the most effective ways to solve environmental problems related to ore-dressing. Complex mineralogical investigations are able to help in improving this process. In collaboration with researchers from the IPKON institute, we have developed an electrochemical method to improve the properties of crushed ores prepared for the wet magnetic separation. This article studies the samples before and after application of the electrochemical method. Surfaces of mineral grains investigated by the scanning electron microscopy show differences in flocculation. Measured polarization curves showed unequal electrochemical processes on surfaces of magnetite, hematite, and martite particles. X-ray analysis and Mössbauer data also confirmed the changes in compositions of the ores before and after using the electrochemical method. Magnetic properties of the studied species to be compared before and after the application of method showed relevant increase in parameters such as magnetic viscosity (Svo), breaking saturation field (Hcr), magnetic susceptibility (χ), and specific magnetization (Is).

  5. Chemical and mineralogical characterizations of a copper converter slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A copper converter slag was examined chemically and mineralogically to determine its existing phases, in particular those containing Co and Cu. The slag consists predominantly of fayalite and magnetite, together with some glass,chalcocite, and metallic copper. Copper is entrapped in the slag mostly as chalcocite and metallic copper, as well as trace copper oxide. There was no indication of any independent Co mineral in the slag, but Co was found to be enriched in fayalite and megnetite as solid solution, although Co was detected in all the phases of the slag by SEM-EDX (scanning electron microscopy equipped with model EDAX-9100 energy dispersive spectrometer) and WDS (model WDX-2A X-ray wave-length dispersive spectrometer).

  6. Mineralogical data on bat guano deposits from three Romanian caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Giurgiu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical studies performed on crusts, nodules and earthy masses from the Romanian caves Gaura cu Muscă, Gaura Haiducească and Peștera Zidită have revealed the presence of three different phosphate associations. The minerals have been identified by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Five phosphates have been identified in the samples, with hydroxylapatite the only common mineral in all the three caves. Brushite, taranakite, leucophosphite and variscite are the other phosphates identified. Associated minerals include gypsum, calcite, quartz and illite-group minerals. Aside from differences in the lithology, the occurrences of the different phosphate minerals indicate variable pH and humidity conditions near or within the guano accumulations.

  7. A mineralogical study of the binding mechanisms in chromite briquettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briquettes are made of chromite fines and a suitable binding material which are fed into a pillow-shaped mould, and pressure is applied to compact the material. The Council for Mineral Technology and Middelburg Steel and Alloys have taken out a provisional patent for the manufacturing of composite briquettes containing not only reducing agents but also fluxes, which will improve the efficiency of the reduction process. Briquettes were examined and the results were correlated with the strengths of the briquettes, which were measured in drop tests, compressive strength and abrasive resistance. The mineralogical procedures included differential thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectroscopy and the use of the electron microprobe. The information obtained by these procedures enabled the determination of the nature of the binding mechanisms. Six different types of briquettes, with their respective binding mechanisms were studied

  8. Clay mineralogy of weathering profiles from the Carolina Piedmont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loferski, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Saprolite profiles (12) that formed over various crystalline rocks from the Charlotte 1o X 2o quadrangle showed overall similarity in their clay mineralogy to depths of 6 to 45 m indicating control by weathering processes rather than by rock type. Most saprolite contained 10-25% clay, and ranged 3 to 70%. Kaolinite and halloysite composed = or >75% of the clay fraction of most samples. The ratio kaolinite:halloysite ranged widely, from 95% kaolinite to 90% halloysite, independent of depth. Clay-size mica was present in all profiles, and ranged 5-75% over a sericite schist. Mixed-layer mica-smectite and mica-vermiculite were subordinate; discrete smectite and vermiculite were rare. The abundance of halloysite indicates a continuously humid environment since the time of profile formation, because of the rapidity with which halloysite dehydrates irreversibly. -R.S.M.

  9. Mineralogy and geochemistry of soils from glass houses and solariums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgariu, Dumitru; Filipov, Feodor; Rusu, Constantin; Bulgariu, Laura

    2010-05-01

    The experimental studies have been performed on soil samples from Copou-Iaşi, Bacău and Bârlad (România) glass houses. We have specially follow the aspects concerning to the distribution of occurrence forms, composition and structure of mineral and organic components, and the genetic correlations between these in conditions of soils from glass houses, respectively. The results regarding the distribution tendencies on profile and the correlations between mineral and organic components of studied soils have been correlated with the results of microscopic, spectral (IR and Raman) and X-ray diffraction studies, and with the results of thermodynamic modelling of mineral equilibriums and dynamics of pedogenesis processes, in conditions of soils from glass houses. The utilization of intensive cultivation technologies of vegetables in glass houses determined the degradation of morphological, physical and chemical characteristics of soils, by fast evolution of salted processes (salinization and / or sodization), compaction, carbonatation, eluviation-illuviation, frangipane formation, stagnogleization, gleization, etc. Under these conditions, at depth of 30-40 cm is formed a compact and impenetrable horizon with frangipane characteristics, expresses more or less. The aspects about the formation of frangipane horizon in soils from glasshouses are not yet sufficiently know. Whatever of the formation processes, the frangipane horizons determined a sever segregation in pedo-geochemical evolution of soils from glasshouses, with very important consequences on the agrochemical quality of these soils. The soils from glass houses are characterized by a very large variability of mineralogy and chemistry, which are traduced by intense modifications of superior horizons, in many cases there are conditions for the apparition of new pedogenetic horizons through new-pedogenesis processes. Under these conditions the definition of some general characteristics of soils from glasshouses is

  10. Addenda to the topographical mineralogy of uranium in old time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with the author's book 'The Uranium and its history', published in 1963, addenda are presented on the inventory of since long well-known deposits of uranium minerals, especially covering the time before 1898, which is the year, when radium was discovered. The supplements are about occurences in Europe, the proof of which should today deserve particular interest considering the investigation of uranium deposits carried out after 1945. The evaluation of so far unnoticed old papers has led up to both a correction and addition of several facts concerning topographical mineralogy in the present literature. Addenda to the information of 1963 from other viewa of the history of uranium are herewith announced. (orig.)

  11. Mineralogical analysis of a weathering mantle derived from tuffite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessbauer spectra are presented at 15 and 298 K for magnetically-separated extracts of magnetic soils from a tuffite-derived weathering mantle from Minas Gerais, Brazil. The principal iron-bearing mineral is maghemite in which the degree of Ti or Mg substitution is found to vary with depth. The Mg-maghemite, with lattice parameter a0 = 0.838 nm, is a new natural mineral. It is associated with anatase in the magnetic-separates. (orig.)

  12. Mineralogy and leachability of gasified sewage sludge solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Study of the solid residue's characterization, solids resulting from sewage sludge gasification. → Multi-technique approach is used to study the evolution of the mineralogy including innovative methods. → Sewage sludge mineralogy undergoes significant transformations during thermal treatment, influenced mainly by temperature and heating atmosphere. → Heavy metals are differently stabilized and located. → Steam gasification is an attractive route for sewage sludge disposal in view of the mobility of heavy metals retained in the residues. - Abstract: Gasification of sewage sludge produces combustible gases as well as tar and a solid residue as by-products. This must be taken into account when determining the optimal thermal conditions for the gasification process. In this study, the influence of temperature, heating atmosphere and residence time on the characteristics of the gasified sewage sludge residues is investigated. ICP-AES analyses reveal that the major chemical elements in the char residues are phosphorus, calcium, iron and silicon. Heavy metals such as copper, zinc, chromium, nickel and lead are also present at relatively high levels - from 50 to more than 1000 mg/kg of dry matter. The major mineral phases' identification - before and after heating - as well as their morphology and approximate chemistry (XRD and SEM-EDX) demonstrate that a number of transformations take place during gasification. These are influenced by the reactor's temperature and the oxidative degree of its internal atmosphere. The copper-, zinc- and chromium-bearing phases are studied using chemometric tools, showing that the distribution of those metals among the mineral phases is considerably different. Finally, batch-leaching tests reveal that metals retained in the residue are significantly stabilized after thermal treatment to a higher or lower extent, depending on the thermal conditions applied.

  13. Comet Mineralogy as Inferred from Infrared Spectra of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    For most comets, infrared (IR) spectroscopy (remote sensing) is the method through which we diagnose the mineralogy and size distribution of dust in their comae. The shape and contrast of the IR spectral features depend on the particle size: optically active minerals (absorbing of visible and near-IR solar photons) and submicron solid grains or highly porous (> 90% vacuum) grains primarily contribute to the shapes of the observed resonances. Comet mineralogies typically are determined by fitting thermal emission models of ensembles of discrete mineral grains to observed IR spectral energy distributions. The absorptivities (Q-abs) and scattering efficiencies (Q-scat) of the discrete mineral grains are computed using Mie scattering, Maxwell-Garnet mixing, Discrete Dipole Approximation, and Multi-Layered Sphere codes. These techniques when applied to crystalline minerals, specifically olivine (Mg_x, Fe_1-x)2 Si04, x>0.9, require the use of ellipsoidal shaped particles with elongated axial ratios or hollow spheres to produce the shapes of the resonances observed both from comet comae and laboratory samples. The wavelength positions of the distinct resonances from submicron-radii crystalline silicates, as well as their thermal equilibrium temperatures, constrain the crystalline olivine to have a relatively high Mg-content (x>0.9, or Fo>90). Only resonances computed for submicron Mg-rich crystalline olivine and crystalline orthopyroxene match the observed IR spectral features. However, this has led to the interpretation that micron-radii and larger crystals are absent from comet comae. Furthermore, the mass fraction of silicate crystals is dependent upon whether just the submicron portion of the size distribution is being compared or the submicron crystals compare to the aggregates of porous amorphous silicates that are computationally tractable as porous spheres. We will discuss the Deep Impact results as examples of these challenges to interpreting mid-IR spectra of

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis as a route to mineralogically-inspired structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Colin D; Kolis, Joseph W

    2016-02-21

    The use of high temperature hydrothermal reactions to prepare crystals having mineralogically-related structures is described. Complex naturally occurring minerals can have fascinating structures and exhibit important features like low dimensionality, noncentrosymmetry, or ion channels that can provide excellent guideposts for the designed synthesis of new materials. Actual minerals, even though they may have intriguing physical properties, are often unsuitable for study because of the persistent impurities inevitably present in natural samples. Hydrothermal fluids at relatively high temperatures provide access to large, high quality single crystals of structures with mineral-like structures. This enables the study of physical properties like ionic conduction, magnetic spin frustration and non-linear optical behavior. Some fundamental considerations of the hydrothermal technique are discussed in the context of synthesizing mineralogically-inspired materials. The metal vanadates provide a surprisingly rich and diversified range of compounds and are selected to illustrate many of the concepts described here. A series of low dimensional mineral analogs featuring isolated units, chains, and layers have been prepared in the laboratory as large single crystals using a high temperature hydrothermal synthetic methods, and their physical properties are under investigation. The metal silicates are also highlighted as another promising field of exploration, since their hydrothermal synthesis surprisingly lags behind the enormous literature of the natural silicate minerals. The introduction of heteroelements, such as boron to make borosilicates, appears to also open the door to additional new materials. Many of these new materials have direct equivalents in the mineral kingdom, while others have no known analogs but are reminiscent of minerals and can be classified in the same ways. From these initial results there appears to be a very rich vein of synthetic minerals waiting

  15. Mineralogy of Selected Paddy Soils in Southeastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.L.WANG; P.M.HUANG

    1997-01-01

    Limited information is available concerning the mineralogy of paddy soils in the southeastern China, Using chemical methods in conjunction with X-ray diffractometry,we studied the mineral composition of three paddy soils:Jinghua (paddy soil on Quaternary red clay),Fuyang (Hapl-percogenic loamy paddy soil),and Shaoxing(gleyic clayey paddy soil).All the soils contained quartz,mica,vermiculite,chlorite and kaolinite ,and the distribution of these minerals varied with soil prticle size fractions.The clay fraction of the Fuyang and Shaoxing soils aso contained smectite.Although X-ray data did not show the presence of smectite in the Jinghua soil,this mineral was identified by the chemical method.suggesting a transitional property of the mineral in the soil.Hydroxy-Al interlayered minerals were also present in the clay fraction.The amount of smectite in the soils was 31.6(Shaoxing),16.5(Fuyang),and 21.4(Jinghua)g kg-1;for vermiculite it was 33.3(Shaoxing),16.5(Fuyang),and 8.5(Jinghua) g kg-1,Smectite was only Found in the clay fraction,In contrast,amounts of vermiculite in soil particle size fractions were 3.0-11.4(sand), 2.1-6.0(coarse silt),4.6-18.9(medium silt),0.9-40.0(fine silt),and 17.0-108(clay)g kg-1,The amount of noncrystalline aluminosilicates in the soils in g kg-1 decreased in the order:Shaoxing(2.4)>Jinghua (1.9)>Fuyang(1.7).This study has provided useful mineralogical information that is fundamental in future development of management strategies of soils.

  16. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    This report assesses Brazil's corporate governance policy framework. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Brazil. It is an update of the 2005 corporate governance Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC). Brazil's experience o...

  17. Liver Transplantation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Paulo Lisboa; Farias, Alberto Queiroz; Couto, Claudia Alves

    2016-09-01

    Over 1700 liver transplantations (LTs) are performed annually in Brazil. In absolute terms, the country performs more LT surgeries than anywhere else in Latin America and is third worldwide. However, due to its increasing population and inadequate donor organ supply, the country averages 5-10 LTs per million population, far lower than required. There is a marked heterogeneity in organ donation and LT activity throughout the country. Access to LT in the underprivileged North, Midwest, and Northeast regions of Brazil is scarce. Major challenges for the future of LT in Brazil will be to increase organ donation and access to LT. The reduction of those geographical disparities in donation, organ procurement, and LT due to political and financial constraints is of utmost importance. Liver Transplantation 22 1254-1258 2016 AASLD. PMID:27228568

  18. Tephrostratigraphy, petrography, geochemistry, age and fossil record of the Ganigobis Shale Member and associated glaciomarine deposits of the Dwyka Group, Late Carboniferous, southern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Bangert, Berthold

    2002-01-01

    Thin, pyroclastic marker beds are preserved in argillaceous units of the Dwyka Group in southern Nambia and South Africa which are the earliest witnesses of volcanism in Karoo-equivalent strata of southern Africa. The aim of this study is to present the field appearance of these marker beds, to characterise their mineralogy, geochemistry and heavy mineral contents and to present new radiometric age data from their juvenile zircons. Carboniferous-Permian Karoo deposits in the Aranos Basin of s...

  19. Detailed mineralogical characterization of the Bullfrog and Tram members USW-G1, with emphasis on clay mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bish, D.L.

    1981-10-01

    The detailed mineralogy of the Bullfrog and Tram Members of the Crater Flat Tuff from drill hole USW-G1 has been examined, primarily to characterize fully the amounts and types of clay minerals in the tuffs and the possible effects clay minerals have on rock properties. Results of bulk sample x-ray diffraction analyses agree closely with previous determinations, although slightly higher clay mineral contents were found in this study. X-ray diffraction analysis of fine fractions revealed that the clay minerals in the tuffs are sodium-saturated montmorillonite-beidellites with typical layer charges and no high-charge layers. These smectites are found in virtually all samples of the Bullfrog and Tram, and there is no correlation between the amounts of smectites and the amounts of zeolite, quartz, and feldspar. Smectites are present in both welded and nonwelded horizons and are scarce in some zones with slight-to-absent welding.

  20. Detailed mineralogical characterization of the Bullfrog and Tram members USW-G1, with emphasis on clay mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detailed mineralogy of the Bullfrog and Tram Members of the Crater Flat Tuff from drill hole USW-G1 has been examined, primarily to characterize fully the amounts and types of clay minerals in the tuffs and the possible effects clay minerals have on rock properties. Results of bulk sample x-ray diffraction analyses agree closely with previous determinations, although slightly higher clay mineral contents were found in this study. X-ray diffraction analysis of fine fractions revealed that the clay minerals in the tuffs are sodium-saturated montmorillonite-beidellites with typical layer charges and no high-charge layers. These smectites are found in virtually all samples of the Bullfrog and Tram, and there is no correlation between the amounts of smectites and the amounts of zeolite, quartz, and feldspar. Smectites are present in both welded and nonwelded horizons and are scarce in some zones with slight-to-absent welding

  1. Eand P opportunities in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilho, Marcelo [National Petroleum Agency of Brasil (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brazil is one of the world's largest economies and the country also has significant heavy oil reserves. This report from the National Petroleum Agency of Brazil aims at presenting the situation of the oil and gas sector in Brazil in terms of resources, production, regulatory framework and opportunities for the future. Brazil has numerous sedimentary basins at its disposal, most of them being prospected by both national and foreign companies from all over the world. Brazil has over 14 billion barrels of proven reserves, its production is 2,1 MMBbl/d and heavy oil represents almost 40% of that production. The National Petroleum Agency of Brazil is responsible for the implementation of oil sector policy with the aims of maintaining self-sufficiency, implementing good practices in terms of health and safety, and increasing local content. This paper pointed out that Brazil has an important opportunity to enhance its energy sector through the development of heavy oil.

  2. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa [BandTech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Linden, Johan [Aabo Akademi, Aabo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  3. Brazil: anchoring the region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of Brazil's state-run petroleum company, Petrobras, in providing a national supply of oil and natural gas and their products to Brazil was discussed. Petrobras is the sole state-run enterprise which carries out research, exploration, production, refining, imports, exports and the transportation of oil and gas in Brazil. Petrobras has built a complete and modern infrastructure made up of refineries, distribution bases, terminals and oil and gas pipelines. Recently (1995) the Brazilian National Assembly approved legislation that while confirming the state monopoly, also provides private contractors and other state-owned companies ways to participate in the petroleum sector. There exists a great potential for oil and gas in many of Brazil's 29 sedimentary basins. The regulatory legislation also created two new organs to deal with the partial deregulation of the petroleum sector, the National Board for Energy Policy and the National Petroleum Agency. The first of these will deal with policy issues, measures and guidelines regarding regional energy supply and demand and specific programs such as those affecting natural gas, fuel alcohol, coal and nuclear energy. The National Petroleum Agency will manage the hydrocarbon sector on behalf of the government. Its functions will include regulation and monitoring of the sector, managing the bidding process for concessions for exploration and production, and other related activities. The new legislation opens up new horizons for the Brazilian oil sector, providing opportunities for private investment, both domestic and foreign, as well as for new technological capabilities associated with these investments. 1 tab., 6 figs

  4. Chikungunya risk for Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimunda do Socorro da Silva Azevedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to show, based on the literature on the subject, the potential for dispersal and establishment of the chikungunya virus in Brazil. The chikungunya virus, a Togaviridae member of the genusAlphavirus, reached the Americas in 2013 and, the following year, more than a million cases were reported. In Brazil, indigenous transmission was registered in Amapa and Bahia States, even during the period of low rainfall, exposing the whole country to the risk of virus spreading. Brazil is historically infested by Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, also dengue vectors. Chikungunya may spread, and it is important to take measures to prevent the virus from becoming endemic in the country. Adequate care for patients with chikungunya fever requires training general practitioners, rheumatologists, nurses, and experts in laboratory diagnosis. Up to November 2014, more than 1,000 cases of the virus were reported in Brazil. There is a need for experimental studies in animal models to understand the dynamics of infection and the pathogenesis as well as to identify pathophysiological mechanisms that may contribute to identifying effective drugs against the virus. Clinical trials are needed to identify the causal relationship between the virus and serious injuries observed in different organs and joints. In the absence of vaccines or effective drugs against the virus, currently the only way to prevent the disease is vector control, which will also reduce the number of cases of dengue fever.

  5. Kaolin clays from Patagonia - Argentina. Relationship between the mineralogy and ceramic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralogy, grain size distribution, chemical composition, S and C contents, plasticity, and cationic exchange capacity are determined in the sedimentary kaolinitic clays from the clay pits Puma Negra, Puma Gris, Tincar Super; and Chenque and Cardenal located in Santa Cruz and Chubut Provinces. Mineralogy and Particle size distribution of > 5, 5-2 and <2μ fractions are determined. Modulus of rupture, 1100 and 1250 deg C shrinkage and water absorption and whiteness are found. It is accomplished a statistics correlation between the characteristics of grain size distribution, mineralogy, and other physical properties with the main ceramic properties to understand its influence in the ceramic process. (author)

  6. Petrography and hydric characterization of the quarry material of the varieties of Borriol Stone (Castellón

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovejero, M.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Borriol stone is one of the most widely used and well-known building materials in the Spanish province of Castellapn. It is a cretaceous limestone quarried in the El Abeller quarry, Borriol (Castellón. Since the seventeenth century it has been used in several historic buildings to be found both in the city of Castellaon and in nearby Valencia. Although it is commercially classified as a single rock type, two different lithologies or varieties can be distinguished in the Abeller outcrop; these represent vertical changes in the outcrop series andaré referred to in this paper as Ochre Borriol and Red Borriol. Petrographic, mineralogical and chemical studies were carried out, along with color determination. The stone s hydric parameters were obtained via the following tests: vacuum water absorption, free water absorption, desorption and capillary water absorption. Red Borriol is a reddish dolomitic grainstone with textures of dedolimitization. It is a low-porosity rock consisting mainly of calcite and dolomite, with quartz, illite, goethite and hematite as secondary minerals. As it has a low absorption coefficient, low capillarity index and rapid water desorption, it is expected to behave well under the action of weathering agents. Ochre Borriol is a yellowish packstonegrainstone with higher porosity. It is famed mainly of calcite and has less dolomite content than Red Borriol. Its accesory minerals are quartz, illite and goethite. It has a higher absorption coefficient and higher capillarity. Although it absorbs water more rapidly, its desorption is slower. As the hydric behavior of Ochre Borriol is less favorable, it is to be expected that its deterioration processes are encouraged by water circulation more than Red Borriol´sare.

    La "Piedra de Borriol" es uno de los materiales más utilizados y conocidos en la construcción de la provincia de Castellón que se han utilizado desde el siglo XVII como material de construcción en numerosos

  7. Relationship between soil oxidizable carbon and physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of umbric ferralsols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Adriano Marques

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Umbric Ferralsols with thick umbric epipedons (> 100 cm thickness in humid Tropical and Subtropical areas is a paradox since the processes of organic matter decomposition in these environments are very efficient. Nevertheless, this soil type has been reported in areas in the Southeast and South of Brazil, and at some places in the Northeast. Aspects of the genesis and paleoenvironmental significance of these Ferralsols still need a better understanding. The processes that made the umbric horizons so thick and dark and contributed to the preservation of organic carbon (OC at considerable depths in these soils are of special interest. In this study, eight Ferralsols with a thick umbric horizon (UF under different vegetation types were sampled (tropical rain forest, tropical seasonal forest and savanna woodland and their macromorphological, physical, chemical and mineralogical properties studied to detect soil characteristics that could explain the preservation of high carbon amounts at considerable depths. The studied UF are clayey to very clayey, strongly acidic, dystrophic, and Al-saturated and charcoal fragments are often scattered in the soil matrix. Kaolinites are the main clay minerals in the A and B horizons, followed by abundant gibbsite and hydroxyl-interlayered vermiculite. The latter was only found in UFs derived from basalt rock in the South of the country. Total carbon (TC ranged from 5 to 101 g kg-1 in the umbric epipedon. Dichromate-oxidizable organic carbon represented nearly 75 % of TC in the thick A horizons, while non-oxidizable C, which includes recalcitrant C (e.g., charcoal, contributed to the remaining 25 % of TC. Carbon contents were not related to most of the inorganic soil variables studied, except for oxalate-extractable Al, which individually explained 69 % (P < 0.001 of the variability of TC in the umbric epipedon. Clay content was not suited as predictor of TC or of the other studied C forms. Bulk

  8. Ancient mortars from Cape Verde: mineralogical and physical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fernando; Costa, Cristiana; Velosa, Ana; Quintela, Ana; Terroso, Denise; Marques, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Times and locations of different building constructions means different knowledge, habits, different construction methods and materials. The study and safeguarding of the architectural heritage takes nowadays a progressive importance as a vehicle for transmission of cultures and history of nations. The coatings are of great importance in the durability of a building due to the protective role of the masonry. The compatibility between the materials with which they are executed (masonry, mortar and grout settlement) promotes the proper functioning of the wall and a consequent increase in durability. Therefore, it becomes important to study and characterize the mortar coating of buildings to know its characteristics and to use compatible materials in the rehabilitation and maintenance of buildings. This study aims to characterize the chemical, physical, mechanical and mineralogical mortar samples collected in buildings in three islands of Cape Verde, for the conservation, rehabilitation and preservation of them. The collected samples belong to buildings constructed in the end of XIX century and in the beginning of XX century. In order to characterize the mortar samples some tests was made, such as X-Ray Diffraction, X- Ray Fluorescence, acid attack and mechanical strength. The samples were divided into three groups depending on origin; so we have a first group collected on the island of Santiago, the second on the island of Saint Vincent and the third on the island of Santo Antao. The samples are all carbonated, but Santiago samples have a lower carbonates content. In terms of insoluble residue (from the acid attack) it was concluded that the samples have similar value ranging from 9 to 26%. The compressive strength of the mortars have a range between 1.36 and 4.55 MPa, which is related to the presence of more binder in samples with higher resistance. The chemical and mineralogical analyzes showed that these consist of lime mortars (binder), natural pozzolan and

  9. Petrography, fine stratigraphy and petrofacies of the Stassfurt rock salt (Zechstein 2) in the development region of ASSE II salt mine near Brunswick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Stassfurt rock salt (Na2) in the Asse II salt mine constitutes a saline sequence of the sub-Hercynian basin. In the anticline of the Asse II the Na2 constitutes a core of the anticline with an interior special folding. The combination of underground mapping with the investigations of the salt petrography permits the recognition of stratigraphic unities and with it sedimentary and early diagenetic formation processes for the stratigraphic beds of the Hauptsalz (Na2β), the Speisesalz (Na2SP) and the Polyhalitbaenkchensalz (Na2P). An additional postdiagenetic new formation of minerals from the overlying Stassfurt potash layer (K2C) can be recognized in the kieseritic region of the ''Carnallitisch-Kieseritische Ueberganssalz (Na2K+C)'' and in the ''Tonliniensalz'' (Na2TL). The lower part of the Na2β belongs to a saline basin facies. In the upper part of the Na2β structural and textural characteristics refer to the swallowing of the saline sedimentation room. Simultaneously, more and more terrestrial influences of the saline sedimentation become conspicuous in the northwestern part of the Asse II. They have their clearest facies in the only locally formed Tonliniensalz (Na2TL). The petrographic review of the ''polyhalite region'', which encloses the upper part of the Na2β, the Na2SP and the Na2P, rendered obvious indications for a pseudomorphic origin of polyhalite from primarily sedimened gypsum. The replacement of anhydrite by polyhalite was compared to it as being of unimportant significance. The quantitative parts of the accessory minerals (polyhalite, anhydrite, kieserite, sylvite, carnallite) were determined by means of geochemical investigations in the stratigraphic horizons of Na2 in the mine Asse II. A regional comparison with the saline sedimentation of Zechstein 2 in the sub-Hercynian basin shows a progressive saline sedimentation cycle of the Stassfurt type for the fine stratigraphic division of the Na2 in Asse II. (orig./HP)

  10. Mineralogy and microstructure of sintered lignite coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marina Ilic; Christopher Cheeseman; Christopher Sollars; Jonathan Knight [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2003-02-01

    Lignite coal fly ash from the 'Nikola Tesla' power plant in Yugoslavia has been characterised, milled, compacted and sintered to form monolithic ceramic materials. The effect of firing at temperatures between 1130 and 1190{sup o}C on the density, water accessible porosity, mineralogy and microstructure of sintered samples is reported. This class C fly ash has an initial average particle size of 82 {mu}m and contains siliceous glass together with the crystalline phases quartz, anorthite, gehlenite, hematite and mullite. Milling the ash to an average particle size of 5.6 m, compacting and firing at 1170{sup o}C for 1 h produces materials with densities similar to clay-based ceramics that exhibit low water absorption. Sintering reduces the amount of glass, quartz, gehlenite and anhydrite, but increases formation of anorthite, mullite, hematite and cristobalite. SEM confirms the formation of a dense ceramic at 1170{sup o}C and indicates that pyroplastic effects cause pore formation and bloating at 1190{sup o}C. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Mineralogical characterization of airborne individual particulates in Beijing PM10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Sen-lin; SHAO Long-yi; WU Ming-hong; JIAO Zheng

    2006-01-01

    This work mainly focuses on the mineralogical study of particulate matter(PM10) in Beijing. Samples were collected on polycarbonate filter from April, 2002 to March, 2003 in Beijing urban area. Scanning electronic microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray(SEM/EDX) was used to investigate individual mineral particles in Beijing PM10. 1454 individual mineral particulates from 48 samples were analysed by SEM/EDX. The results revealed that mineral particulates were complex and heterogeneous. 38kinds of minerals in PM10 were identified. The clay minerals, of annual average percentage of 30.1% , were the main composition among the identified minerals, and illite/smectite was the main composition in clay minerals, reaching up to 35%. Annual average percentage of quartz, calcite, compound particulates, carbonates were 13.5%, 10.9%, 11.95%, 10.31%, respectively. Annual average percentage less than 10% were gypsum, feldspar, dolomite, and so on. Fluorite, apatite, halite, barite and chloridize zinc (ZnCl2) were firstly identified in Beijing PM10. Sulfurization was found on surface of mineral particles, suggested extensive atmospheric reaction in air during summer.

  12. Mineralogical record of the redox conditions on early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehouck, Erwin; Gaudin, Anne; Chevrier, Vincent; Mangold, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Sulfates and Fe-oxides identified on the martian surface by orbital and in situ missions indicate that oxidizing conditions have existed on early Mars, at least locally and/or episodically. In the context of rock alteration and weathering, redox conditions are especially critical for the behavior of iron, which is soluble in its divalent state but insoluble in its trivalent state. Here, we combine results from a series of laboratory experiments conducted under Mars-like conditions to address the influence of highly-oxidizing compounds such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the alteration pathways of primary materials. We show that, if early Mars had a dense CO2 atmosphere allowing for relatively "warm and wet" conditions and surface weathering, highly-oxidizing conditions would have strongly inhibited the formation of Fe/Mg-smectite clays from alteration of igneous ferromagnesian minerals, and possibly enhanced the formation of carbonates. But a decade of mineral mapping of the martian surface show abundant, widespread Fe/Mg-clays and rare carbonates, which we interpret here as a mineralogical record of poorly-oxidizing (or even reducing) conditions during most of the Noachian era. Oxidizing conditions would have occurred later in martian history as a consequence of a higher rate of H2 escape or of a lower rate of volcanic outgassing, or both.

  13. Chemical, Mineralogical, and Morphological Properties of Steel Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irem Zeynep Yildirim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel slag is a byproduct of the steelmaking and steel refining processes. This paper provides an overview of the different types of steel slag that are generated from basic-oxygen-furnace (BOF steelmaking, electric-arc-furnace (EAF steelmaking, and ladle-furnace steel refining processes. The mineralogical and morphological properties of BOF and electric-arc-furnace-ladle [EAF(L] slag samples generated from two steel plants in Indiana were determined through X-Ray Diffraction (XRD analyses and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM studies. The XRD patterns of both BOF and EAF(L slag samples were very complex, with several overlapping peaks resulting from the many minerals present in these samples. The XRD analyses indicated the presence of free MgO and CaO in both the BOF and EAF(L slag samples. SEM micrographs showed that the majority of the sand-size steel slag particles had subangular to angular shapes. Very rough surface textures with distinct crystal structures were observed on the sand-size particles of BOF and EAF(L slag samples under SEM. The characteristics of the steel slag samples considered in this study are discussed in the context of a detailed review of steel slag properties.

  14. Ooid mineralogy and diagenesis of upper Mississippian Pitkin Formation, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydari, E.; Snelling, R.D.; Dawson, W.C.; Machain, M.L. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The Pitkin formation is a marine oolitic-bioclastic limestone exhibiting shoal, lagoonal, beach, and tidal-channel facies. Ooids formed on the Pitkin carbonate shelf show lateral and vertical variations in original mineralogy. In a section south of Mountain View, Arkansas, the lower marine shoal and shoreface facies are composed of originally aragonitic ooids. These ooids are replaced by neomorphic calcite and exhibit elevated strontium and low magnesium concentrations. The overlying lagoonal facies are composed of originally calcite ooids that have retained their original radial fabrics. These ooids exhibit low strontium and high magnesium concentration. Ooids in sections to the west of Mountain View are all calcitic. Early diagenesis of the formation is dominated by marine cementation. Postdepositional diagenesis encompasses extensive dissolution of originally aragonite and magnesian calcite components, precipitation of a late unzoned ferroan calcite, and minor amounts of saddle dolomite. Grainstone units lack any intergranular porosity. Pressure solution contacts among grains in grainstones are generally uncommon. Cementation alone is responsible for destruction of all of the original porosity in these rocks. Intensive pressure solution is observed only in packstone units not affected by early marine cementation.

  15. Mineralogy of the Pahrump Hills Region, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Cavanagh, P. D.; Achilles, C. N.; Bristow, T. F.; Morrison, S. M.; Treiman, A. H.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Crisp, J. A.; Fendrich, K.; Morookian, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Pahrump Hills region of Gale crater is a approximately 12 millimeter thick section of sedimentary rocks in the Murray formation, interpreted as the basal geological unit of Mount Sharp. The Mars Science Laboratory, Curiosity, arrived at the Pahrump Hills in September, 2014, and performed a detailed six-month investigation of the sedimentary structures, geochemistry, and mineralogy of the area. During the campaign, Curiosity drilled and delivered three rock samples to its internal instruments, including the CheMin XRD/XRF. The three targets, Confidence Hills, Mojave 2, and Telegraph Peak, contain variable amounts of plagioclase, pyroxene, iron oxides, jarosite, phyllosilicates, and X-ray amorphous material. Hematite was predicted at the base of Mount Sharp from orbital visible/near-IR spectroscopy, and CheMin confirmed this detection. The presence of jarosite throughout Pahrump Hills suggests the sediments experienced acid-sulfate alteration, either in-situ or within the source region of the sediments. This acidic leaching environment is in stark contrast to the environment preserved within the Sheepbed mudstone on the plains of Gale crater. The minerals within Sheepbed, including Fe-saponite, indicate these sediments were deposited in a shallow lake with circumneutral pH that may have been habitable.

  16. Notes on Lithology, Mineralogy, and Production for Lunar Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, D. L.; Stoeser, D. B.; Benzel, W. M.; Schrader, C. M.; Edmunson, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    The creation of lunar simulants requires a very broad range of specialized knowledge and information. This document covers several topic areas relevant to lithology, mineralogy, and processing of feedstock materials that are necessary components of the NASA lunar simulant effort. The naming schemes used for both terrestrial and lunar igneous rocks are discussed. The conflict between the International Union of Geological Sciences standard and lunar geology is noted. The rock types known as impactites are introduced. The discussion of lithology is followed by a brief synopsis of pyroxene, plagioclase, and olivine, which are the major mineral constituents of the lunar crust. The remainder of the text addresses processing of materials, particularly the need for separation of feedstock minerals. To illustrate this need, the text includes descriptions of two norite feedstocks for lunar simulants: the Stillwater Complex in Montana, United States, and the Bushveld Complex in South Africa. Magnetic mineral separations, completed by Hazen Research, Inc. and Eriez Manufacturing Co. for the simulant task, are discussed.

  17. Mineralogical characteristics of kyanite from Prilepets, Republic of Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives mineralogical characteristics of kyanite from village of Prilepets, R. Macedonia. Several samples were collected for research. The kyanite was identified by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Infrared spectroscopy (IR). The use of these three methods showed that they are very useful methods for rapid mineral analysis contributing important analytical information.The results of the X-ray powder pattern, SEM analysis and Infrared spectroscopy enable straightforward identification of the studied mineral sample as kyanite. Kyanite is located east of village of Prilepets in micashist rocks which have lepidoblastic structure and schistose texture. It occurs in blue thin-bladed triclinic crystals and crystalline aggregates. Cleavage is perfect on {100}, good on {010}. Fracture is splintery. Kyanite is transparent to translucent. Lustre is vitreous or sub-vitreous. Hardness lengthwise 4-5, crosswise 6-7. Density 3.53-3.67 g/cm3 . The colour is blue. Origin on blue colours due to the charge-transfer process Fe2+ → Fe3+ , Fe2+ Ti4+ or Cr3+ . In our samples concentration of Fe is 0.05-0.18 wt%, Ti concentration is 0.03-0.11 wt%, while Cr concentration is 0.02-0.13 wt%. (Author)

  18. Mineralogy of a perudic Andosol in central Java, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ranst, Eric; Utami, S. R.; Verdoodt, A.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2008-02-15

    We studied the mineralogy of a perudic Andosol developed on the Dieng Tephra Sequence in central Java, Indonesia. The objective was to confirm the presence and determine the origin and stability of 2:1 and interlayered 2:1 phyllosilicates in well-drained Andosols. This was and still is a debated topic in the literature. Total elemental and selective dissolution, as well as microscopic and X-ray diffraction analyses, were performed on the soil samples collected from this site. These analyses confirmed that andic properties were present in the soil samples. The allophane content determined by selective dissolution was 3-4% in the A horizons, and increased to 12-18% in the deeper subsoil horizons. In addition, the clay fraction contained dioctahedral smectite, hydroxy-Al-interlayered 2:1 minerals (HIS), Al-chlorite, kaolinite, pyrophyllite, mica, cristobalite and some gibbsite. The silt and sand fractions were rich in plagioclase and pyroxene. The 2:1 minerals (smectite and pyrophyllite), as well as chlorite and kaolinite were of hydrothermal origin and were incorporated in the tephra during volcanic eruption. Besides desilication during dissolution of unstable minerals, Al interlayering of 2:1 layer silicates was most likely the most prominent pedogenic process. Although hydroxy-Al polymeric interlayers would normally stabilize the 2:1 clay phases, the strong weakening, and even disappearance of the characteristic XRD peaks, indicated instability of these minerals in the upper A horizons due to the perudic and intensive leaching conditions.

  19. Spectroscopic Characterization of Mineralogy Across Vesta: Evidence of Different Lithologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanotis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Filacchione, G.; Capria, M. T.; Tosi, F.; Capaccioni, F.; Zambon, F.; Carraro, F.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Jaumann, R.; Magni, G.; Marchi, S.; McCord, T. B.; McFadden, L. A.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Nathues, A.; Palomba, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Turrini, D.

    2012-01-01

    The average spectrum of Vesta, obtained by VIR in the range 0.25-5.1 microns, shows clear evidence of absorption bands due to pyroxenes and thermal emissions beyond 3.5 11m. Vesta shows considerable variability across its surface in terms of spectral reflectance and emission, band depths, bands widths and bands centers, reflecting a complex geological history. Vesta's average spectrum and inferred mineralogy resemble those of howardite meteorites. On a regional scale, significant deviations are seen: the south polar 500km Rheasilvia impact crater has a higher diogenitic component, and equatorial regions show a higher eucritic component. This lithologic distribution, with a concentration of Mg-pyroxenes in the Rheasilvia area, reinforces the hypothesis of a deeper diogenitic crust excavated by the impact that formed the Rheasilvia crater, and an upper eucritic crust, whose remnants are seen in the equatorial region. This scenario has implications for Vesta differentiation, consistent with magma ocean models. However, serial magmatism models could also have concentrated pyroxene cumulates in plutons emplaced within the lower crust,

  20. Mineralogy of Pyroxene and Olivine in the Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Zolensky, M.; Takeda, H.; Hagiya, K.; Ohsumi, K; Satake, W.; Kurihara, T.; Dept. of Physics; Shaddad, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Almahata Sitta meteorite (hereafter "Alma") is the first example of a recovered asteroidal sample that fell to earth after detection still in the orbit (2008TC3 asteroid), and thus is critical to understand the relationship between meteorites and their asteroidal parent bodies [1]. Alma is a polymict ureilite showing a fine-grained brecciated texture with variable lithologies from black, porous to denser, white stones [1]. It is an anomalous ureilite because of wide compositional ranges of silicates with abundant pores often coated by vapor-deposit crystals [1]. Nevertheless, Alma has general similarities to all ureilites because of reduction textures of silicates suggestive of rapid cooling from high temperature as well as heterogeneous oxygen isotope compositions [e.g., 1-5]. Alma is especially unique because it spans the compositional range of known ureilites [1]. In this abstract we report detailed mineralogical and crystallographic investigations of two different fragments to further constrain its thermal history with regards to the nature of the ureilite parent body.

  1. Lunar highland melt rocks - Chemistry, petrology and silicate mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A selected suite containing several of the largest samples of lunar highland melt rocks includes impact melt specimens (anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro) and volcanic specimens (intermediate-K Fra Mauro). Although previous assumptions of LKFM volcanism have fallen into disfavor, no fatal arguments against this hypothesis have been presented, and the evidence of a possibly 'inherited igneous' olivine-plagioclase cosaturation provides cause for keeping a volcanic LKFM hypothesis viable. Comparisons of silicate mineralogy with melt rock compositions provide information on the specimen's composition and cooling history. Plagioclase-rock compositions can be matched to the experimentally determined equilibria for appropriate samples to identify melt rocks with refractory anorthitic clasts. Olivine-rock compositions indicate that melt rock vitrophyres precipitate anomalously Fe-rich olivine; the cause of this anomaly is not immediately evident. The Al-Ti and Ca-Fe-Mg zonation in pyroxene provide information on relative cooling rates of highland melt rocks, but Cr- and Al-content (where Al-rich low-Ca pyroxene cores are preserved in rapidly cooled samples) can be correlated with composition of the host rock.

  2. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for analysis of mineralogical composition of regolith,...

  3. Learning Activities for an Undergraduate Mineralogy/Petrology Course-"I Am/We Are."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an entry level mineralogy/igneous petrology course designed for undergraduate students and presents a series of learning activities based on individual and cooperative learning. Includes 18 references. (Author/YDS)

  4. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop LUNA, a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for mineralogical analysis of regolith, rock...

  5. Correlated modal mineralogy, aqueous alteration and oxygen isotope composition of CM Chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, K. T.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P. A.; Greenwood, R. C.; I. Franchi; Cressy, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we move beyond defining alteration sequences in CM chondrites towards understanding the relationship between modal mineralogy, the extent of aqueous alteration and O-isotope compositions.

  6. Geochemical and mineralogical maps for soils of the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical and mineralogical maps along with a histogram, boxplot, and empirical cumulative distribution function plot for each element or mineral whose data are...

  7. The mineralogy, geochemistry and surface area of mudrocks from the London Clay Formation of southern England

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, S.J.; Wagner, D.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the results of mineralogical and geochemical analysis of a suite of mudstones from the London Clay Formation of southern and south-eastern England. The work was carried out as part of the ongoing ‘Ground Movements: Shrink/Swell’ project under the Physical Hazards Programme. The first part of the report gives an introduction to the geology of the London Clay Formation and a summary of previous mineralogical studies of these rocks. A summary of analytical methods employ...

  8. The mineralogy, surface area and geochemistry of samples from the Wealden Group of southern England

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, S.J.; Wagner, D.; Ingham, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the results of mineralogical and geochemical analysis of a suite of mudstones from the Wealden Group of southern England. The work was carried out as part of the ongoing „Ground Shrinkage Hazards‟ project under the Land Use, Planning and Development Programme. The first part of the report gives an introduction to the geology of the Wealden Group and a summary of previous mineralogical studies of these rocks. A summary of analytical methods employed (X-ray diffraction ...

  9. Effects of Soil and Rock Mineralogy on Soil Erosion Features in the Merek Watershed, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mosayeb Heshmati; Nik M. Majid; Shamshuddin Jusop; Mohamad Gheitury; Arifin Abdu

    2013-01-01

    Accelerated soil erosion is anthropogenic phenomenon and a major worldwide environmental problem. It mainly leads to removal of the clay minerals and soil nutrients and thereby reduces soil fertility because of mineralogical influence on the soil. The objectives of this study were to identify the dominant soil and rock minerals and the influences of mineralogical properties on soil erosion features. This study was conducted at the Merek watershed, located in Kermanshah, Iran. There are diff...

  10. Mineralogical and Thermal Analyses of a Bangle Shard from Harrappa, an Indus Valley Settlement in Pakistan

    CERN Document Server

    Kayani, Saheeb Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    In this research study we present initial results of a recent project in which mineralogical and thermal analysis were carried out on a terracotta bangle shard from Harrappa. We were surprised to find bentonite clay as the major constituent of the bangle shard. Also we have used knowledge of the mineralogical structure determined through X-ray diffraction and results of thermal analysis to predict value of firing temperature of the bangle shard.

  11. Technical characterization by image analysis: an automatic method of mineralogical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of a modern method of image analysis fully automated for the study of grain size distribution modal assays, degree of liberation and mineralogical associations is discussed. The image analyser is interfaced with a scanning electron microscope and an energy dispersive X-rays analyser. The image generated by backscattered electrons is analysed automatically and the system has been used in accessment studies of applied mineralogy as well as in process control in the mining industry. (author)

  12. Mineralogical attenuation for metallic remediation in a passive system for mine water treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Valente, Teresa Maria Fernandes; Antunes, M.; Braga, M. A. Sequeira; Prudêncio, M. I.; Marques, R; Pamplona, J.

    2012-01-01

    Passive systems with constructed wetlands have been consistently used to treat mine water from abandoned mines. Long-term and cost-effective remediation is a crucial expectation for these water treatment facilities. To achieve that, a complex chain of physical, chemical, biological, and mineralogical mechanisms for pollutants removal must be designed to simulate natural attenuation processes. This paper aims to present geochemical and mineralogical data obtained in a recently constructed p...

  13. Mineralogical characteristics of copper flotation products from Cayeli mine, Turkey and their influence to mineral processing

    OpenAIRE

    Strashimirov, S.; Dobrev, S.; Stamenov, S.; GAYDARDZHIEV, Stoyan; Aksani, B.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents mineralogical characteristics and pecularities of minerals distribution in products from Cu cycle of clastic ore mineral processing in Cayeli concentrator, Turkey. Special attention has been drawn to the mineralogical pecularities of sphalerite. The study has covered 16 samples from Cu flotation feed, Cu rougher concentrate, Cu final concentrate and tailing, each sieved in 4 granulometric classes. Significant quantity of sphalerite charactarized by higher amount of Cu and F...

  14. Magnetic fabric and mineralogy of cave deposits in Botovskaya Cave (Eastern Siberia, Russian Federation)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlec, Jaroslav; Hercman, H.; Chadima, Martin; Lisá, Lenka; Oberhänsli, H.; Osintsev, A.

    Vol. 3. Prague : Česká speleologická společnost, 2013 - (Filippi, M.; Bosák, P.), s. 96-98 ISBN 978-80-87857-09-0. [International Congress of Speleology /16./. Brno (CZ), 21.07.2013-28.07.2013] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : caves * magnetic fabric * mineralogy * cave deposits Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  15. Clay Mineralogy, Organic Carbon Burial, and Redox Evolution in Proterozoic Oceans

    OpenAIRE

    Tosca, Nicholas J.; Johnston, David T; Mushegian, Alexandra Arcadievna; Rothman, Daniel H.; Summons, Roger E.; Knoll, Andrew Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Clay minerals formed through chemical weathering have long been implicated in the burial of organic matter (OM), but because diagenesis and metamorphism commonly obscure the signature of weathering-derived clays in Precambrian rocks, clay mineralogy and its role in OM burial through much of geologic time remains incompletely understood. Here we have analyzed the mineralogy, geochemistry and total organic carbon (TOC) of organic rich shales deposited in late Archean to early Cambrian sedimenta...

  16. Towards mineralogical and geochemical reference groups for some Bronze Age ceramics 
from Transylvania (Romania)

    OpenAIRE

    Volker Hoeck; Corina Ionescu; Lucretia Ghergari; Carmen Precup

    2009-01-01

    Based on their chemical composition ceramic shards from three Bronze Age sites in Transylvania, i.e., Copăceni, Derşida and Palatca respectively, were distinguished by major, trace, and RE elements. Within the Copăceni samples, two subgroups (A and B) showing different chemistry and mineralogy were additionally separated out. The link between chemistry and mineralogy showed clearly the important contribution of the temper to the overall chemistry of the ceramic shards. In turn, the chemistry ...

  17. Heliostat tailored to Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Pfahl, Andreas; Bezerra, Pedro; Hölle, Erwin; Liedke, Phillip; Teramoto, Erico Tadao; Hertel, Johannes; Lampkowski, Marcelo; Oliveira, L.

    2015-01-01

    For Brazil it is important to realize a high local production share because of high import tax rates. The rim drive concept offers an alternative for expensive heliostat drive solutions with slew and linear drives from abroad. By (locally produced) rims the demands on the drives regarding strength and precision are reduced to a very low value and low cost drives can be used. Sandwich facets (which are usually foreseen for rim drive heliostats) are not available from Brazilian manufacturers an...

  18. Deforestation, Rondonia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This view of deforestation in Rondonia, far western Brazil, (10.0S, 63.0W) is part of an agricultural resettlement project which ultimately covers an area about 80% the size of France. The patterns of deforestation in this part of the Amazon River Basin are usually aligned adjacent to highways, secondary roads, and streams for ease of access and transportation. Compare this view with the earlier 51G-37-062 for a comparison of deforestation in the region.

  19. Drought Preparedness in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, Ana Paula A.; Engle, Nathan L.; De Nys, Erwin; Molejón, Carmen; Sávio Martins, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Large portions of Brazil's Northeast have experienced an intense and prolonged drought for the majority of 2010–2013. This drought, along with other droughts that have hit the South in recent years, has sparked a new round of discussions to improve drought policy and management at the federal and state levels. To assist with these efforts, the World Bank recently conducted a series of evaluations on national and sub-national drought preparedness measures and approaches across five country cas...

  20. Brazil: Selected Issues Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2012-01-01

    This Selected Issues Paper discusses the macroeconomic implications of pension reforms in Brazil. It assesses empirically the relationship between fiscal policy and the real effective exchange rate in emerging markets and draws policy implications. It reviews the current status of local capital markets in the country, the key challenges, and policy options for further development. The paper also provides a detailed description of consumer credit developments and analyzes recent indicators of ...

  1. Radiopharmacy education in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Santos-Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of schools of pharmacy has been increasing each year in Brazil. From 2002 to 2013 over 300 new schools were opened in Brazil with a final number of 415 schools of pharmacy in operation around the country. Of these schools, only 28 schools offer a course in radiopharmacy (7.77%. However, the demand for such trained professionals has grown exponentially in Brazil, especially following amendment 49 (February 2006 that broke the monopoly on the production, distribution, and marketing of short half-life radiopharmaceuticals, and the recent constitutional amendment project 517/2010, which was approved in the last instance and is waiting for final approval by the President. Thus, in this scenario, there are a total of 417 radiopharmacy services across the country waiting for qualified professionals to fill posts. However, while there are insufficient trained professionals, radiopharmacy services under the aegis of Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria - Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency allow biomedical scientists and biologists to perform specialized functions as developed in radiopharmacy services without the presence of radiopharmacists.

  2. Mineralogy and geochemistry of manganese occurrences from Alto Tapajós basin, southeastern Amazonas State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo José Mota da Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In six of almost fifty occurrences identified to now in Apuí, Novo Aripuanã and Manicoré municipalities, southeast Amazonas State, the manganese is hosted as lenses, laminations and layers in red sandstones, siltstones and mudstones, as well as in manganese lateritic crusts and colluvium accumulations. Romanechite is the main ore mineral, but manjiroite, lithiophorite, hollandite, vernardite, cryptomelane and pyrolusite are also present. There are two main geochemical associations: 1 for manganesiferous material: a Sr, Au, U, Cu, Pb and Hg as in the Zé Julião occurrence; b CaO, K2O, Zn, Tl, Rb, Cd, P2O5 and As in the Silva e Floresta farms occurrences; c MnO, Ni, Mo, Be, Co, Ga and Eu, in the Beneficente, Cotovelo and Holanda occurrences; 2 for the sedimentary rocks, matrix and soil: d Y + ETR - Eu; e SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, Nb, Hf, Zr, Fe2O3, Sc, Th, V. The genesis of the manganese oxy-hydroxides is related to deposition in sedimentary environment and to the subsequent processes of weathering and landscape evolution of the region.

  3. Mineralogical Characteristics of Carbonate Rock-Hosted Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, E.; Roh, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) occurs in rocks and soils as a result of natural weathering and human activities. The parent rocks of asbestos have been associated with ultramafic and mafic rocks, and carbonate rock. The previous studies on naturally occurring asbestos were mainly limited to ultramafic and mafic rock-hosted asbestos and studies on carbonate rock-hosted asbestos are relatively rare in South Korea. Therefore, this study was aimed to characterize mineralogy of carbonate rock-hosted NOA at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk province and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province. The rock types at the four sites are consisting mainly of Precambrian metasedimentary rock. XRD and PLM analyses showed fibrous minerals in the sites were tremolite and actinolite of acicular and columnar forms. SEM-EDS analyses showed that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite had various ratios of length and diameters over 12:1, and needle and columnar forms. A columnar forms of tremolite and actinolite were showed small acicular at the edge of the particle. Its main chemical compositions are mainly Si, O, Mg, Ca, which were identical to tremolite. Actinolite contains Fe in addition to Si, O, Mg, Ca. EPMA analyses of asbestos occurred at Muju indicated that chemical composition are 55% SiO2, 23.2% MgO, 13.1 % CaO, and 0.61 % FeO and the chemical formula calculated as (K0.01Na0.01)Ca2.01(Mg4.94Fe0.05) (Al0.004Si7.98)O22(OH)2, which is close to ideal tremolite. In addition to tremolite, actinolite was also occurred at Seosan, Chungnam. XRD analyses showed that antigorite was existed at Muju, but PLM and SEM analyses showed the antigorite was platy structure, not asbestiform. These results indicate that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite with acicular forms contains in carbonate rocks at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province South Korea.

  4. Heavy metal behaviour in peat - A mineralogical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralogical composition of a 40 cm subsurface layer of transitional mire 'Bagno Bruch' (southern Poland) polluted with atmospheric dust was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The mire is located 9 km to the east of a zinc smelter on the northern limit of industrial Upper Silesia in southern Poland. Concentrations of zinc, lead and cadmium reach values of 494, 238 and 16 mg kg-1, respectively, in the peat layer. Inorganic particles in the peat were grouped into two main categories based on their origin: air dust particles of anthropogenic- and natural sources, and authigenic minerals that originated within the mire. Anthropogenic particles comprise an important part of the inorganic particles in the peat. As they are typically enriched in heavy metals, their stability is critical to controlling metal mobilities. Spheroidal aluminosilicate fly-ash particles are the most common- and most stable anthropogenic pollutants. Partially dissolved Pb-bearing particles (sulphides, chlorides and oxides) and ZnS occur as trace components throughout the peat profile. The prolonged existence of the particles made them susceptible to gravitational relocation in the peat and limits the biogeochemical cycling of the constituent elements. The least resistant Fe (hydro)oxides release Zn and minor amounts of Mn, Mg and Sn due to reductive dissolution. The released Zn is immobilized in the form of ZnS spherules, 1-3 μm in diameter, approximately 10 cm further down in the profile. The investigation shows that the behaviour of trace elements in polluted peatland is controlled by mineral dissolution/precipitation processes. The formation of authigenic minerals (ZnS, barite, gypsum) indicates complex redox conditions and element redistribution in the transitional mire.

  5. Mineralogy of iron microbial mats from loihi seamount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Brandy M; Berquó, Thelma S; Michel, F Marc; Sorensen, Jeffry V; Templeton, Alexis S; Edwards, Katrina J

    2012-01-01

    Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings - freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents - where ever opposing Fe(II)-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted to describe the physical and chemical characteristics of Fe-phases using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering, low-temperature magnetic measurements, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Particle sizes of 3.5-4.6 nm were estimated from magnetism data, and coherent scattering domain (CSD) sizes as small as 1.6 nm are indicated by pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Disorder in the nanostructured Fe-bearing phases results in limited intermediate-range structural order: less than that of standard two-line ferrihydrite (Fh), except for the Pohaku site. The short-range ordered natural Fh (Fh(SRO)) phases were stable at 4°C in the presence of oxygen for at least 1 year and during 400°C treatment. The observed stability of the Fh(SRO) is consistent with magnetic observations that point to non-interacting nanoparticles. PDF analyses of total scattering data provide further evidence for Fh(SRO) particles with a poorly ordered silica coating. The presence of coated particles explains the small CSD for the mat minerals, as well as the stability of the minerals over time and against heating. The mineral properties observed here provide a starting point from which progressively older and more extensively altered Fe deposits may be examined, with the ultimate goal of improved interpretation of past biogeochemical conditions and diagenetic processes. PMID:22485113

  6. Mineralogy of iron microbial mats from Loihi Seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandy Marie Toner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Extensive mats of Fe oxyhydroxides and associated Fe-oxidizing microbial organisms form in diverse geochemical settings – freshwater seeps to deep-sea vents – where ever opposing Fe(II-oxygen gradients prevail. The mineralogy, reactivity, and structural transformations of Fe oxyhydroxides precipitated from submarine hydrothermal fluids within microbial mats remains elusive in active and fossil systems. In response, a study of Fe microbial mat formation at the Loihi Seamount was conducted to describe the physical and chemical characteristics of Fe-phases using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering, low-temperature magnetic measurements, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Particle sizes of 3.5-4.6 nm were estimated from magnetism data, and coherent scattering domain sizes as small as 1.6 nm are indicated by pair distribution function (PDF analysis. Disorder in the nanostructured Fe-bearing phases results in limited intermediate-range structural order: less than that of standard 2-line ferrihydrite (Fh, except for the Pohaku site. The short-range ordered natural Fh (FhSRO phases were stable at 4 °C in the presence of oxygen for at least 1 year and during 400 oC treatment. The observed stability of the FhSRO is consistent with magnetic observations that point to non-interacting nanoparticles. PDF analyses of total scattering data provide further evidence for FhSRO particles with a poorly ordered silica coating. The presence of coated particles explains the small coherent scattering domain for the mat minerals, as well as the stability of the minerals over time and against heating. The mineral properties observed here provide a starting point from which progressively older and more extensively altered iron deposits may be examined, with the ultimate goal of improved interpretation of past biogeochemical conditions and diagenetic processes.

  7. Chemical-mineralogical characterisation of coarse recycled concrete aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbachiya, M C; Marrocchino, E; Koulouris, A

    2007-01-01

    The construction industry is now putting greater emphasis than ever before on increasing recycling and promoting more sustainable waste management practices. In keeping with this approach, many sectors of the industry have actively sought to encourage the use of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) as an alternative to primary aggregates in concrete production. The results of a laboratory experimental programme aimed at establishing chemical and mineralogical characteristics of coarse RCA and its likely influence on concrete performance are reported in this paper. Commercially produced coarse RCA and natural aggregates (16-4 mm size fraction) were tested. Results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses showed that original source of RCA had a negligible effect on the major elements and a comparable chemical composition between recycled and natural aggregates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses results indicated the presence of calcite, portlandite and minor peaks of muscovite/illite in recycled aggregates, although they were directly proportioned to their original composition. The influence of 30%, 50%, and 100% coarse RCA on the chemical composition of equal design strength concrete has been established, and its suitability for use in a concrete application has been assessed. In this work, coarse RCA was used as a direct replacement for natural gravel in concrete production. Test results indicated that up to 30% coarse RCA had no effect on the main three oxides (SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO) of concrete, but thereafter there was a marginal decrease in SiO2 and increase in Al2O3 and CaO contents with increase in RCA content in the mix, reflecting the original constituent's composition. PMID:16574393

  8. Mineralogy, morphology and crystal-chemistry of the monazite from Catalao 1 (Goias, Brazil); Mineralogia, morfologia e cristaloquimica da monazita de Catalao 1 (Goias, Brazil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, Maria Cristina Motta de; Oliveira, Sonia Maria Barros de; Ferrari, Viviane Carillo [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias]. E-mails: mcristol@usp.br; vferrari@usp.br; Fontan, Francois; Parseval, Philippe de [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. Mineralogie et Cristallographie]. E-mails: fontan@cict.fr; parseval@insatlse.fr

    2004-03-15

    The Catalao alkaline carbonatite complex hosts a number of mineral resources including monazite. This mineral is a common accessory phase in two lithological units: carbonatite and silexite. Textural evidence suggest that monazite replaced carbonates in the carbonatite and crystallized simultaneously with quartz in the silexite. Monazite was resistant to the strong laterization that affected the massif, except for the incipient transformation into gorceixite or cerianite. In both carbonatite and silexite, monazite occurs as a complex aggregate of sub-micrometric crystals, showing unusual morphological and chemical characteristics. It contains Ca, Sr, and Ba in the A-site, and shows a certain degree of hydration indicated by ATD and IV data. Structural formulae calculated on the basis of sum of cations=1 show a moderate ionic deficiency in the anionic site. Rietveld refinement indicated poor crystallinity. Notwithstanding these peculiar characteristics, cell dimensions are similar to those of standard monazite. (author)

  9. BRAZIL'S CARBON BUDGET FOR 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent history of deforestation in the Amazon region of Brazil is well known. ajor reason for alarm over the rate and magnitude of deforestation in Brazil has been concern that the reduction in vegetation releases carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases that may contr...

  10. Brazil: Intercultural Experiential Learning Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT. Language Research Center.

    This booklet was designed to facilitate interactions and communication with the people of Brazil by providing information about their customs, attitudes and other cultural characteristics which influence their actions and values. A brief description of Brazil is given, covering the following: its size and geography, history, language, economy,…

  11. Nuclear material control in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general view about the safeguards activities in Brazil is presented. The national system of accounting for and control of nuclear materials is described. The safeguards agreements signed by Brazil are presented, the facilities and nuclear material under these agreements are listed, and the dificulties on the pratical implementation are discussed. (E.G.)

  12. Elementary and isotopic geochemistry of vein goethite in laterite-gossanic crusts from the Igarape Bahia gold mine (Carajas, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lateritic crusts of the gold mine from the Igarape Bahia, in Carajas, situated at Para state, Brazil, present themselves frequently sectioned by the goethite sub-vertical veins. The veins have the following measures: until 10 cm of thickness and more than 6 m of length. This work aims to characterize the textural, mineralogical and chemical aspects of these veins, in order to understand its evolution, mainly the relation with the laterites and its geological importance, including the aspects referents to the mineral prospecting. (author)

  13. Mineralogy and Geochemistry at the Meridiani Landing Site, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.

    2004-05-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity landed in Meridiani Planum on January 24, 2004 (PST). The scientific rationale for selecting this landing site (1.95 S, 354.47 E) centered on the discovery by the orbiting Thermal Emission Spectrometer of 10-20% grey crystalline hematite in association with basaltic rocks in this region. Formation of hematite requires either precipitation in iron-rich waters or thermal oxidation of iron-bearing volcanic rocks. Each MER rover carries instruments well suited for in situ and remote analyses of iron-rich materials. The mast-mounted visible/near-infrared multispectral Pancam system and thermal infrared Mini-TES spectrometer in combination with the arm-mounted alpha particle x-ray spectrometer (APXS), Moessbauer spectrometer (MB), Microscopic Imager (MI), and Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) deliver complementary detailed information on the morphology, mineralogy and composition of the materials at this site. The exposure of relatively high albedo bedrock materials on the western crater rim and low albedo soils in the crater have been the main focus during the first 25 sols of rover operations. Results thus far include: (1) Subtle variability in the ferric and ferrous absorption features observed by Pancam in the soil and bedrock, consistent with poorly crystalline iron phases; (2) Confirmation by Mini-TES of gray hematite-rich soils, with hematite-free soils consistent with basalt; (3) Discovery of small (1-5 mm) grayish spherules embedded in and weathering from the bedrock, with as yet undetermined composition; (4) Moessbauer spectra consistent with olivine and a weak magnetic phase in the soils; (5) APXS soil data consistent with a basaltic composition and with S and Cl levels similar to other landing sites. Among current hypotheses for the bedrock formation, some involve fine-grained basaltic sediments as starting materials that underwent either (a) cementation by minerals and growth of spherical concretions; (b) alteration by

  14. Mineralogy and Petrology of Comet Wild 2 Nucleus Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolensky, M E; Zega, T J; Yano, H; Wirick, S; Westphal, A J; Weisberg, M K; Weber, I; Warren, J L; Velbel, M A; Tsuchiyama, A; Tsou, P; Toppani, A; Tomioka, N; Tomeoka, K; Teslich, N; Taheri, M; Susini, J; Stroud, R; Stephan, T; Stadermann, F J; Snead, C J; Simon, S B; Siminovici, A; See, T H; Robert, F; Rietmeijer, F M; Rao, W; Perronnet, M C; Papanastassiou, D A; Okudaira, K; Ohsumi, K; Ohnishi, I; Nakanura-Messenger, K; Nakamura, T; Mostefaoui, S; Mikouchi, T; Meibom, A; Matrajt, G; Marcus, M A; Leroux, H; Lemelle, L; Le, L; Lanzirotti, A; Langenhorst, F; Krot, A N; Keller, L P; Kearsley, A T; Joswiak, D; Jacob, D; Ishii, H; Harvey, R; Hagiya, K; Grossman, L; Graham, G A; Gounelle, M; Gillet, P; Genge, M J; Flynn, G; Ferrior, T; Fallon, S; Ebel, D S; Dai, Z R; Cordier, P; Chi, M; Butterworth, A L; Brownlee, D E; Bridges, J C; Brennan, S; Brearley, A; Bradley, J P; Bleuet, P; Bland, P A; Bastien, R

    2006-10-11

    The bulk of the Wild 2 samples appear to be weakly-constructed mixtures of nanometerscale grains with occasional much larger (>1{micro}m) ferromagnesian silicates, Fe-Ni sulfides, Fe-Ni metal and accessory phases. The very wide range of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene compositions in Wild 2 require a wide range of formation conditions, probably reflecting different formation locations in the protoplanetary disk. The restricted compositional ranges of Fe-Ni sulfides, the wide range for silicates, and absence of hydrous phases indicate that Wild 2 experienced little or no aqueous alteration. Less abundant Wild 2 materials include a refractory particle, whose presence appears to require large-scale radial transport in the early protoplanetary disk. The nature of cometary solids is of fundamental importance to our understanding of the early solar nebula and protoplanetary history. Until now we have had to study comets from afar using spectroscopy, or settle for analyses of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) of uncertain provenance. We report here mineralogical and petrographic analyses of particles derived directly from Comet Wild 2. All of the Wild 2 particles we have thus far examined have been modified in various ways by the capture process. All particles that may have been loose aggregates, ''traveling sand piles'', disaggregated into individual components with the larger, denser components penetrating more deeply into the aerogel. Individual grains experienced a wide range of heating effects that range from excellent preservation to melting (Fig. 1); such behavior was expected (1, 2 ,3). What is remarkable is the extreme variability of these modifications and the fact that severely modified and unmodified materials can be found within a micrometer of each other, requiring tremendous local temperature gradients. Fortunately, we have an internal gauge of impact collection heating. Fe-Ni sulfides are ubiquitous in the Wild 2 samples, are very

  15. Geomorphological and mineralogical mapping of Hebes Chasma, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, E.; Gwinner, K.; Gendrin, A.; Fueten, F.; Stesky, R.; Pelkey, S.; Zegers, T.; Bibring, J. P.; Jaumann, R.; Neukum, G.

    Despite more than three decades of analysis, the origin of the Interior Layered Deposits (ILD) in the Valles Marineris (VM) trough system is still unknown. The advance of new remote sensing data obtained by the recent planetary missions Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (MO), and Mars Express (MEX) allow investigation of the morphology and composition in unprecedented detail. This study focusses on Hebes Chasma in the central VM, which is unique because it contains a huge mesa of ILD in a completely closed depression. We used topographic data from the HRSC camera onboard MEX to analyze the geometry of layering in Hebes Mensa with the Orion structural analysis software. Strike and dip were measured in 50m/px gridded Digital Elevation Models and corresponding orthoimages. These data have a higher spatial resolution than those used in an earlier study. We find that the layers dip gently in the downslope direction. These results are in agreement with our earlier results in Hebes Chasma and with our similar ILD studies in western Candor and Ophir Chasmata, also based on HRSC topography. A mineralogic map indicating concentrations of polyhydrated sulfates, kieserite, and oxides was produced from OMEGA spectral data. It shows that these alteration minerals are only observed in low-lying areas, which are not covered by landslides. We consider a lacustrine origin of the ILD in Hebes Chasma as unlikely. The downslope dipping of ILD layers is in agreement with a draping process, e.g., pyroclastic fall deposits from a W-E trending volcanic vent, or a series of WNW-ESE trending vents in an en echelon alignment. Thin, finely layered deposits on top of the plateaus surrounding vm (e.g., west of Juventae or south of Ius ChasmaTA) could represent that portion of the pyroclastics which escaped the troughs and were distributed on the adjacent high plains. The occurrence of alteration minerals only in very deep portions of Hebes Chasma also argues against a deposition in a deep

  16. Astronomy in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuy, Beatriz; Maciel, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    A historical background combined with political decisions along time explain the increasing importance of Brazil in the world's astronomical scenario. Professional astronomy was triggered in the late sixties and early seventies by the two main historical institutions then existing (ON and IAG/USP), together with the creation of agencies for research and combined with individual actions. There are presently 670 astronomers working in the country, including permanent jobs and graduate students. A brief description of observational facilities and plans to increase access to other facilities is presented.

  17. Social Psychotherapy in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Heloisa J; Marra, Marlene M; Knobel, Anna M

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the practice of sociodrama, a method created by J. L. Moreno in the 1930s, and the Brazilian contemporary socio-psychodrama. In 1970, after the Fifth International Congress of Psychodrama was held in Brazil, group psychotherapy began to flourish both in private practice and hospital clinical settings. Twenty years later, the Brazilian health care system added group work as a reimbursable mental health procedure to improve social health policies. In this context, socio-psychodrama became a key resource for social health promotion within groups. Some specific conceptual contributions by Brazilians on sociodrama are also noteworthy. PMID:26401805

  18. Correlating Mineralogy and Amino Acid Contents of Milligram-Scale Murchison Carbonaceous Chondrite Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Aaron, S.; Berger, Eve L.; Locke, Darren R.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, have been found to be indigenous in most of the carbonaceous chondrite groups. The abundances of amino acids, as well as their structural, enantiomeric and isotopic compositions differ significantly among meteorites of different groups and petrologic types. This suggests that there is a link between parent-body conditions, mineralogy and the synthesis and preservation of amino acids (and likely other organic molecules). However, elucidating specific causes for the observed differences in amino acid composition has proven extremely challenging because samples analyzed for amino acids are typically much larger ((is) approximately 100 mg powders) than the scale at which meteorite heterogeneity is observed (sub mm-scale differences, (is) approximately 1-mg or smaller samples). Thus, the effects of differences in mineralogy on amino acid abundances could not be easily discerned. Recent advances in the sensitivity of instrumentation have made possible the analysis of smaller samples for amino acids, enabling a new approach to investigate the link between mineralogical con-text and amino acid compositions/abundances in meteorites. Through coordinated mineral separation, mineral characterization and highly sensitive amino acid analyses, we have performed preliminary investigations into the relationship between meteorite mineralogy and amino acid composition. By linking amino acid data to mineralogy, we have started to identify amino acid-bearing mineral phases in different carbonaceous meteorites. The methodology and results of analyses performed on the Murchison meteorite are presented here.

  19. Characterization of indoor dust from Brazil and evaluation of the cytotoxicity in A549 lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, E; Weidler, P G; Friedrich, F; Weiss, C; Diabaté, S

    2014-04-01

    Over the past decade, ambient air particulate matter (PM) has been clearly associated with adverse health effects. In Brazil, small and poor communities are exposed to indoor dust derived from both natural sources, identified as blowing soil dust, and anthropogenic particles from mining activities. This study investigates the physicochemical and mineralogical composition of indoor PM10 dust samples collected in Minas Gerais, Brazil, and evaluates its cytotoxicity and inflammatory potential. The mean PM10 mass concentration was 206 μg/m(3). The high dust concentration in the interior of the residences is strongly related to blowing soil dust. The chemical and mineralogical compositions were determined by ICP-OES and XRD, and the most prominent minerals were clays, Fe-oxide, quartz, feldspars, Al(hydr)oxides, zeolites, and anatase, containing the transition metals Fe, Cr, V, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ti, and Mn as well as the metalloid As. The indoor dust samples presented a low water solubility of about 6 %. In vitro experiments were carried out with human lung alveolar carcinoma cells (A549) to study the toxicological effects. The influence of the PM10 dust samples on cell viability, intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was analysed. The indoor dust showed little effects on alamarBlue reduction indicating unaltered mitochondrial activity. However, significant cell membrane damage, ROS production, and IL-8 release were detected in dependence of dose and time. This study will support the implementation of mitigation actions in the investigated area in Brazil. PMID:23990125

  20. Fuelwood utilization in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual consumption of fuelwood in Brazil is approximately equal to 180 million oil barrels, or 13.3% of all Brazilian primary energy use. Fuelwood consumption in the country is greater than the use of wood for industrial use. Fuelwood taken from existing forest has been a very common activity in Brazil. Forest plantations to support the Brazilian fuelwood consumption have not been important. As fuelwood consumption in the country is expected to increase in the future, it is important to increase the supply of wood by sustainable use of the existing natural forests. Even if they are far from the centers of consumption, these are only available reserves capable of supporting the Brazilian future fuelwood requirements. For this reason it is necessary to use advanced technology to convert the energy of wood efficiently into a form (such as electricity) to carry it to the centers of consumption. In addition, forest plantations would be established in the available areas, mainly for specific uses, as for charcoal production for the pig-iron and steel industries. In all the above plans, at least, the US3/2 billion/year that represents the current Brazilian fuelwood consumption should be returned to rehabilitate the forest growing stock. In addition, it would be used to stimulate the development and use of the most suitable systems of fuelwood conversion, improving the efficiency of energy production. (author)

  1. Waste management in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The waste management policies set up in developed countries have in general been used by other countries with less experience in the nuclear field as the basis for developing waste disposal rules or guidelines according to their particular political, social and economic conditions. The waste management question became a main concern in Brazil during the licensing period of the Angra I nuclear power plant and the other fuel cycle facilities envisaged under the Agreement between Brazil and the Federal Republic of Germany. Before the Angra I licensing period, all final waste products arising from nuclear activities were released into the environment because their radioactive levels were below the standard limits. The Research, Development and Demonstration (RDD) Project initiated by the National Nuclear Energy Commission has the purpose to provide information that may contribute to the formulation of recommendations for a waste disposal policy, as well as to demonstrate the feasibility of the Brazilian waste disposal concept. The paper briefly describes the waste management policy in some countries, their contributions to the studies carried out in the RDD Project, and the recommendations and mechanisms for implementing the waste management proposal, and presents general information concerning the Brazilian repository concept. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig

  2. Mineralogy Considerations for 2003 MER Site Selection and the Importance for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Much of the discussion of site selection on Mars is based on interesting images of the surface combined with safety issues. I argue that the two rovers should be sent to mineralogically distinct regions. Compositional information is still poorly constrained on Mars; however, the instruments on the 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) will provide a unique opportunity for detailed characterization including mineral identification. There is strong motivation for sending one rover to a "typical" region on Mars to be used as a ground truth for the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), while the other rover should be sent to a site where water and chemical alteration are likely to have occurred. Determining the mineralogy of the Martian surface material provides information about the past and present environments on Mars which are an integral aspect of whether or not Mars was suitable for the origin of life. Understanding the mineralogy of terrestrial samples from potentially Mars-like environments is essential to this effort.

  3. Mineralogy of three slightly palagonitized basaltic tephra samples from the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V.; Yang, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The paper characterizes the mineralogy and spectral properties of three slightly palagonitized basaltic tephra samples collected near the summit of Mauna Kea in order to contribute to the basis for inferring mineralogy and processes for Martian surface materials. The mineralogy of size fractions of these samples is examined by diffuse reflectance and FIR spectroscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, magnetic analysis, EMPA, TEM, and SEM. For the 20-1000 micron size fraction, sample HWMK11 (red) is essentially completely oxidized and has a hematite (Ti-hematite) pigment dispersed throughout the silicate matrix. Sample HWMK12 (black) has the lowest proportion of ferric-bearing phases and is thus least weathered. For HWMK11, the amount of hematite is essentially constant, and mica is present only in the coarse clay-sized fraction; smectites are low in structural Fe.

  4. Mineralogy of selected sedimentary interbeds at or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Geological Survey's (USGS) Project Office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) analyzed 66 samples from sedimentary interbed cores during a 38-month period beginning in October 1990 to determine bulk and clay mineralogy. These cores had been collected from 19 sites in the Big Lost River Basin, 2 sites in the Birch Creek Basin, and 1 site in the Mud Lake Basin, and were archived at the USGS lithologic core library at the INEL. Mineralogy data indicate that core samples from the Big Lost River Basin have larger mean and median percentages of quartz, total feldspar, and total clay minerals, but smaller mean and median percentages of calcite than the core samples from the Birch Creek Basin. Core samples from the Mud Lake Basin have abundant quartz, total feldspar, calcite, and total clay minerals. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal

  5. Mineralogic and petrologic investigation of post-test core samples from the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have characterized a suite of samples taken subsequent to the end of the Spent Fuel Test - Climax by petrographic and microanalytical techniques and determined their mineral assemblage, modal properties, and mineral chemistry. The samples were obtained immediately adjacent to the canister borehole at a variety of depths and positions within the canister drift, as well as radially outward from each canister hole. This method of sampling allows variations in post-test mineralogic properties to be evaluated on the basis of (1) depth along a particular canister hole and (2) position within the canister drift, with respect to the heat and radiation sources, and with respect to the pre - test samples. In no case did we find any significant correlation between the mineralogical properties and variables listed above. In short, the Spent Fuel Test - Climax has produced no identifiable mineralogical response in the Climax quartz monzonite. 12 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Mineralogical and lithochemical studies of strata beneath the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determinations have been made of the mineralogy and lithochemistry of the principal lithological units of the Mesozoic and Palaeozoic rocks penetrated by boreholes at the Harwell Research Site. Samples were taken at approximately 9m intervals from the Upper Greensand to the Coal Measures, together with a number from the Chalk. Mineralogical analyses were carried out using X-ray diffraction, with thermal analysis and surface area measurements aiding quantification. Major and trace element determinations were made using direct electron excitation X-ray spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence respectively. Other chemical determinations included organic carbon, sulphate and 'exchangeable' cations. The mineralogical and lithochemical variations within and between the major litho-stratigraphic units are discussed and compared with published data for other localities. (author)

  7. Towards mineralogical and geochemical reference groups for some Bronze Age ceramics 
from Transylvania (Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Hoeck

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on their chemical composition ceramic shards from three Bronze Age sites in Transylvania, i.e., Copăceni, Derşida and Palatca respectively, were distinguished by major, trace, and RE elements. Within the Copăceni samples, two subgroups (A and B showing different chemistry and mineralogy were additionally separated out. The link between chemistry and mineralogy showed clearly the important contribution of the temper to the overall chemistry of the ceramic shards. In turn, the chemistry facilitated the provenance study of the raw materials, which were collected in the vicinity of the sites. In combination with the mineralogy of the ceramics, the chemical analyses can serve as a basis for a geochemical reference set used by further studies.

  8. Magnetic mineralogy of heavy metals-contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenggao, L.

    2012-04-01

    Soils around mine and in urban areas are often contaminated by heavy metals derived from industrial and human activities [1, 2]. These contaminated soils are often characterized by a magnetic enhancement on topsoils. Many studies demonstrated that there are significant correlations between heavy metals and various magnetic parameters in contaminated soils, indicating a strong affinity of heavy metals to magnetic minerals. The magnetic particles in contaminated soils were separated by a magnetic separation technique. The rock magnetism, XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy equiped with an energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer (FESEM/EDX) were used to characterize their magnetic mineralogy. Results of XRD analysis indicated that the magnetic particles separated from heavy metal-contaminated soils are composed of quartz, magnetite, and hematite. Based on the X-ray diffraction peak intensity, the Fe3O4 was identified as the predominant magnetic mineral phase. The high-temperature magnetization (Ms-T) curves of magnetic particles extracted from contaminated soils show a sharp Ms decrease at about 580C (the Curie temperature of magnetite), suggesting that magnetite is the dominant magnetic carrier. The hysteresis loops of contaminated soils are closed at about 100-200 mT which is consistent with the presence of a dominant ferrimagnetic mineral phase. The FESEM analysis showed a great variety of shapes of magnetic particles in contaminated soils. The most common morphology are observed in the form of spherules, with the sizes ranging from 20 to 100 um. The chemical composition of magnetic particles consist mainly of Fe, Si, Al, and Ca with minor heavy metal elements (Cu, Zn, Hg, and Cr). The semi-quantitative Fe content identified by FESEM/EDX ranged from 40 to 90%. Combined studies of rock magnetism, XRD, and FESEM/EDX indicated that magnetic mineral phases responsible for the magnetic enhancement of contaminated soils are anthropogenic origin which are coarse

  9. Petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry of mined coals, western Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Warwick, Peter D. [U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Gonzalez, Eligio [INGEOMIN, Torre Oeste Parque, Central Piso 8, Caracas 1010 (Venezuela)

    2005-07-20

    Upper Paleocene to middle Miocene coal samples collected from active mines in the western Venezuelan States of Tachira, Merida and Zulia have been characterized through an integrated geochemical, mineralogical and petrographic investigation. Proximate, ultimate, calorific and forms of sulfur values, major and trace element, vitrinite reflectance, maceral concentrations and mineral matter content have been determined for 16 channel samples from 14 mines. Ash yield generally is low, ranging from <1 to 17 wt.% (mean=5 wt.%) on a dry basis (db). Total sulfur content is low to moderate, ranging from 1 to 6 wt.%, db (average=1.7 wt.%). Calorific value ranges from 25.21 to 37.21 MJ/kg (10,840-16,000 Btu/lb) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis (average=33.25 MJ/kg, 14,300 Btu/lb), placing most of the coal samples in the apparent rank classification of high-volatile bituminous. Most of the coal samples exhibit favorable characteristics on the various indices developed to predict combustion and coking behavior and concentrations of possible environmentally sensitive elements (As, Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Th and U) generally are similar to the concentrations of these elements in most coals of the world, with one or two exceptions. Concentrations of the liptinite maceral group range from <1% to 70 vol.%. Five samples contain >20 vol.% liptinite, dominated by the macerals bituminite and sporinite. Collotelinite dominates the vitrinite group; telinite was observed in quantities of |1 vol.% despite efforts to better quantify this maceral by etching the sample pellets in potassium permanganate and also by exposure in an oxygen plasma chamber. Inertinite group macerals typically represent <10 vol.% of the coal samples and the highest concentrations of inertinite macerals are found in distantly spaced (>400 km) upper Paleocene coal samples from opposite sides of Lago de Maracaibo, possibly indicating tectonic controls on subsidence related to construction of the

  10. Mineralogy of the Panulcillo skarn copper deposit, Coquimbo Region, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asahiko Sugaki

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Panulcillo skarn copper deposit developed in an Early Cretaceous (Valanginian volcano-sedimentary sequence intruded by a Cretaceous diorite. The exoskarn zone of the deposit is composed of garnet skarn comprising grandite garnet (Ad12.9-47.4 and phlogopite with lesser amounts of diopside (Di89.6-91.6, clintonite, pargasitic hornblende, actinolite, pumpellyite, chlorite, quartz and calcite, exhibiting characteristic Mg-Al-rich assemblages. The principal ores consist of chalcopyrite, monoclinic pyrrhotite, sphalerite, pyrite, and magnetite with small amounts of galena, and locally secondary marcasite, hematite and covellite, generally filling interstices of the garnet skarn. Chalcopyrite shows characteristic polysynthetic twinning, normally including fine star-like crystals of sphalerite as exsolution products. Sphalerite contains 14.4 - 22.5 mol% FeS and 1.6 - 9.2 mol% MnS, and is associated intimately with chalcopyrite. It is highly likely that such Fe-rich sphalerite has coexisted primarily with hexagonal pyrrhotite under low-sulfidation conditions at higher temperatures than 275 - 254°C, below which monoclinic pyrrhotite is stableMineralogía del yacimiento cuprífero tipo skarn de Panulcillo, Región de Coquimbo, Chile. El yacimiento tipo skarn de cobre de Panulcillo se desarrolló en una secuencia volcano-sedimentaria de edad cretácica inferior (Valanginiana, la que es intruida por un cuerpo cretácico de composición diorítica. La zona del exoskarn característicamente presenta una asociación mineralógica rica en Mg y Al, y corresponde a un skarn de granate compuesto por granate tipo ugrandita (Ad12.9-47.4 y flogopita con candidades menores de diópsido (Di89.6-91.6, clintonita, hornblenda pargasítica, actinolita, pumpellita, clorita, cuarzo y calcita. Los minerales metálicos consisten mayoritariamente en calcopirita, pirrotina monoclínica, esfalerita, pirita, y magnetita con menos galena, localmente marcasita, hematita y

  11. Labelling and Packaging in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Cavalcante, Tania M; World Health Organization

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Brazil is the largest country in South America, with an area of 8 547 403.5 square kilometres and a population of 169 799 170 (IBGE, 2000). Its geopolitical structure com-prises 26 states and one Federal District, the capital of Brazil, Brasilia. Each state is divided into municipalities, of which there are a total of 5 507. The primary causes of death in Brazil are cardiovascular diseases and cancer and their major risk factor is tobacco use. Lung cancer is the...

  12. Mineralogical investigations of the area to the North-West of Qattara Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrophysical and mineralogical investigations are given for subsurface samples from this area. The paper deals with mineralogical investigations of Middle Jurassic, Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. It includes thin section examinations for 14 samples of sandstone, siltstone and carbonates, and x-ray powder diffraction analyses of some argillaceous samples, untreated and glycolated. It was found that the kaolinite group is the main clay mineral recorded in the argillaceous sandstone and siltstone samples. Illite and montmorillonite are identified in the shale sample representing the Kharita Formation. Siderite was also recorded in the sample. Illite and montmorillonite were recorded as well as kaolinite in two siltstone samples. (Author)

  13. Mineralogy and Elemental Composition of Wind Drift Soil at Rocknest, Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Bish, D. L.; Morris, R. V.; Downs, R. T.; Trieman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Chipera, S. J.; Ming, D. W.; Yen, A. S.; Vaniman, D. T.; Grotzinger, J.; Crisp, J. A.; Achilles, C. N.; Rampe, E. B.; Bristow, T. F.; Sarrazin, P. C.; Farmer, J. D.; Des Marais, D. J.; Stolper, E. M.; Morookian, J. M.; Wilson, M. A.; Spanovich, N.; Anderson, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring Mars since August 5, 2012, conducting engineering and first-time activities with its mobility system, arm, sample acquisition and processing system (SA/SPaH-CHIMRA) and science instruments. Curiosity spent 54 sols at a location named "Rocknest," collecting and processing five scoops of loose, unconsolidated materials ("soil") acquired from an aeolian bedform (Fig. 1). The Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument analyzed portions of scoops 3, 4, and 5, to obtain the first quantitative mineralogical analysis of Mars soil, and to provide context for Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) measurements of volatiles, isotopes and possible organic materials.

  14. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  15. Mineralogy of an unusual Cr-rich inclusion in the Los Martinez (L6) chrondritic breccia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, Adrian J.; Casanova, Ignacio; Miller, M. L.; Keil, Klaus

    1991-01-01

    During the petrological study of the L6 chondritic breccia, Los Martinez, we discovered a large, highly unusual Cr-rich inclusion whose mineralogy appears to be unique in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial occurrences. We carried out electron microprobe, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy investigations of this inclusion in order to determine its composition and mineralogy in detail and to establish its origin and possible relationship to other Cr-rich objects in chondritic meteorites. Details of the chemical composition, origin, and thermal history are given.

  16. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of a Hematite-bearing Ridge on Mauna Kea, Hawaii: A Potential Mineralogical Process Analog for the Mount Sharp Hematite Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Hamilton, J. C.; Adams, M.; Fraeman, A. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Catalano, J. G.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity landed in Gale Crater in August 2012 and is currently roving towards the layered central mound known as Mount Sharp [1]. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) hyperspectral data indicate Mount Sharp contains an 5 km stratigraphic sequence including Fe-Mg smectites, hematite, and hydrated sulfates in the lower layers separated by an unconformity from the overlying anhydrous strata [1,2,3]. Hematite was initially detected in CRISM data to occur in the lower sulfate layers on the north side of the mound [2]. [3] further mapped a distinct hematite detection occurring as part of a 200 m wide ridge that extends 6.5 km NE-SW, approximately parallel with the base of Mount Sharp. It is likely a target for in-situ analyses by Curiosity. We document here the occurrence of a stratum of hematite-bearing breccia that is exposed on the Puu Poliahu cinder cone near the summit of Mauna Kea volcano (Hawaii) (Fig.1). The stratum is more resistant to weathering than surrounding material, giving it the appearance of a ridge. The Mauna Kea hematite ridge is thus arguably a potential terrestrial mineralogical and process analog for the Gale Crater hematite ridge. We are acquiring a variety of chemical and mineralogical data on the Mauna Kea samples, with a focus on the chemical and mineralogical information already available or planned for the Gale hematite ridge.

  17. The mechanism of myrmekite formation deduced from steady-diffusion modeling based on petrography: Case study of the Okueyama granitic body, Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuguchi, Takashi; Nishiyama, Tadao

    2008-12-01

    Myrmekite is an intergrowth texture consisting of vermicular quartz and albitic plagioclase (Ab 93An 7 in this study), typically occurring between K-feldspar and plagioclase. It occurs ubiquitously in both metamorphic and granitic rocks; however, its genesis has been an enigma. This paper describes myrmekite's petrography and discusses its genesis from the Okueyama granitic body (OKG), which is a young (14 Ma) granite in Southwest Japan with no evidence of deformation after solidification. The genesis of a newly observed texture, the 'reaction rim', will be also discussed in relation to myrmekite. The reaction rim is an albite layer (Ab 95An 5) with no vermicular quartz between K-feldspar and plagioclase, and it occasionally makes a composite texture with myrmekite. Both myrmekite and the reaction rim are accompanied by a diffusive boundary layer (Olg-layer) with a mean composition of oligoclase (Ab 75An 25) in the rim of neighboring plagioclase rim. The overall reactions in an open system for the formation of myrmekite and that for the reaction rim are derived based on the following two models: 1) one based on the assumption of conservation of solid volume with arbitrarily specified closure components, and 2) the other based on the assumption of closure of AlO 3/2 together with an arbitrarily specified volume factor. Steady diffusion modeling in an open system based on the overall reaction thus derived defines the stability field of myrmekite and of the reaction rim in terms of the ratios of phenomenological coefficients ( L-ratios). The steady diffusion models for the above two models have essentially the same features. Myrmekite is stable for large values (> 10) of LAlAl/ LCaCa, for moderate values of LAlAl/ LSiSi, and for only small values (vs. LAlAl/ LNaNa, and its dependence on LAlAl/ LSiSi is stronger than that of myrmekite. The reaction rim is stable only for large values of LAlAl/ LCaCa, which is consistent with the case of myrmekite. Exchange cycles for

  18. Comparative Mineralogy, Microstructure and Compositional Trends in the Sub-Micron Size Fractions of Mare and Highland Lunar Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. S.; Christoffersen, R.; Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    The morphology, mineralogy, chemical composition and optical properties of lunar soils show distinct correlations as a function of grain size and origin [1,2,3]. In the mineralogy type, microstructure and major element compositions of grains in this important size range in lunar soils.

  19. Sulfosalt systematics: a review. Report of the sulfosalt sub-committee of the IMA Commission on Ore Mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moelo, Y.; Makovicky, E.; Mozgova, N.N.; Jambor, J.L.; Cook, N.; Pring, A.; Paar, W.; Nickel, E.H.; Graeser, S.; Karup-Møller, Sven; Balic-Zunic, T.; Mumme, W.G.; Vurro, F.; Topa, D.; Bindi, L.; Bente, K.; Shimizu, M.

    2008-01-01

    This report deals with a general reexamination of the systematics of sulfosalts. It represents an update of the activity of the Sulfosalt Sub-Committee within the Commission on Ore Mineralogy of the International Mineralogical Association, in connection with the Commission on New Minerals...

  20. 150. výročí narození mineraloga a petrografa profesora Antona Pelikana (*1861 Vídeň; +1918 Praha)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulrych, Jaromír; Pertlik, F.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 6 (2012), s. 566568. ISSN 1213-0710 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Pelikan, Anton (1861-1918) * scientists * mineralogy * petrography * history Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  1. Space activities in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, H.; Kono, J.; Quintino, M.; Perondi, L.

    Brazilian space activities develop around three main programs, namely, the China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite (CBERS) , the Applications Satellite program, comprising the Multi-Mission Platform and associated remote sensing payloads (radar and optical), and the Scientific Satellites program. Increasing national industry participation and acquiring new technology are strategic goals established for all programs. CBERS program is the result of successful long term cooperation between China and Brazil for the development of remote sensing satellites. Initially comprising two satellites, launched in 1999 and 2003, and now extended to four, this cooperation fulfills the needs of both countries in earth imagery. CBERS satellites are designed for global coverage and include cameras for high spatial resolution and wide field of view, in the visible, near infrared spectrum, an infrared multi-spectral scanner, and a Transponder for the Brazilian Environmental Data Collection System to gather data on the environment. They are unique systems due to the use of onboard cameras which combine features that are specially designed to resolve the broad range of space and time scales involved in our ecosystem. Applications satellites, mainly devoted to optical and radar remote sensing, are being developed in the frame of international cooperation agreements, and will be based on the use of a recurrent Multi-Mission Platform (MMP), currently under development. The MMP will be 3-axes stabilized and will have a fine pointing capability, in several pointing modes, such as Earth, Inertial or Sun pointing. Missions will be focused on natural resources observation and monitoring.. The Program for Scientific Satellites is based on low-cost micro-satellites and aims at providing frequent flight opportunities for scientific research from space, whilst serving as a technological development platform, involving Research Institutes, Universities and National Industry. Current projects are FBM

  2. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Gualco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10-year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non-Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36% and mature (64% cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B-cell phenotype and 19% of the T-cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central-west region. The distribution by age groups was 15-18 years old, 33%; 11-14 years old, 26%; 6-10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B-cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%, followed by diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (24%. In the mature T-cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK-positive was the most prevalent (57%, followed by peripheral T-cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%. In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%. Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions.

  3. Familial hypercholesterolemia in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, J E; Zago, M A

    2003-11-01

    The Brazilian population has heterogeneous ethnic origins and is unevenly distributed in a country of continental dimensions. In addition to the Portuguese colonists until the end of the World War II Brazil received almost 5 million immigrants who settled mainly in the south and southeast. This features of the Brazilian population have two important consequences for the inherited diseases that are associated with an ethnic background: their frequencies are different in various regions of the country reflecting a variety of ethnic origins and variable degrees of admixtures. There was no report about the molecular basis of hypercholesterolemia in Brazil until our report in 1996 that the Lebanese allele is the most common cause of the disease in our country: 10 out of the 30 families were of Arab origin, and the Lebanese allele was detected in 9 of the 10 unrelated families of Arab origin. In addition, the abnormal gene is associated with the same haplotype at the LDL-R locus in all but one family, suggesting single origin for this mutation. Recently we described seven mutations in exons 4, 7, 12 and 14 and a new mutation in exon 15. In another region of our state, eight mutation already described and seven new mutations were described and interesting no common mutations were find. We can conclude that the complex history and structure of the Brazilian population, which was formed by the contribution of a large number of ethnic components that are in a state of increasing miscegenation, is reflected in the frequency and regional distribution of the more common hereditary diseases. PMID:14615271

  4. Zika: Why Brazil, Why Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160251.html Zika: Why Brazil, Why Now Several factors -- including economics, ... been the country hit hardest by the ongoing Zika virus epidemic and its potential for birth defects. ...

  5. The Espinharas uranium occurrence, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclam has been exploring for uranium in Brazil since 1976. During this period one uranium ore body has been found in the vicinity of Espinharas, a village in Paraiba State, northeast Brazil. According to present knowledge, the mineralized ore body is caused by metasomatic action. The history of discovery and the exploration work until the end of 1979 is given, showing the conceptual change with increasing knowledge of the mineralized zone. (author)

  6. Automobile Pollution Control in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Ferraz; Ronaldo Seroa da Motta

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution concentrations have been rapidly increasing in the major urban areas of Brazil caused mainly by the increasing use of vehicles. In the presence of this negative externality, environmental regulation is required. Car emission control policies in Brazil have relied basically on mandatory emission standards and subsidies for specific cleaner technology resulting in substantial decrease of car emission rates. Nevertheless, car sale taxes, differentiated by vehicles’ size and fuel, h...

  7. Geochemistry, petrography, and zircon U-Pb geochronology of Paleozoic metaigneous rocks in the Mount Veta area of east-central Alaska: implications for the evolution of the westernmost part of the Yukon-Tanana terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Day, Warren C.; Aleinikoff, John N.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of new mapping, whole-rock major, minor, and trace-element geochemistry, and petrography for metaigneous rocks from the Mount Veta area in the westernmost part of the allochthonous Yukon–Tanana terrane (YTT) in east-central Alaska. These rocks include tonalitic mylonite gneiss and mafic metaigneous rocks from the Chicken metamorphic complex and the Nasina and Fortymile River assemblages. Whole-rock trace-element data from the tonalitic gneiss, whose igneous protolith was dated by SHRIMP U–Pb zircon geochronology at 332.6 ± 5.6 Ma, indicate derivation from tholeiitic arc basalt. Whole-rock analyses of the mafic rocks suggest that greenschist-facies rocks from the Chicken metamorphic complex, a mafic metavolcanic rock from the Nasina assemblage, and an amphibolite from the Fortymile River assemblage formed as island-arc tholeiite in a back-arc setting; another Nasina assemblage greenschist has MORB geochemical characteristics, and another mafic metaigneous rock from the Fortymile River assemblage has geochemical characteristics of calc-alkaline basalt. Our geochemical results imply derivation in an arc and back-arc spreading region within the allochthonous YTT crustal fragment, as previously proposed for correlative units in other parts of the terrane. We also describe the petrography and geochemistry of a newly discovered tectonic lens of Alpine-type metaharzburgite. The metaharzburgite is interpreted to be a sliver of lithospheric mantle from beneath the Seventymile ocean basin or from sub-continental mantle lithosphere of the allochthonous YTT or the western margin of Laurentia that was tectonically emplaced within crustal rocks during closure of the Seventymile ocean basin and subsequently displaced and fragmented by faults.

  8. Volcanic stratigraphy of intermediate to acidic rocks in southern Paraná Magmatic Province, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Angélica Polo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first map in detail scale for an area covered by Palmas type volcanic rocks in the south border of the eocretaceous Paraná Magmatic Province, south Brazil. The study of the structural features coupled with petrography and geochemistry made it possible to separate these rocks into three main volcanic sequences and recognize their stratigraphy. The older Caxias do Sul sequence rests directly over the first low-Ti basalt flows (Gramado type, and corresponds to the stacking of lobated lava flows, laminar flows and lava domes, mostly emitted as continuous eruptions; only the latest eruptions are intercalated with thin sandstone deposits. These rocks have dacitic composition (~ 68 wt% SiO2 with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and subordinate pyroxenes and Ti-magnetite immersed in glassy or devitrified matrix. A second volcanic sequence, named Barros Cassal, is composed of several lava flows of basaltic andesite, andesitic and dacitic composition (~ 54; ~ 57 and ~ 63 wt% SiO2 , respectively, with microphenocrysts of plagioclase, pyroxenes and Ti-magnetite. The frequent intercalation of sandstone between the flows attests to the intermittent behaviour of this event. The upper sequence, Santa Maria, is made up of more silica-rich (~ 70 wt% SiO2 rocks occurring as laminar flows, lobated flows and lava-domes. These rocks have rhyolitic composition with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and Ti-magnetite set in a glassy or devitrified matrix with microlites. The structures and textures of all three silicic sequences favor the interpretation that they had a predominantly effusive character, which is thought to be a reflection of the remarkably high temperatures of the lavas (~ 1,000 ºC.

  9. New geological model of the Lagoa Real uraniferous albitites from Bahia (Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Chaves, Alexandre

    2013-09-01

    New evidence supported by petrography (including mineral chemistry), lithogeochemistry, U-Pb geochronology by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and physicochemical study of fluid and melt inclusions by LA-ICP-MS and microthermometry, point to an orogenic setting of Lagoa Real (Bahia-Brazil) involving uraniferous mineralization. Unlike the previous models in which uraniferous albitites represent Na-metasomatised 1.75 Ga anorogenic granitic rocks, it is understood here that they correspond to metamorphosed sodium-rich and quartz-free 1.9 Ga late-orogenic syenitic rocks (Na-metasyenites). These syenitic rocks are rich not only in albite, but also in U-rich titanite (source of uranium). The interpretation of geochemical data points to a petrogenetic connection between alkali-diorite (local amphibolite protolith) and sodic syenite by fractional crystallization through a transalkaline series. This magmatic differentiation occurred either before or during shear processes, which in turn led to albitite and amphibolite formation. The metamorphic reactions, which include intense recrystallization of magmatic minerals, led uraninite to precipitate at 1.87 Ga under Oxidation/Reduction control. A second population of uraninites was also generated by the reactivation of shear zones during the 0.6 Ga Brasiliano Orogeny. The geotectonic implications include the importance of the Orosirian event in the Paramirim Block during paleoproterozoic Săo Francisco Craton edification and the influence of the Brasiliano event in the Paramirim Block during the West-Gondwana assembly processes. The regional microcline-gneiss, whose protolith is a 2.0 Ga syn-collisional potassic granite, represents the albitite host rock. The microcilne-gneiss has no petrogenetic association to the syenite (albitite protolith) in magmatic evolutionary terms.

  10. Random and systematic spatial variability of 137Cs inventories at reference sites in South-Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correchel Vladia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The precision of the 137Cs fallout redistribution technique for the evaluation of soil erosion rates is strongly dependent on the quality of an average inventory taken at a representative reference site. The knowledge of the sources and of the degree of variation of the 137Cs fallout spatial distribution plays an important role on its use. Four reference sites were selected in the South-Central region of Brazil which were characterized in terms of soil chemical, physical and mineralogical aspects as well as the spatial variability of 137Cs inventories. Some important differences in the patterns of 137Cs depth distribution in the soil profiles of the different sites were found. They are probably associated to chemical, physical, mineralogical and biological differences of the soils but many questions still remain open for future investigation, mainly those regarding the adsorption and dynamics of the 137Cs ions in soil profiles under tropical conditions. The random spatial variability (inside each reference site was higher than the systematic spatial variability (between reference sites but their causes were not clearly identified as possible consequences of chemical, physical, mineralogical variability, and/or precipitation.

  11. Sand and clay mineralogy of sal forest soils of the Doon Siwalik Himalayas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh; R K Manhas; A K Tripathi; A K Raina; M K Gupta; S K Kamboj

    2011-02-01

    The peteromineralogical characterization of the soil was carried out for the 12 soil profiles exposed in the Shorea robusta dominated forests of the Siwalik forest division, Dehradun. The quartz was observed as the dominating light mineral fraction (64–80%) in all the profiles studied. Biotite, hornblende, zircon, tourmaline, rutile and opaques comprising of iron minerals constituted the heavy mineral fraction (20%). The mineralogy of both the sand and clay fractions revealed a mixed mineralogy. The clay minerals in the order of their dominance were vermiculite, illite, kaolinite and mixed layer minerals. The presence of vermiculite and illite in appreciable quantities indicates that these were synthesized from the K-rich soil solution, as orthoclase and micas were present in significant quantities in the sand minerals. The mineral suites identified in the study shows that the geological, climatological and topographical factors of the region collectively played a dominant role in their formation and transformation. After critical appraisal of the results, it may be deduced that the mineralogical composition, physicochemical properties and total elemental analysis of the soils do not show any deficiency of the bases and other plant nutrients in general. The inherent fertility of the soil is good as indicated by the sand and clay mineralogy of the soil and the biotite and feldspar together with the mica is an important source of nutrients for the vegetation in the soils of the Doon valley.

  12. Polyacrylamide effects on aggregate and structure stability of soils with different clay mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adding anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) to soils stabilizes existing aggregates and improves bonding between and aggregation of soil particles. However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent with soils having different clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil samples...

  13. Soil aggregate stability as affected by clay mineralogy and polyacrylamide addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The addition of polyacrylamide (PAM) to soil leads to stabilization of existing aggregates and improved bonding between, and aggregation of adjacent soil particles However, the dependence of PAM efficacy as an aggregate stabilizing agent on soil-clay mineralogy has not been studied. Sixteen soil sam...

  14. Pedogenic and lithogenic features in the mineralogical composition of chernozem developed from red-earth deposits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesovaya, S. N.; Kapička, Aleš; Petrovský, Eduard; Aparin, B. F.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 12 (2003), s. 1325-1333. ISSN 1064-2293 Grant ostatní: RFFI(RU) 01-04-48815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : mineralogical composition * chernozem * magnetic minerals Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.136, year: 2003

  15. Pedogennyje i litogennyje osobennosti mineralogičeskogo sostava černozema na krasnocvetnych porodach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesovaja, S. N.; Kapička, Aleš; Petrovský, Eduard; Aparin, B. F.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 12 (2003), s. 1482-1490. ISSN 0032-180X Grant ostatní: RFFI(RU) 01-04-48815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : mineralogical composition * chernozem * magnetic minerals Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  16. Elemental, mineralogical, and pore-solution compositions of selected Canadian clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay materials will be an important component of a barrier and sealing system in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in Canada. In this report the elemental, mineralogical, and pore-solution compositions of candidate clay sealing materials for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program are presented

  17. Petrology and mineralogy of the Neolithic and Aeneolithic artefacts in Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrein, Vladimír; Šreinová, B.; Šťastný, Martin

    17(119) (2000), s. 57-66. ISSN 1211-1910 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3407001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : Neolithic * Aeneolithic * stony artefacts Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  18. Arsenic-rich acid mine water with extreme arsenic concentration: mineralogy, geochemistry, microbiology, and environmental implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majzlan, J.; Plášil, Jakub; Škoda, R.; Gescher, J.; Kögler, F.; Rusznyak, A.; Küsel, K.; Neu, T.R.; Mangold, S.; Rothe, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 23 (2014), s. 13685-13693. ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-31276P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : extreme arsenic concentration Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 5.330, year: 2014

  19. Mineralogical association in the zone of argillic advanced alteration in a kaolin deposit of Patagonia Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the mineralogical and petrological relations of the para genetic association of advanced argillic zone in the kaolin deposit in Patagonia.This study allowed to establish the sequence of events that took place in the deposit as well as the conditions under which they were generated

  20. Mineralogical characterization of uranium ore to evaluate in-situ leaching prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineralogical studies of ore samples from Mobil uranium properties in the Grants Mineral Belt revealed a correlation between certain mineralogical characteristics of the ore and its leaching behavior in the laboratory. Mild alkaline carbonate solutions containing dissolved oxygen gas or hydrogen peroxide were used to leach ore samples. Leaching effects of the uranium minerals and reactive gangue material were investigated by comparing the mineralogical characteristics between pre- and post-leach samples. In one ore trend where uraninite was the principal uranium mineral, studies showed that the majority of uranium minerals was readily accessible to the leachate on a microscopic scale, the predominant, 1 /sigma phi/m-sized uraninite crystals were rapidly dissolved during leaching, the minor, but locally abundant uranium vanadate species was insoluble in mild alkaline carbonate leachate, and pyrite crystals, with dimensions 10 times greater than the uraninite crystallites, showed some surface etchings. These results indicate that the solubility and microscopic occurrence of uraninite are favorable for high and rapid uranium recovery, while the fraction of uranium contained in the insoluble uranium vanadate phase can not be recovered under mild leaching conditions. Mineralogical studies of the pre- and post-leach ore samples correlate well with the laboratory leach tests which showed 80-90% uranium recovery as well as low vanadium and sulfate levels in the effluents

  1. Textural and mineralogical study of the San Gregorio de Polanco mesozoic basic dams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the preliminary results of petrographic study in Mesozoic basic dikes located around San Gregorio de Polanco (Tacuarembo department. Uruguay). The textural mineralogical study conducted by scanning electron microscopy confirms the presence of significant late hydrothermal activity which are represented by the conspicuous presence of interstitial barite mineralization level

  2. Mineralogy by X-ray Diffraction on Mars: The Chemin Instrument on Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Des Marais, D. J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain detailed mineralogy information, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity carries CheMin, the first X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument used on a planet other than Earth. CheMin has provided the first in situ XRD analyses of full phase assemblages on another planet.

  3. Mineralogy of Galvanic Corrosion By-products in Domestic Drinking Water Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presents the results of a visual and mineralogical characterization of scales developed over long time periods at galvanically coupled lead-brass and lead-copper pipe joints from several different drinking water distribution systems. The long-term exposure aspect of t...

  4. Exploring Visuospatial Thinking in Learning about Mineralogy: Spatial Orientation Ability and Spatial Visualization Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    This mixed-method research attempted to clarify the role of visuospatial abilities in learning about mineralogy. Various sources of data--including quantitative pre- and postmeasures of spatial visualization and spatial orientation tests and achievement scores on six measures and qualitative unstructured observations, interviews, and field trip…

  5. Mineralogy of Air-Pollution-Control Residues from a Secondary Lead Smellter: Environmental Implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ettler, V.; Johan, Z.; Baronnet, A.; Jankovský, F.; Gilles, C.; Mihaljevič, M.; Šebek, O.; Strnad, L.; Bezdička, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 23 (2005), s. 9309-9316. ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP205/01/D132 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : mineralogy * environmental aplications Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.054, year: 2005

  6. Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodénan, F; Guyonnet, D; Piantone, P; Blanc, P

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al(0), as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al(0) are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction. PMID:20153161

  7. Mineralogical Characteristics of Specimens of a Meteorwrong Fall from NW Iran

    CERN Document Server

    Pourkhorsandi, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    In the early hours of October 22, 2011, people of a small town in NW Iran, called Khameneh (38{\\deg}11'47" N, 45{\\deg}38'14" E) noticed sounds of some colliding objects to home roofs and yard floors. Mineralogical investigations revealed the terrestrial and man-made origin of these stony samples.

  8. Geochemical and mineralogical data for soils of the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey began a low-density (1 site per 1,600 sq. km., 4857 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils of the conterminous...

  9. Comparisons of Mineralogy Between Cumulate Eucrites and Lunar Meteorites Possibly from the Farside Anorsothitic Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, H.; Yamaguchi, A.; Hiroi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Ohtake, M.; Karouji, Y.; Kobayashi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Anorthosites composed of nearly pure anorthite (PAN) at many locations in the farside highlands have been observed by the Kaguya multiband imager and spectral profiler [1]. Mineralogical studies of lunar meteorites of the Dhofar 489 group [2,3] and Yamato (Y-) 86032 [4], all possibly from the farside highlands, showed some aspects of the farside crust. Nyquist et al. [5] performed Sm-Nd and Ar-Ar studies of pristine ferroan anorthosites (FANs) of the returned Apollo samples and of Dhofar 908 and 489, and discussed implications for lunar crustal history. Nyquist et al. [6] reported initial results of a combined mineralogical/chronological study of the Yamato (Y-) 980318 cumulate eucrite with a conventional Sm-Nd age of 4567 24 Ma and suggested that all eucrites, including cumulate eucrites, crystallized from parental magmas within a short interval following differentiation of their parent body, and most eucrites participated in an event or events in the time interval 4400- 4560 Ma in which many isotopic systems were partially reset. During the foregoing studies, we recognized that variations in mineralogy and chronology of lunar anorthosites are more complex than those of the crustal materials of the HED parent body. In this study, we compared the mineralogies and reflectance spectra of the cumulate eucrites, Y-980433 and 980318, to those of the Dhofar 307 lunar meteorite of the Dhofar 489 group [2]. Here we consider information from these samples to gain a better understanding of the feldspathic farside highlands and the Vesta-like body.

  10. Ashes from oily sewage sludge combustion: chemistry, mineralogy and leaching properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Polc

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the current paper the chemical and mineralogical properties of bottom ash and fly ash from oily sewage sludge combustion are investigated. The mineralogical composition and the morphology of ashes were determined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD in combination with scanning electron microscopy with quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX. In addition, a leaching test results are presented to shed light on the potential toxicity of studied materials and their impact on the environment is discussed. Both of the studied materials are final products of thermal oxidation at industrial sludge incinerator. This facility aims to sanitary disposal of mechanical and biological sludge from industrial wastewater treatment plant. Bottom ash and fly ash are relatively stable solid products with slightly different chemical and mineralogical composition that reflects their different origin – burning condition in furnace vs. flues gas cleaning technology. Leaching tests of both mentioned materials were implemented under laboratory conditions. The aim of the laboratory tests was to determine the possibility of the pollutants release into the environment. The data presented herein support the importance of detailed mineralogical and geochemical study for the better understanding of the leaching tests. The obtained results showed that both of the sewage sludge ash samples exceed the criteria for accepting waste in landfilles established for Slovakia.

  11. Christian Herrgen y la institucionalización de la mineralogía en Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra, Dolores

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals of the scientific policy of the governments of the Borbones were that of favors the disciplines subject to be applied for the necessary stimulus of the Spanish economy. Such it was the case of the Mineralogy, science that was developed and imparted in several scientific cultured institutions. One of these centers were the Cabinet of Natural History from Madrid, in which the work of the German specialist Christian Herrgen contributed to the institutionalization of the Spanish Mineralogy.

    Uno de los objetivos de la política científica de los gobiernos borbones fue la de potenciar aquellas disciplinas susceptibles de ser aplicadas en el necesario fomento de la economía española. Tal fue el caso de la Mineralogía, ciencia que fue desarrollada e impartida en varias instituciones científicas ilustradas. Uno de estos centros fue el Gabinete de Historia Natural de Madrid, en el que la labor del especialista alemán Christian Herrgen contribuyó a la institucionalización de la mineralogía española.

  12. Skeletal mineralogy of coral recruits under high temperature and pCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Foster

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aragonite, which is the polymorph of CaCO3 precipitated by modern corals during skeletal formation, has a higher solubility than the more stable polymorph calcite. This higher solubility leaves animals that produce aragonitic skeletons more vulnerable to anthropogenic ocean acidification. It is therefore, important to determine whether scleractinian corals have the plasticity to adapt and produce calcite in their skeletons in response to changing environmental conditions. Both high pCO2 and lower Mg / Ca ratios in seawater are thought to have driven changes in the skeletal mineralogy of major marine calcifiers in the past ∼540 myr. Experimentally reduced Mg / Ca ratios in ambient seawater have been shown to induce some calcite precipitation in both adult and newly settled modern corals, however, the impact of high pCO2 on the mineralogy of recruits is unknown. Here we determined the skeletal mineralogy of one-month old Acropora spicifera coral recruits grown under high temperature (+3 °C and pCO2 (∼900 μatm conditions, using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. We found that newly settled coral recruits produced entirely aragonitic skeletons regardless of the treatment. Our results show that elevated pCO2 alone is unlikely to drive changes in the skeletal mineralogy of young corals. Not having an ability to switch from aragonite to calcite precipitation may leave corals and ultimately coral reef ecosystems more susceptible to predicted ocean acidification. An important area for prospective research would be to investigate the combined impact of high pCO2 and reduced Mg / Ca ratio on coral skeletal mineralogy.

  13. Phylomineralogy of the coralline red algae: correlation of skeletal mineralogy with molecular phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A M; Sutherland, J E; Kregting, L; Farr, T J; Winter, D J

    2012-09-01

    The coralline algae in the orders Corallinales and Sporolithales (subclass Corallinophycidae), with their high degree of mineralogical variability, pose a challenge to projections regarding mineralogy and response to ocean acidification. Here we relate skeletal carbonate mineralogy to a well-established phylogenetic framework and draw inferences about the effects of future changes in sea-water chemistry on these calcified red algae. A collection of 191 coralline algal specimens from New Zealand, representing 13 genera and 28 species, included members of three families: Corallinaceae, Hapalidiaceae, and Sporolithaceae. While most skeletal specimens were entirely calcitic (range: 73-100 wt.% calcite, mean 97 wt.% calcite, std dev=5, n=172), a considerable number contained at least some aragonite. Mg in calcite ranged from 10.5 to 16.4 wt.% MgCO(3), with a mean of 13.1 wt.% MgCO(3) (std dev=1.1, n=172). The genera Mesophyllum and Lithophyllum were especially variable. Growth habit, too, was related to mineralogy: geniculate coralline algae do not generally contain any aragonite. Mg content varied among coralline families: the Corallinaceae had the highest Mg content, followed by the Sporolithaceae and the Hapalidiaceae. Despite the significant differences among families, variation and overlap prevent the use of carbonate mineralogy as a taxonomic character in the coralline algae. Latitude (as a proxy for water temperature) had only a slight relationship to Mg content in coralline algae, contrary to trends observed in other biomineralising taxa. Temperate magnesium calcites, like those produced by coralline algae, are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification. Changes in biomineralisation or species distribution may occur over the next few decades, particularly to species producing high-Mg calcite, as pH and CO(2) dynamics change in coastal temperate oceans. PMID:22795764

  14. Mineral Supertrumps: A new card game to assist learning of mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandler, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineralogy is considered one of the cornerstone subjects of geoscience curriculum. It provides the basic information from which we can understand the composition and behaviour of Earth and planetary materials, yet many students struggle to obtain adequate comprehension and knowledge of mineralogy during tertiary degree programs. Here, I introduce a new card game called "Mineral Supertrumps" that can be used to assist teaching of mineralogy at secondary and tertiary level. The card game is easy to learn and play, and is designed to promote active learning in a group environment. The game involves 3 to 6 people, and is similar to the "Top Trumps™" card games. The pack consists of 54 mineral cards, and 6 supertrump cards. Each mineral card includes information about the mineral such as the generic chemical formula, the classification, crystal system, the geological environment where the mineral is commonly found or formed, as well as information in the five playing categories (or trumps) of Hardness, Specific Gravity, Cleavage, Crustal Abundance, and Economic Value. The first three playing categories relate to distinct physical properties of the mineral, while last two categories rate the importance of the mineral in terms of abundance in the Earth's crust and value to modern societies. Results of a formal evaluation of the game by students in the second year of a tertiary geology program indicate that the game has clear benefits for learning about mineralogy. The majority of students enjoyed playing the game and considered it to be effective for enhancing learning about mineral properties and their application to other Earth Science disciplines. Therefore, inclusion of "Mineral Supertrumps" into Earth Science curriculum at secondary or tertiary level has the potential to redress the difficulties students face in learning of mineralogy, while requiring little to no adjustment to existing teaching programs.

  15. Skeletal mineralogy of coral recruits under high temperature and pCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, T.; Clode, P. L.

    2016-03-01

    Aragonite, which is the polymorph of CaCO3 precipitated by modern corals during skeletal formation, has a higher solubility than the more stable polymorph calcite. This higher solubility may leave animals that produce aragonitic skeletons more vulnerable to anthropogenic ocean acidification. It is therefore important to determine whether scleractinian corals have the plasticity to adapt and produce calcite in their skeletons in response to changing environmental conditions. Both high pCO2 and lower Mg / Ca ratios in seawater are thought to have driven changes in the skeletal mineralogy of major marine calcifiers in the past ˜ 540 Ma. Experimentally reduced Mg / Ca ratios in ambient seawater have been shown to induce some calcite precipitation in both adult and newly settled modern corals; however, the impact of high pCO2 on the mineralogy of recruits is unknown. Here we determined the skeletal mineralogy of 1-month-old Acropora spicifera coral recruits grown under high temperature (+3 °C) and pCO2 (˜ 900 µatm) conditions, using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. We found that newly settled coral recruits produced entirely aragonitic skeletons regardless of the treatment. Our results show that elevated pCO2 alone is unlikely to drive changes in the skeletal mineralogy of young corals. Not having an ability to switch from aragonite to calcite precipitation may leave corals and ultimately coral reef ecosystems more susceptible to predicted ocean acidification. An important area for prospective research would be the investigation of the combined impact of high pCO2 and reduced Mg / Ca ratio on coral skeletal mineralogy.

  16. The Byzantine ceramics from Pergamon excavations. Characterization of local and imported productions by elementary analysis using PIXE and INAA methods and by petrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important ceramics material dated back to the 12th-14th centuries has been excavated in Pergamon (Turkey). Among these findings, wasters, tripod stilts and unfinished ware attest to local production in the Byzantine period. Elemental analysis by the methods PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) and INAA (Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis) has been performed on a representative sampling of 160 sherds, including attested local material. Multivariate statistical techniques were used to classify the sherds into groups of similar composition and thus to distinguish ceramics made in Pergamon from imported wares. Several groups of local production have been constituted, which correspond to wares differing in date and fabric. The geochemical characterization of the pastes, complemented with petrographical and mineralogical data, shows that specific raw materials have been used to manufacture each ware. The analytical data related to ceramics made in Pergamon will serve as reference data for future provenance studies. Such reference groups of Byzantine ceramics are very rare, and therefore the ceramics imported into Pergamon cannot be attributed as to their origin. Among the ceramics widely diffused in the Byzantine world, some importations belonging to the ''fine sgraffito'' and ''Zeuxippus ware'' types have been identified. The latter type has been a source of stylistic influence for the workshops of Pergamon, since the analyses show that imitated ''Zeuxippus ware'' has been produced there. These imitations were probably themselves diffused on a regional scale. (author). 238 refs., 48 figs., 53 tabs., 22 photos., 8 appends

  17. Contribution to the stratigraphy of the onshore Paraiba Basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossetti, Dilce F.; Valeriano, Marcio M., E-mail: rossetti@dsr.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Sensoriamento Remoto; Goes, Ana M.; Brito-Neves, Benjamim B. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Bezerra, Francisco H.R.; Ochoa, Felipe L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Departamento de Geologia

    2012-06-15

    Several publications have contributed to improve the stratigraphy of the Paraiba Basin in northeastern Brazil. However, the characterization and distribution of sedimentary units in onshore areas of this basin are still incomplete, despite their significance for reconstructing the tectono- sedimentary evolution of the South American passive margin. This work provides new information to differentiate among lithologically similar strata, otherwise entirely unrelated in time. This approach included morphological, sedimentological and stratigraphic descriptions based on surface and sub-surface data integrated with remote sensing, optically stimulated luminescence dating, U+Th/He dating of weathered goethite, and heavy mineral analysis. Based on this study, it was possible to show that Cretaceous units are constrained to the eastern part of the onshore Paraiba Basin. Except for a few outcrops of carbonatic-rocks nearby the modern coastline, deposits of this age are not exposed to the surface in the study area. Instead, the sedimentary cover throughout the basin is constituted by mineralogically and chronologically distinctive deposits, inserted in the Barreiras Formation and mostly in the Post-Barreiras Sediments, of early/middle Miocene and Late Pleistocene-Holocene ages, respectively. The data presented in this work support tectonic deformation as a factor of great relevance to the distribution of the sedimentary units of the Paraiba Basin. (author)

  18. Country watch. Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turra, M D

    1994-01-01

    Persons who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or who suffer from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) often have their civil rights violated in Brazil. To remedy this, the Candido Mendes College in Rio de Janeiro introduced a voluntary course, "AIDS - Legal Approaches", into its law curriculum. Incentive was provided by the college's Model Law Office (MLO), where students learn to defend the rights of people in need. Class size is about 25; law professors use recent magazine and newspaper articles, and documentation on lawsuits concerning persons with HIV to teach the class. Course topics include relevant civil law (suits against blood banks), contract law (suits against private health insurance companies which refuse to cover treatment expenses related to HIV or AIDS), family law, inheritance law, labor law (unjust dismissal of persons with HIV), criminal law (intentional transmission of AIDS), violations of basic human rights, and comparative jurisprudence and constitutional law (a comparison of Brazilian law in this area to the laws of other countries). Students, during their field practice periods at the MLO, provide legal assistance to persons with HIV. Approximately 150 cases have been handled, often with positive outcomes, to date. Clients hear about the program via television, radio, and newspapers. Materials and information about lawsuits handled by the MLO are available to other colleges and universities with the hope of stimulating the formation of similar programs elsewhere. PMID:12288109

  19. Ethanol fuels in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The largest alternative transportation fuels program in the world today is Brazil's Proalcool Program. About 6.0 million metric tons of oil equivalent (MTOE) of ethanol, derived mainly from sugar cane, were consumed as transportation fuels in 1991 (equivalent to 127,000 barrels of crude oil per day). Total primary energy consumed by the Brazilian economy in 1991 was 184.1 million MTOE, and approximately 4.3 million vehicles -- about one third of the total vehicle fleet or about 40 percent of the total car population -- run on hydrous or open-quotes neatclose quotes ethanol at the azeotropic composition (96 percent ethanol, 4 percent water, by volume). Additional transportation fuels available in the country are diesel and gasoline, the latter of which is defined by three grades. Gasoline A (regular, leaded gas)d has virtually been replaced by gasoline C, a blend of gasoline and up to 22 percent anhydrous ethanol by volume, and gasoline B (premium gasoline) has been discontinued as a result of neat ethanol market penetration

  20. Argentina and Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that security is defined in different ways by many international actors. To some, security is tied to the definition of an external threat to borders, as in the case of the NATO countries. To other, security is related to development, as in the case of most Third World countries. but notwithstanding different definitions, all countries recognize that the essence of security is the survival of the nation-state itself. The nuclear programs of Argentina and Brazil are among the oldest, most sophisticated and advanced nuclear programs anywhere in the Third World. The programs have never been explained on the basis of threat perception, and in this regard perhaps they constitute the most atypical form of nuclear proliferation known to date. Not surprisingly, any attempt to explain the rationale for the Brazilian and Argentine nuclear programs based on common issues of threat =merely confuses the issue. Thus, nationalism, the search for national identity and pride, the need to express self-sufficiency and the desire to keep options open in an insecure and evolving world order must all be analyzed to comprehend the likelihood of future types of nuclear proliferation. Meanwhile, the study of the contemporary era of Argentine-Brazilian nuclear rapprochement may provide new insights into the complex reasoning behind the decision of countries to go nuclear

  1. Policing violence in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, E

    1999-03-01

    This article is an excerpted summary of a speech on female police and domestic violence. The speech was given by a woman affiliated with the Association of Women Workers at an Oxfam workshop in northern Brazil. This organization successfully lobbied for female police, which resulted in more reports of domestic violence, especially rape. The organization is active in 13 counties. Female police are trained and usually given respect by police chiefs. In one city, in 1997, the appointment of female police resulted in registered reports of 387 cases of violence and hospital reports of 503 cases, of which 14% were child rape. During January-April 1998, there were 126 registered cases and 168 hospital cases. Policewomen formed a partnership over the past 2 years with the Human Rights Group and other popular political groups to train female police about laws. The compulsory course focused on four areas: legal concepts, penalties, and procedures on registration of complaints; the Brazilian Penal Code; civil law; and world judicial bureaucracies. Training includes a 1 month internship with the program's lawyer. Over 20 women have completed the course to date. Training in some cases resulted in greater expertise among the female police than their Police Chiefs. Female police have experienced harassment by local authorities. PMID:12295035

  2. Essays on Municipal Public Finance in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Rachel Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation studies local public finance in Brazil, with a focus on how federal and state government policies affect local spending and revenue generation. In Chapter I, I provide a descriptive analysis of local public finance in Brazil, with a focus on local revenue generation. In addition to describing the system of public finance in Brazil from a municipal perspective, I discuss the major challenges facing local governments in Brazil and in other low and middle income countries and ...

  3. Brazil, China, US: a triangular relation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Augusto Guilhon-Albuquerque

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is divided in three sections. The first one explores the so-called "strategic partnership" between Brazil and China. In the second section we shall examine how US-China relations in the global system could affect both Brazil-US, and Brazil-China bilateral relations. A final section presents some recommendations for Brazil strategic orientations regarding the current systemic transition in the allotment of global power.

  4. The Evolution of Reforestation in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Bacha, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evolution of reforestation in Brazil and makes an evaluation of federal government policies used to stimulate that activity. Despite the huge increase of reforestation areas in Brazil since the 1970s, what put up Brazil as the sixth large country with reforested areas, a scarcity of roundwood from reforested areas is happing in that country during the first decade of the 21st century. Federal government implemented three programs to foster the reforestation in Brazil d...

  5. Evaluation of cryolite from pitinga (Amazonas-Brazil as a source of hydrogen fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica F. Paulino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the use of cryolite from the Pitinga Mine (Amazonas state, Brazil as raw material in hydrogen fluoride production. Samples were initially characterized by chemical and mineralogical analyses. They presented low silica content (< 4 wt.%. After milling, cryolite samples were digested with concentrated sulfuric acid under stirring (200 rpm and variable temperature, time and liquid to solid ratio conditions. Under the best experimental conditions (140 °C, 3-5 h, 96 wt.% of fluorine was recovered as hydrogen fluoride. The application of a 23 full factorial design showed that temperature and reaction time were relevant parameters during leaching, whereas liquid to solid ratio was not statistically significant.

  6. Petrology and geochemistry of the marbles and calcosilicated rocks from Ipira, Bahia - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work explains a study of marbles and diopsitites from Serra das Panelas, Ipira, Bahia, Brazil. Petrographic analysis, chemistry some elements, trace elements and rare earths, isotopic analysis of Strontium, carbon and oxigen, and geochronological determinations were done. The ages founded correspond to Transamazonic Orogenetic cicle, with Archean age, confirmed by the 18O values found, which give to marble, ages about 2.500 my. The mineralogy and the texture give to marble an invulgar aspect, making a confusion with carbonate. The petrochemical data and the geochemistry of 13C and 18O isotopes showed that the marble and diopsitites was formed from the old marine carbonates. The geochemistry of rare earth suggests a strong correlation with carbonitic and alkaline rocks. An hybrid origem to this rocks is proposed. (C.D.G.)

  7. OUT Success Stories: Rural Electrification in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States and Brazil are collaborating to bring electricity to some 5 million households in rural Brazil. Over the next decade, there is a potential to install approximately 500 megawatts (MW) of solar home systems and 1000 MW of community systems, bringing light to households, schools, and health clinics throughout rural Brazil

  8. Quantification of aluminium in soil of the Solimões Formation, Acre State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Andrade Bernini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The variety of soils in the State of Acre is wide and their chemical profiles are still not fully understood. The nature of the material of origin of these soils is indicated by the high aluminium (Al content, commonly associated with high calcium (Ca and magnesium (Mg contents. The study objective was to use different methods to quantify Al in soils from toposequences formed from material of a sedimentary nature originating from the Solimões Formation, in Acre, Brazil. Trenches were opened at three distinct points in the landscape: shoulder, backslope and footslope positions. Soil samples were collected for physical, chemical, mineralogical analyses. The Al content was quantified using different methods. High Al contents were found in most of these horizons, associated with high Ca and Mg levels, representing the predominant cations in the sum of exchangeable bases. The mineralogy indicates that the soils are still in a low weathering phase, with the presence of significant quantities of 2:1 minerals. Similar Al contents were determined by the methods of NaOH titration, xylenol orange spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. However, no consistent data were obtained by the pyrocatechol violet method. Extraction with KCl overestimated the exchangeable Al content due to its ability to extract the non-exchangeable Al present in the smectite interlayers. It was observed that high Al contents are related to the instability of the hydroxyl-Al smectite interlayers.

  9. Characterization and classification of two soils derived from basic rocks in Pernambuco State Coast, Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Lindomário Barros de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphic surfaces that present soils derived from basic rocks under warm and humid climate are unique scenarios for studying tropical soils. This paper aimed to characterize and classify two pedons derived from basalt at the Atlantic Forest Zone, Pernambuco State, Northeastern coast of Brazil. Two representative pedons (P1 and P2 were selected on a hillslope at the Cabo de Santo Agostinho municipality. Field macromorphological descriptions were carried out and soil horizon were sampled for physical, chemical, mineralogical and micromorphological characterization. The soils were classified, according to the Brazilian System of Soil Classification (and US Soil Taxonomy as: "Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo distroférrico argissólico" (Typic Hapludox (P1 and "Nitossolo Vermelho distroférrico típico" (Rhodic Paleudult (P2. Pedon 1 differs from Pedon 2 in some aspects. For instance, P1 presents more yellowish colors, absence of clay illuviation, more friable consistence and the prismatic structure undergoes transformation to angular and subangular blocks. Pedon 2 presents ferri-argilans and leptocutans which indicate that vertical and lateral illuviation of clay is an active process in their formation. These chemically poor and mineralogically uniform soils are a result of the high temperature and rainfall of the studied area.

  10. Amazonian anthrosols support similar microbial communities that differ distinctly from those extant in adjacent, unmodified soils of the same mineralogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Julie M; O'Neill, Brendan E; Tsai, Siu Mui; Liang, Biqing; Neves, Eduardo; Lehmann, Johannes; Thies, Janice E

    2010-07-01

    We compared the microbial community composition in soils from the Brazilian Amazon with two contrasting histories; anthrosols and their adjacent non-anthrosol soils of the same mineralogy. The anthrosols, also known as the Amazonian Dark Earths or terra preta, were managed by the indigenous pre-Colombian Indians between 500 and 8,700 years before present and are characterized by unusually high cation exchange capacity, phosphorus (P), and calcium (Ca) contents, and soil carbon pools that contain a high proportion of incompletely combusted biomass as biochar or black carbon (BC). We sampled paired anthrosol and unmodified soils from four locations in the Manaus, Brazil, region that differed in their current land use and soil type. Community DNA was extracted from sampled soils and characterized by use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. DNA bands of interest from Bacteria and Archaea DGGE gels were cloned and sequenced. In cluster analyses of the DNA fingerprints, microbial communities from the anthrosols grouped together regardless of current land use or soil type and were distinct from those in their respective, paired adjacent soils. For the Archaea, the anthrosol communities diverged from the adjacent soils by over 90%. A greater overall richness was observed for Bacteria sequences as compared with those of the Archaea. Most of the sequences obtained were novel and matched those in databases at less than 98% similarity. Several sequences obtained only from the anthrosols grouped at 93% similarity with the Verrucomicrobia, a genus commonly found in rice paddies in the tropics. Sequences closely related to Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria sp. were recovered only from adjacent soil samples. Sequences related to Pseudomonas, Acidobacteria, and Flexibacter sp. were recovered from both anthrosols and adjacent soils. The strong similarities among the microbial communities present in the anthrosols for

  11. Zika virus outbreak in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heukelbach, Jorg; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Kelvin, Alyson Ann; de Oliveira, Wanderson Kleber; Pamplona de Góes Cavalcanti, Luciano

    2016-02-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is spreading rapidly within the Americas after originating from an outbreak in Brazil. We describe the current ZIKV infection epidemic in Brazil and the neurological symptoms arising. First cases of an acute exanthematic disease were reported in Brazil's Northeast region at the end of 2014. In March 2015, autochthonous ZIKV was determined to be the causative agent of the exanthematic disease. As cases of neurological syndromes in regions where ZIKV, dengue and/or Chikungunya viruses co-circulate were reported, ZIKV was also identified in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with acute neurological syndromes and previous exanthematic disease. By the end of September 2015, an increasing number of infants with small head circumference or microcephaly were noted in Brazil's Northeast which was estimated to be 29 cases between August and October. ZIKV was identified in blood and tissue samples of a newborn and in mothers who had given birth to infants with microcephaly and ophthalmological anomalies. In 2015, there were an estimated 440,000 - 1,300,000 Zika cases in Brazil. There have been 4,783 suspected cases of microcephaly, most of them in the Northeast of Brazil associated with 76 deaths. The Ministry of Health is intensifying control measures against the mosquito Aedes aegypti and implemented intensive surveillance actions. Further studies are needed to confirm the suspected association between ZIKV infection and microcephaly; to identify antiviral, immunotherapy, or prophylactic vaccine; to introduce diagnostic ELISA testing. Clinical and epidemiological studies must be performed to describe viral dynamics and expansion of the outbreak. PMID:26927450

  12. Sexuality education in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplicy, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive program of sex education in Brazilian schools is described in the context of Brazil's culture and traditions such as the Carnival. The influence of Catholicism is explored as is the effect of the behavioral restrictions called for by scientists concerned about sexually transmitted diseases. The Brazilian response to homosexuality is described, and the emergence of a public discussion of sexuality in the media is traced. It is noted that improvements in the status of women have been held in check by a public ridicule of feminism and by the strength of the traditional patriarchal structures which dominate the culture. With this picture given of how the issue of sexuality fits into Brazilian life, the 1980s initiative on the part of the Work and Research Group for Sex Education is described. Opposition to this effort has largely taken the form of passive resistance; even the Catholic Church has not officially protested the sex education program. Details are provided about 1) the selection of teachers, teacher training, and weekly supervisory teacher meetings; 2) the way in which parental permission for student participation was gained; 3) the implementation of the program; 4) the successes achieved; and 5) the difficulties encountered. Finally, it is noted that plans were made to expand the sex education project from the Sao Paulo area to 6 additional large cities in 1994. Also planned is the publication of the Brazilian Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality which will explain the sex education methodology and be extremely valuable in the establishment of new projects. PMID:12287356

  13. Mutation breeding in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How mutation induction is used for plant breeding in Brazil is reported. For upland rice, the combined treatment with gamma-ray and mutagens (ethylene imine or ethylmethane sulfonate) has been used on the variety, Dourado Precoce, and some mutants with shortculm length and/or earliness without altering the productivity have been obtained. A project on the quantitative and qualitative protein improvement in upland rice was also started in 1979. In corn, the effect of gamma-irradiation on heterosis has been analyzed, and it was found that the single hybrids from two parental lines derived from irradiated seeds had increased ear productivity. For beans (Phaseolus yulgaris), gamma-irradiation and chemical mutagens have been used to induce the mutants with different seed color, disease resistance to golden mosaic virus and Xanthomonas phaseoli, earliness, high productivity and high protein content. Some mutants with partly improved characters have been obtained in these experiments. Two varieties of wheat tolerant to aluminum toxicity have been obtained, but the one showed high lodging due to its unfavorable plant height, and the other was highly susceptible to culm rust. Therefore, irradiation experiments have been started to improve these characters. The projects involving the use of gamma-irradiation have been tested to obtain the mutant lines insensitive to photoperiod and resistant to bud-blight in soybean, the mutant lines resistant to mosaic virus in papaya, the photoperiod-insensitive mutants in sorghum, the mosaic virus resistant and non-flowering mutants in sugar cane, and the Fusarium and nematode-resistant mutants in black pepper. (Kaihara, S.)

  14. Country watch: Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szterenfeld, C

    1995-01-01

    The Health in Prostitution Project was launched in 1991 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The project offers a multi-year training program of health education designed to both fight the stigmatization of and violence against commercial sex workers and enhance their self-esteem, self-determination, and access to civil rights. The project therefore promotes individual awareness while influencing public opinion and policies. At first, health agents were recruited among women and transvestites who work in street-based sex work. The program was then gradually expanded to include young male sex workers and other locations, such as private parlors, saunas, and escort services. People of all sexes and sexual orientation now comprise the health agent group. The program has a paid staff of five women, three young men, and three transvestites, and approximately 70 sex workers are trained annually. Basic training includes topics such as human sexuality, personal risk assessment, HIV/STD infection, negotiation of safer sex, and STD referral services. Year two training emphasizes reproductive and women's health issues, while year three courses prioritize street work methodologies. Theatrical performances, speaking English as a second language, and performing Bach flower therapy for clients take place during the fourth year. Program trainers include medical specialists, nurses, psychologists, health educators, lawyers, and university students. At least half of the 350 health agents trained thus far are estimated to be currently engaged in paid or voluntary prevention work. Two surveys with female sex workers in 1991 and 1993 found that reported regular condom use increased from 57% to 73%; the health agents are having an effect. The program is constantly evaluated and revised. PMID:12346918

  15. Consumers' healthcare rights in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M J

    1996-01-01

    In many countries the rights of patients and consumers of health services are gaining ground and becoming law. As elsewhere, consumers in Brazil are becoming increasingly knowledgeable and demanding respect for their rights. Yet many Brazilian health services--public and private--are still reluctant to accept public evaluation and criticism. But with Brazil's new consumer's code the stage is set for a more active role of patients in their health decisions and for nurses and health professionals to acquiesce to consumers' dissatisfaction and respond with improved professional performance. PMID:8894838

  16. Mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because baseline characterization of shale mineralogy is critical to the interpretation of results from experiments on radionuclide retardation, groundwater-shale interactions, and physicochemical characteristics, a protocol for quantitative mineralogical analyses has been developed by integrating geochemical and instrumental techniques for the investigation of properties related to repository performance. Thermal analyses were used to estimate total organic matter and carbonate mineral contents. Scanning electron microscope backscattering and elemental mapping of polished sectors and particle-size distribution data were used to estimate the amounts of quartz plus feldspar and pyrite in the shales. X-ray diffraction, neutron activation, and size-distribution data were utilized to estimate phyllosilicate mineral contents. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to identify clay mineral components

  17. Characterisation of some Clays Used for Whiteware Ceramics I. Mineralogical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Benea

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain a semiquantitative mineralogical composition of raw materials used for whiteware ceramics, four different clay types were analysed by X-ray diffraction. Studies were carried out by using a combination of analyses of the bulk sample, and of the fine fraction. Using a well-established pre-treatment methodology (use of chemicals, ultrasonic treatment, dispersion procedures, clay mineral concentration by centrifugation and sedimentation, oriented and random powder preparation, cation saturation, expansion/dehydration methods, 12 X-ray diffractometer traces were obtained from each sample. Based on these informations it was possible to establish the qualitative mineralogical composition, and also a semiquantitative one using peak intensities and peak area corrected by various factors. Scanning electron microscopy was also used in order to illustrate the identified mineral phases.

  18. Quantitative x-ray diffraction mineralogy of Los Angeles basin core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; McIntyre, Brandie R.; Edwards, Brian D.; Lakota, Orion I.

    2006-01-01

    This report contains X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of mineralogy for 81 sediment samples from cores taken from three drill holes in the Los Angeles Basin in 2000-2001. We analyzed 26 samples from Pier F core, 29 from Pier C core, and 26 from the Webster core. These three sites provide an offshore-onshore record across the Southern California coastal zone. This report is designed to be a data repository; these data will be used in further studies, including geochemical modeling as part of the CABRILLO project. Summary tables quantify the major mineral groups, whereas detailed mineralogy is presented in three appendices. The rationale, methodology, and techniques are described in the following paper.

  19. A comprehensive physico-chemical, mineralogical and morphological characterization of Indian mineral wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedam, Vidyadhar V; Jha, Rajesh; Labhasetwar, Pawan; Engelsen, Christian J

    2013-08-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive characterization of mineral waste such as fly ash, bottom ash, slag and construction demolition (C&D) collected from four different thermal power plants, three steel plants and three C&D waste generation sites in India. To determine utilisation potential and environmental concerns, as received fly ash, bottom ash, slag and C&D waste were analysed for physico-chemical, mineralogical and morphological properties. The physico-chemical properties analysed include pH, moisture content, acid insoluble residue, loss on ignition(LOI), carbon content, fineness, chloride content, sulphate content, reactive silica content, XRF and heavy metal analysis. Morphological and mineralogical characteristics were investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray. Particle size distribution was obtained using particle size analyser. The material analysed has different compositions and were selected with a view to determine their suitability for different applications in cement and concrete industry and for further research studies. PMID:23255170

  20. Incorporating Environmental and Sustainability Issues into the Curriculum in a Mineralogy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    A traditional curriculum in mineralogy addresses classic subject matter such as crystal chemistry, crystallography, systematic mineralogy and optical mineralogy. This is entirely reasonable and appropriate, as these time-honored aspects of mineralogy are fundamental to students' understanding of Earth Materials; they are also important building blocks for an understanding of other geologic disciplines such as petrology, structural geology, and sedimentology. Due to the impressive breadth and amount of subject material that is covered in most mineralogy courses, time constraints do not allow instructors to branch out into more contemporary subjects. In our increasingly technologically-advanced (and crowded) modern society, issues pertaining to the environment and sustainability are at the forefront of scientific thought. In many introductory physical geoscience courses these issues are addressed and incorporated into the curriculum, thereby giving students valuable scientific background in modern environmental issues. However, in upper division classes (such as mineralogy) there is little time or motivation for instructors to add new content or to connect the course content with current environmental or societal concerns, even though there may be significant and meaningful opportunities to do so throughout the quarter or semester. Consequently, many students' understanding of environmental issues remains at an introductory or cursory level. In my mineralogy class at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), I teach a traditional curriculum with a modern approach that uses dynamic lectures, makes use of multimedia, and also utilizes current best teaching practices. As a department, we have recently made an increased effort to educate our students about environmental issues. Accordingly, I have integrated environmental and sustainability topics (when they are pertinent) into the curriculum as a regular component of the course. These topics typically relate to how

  1. Mineralogical test as a preliminary step for metallurgical proses of Kalan ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineralogical tests as a preliminary step for hydrometallurgy of Kalan ores, including Eko Remaja and Rirang have been carried out to identify the elements and minerals content which affect the metallurgical process, especially the leaching and purification of uranium. Mineralogical tests have been done by means of radioactive and radioluxugraph tests to identify radioactive minerals; thin specimen analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to identify elements and morphology, EPMA to analyse qualitatively the elements, X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) to identify of minerals content; and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and chemical analyses to determine total elements qualitatively and quantitatively. The experimental results show that the Eko Remaja ores contain uraninite and brannerite, iron and titan oxides, sulfides, phosphates and silicates minerals, while the Rirang ores contain uraninite, monazite and molybdenite

  2. Mineralogy at the magma-hydrothermal system interface in andesite volcanoes, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C. Peter

    1994-01-01

    Ejecta from phreatomagmatic eruptions of Ruapehu and White Island andesite volcanoes in New Zealand provide insight into the mineralogical reactions that occur when magma invades a vent-hosted hydrothermal system. At the surface and in ejected blocks from shallow depths, hydrothermal alteration mineralogies are dominated by silica polymorphs, anhydrite, natroalunite, and pyrite. Blocks from greater depths are composed mainly of cristobalite, anhydrite, halite, and magnetite. Where altered material was heated to magmatic temperatures, thermal decomposition reactions produced mullite, wollastonite, and indialite. Some ejected breccias contain osumilite, cordierite, sanidine, and hypersthene, indicative of reactions occurring near the osumilite-cordierite phase boundary at >800 °C and water pressure hydrothermal deposits. High- temperature parageneses of these types have not been reported before in shallow, acidic volcano-hydrothermal systems. However, they may be typical of the magma- hydrothermal contact zone at many andesite volcanoes.

  3. An integrated view of the chemistry and mineralogy of martian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Albert S.; Gellert, Ralf; Schroder, Christian; Morris, Richard V.; Bell, James F 3rd; Knudson, Amy T.; Clark, Benton C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Crisp, Joy A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Blaney, Diana; Bruckner, Johannes; Christensen, Philip R.; DesMarais, David J.; de Souza, Paulo A Jr; Economou, Thanasis E.; Ghosh, Amitabha; Hahn, Brian C.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Haskin, Larry A.; Hurowitz, Joel A.; Joliff, Bradley L.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Klingelhofer, Gostar; Madsen, Morten Bo

    2005-01-01

    The mineralogical and elemental compositions of the martian soil are indicators of chemical and physical weathering processes. Using data from the Mars Exploration Rovers, we show that bright dust deposits on opposite sides of the planet are part of a global unit and not dominated by the composition of local rocks. Dark soil deposits at both sites have similar basaltic mineralogies, and could reflect either a global component or the general similarity in the compositions of the rocks from which they were derived. Increased levels of bromine are consistent with mobilization of soluble salts by thin films of liquid water, but the presence of olivine in analysed soil samples indicates that the extent of aqueous alteration of soils has been limited. Nickel abundances are enhanced at the immediate surface and indicate that the upper few millimetres of soil could contain up to one per cent meteoritic material.

  4. XRF Analysis of mineralogical matrix effects and differences between pulverized and fused ferromanganese slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA ZIVANOVIC

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination and analysis is only as good as the sample preparation that preceded it. Even the most sophisticated analysis is worthless if it follows sloppy sampling and poor preparation. Whether one does plasma emission, infrared or X-ray fluorescence or another spectroscopic technique, it is essential to get reproducible and accurate analysis. This paper shows the effect of mineralogical matrix differences in quantitative measurements by XRF of the main elements (Al, Ca, Mg, Si, Mn and K as oxides of ferromanganese alloy slag. Fused and pulverized slag show a significant difference in XRF microstructure, micro heterogeneity and mineralogy although the results of measurements between pulverized and fused slag, expressed as a percentage of the main elements, is not different. Other analytical techniques such as ICP-OES and classical gravimetric and titrimetric were also used for checking the XRF calibration accuracy

  5. Confidence Hills Mineralogy and Chemin Results from Base of Mt. Sharp, Pahrump Hills, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, P. D.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Downs, R. T.; Morrison, S. M.; Fendrich, K. V.; Yen, A. S.; Grotzinger, J.; Crisp, J. A.; Bristow, T. F.; Sarrazin, P. C.; Farmer, J. D.; Des Marais, D. J.; Stolper, E. M.; Morookian, J. M.; Wilson, M. A.; Spanovich, N.; Anderson, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity recently completed its fourth drill sampling of sediments on Mars. The Confidence Hills (CH) sample was drilled from a rock located in the Pahrump Hills region at the base of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. The CheMin X-ray diffractometer completed five nights of analysis on the sample, more than previously executed for a drill sample, and the data have been analyzed using Rietveld refinement and full-pattern fitting to determine quantitative mineralogy. Confidence Hills mineralogy has several important characteristics: 1) abundant hematite and lesser magnetite; 2) a 10 angstrom phyllosilicate; 3) multiple feldspars including plagioclase and alkali feldspar; 4) mafic silicates including forsterite, orthopyroxene, and two types of clinopyroxene (Ca-rich and Ca-poor), consistent with a basaltic source; and 5) minor contributions from sulfur-bearing species including jarosite.

  6. The influence of clay mineralogy on the mobility of radiocaesium in upland soils of NW Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    137Cs extraction experiments were performed on 14 contaminated soils from NW Italy with different characteristics and mineralogical composition. Solutions of HCl (pH=0.5) and buffered EDTA/ammonium acetate (Lakanen solution) were used to assess bioavailability. The results show that less than 2% of 137Cs is available for leaching and/or root uptake. Even within a complex natural system it was possible to identify the amount of swelling clays (vermiculite+smectite) as the main control on Cs mobility under acidic conditions. The ammonium ion appears to be effective in desorbing Cs and its role is briefly discussed in terms of crystal chemistry. The relevance of mineralogy in assessing soil vulnerability is underlined

  7. Expected Geochemical and Mineralogical Properties of Meteorites from Mercury: Inferences from Messenger Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; McCoy, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and many types of asteroid bodies have been identified among our global inventory of meteorites, however samples of Mercury and Venus have not been identified. The absence of mercurian and venusian meteorites could be attributed to an inability to recognize them in our collections due to a paucity of geochemical information for Venus and Mercury. In the case of mercurian meteorites, this possibility is further supported by dynamical calculations that suggest mercurian meteorites should be present on Earth at a factor of 2-3 less than meteorites from Mars [1]. In the present study, we focus on the putative mineralogy of mercurian meteorites using data obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which has provided us with our first quantitative constraints on the geochemistry of planet Mercury. We have used the MESSENGER data to compile a list of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that a meteorite from Mercury is likely to exhibit.

  8. Mineralogical and geochemical investigation of the Oligocene sedimentary series of Saint-Agoulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralogical investigation is based on determination of the amounts of quartz, clays, feldspars and on grain size analysis. A distinction was established between two lithological groups: the lower group with dominant silica the upper with dominant carbonates. Clays of the two groups are comparable with dominant illite, and accessory kaolinite and montmorillonite. The amounts of the elements Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Ti, Mn, P, Ba, Sr, Rb, Pb, Cu, Ni, Co, V, Be, B, Zr, U, were determined by several analytical methods: chemistry, X ray fluorescence, spectrography and fluorimetry. Correlations between the chemical elements and the mineralogical components were computed and plotted. Lastly the conditions of filling up of the basin are defined, taking into account the Oligocene climatic conditions. (author)

  9. Thermal Emission Spectra of Silica-coated Basalt and Considerations for Martian Surface Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Michalski, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Among the most important discoveries made during the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission was that the rocky materials of Mars are broadly divisible into two distinct rock types. The geological significance of this finding is dependent on the mineralogy of these rock types as well as their geographic and stratigraphic positions. Much work has yet to be done to understand these relationships and the small-scale variability of these units. For now, it is worth considering various scenarios that could have resulted in Mars global-scale mineralogical dichotomy. Such work will make clearer what must be looked for in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (THEMIS) data, what to test with other data sets, and what geological processes can be considered or ruled out as we advance with interpreting Martian geologic history. Here, we suggest that exogenic coatings of secondary silica on basaltic rocks may provide a plausible explanation for the newly discovered distribution of rock types.

  10. Mineralogy of the Ibitira eucrite and comparison with other eucrites and lunar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, I. M.; Smith, J. V.

    1976-01-01

    The mineralogy of the Ibitira meteorite is studied using single-crystal X-ray and energy-dispersive electron-probe techniques. It is shown that this strongly metamorphosed unbrecciated vesicular eucrite has a primary variolitic and secondary hornfelsic texture dominated by equant grains of pale-brown pyroxene (60%) set in an irregular matrix of plagioclase (30%). Minor phases are detected which indicate igneous crystallization, a prolonged metamorphic history, and vapor deposition. The following sequence of events is suggested as the simplest explanation for the mineralogical features observed: (1) crystallization of the meteorite in a lava flow; (2) prolonged annealing, reduction of primary spinel, and vapor deposition; (3) strong shock sufficient to modify the texture of the plagioclase grains; and (4) sufficient annealing to allow crystallization of the plagioclase as a subparallel mosaic and partial conversion to the low structural state. Evidence for this sequence is examined in detail, particularly in relation to the general features of eucrites, howardites, and mesosiderites

  11. Clay Minerals – Mineralogy and Phenomenon of Clay Swelling in Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpiński B.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the minerals found in the earth's crust, clay minerals are of the widest interest. Due to the specific properties such as plasticity, absorbing and catalytic properties clay minerals are used in many industries (oil & gas, chemistry, pharmacy, refractory technology, ceramics etc.. In drilling, a phenomenon of swelling clays is frequently observed. It has an important impact on the cementing quality. During the last few decades clays have been the subject of research on a scale unprecedented in the history of mineralogy. This paper presents review literature on mineralogy of clay minerals and phenomenon of swelling in oil and gas industry. Unique ion exchange properties and clay swelling mechanisms are also considered.

  12. Metasomatic Mechanism of Weathering-Pedogenesis of Carbonate Rocks: I. Mineralogical and Micro-Textural Evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱立军; 李景阳

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of mineralogical, geochemical and micro-textural studies of the typical sections of the red weathering crust of carbonate rocks in the subtropical karst areas of Guizhou Province and Guangxi Autonomous Region, we have found, either on a microscopic or on a macroscopical scale and in different positions of the sections, the most direct and most important mineralogical and micro-textural evidence for the development of metasomatism in the process of weathering-pedogenesis of numerous carbonate rocks. This paper also has expounded for the first time and systematically the mechanism of metasomatism involved in the process of weathering pedogenesis of carbonate rocks and proposed the sequence of mineral metasomatic evolution in the process of weathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks.

  13. Mineralogy of Layered Outcrops at Mawrth Vallis and Implications for Early Aqueous Geochemistry on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.; Gross, C.; Rampe, E. B.; Wray, J. J.; Parente, M.; Horgan, B.; Loizeau, D.; Viviano-Beck, C. E.; Clark, R. N.; Seelos, F. P.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Murchie, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed CRISM parameters and newly available DTMs are enabling refined characterization of the mineralogy at Mawrth Vallis. A stratigraphy including 5 units is mapped using HRSC DTMs across 100s of kms and using HiRISE DTMs across 100s of meters. Transitions in mineralogic units were characterized using spectral properties and surface morphology. The observations point to an ancient wet and warm geologic record that formed the thick nontronite unit, a period of wet/dry cycling to create acid alteration, followed by leaching or pedogenesis to result in Al-phyllosilicates, and finally a drier, colder climate that left the altered ash in the form of nanophase aluminosilicates, rather than crystalline clays.

  14. Mineralogía y termo-barometría de los Complejos máficos Sol de Mayo y Suya Taco, Norte de las Sierras de Comechingones, Córdoba Mineralogy and thermo-barometry of the Sol de Mayo and Suya Taco mafic complexes from northern Sierra de Comechingones, Córdoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina M. Tibaldi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta un estudio detallado de la petrografía, mineralogía química y termo-barometría de dos complejos máficos que afloran al norte de la sierra de Comechingones. Se aplicaron un conjunto de termómetros y barómetros empíricos con el propósito de determinar los rangos de P y T absolutas de cristalización de estas rocas. Las temperaturas de equilibrio en pares de piroxenos (cpx-opx se estimaron usando tres termómetros independientes. Dos calibraciones termométricas (Wells 1977, Kretz 1982 dan resultados consistentes y razonables indicando que los piroxenos registran condiciones de cristalización magmática (920-1150ºC, mientras que la tercera calibración (Lindsley 1983 estima temperaturas muy inferiores. Esta discrepancia puede estar relacionada con el hecho de que la última calibración no sería aplicable a rocas que cristalizaron a partir de magmas ricos en hierro. Por su parte, la termometría Amph-Pl sugiere temperaturas de equilibrio comprendidas entre 750-850ºC, para composiciones típicas de núcleos, mientras que para composiciones representativas de los bordes de grano las temperaturas estimadas son significativamente inferiores (This work presents a detailed study including petrography, mineral chemistry and thermo-barometry of igneous rock from two mafic complexes that outcrop in the north portion of the sierra de Comechingones. The range of absolute P and T under which these rocks crystallized is retrieved using a set of empiric barometers and thermometers. The estimations of equilibrium temperature determined in pairs of pyroxenes (cpx-opx were performed through three independent thermometers. Two of the thermometric formulations (Wells 1977, Kretz 1982 yield consistent and reasonable results indicating that these phases record magmatic crystallizations conditions (920-1150ºC, whereas the third calibration by Lindsley (1983 gives lower temperatures. This discrepancy is thought to reflect the fact that

  15. Two contrasting magma types in late-variscan Erzgebirge: areal distribution and chemical and mineralogical characteristic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breiter, Karel

    Hannover: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geowissenschaften, 2009 - (Röhling, H.). s. 137-137 ISBN 978-3-510-49210-7. [Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Geowissenschaften /161./. 30.09.2009-02.10.2009, Dresden] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : granite typology * Erzgebirge * Krušné Hory * accessory minerals Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  16. Mineralogy and technological properties of some kaolin types used in the ceramic industry

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel Benea; Maria Gorea

    2004-01-01

    Three different kaolin types used in ceramic industry were analyzed by different methods in order to obtain a complete mineralogical and technological characterisation. Studies were carried out by using a combination of analyses (XRD, SEM, methylene blue absorption, particle size distribution) of both the bulk sample, and the fine fraction. The main technological characteristics (drying and firing shrinkage, Pfefferkorn plasticity index, rheology, resistance, and colour after firing) of the c...

  17. Mineralogy, Petrology, Chronology, and Exposure History of the Chelyabinsk Meteorite and Parent Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Abell, P.; Agresti, D.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Delaney, J. S.; Fries, M. D.; Gibson, E. K.; Harrington, R.; Herzog, G. F.; Keller, L. P.; Locke, D.; Lindsay, F.; McCoy, T. J.; Morris, R. V.; Nagao, K.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Niles, P. B.; Nyquist, L.; Park, J.; Peng, Z. X.; Shih, C. Y.; Simon, J. I.; Swisher, C. C., III; Tappa, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fall on February 15, 2013 attracted much more attention worldwide than do most falls. A consortium led by JSC received 3 masses of Chelyabinsk (Chel-101, -102, -103) that were collected shortly after the fall and handled with care to minimize contamination. Initial studies were reported in 2013; we have studied these samples with a wide range of analytical techniques to better understand the mineralogy, petrology, chronology and exposure history of the Chelyabinsk parent body.

  18. A mineralogical characterization of biogenic calcium carbonates precipitated by heterotrophic bacteria isolated from cryophilic polar regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronholm, J; Schumann, D; Sapers, H M; Izawa, M; Applin, D; Berg, B; Mann, P; Vali, H; Flemming, R L; Cloutis, E A; Whyte, L G

    2014-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3(s) ) can be driven by microbial activity. Here, a systematic approach is used to identify the morphological and mineralogical characteristics of CaCO3(s) precipitated during the heterotrophic growth of micro-organisms isolated from polar environments. Focus was placed on establishing mineralogical features that are common in bioliths formed during heterotrophic activity, while in parallel identifying features that are specific to bioliths precipitated by certain microbial phylotypes. Twenty microbial isolates that precipitated macroscopic CaCO3(s) when grown on B4 media supplemented with calcium acetate or calcium citrate were identified. A multimethod approach, including scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD), was used to characterize CaCO3(s) precipitates. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that complete CaCO3(s) crystal encrustation of Arthrobacter sp. cells was common, while encrustation of Rhodococcus sp. cells did not occur. Several euhedral and anhedral mineral formations including disphenoid-like epitaxial plates, rhomboid-like aggregates with epitaxial rhombs, and spherulite aggregates were observed. While phylotype could not be linked to specific mineral formations, isolates tended to precipitate either euhedral or anhedral minerals, but not both. Three anhydrous CaCO3(s) polymorphs (calcite, aragonite, and vaterite) were identified by μ-XRD, and calcite and aragonite were also identified based on TEM lattice-fringe d value measurements. The presence of certain polymorphs was not indicative of biogenic origin, although several mineralogical features such as crystal-encrusted bacterial cells, or casts of bacterial cells embedded in mesocrystals are an indication of biogenic origin. In addition, some features such as the formation of vaterite and bacterial entombment appear to be linked to certain phylotypes. Identifying

  19. Clay Mineralogy of the Middle Miocene Paghumayan Formation, Vallehermoso, Negros Oriental, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    ALETA, Dennis Gerald A.; TOMITA, Katsutoshi; MIEL, Julius Z.; LUPO, Elena S.; KAWANO, Motoharu; KITAMURA, Ryosuke

    2002-01-01

    Clay minerals of stratified tuff and mudrocks of the Middle Miocene Paghumayan Formation in Vallehermoso, Negros Oriental, Philippines were examined. The results showed homogeneity of clay mineralogy in the sedimentary sequence with single-phase smectite as the dominant phyllosilicate present and with little association of kaolinite. Feldspar, zeolite, cristobalite, quartz and calcite are typical non-sheeted accessories that yield to some mineral assemblages along with smectite. The signature...

  20. Physico-chemical and Mineralogical Characterisation of Subsurface Sediments around Gaborone Landfill, Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    EKOSSE, G E; TOTOLO, O; NGOLE, V M

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Studies were carried out on subsurface sediments obtained around the Gaborone landfill area Botswana, in order to characterize their mineralogy and physico-chemistry, appraise any contaminant inputs from the landfill and assess their ability to attenuate contaminants from the landfill. Physico-chemical properties investigated included particle size distribution (PSD), moisture content, bulk density (Db), porosity, surface area, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), and cation exchange c...

  1. Mineralogical impact on long-term patterns of soil nitrogen and phosphorus enzyme activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikutta, Robert; Turner, Stephanie; Meyer-Stüve, Sandra; Guggenberger, Georg; Dohrmann, Reiner; Schippers, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Soil chronosequences provide a unique opportunity to study microbial activity over time in mineralogical diverse soils of different ages. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of mineralogical properties, nutrient and organic matter availability over whole soil pro-files on the abundance and activity of the microbial communities. We focused on microbio-logical processes involved in nitrogen and phosphorus cycling at the 120,000-year Franz Josef soil chronosequence. Microbial abundances (microbial biomass and total cell counts) and enzyme activities (protease, urease, aminopeptidase, and phosphatase) were determined and related to nutrient contents and mineralogical soil properties. Both, microbial abundances and enzyme activities decreased with soil depth at all sites. In the organic layers, microbial biomass and the activities of N-hydrolyzing enzymes showed their maximum at the intermediate-aged sites, corresponding to a high aboveground biomass. In contrast, the phosphatase activity increased with site age. The activities of N-hydrolyzing enzymes were positively correlated with total carbon and nitrogen contents, whereas the phosphatase activity was negatively correlated with the phosphorus content. In the mineral soil, the enzyme activities were generally low, thus reflecting the presence of strongly sorbing minerals. Sub-strate-normalized enzyme activities correlated negatively to clay content as well as poorly crystalline Al and Fe oxyhydroxides, supporting the view that the evolution of reactive sec-ondary mineral phases alters the activity of the microbial communities by constraining sub-strate availability. Our data suggest a strong mineralogical influence on nutrient cycling par-ticularly in subsoil environments.

  2. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Phyllite Samples Based on Chemical (XRF) and Mineralogical Data by XRD

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    It is presented the results obtained of a multivariate statistical analysis concerning the chemical and phase composition, as a characterization purpose, carried out with 52 rock phyllite samples selected from the provinces of Almería and Granada (SE Spain). Chemical analysis was performed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Crystalline phase analysis was performed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and the mineralogical composition was then deduced. Quantification of weight loss (100° an...

  3. Mineralogical and Geochemical Controls of Arsenic in an Active Tailings Dam

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel A. Ndur; William K. Buah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess arsenic (As) mobilization in an active tailings dam through mineralogical and geochemical characterization study. Arsenite is the predominant As species in the dam with more than 50% of the arsenic bound to the organic fraction. Pyrite and arsenopyrite are the principal opaque minerals remaining in the tailings with relic grains showing rims of oxidation (hematite/goethite). Illite, kaolinite and carbonates act as pH buffers and consume the acid generated d...

  4. Influence of the chemical, physical and mineralogical characteristics on the three latosoils compacting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studies the behavior of three brazilian latosoils (Purple, Una and yellow latosoils) concerning to the tendency of compacting, by using the trail analysis for evaluation of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and other compacting estimation effects on this process. Two conditions of soil use were considered: intensive cultivation, with field evaluation which indicates the compacting and not worked area, with natural forest or old and abandoned reforesting

  5. Mineralogical Study of Workable Material Coming from Mina Fe Ciudad Rodrigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mineralogical analysis is made to ascertain the effects of acid bleaching on normalized conditions. Uranium is mainly found under uranotile, pitchblende and autunite form with an average assay of 0.4 p. ct. The loss of uranium in tailings under current conditions of attach, mainly is due to pitchblende resistance, being practically no leachable, and to uranium absorption by hydrated iron oxides and colloidal ores. This last problem will be discussed in a next paper. (Author) 5 refs

  6. Geology and mineralogy of the radioactive Quaternary sediments of the North Fayium depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Fahmy Raslan, Mohamed; Sayed Haroun, Yehia

    2010-01-01

    Quaternary sediments of the North Fayium depression, are mainly represented by residual soil and calcrete, and have been found to be anomalously radioactive. These sediments are deposited on the irregular surface of the carbonaceous shale of the middle member of the Oligocene Qatrani Formation in the northern part of the Fayium depression. A mineralogical investigation involving a preliminary microscopic examination and detailed Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) has revealed t...

  7. Mineralogical characterization of uranium ore to evaluate in-situ leaching prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineralogical studies of ore samples from Mobil uranium properties in Grants mineral belt (NM) revealed a correlation between certain mineralogical characteristics of the ore and its leaching behavior in the laboratory. Mild alkaline carbonate solutions containing dissolved oxygen gas or hydrogen peroxide were used to leach ore samples. Leaching effects of the uranium minerals and reactive gangue material were investigated by comparing the mineralogical characteristics between pre- and postleach samples. Analyses were made by using the X-ray diffraction method, petrographic microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examinations. In one ore trend where uraninite was the principal uranium mineral, studies showed that (1) the majority of uranium minerals was readily accessible to the leachate on a microscopic scale, (2) the predominant, 1-micron (1-μm) size uraninite crystals were dissolved rapidly during leaching, (3) the minor but locally abundant uranium vandate species was insoluble in mild alkaline carbonate leachate, and (4) pyrite crystals, with dimensions 10 times greater than the uraninite crystallites, showed some surface etchings. These results indicate that the solubility and microscopic occurrence of uraninite are favorable for high and rapid uranium recovery, while the fraction of uranium contained in the insoluble uranium vanadate phase cannot be recovered under mild leaching conditions. The uraninite apparently dissolved at a much faster rate than pyrite, indicating a favorable initial selectivity of leachate for uranium. Mineralogical studies of the preand postleach ore samples correlate well with the laboratory leach tests, which showed 80 to 90% uranium recovery as well as low vanadium and sulfate levels in the effluents

  8. Vein Formation and Element Mobility During Serpentinization of Peridotites: Mineralogy and Thermodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Caddick, M. J.; Beard, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Serpentinization is a common mineralogical process that occurs in ultramafic rocks when water interacts with the primary minerals olivine and pyroxene to form a rock dominated by serpentine. Temperature of hydration and the primary mineralogy of the peridotite strongly influence the alteration products. We studied peridotites with low to extremely low degrees of serpentinization from two settings, the Santa Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica and the Gakkel Ridge, to test how temperature and primary mineralogy control reactions, reaction sequences, and subsequent vein textures during peridotite hydration. Serpentinization of a harzburgite from Costa Rica occurred at around 250°C, resulting in olivine-hosted veins that are a mixture of brucite and serpentine - with a bulk composition approximately equivalent to hydrated host olivine - and later stage veins that also contain magnetite. Serpentinite that formed by hydration of orthopyroxene is accompanied by talc, with a bulk composition (serp + tlc) that is depleted in silica relative to the orthopyroxene host. In contrast, veins in orthopyroxene in an almost un-serpentinized peridotite (degree of serpentinization ~ 5 %) from the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge have an average composition very similar to the host orthopyroxene, whilst veins in olivine suggest slight enrichment in silica compared to the host olivine. Replacement of orthopyroxene here results in the formation of serpentine, talc and amphibole. The presence of amphibole in orthopyroxene and the higher degree of orthopyroxene replacement compared to olivine suggests that serpentinization occurred at higher temperatures than in the Santa Elena peridotites, resulting in the mobilization of more silica through the system. Thermodynamic models of the hydration of olivine and orthopyroxene agree with the mineralogical observations and show that hydration of olivine first results in the simple formation of serpentine and brucite. Increasing water-rock ratios then

  9. Geological and Mineralogical-technological features chromite ore from nickel-weathering crusts Average Bug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkov E.S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conditions of occurrence and distribution features of chromites ore bodies in the ultra-basic nickel bearing weathering crusts of Middle Bug Area are considered. Main types of exogenous chromites ores in weathering crusts and beyond of them are identified as well as mineralogical, chemical and grain features of mineralization are given. Obtained data are substantiated in order to apply them while developing the efficient schemes of mining and processing of exogenous chromites ores.

  10. Processing Mineralogy Study on Lead and Zinc Oxide Ore in Sichuan

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Yang; Wending Xiao; Xiang Yang; Patrick Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The processing mineralogy characteristics of an oxidized lead-zinc ore from Sichuan were studied systematically using numerous modern instruments. Results showed that lead and zinc oxide content in the ore exceeded the minimum industrial grade, and also included a relatively high concentration of silver and iron. This ore is composed of many different minerals. Major zinc-containing minerals include sphalerite, hemimorphite, smithsonite, hydrozincite, zinc-containing baileychlore, and zinc-co...

  11. Mineralogy of Fluvio-Lacustrine Sediments Investigated by Curiosity During the Prime Mission: Implications for Diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Blake, D. F.; Ming, D. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Morrison, S. M.; Treiman, A. H.; Archilles, C. N.; Crisp, J. A.; DesMarais, D. J.; Downs, R. T.; Morookian, J. M.; Sarrazin, P.; Spanovich, N.; Yen, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity investigated sedimentary rocks that were deposited in a diversity of fluvio-lacustrine settings. The entire science payload was employed to characterize the mineralogy and chemistry of the Sheepbed mudstone at Yellowknife Bay and the Windjana sandstone at the Kimberley. Data from the CheMin instrument, a transmission Xray diffractometer, were used to determine the quantitative mineralogy of both samples. The Sheepbed mudstone contains detrital basaltic minerals, calcium sulfates, iron oxides or hydroxides, iron sulfides, trioctahedral smectite, and amorphous material. The mineral assemblage and chemical data from APXS suggest that the trioctahedral smectite and magnetite formed authigenically as a result of alteration of olivine. The apparent lack of higher-grade phyllosilicates (e.g., illite and chlorite) and the presence of anhydrite indicate diagenesis at 50- 80 ºC. The mineralogy of the Windjana sandstone is different than the Sheepbed mudstone. Windjana contains significant abundances of K-feldspar, low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, magnetite, phyllosilicates, and amorphous material. At least two distinct phyllosilicate phases exist: a 10 Å phase and a component that is expanded with a peak at 11.8 Å. The identity of the expanded phase is currently unknown, but could be a smectite with interlayer H2O, and the 10 Å phase could be illite or collapsed smectite. Further work is necessary to characterize the phyllosilicates, but the presence of illite could suggest that Windjana experienced burial diagenesis. Candidates for the cementing agents include fine-grained phyllosilicates, Fe-oxides, and/or amorphous material. Interpretations of CheMin data from the Windjana sandstone are ongoing at the time of writing, but we will present an estimate of the composition of the amorphous material from mass balance calculations using the APXS bulk chemistry and quantitative mineralogy from CheMin.

  12. Chemical, mineralogical and ceramic properties of kaolinitic materials from the Tresnuraghes mining district (Western Sardinia, Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Dondi, Michele; Guarini, Guia; Ligas, Paola; Raimondo, Mariarosa; Palomba, Marcella; Uras, Ivo

    2001-01-01

    Kaolinitic materials crop out in the Tresnuraghes mining district (Western Sardinia, Italy). Three main kaolinitic deposits, located in the Patalza, Salamura and Su Fongarazzu areas, respectively, were investigated in order to assess their potential in the ceramic industry. The parent rock-types of this raw material are the Oligocene-Miocene rhyolitic-rhyodacitic ignimbrites. Chemical and mineralogical analyses were performed on representative samples of each deposit, by XRD and XRF methodolo...

  13. Study of bismuth minerals belonging to the mineralogical collection from the National Museum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose of searching the presence of Tellurium minerals in the Ouro Preto-Mariana country, Minas Gerais State, and considering the existence of a great number of minerals in which this element come across allied with Bismuth, samples of the mineralogical collection of the Museu Nacional, proceeding that region and classified as Bismuth minerals were studied by X-ray fluorescence analysis and diffractometric analysis. In this report the results of this research are presented. (Author)

  14. Notas inéditas de Jovellanos sobre mineralogía

    OpenAIRE

    Ordaz Gargallo, Jorge; Manuel GUTIÉRREZ CLAVEROL; Lorenzo Álvarez, Elena de

    2010-01-01

    An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca) is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of t...

  15. Christian Herrgen y la institucionalización de la mineralogía en Madrid

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, Dolores; Pelayo, Francisco

    1996-01-01

    One of the goals of the scientific policy of the governments of the Borbones were that of favors the disciplines subject to be applied for the necessary stimulus of the Spanish economy. Such it was the case of the Mineralogy, science that was developed and imparted in several scientific cultured institutions. One of these centers were the Cabinet of Natural History from Madrid, in which the work of the German specialist Christian Herrgen contributed to the institutionalization of the Spanish ...

  16. Petrology and mineralogy of CK chondrites: Implications for the metamorphism of the CK chondrite parent body

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki, Noguchi

    1993-01-01

    The petrology and mineralogy of four CK chondrites, Karoonda (CK4), Maralinga (CK4), Yamato(Y)-693(CK4), and Elephant Moraine (EET) 87507 (CK5) were investigated in detail to estimate the origin of their quite heterogeneous plagioclases and the metamorphic history of CK chondrite parent body. EPMA analyses and SEM observations revealed that plagioclases in chondrules, CAIs, and matrices in CK chondrites have different compositional variations and that plagioclases in matrices display distinct...

  17. Mineralogy of the Asuka 87 and 88 eucrites and crustal evolution of the HED parent body

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda,Hiroshi/Ishii,Teruaki/Arai,Tomoko/Miyamoto,Masamichi

    1997-01-01

    Mineralogical study of three apparently crystalline eucrites, Asuka (A)-87272,A-881388 and A-881394 revealed that their textures are not primary crystallization products from a magma. A-87272 is a monomict breccia, but the finegrained matrix is recrystallized to a granulitic texture with fine, rounded pyroxene crystals set in a plagioclase matrix. Large fragments of pyroxene are inverted to orthopyroxene with coarse exsolution lamellae on (001) and fine ones on (100). A-881388 contains a larg...

  18. Qualitative mineralogical characterization of the sinter by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims the qualitative mineralogical characterization of sinters and raw materials employed on its fabrication, via X-ray diffraction technique. Thus, sample with constant coke breeze content and variable contents of sand, limestone, dunite and dolomite were prepared to obtain current sinter compositions, with variable basicity. The tests were performed at the research of the following institutions: Companhia Siderurgica Nacional, Centro de Tecnologia Mineral and Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia. (author)

  19. Aqueous Alteration Rinds in Basalt: Mineralogic Characterization from Hand Sample to Outcrop with Hyperspectral Imaging and Implications for Mars 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, R. N.; Mustard, J. F.; Cloutis, E. A.; Mann, P.; Wilson, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Hydrothermally altered lacustrine pillow basalts show strong gradients in mineralogy, chemistry, and redox state from interior to exterior at thick section, hand sample, and outcrop scales identified with hyperspectral imaging and elemental mapping.

  20. Characterization of raw and burnt oil shale from Dotternhausen: Petrographical and mineralogical evolution with temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Toarcian Posidonia shale from Dotternhausen, Germany, is quarried and burnt in a fluidized bed reactor to produce electricity. The combustion residue, namely burnt oil shale (BOS), is used in the adjacent cement work as an additive in blended cements. The starting material is a typical laminated oil shale with an organic matter content ranging from 6 to 18%. Mineral matter consists principally of quartz, feldspar, pyrite and clays. After calcination in the range, the resulting product, burnt oil shale, keeps the macroscopic layered texture however with different mineralogy (anhydrite, lime, iron oxides) and the formation of an amorphous phase. This one, studied under STEM, reveals a typical texture of incipient partial melting due to a long retention time (ca. 30 min) and quenching. An in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) allowed studying precisely the mineralogical changes associated with the temperature increase. - Highlights: • We present oil shale/burnt oil shale characterization. • The Posidonia Shale is burnt in a fluidized bed. • Mineralogical evolution with temperature is complex. • The burnt oil shale is used in composite cements

  1. Mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One objective of the Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been to examine end-member shales to develop a data base that will aid in evaluations if shales are ever considered as a repository host rock. Five end-member shales were selected for comprehensive characterization: the Chattanooga Shale from Fentress County, Tennessee; the Pierre Shale from Gregory County, South Dakota; the Green River Formation from Garfield County, Colorado; and the Nolichucky Shale and Pumpkin Valley Shale from Roane County, Tennessee. Detailed micromorphological and mineralogical characterizations of the shales were completed by Lee et al. (1987) in ORNL/TM-10567. This report is a supplemental characterization study that was necessary because second batches of the shale samples were needed for additional studies. Selected physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties were determined for the second batches; and their properties were compared with the results from the first batches. Physical characterization indicated that the second-batch and first-batch samples had a noticeable difference in apparent-size distributions but had similar primary-particle-size distributions. There were some differences in chemical composition between the batches, but these differences were not considered important in comparison with the differences among the end-member shales. The results of x-ray diffraction analyses showed that the second batches had mineralogical compositions very similar to the first batches. 9 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Sub-grain scale mineralogy of Hanford sand after reaction with caustic tank wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, L. E.; Peters, C. A.; Um, W.; Lindquist, W.

    2010-12-01

    Reactions of caustic tank waste with vadose-zone sediments at the DOE Hanford, WA site cause dissolution of quartz and aluminosilicate minerals and precipitation of secondary minerals, sodalite and cancrinite. In this study, Hanford sediments from reactive column experiments were examined using 2-D imaging technologies. Mineralogy was examined at the sub-grain scale through image analysis of SEM backscattered electron (BSE) images supplemented with elemental mapping from energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The thin sections were made from cross-sections of epoxied sediments in the experimental columns, before and after reaction with simulated tank waste leachate. The image analysis method developed for this work identifies the important minerals and quantifies their accessibility to pore fluids, information that may be used to improve reactive transport modeling of water-rock reactions. Current reactive transport models use mineralogical information obtained through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of crushed samples. Such analysis provides reliable information on the relative quantities of minerals present in macroscopic samples. However, the absence of information on sub-grain scale mineralogy may lead to erroneous interpretation in the context of reactive transport. Preliminary findings indicate the presence of grain inclusions and secondary mineral coatings which may significantly impact the accessibility of minerals to pore waters and thus alter the predicted water -rock reactions.

  3. Chemical dispersants and pre-treatments to determine clay in soils with different mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rodrigues

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the soil physical properties, including the clay content, is of utmost importance for agriculture. The behavior of apparently similar soils can differ in intrinsic characteristics determined by different formation processes and nature of the parent material. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of separate or combined pre-treatments, dispersion methods and chemical dispersant agents to determine clay in some soil classes, selected according to their mineralogy. Two Brazilian Oxisols, two Alfisols and one Mollisol with contrasting mineralogy were selected. Different treatments were applied: chemical substances as dispersants (lithium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide, and hexametaphosphate; pre-treatment with dithionite, ammonium oxalate, and hydrogen peroxide to eliminate organic matter; and coarse sand as abrasive and ultrasound, to test their mechanical action. The conclusion was drawn that different treatments must be applied to determine clay, in view of the soil mineralogy. Lithium hydroxide was not efficient to disperse low-CEC electropositive soils and very efficient in dispersing high-CEC electronegative soils. The use of coarse sand as an abrasive increased the clay content of all soils and in all treatments in which dispersion occurred, with or without the use of chemical dispersants. The efficiency of coarse sand is not the same for all soil classes.

  4. Characterization of raw and burnt oil shale from Dotternhausen: Petrographical and mineralogical evolution with temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiéry, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.thiery@mines-douai.fr [Mines Douai, LGCgE-GCE, F-59508 Douai (France); Université de Lille (France); Bourdot, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.bourdot@gmail.com [Mines Douai, LGCgE-GCE, F-59508 Douai (France); Bulteel, David, E-mail: david.bulteel@mines-douai.fr [Université de Lille (France)

    2015-08-15

    The Toarcian Posidonia shale from Dotternhausen, Germany, is quarried and burnt in a fluidized bed reactor to produce electricity. The combustion residue, namely burnt oil shale (BOS), is used in the adjacent cement work as an additive in blended cements. The starting material is a typical laminated oil shale with an organic matter content ranging from 6 to 18%. Mineral matter consists principally of quartz, feldspar, pyrite and clays. After calcination in the range, the resulting product, burnt oil shale, keeps the macroscopic layered texture however with different mineralogy (anhydrite, lime, iron oxides) and the formation of an amorphous phase. This one, studied under STEM, reveals a typical texture of incipient partial melting due to a long retention time (ca. 30 min) and quenching. An in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) allowed studying precisely the mineralogical changes associated with the temperature increase. - Highlights: • We present oil shale/burnt oil shale characterization. • The Posidonia Shale is burnt in a fluidized bed. • Mineralogical evolution with temperature is complex. • The burnt oil shale is used in composite cements.

  5. Carbonatitic lavas in Catanda (Kwanza Sul, Angola): Mineralogical and geochemical constraints on the parental melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeny, Marc; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Melgarejo, Joan C.; Mangas, José; Manuel, José; Alfonso, Pura; Kamenetsky, Maya B.; Bambi, Aurora C. J. M.; Gonçalves, Antonio O.

    2015-09-01

    A set of small volcanic edifices with tuff ring and maar morphologies occur in the Catanda area, which is the only locality with extrusive carbonatites reported in Angola. Four outcrops of carbonatite lavas have been identified in this region and considering the mineralogical, textural and compositional features, we classify them as: silicocarbonatites (1), calciocarbonatites (2) and secondary calciocarbonatites produced by the alteration of primary natrocarbonatites (3). Even with their differences, we interpret these lava types as having been a single carbonatite suite related to the same parental magma. We have also estimated the composition of the parental magma from a study of melt inclusions hosted in magnetite microphenocrysts from all of these lavas. Melt inclusions revealed the presence of 13 different alkali-rich phases (e.g., nyerereite, shortite, halite and sylvite) that argues for an alkaline composition of the Catanda parental melts. Mineralogical, textural, compositional and isotopic features of some Catanda lavas are also similar to those described in altered natrocarbonatite localities worldwide such as Tinderet or Kerimasi, leading to our conclusion that the formation of some Catanda calciocarbonatite lavas was related to the occurrence of natrocarbonatite volcanism in this area. On the other hand, silicocarbonatite lavas, which are enriched in periclase, present very different mineralogical, compositional and isotopic features in comparison to the rest of Catanda lavas. We conclude that its formation was probably related to the decarbonation of primary dolomite bearing carbonatites.

  6. Chemistry and Mineralogy of Antarctica Dry Valley Soils: Implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. E.; Golden, D. C.; Graff, T. G.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Douglas, S.; Kounaves, S. P.; McKay, C. P.; Tamppari, L, K.; Smith, P. H.; Zent, A. P.; Archer, P. D., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) comprise the largest ice-free region of Antarctica. Precipitation almost always occurs as snow, relative humidity is frequently low, and mean annual temperatures are about -20 C. The ADV soils have previously been categorized into three soil moisture regimes: subxerous, xerous and ultraxerous, based on elevation and climate influences. The subxerous regime is predominately a coastal zone soil, and has the highest average temperature and precipitation, while the ultraxerous regime occurs at high elevation (>1000 m) and have very low temperature and precipitation. The amounts and types of salts present in the soils vary between regions. The nature, origin and significance of salts in the ADV have been previously investigated. Substantial work has focused on soil formation in the ADVs, however, little work has focused on the mineralogy of secondary alteration phases. The dominant weathering process in the ADV region is physical weathering, however, chemical weathering has been well documented. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemistry and mineralogy, including the alteration mineralogy, of soils from two sites, a subxerous soil in Taylor Valley, and an ultraxerous soil in University Valley. The style of aqueous alteration in the ADVs may have implications for pedogenic processes on Mars.

  7. Magnetic mineralogy analyses on greigite-bearing sediments with inconsistent magnetic polarity (Adana Basin, Southern Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucifora, S.; Cifelli, F.; Mattei, M.; Cosentino, D.; Sagnotti, L.; Roberts, A.

    2012-04-01

    A paleomagnetic study has been carried out, in the framework of the VAMP (Vertical Anatolian Movement Project) project, on 4 stratigraphic sections and 1 site from the Adana basin in the southern margin of the Anatolian Plateau. About 300 standard cylindrical samples have been analysed for paleomagnetism and rock magnetism. All the sections have been deposited in the upper Messinian"lago-mare" post-evaporitic event, which occurred in the Mediterranean basin, during the reverse polarity Chron C3r. Paleomagnetic results, presented in this work, are in contrast with these data, showing both normal and reverse polarities along the sections. Standard magnetic mineralogy investigations, integrated with SEM analyses and FORC diagrams, show that magnetite and ferrimagnetic iron sulphides (greigite) are the main magnetic carriers. Moreover, we find an interesting correlation between the magnetic mineralogy of the sediments and the magnetic polarities, being magnetite the magnetic carrier in the normal polarity samples and greigite in the reverse ones. Reversal and fold tests demonstrate that normal polarity samples have been subjected to a pervasive magnetic overprint and acquired their remanent magnetization after bedding tilt. Whereas samples with a reverse polarity acquired their remanent magnetization before bedding tilt, but after syn-sedimentary soft deformation. This work is proposed as a contribution aimed to improve the understanding of the relationship between the magnetic mineralogy and the remagnetization phenomena in order to avoid misinterpretation of magnetostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data.

  8. Mineralogy and inorganic chemistry of naturally occurring biogenic iron oxyhydroxides: Spectroscopic evidence of thermal maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, A.; Fakra, S.; Orcutt, B. N.; Toner, B.; Edwards, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial mats were sampled at four sites at the Lo'ihi Seamount and examined for changes in mineralogy and inorganic chemistry via synchrotron-sourced X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). These mats are rich in iron oxyhydroxides with morphologies similar to those produced by iron oxidizing microorganisms related to Zetaproteobacteria such as Mariprofundus ferroxydans, which have been shown to be present and active in all of these mat ecosystems. The same particle morphologies are observed consistently at all four sites, which range in temperature (4 - 40°C) and hydrothermal activity (dead to very active). Fe L-edge XAS reveals no significant differences in Fe speciation between the morphologies. Mineralogy, however, as reflected in O 1s XAS measurements, appears to be a function of thermal maturation with the hottest site harboring more crystalline particles. Morphology does not factor into the changes in mineralogy. These measurements are confirmed by Fe 1s XAS spectroscopy. The C 1s XAS spectroscopy is highly variable and may be related to overall maturation (age) or undetermined factors. Elucidating the effect of thermal maturation on biogenic iron oxhydroxide particles is essential to understanding the environmental influences on their preservation in the rock record.

  9. Mineralogical Diversity in Lake Pavin: Connections with Water Column Chemistry and Biomineralization Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer Miot

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As biominerals are good tracers of microbial interactions with the environment, they may provide signatures of microbial evolution and paleoenvironmental conditions. Since modern analogues of past environments help with defining proxies and biosignatures, we explored microbe mineral interactions in the water column of a maar lake, located in France: Lake Pavin. This lake is considered as a potential Precambrian ocean analogue, as it is ferruginous and meromictic, i.e., stratified with a superficial O2-rich layer (mixolimnion and a deeper permanently anoxic layer (monimolimnion. We combined bulk chemical analyses of dissolved and particulate matter in combination with electron microscopy analyses of the particulate matter at different depths along the water column. The mineralogy changed along with water chemistry, and most of the minerals were intimately associated with microorganisms. Evolution of the redox conditions with depth leads to the successive precipitation of silica and carbonates, Mn-bearing, Fe-bearing and S-containing phases, with a predominance of phosphates in the monimolimnion. This scheme parallels the currently-assessed changes of microbial diversity with depth. The present results corroborate previous studies that suggested a strong influence of microbial activity on mineralogical diversity through extracellular and intracellular biomineralization. This paper reports detailed data on mineralogical profiles of the water column and encourages extended investigation of these processes.

  10. Mineralogical and Geochemical Trends in a Fluviolacustrine Sequence in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E.; Ming, D.; Morris, R.; Blake, D.; Vaniman, D.; Bristow, T.; Chipera, S.; Yen, A.; Grotzinger, J.; DesMarais, D.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, landed at Gale crater in August 2012 and has been investigating a sequence of dominantly fluviolacustrine sediments deposited 3.6-3.2 billion years ago. Curiosity collects quantitative mineralogical data with the CheMin XRD/XRF instrument and quantitative chemical data with the APXS and ChemCam instruments. These datasets show stratigraphic mineralogical and geochemical variability that suggest a complex aqueous history. The Murray Formation, primarily composed of fine-laminated mudstone, has been studied in detail since the arrival at the Pahrump Hills in September 2014. CheMin data from four samples show variable amounts of iron oxides, phyllosilicates, sulfates, amorphous and crystalline silica, and mafic silicate minerals. Geochemical data throughout the section show that there is significant variability in Zn, Ni, and Mn concentrations. Mineralogical and geochemical trends with stratigraphy suggest one of possibly several aqueous episodes involved alteration in an open system under acidic pH, though other working hypotheses may explain these and other trends. Data from the Murray Formation contrast with those collected from the Sheepbed mudstone located approximately 60 meters below the base of the Murray Formation, which showed evidence for diagenesis in a closed system at circumneutral pH. Ca-sulfates filled late-stage veins in both mudstones.

  11. High Alpine landscape evolution in Val di Sole (Trentino, Italy) during the Holocene based on charcoal, soil chemistry and mineralogy

    OpenAIRE

    Favilli, F; Egli, M; P. Cherubini; Mirabella, A; Sartori, G; Giaccai, D

    2008-01-01

    We investigated five soil profiles developed on subalpine and alpine environment in northern Italy (Val di Sole, Trentino) with respect to their radiocarbon ages, soil mineralogy and chemistry. The purpose of this research was to document chemical weathering in a periglacial environment and to use the clay mineralogy and radiocarbon ages to explain landscape evolution. The time of developing of the soil horizons, obtained by the extraction of the stable pool of the soil organic matter (SOM) r...

  12. Remote sensing survey of the mineralogy of Valles Marineris : insights into the magmatic and sedimentary processes on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Flahaut, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Valles Marineris is a unique vertical section through the uppermost kilometers of the martian crust; its location, east of Tharsis bulge, and its water-related history suggest a great diversity of rock types in this area. High resolution morphologic (HiRISE) and mineralogic (CRISM) data from the MRO mission (NASA, 2006) available over the area were investigated. A typical succession of horizontal units of distinct morphologies and mineralogies was observed in the Eastern part of Valles Marine...

  13. Labour market of bachue Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    Rato Mhc; Braganca SL

    1980-01-01

    ILO pub-wep pub. Working paper on the labour market of Brazil - discusses theoretical aspects of labour market and labour law, effects of government's wage policy, minimum wage laws, underemployment, unemployment, labour market segmentation, labour demand and labour supply in the agricultural sector and the non-agricultural sector, the number of self employed, labour mobility, etc. Diagram, references and statistical tables.

  14. Violence in Schools in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Angel

    1995-01-01

    The causes of violence in schools, as in society, are multiple and complex; they are rooted in the intolerable economic and social conditions created by Brazil's development model, characterized by unequal wealth distribution, widespread poverty, and an exclusive society. By mirroring this exclusionary process, the educational system is inherently…

  15. Evaluating School Facilities in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, Sheila Walbe; Moreira, Nanci Saraiva

    2008-01-01

    Brazil's Sao Paulo Metropolitan Region is conducting a performance evaluation pilot study at three schools serving disadvantaged populations. The objective is first to test methods which can facilitate Post Occupancy Evaluations (POEs) and then to carry out the evaluations. The preliminary results are provided below.

  16. Brazil and CERN get closer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The map of countries affiliated to CERN may in future include Brazil. On a visit to CERN last week, the Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology, Ronaldo Mota Sardenberg, expressed his country's interest in closer links to the Laboratory.   Luciano Maiani and the Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology Ronaldo Mota Sardenberg shake hands on CERN-Brazil co-operation. During his visit, the Minister and CERN Director General Luciano Maiani issued a joint statement for the continuation of a Co-operation Agreement first established in 1990. They also agreed to study the possibility of Brazil joining CERN-led Grid computing infrastructure projects. Brazilian physicists are already involved in the LHCb, ATLAS and CMS experiments. At the conclusion of the Minister's visit, he and Director-General Maiani agreed to establish a Working Group to examine ways of strengthening Brazil's links with CERN, and to prepare the way for a Brazilian request to CERN Council to become an Observer at th...

  17. The population question in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Population control programs were instituted in Brazil in the 1960s and resulted in as 50% reduction of the fertility rate in 20 years with a reduction in population growth from 2.9%/year in the 1960s to 2.1% in the 1980s. The rapid urbanization which has occurred in Brazil also contributed to this process. While the Brazilian government has eschewed foreign intervention, it encourages the population control programs which are funded by international agencies. The women's movement became involved in policies relating to reproductive rights in 1980, and attempts were made to change the focus of women's health care and the right of women to make reproductive choices. 71% of Brazilian women of reproductive age who are married or living in consensual union use contraception. This compares with 70% of women in developed countries. In Brazil, however, 44% of the women have been sterilized, 41% use oral contraceptives (OCs), and 12% use natural or barrier methods, compared to 7, 13, and 41%, respectively, in developed countries. Sterilization is illegal in Brazil, although it is widespread; the high number of Cesarean section births may determine a medical need for sterilization (after three such deliveries, for example). Abortion is also illegal (except in cases of rape or if the mother's life is in danger) and widespread. The 2 to 3 million abortions each year are thought to be the third cause of maternal mortality. Studies of OC use have shown that Brazilian women often use OCs without medical monitoring or in cases when the contraceptive is absolutely contraindicated. In the past few years, Brazilian women's groups have demanded that the government deal with the issue of family planning in order to stop the intervention of international population control agencies. Brazil has never had the sufficiently modern and effective policy to help women to use contraception safely during the various stages of their reproductive lives. PMID:12286343

  18. Cambro-Ordovician magmatism in the Araçuaí Belt (SE Brazil): Snapshots from a post-collisional event

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Campos, Cristina P.; de Medeiros, Silvia R.; Mendes, Julio C.; Pedrosa-Soares, Antonio C.; Dussin, Ivo; Ludka, Isabel P.; Dantas, Elton L.

    2016-07-01

    The focus of the present work is the rebound of the magmatism at the late stages of orogenic collapse in the Araçuaí Belt, in Brazil. At the end of the orogen bimodal inversely zoned plutons were emplaced along a tectonic corridor following the Atlantic coast of Brazil. This event culminates around 500 Ma. We review geology, petrography, geochemistry and geochronology of these plutonic structures in the region of Espírito Santo. New geochemical modeling of trace element data together with new whole rock Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic data depict a gradual process of mantle contamination during different stages of the orogen. In the post-orogenic stage contamination reaches extreme values. Basic rocks reach εNd(0.5Ga) values below -10. Gabbros to peridotites are more enriched in Ba, Zr, LREE and Sr than the surrounding metasediments. Four new U-Pb data sets from determinations in zircon and monazite crystals, (central northern part of the belt) confirm peak magma production around 500 ± 15 Ma, ranging up to 525 ± 3 Ma in one of the structures. Based on the pictured data, we discuss the significance of this magmatism and present a possible model: a process of gradational delamination of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle and adjacent deep continental crust through underplating. As a consequence, an already enriched mantle was dramatically further contaminated. At the end of this event the intrusion of alkaline melts, with less negative εNd (-5) and further enrichment in incompatible elements, point towards a new input of deeper juvenile mantle magma. Our data suggest the possible onset of a hotspot due to the destabilization of the asthenospheric mantle after orogenic collapse.

  19. 76 FR 30195 - Brazil: Competitive Factors in Brazil Affecting U.S. and Brazilian Agricultural Sales in Selected...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... COMMISSION Brazil: Competitive Factors in Brazil Affecting U.S. and Brazilian Agricultural Sales in Selected... No. 332-524, Brazil: Competitive Factors in Brazil Affecting U.S. and Brazilian Agricultural Sales in... competitive factors in Brazil affecting U.S. and Brazilian agricultural sales in third country markets....

  20. The Byzantine ceramics from Pergamon excavations. Characterization of local and imported productions by elementary analysis using PIXE and INAA methods and by petrography; Les ceramiques byzantines des fouilles de Pergame. Caracterisation des productions locales et importees par analyse elementaire par les methodes PIXE et INAA et par petrographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waksman, S.Y.

    1995-01-12

    An important ceramics material dated back to the 12th-14th centuries has been excavated in Pergamon (Turkey). Among these findings, wasters, tripod stilts and unfinished ware attest to local production in the Byzantine period. Elemental analysis by the methods PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) and INAA (Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis) has been performed on a representative sampling of 160 sherds, including attested local material. Multivariate statistical techniques were used to classify the sherds into groups of similar composition and thus to distinguish ceramics made in Pergamon from imported wares. Several groups of local production have been constituted, which correspond to wares differing in date and fabric. The geochemical characterization of the pastes, complemented with petrographical and mineralogical data, shows that specific raw materials have been used to manufacture each ware. The analytical data related to ceramics made in Pergamon will serve as reference data for future provenance studies. Such reference groups of Byzantine ceramics are very rare, and therefore the ceramics imported into Pergamon cannot be attributed as to their origin. Among the ceramics widely diffused in the Byzantine world, some importations belonging to the ``fine sgraffito`` and ``Zeuxippus ware`` types have been identified. The latter type has been a source of stylistic influence for the workshops of Pergamon, since the analyses show that imitated ``Zeuxippus ware`` has been produced there. These imitations were probably themselves diffused on a regional scale. (author). 238 refs., 48 figs., 53 tabs., 22 photos., 8 appends.

  1. Brazil, oil and statoil: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Linchausen, Harald Christoffer

    2010-01-01

    This thesis aims to shed some light on what challenges Brazil faces concerning its oil reserves. It also considers Statoil’s situation and attempts to analyse the challenges both face. Hotelling’s rule and Dunning’s OLI framework are presented and used in order to complete this analysis. The thesis starts by looking at the history of petroleum in Brazil and Norway. Next, the theoretical framework is outlined. The challenges for both Brazil and Statoil are presented and anal...

  2. Corruption - Can Brazil win this war?

    OpenAIRE

    Washington de Queiroz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Corruption in Brazil is endemic and has increased since the end of the military transition regime in 1985, a year marked by an indirect presidential election, which was followed by the 1988 Constitutional Reform. The present thesis answers the research question of how corruption affects well-being in Brazil" by investigating the existing cause-effect relationships and complex dynamics and logic between corruption and related variables in Brazil, with each of the twenty-s...

  3. Brazil: The Future of Modern Agriculture?

    OpenAIRE

    Holger Matthey; Fabiosa, Jacinto F.; Fuller, Frank H.

    2004-01-01

    In an attempt to understand better Brazil's future role in agricultural markets, the authors of this report traveled to Brazil on a fact-finding mission in September 2003. The goal was to get a first-hand impression of Brazil's agricultural sector and especially its future potential. In this report we provide a general description of crop and livestock production, government policies, public and private cooperation, and transportation and biotechnology issues. The most striking observations m...

  4. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil Nuts

    OpenAIRE

    Taniwaki, Marta H.; Pitt, John I.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.; Sartori, Daniele; Copetti, Marina V.; Balajee, Arun; Fungaro, Maria Helena P.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2012-01-01

    During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial beta-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The fol...

  5. Brazil's Economy:Too Hot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Brazil has a lot to be proud of.A decade of faster growth and progressive social policies has brought a prosperity that is ever more widely shared.The unemployment rate for April, at 6.4%, is the lowest on record.Credit is booming, particularly to the swelling numbers who have moved out of poverty and into the middle class.Income inequality, though still high, has fallen sharply.For most Brazilians life has never been so good.

  6. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] (and others)

    2003-07-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  7. State Government Bailouts in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Bevilaqua, Afonso S.

    2002-01-01

    As a result of the consolidation of democracy after the end of the military regime in the mid-1980s, Brazil has gone through a period of remarkable decentralization both in fiscal and political terms. The move towards decentralized management and control of public finances has been followed by a series of bailouts of state governments by the federal government. The lack of effective control on borrowing, coupled with reputational effects originating from these repeated bailout operations, red...

  8. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  9. Brazil: Mechanisms of Direct Democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Bovo, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    In the structure of Brazilian Government, regarding both the executive as well as the executive powers, the increase in ways in which society can participate in decisions of public interest, stands out. Among the shared or participatory managerial policies implemented in Brazil, the following are noteworthy: the participatory budget, managerial councils, committees dealing with watersheds, thematic conferences, plebiscites, public meetings and referenda. However, if compared to the size of Br...

  10. Fluid–rock interaction across the South Tibetan Detachment, Garhwal Himalaya (India): Mineralogical and geochemical evidences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anubhooti Saxena; Himanshu K Sachan; Pulok K Mukherjee; Dilip K Mukhopadhya

    2012-02-01

    The Malari Leucogranite in the Garhwal Himalaya is cut across by a continental-scale normal fault system called the South Tibetan Detachment (STD). A mineralogical, geochemical and fluid inclusion study of samples from the fault zone of the Malari Granite was performed to reveal the imprints of fluid–rock interaction. Fluid inclusion assemblages observed in the alteration zone indicate the presence of NaCl-dominated aqueous fluids with varied salinity of 6 –16 wt.% of NaCl equivalent. Mineralogical changes include the alteration of feldspar to muscovite and muscovite to chlorite. This alteration took place at temperatures of 275°–335°C and pressures between 1.9 and 4.2 kbars as revealed by the application of chlorite thermometry, fluid isochores, and presence of K-feldspar+muscovite+chlorite+quartz mineral assemblage. Geochemical mass-balance estimates predict 32% volume loss during alteration. An estimated fluid/rock ratio of 82 is based on loss of silica during alteration, and reveals presence of a moderately low amount of fluid at the time of faulting. Results of fluid inclusion and alteration mineralogy indicate that the Malari Leucogranites were exhumed due to normal faulting along the STD and erosion from mid-crustal levels. Most of the leucogranites in the Himalayas occur along the STD and possibly a regional-scale fluid flow all along the STD might have caused similar alteration of leucogranites along this tectonic break. Regional fluid flow was probably concentrated along the STD and channelized through mesoscopic fractures, microcracks and grain boundaries.

  11. Morphological and mineralogical forms of technogenic magnetic particles in industrial dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiera, T.; Jabłońska, M.; Strzyszcz, Z.; Rachwal, M.

    2011-08-01

    The morphology, mineralogy, and magnetic properties of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) were analysed in four kinds of industrial dust produced during high temperature technological processes of different branches of industry (lignite and hard coal burning, cement production, coke production). The study was carried out by means of magnetic susceptibility measurement, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and thermomagnetic analysis. To assess the total content of the magnetic fraction in bulk dust samples, mass specific magnetic susceptibility (χ) was measured and then a physical separation of magnetic particles (mostly of technogenic origin) was conducted. The dusts revealed high diversity of the χ value, which was dependent on the magnetic particles' concentration and mineralogical composition. Significant differences in the magnetic mineralogy of dusts coming from different branches of industry were observed. In fly ashes from coal combustion, spherical forms (typical ferromagnetic spherules) of magnetite, magnesioferrite, and maghemite were mostly observed. In dusts after lignite combustion a higher content of antiferromagnetic hematite and maghemite was observed due to the lower temperature of lignite combustion. In cement dusts a large variety of iron minerals were observed including magnetite, maghemite, hematite, ferrites, and goethite. The characteristic mineral forms for cement dusts were Ca-ferrites and co-occurrence of calcite, anhydrite, gypsum, and bassanite with a magnetic mineral fraction. The magnetic fraction produced by the coke industry was mostly in the form of tightly compacted aggregates with well-formed crystal structures where ferromagnetic pyrrhotite was characteristic feature. The TMPs could be distinctive for pollution source identification and serve as a tracer of dust origin and (if found in topsoil) identification of soil pollution sources.

  12. Quantitative mineralogical characterization of chrome ore beneficiation plant tailing and its beneficiated products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    Mineralogical characterization and liberation of valuable minerals are primary concerns in mineral processing industries. The present investigation focuses on quantitative mineralogy, elemental deportment, and locking-liberation characteristics of the beneficiation of tailings from a chrome ore beneficiation plant in the Sukinda region, Odisha; methods used for the study of the beneficiated tailings are QEMSCAN®, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and mineral chemistry by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The tailing sample was fine grained (69.48wt% below 45 μm size), containing 20.25wt% Cr2O3 and 39.19wt% Fe2O3, with a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 0.51. Mineralogical investigations using QEMSCAN studies revealed that chromite, goethite, and gibbsite are the dominant mineral phases with minor amounts of hematite, kaolinite, and quartz. The sample contained 34.22wt% chromite, and chromite liberation is more than 80% for grains smaller than 250 μm in size. Based on these results, it was predicted that liberated chromite and high-grade middling chromite particles could be separated from the gangue by various concentration techniques. The tailing sample was beneficiated by hydrocyclone, tabling, wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS), and flotation in order to recover the chromite. A chromite concentrate with 45.29wt% Cr2O3 and a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 1.85 can be produced from these low-grade chromite ore beneficiation plant rejects.

  13. Geochemical and Mineralogical Composition of Bima Sandstone Deposit, Yola Area, NE Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Orazulike

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the geochemical and mineralogical composition of Bima Sandstone deposite of northeastern Nigeria. A total number of sixteen (16 sandstone samples were collected in Yola area inorder to classify the deposit of the Bima Sandstone exposed in this area on the basis of its chemical and mineralogical make-up. All the samples were selected randomly and subjected to both geochemical and petrographic studies. Relative concentration of the major oxide groups such as silica and alumina alkali oxides, iron oxide and magnesia has been used to classify the deposit. The results of the log of ratio of the m ajor oxide groups indicate that Bima Sandstone of the study area can be classified as greywackes, arkoses and lithic arenites including sub-greywackes and protoquartzites. The abundant alkali values as shown by the relatively high log K2O/Na2O ratio in most of the samples indicated immature sandstones whereas low alkali values in sam ples F, H and M revealed mature sandstones. The enrichment of silica (quartz over Al2O3 (log SiO2/Al2O3<1.5 indicate that Bima Sandstone has undergone long period of transportation and have been subjected to intense weathering resulting in the destruction of other minerals especially plagioclase and potassium feldspars during transportation. Microscopic examination of about sixteen slides (16 of Bima Sandstone under both plane and cross polars revealed the following average mineralogical composition: quartz (65% feldspars (14%, mica (9%, iron oxide (5%, calcite (3% further confirms quartz/lithic arenites and greywackes as some of the predominant sedimentary rocks in the study area.

  14. Effect of thermal treatment on coke reactivity and catalytic iron mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byong-chul Kim; Sushil Gupta; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology

    2009-07-15

    Iron minerals in coke can catalyze its gasification and may affect coke behavior in the blast furnace. The catalytic behavior of iron depends largely upon the nature of the iron-bearing minerals. To determine the mineralogical changes that iron could undergo in the blast furnace, cokes made from three coals containing iron present in different mineral forms (clays, carbonates, and pyrite) were examined. All coke samples were heat-treated in a horizontal furnace at 1373, 1573, and 1773 K and then gasified with CO{sub 2} at 1173 K in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Coke mineralogy was characterized using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of coke mineral matter prepared by low-temperature ashing (LTA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (FESEM/EDS). The mineralogy of the three cokes was most notably distinguished by differing proportions of iron-bearing phases. During heat treatment and subsequent gasification, iron-containing minerals transformed to a range of minerals but predominantly iron-silicides and iron oxides, the relative amounts of which varied with heat treatment temperature and gasification conditions. The relationship between initial apparent reaction rate and the amount of catalytic iron minerals - pyrrhotite, metallic iron, and iron oxides - was linear and independent of heat treatment temperature at total catalyst levels below 1 wt %. The study showed that the coke reactivity decreased with increasing temperature of heat treatment due to decreased levels of catalytic iron minerals (largely due to formation of iron silicides) as well as increased ordering of the carbon structure. The study also showed that the importance of catalytic mineral matter in determining reactivity declines as gasification proceeds. 37 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Mineralogical discrimination of the pleistocene loess/paleosol sections in Srijem and Baranja, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galović, Lidija; Peh, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    Previous investigations of the mineralogical composition of loess sections (loess, loess-like sediments, paleosols, alluvial intercalations) in the Carpathian Basin have concluded that the Danube River is the dominant control on the loessitic parent material. These investigations also identify a significant role for the Danube's tributaries in creating local variations. The north-south alignment of these sections forms a transect from the central part of the Carpathian Basin to its southern edge. In this work, the mineral origin of loess sediments was identified by using the multivariate statistical method of discriminant function analysis. Two models were constructed based on the modal composition as the suite of predictor (independent) variables: one is using geographic location as the a priori grouping criterion (SECTION); another employing the difference between the sampling media (LITHOLOGY). Both of the examined discriminant models demonstrate the existence of the mixing zones. The Erdut section is a clear mixture of the mineralogies at the other studied locations, while loesses appear generally intermediate in mineralogy between alluvium and paleosol. The main rationale for the observed difference in modal composition between the Šarengrad and other analyzed sections is the proximity of the Šarengrad section to the Sava River floodplain and Dinaric Ophiolite Zone (DOZ), both important source areas for aeolian sediments in the southern edge of the Carpathian Basin that transport material from the Central Bosnian Mountains unit of DOZ. Chemically, the most resistant heavy minerals together with opaque minerals are exclusively associated with paleosols, being typical products of geochemical pedogenic processes.

  16. Mineralogical and geochemical patterns of urban surface soils, the example of Pforzheim, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a combined geochemical and mineralogical survey of urban surface soils. Many studies on urban soils are restricted to purely chemical surveys in order to investigate soil pollution caused by anthropogenic activities such as traffic, heating, industrial processing, waste disposal and many more. In environmental studies, chemical elements are often distinguished as lithogenic and anthropogenic elements. As a novel contribution to those studies, the authors combined the analysis of a broad set of chemical elements with the analysis of the main mineralogical phases. The semi-quantification of mineralogical phases supported the assignment of groups of chemical elements to lithogenic or anthropogenic origin. Minerals are important sinks for toxic elements. Thus, knowledge about their distribution in soils is crucial for the assessment of the environmental hazards due to pollution of urban soils. In Pforzheim, surface soils (0-5 cm depth) from various land use types (forest, agriculture, urban green space, settlement areas of various site densities) overlying different geological units (clastic and chemical sediments) were investigated. Urban surface soils of Pforzheim reflect to a considerable degree the mineral and chemical composition of parent rocks. Irrespective of the parent rocks, elevated concentrations of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Sn, Ag) were found in soils throughout the whole inner urban settlement area of Pforzheim indicating pollution. These pollutants will tend to accumulate in inner urban surface soils according to the available adsorption capacity, which is normally higher in soils overlying limestone than in soils overlying sandstone. However, inner urban surface soils overlying sandstone show elevated concentrations of carbonates, phyllo-silicates and Fe and elevated pH values compared with forest soils overlying sandstone. Thus, in comparison to forest soils overlying sandstones, inner urban soils overlying sandstone affected by

  17. Brazil-Africa geological links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquato, Joaquim Raul; Cordani, Umberto G.

    1981-04-01

    In this work, the main evidence and conclusions regarding geological links between Brazil and Africa are summarized, with emphasis on the geochronological aspects. Taking into account the geographical position, as well as the similarities in the geochronological pattern, the following main provinces of the two continents are correlated: The Imataca and Falawatra complexes in the Guayana Shield and the Liberian Province of West Africa. The Paraguay-Araguaia and the Rockelide Fold Belts. The Sa˜o Luiz and the West African cratonic areas. The Caririan Fold Belt of northeastern Brazil and the Pan-Africa Belt of Nigeria and Cameroon. The JequiéComplex of Bahia, the Ntem Complex of Cameroon and similar rocks of Gabon and Angola. The Ribeira Fold Belt in Brazil and the West Congo and Damara Belts in West and South Africa. In addition, other geological links are considered, such as some of the major linear fault zones which can be traced across the margins of South America and Africa, in the pre-drift reconstructions. Correlations are also made of the tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of the Paranáand Karroo syneclises, and the Brazilian and African marginal basins around the South Atlantic, during their initial stages. Finally, several similarities in the tectonic evolution of South America and Africa, during and after the onset of drifting, are shown to be compatible with a recent origin for the South Atlantic floor, as required by sea-floor spreading and continental drift between South America and Africa.

  18. Decentralization and REDD+ in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Toni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent discussions on REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, plus conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks have raised optimism about reducing carbon emissions and deforestation in tropical countries. If approved under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC, REDD+ mechanisms may generate a substantial influx of financial resources to developing countries. Some authors argue that this money could reverse the ongoing process of decentralization of forest policies that has spread through a large number of developing countries in the past two decades. Central states will be accountable for REDD+ money, and may be compelled to control and keep a significant share of REDD+ funds. Supporters of decentralization argue that centralized implementation of REDD+ will be ineffective and inefficient. In this paper, I examine the relation between subnational governments and REDD+ in Brazil. Data show that some state governments in the Brazilian Amazon have played a key role in creating protected areas (PAs after 2003, which helped decrease deforestation rates. Governors have different stimuli for creating PAs. Some respond to the needs of their political constituency; others have expectations to boost the forest sector so as to increase fiscal revenues. Governors also have led the discussion on REDD+ in Brazil since 2008. Considering their interests and political power, REDD+ is unlikely to curb decentralization in Brazil.

  19. An AIDS campaign in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoff, D

    1987-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) distribution program in Brazil, spearheaded by the National Division of Sanitary Surveillance in Ports, Airports, and Borders, was part of the government's massive education campaign to prevent the transmission of HIV-AIDS in Brazil. Beginning in February 1987, the climate was sufficiently favorable to operate a coordinated information campaign during the Carnival celebration, and tourists arriving in the cities of Brazil for the annual Carnival celebration were handed an educational brochure in Portugese, Spanish, English, and French. Yet, beyond reaching the tourist populations, it is particularly important to reach large portions of the Brazilian population. Planners of the national AIDS campaign intend to use television, radio, and all major newspapers in their effort to cover the country. Initial television coverage is comprised of short informational messages directed at high-risk groups. There also are plans to use radio and the print media in order to reach a wider audience. It is estimated that US $6 million will be needed to adequately meet the costs of AIDS prevention and medical care, but due to extreme budget constraints, only $45,000 has been earmarked for ongoing AIDS activities at this time. PMID:12281284

  20. Mineralog??a de alteraci??n en el pozo Pte-1, campo geotermal Tinguiririca, Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Droguett, B??rbara; Morata, Diego; Clavero, Jorge; Pineda, Germ??n; Morales-Ruano, Salvador; Carrillo-Ros??a, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Este trabajo presenta los avances en el estudio mediante petrograf??a ??ptica, DRX y SEM de la mineralog??a de alteraci??n presente en el pozo PTe-1, ubicado en el campo geot??rmico Tinguiririca (Chile central). Los 813,85m de rocas perforadas pertenecen al Complejo Volc??nico Tinguiririca (Pleistoceno-Holoceno) formado por lavas, tobas y brechas volc??nicas de composici??n andes??tica. Sobre la base de las asociaciones minerales se ha determinado dos zonas de alteraci??n principales. La de m...

  1. The postglacial Stuoragurra Fault, North Norway - A textural and mineralogical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roaldset, E.

    2012-04-01

    The postglacial Stuoragurra Fault, North Norway - A textural and mineralogical study Elen Roaldset(1), Mari Åm (2), and Oddleiv Olesen(3) 1) Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, P.O.Box 1172 Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway 2) Statoil R &D, P. O. Box 2470, 7005 Trondheim, Norway 3) Norwegian Geological Survey, P.O.Box 6315 Sluppen, 7491 Trondheim, Norway The Stuoragurra Fault is part of the Lapland province of postglacial faults and was identified in 1983 during a colloborative project between the Geological Surveys of Finland Norway and Sweden. The Stuoragurra Fault is an 80 km long fault zone which contains three main segments of eastward dipping faults (30-55 deg.) with up to 10 m of reverse displacement and a 7 m high escarpment. It cross-cuts glaciofluvial deposits and consequently being younger than 10.000 years. The postglacial fault segments follow to a large extent older fault zones represented by lithified breccias and diabases of Proterozoic age. In this paper we will present textural and mineralogical study of a 135 m continous core drilled across the fault zone. The investigation methods include quality assessments by rock quality designation methods (RQD and Q- methods), textural and petrological descriptions visually and by thin section microscopy, and mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction. Special attention is drawn to neoformed and/or degraded minerals like clay minerals and iron oxides/hydroxides. The quality assessments of the cored material reflect the degree of rock deformation and fragmentation and show the quality of the bedrock generally to be of very poor (about 60%) to poor quality" (25%) The main minerals in the fresh rock are quarts, feldspar, mica and iron oxides (magnetite and ilmenite). Throughout the cored borehole products of weathering have formed on fissures, fractures and in strongly deformed, gravelly, zones. The neoformed minerals include kaolinite, smectite, and vermiculite, as well as goethite. The mineralogical

  2. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  3. Physical, Chemical, and Mineralogical Properties of Comet 81P/Wild 2 Particles Collected by Stardust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, G.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft collected dust from the coma of Comet 81P/Wild 2 by impact into aerogel capture cells or into Al-foils. The first direct, laboratory measurement of the physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties of cometary dust grains ranging from <10-15 to ?10-4 g were made on this dust. Deposition of material along the entry tracks in aerogel and the presence of compound craters in the Al-foils both indicate that many of the Wild 2 particles in the size range sampled by Stardust are weakly bound aggregates of a diverse range of minerals. Mineralogical characterization of fragments extracted from tracks indicates that most tracks were dominated by olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, or Fe-sulfides, although one track was dominated by refractory minerals similar to Ca-Al inclusions in primitive meteorites. Minor mineral phases, including Cu-Fe-sulfide, Fe-Zn-sulfide, carbonate and metal oxides, were found along some tracks. The high degree of variability of the element/Fe ratios for S, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Ga among the 23 tracks from aerogel capture cells analyzed during Stardust Preliminary Examination is consistent with the mineralogical variability. This indicates Wild 2 particles have widely varying compositions at the largest size analyzed (>10 ?m). Because Stardust collected particles from several jets, sampling material from different regions of the interior of Wild 2, these particles are expected to be representative of the non-volatile component of the comet over the size range sampled. Thus, the stream of particles associated with Comet Wild 2 contains individual grains of diverse elemental and mineralogical compositions, some rich in Fe and S, some in Mg, and others in Ca and Al. The mean refractory element abundance pattern in the Wild 2 particles that were examined is consistent with the CI meteorite pattern for Mg, Si, Cr, Fe, and Ni to 35%, and for Ca, Ti and Mn to 60%, but S/Si and Fe/Si both show a statistically significant

  4. Relating Optical Properties of Dusts to their Mineralogical and Physical Interrelationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, J. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Jayanty, R. K. M.; Casuccio, G.; Pincock, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the project was to provide information on the mineralogical, chemical and physical interrelationships of re-suspended mineral dust samples collected as grab samples from global dust sources. Surface soil samples were collected from about 65 desert sites, including the southwestern USA (12), Mali (3), Chad (3), Morocco (1), Canary Islands (8), Cape Verde (1), Djibouti (1), Afghanistan (3), Iraq (6), Kuwait (5), Qatar (1), UAE (1), Serbia (3), China (5), Namibia (3), Botswana (4), Australia (3), and Chile (1). The 38 μm, health (medical geology), ocean fertilization, and damage to equipment.

  5. Mineralogical Composition of the Urinary Stones from Different Provinces in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan H. Afaj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available For this study, 25 samples of urinary stones were chosen from different provinces in Iraq as representative sampling localities. These samples of urinary stones were collected to represent kidney, urate, and bladder stones. The main objectives of this study are to try to shed some light on the possibilities of tracking down the effective environmental factors that determine the mineralogical and chemical composition of these stones. The stones were examined using several techniques, the most important of which was the use of the X-ray diffraction (XRD technique to determine the mineralogical composition of these stones. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM test was conducted to determine the crystallographic forms and structures for the minerals forming these stones. Optical properties of these minerals were studied using a polarizing microscope. All these techniques revealed that the calcium oxalate, represented in Whewellite mineral, is the most dominant type of these stones, in addition to other minerals such as Hydroxy apatite, Struvite, and Uricite. Dittmarite was pointed out for the first time ever in some samples. This mineral has not been determined in any previous study worldwide.Considering the results of mineralogical and chemical examinations of the urinary stones in question, and the statistical information gathered from the Iraqi Health Ministry, statistical analyses were applied. The ratio of male-female cases in this study happened to be 4:1, which was higher than the ratio in the years 1988––1989 and 1993–1994, 2:1; 3:1 respectively. The highest percentage of the cases was in the 15–50 age group, which is considered as the most productive years of human lifetime. This study showed that one of the most significant factors was that the mineralogical variation of urinary stones in some Iraqi provinces was due to geographical differences, which reflect the variation in lithogenic factors and also climatological factors. Other

  6. Accounting for mineralogical composition and origin of soils and sedimentary rocks in thermal property predictions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rev I.Gavriliev

    2014-01-01

    A methodology for calculating the thermal conductivity of soils and rocks is developed which takes into account their origin and mineralogical composition. This method utilizes three approaches. One is founded on the structural modeling of contact heat interaction between particles and fills and estimates the statistical probability distribution of the particles in the volume of the medium. The second approach analyses perturbation to the temperature field of the matrix medium by ellipsoidal inclusions. The third approach is to find the mean thermal conductivity of the solid skeleton in the universal model at different composition of rock-forming minerals.

  7. Mineralogical and Biogeochemical Characteristics of Rhodolith from Wu Island, Jeju-do, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Y.; Kang, S.; Roh, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    This study focused on investigation of mineralogical and biogeochemical characteristics of the rhodoliths and examination of the rhodolith origin whether they were formed by chemical or biological processes. Rhodoliths are free-living forms of calcareous, coralline red algae formed under specific environmental conditions, but their formation processes are still controversial. The rhodoliths and sea water were sampled at Seogwang-ri coast in the western part of Wu Island, Jeju-do, Korea. The chemical compositions and pHs of sea water were measured by ICP-AES and pH meter. Microorganisms enriched from rhodoliths were aerobically cultured at room temperature in D-1 media containing various concentrations (0, 30, 100 mM) of Ca and Mg-acetate, and the microorganisms were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene DGGE analysis to confirm microbial diversity. Mineralogical characteristics of the rhodoliths and precipitates formed by the enriched microorganisms were determined by XRF, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses. The sea water had a range of pH 6 to 7, and consisted of approximately 400 mg/L of Ca and 1200 mg/L of Mg which are low to form carbonate minerals by chemical process in natural environments. XRF and XRD analyses showed the rhodoliths mainly consisted of 46% CaO and 5 % MgO and mineralogy is Mg-rich calcite. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed the enriched microorganisms contained a carbonate forming microorganism, Proteus mirabilis. The enriched microorganisms precipitated carbonate minerals using D-1 media containing Ca- and Mg-acetate (30, 100 mM) and mineralogy of the precipitated carbonate mineral was Mg-rich calcite, whereas the microorganisms did not form carbonate minerals without Ca- and Mg-acetate in D-1 media. SEM-EDS analyses showed that the Mg-rich calcite formed by the microorganisms had a rhombohedron shape. And the Mg-rich calcite consisted of Ca, Si and Mg with extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). These results indicate that the rhodoliths at Seogwang-ri coast

  8. Comparison of the Mineralogy of Comet Wild 2 Coma Grains to Other Astromaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David; Zolensky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We propose that Kuiper Belt samples (in this case comet coma grains from the Jupiter family comet Wild 2) are recognizably different from the bulk of materials in outer belt asteroids, because of their different formation positions and times in the early solar system. We believe this despite similarities found between some Wild 2 grains and components of carbonaceous chondrites (i.e. some CAI and chondrules). Kuiper Belt samples must preserve measurable mineralogical and compositional evidence of formation at unique positions and times in the early solar nebula, and these formational differences must have imparted recognizable special characteristics. We hypothesize that these characteristics include: (1) Unique major element compositional ranges of common astromaterial minerals, especially olivine and pyroxene; (2) Unique minor element compositions of major silicate phases, especially olivine and low-Ca pyroxene; (3) Degree and effects of radiation processing -- including amorphous rims, metal coatings, and Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulfides (GEMS); (4) Presence of abundant presolar silicate grains as recognized by anomalous oxygen in silicates; (5) Oxidation state of the mineral assemblage. We are working our way through all available Wild 2 samples, selecting 1-2 non-consecutive viable TEM grids from each possible extracted Wild 2 grain. We especially prefer TEM grids from grains for which complete mineralogical details have not been published (which is to say the majority of the extracted grains). We are performing a basic mineralogic survey by E-beam techniques, to establish the essential features of the extracted Wild 2 grains. We are making a particular effort to carefully and accurately measure minor elements of olivine and pyroxene, as these minerals are widespread in astromaterials, and comparisons of their compositions will serve to place the Wild 2 silicates in contact with asteroids, meteorites and chondritic interplanetary dust particles

  9. Textural and mineralogical characteristics of agricultural soils in SW Punjab: correlation with distribution of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, spatial distribution of uranium (U) in agricultural soils collected from two potential districts (Bathinda and Mansa) was investigated. The measured activity levels of 238U in soil of studied area ranged from 40.5 to 68 Bqkg-1, dry, with mean value of 53.8 ± 6.3 Bqkg-1, dry. The correlation between soil properties (especially textural and mineralogical characteristics) and U contents was established. The textural analysis revealed that soils were mainly composed of sand and silt. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that clay fractions ranging from 2.8 to 5 % dominated by quartz and montmorillonite. (author)

  10. Soil mineralogy and chemistry on Mars - Possible clues from salts and clays in SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, James L.

    1992-01-01

    If the shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) meteorites' parent planet is Mars, then the aqueous precipitates found in them imply that oxidizing, water-based solutions may have been chemically active on that planet over the past 200-1300 million yrs. It is suggested that the mixture of aqueous precipitates found in the SNCs furnish a self-consistent model for the bulk elemental composition of surface sediments at the Viking Lander sites. Further mineralogical and stable-isotope studies of the secondary minerals may establish the limits for biological activity over the last 1300 million years of Mars' water-based chemistry.

  11. The uranium source-term mineralogy and geochemistry at the Broubster natural analogue site, Caithness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) has been conducting a coordinated research programme at the Broubster natural analogue site in Caithness, north Scotland. This work on a natural radioactive geochemical system has been carried out with the aim of improving our confidence in using predictive models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This report is one of a series being produced and it concentrates on the mineralogical characterization of the uranium distribution in the limestone unit considered as the 'source-term' in the natural analogue model

  12. IMPACT OF POLLUTION ON THE CLAY MINERALOGICAL COMPOSITION OF SOME SOILS FROM ZLATNA AREA (ROMANIA)

    OpenAIRE

    C.Craciun; Alexandrina Manea; Laura Paulette; Marius Eftene; Victoria Mocanu

    2008-01-01

    Zlatna area is a high polluted zone with heavy metals due to industrial activity (extraction and processing of non-ferrous area). In spite of the fact that industrial activity was stoped for 2-3 years, the effect of pollution are still obvious. The aim of this paper is to make evident some aspects concerning the impact of pollution on the mineralogical composition of the clay fraction (below 2μ) from some soils belonging to dystric cambisol and luvisol type. From the chemical point of view, ...

  13. Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) for In-Situ Planetary Mineralogy: Laboratory and Field Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorp, Byron; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Green, Robert O.; Rodriguez, Jose I.; Blaney, Diana; Wilson, Daniel W.; Sellar, R. Glenn; Richardson, Brandon S.

    2012-01-01

    The Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a miniature telescope and spectrometer system intended for mapping terrain mineralogy over distances from 1.5 m to infinity with spatial sampling of 1.35 mrad over a 33 deg field, and spectral sampling of 10 nm in the 600-2500 nm range. The core of the system has been designed for operation in a Martian environment, but can also be used in a terrestrial environment when placed inside a vacuum vessel. We report the laboratory and field calibration data that include spatial and spectral calibration, and demonstrate the use of the system.

  14. Geochemical and mineralogical correlation of kimberlites of Timan and Zimnii Bereg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparative geochemical, mineralogical and isotope-chronological analyses of diatremes of the Timan and Zimnii Bereg (the Arkhangelsk Region) are accomplished with the purpose of solving the problem on their belonging to kimberlites. It is shown, that the basalt age value of the Volsk-Wymsk Ridge, equal to 383±38 mln. years obtained through the Sm-Nd-dating method, represents the upper age limit of the kimberlites diatremes of the Middle Timan. The similarity of the Timan kimberlites with the kimberlites of the Verkhotinski field of the Arkhangelsk Region is noted

  15. In Situ Planetary Mineralogy Using Simultaneous Time Resolved Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman , G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is one of the primary methods of mineralogical analysis in the laboratory, and more recently in the field. Because of its versatility and ability to interrogate rocks in their natural form it is one of the front runners for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to explore adverse set of solar system bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, the Moon, and other primitive bodies such as asteroids and the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos), as well as for pre-selection of rock and soil samples for potential cache and return missions.

  16. Role of mineralogical structure of sediments in accumulation of radionuclides and trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similar distributions for 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 210Po, 238,239,240Pu, 137Cs and trace elements were obtained in sediment samples collected along the Romanian sector of the Danube River and the Black Sea coast during 1994. The radionuclide and trace element accumulation in the investigated samples is discussed with respect to their geochemical behavior and the mineralogical structure of the samples. The latter, investigated by X-ray diffraction and cation exchange capacity of the same samples, proves to be an important factor in the selection of sampling sites for monitoring the pollution of river basins and the sea. (author)

  17. Mineralogical characteristics of the Bochnia tuff from the Chodenice Beds (Carpathian Foredeep, S Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Dudek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The tuff from the Chodenice Beds, sampled in a natural outcrop in Chodenice, wassubjected to mineralogical and geochemical analyses. Main components of the rock proved to be glassshards, quartz and feldspar crystals, as well as mixed-layered Ca-Na-smectite, formed by alteration ofvolcanic glass. The distinguished heavy fraction consists of ilmenite (predominating component, zircon,secondary iron oxides and scarce crystals (or crushed fragments of apatite, tourmaline, rutile, monazite,garnet and staurolite. SEM/EDS analyses revealed crypto-inclusions of a metallic, Ni-Fe-rich phase, presumablyof cosmic origin.

  18. Using mineralogical and geochemical data as a tool for determining potential environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perunović, Tamara; Jovančićević, Branimir; Brčeski, Ilija; Šajnović, Aleksandra; Stojanović, Ksenija; Simić, Vlada; Kašanin-Grubin, Milica

    2014-05-01

    Neogene lacustrine basins are often bearing coal, oil-shale and non-metallic minerals such as magnesite, borates and marls. Exploration of these deposits could put a lot of pressure on the landscape. Aim of this research is to show that geochemical and mineralogical data could be used as a tool in determining landscape sensitivity to an imposed change. To test this hypothesis Lower Miocen lacustrine Kremna basin, Serbia, was investigated. Kremna basin covers an area of approximately 15 km2 and is located in SW Serbia. For the purpose of this study, geomorphologic and microclimatic characteristics of the area were assessed and geochemical and mineralogical composition of 43 sediment samples from one borehole was determined. The purpose of the drilling was to determine the possible evaporite deposit and boron occurrence. The borehole was 343 m deep and ended in weathered serpentinite. Landscape of Kremna basin is hilly-mountainous with pastures, meadows and agriculture as dominant vegetation type. The area is sparsely populated with mountain villages dispersed and mostly isolated. Main water supplies for villages are springs. Climate data (1961-2012) indicate that the average precipitation is 988 mm, and temperature 7,5oC. However, variations in climatic conditions are evident since 1990 showing more profound change between colder and wetter, and warmer and drier years alternating every two to three years. The base and the edge of the Kremna basin consist predominantly of ultrabasic rocks, serpentinite and ophiolitic mélange, which are all prone to weathering. Drill-hole date showed that uppermost clay and Mg rich sediments were overlain by a thin soil layer (~ 15cm). Leaching tests performed on these uppermost sediments indicated that they are dispersive and prone to erosion. Higher average concentration of boron and certain heavy metals, as well as presents of Cr, Hg, As, Pb, Ni, Th, U was determined. Effect of these elements on the environment can be highly

  19. Notas inéditas de Jovellanos sobre mineralogía

    OpenAIRE

    Ordaz Gargallo, Jorge; Gutiérrez Claverol, Manuel Alberto; Lorenzo Álvarez, Elena de

    2010-01-01

    Se presenta y analiza un manuscrito inédito de Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos sobre la historia de la mineralogía, que redactó durante su cautiverio en el Castillo de Bellver (Palma de Mallorca). En el escrito considera de gran importancia los conocimientos químicos como fuente de otras ramas del saber científico y sus aplicaciones en distintos ámbitos de la agricultura, minería e industria. El autor hace una síntesis histórica repasando los hombres de ciencia que en mayor medida contribuyeron ...

  20. FeII induced mineralogical transformations of ferric oxyhydroxides into magnetite of variable stoichiometry and morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Usman, Muhammad; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Hanna, Khalil; Grégoire, Brian; Faure, Pierre; Ruby, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to monitor the mineralogical transformations of ferrihydrite (F), lepidocrocite (L) and goethite (G) into magnetite as a function of aging time. Ferric oxyhydroxides were reacted with soluble FeII and OH- in stoichiometric amounts to form magnetite at an initial pH of  9.7. Observed transformation extent into magnetite followed the order: F > L > G with almost 30 % of untransformed G after 1 month. The departure from stoichiometry, δ, of magnetite (Fe3-δO4...