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Sample records for brazil nut bertholletia

  1. THE BRAZIL NUT TREE (BERTHOLLETIA EXCELSA HUMB. & BONPL. (LECYTHIDACEAE: IMPORTANCE AND BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS

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    L. Santos-Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa is a species of tree native to the Amazon region. The exploitation of its wood and fruit provides significant economic value. Due to this important economic value, different studies related to the Brazil nut tree provide relevant information about the beneficial and harmful relationships between the tree and other organisms. However, such information is scattered and difficult to access. The objective of this study was to compile the available information on the different relationships between the Brazil nut tree and other organisms to support future studies and strategies to better manage the resources and benefits of this tree. We found 194 species that interact with the Brazil nut tree. These species consisted of predators, dispersers, competitors, pollinators, floral visitors, pathogens and microorganisms. Although exploitation of the Brazil nut has occurred for many decades in native forests, the production of seedlings and cultivation of the species are relatively recent events, with few occurrences of pests and diseases recorded for B.excelsa in native forests and plantations. In contrast, pollinators, floral visitors and dispersers were recorded in abundance, as well as contaminating fungi that deteriorate the nut. Considering the volume and diversity of records it is possible to infer that there is a need for constant monitoring of the Brazil nut in plantations and natural areas, as well as to encourage research related to the specific biotic interactions of Brazil nuts.

  2. Public perceptions of hazards associated with Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) : evaluation of risk within an European context

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira, S.; Cunha, L. M.; Moura, Ana Pinto de; Lima, R. C.; Souza, M. P.; Souza Filho, T. A.; Silva, T. N.; Pedrozo, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important economic plants of the Amazon is the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa). Brazil nuts for international trade are mainly obtained from wild collection rather than from plantations, often cited as one of the most important products of extractive reserves in Amazonia. The European Commission (2003/493/EC) has imposed strict regulations on the import from Brazil of Brazil nuts in their shells, as the shells have been found to contain high levels of aflatoxi...

  3. Brazil Nut (Bertholletia excelsa, Lecythidaceae Regeneration in Logging Gaps in the Peruvian Amazon

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    Julian Moll-Rocek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl. extraction serves as an important economic resource in the Madre de Dios region of Peru simultaneously promoting forest conservation, yet, under current management, it cannot compete with other land uses. This study investigated the effects of logging gaps on Brazil nut natural regeneration. A total of 48 paired logging gap-understory sites were visited in Brazil nut concessions in the Tambopata province of Madre de Dios, Peru. At each site, the number of Brazil nut recruits was counted and canopy openness and gap area were measured. Significantly higher levels of recruit density were found in logging gaps than in understory sites. Additionally, recruit density was positively correlated with canopy openness. Further, in experimental plantings in paired gap and understory sites, canopy openness, height, total leaf area, and number were recorded from August 2011 to February 2012. Height, total leaf area, and leaf number were significantly higher for tree-fall gap grown seedlings, lending further evidence to improved recruitment success of Brazil nuts in forest gaps. These results suggest that multiple-use forest management could be considered as an alternative for the sustainable extraction of Brazil nuts but also highlight that further studies are required.

  4. Uncovering spatial patterns in the natural and human history of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) across the Amazon Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, E.; Alcázar Caicedo, C.; McMichael, C.H.; Corvera, R.; Loo, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Our goal was to test the hypothesis that ancient humans substantially contributed to shaping the current distribution of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa), an Amazonian tree species that has been important for human livelihoods since pre-Columbian times. We scrutinized the putative association

  5. Demography of the Brazil nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa) in the Bolivian Amazon : impact of seed extraction on recruitment and population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Boot, R.G.A.

    2002-01-01

    A demographic study was carried out on Bertholletia excelsa, the Brazil nut tree, in two primary forest sites in Northern Bolivia where Brazil nuts have been harvested for several decades. In spite of the large proportion (93€of seeds that are harvested, reasonable densities of recently emerged

  6. How old are large Brazil-nut trees (Bertholletia excelsa in the Amazon? Que idade podem alcançar as castanheiras (Bertholletia excelsa da Amazônia?

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    P.B. de Camargo

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available The age of a large Brazil-nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa is measured by radiocarbon dating, and a discussion is made about their importance in the Amazon rain-forest ecosystem.A idade de uma castanheira (Bertholletia excelsa grande é medida por datação radiocarbônica e uma discussão é feita a respeito de sua importância no ecosistema da floresta amazônica.

  7. Pollination Requirements and the Foraging Behavior of Potential Pollinators of Cultivated Brazil Nut (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl. Trees in Central Amazon Rainforest

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    M. C. Cavalcante

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out with cultivated Brazil nut trees (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl., Lecythidaceae in the Central Amazon rainforest, Brazil, aiming to learn about its pollination requirements, to know the floral visitors of Brazil nut flowers, to investigate their foraging behavior and to determine the main floral visitors of this plant species in commercial plantations. Results showed that B. excelsa is predominantly allogamous, but capable of setting fruits by geitonogamy. Nineteen bee species, belonging to two families, visited and collected nectar and/or pollen throughout the day, although the number of bees decreases steeply after 1000 HR. Only 16, out of the 19 bee species observed, succeeded entering the flower and potentially acted as pollinators. However, due to the abundance, flower frequency and foraging behavior of floral visitors, it was concluded that only the species Eulaema mocsaryi and Xylocopa frontalis could be considered relevant potential pollinators.

  8. Phenology of brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa Humb.& Bonpl., Lecythidaceae in south of Roraima state

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    Helio Tonini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work was carried out in order to study the phenological pattern of brasil-nut trees in natural forest located in the south of Roraima state, in order to relate the frequency of occurrence of phenophases with rainfall. For the phenological survey 20 adult trees (DBH > 50 cm were selected in a permanent sample plot of 9 ha. The phenological observations occurred fortnightly from February 2006 to February 2009, when data were collected on the presence or absence of events of flowering, fruiting, leaf flushing and leaf fall for each tree. The Index of population synchrony was used for estimating the synchrony of phenological events. The flowering of brasil-nut proved to be regular, annual, long and synchronous and was correlated with the reduction of rainfall. The fruiting was regular and synchronous, and dispersal was correlated with rainfall reduction. The phenological pattern of leaf flushing tended to vary yearly, being around the continual one in 2007 and bimodal in 2006 and 2008. It was noticed a higher proportion of trees falling leaves between August and October which characterizes a period of transition between the dry and the rainy time with sensitive reduction of rainfall.

  9. Optimized extraction of polyphenolic antioxidant compounds from Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) cake and evaluation of the polyphenol profile by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Suellen; Torres, Alexandre G

    2016-06-01

    The solid residue (cake) of pressed Brazil nut oil has high energy value and contains high levels of nutrients and bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols. However, little is known about these components in this by-product. Extraction is the first step in investigating the phenolic compounds in Brazil nut cake because extraction conditions might impact the yields of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity. The aim of this study was to select the best phenolic compound extraction conditions for Brazil nut cake by using factorial experimental design and to characterize the phenolic compounds in the extract. The optimal extraction of antioxidant phenolic compounds from Brazil nut cake was achieved under the following conditions: ethanol-water (40:60; v/v); 2.5 min homogenization; and 1 h extraction at 60 °C. The phenolic compound profile of the Brazil nut cake extract using the optimized extraction was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. Six phenolic acids (gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-coumaric acid and sinapic acid) and one flavonoid ((+)-catechin) were identified, and the contents of the phenolic compounds varied from 70.0 to 421 mg kg(-1) . Knowledge of the potential bioactivity of Brazil nut cake identified in the present study might promote its use in the food industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Stereo and scanning electron microscopy of in-shell Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.): part two-surface sound nut fungi spoilage susceptibility.

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    Scussel, Vildes M; Manfio, Daniel; Savi, Geovana D; Moecke, Elisa H S

    2014-11-01

    This work reports the in-shell Brazil nut spoilage susceptible morpho-histological characteristics and fungi infection (shell, edible part, and brown skin) through stereo and scanning electron microscopies (SEM). The following characteristics related to shell (a) morphology-that allow fungi and insects' entrance to inner nut, and (b) histology-that allow humidity absorption, improving environment conditions for living organisms development, were identified. (a.1) locule in testae-the nut navel, which is a cavity formed during nut detaching from pods (located at 1.0 to 2.0/4th of the shell B&C nut faces linkage). It allows the nut brown skin (between shell and edible part) first contact to the external environment, through the (a.2) nut channel-the locule prolongation path, which has the water/nutrients cambium function for their transport and distribution to the inner seed (while still on the tree/pod). Both, locule followed by the channel, are the main natural entrance of living organisms (fungi and insects), including moisture to the inner seed structures. In addition, the (a.3) nut shell surface-which has a crinkled and uneven surface morphology-allows water absorption, thus adding to the deterioration processes too. The main shell histological characteristic, which also allows water absorption (thus improving environment conditions for fungi proliferation), is the (b.1) cell wall porosity-the multilayered wall and porous rich cells that compose the shell faces double tissue layers and the (b.2) soft tissue-the mix of tissues 2 faces corner/linkage. This work also shows in details the SEM nut spoilage susceptible features highly fungi infected with hyphae and reproductive structures distribution. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil Nuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniwaki, Marta H.; Pitt, John I.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.

    2012-01-01

    During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial beta-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS...... sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The following extrolites were produced by this species: aflavinin, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid, tenuazonic...

  12. Aspectos silviculturais da castanha-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa em sistemas agroflorestais na Amazônia Central Silvicultural aspects of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa in agroforestry systems in Central Amazonia

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    Joanne Régis Costa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avaliou o desempenho da castanha-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa em sistemas agroflorestais implantados em ecossistema de terra firme na Amazônia Central. Foram avaliados 3 sítios de sistemas agroflorestais multi-estratificados, implantados em 1992, em áreas de pastagens degradadas, situadas no km 54 da BR-174, no Campo Experimental da Embrapa Amazônia Ocidental, em Manaus (AM. Os sistemas foram implantados após o processo tradicional de derruba e queima da vegetação secundária estabelecida em pastagens submetidas por 6 anos ao pastejo intensivo e abandonadas por 4 anos, em média, ao processo de regeneração natural. O desempenho da espécie com 12 anos de idade foi avaliado por meio do diâmetro à altura do peito (DAP, da altura total, da taxa de sobrevivência e das variáveis morfométricas "Diâmetro da Copa", "Proporção de Copa", "Grau de Esbeltez", "índice de Saliência", "índice de Abrangência" e "Forma de Copa". Os indivíduos atingiram altura total média de 20,9 m e DAP de 37,9 cm, com incremento médio anual de 1,74 m e 3,16cm, respectivamente. A porcentagem média de sobrevivência foi de 78%, cuja mortalidade foi relacionada às ventanias e raios. Os resultados indicaram a eficiência dessa espécie para reabilitar áreas degradadas e confirmaram-na como uma espécie adequada para formar sistemas agroflorestais.This study evaluated the development of Brasil nut (Bertholletia excelsa in agroforestry systems established on non-flooding plateaus in Central Amazonia. Three multi-strata agroforestry systems established in 1992 in degraded pastures, located at the Experiment Station of Embrapa Amazonia Ocidental, BR-174 highway, km 54, Manaus, Amazonas, were evaluated. The area had been intensively managed as pasture for six years, then abandoned for four years, and reopened with traditional slash and burn practices to plant the agroforestry systems. Species development was evaluated with measurements of

  13. Nut Production in Bertholletia excelsa across a Logged Forest Mosaic: Implications for Multiple Forest Use.

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    Rockwell, Cara A; Guariguata, Manuel R; Menton, Mary; Arroyo Quispe, Eriks; Quaedvlieg, Julia; Warren-Thomas, Eleanor; Fernandez Silva, Harol; Jurado Rojas, Edwin Eduardo; Kohagura Arrunátegui, José Andrés Hideki; Meza Vega, Luis Alberto; Revilla Vera, Olivia; Quenta Hancco, Roger; Valera Tito, Jonatan Frank; Villarroel Panduro, Betxy Tabita; Yucra Salas, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    Although many examples of multiple-use forest management may be found in tropical smallholder systems, few studies provide empirical support for the integration of selective timber harvesting with non-timber forest product (NTFP) extraction. Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, Lecythidaceae) is one of the world's most economically-important NTFP species extracted almost entirely from natural forests across the Amazon Basin. An obligate out-crosser, Brazil nut flowers are pollinated by large-bodied bees, a process resulting in a hard round fruit that takes up to 14 months to mature. As many smallholders turn to the financial security provided by timber, Brazil nut fruits are increasingly being harvested in logged forests. We tested the influence of tree and stand-level covariates (distance to nearest cut stump and local logging intensity) on total nut production at the individual tree level in five recently logged Brazil nut concessions covering about 4000 ha of forest in Madre de Dios, Peru. Our field team accompanied Brazil nut harvesters during the traditional harvest period (January-April 2012 and January-April 2013) in order to collect data on fruit production. Three hundred and ninety-nine (approximately 80%) of the 499 trees included in this study were at least 100 m from the nearest cut stump, suggesting that concessionaires avoid logging near adult Brazil nut trees. Yet even for those trees on the edge of logging gaps, distance to nearest cut stump and local logging intensity did not have a statistically significant influence on Brazil nut production at the applied logging intensities (typically 1-2 timber trees removed per ha). In one concession where at least 4 trees ha-1 were removed, however, the logging intensity covariate resulted in a marginally significant (0.09) P value, highlighting a potential risk for a drop in nut production at higher intensities. While we do not suggest that logging activities should be completely avoided in Brazil nut rich

  14. Nut Production in Bertholletia excelsa across a Logged Forest Mosaic: Implications for Multiple Forest Use.

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    Cara A Rockwell

    Full Text Available Although many examples of multiple-use forest management may be found in tropical smallholder systems, few studies provide empirical support for the integration of selective timber harvesting with non-timber forest product (NTFP extraction. Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, Lecythidaceae is one of the world's most economically-important NTFP species extracted almost entirely from natural forests across the Amazon Basin. An obligate out-crosser, Brazil nut flowers are pollinated by large-bodied bees, a process resulting in a hard round fruit that takes up to 14 months to mature. As many smallholders turn to the financial security provided by timber, Brazil nut fruits are increasingly being harvested in logged forests. We tested the influence of tree and stand-level covariates (distance to nearest cut stump and local logging intensity on total nut production at the individual tree level in five recently logged Brazil nut concessions covering about 4000 ha of forest in Madre de Dios, Peru. Our field team accompanied Brazil nut harvesters during the traditional harvest period (January-April 2012 and January-April 2013 in order to collect data on fruit production. Three hundred and ninety-nine (approximately 80% of the 499 trees included in this study were at least 100 m from the nearest cut stump, suggesting that concessionaires avoid logging near adult Brazil nut trees. Yet even for those trees on the edge of logging gaps, distance to nearest cut stump and local logging intensity did not have a statistically significant influence on Brazil nut production at the applied logging intensities (typically 1-2 timber trees removed per ha. In one concession where at least 4 trees ha-1 were removed, however, the logging intensity covariate resulted in a marginally significant (0.09 P value, highlighting a potential risk for a drop in nut production at higher intensities. While we do not suggest that logging activities should be completely avoided in Brazil

  15. Nut Production in Bertholletia excelsa across a Logged Forest Mosaic: Implications for Multiple Forest Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Cara A.; Guariguata, Manuel R.; Menton, Mary; Arroyo Quispe, Eriks; Quaedvlieg, Julia; Warren-Thomas, Eleanor; Fernandez Silva, Harol; Jurado Rojas, Edwin Eduardo; Kohagura Arrunátegui, José Andrés Hideki; Meza Vega, Luis Alberto; Revilla Vera, Olivia; Valera Tito, Jonatan Frank; Villarroel Panduro, Betxy Tabita; Yucra Salas, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    Although many examples of multiple-use forest management may be found in tropical smallholder systems, few studies provide empirical support for the integration of selective timber harvesting with non-timber forest product (NTFP) extraction. Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, Lecythidaceae) is one of the world’s most economically-important NTFP species extracted almost entirely from natural forests across the Amazon Basin. An obligate out-crosser, Brazil nut flowers are pollinated by large-bodied bees, a process resulting in a hard round fruit that takes up to 14 months to mature. As many smallholders turn to the financial security provided by timber, Brazil nut fruits are increasingly being harvested in logged forests. We tested the influence of tree and stand-level covariates (distance to nearest cut stump and local logging intensity) on total nut production at the individual tree level in five recently logged Brazil nut concessions covering about 4000 ha of forest in Madre de Dios, Peru. Our field team accompanied Brazil nut harvesters during the traditional harvest period (January-April 2012 and January-April 2013) in order to collect data on fruit production. Three hundred and ninety-nine (approximately 80%) of the 499 trees included in this study were at least 100 m from the nearest cut stump, suggesting that concessionaires avoid logging near adult Brazil nut trees. Yet even for those trees on the edge of logging gaps, distance to nearest cut stump and local logging intensity did not have a statistically significant influence on Brazil nut production at the applied logging intensities (typically 1–2 timber trees removed per ha). In one concession where at least 4 trees ha-1 were removed, however, the logging intensity covariate resulted in a marginally significant (0.09) P value, highlighting a potential risk for a drop in nut production at higher intensities. While we do not suggest that logging activities should be completely avoided in Brazil nut rich

  16. Association between aflatoxin and aflatoxigenic fungi in Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. Associação de aflatoxinas e fungos aflatoxigênicos em castanha-do-Brasil (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.

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    Ariane Mendonça Pacheco

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazil nut has a high nutritional content and is a very important trade commodity to some Latin American countries. In order to evaluate its safety, 120 samples from different stages of the productive chain were analyzed in terms of: moisture content (mc, aflatoxigenic fungi and aflatoxin (LOQ = 1.95 μg.kg-1 total aflatoxin using TLC. Among all samples, 4 (6.7% from the receiving area, and 5 (16.7%, from retail presented aflatoxins above the LOQ, but the amount of aflatoxins was below the LOQ after the samples were dried in the plant. The positive samples were above the limit of total aflatoxin permitted by the European Union (4.0 μg.kg-1 and Brazil (30 μg.kg-1. The mc mean was 22.43% in the receiving area, which is higher than that in the other stages samples. All the A. flavus strains were aflatoxigenic, and there was statistic association between the presence of aflatoxin and flavus strains. The aflatoxigenic fungi strains associated to the aflatoxins levels in the samples show that an effective control is necessary for the food safety in the Brazil nut production chain.A castanha-do-Brasil tem um alto teor nutricional e é um importante produto comercial para alguns países da América Latina. Com objetivo de avaliar a segurança, 120 amostras de diferentes etapas da cadeia produtiva, foram analisadas quanto a: teor de umidade, fungos aflatoxigênicos e aflatoxinas (LOQ = 1,95 μg.kg-1 aflatoxinas totais por CCD. Das amostras, 4 (6,7% da área de recepção, e 5 (16,7% do varejo apresentaram aflatoxinas acima do LOQ. Nas amostras após secagem na usina não foram detectadas aflatoxinas(< LOQ. As amostras positivas estavam acima dos limites aceitos pela União Européia (4,0 μg.kg-1 e Brasil (30 μg.kg-1. A média do teor de umidade foi de 22,43% na etapa de recepção, maior do que as outras etapas estudadas. Todas as cepas de A. flavus eram aflatoxigênicas e houve associação estatística entre a presença de aflatoxinas e a presen

  17. Expression of a methionine-rich storage albumin from the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K., Lecythidaceae in transgenic bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Fabaceae

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    Aragão F.J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, an important component in the diet of people in developing countries, has low levels of the essential amino acid, methionine. We have attempted to correct this deficiency by introducing a transgene coding for a methionine-rich storage albumin from the Brazil nut via biolistic methods. The transgene's coding sequence was driven by a doubled 35S CaMV promoter and AMV enhancer sequences. The transgene was stable and correctly expressed in homozygous R2 to R5 seeds. In two of the five transgenic lines the methionine content was significantly increased (14 and 23% over the values found in untransformed plants.

  18. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil nuts.

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    Marta H Taniwaki

    Full Text Available During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial β-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The following extrolites were produced by this species: aflavinin, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid, tenuazonic acid and ustilaginoidin C. Phylogenetic analysis using partial β-tubulin and camodulin gene sequences showed that A. bertholletius represents a new phylogenetic clade in Aspergillus section Flavi. The type strain of A. bertholletius is CCT 7615 ( = ITAL 270/06 = IBT 29228.

  19. Identification of Aspergillus nomius in Bees Visiting Brazil Nut Flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, Fernanda Pelisson; Penha, Rafael Elias Silva; Cavalcante, Marcelo Casimiro; Viaro, Helena Paula; da Silva, Josué José; de Souza Ferranti, Larissa; Fungaro, Maria Helena Pelegrinelli

    2015-01-01

    We designed a primer pair (BtubNomF/BtubNomR) specifically for amplifying Aspergillus nomius DNA. In vitro assays confirmed BtubNomF/BtubNomR specificity, corroborating its usefulness in detecting and identifying A. nomius. We then investigated the occurrence of A. nomius in floral visitors of Bertholletia excelsa trees by means of PCR, and A. nomius was detected in the following bees: Xylocopa frontalis, Bombus transversalis, Centris denudans, C. ferruginea, and Epicharis flava. The presence of A. nomius in bees visiting Brazil nuts opens up new avenues for obtaining novel insights into the process whereby Brazil nuts are contaminated by aflatoxin-producing fungi. PMID:26063353

  20. Functional characterization of acetylated Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa HBK kernel globulin Caracterizaçao funcional das globulinas de amêndoa de castanha-do-Pará após a acetilação

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    Cíntia Maria Pinto Ramos

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Defatted Brazil nut kernel flour, a rich source of high quality proteins, is presently being utilized in the formulation of animal feeds. One of the possible ways to improve its utilization for human consumption is through improvement in its functional properties. In the present study, changes in some of the functional properties of Brazil nut kernel globulin were evaluated after acetylation at 58.6, 66.2 and 75.3% levels. The solubility of acetylated globulin was improved above pH 6.0 but was reduced in the pH range of 3.0-4.0. Water and oil absorption capacity, as well as the viscosity increased with increase in the level of acetylation. Level of modification also influenced the emulsifying capacity: decreased at pH 3.0, but increased at pH 7.0 and 9.0. Highest emulsion activity (approximately 62.2% was observed at pH 3.0 followed by pH 9.0 and pH 7.0 and least (about 11.8% at pH 5.0. Emulsion stability also followed similar behavior as that of emulsion activity.Farinha desengordurada de amêndoa de castanha-do-Pará, fonte rica de proteína de alta qualidade, vem sendo, atualmente, aproveitada apenas na formulação de ração animal. Uma das possíveis maneiras de melhorar seu aproveitamento para o consumo humano é através do melhoramento de suas propriedades funcionais. No presente trabalho, mudanças em algumas propriedades funcionais da globulina de castanha-do-Pará, após acetilação, aos níveis de 58,6, 66,2 e 75,3% foram estudadas. A solubilidade da globulina acetilada aumentou acima de pH 6,0, porém diminuiu na faixa de pH 3,0 a 4,0. As capacidades de absorção de água e de óleo como também a viscosidade, melhoraram com o aumento de grau de acetilação. O grau de modificação também influenciou a capacidade de emulsificação: reduziu em pH 3,0, e aumentou nos pHs 7,0 e 9,0. A máxima atividade de emulsão (aproximadamente 62,2% foi observada em pH 3,0 seguida de pH 9,0 e a mínima foi observada (11,8% em pH 5,0. A

  1. Molecular analysis of Aspergillus section Flavi isolated from Brazil nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Juliana Soares; Ferracin, Lara Munique; Carneiro Vieira, Maria Lucia; Iamanaka, Beatriz Thie; Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Pelegrinelli Fungaro, Maria Helena

    2012-04-01

    Brazil nuts are an important export market in its main producing countries, including Brazil, Bolivia, and Peru. Approximately 30,000 tons of Brazil nuts are harvested each year. However, substantial nut contamination by Aspergillus section Flavi occurs with subsequent production of aflatoxins. In our study, Aspergillus section Flavi were isolated from Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa), and identified by morphological and molecular means. We obtained 241 isolates from nut samples, 41% positive for aflatoxin production. Eighty-one isolates were selected for molecular investigation. Pairwise genetic distances among isolates and phylogenetic relationships were assessed. The following Aspergillus species were identified: A. flavus, A. caelatus, A. nomius, A. tamarii, A. bombycis, and A. arachidicola. Additionally, molecular profiles indicated a high level of nucleotide variation within β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences associated with high genetic divergence from RAPD data. Among the 81 isolates analyzed by molecular means, three of them were phylogenetically distinct from all other isolates representing the six species of section Flavi. A putative novel species was identified based on molecular profiles.

  2. Purification, crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of brazil-nut allergen Ber e 2

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    Guo, Feng; Jin, Tengchuan; Howard, Andrew; Zhang, Yu-Zhu, E-mail: zhangy@iit.edu [Department of Biology, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The crystallization of the brazil nut allergen Ber e 2 is reported. Peanut and tree-nut allergies have attracted considerable attention because of their frequency and their lifelong persistence. Brazil-nut (Bertholletia excelsa) allergies have been well documented and the 11S legumin-like seed storage protein Ber e 2 (excelsin) is one of the two known brazil-nut allergens. In this study, Ber e 2 was extracted from brazil-nut kernels and purified to high purity by crystalline precipitation and gel-filtration chromatography. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A molecular-replacement structural solution has been obtained. Refinement of the structure is currently under way.

  3. Ação fungitóxica do óleo essencial de Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. e K. Shum sobre o Aspergillus flavus isolado da castanha-do-Brasil (Bertholletia excelsa Fungitoxic action of the essential oil of Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. and K. Shum on Aspergillus flavus isolated from the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa

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    Flávio Araújo Pimentel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a capacidade fungitóxica do óleo essencial de folhas frescas de Tanaecium nocturnum sobre o Aspergillus flavus isolado da castanha-do-brasil, por meio das técnicas de contato e fumigação. Pelos resultados dos bioensaios realizados até 10 dias de incubação, verificou-se que a inibição total do crescimento micelial ocorreu quando se utilizou o óleo essencial nas concentrações de 782 ppm (técnica de contato e 1000 ppm (técnica de fumigação. Em ambas as técnicas, o óleo essencial inibiu a esporulação a partir da concentração de 500 ppm. Observou-se que nos cinco primeiros dias de incubação não houve diferença significativa nos resultados apresentados pelas duas técnicas estudadas, havendo a partir daí uma redução da atividade do óleo essencial nas concentrações inferiores a 1000 ppm pelo teste de fumigação. A ação fungitóxica do óleo essencial sobre o microrganismo estudado pode ser atribuída à presença do benzaldeído (composto majoritário do óleo essencial estudado, em associação com outros compostos também presentes nesse óleo essencial, tais como; álcool benzílico, benzoato de benzila e mandelonitrila.The present work sought to evaluate the fungitoxic activity of the essential oil from fresh Tanaecium nocturnum fresh leaves on Aspergillus flavus isolated from Brazil nuts, using contact and fumigation techniques. The results of bioassays performed up to 10 days of incubation demonstrated that total inhibition of mycelial growth occurred when using the essential oil at concentrations of 782 ppm (contact technique and 1000 ppm (fumigation technique. In both techniques, the essential oil inhibited the formation of spores at the concentration of 500 ppm. No significant difference in the results presented by the two techniques was observed in the first five days of incubation. After this period, the essential oil showed a reduction in activity at concentrations lower than

  4. Can Brazil nut plantations recover soil properties in former pasture lands?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinheiro Bastos, Rodrigo; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Stupak, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Soils of livestock pastures are heavily degraded in the Amazon region compared to conditions immediately after deforestation. We hypothesized that incoming-generating Brazil nut plantations (Bertholletia excelsa) and natural succession secondary forests can recover soil properties of these lands....... To test this, we sampled two 200-cm soil pits in four vegetation types: pasture (PA), Brazil-nut plantation (BN), secondary forest (SF) and primary forest (PF). Soil samples were collected at nine fixed depths to measure bulk density, pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN) and C...

  5. Natural variation of selenium in Brazil nuts and soils from the Amazon region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Junior, E C; Wadt, L H O; Silva, K E; Lima, R M B; Batista, K D; Guedes, M C; Carvalho, G S; Carvalho, T S; Reis, A R; Lopes, G; Guilherme, L R G

    2017-12-01

    Brazil nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa) is native of the Amazon rainforest. Brazil nuts are consumed worldwide and are known as the richest food source of selenium (Se). Yet, the reasoning for such Se contents is not well stablished. We evaluated the variation in Se concentration of Brazil nuts from Brazilian Amazon basin, as well as soil properties, including total Se concentration, of the soils sampled directly underneath the trees crown, aiming to investigate which soil properties influence Se accumulation in the nuts. The median Se concentration in Brazil nuts varied from 2.07 mg kg - 1 (in Mato Grosso state) to 68.15 mg kg - 1 (in Amazonas state). Therefore, depending on its origin, a single Brazil nut could provide from 11% (in the Mato Grosso state) up to 288% (in the Amazonas state) of the daily Se requirement for an adult man (70 μg). The total Se concentration in the soil also varied considerably, ranging from <65.76 to 625.91 μg kg - 1 , with highest Se concentrations being observed in soil samples from the state of Amazonas. Se accumulation in Brazil nuts generally increased in soils with higher total Se content, but decreased under acidic conditions in the soil. This indicates that, besides total soil Se concentration, soil acidity plays a major role in Se uptake by Brazil nut trees, possibly due to the importance of this soil property to Se retention in the soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring and determination of fungi and mycotoxins in stored Brazil nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquião, Arianne Costa; De Oliveira, Maitê M M; Reis, Tatiana A; Zorzete, Patrícia; Atayde, Danielle D; Corrêa, Benedito

    2013-08-01

    Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) is an important commodity from the Brazilian Amazon, and approximately 37,000 tons (3.36 × 10⁷ kg) of Brazil nuts are harvested each year. However, substantial nut contamination by Aspergillus section Flavi occurs, with subsequent production of mycotoxins. In this context, the objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the presence of fungi and mycotoxins (aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid) in 110 stored samples of cultivated Brazil nut (55 samples of nuts and 55 samples of shells) collected monthly for 11 months in Itacoatiara, State of Amazonas, Brazil. The samples were inoculated in duplicate onto Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus agar and potato dextrose agar for the detection of fungi, and the presence of mycotoxins was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The most prevalent fungi in nuts and shells were Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., and Penicillium spp. A polyphasic approach was used for identification of Aspergillus species. Aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid were not detected in any of the samples analyzed. The low water activity of the substrate was a determinant factor for the presence of fungi and the absence of aflatoxin in Brazil nut samples. The high frequency of isolation of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus section Flavi strains, mainly A. flavus, and their persistence during storage increase the chances of aflatoxin production on these substrates and indicates the need for good management practices to prevent mycotoxin contamination in Brazil nuts.

  7. Characterization of Aspergillus section Flavi isolated from organic Brazil nuts using a polyphasic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, T A; Baquião, A C; Atayde, D D; Grabarz, F; Corrêa, B

    2014-09-01

    Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa), an important non-timber forest product from Amazonia, is commercialized in worldwide markets. The main importers of this nut are North America and European countries, where the demand for organic products has grown to meet consumers concerned about food safety. Thus, the precise identification of toxigenic fungi is important because the Brazil nut is susceptible to colonization by these microorganisms. The present study aimed to characterize by polyphasic approach strains of Aspergillus section Flavi from organic Brazil nuts. The results showed Aspergillus flavus as the main species found (74.4%), followed by Aspergillus nomius (12.7%). The potential mycotoxigenic revealed that 80.0% of A. flavus were toxin producers, 14.3% of which produced only aflatoxin B (AFB), 22.85% of which produced only cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), and 42.85% produced both them. All strains of A. nomius were AFB and AFG producers and did not produce CPA. There is no consensus about what Aspergillus species predominates on Brazil nuts. Apparently, the origin, processing, transport and storage conditions of this commodity influence the species that are found. The understanding about population of fungi is essential for the development of viable strategies to control aflatoxins in organic Brazil nuts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Properties of Brazil nuts: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2015-02-25

    Feb 25, 2015 ... family of Lecythidaceae, is native to the Amazon rain forest and adjacent areas in Brazil, Bolivia, Peru (Ferreira et al., 2011). It is an extractive product with high ... humidity below 15%) to be processed in-shell or shelled. Figure 1 shows a flowchart of Brazil nut production. The nuts that do not meet the size ...

  9. Occurrence and fumonisin B2 producing potential of Aspergillus section Nigri in Brazil nuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferranti, Larissa S.; Correa, Benedito; Fungaro, Maria Helena P.

    2017-01-01

    Bertholletia excelsa is the tree that produces Brazil nuts which have vast economic importance in the Amazon region and as an export commodity. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Aspergillus section Nigri in Brazil nut samples at different stages of its production chain...... and to verify the toxigenic potential for fumonisin B2 (FB2) production of these isolates along with the presence of this mycotoxin in Brazil nut samples. The fungal infection ranged from 0 to 80% at the different stages of the harvest and processing chain and the water activity of the nuts from 0.273 to 0.......994. A total of 1052 A. section Nigri strains were isolated from Brazil nuts and 200 strains were tested for their ability to produce FB2: 41 strains (20.5%) were FB2 producers with concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 37.25 mg/kg; 2 strains (1%) showed traces of FB2, less than the detection limit (0.08 mg...

  10. Effect of electron beam irradiation on mechanical properties of gelatin/Brazil nut shell fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Shimazaki, Kleber; Moura, Esperidiana Augusta Barretos de; Mastro, Nelida L. del, E-mail: patyoko@yahoo.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Colombo, Maria Aparecida [Faculdade de Tecnologia da Zona Leste (FATEC), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rosa, Ricardo de [Amazon Brazil Nuts, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The use of natural fiber as polymeric matrix reinforcement has attracted interest, as fibers are renewable, of low cost, biodegradable and possesses non-toxic properties. In the present paper, Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) shell fiber (10% w/w) were mixed with gelatin (25% w/w), glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer to investigate the resultant mechanical properties effects upon ionizing radiation. The samples were irradiated at 40 kGy using a Dynamitron electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in the presence of air. The results showed that samples of gelatin with 10% of Brazil nuts shell fiber and irradiated at 40 kGy presented promising results for mechanical performance. (author)

  11. Effect of electron beam irradiation on mechanical properties of gelatin/Brazil nut shell fiber composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Shimazaki, Kleber; Moura, Esperidiana Augusta Barretos de; Mastro, Nelida L. del; Colombo, Maria Aparecida; Rosa, Ricardo de

    2010-01-01

    The use of natural fiber as polymeric matrix reinforcement has attracted interest, as fibers are renewable, of low cost, biodegradable and possesses non-toxic properties. In the present paper, Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) shell fiber (10% w/w) were mixed with gelatin (25% w/w), glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer to investigate the resultant mechanical properties effects upon ionizing radiation. The samples were irradiated at 40 kGy using a Dynamitron electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in the presence of air. The results showed that samples of gelatin with 10% of Brazil nuts shell fiber and irradiated at 40 kGy presented promising results for mechanical performance. (author)

  12. Effect of Oxygen-Reducing Atmospheres on the Safety of Packaged Shelled Brazil Nuts during Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vildes Maria Scussel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the application of oxygen-(O2- reducing atmosphere methods on stored shelled Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. packs aiming to evaluate the degree of aflatoxin degradation, nuts lipid oxidative stability, fungi control, and hygienic conditions improvement. The methods applied were (a ozone: O3, (b carbon dioxide: CO2, and (c O2 absorber pads with and without vacuum. From all modified atmospheres evaluated, the best performance was obtained with O3, either with or without vacuum. It was the only nut treatment that was able to degrade aflatoxins. None of the spiked (AFLs: 15 μg·kg−1 nut samples O3- treated had aflatoxins detected up to the LC-MS/MS method LOQ (0.36 μg·kg−1 for total AFLs, thus producing safer nuts. Also it kept the fatty acid oxidation indicator—malondialdehyde stable and improved the sensory attributes for consumer acceptance. In addition, the destruction of fungi and yeast was observed since the O3 application (from 1.8×104 cfu/g to NG = no growth. All other treatments stabilized and/or inhibited microorganisms' growth only. By adding CO2 gas also played an important role in the nut quality. Regarding cost, gaseous O3 showed to be of low cost for application in the nut packs.

  13. Effect of Oxygen-Reducing Atmospheres on the Safety of Packaged Shelled Brazil Nuts during Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scussel, Vildes Maria; Giordano, Barbara Nantua; Simao, Vanessa; Manfio, Daniel; Galvao, Simone; Rodrigues, Manuel Nazaré Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the application of oxygen-(O2-) reducing atmosphere methods on stored shelled Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.) packs aiming to evaluate the degree of aflatoxin degradation, nuts lipid oxidative stability, fungi control, and hygienic conditions improvement. The methods applied were (a) ozone: O3, (b) carbon dioxide: CO2, and (c) O2 absorber pads with and without vacuum. From all modified atmospheres evaluated, the best performance was obtained with O3, either with or without vacuum. It was the only nut treatment that was able to degrade aflatoxins. None of the spiked (AFLs: 15 μg·kg−1) nut samples O3- treated had aflatoxins detected up to the LC-MS/MS method LOQ (0.36 μg·kg−1 for total AFLs), thus producing safer nuts. Also it kept the fatty acid oxidation indicator—malondialdehyde stable and improved the sensory attributes for consumer acceptance. In addition, the destruction of fungi and yeast was observed since the O3 application (from 1.8 × 104 cfu/g to NG = no growth). All other treatments stabilized and/or inhibited microorganisms' growth only. By adding CO2 gas also played an important role in the nut quality. Regarding cost, gaseous O3 showed to be of low cost for application in the nut packs. PMID:21760791

  14. DAMAGE CAUSED BY RHYZOPERTHA DOMINICA (FABRICIUS, 1792 (COLEOPTERA: BOSTRICHIDAE IN STORED BRAZIL NUTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Pires

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhyzopertha dominica is an insect that attacks several grains and seeds and is considered the main pest found in stored products in Brazil. This insect is classified as an internal primary pest being a borer. It develops effectively in the grain mass due to its adaptability and high biotic potential. The objectives of this study were to verify if R. dominica adults and larvae feed on Brazil nuts, and also to characterize the damage caused by this Coleoptera. The injuries inflicted by this insect appear as scratched surfaces, which evolve into deep holes, in almonds. As it has the ability to cause considerable damage with consequent losses in the market value of the product, this beetle can be included among the many pests of this product, and even be considered an internal primary pest of the stored Bertholletia excelsa.

  15. Effects of electron-beam irradiation on HDPE/Brazil nut shell fiber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Maiara S.; Sartori, Mariana N.; Oliveira, Rene R.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, research on the replacement of synthetic fibers by natural fibers as reinforcement in thermoplastic composites has increased dramatically due to the advantages of natural fibers, such as low density, low cost, environmental appeal and recyclability. In the present work, the influence of electron-beam irradiation on mechanical properties of HDPE and HDPE/Brazil Nut Shell (Bertholletia excelsa) fiber compositive was investigated. The HDPE composite reinforced with 5% or 10%, by weight of Brazil nut shell fiber powder with particle sizes equal or smaller than 250 μm were obtained by extrusion, using a twin screw extruder. The materials were irradiated at 200 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. The irradiated and non-irradiated specimens tests samples were submitted to mechanical and thermo-mechanical tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and sol-gel analysis and the correlation between their properties was discussed. The results showed significant changes in HDPE mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties due to Brazil nut shell fibers addition and electron-beam irradiation. The surface of the cryo fractured composite samples irradiated showed important visual changes which suggest a better fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion, due to irradiation treatment. These results showed that it is possible to get interesting property gains by using waste from renewable sources instead of the traditional ones and electron-beam radiation treatment. (author)

  16. Effects of electron-beam irradiation on HDPE/Brazil nut shell fiber composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Maiara S.; Sartori, Mariana N.; Oliveira, Rene R.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B., E-mail: maiara.sferreira@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, research on the replacement of synthetic fibers by natural fibers as reinforcement in thermoplastic composites has increased dramatically due to the advantages of natural fibers, such as low density, low cost, environmental appeal and recyclability. In the present work, the influence of electron-beam irradiation on mechanical properties of HDPE and HDPE/Brazil Nut Shell (Bertholletia excelsa) fiber compositive was investigated. The HDPE composite reinforced with 5% or 10%, by weight of Brazil nut shell fiber powder with particle sizes equal or smaller than 250 μm were obtained by extrusion, using a twin screw extruder. The materials were irradiated at 200 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. The irradiated and non-irradiated specimens tests samples were submitted to mechanical and thermo-mechanical tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and sol-gel analysis and the correlation between their properties was discussed. The results showed significant changes in HDPE mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties due to Brazil nut shell fibers addition and electron-beam irradiation. The surface of the cryo fractured composite samples irradiated showed important visual changes which suggest a better fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion, due to irradiation treatment. These results showed that it is possible to get interesting property gains by using waste from renewable sources instead of the traditional ones and electron-beam radiation treatment. (author)

  17. Influência do processo de beneficiamento na qualidade de amêndoas de castanha-do-brasil Influence of Brazil nut processing on the quality of nuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Ferreira da Silva

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A castanha-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. é uma matéria-prima importante que constitui a base de subsistência para os povos da região Amazônica. Em razão do alto teor de lipídios insaturados, cerca de 60 a 70% torna-se altamente perecível. Inadequadas práticas de beneficiamento fazem com que o descascamento resulte alto índice de amêndoas quebradas ou danificadas. Neste trabalho objetivou-se fazer um comparativo das propriedades físico-químicas, teor de minerais, ácidos graxos e perfil de aminoácidos essenciais de amêndoas que sofreram danos mecânicos em comparação a amêndoas intactas, que foram beneficiadas, embaladas e armazenadas nas mesmas condições. O teor de minerais totais de amêndoas danificadas e intactas, armazenadas durante três meses à temperatura ambiente, não apresentaram diferenças significativas entre si. Entretanto, resultou em perdas significativas de ácidos graxos insaturados, como o oléico e o linoléico, além de aminoácidos essenciais, principalmente a lisina. Isso pode implicar na redução do valor biológico da castanha, principalmente na sua qualidade sensorial.Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. is an important raw material. It constitutes a basic stable of the population living in the Amazon region. Due to high unsaturated lipid content, around 60 to 70% is highly perishable. Moreover, inadequate processing practices result in high broken or damaged nuts. The objective this work was to make a comparative study of the physicochemical properties, mineral contents, lipids, and essential amino acid profiles between intact and highly damaged Brazil nut. All samples were stored in the same conditions. Samples were stored during three months at room temperature.The mineral profile of both samples did not show significant variation in total contents. It resulted, however, in significant loss of unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic and linoleic acid, besides essential amino acid

  18. Brazil nuts: an effective way to improve selenium status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Christine D; Chisholm, Alexandra; McLachlan, Sarah K; Campbell, Jennifer M

    2008-02-01

    Brazil nuts provide a rich natural source of selenium, yet no studies have investigated the bioavailability of selenium in humans. We investigated the efficacy of Brazil nuts in increasing selenium status in comparison with selenomethionine. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 59 New Zealand adults. Participants consumed 2 Brazil nuts thought to provide approximately 100 mug Se, 100 mug Se as selenomethionine, or placebo daily for 12 wk. Actual intake from nuts averaged 53 mug Se/d (possible range: 20-84 mug Se). Plasma selenium and plasma and whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were measured at baseline and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 wk, and effects of treatments were compared. Plasma selenium increased by 64.2%, 61.0%, and 7.6%; plasma GPx by 8.3%, 3.4%, and -1.2%; and whole blood GPx by 13.2%, 5.3%, and 1.9% in the Brazil nut, selenomethionine, and placebo groups, respectively. Change over time at 12 wk in plasma selenium (P nut (P nut group than in the placebo (P = 0.002) and selenomethionine (P = 0.032) groups. Consumption of 2 Brazil nuts daily is as effective for increasing selenium status and enhancing GPx activity as 100 mug Se as selenomethionine. Inclusion of this high-selenium food in the diet could avoid the need for fortification or supplements to improve the selenium status of New Zealanders.

  19. NTFP harvesters as citizen scientists: Validating traditional and crowdsourced knowledge on seed production of Brazil nut trees in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evert Thomas

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors that underlie the production of non-timber forest products (NTFPs, as well as regularly monitoring production levels, are key to allow sustainability assessments of NTFP extractive economies. Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, Lecythidaceae seed harvesting from natural forests is one of the cornerstone NTFP economies in Amazonia. In the Peruvian Amazon it is organized in a concession system. Drawing on seed production estimates of >135,000 individual Brazil nut trees from >400 concessions and ethno-ecological interviews with >80 concession holders, here we aimed to (i assess the accuracy of seed production estimates by Brazil nut seed harvesters, and (ii validate their traditional ecological knowledge (TEK about the variables that influence Brazil nut production. We compared productivity estimates with actual field measurements carried out in the study area and found a positive correlation between them. Furthermore, we compared the relationships between seed production and a number of phenotypic, phytosanitary and environmental variables described in literature with those obtained for the seed production estimates and found high consistency between them, justifying the use of the dataset for validating TEK and innovative hypothesis testing. As expected, nearly all TEK on Brazil nut productivity was corroborated by our data. This is reassuring as Brazil nut concession holders, and NTFP harvesters at large, rely on their knowledge to guide the management of the trees upon which their extractive economies are based. Our findings suggest that productivity estimates of Brazil nut trees and possibly other NTFP-producing species could replace or complement actual measurements, which are very expensive and labour intensive, at least in areas where harvesters have a tradition of collecting NTFPs from the same trees over multiple years or decades. Productivity estimates might even be sourced from harvesters through registers on an

  20. NTFP harvesters as citizen scientists: Validating traditional and crowdsourced knowledge on seed production of Brazil nut trees in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evert; Valdivia, Jheyson; Alcázar Caicedo, Carolina; Quaedvlieg, Julia; Wadt, Lucia Helena O; Corvera, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the factors that underlie the production of non-timber forest products (NTFPs), as well as regularly monitoring production levels, are key to allow sustainability assessments of NTFP extractive economies. Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, Lecythidaceae) seed harvesting from natural forests is one of the cornerstone NTFP economies in Amazonia. In the Peruvian Amazon it is organized in a concession system. Drawing on seed production estimates of >135,000 individual Brazil nut trees from >400 concessions and ethno-ecological interviews with >80 concession holders, here we aimed to (i) assess the accuracy of seed production estimates by Brazil nut seed harvesters, and (ii) validate their traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) about the variables that influence Brazil nut production. We compared productivity estimates with actual field measurements carried out in the study area and found a positive correlation between them. Furthermore, we compared the relationships between seed production and a number of phenotypic, phytosanitary and environmental variables described in literature with those obtained for the seed production estimates and found high consistency between them, justifying the use of the dataset for validating TEK and innovative hypothesis testing. As expected, nearly all TEK on Brazil nut productivity was corroborated by our data. This is reassuring as Brazil nut concession holders, and NTFP harvesters at large, rely on their knowledge to guide the management of the trees upon which their extractive economies are based. Our findings suggest that productivity estimates of Brazil nut trees and possibly other NTFP-producing species could replace or complement actual measurements, which are very expensive and labour intensive, at least in areas where harvesters have a tradition of collecting NTFPs from the same trees over multiple years or decades. Productivity estimates might even be sourced from harvesters through registers on an annual basis

  1. Brazil nuts intake improves lipid profile, oxidative stress and microvascular function in obese adolescents: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koury Josely C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a chronic disease associated to an inflammatory process resulting in oxidative stress that leads to morpho-functional microvascular damage that could be improved by some dietary interventions. In this study, the intake of Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa, composed of bioactive substances like selenium, α- e γ- tocopherol, folate and polyunsaturated fatty acids, have been investigated on antioxidant capacity, lipid and metabolic profiles and nutritive skin microcirculation in obese adolescents. Methods Obese female adolescents (n = 17, 15.4 ± 2.0 years and BMI of 35.6 ± 3.3 kg/m2, were randomized 1:1 in two groups with the diet supplemented either with Brazil nuts [BNG, n = 08, 15-25 g/day (equivalent to 3 to 5 units/day] or placebo [PG (lactose, n = 09, one capsule/day] and followed for 16 weeks. Anthropometry, metabolic-lipid profiles, oxidative stress and morphological (capillary diameters and functional [functional capillary density, red blood cell velocity (RBCV at baseline and peak (RBCVmax and time (TRBCVmax to reach it during post-occlusive reactive hyperemia, after 1 min arterial occlusion] microvascular variables were assessed by nailfold videocapillaroscopy at baseline (T0 and after intervention (T1. Results T0 characteristics were similar between groups. At T1, BNG (intra-group variation had increased selenium levels (p = 0.02, RBCV (p = 0.03 and RBCVmax (p = 0.03 and reduced total (TC (p = 0.02 and LDL-cholesterol (p = 0.02. Compared to PG, Brazil nuts intake reduced TC (p = 0.003, triglycerides (p = 0.05 and LDL-ox (p = 0.02 and increased RBCV (p = 0.03. Conclusion Brazil nuts intake improved the lipid profile and microvascular function in obese adolescents, possibly due to its high level of unsaturated fatty acids and bioactive substances. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT00937599

  2. Concentrations of Se, Ba, Zn and Mn in Brazil nuts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armelin, Maria José A.; Maihara, Vera A.; Cardoso, Paulo S.; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cozollino, Silvia M.F., E-mail: marmelin@ipen.br, E-mail: vmaihara@ipen.br, E-mail: msaiki@ipen.br, E-mail: pscsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: smfcozzo@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas

    2017-07-01

    The concentrations of Se, Ba, Zn and Mn were determined in samples of Brazil nuts collected in two ways: a) in a production farm predominantly for export and, b) in various points of sale from different regions of Brazil. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was the analytical technique used in this study. Results indicate that the concentrations of Se and Ba varied greatly among the Brazil nut samples analyzed. This large variability may be related to the soil characteristics from which the nuts were produced. An inverse correlation was observed between the concentrations of Se and Ba. On the other hand, the concentrations of Zn and Mn did not show significant differences among these samples. (author)

  3. BIOMASSA, CRESCIMENTO E RESPOSTAS ECOFISIOLÓGICAS DE PLANTAS JOVENS DE Bertholletia excelsa BONPL. SUBMETIDAS A DIFERENTES NÍVEIS DE IRRADIÂNCIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Santos do Carmo Ribeiro de Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil nut ( Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl. is a light-demanding species, because in natural forest, the species depending of formation of clearings for reach reproduction size and in forest plantation, showing fast initial growth when exposed to high levels of irradiance. However, the ecophysiological traits of this species under contrasting conditions of irradiance were not investigated. In this study, in addition to growth traits, we investigated for first time the degree of plasticity of ecophysiological response of Bertholletia excelsa when subjected to contrasting irradiance environments. Young plants of Bertholletia excelsa were cultivated under three conditions of irradiance: low (20-300 μmol m -2 s -1 , moderate (800-1000 μmol m -2 s -1 and high (1900-2100 μmol m -2 s -1 . We analyzed the growth traits, gas exchange, chloroplastid pigment contents and, the end of experiment, the accumulation and partitioning of biomass. Young plants of Bertholletia excelsa showed the highest values of biomass, growth and photosynthesis when exposed to environments of moderate and high irradiance. Low irradiance condition stimulated more biomass partitioning for shoot and chloroplastid pigment contents. Bertholletia excelsa showed physiological plasticity under contrasting conditions of irradiance, the largest growth and biomass accumulation in environments of moderate and high irradiance were promoted by better photosynthetic performance, whereas the positive carbon balance under low irradiance is ensured by investment in structures of interception and energy harvesting.

  4. Effect of Brazil nut supplementation on the blood levels of selenium and glutathione peroxidase in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockler-Pinto, M B; Mafra, D; Farage, N E; Boaventura, G T; Cozzolino, S M F

    2010-01-01

    In patients who have undergone hemodialysis, large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced and, at higher concentrations, ROS are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. It has been proposed that selenium (Se) may exert an antiatherogenic influence by reducing oxidative stress. The richest known food source of selenium is the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, family Lecythidaceae), found in the Amazon region. We evaluated the effect of Brazil nut supplementation on blood levels of Se and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in patients on hemodialysis. A total of 81 patients on hemodialysis (52.0±15.2 y old, average time on dialysis 82.3±91.4 mo, body mass index 24.9±4.4 kg/m(2)) from the RenalCor and RenalVida Clinics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were studied. All patients received one nut (around 5 g, averaging 58.1 μg Se/g) a day for 3 mo. The Se concentrations in the nuts and in plasma and erythrocytes were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry with hydride generation (Hitachi, Z-500). GSH-Px levels were measured using Randox commercial kits. Plasma Se (18.8±17.4 μg/L) and erythrocyte (72.4±37.9 μg/L) levels were below the normal range before nut supplementation. After supplementation, the plasma level increased to 104.0±65.0 μg/L and erythrocytes to 244.1±119.5 μg/L (P<0.0001). The activity of GSH-Px also increased after supplementation, from 46.6±14.9 to 55.9±23.6 U/g of hemoglobin (P<0.0001). Before supplementation, 11% of patients had GSH-Px activity below the normal range (27.5-73.6 U/g of hemoglobin). After supplementation, all patients showed GSH-Px activity within the normal range. The data revealed that the investigated patients presented Se deficiency and that the consumption of only one Brazil nut a day (5 g) during 3 mo was effective to increase the Se concentration and GSH-Px activity in these patients, thus improving their antioxidant status. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc

  5. Effect of Brazil nut supplementation on plasma levels of selenium in hemodialysis patients: 12 months of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockler-Pinto, Milena B; Lobo, Julie; Moraes, Cristiane; Leal, Viviane O; Farage, Najla E; Rocha, Ariana V; Boaventura, Gilson T; Cozzolino, Silvia M F; Malm, Olaf; Mafra, Denise

    2012-07-01

    Large amounts of reactive oxygen species are produced in hemodialysis (HD) patients, and, at higher concentrations, reactive oxygen species are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. It has been proposed that selenium (Se) may exert an antiatherogenic influence by reducing oxidative stress. The richest known food source of Se is the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, family Lecythidaceae), found in the Amazon region. The objective of this work was to determine if Se plasma levels in HD patients submitted to a program of supplementation during 3 months with 1 Brazil nut by day could be sustained after 12 months. A total of 21 HD patients (54.2 ± 15.2 years old; average time on dialysis, 82.3 ± 51.6 months; body mass index, 24.4 ± 3.8 kg/m(2)) from the RenalCor Clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were followed up 12 months after the supplementation study ended. The Se plasma levels were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry with hydride generation. The Se Plasma levels (17.3 ± 19.9 μg/L) were below the normal range (60 to 120 μg/L) before nut supplementation, and after 3 months of supplementation, the levels increased to 106.8 ± 50.3 μg/L (P nutritional status. Se levels 12 months after the supplementation period were not as low as presupplementation levels but yet significantly lower, and we needed to motivate patients to adopt different dietary intake patterns. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodiversity of mycobiota throughout the Brazil nut supply chain: From rainforest to consumer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniwaki, Marta H.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Ferranti, Larissa S.

    2017-01-01

    A total of 172 Brazil nut samples (114 in shell and 58 shelled) from the Amazon rainforest region and São Paulo state, Brazil was collected at different stages of the Brazil nut production chain: rainforest, street markets, processing plants and supermarkets. The mycobiota of the Brazil nut samples...... of mycotoxin production from rainforest to consumer, considering the different environments which exist until the nuts are consumed....

  7. Anthropogenic landscape in southeastern Amazonia: contemporary impacts of low-intensity harvesting and dispersal of Brazil nuts by the Kayapó Indigenous people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatriz N Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Brazil nut, the Bertholletia excelsa seed, is one of the most important non-timber forest products in the Amazon Forest and the livelihoods of thousands of traditional Amazonian families depend on its commercialization. B. excelsa has been frequently cited as an indicator of anthropogenic forests and there is strong evidence that past human management has significantly contributed to its present distribution across the Amazon, suggesting that low levels of harvesting may play a positive role in B. excelsa recruitment. Here, we evaluate the effects of Brazil nut harvesting by the Kayapó Indigenous people of southeastern Amazonia on seedling recruitment in 20 B. excelsa groves subjected to different harvesting intensities, and investigated if management by harvesters influences patterns of B. excelsa distribution. The number of years of low-intensity Brazil nut harvesting by the Kayapó over the past two decades was positively related to B. excelsa seedling density in groves. One of the mechanisms behind the higher seedling density in harvested sites seems to be seed dispersal by harvesters along trails. The Kayapó also intentionally plant B. excelsa seeds and seedlings across their territories. Our results show not only that low-intensity Brazil nut harvesting by the Kayapó people does not reduce recruitment of seedlings, but that harvesting and/or associated activities conducted by traditional harvesters may benefit B. excelsa beyond grove borders. Our study supports the hypothesis that B. excelsa dispersal throughout the Amazon was, at least in part, influenced by indigenous groups, and strongly suggests that current human management contributes to the maintenance and formation of B. excelsa groves. We suggest that changes in Brazil nut management practices by traditional people to prevent harvesting impacts may be unnecessary and even counterproductive in many areas, and should be carefully evaluated before implementation.

  8. Anthropogenic Landscape in Southeastern Amazonia: Contemporary Impacts of Low-Intensity Harvesting and Dispersal of Brazil Nuts by the Kayapó Indigenous People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Maria Beatriz N.; Jerozolimski, Adriano; de Robert, Pascale; Salles, Nilson V.; Kayapó, Biribiri; Pimentel, Tania P.; Magnusson, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Brazil nut, the Bertholletia excelsa seed, is one of the most important non-timber forest products in the Amazon Forest and the livelihoods of thousands of traditional Amazonian families depend on its commercialization. B. excelsa has been frequently cited as an indicator of anthropogenic forests and there is strong evidence that past human management has significantly contributed to its present distribution across the Amazon, suggesting that low levels of harvesting may play a positive role in B. excelsa recruitment. Here, we evaluate the effects of Brazil nut harvesting by the Kayapó Indigenous people of southeastern Amazonia on seedling recruitment in 20 B. excelsa groves subjected to different harvesting intensities, and investigated if management by harvesters influences patterns of B. excelsa distribution. The number of years of low-intensity Brazil nut harvesting by the Kayapó over the past two decades was positively related to B. excelsa seedling density in groves. One of the mechanisms behind the higher seedling density in harvested sites seems to be seed dispersal by harvesters along trails. The Kayapó also intentionally plant B. excelsa seeds and seedlings across their territories. Our results show not only that low-intensity Brazil nut harvesting by the Kayapó people does not reduce recruitment of seedlings, but that harvesting and/or associated activities conducted by traditional harvesters may benefit B. excelsa beyond grove borders. Our study supports the hypothesis that B. excelsa dispersal throughout the Amazon was, at least in part, influenced by indigenous groups, and strongly suggests that current human management contributes to the maintenance and formation of B. excelsa groves. We suggest that changes in Brazil nut management practices by traditional people to prevent harvesting impacts may be unnecessary and even counterproductive in many areas, and should be carefully evaluated before implementation. PMID:25029191

  9. Radium-224, 226 and 228 activity in Brazil nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrello, Avacir Casanova; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto; Martins, Maristela; Pacheco, Ariane Mendonca

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Recently, Brazil nuts have received a special attention because they contain large quantities of omega 6, antioxidant fat and selenium. Omega 6 and antioxidant fat prevent body cells inflammation and selenium combats cellular aging, guaranteeing a long and healthy life. One cashew per day is sufficient to assure the minimum amount of selenium necessary to the body. The aim of this work was to study radium (224, 226 and 228) concentration in Brazil nuts of the Amazon region. Thirty samples of different size (10 small, 10 medium and 10 large) exportation-type Brazil nuts, peeled and dehydrated, from the 2009 harvest, were analysed. Each sample, with 1.8 kg mass, was milled and then incinerated, resulting in 48 grams of ashes, that were placed in a 300 ml cylindrical recipient for gamma-ray spectrometry. Ra-224, Ra-226 and Ra-228 activities were determined using the gamma-rays of 234 keV following Pb-214 decay, 352 keV and 609 keV from Pb-212 and Bi-212, and the 911 keV from Ac-228, respectively. The incinerated samples average activities were 1100 Bq/kg for Ra-224, 4500 Bq/kg for Ra-226 and 3500 Bq/kg for Ra-228, corresponding to activities of 29.3 Bq/kg for Ra-224, 120 Bq/kg for Ra-226 and 93.9 Bq/kg for Ra-228 in raw Brazil nuts. (author)

  10. Consumers' ability to discriminate aflatoxin-contaminated Brazil nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklinder, I; Lindblad, M; Gidlund, A; Olsen, M

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the extent to which consumers can separate nuts with a high content of aflatoxin from sound nuts, and whether sorting results can be improved by information or whether they are affected by certain factors. A test panel consisting of 100 subjects was asked to crack 300 g Brazil nuts and to sort the nuts into those they considered edible and inedible. The test showed that consumers can, on current behaviour, discriminate aflatoxin-contaminated Brazil nuts to a significant extent. The median and the 95th percentile of the total concentrations of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, G2) in the samples before sorting were 1.4 and 557 microg kg(-1), respectively, and in the edible fractions after sorting 0.4 and 56 microg kg(-1), respectively. Given that levels of aflatoxins before sorting exceed either 2 microg aflatoxin B1 kg(-1) or totally 4 microg aflatoxins kg(-1), there was no effect of aflatoxin concentrations before sorting on the probability of exceeding these thresholds in the edible fraction. This means that similar sorting results were obtained for samples with aflatoxin levels exceeding either of the two thresholds, irrespective of if the thresholds were exceeded with a few microg kg(-1) or up to more than 1000 microg kg(-1). None of the tested factors (such as sex, age, level of education, ethnic background or knowledge of mycotoxins) had any effects on the probability of exceeding either of the two aflatoxin thresholds.

  11. High hair selenium mother to fetus transfer after the Brazil nuts consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momčilović, B; Prejac, J; Višnjević, V; Brundić, S; Skalny, A A; Mimica, N

    2016-01-01

    Lactating mother and her two month old healthy daughter (APGAR 10) gave their scalp hair for a multielement profile analysis; 25 elements were analyzed with the ICP MS. Mother's hair was divided into 5cm long segment proximal to the scull (Young), and the distal segment further up to the hair tip (Old). One centimeter of hair records one month of the metabolic activity of the bioelements in the body. Mother's Young hair and daughters hair have 2.70 and 9.74μgg(-1)Se, a distinctly higher Se concentrations than the Old hair of 0.87μgg(-1). The adequate hair Se concentrations in Croatia women population vary from 0.08 to 0.63μgg(-1); values below or above that range indicate deficiency or excess, respectively. Dietary recall revealed that during the last trimester of pregnancy and over a period of a week, the mother has consumed 135g of Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) (BN); BN is an exceptionally rich Se dietary source. The amount of Se in BN varies and one week consumption of 135g of BN may result in Se daily intake of 367 to 492μgg(-1)day(-1) over a period of seven consecutive days, and what is about or exceeds the Upper Limit of daily selenium intake of 400μg(-1)g(-1). The excessively high infant hair Se mirrored a natural high mother to fetus transplacental transfer of bio elements in the last trimester of pregnancy. The potential toxicological risks of such a high Se transfer remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Ingestive behavior of sheep fed Brazil nut cake in the diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Fernanda Oliveira Ramos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the ingestive behavior of sheep when fed a corn-silage-based diet with varying levels (0%, 15%, 30%, and 60% of Brazil nut cake (NC (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl.. Sixteen mongrel sheep with an average weight of 33 ± 6.04 kg were randomly distributed between four treatments. Data were tested for assumptions of normality, subjected to an analysis of variance, and adjusted in regression equations and by Williams’ test, to estimate the W point. The voluntary intake of dry matter (DM and insoluble neutral detergent fiber (NDF decreased linearly (P = 0.013 and P = 0.002 by 5.0 g and 2.41 g d-1, respectively, for every 1% of NC added to the diet. The time the animals spent feeding (288.75 min d-1 was not significantly affected; time spent idle increased linearly (P= 0.0002 by 3.10 min, and time spent during rumination decreased linearly by 2.62 min (P = 0.001 for each 1% addition of the co-product. The number of ruminated boluses (NRB displayed a decreasing effect (P = 0.004 of 4.61 d-1 for each 1% of NC. For ruminating chews, the time spent per bolus (37.5 sec and the number per bolus (56.14 did not differ (P > 0.05 between treatments. However, the total chewing time (TCT decreased linearly (P = 0.002 by 0.05 h d-1 and the number of chews per day displayed a quadratic effect (P = 0.008, with a maximum value estimated at 17.5% of NC in the diet. Rumination efficiency did not differ between the treatments (101.95 g DM h-1 and 36.76 g NDF h-1. The feeding efficiency (FE had a linear reduction (P = 0.045 of 0.42 g NDF h-1, but was similar for g DM h-1 (172.5. The daily intake of DM and NDF showed W points estimated at 51.96% and 30.67% NC, respectively. The variables NRB, TCT, and FE (g NDF h-1 had W points estimated at 56.64%, 56.19%, and 56.33% NC, respectively. The Brazil nut cake, when present at levels greater than 56% of the diet’s DM, affects the ingestive behavior of the animals, particularly rumination-related variables

  13. Fermentation kinetics and ruminal parameters of animals fed diets containing Brazil nut cake inclusion levels

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    Juliana Cristina de Castro Budel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion effect of 0 (control, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 100% dry matter (DM of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl. cake (BNC aiming at replacing corn silage was assessed on fermentation kinetics and effective degradability (ED by means of in vitro gas production at 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. A randomized block design was used with six treatments, three blocks, and two replications per block. France’s model was fit to the data. An in vivo experiment, conducted in fistulated ovine, assessed the effects of BNC inclusion levels of 0, 15, 30, and 45% DM replacing corn silage on ruminal parameters. Ruminal fluid samples were collected postprandial at 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 h for determining the concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA, pH, and N–NH3. A completely randomized design with repeated measures in time was used, with four treatments and three replications. Results of acetate, propionate, butyrate, acetate to propionate ratio, pH, and NH3 were submitted to analysis of variance and regression (linear and quadratic considering treatment, time and interaction of both. In addition, the F test with a 5% (P 0.40, acetic acid (P > 0.41, propionic acid (P > 0.85, butyric acid (P > 0.62 and pH (P > 0.57. BNC replacements of 0, 15, 30 and 45% did not change (P > 0.05 total SCFA concentration, as well as acetic acid concentration in ovine. When including 45% DM of BNC, concentrations (mMol/100 mL of propionic (P < 0.001 and butyric (P < 0.022 acids was reduced in the ruminal fluid. The highest concentrations at measurement times were observed 4 hours after feeding. The pH values presented a quadratic effect on both inclusion (P < 0.001 and time (P < 0.001. An interaction was observed between treatment and time for N–NH3 concentration (mg/ml (P < 0.001 and acetic to propionic acids ratio (P < 0.014. Fermentation kinetics was negatively affected by Brazil nut cake inclusion to corn silage-based diet. Therefore, the use of this

  14. Quality of Brazil nuts stored in forced aeration silos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Aquino da Costa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The traditional system of collection and storage of Brazil nut compromises seriously the quality of these almonds as it contributes to the high incidence of contaminants, like fungi of the genus Aspergillus, which can produce aflatoxins. In this study, the objective was to evaluate the influence of the storage period in studied conditions, on the physicochemical characteristics and on the microbiological contamination of Brazil nuts. The experimental was designed as completely randomized, considering as treatments the storage period (0 - control, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days with four replicates of 3 kg of Brazil nuts each. The samples were submitted to physicochemical and microbiological analysis. It was observed that almonds submitted to the storage had their moisture content reduced by 78.2% at 150 days of storage, however, this reduction was not fast enough to avoid surface contamination by filamentous and potentially aflatoxins producing fungi. The critical period of contamination occurred on the first 30 days of storage when there was an increase of the studied fungi, as well as B1 and total aflatoxin. The studied storage conditions were four times more effective in reducing the product moisture content than the traditional methods, however, pre-drying is necessary to avoid contamination of the product.

  15. Soy and Brazil nut beverage: processing, composition, sensory, and color evaluation Bebida de soja e castanha do Brasil: processamento, composição, avaliação sensorial e de cor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Felberg

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high nutritional value, soymilk consumption in Western countries is limited mainly due to undesirable flavors developed during the traditional elaboration process. Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa has pleasant flavor and recognized nutritional value. Thus, the aim of this work was to elaborate a soy and Brazil nut beverage exploring the use of two national products of high nutritional quality. The process for manufacturing a soy and Brazil nut beverage consisted of elaboration, formulation, and homogenization of soymilk and Brazil nut milk. The addition of five levels (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50% of Brazil nut milk to soy beverages was investigated. Although no significant differences in consumer average preference (p > 0.05 were observed among the beverages, analyzing both the consumer preference frequency distribution of the products and the Internal Preference Mapping (IPM, it was possible to conclude that the beverage with 30% of Brazil nut milk reached the most adequate performance demonstrating the sensory benefits Brazil nuts brought to the product. Regarding proximate composition, it did not present a better performance in terms of nutritional value, except for the oil content. The soy and Brazil nut beverage presented visual stability and no phase separation despite the non-stability shown by Brazil nut beverage itself. When Brazil nut milk was added to soy beverage, the final product became whiter than soy beverage, which is appealing to consumers who normally search for a clearer soymilk. The soy and Brazil nut beverage processing can be considered an alternative to increase the use of Brazil nuts in the Brazilian diet.Apesar do alto valor nutricional do extrato de soja, seu consumo nos países do ocidente ainda é limitado principalmente devido às características sensoriais desagradáveis resultantes do seu tradicional processo de obtenção. A castanha do Brasil (Bertholletia excelsa apresenta sabor agradável e

  16. Fatty acids profile of pulp and nuts of Brazilian fruits

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    Paulo Afonso da Costa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fruits and nuts from the North and Northeast regions of Brazil were collected to determine the fatty acid profile of their oils. The species studied were Brazil (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K., Mucajá (Couma rigida M., Inajá (Maximiliana maripa D., Jenipapo (Genipa Americana L., and Buriti (Mauritia flexuosa L. nuts. Fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID. Brazil nut major fatty acid was 18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid, and Buriti nut had approximately 23 times more 18:3n-3 than the pulp. Mucajá nut presented high content of 12:0 (lauric acid and 16:0 (palmitic acid, and Mucajá pulp showed significant levels of 18:2n-6 (linoleic acid. Considering the PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acid sum values, almost all fruits and nuts analyzed presented very high levels of these compounds. Regarding n-6/n-3 ratio, only Brazil Nut, Buriti Nut, Inajá pulp, and Jenipapo pulp corresponded to the desired profile. These Brazilian fruits and nuts could be of potential interest due to their high nutritive value and lipid content.

  17. Characteristics of in-shell Brazil nuts and their relationship to aflatoxin contamination: criteria for sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mello, Fernanda Robert; Scussel, Vildes Maria

    2007-10-31

    External characteristics of in-shell Brazil nuts were evaluated for dimensions (length and face width), weight, chromaticity, and shell thickness. The internal characteristics evaluated were moisture content (mc), aflatoxin contamination (analyzed by LC-MS/MS), and shell/nut ratio. According to their length, Brazil nuts were classified in three groups: I, II, and III, corresponding to large, medium, and small sizes, respectively. It was possible to establish the following parameters as standards for normal/healthy nuts: length (53.2, 43.9, and 36.6 mm), weight (12.9, 8.8, and 6.3 g), and shell chromaticity components (L*, 38.3, 39.5, and 41.6; a*, 8.0, 7.9, and 7.8; and b*, 17.6, 18.0, and 18.7), for the three groups, respectively. The mean of shell thicknesses were 1.92 and 2.68 mm taken from each face and nut top. The nuts, classified as small (Group III), presented aflatoxin B1 contamination at a level of 5.62 microg/kg. The Groups shell/nut ratios were 1.2, 1.2, and 1.3 for normal whole and healthy nuts. No aflatoxin was detected in Groups I and II. The data obtained from the Brazil nut measured characteristics can help to distinguish healthy/safe and deteriorated nuts and will be useful for Brazil nut sorting and machine development.

  18. Microbiological and aflatoxin evaluation of Brazil nut pods and the effects of unit processing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrus, Katia; Blank, Greg; Clear, Randall; Holley, Richard A; Abramson, David

    2005-05-01

    Harvesting of Brazil nuts not only helps to preserve the Amazon rainforest but also provides income to individuals who would otherwise have little means of making a livelihood. Recently, the European Community has tightened the quality requirements for Brazil nuts, particularly with regard to aflatoxin levels and microbiological contamination. The objectives of this research were to gain a better understanding of the origin of aflatoxins on Brazil nuts and to microbiologically evaluate some of the operations involved in processing. In this regard, five Brazil nut pods were aseptically picked from trees located in each of three concessions of the Peruvian Amazon rainforest (Madre de Dios province). The exteriors of the pods and the nuts were examined for yeast and molds, including Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, and for bacteria, including Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Brazil nuts obtained from various commercial process operations located in Peru were similarly evaluated. Exteriors of all Brazil nut pods did not contain A. parasiticus, and only pods from one concession yielded A. flavus isolates. All isolates tested were aflatoxigenic (630 to 915 ppb total aflatoxin). Coliforms, E. coli, and salmonellae were not recovered from any of the pods. Whole, in-shell nuts obtained after opening the pods yielded no A. flavus or A. parasiticus. Aflatoxins were not detected (detection limit 1.75 ppb) in any of the nuts. Whole, in-shell and shelled nuts from various process operations were all positive for A. flavus but negative for E. coli and salmonellae. Soaking of whole, in-shell nuts before cracking or shelling increased coliform numbers, whereas levels of A. flavus decreased. In order to gain a better understanding of the sanitary performance of the unit process operations, additional evaluations should be conducted on product lots processed on different days. Also, the microbiology of product processed from common lots should be followed through the

  19. Brazil nut harvesting in Peruvian Amazonia from the perspective of ecosystem services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risto Kalliola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil nuts are harvested from the primary rainforests in the Amazonian lowlands as a direct form of sustainably using the region’s biological resources. We analyze the ecological economics of Brazil nut production in the Peruvian region of Madre de Dios where nut extraction occurs on hundreds of small-holder concessions operating under long-term agreements. This activity sustains locally important economies that suffer from small volumes and high seasonality. The size and the remoteness of the NTFP concession determine much of its profitability to concessionaires. Seasonality of the harvest generates short-term income peaks for the majority of collectors. The fragility of the Brazil nut economy in the region is compounded by volatile market prices and the overall development pressures in Amazonia, which usually involve deforestation. Although the current regulatory mechanisms in Peru encourage long-term Brazil nut production in concessions, the income level is seldom high enough to help concession-owners to rise from poverty. Auxiliary financial support based on compensations for the non-valued ecosystem services provided by the forest-covered Brazil nut concessions could change the picture. Funds for these could come from international instruments like those of carbon emission control or debt for nature swaps. Green marketing could be developed to consider payments supporting ecosystem values as well as mechanisms supporting indigenous communities working with Brazil nuts. Appropriate indicators are needed to optimize those management, policy and trading conditions that best help to preserve the invaluable ecosystem functions and services.

  20. Microfocus X-ray imaging of Brazil nuts for quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Kazuyo Kobayashi Dias Franco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive quality assessment of food prior to processing is desirable in commercial facilities due to its non-invasive nature, for economic reasons and for its safety appeals. Grading Brazil nuts in this way allows for the separation of undesirable nuts to avoid contamination during the automatic nut-shelling process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of X-ray phase contrast enhanced imaging in assessing nut quality. For this goal, details of the imaging technique are described and phase contrast X-ray and microtomography imaging of nut samples are investigated. Both high quality (i.e. “sound” nuts as well as treated nuts were examined. It was concluded that both the X-ray imaging and tomography techniques have the potential to discriminate morphological features of the nut and to identify “sound” kernels from atypical ones. Larger nuts and nuts with a larger gap area between shell and kernel were concluded to have more atypical formations. Both techniques also seemed promising for use in automatic sorting lines. However, by using microtomography, the visualization of finer formations not noticeable in the X-ray images was possible. Further studies shall be carried out to investigate the nature of these formations, how they affect nut quality and their evolution with storage time.

  1. Microfocus X-ray imaging of Brazil nuts for quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Margareth Kazuyo Kobayashi Dias, E-mail: mkfranco@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Yokaichiya, Fabiano, E-mail: fabiano.yokaichiya@helmholtz-berlin.de [Department Quantum Phenomena in Novel Materials, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlim für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kardjilov, Nikolay, E-mail: kardjilov@helmholtz-berlim.de [Institut Angewandte Materialforschung, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlim für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Ferraz, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira, E-mail: carlos@feagri.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Agricola

    2015-07-15

    Non-destructive quality assessment of food prior to processing is desirable in commercial facilities due to its non-invasive nature, for economic reasons and for its safety appeals. Grading Brazil nuts in this way allows for the separation of undesirable nuts to avoid contamination during the automatic nut shelling process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of X-ray phase contrast enhanced imaging in assessing nut quality. For this goal, details of the imaging technique are described and phase contrast X-ray and microtomography imaging of nut samples are investigated. Both high quality (i.e. 'sound' nuts as well as treated nuts were examined. It was concluded that both the X-ray imaging and tomography techniques have the potential to discriminate morphological features of the nut and to identify 'sound' kernels from atypical ones. Larger nuts and nuts with a larger gap area between shell and kernel were concluded to have more atypical formations. Both techniques also seemed promising for use in automatic sorting lines. However, by using microtomography, the visualization of finer formations not noticeable in the X-ray images was possible. Further studies shall be carried out to investigate the nature of these formations, how they affect nut quality and their evolution with storage time. (author)

  2. Determination of aflatoxin risk components for in-shell Brazil nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, E A; dos Santos, E A; Whitaker, T B; Slate, A B

    2011-09-01

    A study was conducted on the risk from aflatoxins associated with the kernels and shells of Brazil nuts. Samples were collected from processing plants in Amazonia, Brazil. A total of 54 test samples (40 kg) were taken from 13 in-shell Brazil nut lots ready for market. Each in-shell sample was shelled and the kernels and shells were sorted in five fractions: good kernels, rotten kernels, good shells with kernel residue, good shells without kernel residue, and rotten shells, and analysed for aflatoxins. The kernel:shell ratio mass (w/w) was 50.2/49.8%. The Brazil nut shell was found to be contaminated with aflatoxin. Rotten nuts were found to be a high-risk fraction for aflatoxin in in-shell Brazil nut lots. Rotten nuts contributed only 4.2% of the sample mass (kg), but contributed 76.6% of the total aflatoxin mass (µg) in the in-shell test sample. The highest correlations were found between the aflatoxin concentration in in-shell Brazil nuts samples and the aflatoxin concentration in all defective fractions (R(2)=0.97). The aflatoxin mass of all defective fractions (R(2)=0.90) as well as that of the rotten nut (R(2)=0.88) were also strongly correlated with the aflatoxin concentration of the in-shell test samples. Process factors of 0.17, 0.16 and 0.24 were respectively calculated to estimate the aflatoxin concentration in the good kernels (edible) and good nuts by measuring the aflatoxin concentration in the in-shell test sample and in all kernels, respectively. © 2011 Taylor & Francis

  3. Processamentos de amêndoa e torta de castanha-do-Brasil e farinha de mandioca: parâmetros de qualidade Processing of Brazil nut and meal and cassava flour: quality parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luzenira de Souza

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A castanha-do-Brasil (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. e mandioca (Manihot esculenta Crantz são matérias-primas importantes que constituem a base de subsistência para os povos da região Amazônica. Devido à falta de incentivo às suas utilizações pela indústria de alimentos no mercado interno, buscou-se processar a castanha-do-Brasil para obtenção de amêndoa e torta, e de mandioca para obtenção de farinha, objetivando identificar parâmetros de qualidade que justificassem e incentivassem o apelo aos seus aproveitamentos. Os resultados mostraram que a negatividade de aflatoxinas na amêndoa e torta apontaram a alta qualidade do lote da castanha-do-Brasil em relação a segurança alimentar. Os teores encontrados de selênio 2,04mg/kg na amêndoa e 7,13mg/kg na torta, os percentuais de fibra alimentar de 8,02 na amêndoa, de 15,72 na torta e de 5,68 na farinha, proteína bruta de 40,23% na torta e carboidratos 79,33% na farinha, permitiram caracterizar o produto a base de castanha como protéico, rico em selênio e fibras; e o de mandioca como rico em carboidratos e fibras. A proteína bruta da amêndoa é completa, rica em aminoácidos sulfurados, estando uns aminoácidos em quantidades superiores e outros equivalentes aos do padrão da FAO, podendo a castanha e derivados - devido a estes aminoácidos, ao selênio e fibras - serem considerados um apelo ao seu consumo, pelas funções de grande relevância que desempenham à manutenção da saúde do ser humano.Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. and cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz are important raw materials, which constitute the basis of subsistence for those who live in the Amazon region. Due to a total lack of incentive for their use by the national food industry, this study aimed at processing Brazil nuts to obtain the nuts and the meal and at processing cassava to obtain the flour, studying the quality parameters which could justify and encourage their use. The absence of

  4. Scaling behavior in the convection-driven Brazil nut effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejmady, Prakhyat; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Dhar, Abhishek

    2012-11-01

    The Brazil nut effect is the phenomenon in which a large intruder particle immersed in a vertically shaken bed of smaller particles rises to the top, even when it is much denser. The usual practice while describing these experiments has been to use the dimensionless acceleration Γ=aω2/g, where a and ω are, respectively, the amplitude and the angular frequency of vibration and g is the acceleration due to gravity. Considering a vibrated quasi-two-dimensional bed of mustard seeds, we show here that the peak-to-peak velocity of shaking v=aω, rather than Γ, is the relevant parameter in the regime where boundary-driven granular convection is the main driving mechanism. We find that the rise time τ of an intruder is described by the scaling law τ˜(v-vc)-α, where vc is identified as the critical vibration velocity for the onset of convective motion of the mustard seeds. This scaling form holds over a wide range of (a,ω), diameter, and density of the intruder.

  5. Critical points of Brazil nuts: a beginning for food safety, quality control and Amazon sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Andriele M; Gonçalves, Evonnildo C; Andrade, Soraya S; Barbosa, Maria S R; Barroso, Karla F P; de Sousa, Mayara B; Borges, Larissa; Vieira, Jozé L F; Teixeira, Francisco M

    2013-03-15

    One difficulty of self-sustainability is the quality assurance of native products. This research was designed to study the risks and critical control points in the collection, handling and marketing of Brazil nuts from native forests and urban fairs in the Brazilian Amazon by characterisation of morphological aspects of fungi and posterior identification by molecular biology and determination of aflatoxins by high-performance liquid chromatography. Several corrective actions to improve product quality were found to be necessary in both sites. Growth of fungi was observed in 95% of fragments of Brazil nuts from both sites during the between-harvest period. Aflatoxin levels indicated that, although fungal growth was observed in both sites, only Brazil nuts from the native forest showed a high risk to human health (total aflatoxin level of 471.69 µg kg(-1)). This study has shown the main issues related to the process design of Brazil nuts, supporting the necessity for research on new strategies to improve the quality of nuts. Also, the habit of eating Brazil nuts stored throughout the year may represent a risk to farmers. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Contribution of Brazil nut shell fiber and electron-beam irradiation in thermomechanical properties of HDPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polato, Pamella; Lorusso, Leandro Alex; Souza, Clecia de Moura; Moura, Esperidiana Augusta Barretos de; Chinellato, Anne; Rosa, Ricardo de

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, the influence of electron-beam irradiation on thermo-mechanical properties of HDPE and HDPE/Brazil nut shell fiber composite was investigated. The materials were irradiated at radiation dose 50 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. The irradiated and non-irradiated samples were submitted to thermo-mechanical tests and the correlation between their properties was discussed. The results showed that the incorporation of Brazil nut shell fiber represented a significant gain (p < 0,05) in tensile strength at break, flexural strength, flexural module, Vicat softening temperature and heat distortion temperature (HDT) properties of the HDPE. In addition, the irradiated HDPE/Brazil nut shell fiber composite presented a significant increase (p < 0.05) in this properties compared with irradiated HDPE. (author)

  7. Tracing fungi secondary metabolites in Brazil nuts using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas-Silva, Otniel; de Lourdes, Maria; de Souza, Mendes; Venãncio, Armando

    2011-08-01

    This screening aimed to evaluate quantitatively the occurrence of fungal metabolites in Brazil nuts. Nuts were collected from Agroforest production areas in Amazon basin region. A total of 235 mycotoxins (including the most prominent ones) was screened by a multi-mycotoxin method based on HPLC-MS/MS. The recovery of metabolites by the method was between 56 and 136%. Fifteen mycotoxins were detected and quantified, in at least one sample; namely, aflatoxins (AFB(1), AFB(2), AFG(1), and AFM(1)), sterigmatocystin, methyl-sterigmatocystin, kojic acid, citrinin, cyclosporin A, cyclosporin C, cyclosporin D, cyclosporin H, rugulosin, alternariol-methylether and emodin. This is the first study dealing with the detection of the latter nine metabolites in Brazil nuts. Alternariol-methylether (from 0.75 to 3.2 µg/kg) was the only metabolite detected in all analyzed samples.

  8. Mycoflora and mycotoxins in Brazilian black pepper, white pepper and Brazil nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, F C; Kozakiewicz, Z; Paterson, R R

    2000-01-01

    A wide range of field and storage fungi were isolated from black pepper, white pepper and Brazil nut kernels from Amazonia. A total of 42 species were isolated from both peppers. Aspergillus flavus and A. niger were isolated more frequently from black than from white pepper. Other potential mycotoxigenic species isolated included: A. ochraceus, A. tamarii, A. versicolor, Emericella nidulans and Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium brevicompactum, P. citrinum, P. islandicum and P. glabrum. Species isolated from pepper for the first time were Acrogenospora sphaerocephala, Cylindrocarpon lichenicola, Lacellinopsis sacchari, Microascus cinereus, Petriella setifera and Sporormiella minima. Seventeen species were isolated from Brazil nut kernels. A. flavus was the dominant species followed by A. niger. P. citrinum and P. glabrum were the only penicillia isolated. Species isolated for the first time included Acremonium curvulum, Cunninghamella elegans, Exophiala sp., Fusarium oxysporum, Pseudoallescheria boydii, Rhizopus oryzae, Scopulariopsis sp., Thielavia terricola and Trichoderma citrinoviride. Considerably more metabolites were detected from black than white pepper in qualitative analyses. Chaetocin, penitrem A, and xanthocillin were identified only from black pepper, and tenuazonic acid was identified from both black and white pepper. Aflatoxin G2, chaetoglobosin C, and spinulosin were identified from poor quality brazil nuts. Aflatoxin B1 and B2 were also only detected in poor quality brazil nuts at concentrations of 27.1 micrograms kg-1 and 2.1 micrograms kg-1 respectively (total 29.2 micrograms kg-1).

  9. Heat denaturation of Brazil nut allergen Ber e 1 in relation to food processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxtel, E.L. van; Koppelman, S.J.; Broek, L.A.M. van den; Gruppen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Ber e 1, a major allergen from Brazil nuts, is very stable to in vitro peptic digestion. As heat-induced denaturation may affect protein digestibility, the denaturation behaviour of Ber e 1 was investigated. The denaturation temperature of Ber e 1 varies from approximately 80-110 °C, depending on

  10. Brazil nuts are subject to infection with B and G aflatoxin-producing fungus, Aspergillus pseudonomius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massi, Fernanda Pelisson; Cameiro Vieira, Maria Lucia; Sartori, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of the Brazil nut is one of the most important activities of the extractive communities of the Amazon rainforest. However, its commercialization can be affected by the presence of aflatoxins produced by fungi, namely Aspergillus section Flavi. In the present study, we investigated...

  11. Biodiversity of mycobiota throughout the Brazil nut supply chain: From rainforest to consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniwaki, Marta H; Frisvad, Jens C; Ferranti, Larissa S; de Souza Lopes, Aline; Larsen, Thomas O; Fungaro, Maria Helena P; Iamanaka, Beatriz T

    2017-02-01

    A total of 172 Brazil nut samples (114 in shell and 58 shelled) from the Amazon rainforest region and São Paulo state, Brazil was collected at different stages of the Brazil nut production chain: rainforest, street markets, processing plants and supermarkets. The mycobiota of the Brazil nut samples were evaluated and also compared in relation to water activity. A huge diversity of Aspergillus and Penicillium species were found, besides Eurotium spp., Zygomycetes and dematiaceous fungi. A polyphasic approach using morphological and physiological characteristics, as well as molecular and extrolite profiles, were studied to distinguish species among the more important toxigenic ones in Aspergillus section Flavi and A. section Nigri. Several metabolites and toxins were found in these two sections. Ochratoxin A (OTA) was found in 3% of A. niger and 100% of A. carbonarius. Production of aflatoxins B and G were found in all isolates of A. arachidicola, A. bombycis, A. nomius, A. pseudocaelatus and A. pseudonomius, while aflatoxin B was found in 38% of A. flavus and all isolates of A. pseudotamarii. Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) was found in A. bertholletius (94%), A. tamarii (100%), A. caelatus (54%) and A. flavus (41%). Tenuazonic acid, a toxin commonly found in Alternaria species was produced by A. bertholletius (47%), A. caelatus (77%), A. nomius (55%), A. pseudonomius (75%), A. arachidicola (50%) and A. bombycis (100%). This work shows the changes of Brazil nut mycobiota and the potential of mycotoxin production from rainforest to consumer, considering the different environments which exist until the nuts are consumed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The biodiversity of Aspergillus section Flavi in brazil nuts: From rainforest to consumer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderari, Thaiane O.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2013-01-01

    A total of 288 brazil nut samples (173 kernel and 115 shell) from the Amazon rainforest region and São Paulo State, Brazil were collected at different stages of brazil nut production. Samples were analysed for: percentages of aflatoxigenic fungal species and potential for aflatoxin production...... pseudotamarii produced only aflatoxin B1. The total aflatoxin levels found in samples taken from the rainforests was 0.7μg/kg, from processing plants before and after sorting 8.0 and 0.1μg/kg respectively, from street markets in the Amazon region 6.3μg/kg and from supermarkets in São Paulo State 0.2μg...

  13. Extração e fracionamento simultâneo do óleo da castanha-do-Brasil com etanol Extraction and simultaneous separation of the Brazil nuts oil with ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Pereira Freitas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi utilizar o etanol comercial para extração e fracionamento simultâneos das frações lipídicas presentes na castanha-do-Brasil (Bertholletia excelsea H.B.K.. O óleo foi obtido a partir da castanha desidratada e moída. O processo foi conduzido na proporção 4:1 solvente/substrato (v.p-1 em banho termostatizado a 65 °C, sob agitação de 30 rpm. A mistura foi filtrada, resfriada a 10 °C e, a seguir, centrifugada para separação das fases: uma fase com consistência de gel (micela rica, contendo 75% de óleo e 25% de etanol, e a outra líquida, contendo 2,4% de óleo e 97,6% de etanol (micela pobre. Pelas características apresentadas, a micela rica tem potencial para ser utilizada no preparo de cremes vegetais como substituto parcial de gorduras hidrogenadas, cujos efeitos biológicos na saúde dos consumidores vêm provocando muitas polêmicas. Além de ser uma alternativa na obtenção de gorduras para a formulação de alimentos mais seguros, a tecnologia proposta poderá ser estendida a diferentes oleaginosas de interesse comercial, eliminando o uso de n-hexano no processamento de óleos e gorduras vegetais.In this work, the extraction and simultaneous separation of lipids from Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. with ethanol were investigated. Brazil nuts were dried and triturated prior to oil extraction. The process was carried out at a rate of 4:1 solvent to substrate (v.w-1. The raw material and ethanol were placed in an erlenmeyer flask and maintained in a temperature-controlled bath at 65 °C and 30 rpm. After 1 hour, the mixture was filtered under a vacuum and the resultant miscella was maintained at 10 °C and centrifuged for phase separation. A rich miscella containing 75% oil and 25% ethanol was obtained presenting a gel consistency while a poor miscella, containing 2.4% oil and 97.6% ethanol, was liquid. The rich miscella presented an important potential to partially replace hydrogenate

  14. Babassu nut residues: potential for bioenergy use in the North and Northeast of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Protásio, Thiago; Fernando Trugilho, Paulo; da Silva César, Antônia Amanda; Napoli, Alfredo; Alves de Melo, Isabel Cristina Nogueira; Gomes da Silva, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Babassu is considered the largest native oil resource worldwide and occurs naturally in Brazil. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of babassu nut residues (epicarp, mesocarp and endocarp) for bioenergy use, especially for direct combustion and charcoal production. The material was collected in the rural area of the municipality of Sítio Novo do Tocantins, in the state of Tocantins, Brazil. Analyses were performed considering jointly the three layers that make up the babassu nut shell. The following chemical characterizations were performed: molecular (lignin, total extractives and holocellulose), elemental (C, H, N, S and O), immediate (fixed carbon, volatiles and ash), energy (higher heating value and lower heating value), physical (basic density and energy density) and thermal (thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis), besides the morphological characterization by scanning electron microscopy. Babassu nut residues showed a high bioenergy potential, mainly due to their high energy density. The use of this biomass as a bioenergy source can be highly feasible, given their chemical and thermal characteristics, combined with a low ash content. Babassu nut shell showed a high basic density and a suitable lignin content for the sustainable production of bioenergy and charcoal, capable of replacing coke in Brazilian steel plants.

  15. Effects of Gamma and Electron Beam Radiation on Brazil Nuts Artificially Inoculated with Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Ednei; Reis, Tatiana Alves; Baquião, Arianne Costa; Corrêa, Benedito

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation (GR) and electron beam (EB) on Brazil nut samples contaminated with Aspergillus flavus. Fifty samples were spread with an A. flavus suspension and incubated at 30°C and a relative humidity of 93%. After 15 days of incubation, mycobiota and aflatoxin analysis were performed. The samples were divided into three groups (control, group 1, and group 2) that received radiation doses of 0 kGy (control) and 5 and 10 kGy each of GR and EB (groups 1 and 2). Noninoculated samples were irradiated with the same doses for sensory evaluation. The results showed that after 15 days of incubation, the average water activity of the samples was 0.80. The irradiation with GR and EB at doses of 5 and 10 kGy was able to eliminate A. flavus in Brazil nut samples. Aflatoxin analysis showed that EB doses of 5 and 10 kGy reduced aflatoxin B1 levels by 53.32 and 65.66%, respectively, whereas the same doses of GR reduced the levels of this toxin by 70.61 and 84.15% compared with the level in the control groups. Sensory evaluation demonstrated that the texture and odor of irradiated Brazil nut samples were acceptable. The taste evaluation indicated that 5 kGy of GR was judged acceptable. The results highlight that both irradiation processes (5- and 10-kGy doses) showed efficiency in A. flavus and aflatoxin elimination. GR and EB treatments resulted in some alterations in the sensory attributes of samples with the doses used in this study; however, Brazil nut samples irradiated with 5-kGy GR doses were considered acceptable.

  16. Brazil nuts are subject to infection with B and G aflatoxin-producing fungus, Aspergillus pseudonomius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, Fernanda Pelisson; Vieira, Maria Lúcia Carneiro; Sartori, Daniele; Penha, Rafael Elias Silva; de Freitas Munhoz, Carla; Ferreira, Josué Maldonado; Iamanaka, Beatriz Thie; Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Frisvad, Jens C; Fungaro, Maria Helena Pelegrinelli

    2014-09-01

    The exploitation of the Brazil nut is one of the most important activities of the extractive communities of the Amazon rainforest. However, its commercialization can be affected by the presence of aflatoxins produced by fungi, namely Aspergillus section Flavi. In the present study, we investigated a collection of Aspergillus nomius strains isolated from Brazil nuts using different approaches, including morphological characters, RAPD and AFLP profiles, partial β-tubulin and calmodulin nucleotide sequences, aflatoxin patterns, as well as tolerance to low water activity in cultured media. Results showed that most of the isolates do belong to A. nomius species, but a few were re-identified as Aspergillus pseudonomius, a very recently described species. The results of the analyses of molecular variance, as well as the high pairwise FST values between A. nomius and A. pseudonomius suggested the isolation between these two species and the inexistence of gene flow. Fixed interspecific nucleotide polymorphisms at β-tubulin and calmodulin loci are presented. All A. pseudonomius strains analyzed produced aflatoxins AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2. This study contains the first-ever report on the occurrence in Brazil nuts of A. pseudonomius. The G-type aflatoxins and the mycotoxin tenuazonic acid are reported here for the first time in A. pseudonomius. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Pollinators of Bertholletia excelsa (Lecythidales: Lecythidaceae): interactions with stingless bees (Apidae: Meliponini) and trophic niche].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Charles F; Absy, Maria L

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the foraging behavior and interactions of Xylocopa frontalis Olivier (Apidae: Xylocopini) and Eulaema mocsaryi (Friese) (Apidae: Euglossini) in the presence of stingless bees (Apidae: Meliponini) in flowers of Bertholletia excelsa, the Brazilian nut. The palynological load carried by both species was also examined. This study was conducted in the farm Aruanã, Itacoatiara/ Amazonas state, Brazil, during the flowering peak of B. excelsa. The visitation by the main pollinators X. frontalis and E. mocsaryi were influenced by the presence and activities of stingless bees in the flowers of B. excelsa. Meliponini bees did not have any effect on the visits and collection of floral resources by X. frontalis, while negatively affecting the number of visits by E. mocsaryi. The stingless bees presented a variety of strategies to get access to pollen grains of B. excelsa, grouped into two categories: opportunism -Frieseomelitta trichocerata Moure, Tetragona goettei (Friese), and Tetragona kaieteurensis (Schwarz), and stealing -Trigona branneri Cockerell, Trigona fuscipennis Friese, and Trigona guianae Cockerell. The palynological analysis from X. frontalis showed that the bee collected pollen in a few species of plants, but mainly on B. excelsa. The pollen grains of B. excelsa were poorly represented in the pollen shipments of E. mocsaryi, due to its large trophic niche in the locality.

  18. Selenium and aflatoxin levels in raw Brazil nuts from the Amazon basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Ariane M; Scussel, Vildes M

    2007-12-26

    Whereas selenium (Se) is an important antioxidant in human metabolism to prevent cancer, aflatoxins are highly carcinogenic. Brazil nuts from Eastern and Western Amazon regions were evaluated to find any relationship between Se and aflatoxins levels. A total of 80 (in-shell and shelled) nuts samples were collected directly from different forest sites and analyzed for Se by atomic emission spectrometry and aflatoxins by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for Se was 2.0 mg/kg, and LOQ for total aflatoxins was 0.390 microg/kg. Nut Se levels from the Eastern region were higher than the Western, in addition to the aflatoxins. The moisture content (mc) and water activity (aw) of the raw nuts from the two regions did not present a significant difference, for either in-shell or shelled. The mc was 24.5% (minimum of 20.1% and maximum of 30.4%) and 22.1% (minimum of 14.6% and maximum of 28.9%) and a w of 0.85 for both regions. Further studies need to be carried out to discover the role of Se on fungi growth stress and aflatoxin production mechanisms.

  19. Brazil nut sorting for aflatoxin prevention: a comparison between automatic and manual shelling methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Mendonça Pacheco

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of automatic and manual shelling methods during manual/visual sorting of different batches of Brazil nuts from the 2010 and 2011 harvests was evaluated in order to investigate aflatoxin prevention.The samples were tested as follows: in-shell, shell, shelled, and pieces in order to evaluate the moisture content (mc, water activity (Aw, and total aflatoxin (LOD = 0.3 µg/kg and LOQ 0.85 µg/kg at the Brazil nut processing plant. The results of aflatoxins obtained for the manually shelled nut samples ranged from 3.0 to 60.3 µg/g and from 2.0 to 31.0 µg/g for the automatically shelled samples. All samples showed levels of mc below the limit of 15%; on the other hand, shelled samples from both harvests showed levels of Aw above the limit. There were no significant differences concerning the manual or automatic shelling results during the sorting stages. On the other hand, the visual sorting was effective in decreasing the aflatoxin contamination in both methods.

  20. The biodiversity of Aspergillus section Flavi in brazil nuts: from rainforest to consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderari, Thaiane O; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Frisvad, Jens C; Pitt, John I; Sartori, Daniele; Pereira, Jose Luiz; Fungaro, Maria Helena P; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2013-01-01

    A total of 288 brazil nut samples (173 kernel and 115 shell) from the Amazon rainforest region and São Paulo State, Brazil were collected at different stages of brazil nut production. Samples were analysed for: percentages of aflatoxigenic fungal species and potential for aflatoxin production and presence of aflatoxins. Aspergillus nomius was the most common species found (1235 isolates) which amounted to 30% of the total species with potential to produce aflatoxins. This species is of concern since 100% of all isolates produced aflatoxins B(1), B(2), G(1) and G(2). Aspergillus flavus was almost equally common (1212 isolates) although only 46% produced aflatoxins under laboratory conditions, and only aflatoxins B(1) and B(2). Low number of other species with the potential to produce aflatoxins was isolated: Aspergillus arachidicola and Aspergillus bombycis produced B and G aflatoxins whilst Aspergillus pseudotamarii produced only aflatoxin B(1). The total aflatoxin levels found in samples taken from the rainforests was 0.7 μg/kg, from processing plants before and after sorting 8.0 and 0.1 μg/kg respectively, from street markets in the Amazon region 6.3 μg/kg and from supermarkets in São Paulo State 0.2 μg/kg. Processing, which included manual or mechanical sorting and drying at 60°C for 30 to 36 h, eliminated on average more than 98% of total aflatoxins. These results showed that sorting is a very effective way to decrease aflatoxin content in brazil nuts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fumigation of Brazil nuts with allyl isothiocyanate to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and aflatoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lucas F; Bordin, Keliani; de Lara, Gabriel Hc; Saladino, Federica; Quiles, Juan M; Meca, Giuseppe; Luciano, Fernando B

    2018-01-01

    Brazil produces approximately 40 000 tons of Brazil nuts annually, which is commonly contaminated with fungi and mycotoxins. Gaseous allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) was used to inhibit the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and its production of aflatoxins (AFs) in Brazil nuts. Nuts were inoculated with 10 4 spores g -1 of A. parasiticus and placed in airtight glass jars with controlled relative humidity (RH = 95 or 85%). Samples were treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.5 µL L -1 of gaseous AITC and analyzed after 30 days to determine the fungal population and AFs content. Samples were also submitted to sensory evaluation. AITC at 2.5 µL L -1 could completely inhibit the fungal growth and AFs production in both the RH tested. AITC at 0.5 and 1 µL L -1 did not affect the microbial growth at RH = 95%, but 1 µL L -1 reduced the production of AFs by ∼50%. All AITC treatments reduced the fungal population and AFs to undetectable levels at RH = 85%. None of the concentrations altered sensory characteristics of Brazil nuts. Gaseous AITC could be used as an alternative to inhibit the growth of A. parasiticus during storage and transport of Brazil nuts. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Aflatoxin evaluation in ready-to-eat brazil nuts using reversed-phase liquid chromatography and post-column derivatisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iamanaka, Beatriz Thie; Nakano, Felipe; Lemes, Daniel Ponciano; Ferranti, Larissa Souza; Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence (HPLC-FD) method for aflatoxin quantification in brazil nuts was developed. Samples of brazil nuts collected in Brazilian markets were extracted with methanol:water and cleaned using an immunoaffinity column. Aflatoxins were eluted with methanol and a post-column derivatisation was performed with bromine, using a Kobra Cell system. The optimised method for total aflatoxins was sensitive, with detection and quantification limits of 0.05 and 0.25 µg kg⁻¹, respectively. The method was accurate, with recovery values of 87.6%; 85.3% and 85.0% for 0.5, 5.0 and 14.6 µg kg⁻¹ spiked levels, respectively. It was shown that the method was applicable to brazil nuts. From a total of 95 brazil nut samples analysed from 21 São Paulo supermarket samples and 51 Manaus and 23 Belém street markets samples, 37.9% showed detectable levels of aflatoxins and three exceeded the recommended Codex Alimentarius limit of 10 µg kg⁻¹ for ready-to-eat brazil nuts.

  3. Reversible denaturation of Brazil nut 2S albumin (Ber e1) and implication of structural destabilization on digestion by pepsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Gaspari, M.; Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.; Knol, E.F.; Hefle, S.L.; Jongh, H.H.J.de

    2005-01-01

    The high resistance of Brazil nut 2S albumin, previously identified as an allergen, against proteolysis by pepsin was examined in this work. Although the denaturation temperature of this protein exceeds the 110 °C at neutral pH, at low pH a fully reversible thermal denaturation was observed at ∼82

  4. Polyphasic approach to the identification of Aspergillus section Flavi isolated from Brazil nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquião, Arianne Costa; de Oliveira, Maitê Martins Melo; Reis, Tatiana Alves; Zorzete, Patricia; Diniz Atayde, Danielle; Correa, Benedito

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this study was to use a polyphasic approach to identify Aspergillus section Flavi isolated from Brazil nuts collected in the Amazon forest: investigation of macro- and microscopic morphology, production of extrolites, heat-resistance fungi, and sequencing of DNA regions. The following Aspergillus section Flavi species were identified: Aspergillus flavus (75.5%), Aspergillus nomius (22.3%), and Aspergillus parasiticus (2.2%). All A. nomius and A. parasiticus isolates produced aflatoxins B and G, but not cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). A. flavus isolates were more diversified and a high frequency of mycotoxigenic strains was observed. The polyphasic approach permitted the reliable identification of section Flavi species. The rate of mycotoxigenic strains was high (92.7%) and mainly included A. flavus strains producing elevated levels of aflatoxins and CPA. These results highlight the possibility of co-occurrence of both toxins, increasing their potential toxic effect in this commodity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of Genes by Aflatoxigenic and Nonaflatoxigenic Strains of Aspergillus flavus Isolated from Brazil Nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquião, Arianne Costa; Rodriges, Aline Guedes; Lopes, Evandro Luiz; Tralamazza, Sabina Moser; Zorzete, Patricia; Correa, Benedito

    2016-08-01

    The aims of the present study were to monitor the production of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and mycelial growth, and to evaluate the expression of genes directly and indirectly involved in the biosynthesis of aflatoxins by Aspergillus flavus isolated from Brazil nuts. Six previously identified A. flavus strains were grown on coconut agar at 25°C for up to 10 days. Mycotoxins were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and fungal growth was measured daily using the diametric mycelial growth rate. Transcriptional analysis was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after 2 and 7 d of incubation using specific primers (aflR, aflD, aflP, lipase, metalloprotease, and LaeA). Three (50%) of the six A. flavus isolates produced AFB1 (ICB-1, ICB-12, and ICB-54) and three (50%) were not aflatoxigenic (ICB-141, ICB-161, and ICB-198). Aflatoxin production was observed from d 2 of incubation (1.5 ng/g for ICB-54) and increased gradually with time of incubation until d 10 (15,803.6 ng/g for ICB-54). Almost all A. flavus isolates exhibited a similar gene expression pattern after 2 d of incubation (p > 0.10). After 7 d of incubation, the LaeA (p aflatoxin production in A. flavus and that overexpression of aflR could affect the transcriptional and aflatoxigenic pattern (ICB-54). Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the secondary metabolism of toxigenic fungi may permit the rational silencing of the genes involved and consequently the programmed inhibition of aflatoxin production. Knowledge of the conditions, under which aflatoxin genes are expressed, should contribute to the development of innovative and more cost-effective strategies to reduce and prevent aflatoxin contamination in Brazil nuts.

  6. Quality of in-shell Brazil nuts after drying using a pilot natural convection oven in the state of Acre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Aquino da Costa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The natural drying of in-shell Brazil nuts carried out by the extractivists is not effective in reducing contamination by aflatoxin-producing fungi. Thus the use of an artificial heater could prove to be a favourable method to bring about a rapid reduction in the moisture content of the nuts and thereby prevent fungal growth. Hence the objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a natural convection-type drier with respect to the physical, physicochemical and microbiological quality of nuts after drying for 6 hours at 45 °C. A random block experimental design with two treatments (nuts before and after drying was used, using 10 replications of 3 kg. The nuts were analysed for their moisture, ash, protein, dietary fibre, total carbohydrates and lipid contents, water activity, total count of filamentous, potentially aflatoxin-producing fungi, and also the quantification of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2 and the total aflatoxins. There was no effect of drying on the Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus counts or on the physicochemical composition of the nuts, except for the ash content. However the moisture content of the nuts was reduced by 39.7% and there was a decrease in the contamination by pre-existing total filamentous fungi. The dryer was effective in reducing the average time taken for drying as compared to the traditional method used by extractivists.

  7. Interactions between carpenter bees and orchid bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae in flowers of Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl. (Lecythidaceae Interações entre abelhas carpinteiras e abelhas das orquídeas (Hymenoptera: Apidae em flores de Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl. (Lecythidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Fernando dos Santos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Competition between two species of bees for the same type of floral resource may generate antagonistic behavior between them, especially in cultivated areas where food resources are limited, seasonally and locally. In this study, was tested the hypothesis of antagonism between two solitary bee species of the family Apidae, Eulaema mocsaryi (Euglossini and Xylocopa frontalis (Xylocopini, visiting the Brazil nut flowers (Bertholletia excelsa: Lecythidaceae in a central Amazonia agricultural area. The visitation time was analyzed to detect the possible temporal overlap in the foraging of these bees. Furthermore, was analyzed their interspecific interactions for manipulating flower species visited by an opponent species, as well as attempts to attack this opponent. The individuals of Xylocopa frontalis visited the Brazil nut flowers before Eulaema mocsaryi, although the peak visitation of both did not presented significant differences. Neither of the species manipulated flowers recently visited by opponent species, and there were practically no antagonistic interactions between them. Thus, X. frontalis and E. mocsaryi shared the same food source in the flowers of B. excelsa due to differences in their time of visits and non-aggressive way of interacting with the opponent. This result has important implications for pollinating the Brazil nut, and a possible management of X. frontalis and E. mocsaryi, since these two were the most abundant pollinators in the studied locality.A competição entre duas espécies de abelhas por um mesmo tipo de recurso floral pode gerar comportamentos antagônicos entre elas, principalmente, dentro de áreas cultivadas, onde o recurso alimentar é limitado sazonalmente e localmente. No presente trabalho, foi testada a hipótese de antagonismo entre duas espécies de abelhas solitárias da família Apidae, Eulaema mocsaryi (Euglossini e Xylocopa frontalis (Xylocopini em flores da castanheira do Brasil (Bertholletia

  8. Brazil nut shells as a new biosorbent to remove methylene blue and indigo carmine from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Brito, Suzana Modesto; Andrade, Heloysa Martins Carvalho; Soares, Luciana Frota; de Azevedo, Rafael Pires

    2010-02-15

    The adsorption of methylene blue and indigo carmine, respectively a basic and an acid dye, was studied on raw Brazil nut shells. The dye removal from solution by BNS was governed by: (i) polarization effects between the colored ions and the surface sites, leading to physisorbed species due to weak electrostatic forces and (ii) diffusion limitations affecting the kinetic parameters. Thermodynamic studies showed that the adsorption of methylene blue and of indigo carmine was spontaneous and exothermic occurring with entropy decrease. H(0) values confirmed the physical nature of the adsorption processes. The adsorption followed the Langmuir model and pseudo-second order kinetics over the entire range of tested concentrations but the process was controlled by intraparticle diffusion. The maximal uptakes were 7.81 mg g(-1), for methylene blue, and 1.09 mg g(-1) for indigo carmine, at room temperature. These results indicate that Brazil nut shells may be useful as adsorbent either for basic or acid dyes.

  9. Brazil nut shells as a new biosorbent to remove methylene blue and indigo carmine from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modesto de Oliveira Brito, Suzana; Carvalho Andrade, Heloysa Martins; Soares, Luciana Frota; Pires de Azevedo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of methylene blue and indigo carmine, respectively a basic and an acid dye, was studied on raw Brazil nut shells. The dye removal from solution by BNS was governed by: (i) polarization effects between the colored ions and the surface sites, leading to physisorbed species due to weak electrostatic forces and (ii) diffusion limitations affecting the kinetic parameters. Thermodynamic studies showed that the adsorption of methylene blue and of indigo carmine was spontaneous and exothermic occurring with entropy decrease. H 0 values confirmed the physical nature of the adsorption processes. The adsorption followed the Langmuir model and pseudo-second order kinetics over the entire range of tested concentrations but the process was controlled by intraparticle diffusion. The maximal uptakes were 7.81 mg g -1 , for methylene blue, and 1.09 mg g -1 for indigo carmine, at room temperature. These results indicate that Brazil nut shells may be useful as adsorbent either for basic or acid dyes.

  10. Quality of in-shell Brazil nuts after drying using a pilot natural convection oven in the state of Acre, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    David Aquino da Costa; Virgínia de Souza Álvares; Jorge Ferreira Kusdra; Roberta Martins Nogueira; Vlayrton Tomé Maciel; Daniela Popim Miqueloni

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The natural drying of in-shell Brazil nuts carried out by the extractivists is not effective in reducing contamination by aflatoxin-producing fungi. Thus the use of an artificial heater could prove to be a favourable method to bring about a rapid reduction in the moisture content of the nuts and thereby prevent fungal growth. Hence the objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a natural convection-type drier with respect to the physical, physicochemical and microbiolo...

  11. Soft repulsive mixtures under gravity: Brazil-nut effect, depletion bubbles, boundary layering, nonequilibrium shaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Tobias; Neuhaus, Tim; Messina, René; Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-04-01

    A binary mixture of particles interacting via long-ranged repulsive forces is studied in gravity by computer simulation and theory. The more repulsive A-particles create a depletion zone of less repulsive B-particles around them reminiscent to a bubble. Applying Archimedes' principle effectively to this bubble, an A-particle can be lifted in a fluid background of B-particles. This "depletion bubble" mechanism explains and predicts a brazil-nut effect where the heavier A-particles float on top of the lighter B-particles. It also implies an effective attraction of an A-particle towards a hard container bottom wall which leads to boundary layering of A-particles. Additionally, we have studied a periodic inversion of gravity causing perpetuous mutual penetration of the mixture in a slit geometry. In this nonequilibrium case of time-dependent gravity, the boundary layering persists. Our results are based on computer simulations and density functional theory of a two-dimensional binary mixture of colloidal repulsive dipoles. The predicted effects also occur for other long-ranged repulsive interactions and in three spatial dimensions. They are therefore verifiable in settling experiments on dipolar or charged colloidal mixtures as well as in charged granulates and dusty plasmas.

  12. Categorization of Brazil nut effect and its reverse under less-convective conditions for microgravity geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chujo, Toshihiro; Mori, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Junichiro; Yano, Hajime

    2018-03-01

    Due to its important role in the sorting of particles on microgravity bodies by size, Brazil nut effect (BNE) is a major subject of study for understanding the evolution of planetesimals. Recent studies have revealed that the mechanism for the BNE on microgravity bodies is the percolation of particles or void-filling, rather than granular convection. This study also considers the mechanism for the BNE under `less-convective' conditions and introduces three categories of behaviour for particles that mainly depend on the dimensionless acceleration of vibration Γ (ratio of maximum acceleration to gravitational acceleration), using a simplified analytical model. The conditions for Γ proposed by the model for each category are verified by both numerical simulations and laboratory experiments. `Less-convective' conditions are realized by reducing the friction force between particles and the wall. We found three distinct behaviours of the particles when Γ > 1: the (i) `slow BNE', (ii) `fast BNE', and (iii) `fluid motion' (the reverse BNE may be induced), and the thresholds for Γ correspond well with those proposed by the simple model. We also applied this categorization to low-gravity environments and found that the categorization scales with gravity level. These results imply that laboratory experiments can provide knowledge of granular mobility on the surface of microgravity bodies.

  13. Elemental composition of edible nuts: fast optimization and validation procedure of an ICP-OES method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tošić, Snežana B; Mitić, Snežana S; Velimirović, Dragan S; Stojanović, Gordana S; Pavlović, Aleksandra N; Pecev-Marinković, Emilija T

    2015-08-30

    An inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry method for the speedy simultaneous detection of 19 elements in edible nuts (walnuts: Juglans nigra; almonds: Prunus dulcis; hazelnuts: Corylus avellana; Brazil nuts: Bertholletia excelsa; cashews: Anacardium occidentalle; pistachios: Pistacia vera; and peanuts: Arachis hypogaea) available on the Serbian markets, was optimized and validated through the selection of instrumental parameters and analytical lines free from spectral interference and with the lowest matrix effects. The analysed macro-elements were present in the following descending order: Na > Mg > Ca > K. Of all the trace elements, the tested samples showed the highest content of Fe. The micro-element Se was detected in all the samples of nuts. The toxic elements As, Cd and Pb were either not detected or the contents were below the limit of detection. One-way analysis of variance, Student's t-test, Tukey's HSD post hoc test and hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis were applied in the statistical analysis of the results. Based on the detected content of analysed elements it can be concluded that nuts may be a good additional source of minerals as micronutrients. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Multifunctional column coupled with liquid chromatography for determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in corn, almonds, brazil nuts, peanuts, and pistachio nuts: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucksess, M W; Stack, M E; Nesheim, S; Albert, R H; Romer, T R

    1994-01-01

    An AOAC/IUPAC collaborative study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a multifunctional column for the determination of aflatoxins. The test portion is extracted with acetonitrile-water (9 + 1), the extract is filtered, and the filtrate is passed through the column. The aflatoxins in the eluate are determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography after derivatization with trifluoroacetic acid. Naturally contaminated corn, almonds, Brazil nuts, peanuts, and pistachio nuts spiked with total aflatoxins at 5, 10, 20, and 30 ng/g were sent to 12 collaborators in the United States, Denmark, France, Japan, and Switzerland. Eleven collaborators completed the study. Average recoveries of total aflatoxins for each spike level for the various commodities (excluding Brazil nuts at 5 ng/g) were 93, 97, 95, and 95%, respectively; the repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) ranged from 6.0 to 23.2% and the reproducibility relative standard deviation (RSDR) ranged from 12.0 to 69.4%. The multifunctional column coupled with a liquid chromatographic method for determination of aflatoxins in corn, almonds, Brazil nuts, peanuts, and pistachio nuts has been adopted first action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  15. Effects of gamma radiation and electron beam on samples of the Brazil nuts artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Ednei Assuncao Antunes

    2012-01-01

    The high level of contamination by aflatoxin produced by fungi in lots of Brazil nuts and the strict control by importing countries in relation to the levels of toxins in food, European Union countries decided in 2003 by the return of these lots products from Brazil. Despite the economic loss represented by contamination by toxigenic fungi in Brazil nuts, a major product of extractive Northern of Brazil, studies are still preliminary as the control of contamination aflatoxigenic fungal using methods such as gamma radiation (G.R) and mainly, electron beam (E.B). These facts motivated this research, which aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation and application of electron beam in samples of Brazil nut artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus. This goal, we were studied 50 samples of the Brazil nut previously inoculated with spores of A. flavus and subsequently incubated at 30 °C in relative humidity controlled at 93%. After incubation, period of 15 days, the average water activity of the samples was 0.80, the samples were divided into 5 groups that received the following doses of radiation: control (0 kGy), 5 and 10 kGy 5 E.B and G.R. The mycobiota was performed by serial dilution, plated on surface using potato dextrose agar. The results demonstrated that treatment with E.B using a dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy resulted in reduced growth of A. flavus in 74% (37/50) and 94% (47/50) of samples. The samples treated with G.R at the dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy no fungal growth occurred in 92% (46/50) 100% (50/50) of. The study of aflatoxins showed that doses of E.B of 5 kGy and 10 kGy reduced levels of AFB1 at 53.32% and 65.66% respectively. The application of gamma rays at doses of 5 and 10 kGy reduced levels of toxins in 70.61% and 84.15% respectively. This result may be attributed to higher penetrability of gamma radiation. Sensory analysis showed greater acceptance of the judges for the samples irradiated with E.B and G.R at the dose of 10 kGy. We concluded

  16. Extrusão de misturas de castanha do Brasil com mandioca Extrusion of Brazil nut and cassava flour mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luzenira de Souza

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Considerando-se que a castanha do Brasil apresenta elevado potencial nutritivo, baixo consumo no Brasil, baixo valor agregado e é um produto orgânico, além da alta produtividade, do baixo custo da mandioca e da tecnologia de extrusão termoplástica apresentarem ampla aplicabilidade e vantagens, este trabalho teve como objetivo empregar estas três variáveis, para formular misturas com castanha do Brasil e farinha de mandioca e processá-las por extrusão, visando à obtenção de produtos extrusados ricos em proteína vegetal e prontos para o consumo. Foram utilizadas torta de amêndoa de castanha do Brasil semidesengordurada e farinha de mandioca para formulações das misturas para extrusão. Aplicou-se o delineamento fatorial completo composto central (2³, com 3 variáveis independentes e a metodologia de superfície de resposta foi usada para avaliar os resultados da composição centesimal e o valor calórico, frente às variações de castanha, umidade e temperatura. Os resultados indicam que as formulações com maiores quantidades de castanha apresentam quantidades de proteínas, lipídios e cinzas mais elevadas, já as formulações com menores teores de castanha apresentam maiores percentuais de carboidratos. Os coeficientes de regressão médios do modelo estatístico para as respostas são: umidade 7,40; carboidratos 51,09; proteínas 15,34; lipídios 11,77; fibra total 9,92 e kcal 371,65. Os ensaios com menores teores de castanha e maiores de farinha apresentam-se mais expandidos e de cor clara, enquanto que aqueles com maiores teores de castanha não se expandem e têm a cor acinzentada. Conclui-se que a adição de castanha semidesengordurada à farinha de mandioca pode ser submetida à extrusão, originando um produto extrusado fonte de proteína vegetal, pronto para o consumo e que pode atender à exigência de consumidores que não utilizam proteínas de origem animal.Considering that Brazil nut presents high nutritional

  17. Stability of porridge pre-mixture made with Brazil nut flour and green banana flour with and without milk powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Reschke Da Cunha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of Brazil nut flour and green banana flour can improve the nutritional value of school meals, allowing for the use of regional ingredients derived from family agriculture. This study aimed to assess the stability of porridge pre-mixtures made with Brazil nut flour and green banana flour during six months of storage. Two types of pre-mixture were evaluated: with and without milk powder. These mixtures were packed in polyethylene/metallized polyester film, vacuum-sealed, and stored at room temperature. The products were evaluated for physicochemical composition, and every 30 days for moisture content, water activity, titratable acidity, pH, peroxide value and acidity of the lipid phase, total and thermotolerant coliforms, yeasts and molds, and sensory acceptance. There was no difference between the mixtures for the parameters evaluated. Moisture content, water activity, acidity of the lipid phase, and the yeast and mold count increased with storage time. The growth of yeasts and molds was more pronounced after 90 days of storage, when water activity reached the limit of 0.60. Although both products had good sensory acceptance throughout the period of study, it is recommended that the shelf life does not exceed 90 days.

  18. Improvement of a sample preparation procedure for multi-elemental determination in Brazil nuts by ICP-OES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welna, Maja; Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Various sample preparation procedures, such as common wet digestions and alternatives based on solubilisation in aqua regia or tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, were compared for the determination of the total Ba, Ca, Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sr and Zn contents in Brazil nuts using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). For measurement of Se, a hydride generation technique was used. The performance of these procedures was measured in terms of precision, accuracy and limits of detection of the elements. It was found that solubilisation in aqua regia gave the best results, i.e. limits of detection from 0.60 to 41.9 ng ml(-1), precision of 1.0-3.9% and accuracy better than 5%. External calibration with simple standard solutions could be applied for the analysis. The proposed procedure is simple, reduces sample handling, and minimises the time and reagent consumption. Thus, this can be a vital alternative to traditional sample treatment approaches based on the total digestion with concentrated reagents. A phenomenon resulting from levels of Ba, Se and Sr in Brazil nuts was also discussed.

  19. Brazil nut shells as a new biosorbent to remove methylene blue and indigo carmine from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modesto de Oliveira Brito, Suzana, E-mail: smobrito@uefs.br [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana - UEFS, Av. Transnordestina s/n, Novo Horizonte, 44036-900 Feira de Santana, Bahia (Brazil); Carvalho Andrade, Heloysa Martins [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Bahia - UFBA, End: Rua Barao de, Jeremoabo, s/n - Campus Universitario de Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Soares, Luciana Frota; Pires de Azevedo, Rafael [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana - UEFS, Av. Transnordestina s/n, Novo Horizonte, 44036-900 Feira de Santana, Bahia (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The adsorption of methylene blue and indigo carmine, respectively a basic and an acid dye, was studied on raw Brazil nut shells. The dye removal from solution by BNS was governed by: (i) polarization effects between the colored ions and the surface sites, leading to physisorbed species due to weak electrostatic forces and (ii) diffusion limitations affecting the kinetic parameters. Thermodynamic studies showed that the adsorption of methylene blue and of indigo carmine was spontaneous and exothermic occurring with entropy decrease. H{sup 0} values confirmed the physical nature of the adsorption processes. The adsorption followed the Langmuir model and pseudo-second order kinetics over the entire range of tested concentrations but the process was controlled by intraparticle diffusion. The maximal uptakes were 7.81 mg g{sup -1}, for methylene blue, and 1.09 mg g{sup -1} for indigo carmine, at room temperature. These results indicate that Brazil nut shells may be useful as adsorbent either for basic or acid dyes.

  20. Expanded bed adsorption as a fast technique for the large-scale purification of the complete isoform pool of Ber e 1, the major allergen from Brazil nuts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxtel, van E.L.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Koppelman, S.J.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Gruppen, H.

    2006-01-01

    A new, fast, large-scale purification method for Ber e 1, the major allergen from Brazil nuts, using expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography, is presented. Using EBA, crude extracts can be applied to a fluidized column, which allows the unhindered passage of particulate impurities, thereby

  1. Expanded bed adsorption as a fast technique for the large-scale purification of the complete isoform pool of Ber e 1, the major allergen from Brazil nuts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxtel, E.L. van; Koningsveld, G.A. van; Koppelman, S.J.; Broek, L.A.M. van den; Voragen, A.G.J.; Gruppen, H.

    2006-01-01

    A new, fast, large-scale purification method for Ber e 1, the major allergen from Brazil nuts, using expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography, is presented. Using EBA, crude extracts can be applied to a fluidized column, which allows the unhindered passage of particulate impurities, thereby

  2. Characterization of Aspergillus species on Brazil nut from the Brazilian Amazonian region and development of a PCR assay for identification at the genus level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Glaucia E O; de Sousa, Maria de Lourdes M; Freitas Silva, Otniel; Dias, Jurema do Socorro A; Kanzaki, Luis I B; Hanada, Rogerio E; Mesquita, Renata M L C; Gonçalves, Rivadalve C; Alvares, Virginia S; Bittencourt, Daniela M C; Miller, Robert N G

    2014-05-30

    Brazil nut is a protein-rich extractivist tree crop in the Amazon region. Fungal contamination of shells and kernel material frequently includes the presence of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species from the section Flavi. Aflatoxins are polyketide secondary metabolites, which are hepatotoxic carcinogens in mammals. The objectives of this study were to identify Aspergillus species occurring on Brazil nut grown in different states in the Brazilian Amazon region and develop a specific PCR method for collective identification of member species of the genus Aspergillus. Polyphasic identification of 137 Aspergillus strains isolated from Brazil nut shell material from cooperatives across the Brazilian Amazon states of Acre, Amapá and Amazonas revealed five species, with Aspergillus section Flavi species A. nomius and A. flavus the most abundant. PCR primers ASP_GEN_MTSSU_F1 and ASP_GEN_MTSSU_R1 were designed for the genus Aspergillus, targeting a portion of the mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Primer specificity was validated through both electronic PCR against target gene sequences at Genbank and in PCR reactions against DNA from Aspergillus species and other fungal genera common on Brazil nut. Collective differentiation of the observed section Flavi species A. flavus, A. nomius and A. tamarii from other Aspergillus species was possible on the basis of RFLP polymorphism. Given the abundance of Aspergillus section Flavi species A. nomius and A. flavus observed on Brazil nut, and associated risk of mycotoxin accumulation, simple identification methods for such mycotoxigenic species are of importance for Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point system implementation. The assay for the genus Aspergillus represents progress towards specific PCR identification and detection of mycotoxigenic species.

  3. Effects of Brazil nut consumption on selenium status and cognitive performance in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita Cardoso, Bárbara; Apolinário, Daniel; da Silva Bandeira, Verônica; Busse, Alexandre Leopold; Magaldi, Regina Miksian; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative stress is closely related to cognitive impairment, and the antioxidant system may be a potential therapeutic target to preserve cognitive function in older adults. Selenium plays an important antioxidant role through selenoproteins. This controlled trial aimed to investigate the antioxidant and cognitive effects of the consumption of Brazil nuts, the best selenium food source. We enrolled 31 older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who were randomly assigned to ingestion of Brazil nuts or to the control group. Participants of the treatment group consumed one Brazil nut daily (estimated 288.75 µg/day) for 6 months. Blood selenium concentrations, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, and malondialdehyde were evaluated. Cognitive functions were assessed with the CERAD neuropsychological battery. Eleven participants of the treated group and nine of the control group completed the trial. The mean age of the participants was 77.7 (±5.3) years, 70 % of whom were female. We observed increased selenium levels after the intervention, whereas the control group presented no change. Among the parameters related to the antioxidant system, only erythrocyte GPx activity change was significantly different between the groups (p = 0.006). After 6 months, improvements in verbal fluency (p = 0.007) and constructional praxis (p = 0.031) were significantly greater on the supplemented group when compared with the control group. Our results suggest that the intake of Brazil nut restores selenium deficiency and provides preliminary evidence that Brazil nut consumption can have positive effects on some cognitive functions of older adults with MCI.

  4. Conservação do leite de castanha-do-pará Conservation of Brazil nut extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haíssa Roberta Cardarelli

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a conservação do extrato fluido da amêndoa de castanha-do-pará (conhecido como leite de castanha, executou-se a pasteurização com e sem adição de conservantes químicos e armazenou-se o produto sob refrigeração. Monitorou-se o produto, ao longo de um período de 180 dias de armazenamento, através de análises microbiológicas e das análises físico-químicas de acidez titulável e de pH. Os tratamentos que receberam conservantes químicos foram os mais estáveis microbiologicamente e obtiveram pH e acidez titulável mais equilibrados. A ausência de coliformes totais e fecais demonstrou a eficiência da pasteurização. Concluiu-se que a pasteurização só é um método viável de conservação do leite de castanha se associada à adição de conservantes e à refrigeração.Pasteurization of a Brazil nut extract with and without addition of chemical preservatives and the storage of this product under refrigeration was performed to evaluate the conservation of this extract. The product was monitored during 180 days by microbiological, physical and chemical analysis including titratable acidity and pH. Treatments with chemical preservatives were microbiologically stable and titratable acidity and pH were equilibrated. Absence of total and fecal coliforms demonstrated the pasteurization efficiency. It is concluded that the pasteurization is only a viable method for preservation of the Brazil nut extract when associated with chemical preservatives and refrigeration.

  5. REPEATABILITY OF FRUITS AND SEEDS PRODUCTION AND SELECTION OF BRAZIL NUT GENOTYPES IN NATIVE POPULATIONS IN RORAIMA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Ângela Pedrozo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study estimates the repeatability coefficients of two production traits in two native populations of Brazil nut trees. It determines the number of years of suitable evaluations for an efficient selection process, determines the permanent phenotypic correlation between production traits and also the selection of promising trees in these populations. Populations, located in the Itã region (ITA and in the in the Cujubim region (CUJ, are both belonging to the municipality of Caracaraí, state of Roraima - Brazil, and consist of 85 and 51 adult trees, respectively. Each tree was evaluated regarding the number of fruits per plant (NFP and fresh seed weight per plant (SWP, for eight (ITA and five consecutive years (CUJ. Statistical analyses were performed according to the mixed model methodology, using Software Selegen-REML/BLUP (RESENDE, 2007. The repeatability coefficients were low for NFP (0.3145 and 0.3269 for ITA and CUJ, respectively and also for SWP (0.2957 and 0.3436 for ITA and CUJ, respectively. It on average takes nine evaluation years to reach coefficients of determination higher than 80%. Permanent phenotypic correlation values higher than 0.95 were obtained for NFP and SWP in both populations. Although trees with a high number of fruits and seed weight were identified, more evaluation years are needed to perform the selection process more efficiently.

  6. Socio-ecological costs of Amazon nut and timber production at community household forests in the Bolivian Amazon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soriano Candia, M.; Mohren, G.M.J.; Ascarrunz, Nataly; Dressler, W.H.; Pena Claros, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Bolivian Amazon holds a complex configuration of people and forested landscapes in which communities hold secure tenure rights over a rich ecosystem offering a range of livelihood income opportunities. A large share of this income is derived from Amazon nut (Bertholletia excelsa). Many

  7. Alternative Carbon Sources from Sugar Cane Process for Submerged Cultivation of Cunninghamella bertholletiae to Produce Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pinto Pedrosa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A mucoralean strain of Cunninghamella bertholletiae was used to evaluate the influence of culture medium on chitosan production. In the traditional medium for the growth of mucoralean strains, constituted of yeast extract, peptone, and D-glucose as carbon source, the highest chitosan yield found was 55 mg/g of dry mycelia in a 72-hour submerged culture. Regional substrates from sugar cane process in Northeast Brazil, as sugar cane juice and molasses, which were supplemented with 0.3 % yeast extract, were used as economic substrates to produce chitosan. The optimal production of chitosan was found in sugar cane juice medium, yielding 128 mg/g of dry mycelia in batch flasks at 28 °C. This condition did not need high concentration of sugar cane and gave a good yield of chitosan produced within 48 h (580 mg per L of medium. Molasses did not show to be a good carbon source for chitosan production.

  8. Phytochemical composition of nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-Y Oliver; Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2008-01-01

    Observational studies suggest nut consumption is inversely associated with the incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition to being rich in several vitamins and minerals, unsaturated fatty acids, and fiber, tree nuts and peanuts contain numerous phytochemicals that may contribute to promoting health and reducing the risk of chronic disease. While many of these bioactive constituents remain to be fully identified and characterized, broad classes include carotenoids, phenols, and phytosterols. Phytosterols in nuts range from 95-280 mg/100 g. alpha- and beta-Carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin are found in microg/100 g amounts in some nuts but at 1-3 mg/100 g in pistachios and none at all in Brazils, macadamias, and peanuts. Phenols, including phenolic acids, flavonoids, and stilbenes, are present in nuts. Walnuts are particularly rich in total phenols with 1625 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 g. The stilbene resveratrol is found in peanuts and pistachios at 84 and 115 microg/100 g, respectively. The flavonoid content of nuts as provided in USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content of Selected Foods, lists totals in pecans at 34, almonds at 15, and pistachios and hazelnuts at 12 mg/100 g. Proanthocyanidins are found in almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios, peanuts, and walnuts, with concentrations varying from 9-494 mg/100 g. Nut phytochemicals have been associated with numerous bioactivities known to affect the initiation and progression of several pathogenic processes. However, as complete phytochemical profiles are lacking for most nuts, information is limited regarding their bioavailability and metabolism, so further research on this topic is warranted.

  9. Aspergillus on tree nuts: incidence and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayman, Paul; Baker, James L; Mahoney, Noreen E

    2002-01-01

    California exports tree nuts to countries where they face stringent standards for aflatoxin contamination. Trade concerns have stimulated efforts to eliminate aflatoxins and Aspergillus flavus from almonds, pistachios and walnuts. Incidence of fungi on tree nuts and associations among fungi on tree nuts were studied. Eleven hundred pistachios, almonds, walnuts and brazil nuts without visible insect damage were plated on salt agar and observed for growth of fungi. Samples came both from California nut orchards and from supermarkets. To distinguish internal fungal colonization of nuts from superficial colonization, half the nuts were surface-sterilized before plating. The most common genera found were Aspergillus, Rhizopus and Penicillium. Each species of nut had a distinct mycoflora. Populations of most fungi were reduced by surface sterilization in all except brazil nuts, suggesting that they were present as superficial inoculum on (rather than in) the nuts. In general, strongly positive associations were observed among species of Aspergillus; nuts infected by one species were likely to be colonized by other species as well. Presence of Penicillium was negatively associated with A. niger and Rhizopus in some cases. Results suggest that harvest or postharvest handling has a major influence on nut mycoflora, and that nuts with fungi are usually colonized by several fungi rather than by single species.

  10. Qualidade da castanha-do-brasil do comércio de Rio Branco, Acre Quality of Brazil nuts marketed in Rio Branco, Acre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia de Souza Álvares

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a qualidade de castanhas-do-brasil beneficiadas e comercializadas em Rio Branco, Acre. Foram analisadas amostras das três marcas de castanha encontradas no mercado local quanto às variáveis: atividade de água, teor de umidade, contagem total de fungos filamentosos, quantificação de Aspergillus flavus e de A. parasiticus, bem como quantificação de aflatoxinas B1, B2, G1 e G2. As castanhas do comércio se encontravam com um teor de umidade e atividade de água adequados, o que pode ter sido responsável pela baixa contaminação por fungos e por aflatoxinas. Quanto a estas micotoxinas, as amostras estão de acordo com o recomendado pela Anvisa, podendo ser esta uma consequência da grande divulgação no Estado do uso de Boas Práticas no manejo da castanha.The goal of this paper was to evaluate the quality of Brazil nuts processed and marketed in the city of Rio Branco, in the state of Acre (Brazil. We analysed three samples for water activity, moisture content, total fungus quantification of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, as well as quantification of total aflatoxin, Afla B1, Afla B2, Afla G1 and Afla G2. The nut samples from the market showed an appropriate moisture content and water activity, which may have been responsible for the low fungus contamination and aflatoxin production. As to these mycotoxins, the samples were consistent with Anvisa's recommendations, which may be a consequence of good management of the nuts in Acre.

  11. Application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for direct identification of pure cultures of Aspergillus flavus, A. nomius, and A. caelatus and for their rapid detection in shelled Brazil nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Taniwaki, Marta H; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Vogel, Rudi F; Niessen, Ludwig

    2014-02-17

    Brazil nuts have a high nutritional content and are a very important trade commodity for some Latin American countries. Aflatoxins are carcinogenic fungal secondary metabolites. In Brazil nuts they are produced predominantly by Aspergillus (A.) nomius and A. flavus. In the present study we applied and evaluated two sets of primers previously published for the specific detection of the two species using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technology. Moreover, a primer set specific for A. caelatus as a frequently occurring non-aflatoxigenic member of Aspergillus section Flavi in Brazil nuts was newly developed. LAMP assays were combined with a simplified DNA release method and used for rapid identification of pure cultures and rapid detection of A. nomius and A. flavus from samples of shelled Brazil nuts. An analysis of pure cultures of 68 isolates representing the major Aspergillus species occurring on Brazil nuts showed that the three LAMP assays had individual accuracies of 61.5%, 84.4%, and 93.3% for A. flavus, A. nomius, and A. caelatus, respectively when morphological identification was used as a reference. The detection limits for conidia added directly to the individual LAMP reactions were found to be 10⁵ conidia per reaction with the primer set ID9 for A. nomius and 10⁴ conidia per reaction with the primer set ID58 for A. flavus. Sensitivity was increased to 10¹ and 10² conidia per reaction for A. nomius and A. flavus, respectively, when sample preparation included a spore disruption step. The results of LAMP assays obtained during the analysis of 32 Brazil nut samples from different regions of Brazil and from different steps in the production process of the commodity were compared with results obtained from mycological analysis and aflatoxin analysis of corresponding samples. Compared with mycological analysis of the samples, the Negative Predictive Values of LAMP assays were 42.1% and 12.5% while the Positive Predictive Values were 61

  12. Comparison of phenol content and antioxidant capacity of nuts Comparação entre o conteúdo de fenólicos e capacidade antioxidante de sementes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile Tiemi Abe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Frequent nut intake is associated with protective effects against cardiovascular diseases. In addition to the generally high contents of unsaturated fatty acids, polyphenol compounds seem to be also implicated in health promoting effects of nuts due to their antioxidant properties. In this way, eleven different kinds of nuts, including pinhao seeds (Araucaria angustifolia and Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa, typical of Brazil, were analyzed for the content of phenol compounds, including the potent anti-mutagenic and anti-cancer ellagic acid, and antioxidant capacity of methanolic extracts. The antioxidant capacity varied a hundred times among the different nuts, from 1.2 to 120 mg of Trolox equivalents.100 g-1 (FW. Total ellagic acid was determined after acid hydrolysis of ellagitannins and ellagic acid glycosides, and it was detected in only 3 of the 11 samples. The content of free and total ellagic acid in nuts varied from 0.37 to 41 and from 149 (chestnuts to 823 (walnuts mg.100 g-1 (FW, respectively. Among nuts, samples with the highest contents of ellagic acid (walnuts and pecans also presented the highest total phenol contents and DPPH radical scavenging capacities. Pinhao seeds and Brazil nuts did not present significant amounts of phenols nor antioxidant capacity.O consumo frequente de nozes está associado a efeitos protetores contra doenças cardiovasculares. Além do alto teor de ácidos graxos insaturados, os compostos polifenólicos também parecem implicados nos efeitos promotores da saúde devido a suas propriedades antioxidantes. Desta forma, onze tipos de nozes/sementes, incluindo pinhão (Araucaria angustifolia e castanha-do-pará (Bertholletia excelsa, típicos do Brasil, foram analisados em relação ao seu conteúdo de fenólicos, incluindo ácido elágico, tido como potente antimutagênico e anticancerígeno, e capacidade antioxidante dos extratos metanólicos. A capacidade antioxidante variou cem vezes entre as

  13. Tiger Nut

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oil of tiger nut (C. esculentus) is used for the production of biodiesel (Nag, 2008). The research for lesser known and ... protocols of Dutta (2011). Samples were coded BY (big yellow) and SB (small brown) after ... modify biologically activity by helping to strengthen contraction of the heart muscle (Frantisek, 1991). The.

  14. Levels of shading on growth in Brazil-nut seedlings=Níveis de sombreamento no crescimento de mudas de castanheira do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresinha Costa Silveira de Albuquerque

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency initial growth of native tree seedlings may be related to adaptation ability to light environmental conditions. The objective of this study was to analyze the growth of the Brazil nut tree seedlings in the nursery under different levels of shading. The treatments tested were five environments: T75 = 75% shade; T50 = 50% shade; T25 = 25% shade; TCza = gray screen; and TPsol = full sun. The growth were evaluated after 185 days the plants remain in individual cages, measuring height, stem diameter, basal as well as the number, the length and width of the sheets. Also evaluated in chlorophyll content and calculate the chlorophyll content a, b, and total carotenoid. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by Tukey test (p <0.05. We conclude that the environments with medium shading 25 and 50% are best suited for seedling development of the Brazil nut trees, allowing more vigorous plant growth.The plants in more shaded environments and full sun have higher levels of chlorophyll and carotenoids as an adaptive strategy. = A eficiência no crescimento inicial de árvores nativas pode ser relacionada à habilidade de adaptação de plântulas às condições luminosas do ambiente. O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar o crescimento de mudas de castanheira do brasil, na fase de viveiro, sob diferentes níveis de sombreamento artificial. Como tratamentos testaram-se cinco ambientes: T75 = 75% de sombra; T50 = 50% de sombra; T25 = 25% de sombra; TCza = tela cinza; e TPsol = pleno sol. As avaliações de crescimento foram realizadas após 185 dias de permanência das plantas nos telados, medindo-se a altura, o diâmetro basal do caule, bem como o número, o comprimento e a largura das folhas. Avaliou-se também o teor de clorofila e o cálculo dos teores de clorofila a, b, total e carotenoides. Os resultados foram submetidos à análise de variância e as médias foram comparadas pelo teste de Tukey (p < 0

  15. Avaliação sensorial de cereais matinais de castanha-do-brasil com mandioca extrusados Sensorial evaluation of matutinal cereals of the Brazil nut with extruded cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luzenira de Souza

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou estudar a aceitabilidade de cereais matinais de torta de amêndoa de castanha-do-brasil com mandioca extrusados nos sabores doce, salgado e natural, referentes aos atributos: aceitação global, sabor, crocância e intenção de compra por 06 meses de armazenagem à temperatura ambiente de Campinas-SP. As amostras foram servidas a um painel constituído por 40 consumidores, de forma balanceada em pratos pretos codificados com três dígitos e os resultados, comparados com um produto similar disponível no mercado. Os resultados mostraram que os três tipos de cereais matinais de castanha-do-brasil com mandioca alcançaram maiores notas para todas os atributos sensoriais avaliados do que o cereal matinal similar comercializado, com diferenças significativas (The aim of this work is to study the acceptability of matutinal cereals of almond pie of the Brazil nut with cassava extruded with sweet, savoury and natural flavors regarding the following attributes: global acceptance, flavor, crispness and purchase intention for a six month product stored at the temperature it sets. The samples were served in a balanced way to a panel of 40 consumers on black plates, coded with three digits and compared with the results of a similar product available on the market. The three kinds of matutinal cereals of Brazil nut with cassava obtained larger scores in all the appraised sensorial characteristics than the matutinal cereal commercialized on the market, presenting a significant difference (< 0.05 for the Tukey test. The same test showed that the crispness of the cereal containing the Brazil nut with cassava and a sweet flavor was different (p < 0.05 in the second, third and sixth month of storage of the averages of natural and savoury flavors while the other did not differ. Among the tree flavors of cereals, the sweet one obtained the highest scores in all evaluating attributes, however with a significant difference for some

  16. Morphometric characterisation of solitary trees of Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. In the southeast Roraima = Caracterização morfométrica de árvores solitárias de Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. no sudeste de Roraima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernandes Silva Dionisio

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to manage native forest species, it is necessary to know both the characteristics and dynamics of the trees over time, as well as their morphometric relationship to improve silvicultural techniques. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphometric characteristics of solitary Brazil nut trees (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K, in the towns of São João da Baliza and Caroebe, in the State of Roraima. The inventory evaluated 49 individuals with a diameter at breast height (DAP ≥10 cm. The following morphometric variables were evaluated: diameter at breast height, measured 1.30 m from ground level; total height (HT, commercial trunk height (HC; crown diameter (DC, crown length (CC, crown ratio (PC, crown area (AC, degree of slenderness (GE, salience index (s, crown cover index (ia and crown shape index (fc. To study interdimensional relationships, the morphometric variables were related to the DAP using regression analysis. It was found that 32.9% of individuals presented a mean value for ht of 16.05 m and a DAP of 49.75 cm, with values for ac, cc and pc of 12.61 m2 , 8.18 m and 51.29 m respectively. The results showed a statistically significant relationship between DAP and HT, CC, PC, IS, FC and AC. The length, crown ratio and crown diameter showed a wide range of variation. The crown shape revealed that Brazil nut trees have crowns that are more elongated. It is possible to fit the significant mathematical models as a function of DAP. More-efficient measures are needed to ensure the full protection of these isolated individuals. = Para manejar espécies florestais nativas, é necessário conhecer tanto as características quanto a dinâmica das árvores ao longo do tempo, bem como suas relações morfométricas a fim de aperfeiçoar as técnicas silviculturais. Assim, objetivou-se com o presente trabalho avaliar as características morfométricas de árvores solitárias de castanheira-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K, nos munic

  17. Effects of gamma radiation and electron beam on samples of the Brazil nuts artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus; Efeitos da radiacao gama e feixe de eletrons sobre amostras de castanhas-do-Brasil inoculadas artificialmente com Aspergillus flavus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Ednei Assuncao Antunes

    2012-07-01

    The high level of contamination by aflatoxin produced by fungi in lots of Brazil nuts and the strict control by importing countries in relation to the levels of toxins in food, European Union countries decided in 2003 by the return of these lots products from Brazil. Despite the economic loss represented by contamination by toxigenic fungi in Brazil nuts, a major product of extractive Northern of Brazil, studies are still preliminary as the control of contamination aflatoxigenic fungal using methods such as gamma radiation (G.R) and mainly, electron beam (E.B). These facts motivated this research, which aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation and application of electron beam in samples of Brazil nut artificially inoculated with Aspergillus flavus. This goal, we were studied 50 samples of the Brazil nut previously inoculated with spores of A. flavus and subsequently incubated at 30 °C in relative humidity controlled at 93%. After incubation, period of 15 days, the average water activity of the samples was 0.80, the samples were divided into 5 groups that received the following doses of radiation: control (0 kGy), 5 and 10 kGy 5 E.B and G.R. The mycobiota was performed by serial dilution, plated on surface using potato dextrose agar. The results demonstrated that treatment with E.B using a dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy resulted in reduced growth of A. flavus in 74% (37/50) and 94% (47/50) of samples. The samples treated with G.R at the dose of 5 kGy and 10 kGy no fungal growth occurred in 92% (46/50) 100% (50/50) of. The study of aflatoxins showed that doses of E.B of 5 kGy and 10 kGy reduced levels of AFB1 at 53.32% and 65.66% respectively. The application of gamma rays at doses of 5 and 10 kGy reduced levels of toxins in 70.61% and 84.15% respectively. This result may be attributed to higher penetrability of gamma radiation. Sensory analysis showed greater acceptance of the judges for the samples irradiated with E.B and G.R at the dose of 10 kGy. We concluded

  18. Germinação de sementes de castanheira-do-pará armazenadas em areia úmida Brazil nut seed germination stored in moist sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Nobre da Silva

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do armazenamento em areia úmida e do pré-tratamento com ácido giberélico na germinação das sementes de castanheira-do-pará. Foram realizados dois experimentos em delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso, com cinco repetições; o primeiro em viveiro, em arranjo fatorial 4x2, com quatro períodos de armazenamento em areia úmida (0, 90, 120 e 180 dias e duas concentrações de ácido giberélico (0 e 600 mg L-1; o segundo em câmara BOD, em arranjo fatorial 3x2x2: três procedências de sementes, dois substratos - vermiculita e rolo de papel -, e duas concentrações de ácido giberélico - 0 e 600 mg L-1. No primeiro experimento, o armazenamento em areia úmida manteve a viabilidade das sementes, que tiveram de 55 a 64% de germinação, enquanto o ácido giberélico reduziu a germinação de 82 para 36%. No segundo, essa redução foi de 98 para 62,5% e não houve diferença significativa entre procedências e substratos. O tratamento das amêndoas com ácido giberélico prejudicou o processo germinativo e causou perdas por deterioração. O armazenamento em areia úmida mantém a viabilidade das sementes de castanheira-do-pará e permite o desenvolvimento do embrião.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of storage in moist sand and treatment with gibberellic acid on Brazil nut seed germination. Two experiments were carried out in a randomized block design, with five replicates. The first one was done in the nursery, in a factorial 4x2 arrangement, with four storage periods in moist sand (0, 90, 120 and 180 days and two concentrations of gibberellic acid (0 and 600 mg L-1. The second one was done in a BOD chamber, with a factorial 3x2x2 arrangement, with three seed origins, two substrata (vermiculite and rolled towel paper, and two concentrations of gibberellic acid (0/ and 600 mg L-1. In the nursery experiment, storage in moist sand maintained seed viability, and

  19. Brazil nuts: determination of natural elements and aflatoxin Castanha do Brasil: determinação de elementos naturais e aflatoxinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela Martins

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to evaluate the association of levels of radioactivity, selenium and aflatoxin in shelled Brazil nuts, which were classified in different sizes, for export. The selenium determinations were performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LOQ = 3.0 µg g-1, and aflatoxins were detected by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LOQ = 0.85 µg kg-1, recovery rates were between 92 and 100%. Radioactivity was measured by high-resolution gamma spectrometry. The selenium mean concentration was (22.7 ± 7.4 µg g-1. (n = 30. Mean activities determined for the following radium isotopes were: 15.77 Bq kg-1 for 224Ra, 104.8 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra and 99.48 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra. For 226Ra, the levels did not vary significantly with nut sizes, although such differences were observed for 224Ra and 228Ra. There was no statistically significant association between the level of selenium and the activity of radionuclides, however, there was correlation between the radionuclides. Aflatoxins above the quantification limit were not found.Um estudo foi realizado para avaliar a associação dos níveis de radioatividade, selênio e aflatoxinas em castanha-do-Brasil descascada, que foram classificadas em diferentes tamanhos, para exportação. As determinações de selênio foram realizadas por espectrometria de emissão óptica com plasma indutivamente acoplado (LOQ=3,0 µg kg-1 e aflatoxinas foram detectadas por LC-MSMS (LOQ=0,85 µg kg-1, as taxas de recuperação ficaram entre 92 e 100%. A radioatividade foi medida por espectrometria gama de alta resolução. A concentração média de selênio foi de (22,7 ± 7,4 µg g-1. (n = 30. A atividade média determinada para os radioisótopos foram: 15,77 Bq kg-1 para o 224Ra, 104,8 Bq kg-1 para 226Ra e 99,48 Bq kg-1 para 228Ra. Para 226Ra, os níveis não variaram significativamente com o tamanho das nozes, embora tais diferenças foram observadas para 224Ra e 228Ra. Não houve

  20. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a Cunninghamella bertholletiae isolate from a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragulat, M Rosa; Castellá, Gemma; Isidoro-Ayza, Marcos; Domingo, Mariano; Cabañes, F Javier

    Cunninghamella is a genus of the order Mucorales which includes saprophytic species, rarely causing mycoses. The most frequently reported in human mycoses is the thermophilic species Cunninghamella bertholletiae. However, this species does not appear to cause mucormycosis in animals, so there is scarce information about C. bertholletiae isolates from animals. In this paper we describe the phenotypic and genotypic characterization, and the phylogenetic analysis, of an isolate of C. bertholletiae involved in a central nervous system mucormycosis in a dolphin. The isolate studied in this publication was characterized using the current morphological and physiological identification system for Cunninghamella species. DNA sequencing and analysis of the D1/D2 regions of the 26S rRNA gene and the ITS-5.8S rRNA gene sequences were also performed. Colonies were fast-growing, white at first, although they became tannish-gray, covering the whole plate after 7 days of incubation at 30 and 40°C. Limited growth was observed after 7 days at 45°C. The micromorphology showed characteristic erect sporangiophores. The identification of the isolate was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the D1/D2 regions of the 26S and the ITS-5.8S (ITS) rRNA gene sequencing. In the phylogenetic study, the isolate clustered in the same clade as C. bertholletiae neotype strain although some differences were observed in the ITS sequences. In the cetacean cases, the possible sources of infection are unclear. The reasons why this pathogen has been found only in cetaceans and not in other domestic or wild animals are at the moment unknown and need further study. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of total mercury in nuts at ultratrace level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Maria José da, E-mail: maryquimica@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Química – Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Rue Dom Manoel de Medeiros s/n. Dois irmãos, 52171-900 Recife, PE (Brazil); Paim, Ana Paula S. [Departamento de Química Fundamental – Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitária, 50740-550 Recife, PE (Brazil); Pimentel, Maria Fernanda [Departamento de Engenharia Química – Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Cervera, M. Luisa; Guardia, Miguel de la [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Research Building, University of Valencia, 50th Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Direct analysis of Hg in nuts has been improved by a previous fat removal. • Comparison of cold vapour atomic fluorescence and direct analysis of Hg in nuts. • Mercury content in tree nuts was determined. - Abstract: Total mercury, at μg kg{sup −1} level, was determined in different types of nuts (cashew nut, Brazil nuts, almond, pistachio, peanut, walnut) using a direct mercury analyser after previous sample defatting and by cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry. There is not enough sensitivity in the second approach to determine Hg in previously digested samples due to the strong matrix effect. Mercury levels in 25 edible nut samples from Brazil and Spain were found in the range from 0.6 to 2.7 μg kg{sup −1} by using the pyrolysis of sample after the extraction of the nut fat. The accuracy of the proposed method was confirmed by analysing certified reference materials of Coal Fly Ash-NIST SRM 1633b, Fucus-IAEA 140 and three unpolished Rice Flour NIES-10. The observed results were in good agreement with the certified values. The recoveries of different amounts of mercury added to nut samples ranged from 94 to 101%. RSD values corresponding to three measurements varied between 2.0 and 14% and the limit of detection and quantification of the method were 0.08 and 0.3 μg kg{sup −1}, respectively.

  2. Physic Nut Thrips Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Asbani, Nur; Sartiami, Dewi

    2011-01-01

    Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is a relatively new agricultural crop commodity in Indonesia. Hence, the thrips associated with this plant are not well recognized. The research objective was to provide information and tool for identification of thrips associated with physic nut. Survey method was conducted in some areas of Java, Madura, and Lombok island. The results showed that 10 species of thrips were found associated with physic nut. They belonged to nine genera and three family i.e. Thri...

  3. Physic nut (Jatropha curcas):

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    else

    Hence a serious of silvicultural and genotype testing have been carried out in the Central Rift Valley of. Ethiopia. The result indicated that physic nut has a very narrow genetic ... physic nut as a source of raw material for biodiesel industry. .... such level of seed yield per hectare was achieved through good management and.

  4. Cashew Nut Allergy in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.M. Kuiper- van der Valk (Hanna)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe content of the thesis contributes to the knowledge of the cashew nut and cashew nut allergy. Cashew nut allergy is an important healthcare problem, especially in children. The cashew nut (Anacardium occidentale) belongs to the Ancardiaceae family and the major allergen components

  5. Umidade relativa de equilibrio e oxidação de lipídeos em farinhas de castanha do Pará, de macadâmia e de soja Equilibrium relative humidity and lipid oxidation in Brazil-nut, macadamia nut and soybean seed flours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G. do Prado-Filho

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a oxidação de lipídeos adicionados a farinhas de castanha do Pará (Bertholleta excelsa, de macadâmia (Macadâmia integrifolia e de soja (Glycine max equilibradas nas atividades de água (Aa 0,51; 0,57; 0,67; 0,75; 0,79 e 0,81, a 35°C. O substrato utilizado para quantificar tanto a oxidação autocatalítica como a oxidação enzímica foi o óleo de soja na proporção de 20% (p:p. Dois mecanismos de oxidação de lipídeos concorrem pelo substrato nas condições estudadas. A baixos valores de Aa - de 0,51 a 0,75 - o mecanismo mais eficiente é a autoxidação devida à maior exposição do substrato ao oxigênio e à menor mobilidade dos reagentes - enzima e lipídeo - nas reações de natureza enzímica. Em valores de Aa maiores - 0,79 e 0,81 - predomina a oxidação enzímica, e atua a proteção do substrato pela água, frente à ação do oxigênio. O índice de peróxido medido no transcurso de 6 dias apresenta máximos e mínimos devidos a reações secundárias atuando sobre produtos das reações primárias.Lipid oxidation was studied on the flour of Brazil-nut (Bertolleta excelsa, macadâmia nut (Macadamia integrifoliá and soybean seed (Glycine max, in enviroments with controlled water activity (Aw values of 0.51; 0.57; 0.67; 0.75; 0.79 and 0.81 at 35°C. Every 24 hours during 6 days the peroxide value was determined for each Aw in flour with enzyme inactivation (110°C, 2 hours as well as in flour without inactivation. At low Aw values (up to 0.75 the oxidation by oxigen is the most effective mechanism of deterioration of the lipids. At higher water activity values (0.79 and 0.81 the protective effect of the humidity upon the lipids and the greater mobility of the reagents make the activity of the lipoxigenase the most important mechanism of lipid deterioration.

  6. Nuts and Your Heart: Eating Nuts for Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart-healthy diet. Just eating nuts and not cutting back on saturated fats found in many dairy ... covered with chocolate, sugar or salt. Here's some nutrition information on common types of nuts. All calorie ...

  7. Physic nut (Jatropha curcas):

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    else

    and curcin that are present in all plant parts (Hellar 1996). The composition of toxic substances is known to be very high in the seed than roots, stems, leaves, stem, and branches. Nontoxic and edible physic nut varieties have been identified in Mexico (Makkar et al 1998). In Ethiopia, there is no report on the consumption.

  8. Review of nut phytochemicals, fat-soluble bioactives, antioxidant components and health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasalvar, Cesarettin; Bolling, Bradley W

    2015-04-01

    The levels of phytochemicals (total phenols, proanthocyanidins, gallic acid + gallotannins, ellagic acid + ellagitannins, flavonoids, phenolic acids, stilbenes and phytates), fat-soluble bioactives (lipid, tocols, phytosterols, sphingolipids, carotenoids, chlorophylls and alkyl phenols) as well as natural antioxidants (nutrient and non-nutrient) present in commonly consumed twelve nuts (almond, Brazil nut, cashew, chestnut, hazelnut, heartnut, macadamia, peanut, pecan, pine nut, pistachio and walnut) are compared and reported. Recent studies adding new evidence for the health benefits of nuts are also discussed. Research findings from over 112 references, many of which have been published within last 10 years, have been compiled and reported.

  9. Revisiting the ‘cornerstone of Amazonian conservation’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guariguata, Manuel R.; Cronkleton, Peter; Duchelle, Amy E.; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2017-01-01

    The Brazil nut (the seeds of the rainforest tree Bertholletia excelsa) is the only globally traded seed collected from the wild by forest-based harvesters across the Amazon basin. The large geographic scale of Brazil nut exploitation and the significant contributions to local livelihoods, national

  10. Biologia floral e polinização artificial de pinhão-manso no norte de Minas Gerais Floral biology and artificial polinization in physic nut in the north of Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Pinto Juhász

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar alguns aspectos da biologia floral e do sistema reprodutivo de Jatropha curcas, em Janaúba, MG. Foram registrados: o número de flores femininas e masculinas; o intervalo de abertura das flores femininas; e a formação de frutos por apomixia, autofecundação, geitonogamia e xenogamia. A proporção de flores masculinas para femininas foi de 20:1. O intervalo de abertura das flores femininas variou de um a sete dias, conforme o número delas na inflorescência. No teste de apomixia, houve formação de frutos em apenas 5% das flores avaliadas. A percentagem de frutificação variou de 79 a 88% na autofecundação manual, na geitonogamia e na xenogamia. Na autofecundação sem a polinização manual a frutificação foi de 20%, e os frutos formados foram significativamente menores, com número inferior de sementes por fruto e menor índice de velocidade de emergência. As sementes foram semelhantes às formadas por polinização natural. é possível a realização de cruzamentos controlados em pinhão-manso, e não há autoincompatibilidade nesta espécie.The aim of this work was to evaluate some aspects of the floral biology and of the reproductive system of Jatropha curcas, in Janaúba county, MG, Brazil. The number of female and male flowers, the interval between the opening of female flowers, and the formation of fruits by apomixis, self-pollination, geitonogamy and by xenogamy were registered. The ratio of male to female flowers was 20:1. The interval of opening of female flowers was of one to seven days, depending on the number of female flowers in the inflorescence. On the apomixy test, the formation of fruits occurred in only 5% of the evaluated flowers. The fruit set was between 79 and 88% through the manual self-pollination, and through the geitonogamy, and the xenogamy. In the self-pollination treatment, without the hand-pollination, the fruit set was of 20%, and the fruits formed were

  11. O CUSTO SOCIAL DO DESMATAMENTO DA AMAZÔNIA BRASILEIRA: O CASO DA CASTANHA-DO-BRASIL (Bertholletia excelsa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is studied the deforestation of ‘castanha-do-brasil’ (Bertholletia excelsa from the Brazilian tropical rainforest with emphasis on the valuation of social costs imposed on society by the reduction and the loss of forest cover from 1998 to 2008. To measure the social costs, the concept used was of Marshall economic surplus, which measures the level of welfare consumers and producers. From 1998 to 2008, the estimated average social costs were of R$ 11.6 million per year. The social costs falling 63 % on producers and 37 % on consumers. In conclusion, both, supply and demand, lose with damages in the Brazilian tropical rainforest.

  12. Socio-ecological costs of Amazon nut and timber production at community household forests in the Bolivian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Soriano

    Full Text Available The Bolivian Amazon holds a complex configuration of people and forested landscapes in which communities hold secure tenure rights over a rich ecosystem offering a range of livelihood income opportunities. A large share of this income is derived from Amazon nut (Bertholletia excelsa. Many communities also have long-standing experience with community timber management plans. However, livelihood needs and desires for better living conditions may continue to place these resources under considerable stress as income needs and opportunities intensify and diversify. We aim to identify the socioeconomic and biophysical factors determining the income from forests, husbandry, off-farm and two keystone forest products (i.e., Amazon nut and timber in the Bolivian Amazon region. We used structural equation modelling tools to account for the complex inter-relationships between socioeconomic and biophysical factors in predicting each source of income. The potential exists to increase incomes from existing livelihood activities in ways that reduce dependency upon forest resources. For example, changes in off-farm income sources can act to increase or decrease forest incomes. Market accessibility, social, financial, and natural and physical assets determined the amount of income community households could derive from Amazon nut and timber. Factors related to community households' local ecological knowledge, such as the number of non-timber forest products harvested and the number of management practices applied to enhance Amazon nut production, defined the amount of income these households could derive from Amazon nut and timber, respectively. The (inter relationships found among socioeconomic and biophysical factors over income shed light on ways to improve forest-dependent livelihoods in the Bolivian Amazon. We believe that our analysis could be applicable to other contexts throughout the tropics as well.

  13. Socio-ecological costs of Amazon nut and timber production at community household forests in the Bolivian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohren, Frits; Ascarrunz, Nataly; Dressler, Wolfram; Peña-Claros, Marielos

    2017-01-01

    The Bolivian Amazon holds a complex configuration of people and forested landscapes in which communities hold secure tenure rights over a rich ecosystem offering a range of livelihood income opportunities. A large share of this income is derived from Amazon nut (Bertholletia excelsa). Many communities also have long-standing experience with community timber management plans. However, livelihood needs and desires for better living conditions may continue to place these resources under considerable stress as income needs and opportunities intensify and diversify. We aim to identify the socioeconomic and biophysical factors determining the income from forests, husbandry, off-farm and two keystone forest products (i.e., Amazon nut and timber) in the Bolivian Amazon region. We used structural equation modelling tools to account for the complex inter-relationships between socioeconomic and biophysical factors in predicting each source of income. The potential exists to increase incomes from existing livelihood activities in ways that reduce dependency upon forest resources. For example, changes in off-farm income sources can act to increase or decrease forest incomes. Market accessibility, social, financial, and natural and physical assets determined the amount of income community households could derive from Amazon nut and timber. Factors related to community households’ local ecological knowledge, such as the number of non-timber forest products harvested and the number of management practices applied to enhance Amazon nut production, defined the amount of income these households could derive from Amazon nut and timber, respectively. The (inter) relationships found among socioeconomic and biophysical factors over income shed light on ways to improve forest-dependent livelihoods in the Bolivian Amazon. We believe that our analysis could be applicable to other contexts throughout the tropics as well. PMID:28235090

  14. NUTRITIONAL COMPOSITION OF SHEA NUT (Vitellaria paradoxa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    2014-08-04

    Aug 4, 2014 ... ABSTRACT. This study was conducted to determine the nutritional (proximate and energy) composition of selected shea nut by-products (SNPs) namely; shea nut meal (SNM, solvent extracted), shea nut cake (SNC, mechanically extracted) and shea nut cake (SNCW, water extracted) and their ap-.

  15. Systematic review on cashew nut allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, van der J.P.M.; Dubois, A.E.J.; Wichers, H.J.; Jong, de N.W.; Wijk, van R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on cashew nut allergy suggest that the prevalence of cashew nut allergy is increasing. Cashew nut consumption by allergic patients can cause severe reactions, including anaphylaxis. This review summarizes current knowledge on cashew nut allergy to facilitate timely clinical

  16. Systematic review on cashew nut allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, J. P. M.; Dubois, A. E. J.; van Wijk, R. Gerth; Wichers, H. J.; de Jong, N. W.

    Recent studies on cashew nut allergy suggest that the prevalence of cashew nut allergy is increasing. Cashew nut consumption by allergic patients can cause severe reactions, including anaphylaxis. This review summarizes current knowledge on cashew nut allergy to facilitate timely clinical

  17. 76 FR 69693 - Tolerance Crop Grouping Program III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... following 12 commodities: Almond, Prunus dulcis; Beechnut, Fagus spp.; Brazil nut, Bertholletia excelsa... nut-tree (Ricinodendron heudelotii (Baill.) Heckel) Almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb) Beechnut... following 11 commodities: Apricot, Prunus armeniaca; Cherry, sweet, Prunus avium; Cherry, tart, Prunus...

  18. Cashew nut shell liquid resin used as matrix for compound materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes de; Nogueira, Ricardo Emilio Ferreira Quevedo

    1996-01-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid resin a by product of cashew processing industry is a naturally occurring phenol of low cost and are used in Brazil as fuel in the industrial production of cashew nut or as a structural material when associated with coconut fiber or rice shell. A high measured Tg points to noble applications. This paper presents some properties of LCC resin and concludes that it has good perspectives as a composite matrice to work at elevated temperatures. (author)

  19. Mycotoxins in edible tree nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Russell J; Mahoney, Noreen; Kim, Jong H; Campbell, Bruce C

    2007-10-20

    Tree nuts (almonds, pistachios, and walnuts) are an exceptionally valuable crop, especially in California, with an aggregate value approaching $3.5 billion. Much of this economic value comes from overseas markets, with up to 60% of the crop being exported. The product can be contaminated with aflatoxins or ochratoxins, with the former being of special concern because of the strict regulatory levels (4 ppb total aflatoxins) applied by the European Community (EC). Natural, consumer-acceptable control methods are therefore required to conform to such limits. Research has shown that aflatoxin production is markedly decreased by the presence of natural antioxidants that occur in tree nuts, including hydrolysable tannins, flavonoids and phenolic acids. In vitro testing of individual compounds showed that the antiaflatoxigenic effect correlated with the structure and concentration of such compounds in individual nut varieties and species. This lead to the hypothesis that aflatoxin biosynthesis is stimulated by oxidative stress on the fungus and that compounds capable of relieving oxidative stress should therefore suppress or eliminate aflatoxin biosynthesis. Oxidative stress induced in A. flavus by addition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide to the media stimulated peak aflatoxin production and maintained high levels over time. However, aflatoxin formation was significantly inhibited by incorporation into the media of the antioxidant, tannic acid. Measures to increase natural products with antioxidant properties in tree nuts may thereby reduce or eliminate the ability of A. flavus to biosynthesize aflatoxins, thus ensuring levels at or below regulatory limits and maintaining export markets for U.S. tree nuts.

  20. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, S.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  1. Evaluation of the content and bioaccessibility of iron, zinc, calcium and magnesium from groats, rice, leguminous grains and nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliburska, Joanna; Krejpcio, Zbigniew

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the content and the bioaccessibility of minerals (Fe, Zn, Ca and Mg) in commonly consumed food products, such as cereal groats, rice, leguminous grains and nuts purchased from the local market. The contents of Fe, Zn, Ca and Mg in foods were assayed after dry ashing of samples, while the bioaccessibility of these minerals after enzymatic in vitro digestion, was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A relatively high content of Fe was found in cashew nuts and green lentils, while cashew nuts and buckwheat groats had the highest concentration of Zn. It was found that the highest amount of macro-elements was generally in nuts, in particular: brazil nuts (Ca and Mg), cashews (Mg) and hazelnuts (Ca and Mg). Concerning the mineral bioaccessibility, the highest values for Fe were obtained in cashew nuts and green lentils (2.8 and 1.7 mg/100 g), for Zn in green lentils (2.1 mg/100 g), for Ca in brazil nuts and shelled pea (32.6 and 29.1 mg/100 g), while for Mg in shelled peas and green lentils (43.4 and 33.9 mg/100 g). Generally, the best sources of bioaccessible minerals seem to be leguminous grains and nuts.

  2. Nuts and oxidation: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Mònica Bulló; Patricia López-Uriarte; Patricia Casas-Agustench; Nancy Babio; Jordi Salas-Salvadó

    2009-01-01

    Nuts and oxidation: a systematic review In recent years, nuts have received special attention because of their potential role in preventing cardiovascular disease. Because nuts are very rich in total fat that can potentially be oxidized and their skins contain several antioxidants, studies have been conducted to evaluate the potential effect of nut consumption on oxidative stress. This review evaluates the in vitro and in vivo studies conducted in animals or humans to analyze the effect of...

  3. Decontamination of nuts and spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    The social and economic impacts of outbreaks of foodborne illnesses and food recalls connected to consumption of microbiologically contaminated nuts, spices or their products have become important food safety concerns. Initiatives have been undertaken by regulatory and public health agencies, indust...

  4. Distribuição geográfica e diversidade varietal de frutíferas e nozes de clima temperado no Estado de São Paulo Geographic distribution and varietal diversity of temperate fruits and nuts in São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Barbosa

    2003-08-01

    ícola do Estado de São Paulo , the locals and cultivated areas, the plant quantities and main species of temperate fruits and nuts in São Paulo State, Brazil. Fruit growers from all regions of the State were consulted about commercial cultivars used. The data showed 6 botanical families, 11 genus and 12 main temperate fruit and one nut species: rustic grape, fine grape, peach (and nectarine, fig, persimmon, macadamia nut, apple, japanese plum, European pear, Asiatic pear, loquat, kiwi and quince trees. The grapes are planted on 51% of the total area occupied by temperate fruits and nuts, 11,9 thousand ha. A total of 9,510 of temperate fruit growers were recorded in 65% of all the municipality of the State. Only the grape and pear showed more than one botanical species commercially cultivated. Fifty three principal cultivars were detected in commercial cultivation, most of them in peach trees. Considering the twelve main species, the fruit harvest occurs during all months of the year. It was recorded new important fruit crop niches at Jales, Presidente Prudente, Barretos and Jaú regions, respectively, with emphasis to fine grapes, asiatic pears, adapted peaches and macadamia nuts.

  5. Study on Korean Pine Nut Processors

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hag Mo; Choi, Soo Im; Sato, Noriko; Kim, Hyun; 佐藤, 宣子

    2012-01-01

    In the results of survey on operating state of pine nut processors located in Gapyeong–gun, Gyeonggi–do and Hongcheon–gun, Gangwon–do, representative pine nut producing area, the total purchasing amount of pine nuts with a cone of Gapyeong–gun, Gyeonggi–do was 500~4,000 bags (1 bag is 80 kg), of which average amount per processor was 2000 bags. The price range per bag of pine nuts was 470~620 thousand won and the average price was 550 thousand won. Total purchase price of pine nuts with a con...

  6. Systematic review on cashew nut allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Valk, J P M; Dubois, A E J; Gerth van Wijk, R; Wichers, H J; de Jong, N W

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies on cashew nut allergy suggest that the prevalence of cashew nut allergy is increasing. Cashew nut consumption by allergic patients can cause severe reactions, including anaphylaxis. This review summarizes current knowledge on cashew nut allergy to facilitate timely clinical recognition and to promote awareness of this emerging food allergy amongst clinicians. The goal of this study is to present a systematic review focused on the clinical aspects of allergy to cashew nut including the characteristics of cashew nut, the prevalence, allergenic components, cross-reactivity, diagnosis and management of cashew nut allergy. The literature search yielded 255 articles of which 40 met our selection criteria and were considered to be relevant for this review. The 40 articles included one prospective study, six retrospective studies and seven case reports. The remaining 26 papers were not directly related to cashew nut allergy. The literature suggests that the prevalence of cashew nut allergy is increasing, although the level of evidence for this is low. A minimal amount of cashew nut allergen may cause a severe allergic reaction, suggesting high potency comparable with other tree nuts and peanuts. Cashew allergy is clearly an underestimated important healthcare problem, especially in children. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nuclear fuel element nut retainer cup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    A typical embodiment has an end fitting for a nuclear reactor fuel element that is joined to the control rod guide tubes by means of a nut plate assembly. The nut plate assembly has an array of nuts, each engaging the respective threaded end of the control rod guide tubes. The nuts, moreover, are retained on the plate during handling and before fuel element assembly by means of hollow cylindrical locking cups that are brazed to the plate and loosely circumscribe the individual enclosed nuts. After the nuts are threaded onto the respective guide tube ends, the locking cups are partially deformed to prevent one or more of the nuts from working loose during reactor operation. The locking cups also prevent loose or broken end fitting parts from becoming entrained in the reactor coolant

  8. Hidrogenación e interesterificación del aceite de castaña de Brasil (Bertholletia excelsa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polakiewicz, Bronislaw

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Brazil nut oil (ACB was hydrogenated in a 1L Parr reactor, with Ni as catalyst, at the following process conditions: 175ºC, 3 atm, 60 min (GH1, 150ºC, 1 atm, 30 min (GH2 and 125ºC, 1 atm, 30 min (GH3. Different proportions of blends with ACB and GH1 and GH2 were prepared. These mixtures were interesterified at laboratory scale (0.75% of sodium metoxide, 60 min, 60-65ºC. Linoleic selectivity (Sl was 3.87 (GH1, 17.46 (GH2 and 17.46 (GH3. Linolenic selectivity (Sln was 2.3 for every reaction. It was observed different results for starting and interesterificated blends for the physical properties, for these parameters and for the interesterified fats, were applied a multiple regression. Results showed that consistency and solid fat content (SFC were dependent on the hydrogenated fats. Significant interactions were, in general, for the interesterified blends of ACB/GH1 and GH1/GH2, only for the consistency and not for the other properties.El aceite de castaña de Brasil (ACB fue hidrogenado, en un reactor Parr de 1 L, catalizador a base de Ni, y bajo las siguientes condiciones de proceso: 175ºC, 3 atm, 60 min (GH1, 150ºC, 1 atm, 30 min (GH2 y 125ºC, 1 atm, 30 min (GH3. Con las grasas resultantes se prepararon mezclas en diferentes proporciones de ACB con GH1 y GH2. Estas fueron interesterificadas a escala de laboratorio con 0.75% de metóxido de sodio, 60 min, 60-65ºC. En la hidrogenación la selectividad linoleica (Sl fue 3.87 (GH1, 17.46 (GH2 y 8.45 (GH3 y la selectividad linolénica (Sln fue 2.3 para las tres reacciones. A los parámetros de las propiedades físicas de los productos interesterificados, se aplicó un modelo de regresión múltiple. Los resultados mostraron que la consistencia y el contenido en grasa sólida dependían de la grasa hidrogenada, e indicaron que las interacciones fueron en general, significativas para las mezclas interesterificadas de ACB/GH1 y GH1/GH2 en cuanto a la consistencia, pero no en las

  9. Análise econômica de sistemas agroflorestais na Amazônia ocidental, Machadinho d'Oeste- RO Economic analysis of agroforestry systems in eastern Amazonia, Machadinho d'Oeste- RO, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelliny de Matos Bentes-Gama

    2005-06-01

    tested, T1 Brazil nut-Banana-Black pepper-Cupuaçu was the agroforestry system (AFS with the best financial results, comparing to T2 Frreijó wood- banana-black pepper-cupuaçu and T3 Pupunha palm- banana-black pepper-cupuaçu. The management and harvesting costs represented more than 70% of the total cost composition; and the labor cost participation was higher than 50% in the site preparation and long-term maintenance phases of the agroforestry systems. The risk analysis simulation showed that the variables which affected Infinite Horizon Net Present Value (NPV*, according to the ranking of importance (R, were: discount rate, price of cupuaçu fruits (Theobroma grandiflorum, harvesting cost, price of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa wood, and long-term maintenance costs. Even though the high establishment and the long-term maintenance costs, AFS T1 Castanha-do-brasil-Banana-black pepper-cupuaçu showed a 15% probability that Net Present Value (NPV value could be concentrated around R$ 35.000 ha-1 year-1.

  10. Barreiras às novas formas de coordenação no agrossistema do caju na região nordeste, Brasil Barriers to new coordination forms in the cashew nut agricultural system in northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildo Meirelles de Souza Filho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embora a produção brasileira de amêndoa de castanha-de-caju tenha crescido nos anos 2000, sua participação no mercado internacional reduziu-se, revelando perda de competitividade desse agrossistema. A produtividade na produção rural é baixa e subsiste uma antiquada estrutura de governança das relações entre produtores, intermediários e processadores de castanha em casca. Novas formas de coordenação estão sendo testadas, mas ainda não foram capazes de substituir a antiga. O objetivo desse artigo é identificar o conjunto de barreiras à transformação dessa estrutura. O referencial teórico adotado encontra-se fundamentalmente na Economia de Custos de Transação. Para investigação empírica, adotou-se o método de pesquisa rápida (rapid appraisal, compreendendo entrevistas junto a uma amostra não probabilística de agentes da cadeia nos estados do Ceará, Piauí e Rio Grande do Norte. Os resultados mostram que há resiliência da estrutura de governança antiga, a qual está assentada na funcionalidade e capacidade de reação dos intermediários. Assim, a estratégia de mudança cautelosa das empresas processadoras é, por um lado, racional diante de grandes incertezas, e, por outro, lenta diante das transformações do mercado internacional.Although the Brazilian production of cashew nuts has increased in the years 2000, its international market-share has decreased revealing competitiveness loss of this agri-system. Agricultural yields are low and a traditional governance structure among farmers, intermediaries, and cashew nut processing industries still subsists. New coordination forms have been tested, but they have not been able to substitute the old one. The objective of this article is the identification of barriers to the changes of this structure. The Economy of Transaction Cost is the theoretical approach adopted. For empirical investigation, a rapid appraisal method was adopted comprising interviews with

  11. Physiological response and performance of tambaqui fed with diets supplemented with Amazonian nut Respostas fisiológicas e desempenho do tambaqui alimentado com dietas suplementadas com castanha da Amazônia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Quara de Carvalho Santos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effectiveness of Amazonian nut (Bertholletia excelsa as an alternative source of vegetal protein in tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum diet. Performance and physiological status of fish fed for 60 days were evaluated. Four experimental isonitrogenous diets with 36% crude protein were formulated with increasing levels of nut meal (0, 10, 20 and 30%. Results showed the same growth performance for fish fed with diet with different levels of Amazonian nut than that without this ingredient (control. Analysis of physiological parameters (hematocrit, erythrocyte number, hemoglobin concentration, hematimetric indexes, total plasma protein and plasma glucose corroborate these results, with no significant differences among treatments. Therefore, adding up to 30% of Amazonian nut in tambaqui diet there is no negative effect on physiological homeostasis and growth performance, indicating that the Amazonian nut is a promising alternative dietary protein source ingredient for tambaqui.Este estudo avaliou a eficácia da farinha de castanha da Amazônia (Bertholletia excelsa como fonte alternativa de proteína vegetal na dieta do tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum. Para isso, foram avaliados o desempenho e o estado fisiológico dos peixes alimentados durante 60 dias. Foram formuladas quatro dietas experimentais isoproteicas com 36% proteína bruta, com níveis crescentes de farinha de castanha (0, 10, 20 e 30%. Os resultados mostraram que os diferentes níveis de castanha da Amazônia mantiveram o mesmo desempenho zootécnico obtido para os peixes alimentados com dieta sem esse ingrediente (controle. Esses resultados são corroborados pela análise dos parâmetros fisiológicos: hematócrito, número de eritrócitos, concentração de hemoglobina, índices hematimétricos, proteínas plasmáticas totais e glicose plasmática, os quais não demonstraram diferenças significativas relacionadas aos diferentes tratamentos. Portanto, até 30

  12. Branes, Instantons, and Taub-NUT Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Edward

    2009-01-01

    ALE and Taub-NUT (or ALF) hyper-Kahler four-manifolds can be naturally constructed as hyper-Kahler quotients. In the ALE case, this construction has long been understood in terms of D-branes; here we give a D-brane derivation in the Taub-NUT case. Likewise, instantons on ALE spaces and on Taub-NUT spaces have ADHM-like constructions related to hyper-Kahler quotients. Here we refine the analysis in the Taub-NUT case by making use of a D-brane probe, and give an application to M-theory.

  13. Branes, instantons, and Taub-NUT spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Edward

    2009-06-01

    ALE and Taub-NUT (or ALF) hyper-Kahler four-manifolds can be naturally constructed as hyper-Kahler quotients. In the ALE case, this construction has long been understood in terms of D-branes; here we give a D-brane derivation in the Taub-NUT case. Likewise, instantons on ALE spaces and on Taub-NUT spaces have ADHM-like constructions related to hyper-Kahler quotients. Here we refine the analysis in the Taub-NUT case by making use of a D-brane probe.

  14. Optimum drying time for palm nuts for efficient nut cracking in small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Palm kernel, one of the end products of oil palm fruit processing is recovered by the cracking of the palm nuts which is first dried to aid efficient kernel recovery. In small-scale mills palm nuts are air-dried. This paper investigates the optimum drying time necessary for efficient nut cracking. Such factors as wholeness of kernel, ...

  15. Species determination of pine nuts in commercial samples causing pine nut syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Aase Æ.; Jessen, Flemming; Ballin, Nicolai Z.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of pine nuts from the species of Pinus armandii has been reported to cause dysgeusia, commonly known as pine mouth, or pine nut syndrome (PNS). However, the number of reports on pine nut consumptions of the different species and PNS is limited. This leaves open the possibility...

  16. Directed-spray application of paraquat and diuron in physic nut plants

    OpenAIRE

    Costa,N.V.; Neunfeld,T.H.; Ohland,T.; Piano,J.T.; Klein,J.

    2013-01-01

    There is little information about the selectivity of herbicides in physic nut (Jatropha curcas) in Brazil. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the selectivity of different doses and mixtures of paraquat and diuron in direted-spray applications in physic nut plants in greenhouse conditions. The study used a randomized block design, with five replicates. The treatments were: paraquat (200 and 600 g ha-1), diuron (1,000 and 2,000 g ha-1), paraquat + diuron (200 + 1,000 g ha-1), paraquat + di...

  17. Low percentage of clinically relevant pistachio nut and mango co-sensitisation in cashew nut sensitised children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, J. P. M.; el Bouche, R.; van Wijk, R. Gerth; de Groot, H.; Wichers, H. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.; de Jong, N. W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cashew nut, pistachio nut and mango belong to the Anacardiaceae family and are botanically related. Therefore, cashew nut sensitised children are frequently advised to eliminate cashew nuts and pistachio nuts from their diet. The 'Improvement of Diagnostic mEthods for ALlergy assessment

  18. Low percentage of clinically relevant pistachio nut and mango co-sensitisation in cashew nut sensitised children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.M. van der Valk; Bouche, R.E. (R. el); R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); H. de Groot (Hans); H.J. Wichers; A.E.J. Dubois; N.W. de Jong (Nicolette)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cashew nut, pistachio nut and mango belong to the Anacardiaceae family and are botanically related. Therefore, cashew nut sensitised children are frequently advised to eliminate cashew nuts and pistachio nuts from their diet. The ‘Improvement of Diagnostic mEthods for ALlergy

  19. Low percentage of clinically relevant pistachio nut and mango co-sensitisation in cashew nut sensitised children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, van der J.P.M.; Bouche, el R.; Gerth van Wijk, R.; Groot, de H.; Wichers, H.J.; Dubois, A.E.J.; Jong, de N.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cashew nut, pistachio nut and mango belong to the Anacardiaceae family and are botanically related. Therefore, cashew nut sensitised children are frequently advised to eliminate cashew nuts and pistachio nuts from their diet. The ‘Improvement of Diagnostic mEthods for ALlergy

  20. Distribution of throughfall and stemflow in multi-strata agroforestry, perennial monoculture, fallow and primary forest in central Amazonia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Götz; Ferreira da Silva, Luciana; Wolf, Marc-Andree; Geraldes Teixeira, Wenceslau; Zech, Wolfgang

    1999-07-01

    The partitioning of rain water into throughfall, stemflow and interception loss when passing through plant canopies depends on properties of the respective plant species, such as leaf area and branch angles. In heterogeneous vegetation, such as tropical forest or polycultural systems, the presence of different plant species may consequently result in a mosaic of situations with respect to quantity and quality of water inputs into the soil. As these processes influence not only the water availability for the plants, but also water infiltration and nutrient leaching, the understanding of plant effects on the repartitioning of rain water may help in the optimization of land use systems and management practices. We measured throughfall and stemflow in a perennial polyculture (multi-strata agroforestry), monocultures of peach palm (Bactris gasipaes) for fruit and for palmito, a monoculture of cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum), spontaneous fallow and primary forest during one year in central Amazonia, Brazil. The effect on rain water partitioning was measured separately for four useful tree species in the polyculture and for two tree species in the primary forest. Throughfall at two stem distances, and stemflow, differed significantly between tree species, resulting in pronounced spatial patterns of water input into the soil in the polyculture system. For two tree species, peach palm for fruit (Bactris gasipaes) and Brazil nut trees (Bertholletia excelsa), the water input into the soil near the stem was significantly higher than the open-area rainfall. This could lead to increased nutrient leaching when fertilizer is applied close to the stem of these trees. In the primary forest, such spatial patterns could also be detected, with significantly higher water input near a palm (Oenocarpus bacaba) than near a dicotyledonous tree species (Eschweilera sp.). Interception losses were 6·4% in the polyculture, 13·9 and 12·3% in the peach palm monocultures for fruit and for

  1. NUT carcinoma presenting in the palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjornstrup, Libana Raffoul; Reibel, Jesper; Kiss, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    NUT carcinomas (NC) are rare and aggressive tumours characterized by chromosomal rearrangements of the gene encoding for nuclear protein of the testis (NUT) located on chromosome 15q14. This article presents a case of a 60-year-old woman diagnosed with NC presenting as a fast growing primary tumo...

  2. Symmetries of Taub-NUT dual metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleanu, D.; Codoban, S.

    1998-01-01

    Recently geometric duality was analyzed for a metric which admits Killing tensors. An interesting example arises when the manifold has Killing-Yano tensors. The symmetries of the dual metrics in the case of Taub-NUT metric are investigated. Generic and non-generic symmetries of dual Taub-NUT metric are analyzed

  3. How nut and seed butters are processed

    Science.gov (United States)

    This month's food processing column follows the theme "How Is It Porcessed?". It will explore how nut and seed butters are processed. In recent years a variety of new nut and seed butters have entered the marketplace. Their predecessor, peanut butter, as well as these new products and the process...

  4. A search for phylogenetically informative wood characters within Lecythidaceae s.l.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, F.; Baas, P.; Jansen, S.; Smets, E.

    2007-01-01

    The wood structure of 71 species representing 24 genera of the pantropical Lecythidaceae s.l., including the edible Brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) and the spectacular cannon-ball tree (Couroupita guianensis), was investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy. This study focused on

  5. Levels of inorganic constituents in raw nuts and seeds on the Swedish market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodushkin, I; Engström, E; Sörlin, D; Baxter, D

    2008-03-25

    The levels of approximately 70 elements were determined in different culinary nuts (hazelnuts, walnuts, almonds, bitter almonds, pecans, cashews, Brazil nuts, pistachios, pine nuts, peanuts and coconuts) and seeds (pumpkin and sunflower) available on the Swedish market. The study was limited to raw, virtually unprocessed nuts and seeds (both shelled and unshelled) excluding mixed, roasted or salted products. In total, 44 products from different suppliers were analyzed, with the number of samples per nut/seed variety reflecting the availability of unprocessed products in retail outlets, varying from two for bitter almonds and pistachios to six for hazelnuts and walnuts. This selection includes samples from at least 11 different countries of origin. The optimized analytical procedure consists of microwave-assisted sample digestion using a HNO3/HF mixture, followed by multi-elemental analysis by double focusing, sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The analyses were accompanied by rigorous quality control measures including thorough control of potential sample contamination at all analytical stages, participation in inter-laboratory performance assessment schemes, and the analysis of certified reference materials of plant origin. Concentrations thus obtained were compared with data from product labels (where available), food composition tables and other relevant surveys, demonstrating, depending on the elements in question, close agreement as well as considerable differences.

  6. Comportamento da castanha-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa e da cupiúba (Goupia glabra em sistema agrosilvicultural na região da Confiança, Cantá - Roraima Behavior of castanha-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa and cupiúba (Goupia glabra in an agrosilvicultural system in Confiança region, Cantá - Roraima State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Marise Moreira Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho objetivou estudar o desempenho das espécies castanha-do-brasil (Bertholetia excelsa e cupiúba (Goupia glabra e o ajuste de uma função de crescimento e uma equação para estimar o diâmetro de copa em um modelo de sistema agroflorestal - SAF implantado em 1995 no Campo Experimental Confiança, Cantá, Estado de Roraima. Foram medidas 71 árvores de castanheira e 50 de cupiúbas totalizando 121 árvores, sendo tomados o CAP (circunferência a 1,30 m do solo, altura total, altura de inserção da copa, diâmetro da copa e dados qualitativos como sobrevivência, qualidade do fuste, bifurcações e aspectos fitossanitários como doenças ou pragas. Das 71 árvores de castanheira avaliadas 20 (27,8% produziram frutos. A cupiúba apresentou alta porcentagem de indivíduos com bifurcação (cerca de 87,5%. A análise estatística indicou a função de Backman como a de melhor ajuste para as espécies observadas e com base nas equações construídas para estimar o diâmetro da copa em função do DAP pode-se fazer inferências sobre o espaço vital necessário para atingir uma determinada dimensão. Ambas as espécies apresentaram potencial silvicultural para recuperação de áreas alteradas em sistemas agroflorestais ou plantios homogêneos.The aim of this present work was to study the behavior of castanha-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa and cupiúba (Goupia glabra and also set a growing function and an equation for estimating the crown diameter in an agroforestry system model, installed in Confiança Experimental Station, Cantá, Roraima, Brazil, in 1995. We measured quantitative data, such as diameter basal height, total height, crown insertion height, crown diameter and qualitative data like survival, bole quality and phytosanitary aspects such as disease or pests. We analyzed the silvicultural behavior and estimated equation at the crown diameter in function of DBH, and adjusted a growing function for the cupiuba and

  7. NUT Carcinoma of the Sublingual Gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Simon; French, C A; Josiassen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NUT carcinoma (NC) is a recently described, rare and extremely aggressive cancer primarily located to supradiaphragmatic structures and affecting young individuals. NC is characterized by translocations involving the NUT gene on 15q14 with the most common translocation partner gene being BRD4 on 19......p13, resulting in the t(15;19)(q14;p13) karyotype. NC is poorly differentiated and is likely to be overlooked and misdiagnosed as poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) when immunohistochemical evaluation of NUT protein expression is omitted. Previously, NC has been found in the parotid...

  8. Genetic gains in physic nut using selection indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Lopes Bhering

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate genetic gains in physic nut (Jatropha curcas using selection indexes and to establish the best selection strategy for the species. Direct and indirect selection was carried out using different selection indexes, totalizing 14 strategies. One hundred and seventy five families from the active germplasm bank of Embrapa Agroenergy, Brasília, Brazil, were analyzed in a randomized complete block design with two replicates. The evaluated traits were: grain yield; seeds per fruit; endosperm/seed ratio; seed weight, length, width, and thickness; branches per plant at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m; plant height; stem diameter; canopy projection on rows and between lines; canopy volume; juvenility (days to the first flowering; and height of the first inflorescence. Evaluations were done during the second year of cultivation. The use of selection indexes is relevant to maximize the genetic gains in physic nut, favoring a better distribution of desirable traits. The multiplicative and restrictive indexes are considered the most promising for selection.

  9. The importance of diagnosing NUT midline carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Christopher A

    2013-03-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is an aggressive subset of squamous cell carcinoma, genetically defined by rearrangement of the NUT gene. The rearrangements most often take the form of BRD4-NUT fusions, and in a minority of cases, BRD3-NUT or NUT-variant fusions. The simple karyotypes of NMCs, in contrast to the complex ones of typical squamous cell carcinoma, suggest an alternate, genetic shortcut to squamous cancer. Although originally thought to be a disease of the mediastinum, NMC frequently (35 %) arises in the head and neck. Diagnosis is made simply by demonstration of nuclear immunoreactivity to NUT protein, and ancillary studies to characterize the fusion oncogene, though not required for diagnosis, are recommended. The prognosis is dismal, with a 6.7 month median survival, and treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic regimens is ineffective. The oncogenic mechanism of the dual bromodomains and the p300-binding portion of BRD4-NUT is to sequester p300 to localized regions of chromatin, leading to global transcriptional repression and blockade of differentiation. Two therapies which target this mechanism have emerged, including bromodomain inhibitors (BETi) and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), both of which induce differentiation and growth arrest of NMC cells, both in vitro and in vivo. BETi is available to adults with NMC through a phase I clinical trial, and clinical response to HDACi has been demonstrated in pediatric patients. The emergence of these promising targeted therapies gives hope that NMC may one day be effectively treated and provides a strong rationale for diagnostic testing for NMC.

  10. Relação da produção de sementes de castanha-do-Brasil com características morfométricas da copa e índices de competição Relationship of Brazil-nut seed yield to crown morphometric characteristics and competition indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Tonini

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a relação da produção de sementes de árvores nativas de castanha-do-brasil com características morfométricas da copa e índices de competição. Os dados foram coletados em florestas nativas no Sul do Estado de Roraima, com 88 árvores amostradas em diferentes classes de produtividade. Em cada árvore, foram medidas as variáveis dendrométricas e foram determinados os índices morfométricos da copa e os índices de competição, dependentes e independentes da distância. As relações entre a morfometria, os parâmetros da copa e os índices de competição com a produção de sementes foram obtidas com o coeficiente de correlação de Spearman e os testes de Kruskal-Wallis e Mann-Witney. Para inferir as relações entre as variáveis morfométricas da copa e o diâmetro do tronco, utilizou-se a análise de regressão linear pelo procedimento "stepwise". As árvores mais produtivas foram aquelas com posições superiores no dossel, que apresentam copas bem formadas, mais compridas e com menor relação altura/diâmetro. A competição teve pouco efeito sobre a produção de sementes, em árvores adultas que começam a produzir frutos somente após atingirem as posições superiores do dossel.The aim of this work was to evaluate the relationship of seed yield of Brazil-nut native trees to crown morphometric characteristics and competition indexes. The data were collected in 88 sample trees, in natural forests in the South of Roraima State, Brazil, regarding different productivity classes. In each tree, the dendrometric variables, the indexes of morphometry and competition (distance dependent and independent were measured. The relationships between crown morphometric variables and competition indexes to seed yield were obtained through the Spearman correlation coefficient and Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. A linear regression analysis, through the stepwise procedure, was used to infer crown

  11. Escherichia coli Field Contamination of Pecan Nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Karen A.; Amling, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    More pecan samples collected from grazed orchards were contaminated with Escherichia coli than were samples from nongrazed orchards. No differences in frequency of contamination between mechanically and manually harvested nuts occurred. Nutmeats from whole uncracked pecans that were soaked for 24 h in a lactose broth solution containing E. coli did not become contaminated. Twentyfour percent of the whole pecans soaked in water for 48 h to simulate standing in a rain puddle developed openings along shell suture lines which did not completely close when the nuts were redried. PMID:4584575

  12. Radiation preservation of dry fruits and nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, M.; Sattar, A.; Ahmad, W.A.; Khan, I.

    1990-06-01

    Present studies were conducted to investigate insect infestation and oxidative changes of packaging materials. Dry fruits and nuts such as apricots, dates raisins, almonds, pinenuts and walnuts were used for these experiments. Insect infestation and other physico-chemical parameters were used for quality evaluation of the stored dry fruits and nuts. The effect of irradiation and polyethylene (PE) thickness on the over all acceptance of dry fruits on their color, texture, taste and flavor were evaluated. Radiation treatment and low temperature independently inhibited insect infestation during storage. (A.B.)

  13. Properties of Brazil nuts: A review | Kluczkovski | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 8 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. More Nuts and Bolts of Michaelis-Menten Enzyme Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01

    Several additions to a classroom activity are proposed in which an "enzyme" (the student) converts "substrates" (nut-bolt assemblies) into "products" (separated nuts and bolts) by unscrewing them. (Contains 1 table.)

  15. Gedefinieerde belangen: algemeen nut na de Geefwet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.C. Hemels (Sigrid)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractInleiding: Sinds 1 januari 2012 is voor het eerst sinds de introductie van het begrip ‘algemeen belang’ in de Nederlandse belastingwet in 1917 het begrip ‘algemeen nut’ gedefinieerd. Bovendien geldt nu één definitie van algemeen nut voor alle belastingwetten, doordat deze definitie is

  16. Tiger nut: as a plant, its derivatives and benefits | Bamishaiye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... thrombosis and colon cancer, among others. The presence of anti-nutrients like polyphenols and tannins can be eliminated by boiling in water. The tiger nut, though under-utilized, is still a good food snack for all. There is a need for awareness creation on tiger nut's inherent nutritional properties. Key words: nut, nutrition, ...

  17. Determination of Optimum Moisture Content of Palm Nut Cracking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    A study of the optimum drying time for sun-dried palm nuts, for efficient nut cracking was carried out by Okoli (2003) but the moisture content was not reported. The objective of this study was therefore to determine the optimum moisture content for the production of whole kernel from a palm nut cracked by impact in a static ...

  18. Nut Growers Hear It Pays to Care for Black Walnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Jr. Ponder; James E. Jones; Rita Mueller; Andrea Clark

    2003-01-01

    Careful attention to walnut trees could pay off in nut yields. Nutrient management and improved nut varieties can make a big difference in black walnut nut production. This was the theme of the 2002 American Black Walnut Conference in Springfield, MO. The conference was sponsored by the Center For Advancement of American Black Walnut and Southwest Missouri RC&D (...

  19. Biodegradation of shea nut cake by indigenous soil bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is to isolate bacteria with high shea nut cake degrading ability and consequently select the potential application of these bacteria in bioremediation. The bacteria were grown in mineral salt medium supplemented with 2% shea nut cake as sole source of carbon. More Gram negative bacteria were involved in shea nut ...

  20. Mycology and spoilage of retail cashew nuts | Adebajo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the species recovered induced detectable loss in weights of the milled nuts, though to varying extents and would be expected to cause considerable spoilage of the nuts. Key words: Cashew nut, Anacardium occidentale, fungal count, mycology, Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., spoilage. African Journal of Biotechnology ...

  1. Nut-enriched bread is an effective and acceptable vehicle to improve regular nut consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Asika; Chisholm, Alexandra; Gray, Andrew; Tey, Siew Ling; Williamson-Poutama, Destynee; Cameron, Sonya L; Brown, Rachel C

    2016-10-01

    Consuming 30 g of nuts/day is recommended to reduce chronic disease. However, nut consumption appears far from ideal among several populations. A potential strategy to increase consumption is to add nuts to a staple, for example, bread. Whether the health benefits and acceptability of nuts persist in this form is currently unknown. Thus, we examined the effects of consuming three nut-enriched breads on postprandial glycaemia, satiety, gastrointestinal tolerance, dietary intakes, and acceptance. In this controlled, crossover study, 32 participants were randomly allocated to receive one of four breads for 8 days each. Three breads contained either 30 g of finely sliced hazelnuts, 30 g semi-defatted hazelnut flour, or 15 g of each (amounts per 120 g bread) and were compared with a control nut-free bread. Blood glucose response was measured over 120 min, along with ratings of gastrointestinal discomfort. Appetite ratings and diet diaries were completed during each treatment period. Area under the blood glucose curve was significantly lower for the nut breads compared to the control bread (all P breads (all P ≥ 0.130). There were no significant differences in satiety (all P ≥ 0.135) or gastrointestinal symptoms (all P ≥ 0.102) between the breads. Acceptance was highest for the finely sliced hazelnut bread. Furthermore, consuming hazelnut-enriched bread improved diet quality, increasing monounsaturated fat, vitamin E, and dietary fibre intakes. Bread appears to be an effective and acceptable vehicle for increasing nut consumption, resulting in improved postprandial glycaemia and diet profiles. Long-term studies are now required.

  2. Incidence of aflatoxins in Iran pistachio nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghali, A M; Yazdanpanah, H; Doraki, N; Abouhossain, G; Hassibi, M; Ali-abadi, S; Aliakbarpoor, M; Amirahmadi, M; Askarian, A; Fallah, N; Hashemi, T; Jalali, M; Kalantari, N; Khodadadi, E; Maddah, B; Mohit, R; Mohseny, M; Phaghihy, Z; Rahmani, A; Setoodeh, L; Soleimany, E; Zamanian, F

    2007-05-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are highly toxic and carcinogenic secondary fungal metabolites and have been detected in various food commodities including pistachio nuts. Pistachio nuts were produced in Iran during March 2002-February 2003 analyzed for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) using immunoaffinity column and quantitated by HPLC and/or TLC-scanner. In this regard, 3356 pistachio nut samples were collected. After dividing samples to sub-samples, 10,068 AF analyses were done. Among 10,068 samples analyzed, AFB1 was detected in 3699 samples (36.7% of the total) with the mean and median of 5.9 (+/-41.7) ng/g and 0.1 ng/g, respectively. Total AF (AFT) was detected in 2852 samples (28.3% of the total) with the mean and median of 7.3 (+/-53.2)ng/g and 0.4 ng/g, respectively. AFB1 level in 1191 samples (11.8%) was above the maximum tolerated level (MTL) of AFB1 in pistachio nut in Iran (5 ng/g). Regarding AFT, the mean contamination level (7.3 ng/g) was lower than MTL of AFT in pistachio nut in Iran as well as lower than the proposed draft maximum level of Codex Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants for AFT (15 ng/g), and only 7.5% of samples had levels above the MTL.

  3. Driving factors of the communities of phytophagous and predatory mites in a physic nut plantation and spontaneous plants associated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Wilton P; Sarmento, Renato A; Teodoro, Adenir V; Neto, Marçal P; Ignacio, Maíra

    2013-08-01

    Seasonal changes in climate and plant diversity are known to affect the population dynamics of both pests and natural enemies within agroecosystems. In Brazil, spontaneous plants are usually tolerated in small-scale physic nut plantations over the year, which in turn may mediate interactions between pests and natural enemies within this agroecosystem. Here, we aimed to access the influence of seasonal variation of abiotic (temperature, relative humidity and rainfall) and biotic (diversity of spontaneous plants, overall richness and density of mites) factors on the communities of phytophagous and predatory mites found in a physic nut plantation and its associated spontaneous plants. Mite sampling was monthly conducted in dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous leaves of spontaneous plants as well as in physic nut shrubs over an entire year. In the dry season there was a higher abundance of phytophagous mites (Tenuipalpidae, Tarsonemidae and Tetranychidae) on spontaneous plants than on physic nut shrubs, while predatory mites (Phytoseiidae) showed the opposite pattern. The overall density of mites on spontaneous plants increased with relative humidity and diversity of spontaneous plants. Rainfall was the variable that most influenced the density of mites inhabiting physic nut shrubs. Agroecosystems comprising spontaneous plants associated with crops harbour a rich mite community including species of different trophic levels which potentially benefit natural pest control due to increased diversity and abundance of natural enemies.

  4. Sustainability in a nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvertown, Jonathan

    2004-06-01

    Sustainable exploitation is widely advocated as a strategy for reconciling economic pressures upon natural habitats with nature conservation. Two recent papers examine different aspects of the sustainability of the nut harvest on wild populations of Brazil nut trees Bertholletia excelsa in Amazonia. Peres et al. find that many populations of the Brazil nut tree lack juvenile trees and are not regenerating. In a socioeconomic study, Escobal and Aldana find that nut-gathering provides insufficient income on its own to support nut-gatherers and that their other income-raising activities damage the forest. The existence of a market for rainforest products is, therefore, not sufficient on its own to prevent habitat destruction or the overexploitation of the resource and a more sophisticated approach to sustainability is required. Development of a market in ethically traded Brazil nuts might be one solution.

  5. Resource Theft in Tropical Forest Communities: Implications for Non-timber Management, Livelihoods, and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E. Duchelle

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Increased devolution of forest ownership and management rights to local control has the potential to promote both conservation and livelihood development in remote tropical regions. Such shifts in property rights, however, can generate conflicts, particularly when combined with rapidly increasing values of forest resources. We explored the phenomenon of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa theft in communities in Western Amazonia. Through interviews with 189 Brazil nut collectors in 12 communities in Bolivia and Brazil and participation in the 2006 and 2007 harvests, we quantified relative income derived from Brazil nuts, reported nut thefts, and nut collection and management practices. We found a much greater incidence of reported Brazil nut thefts in Pando, Bolivia than in the adjacent state of Acre, Brazil. Our analyses suggest that three factors may have affected nut thefts in the forest: (1 contrasts in the timing and process of formally recognizing property rights, (2 different historic settlement patterns, and (3 varying degrees of economic dependence on Brazil nuts. Threat of theft influenced Brazil nut harvest regimes, with potentially long-term implications for forest-based livelihoods, and management and conservation of Brazil nut-rich forests in Western Amazonia.

  6. Sobrevivência e Frutificação de Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl. em Áreas Desmatadas em Oriximiná, Pará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Scoles

    Full Text Available RESUMO Analisaram-se as condições biológicas (sobrevivência, reprodução, rebrotação e estrutura de populações de castanheira (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl. nas margens de estradas em áreas desmatadas (Oriximiná, Pará. Identificaram-se 441 árvores de castanheira (Diâmetro à Altura do Peito – DAP > 10 cm. De cada árvore, coletaram-se as coordenadas geográficas, dados dendrométricos e registrou-se o estado vital e reprodutivo, assim como evidências de perturbação e rebrotamento. Cerca de 75% das castanheiras foram encontradas em estado morto. A estrutura populacional das árvores vivas é envelhecida (DAP médio, 159 ± 0,55 cm, com baixa presença de jovens improdutivos (4,6%. Pouco mais da metade das castanheiras adultas sobreviventes (DAP > 40 cm apresentou evidências de frutificação. As árvores com frutos apresentaram uma área de copa significativamente maior que as improdutivas. São necessárias medidas urgentes de conservação e reflorestamento da população de castanheiras na região do estudo, em conformidade da legislação ambiental vigente.

  7. Nuts in the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Bulló, Mònica; Sabaté, Joan

    2014-07-01

    Nuts are rich in many bioactive compounds that can exert beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. We reviewed the evidence relating nut consumption and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components. Nuts reduce the postprandial glycemic response; however, long-term trials of nuts on insulin resistance and glycemic control in diabetic individuals are inconsistent. Epidemiologic studies have shown that nuts may lower the risk of diabetes incidence in women. Few studies have assessed the association between nuts and abdominal obesity, although an inverse association with body mass index and general obesity has been observed. Limited evidence suggests that nuts have a protective effect on blood pressure and endothelial function. Nuts have a cholesterol-lowering effect, but the relation between nuts and hypertriglyceridemia and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is not well established. A recent pooled analysis of clinical trials showed that nuts are inversely related to triglyceride concentrations only in subjects with hypertriglyceridemia. An inverse association was found between the frequency of nut consumption and the prevalence and the incidence of MetS. Several trials evaluated the effect of nuts on subjects with MetS and found that they may have benefits in some components. Compared with a low-fat diet, a Mediterranean diet enriched with nuts could be beneficial for MetS management. The protective effects on metabolism could be explained by the modulation of inflammation and oxidation. Further trials are needed to clarify the role of nuts in MetS prevention and treatment. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Radiation preservation of dry fruits and nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahid, M.; Sattar, A.; Jan, M.; Ahmad, A.; Khan, I.

    1988-01-01

    Dried fruits are considered a major source of income and foreign exchange in many countries. The spoilage of dried fruits and nuts by insect infestation, colour deterioration and chemical changes during storage are the serious problems especially under humid tropical conditions. The present work was undertaken to study the effect of irradiation in combination with different modified storage environments on insect infestation as well as chemical and sensory quality indices. The affect of gamma radiation dose of 1 KGy and storage environments such as air vacuum and carbon dioxide on insect infestation of dry fruits and nuts. In the case of un-irradiated samples, insect infestation progressed throughout the storage period especially in those kept under air. The vacuum storage was found better in checking infestation followed by CO/sub/2 and air. (orig./A.B.)

  9. Circular orbits in the Taub-NUT and massless Taub-NUT spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    In this work, we study the equatorial causal geodesics of the Taub-NUT (TN) spacetime in comparison with massless TN spacetime. We emphasized both on the null circular geodesics and time-like circular geodesics. From the effective potential diagram of null and time-like geodesics, we differentiate the geodesics structure between TN spacetime and massless TN spacetime. It has been shown that there is a key role of the NUT parameter to changes the shape of pattern of the potential well in the NUT spacetime in comparison with massless NUT spacetime. We compared the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO), marginally bound circular orbit (MBCO) and circular photon orbit (CPO) of the said spacetime with graphically in comparison with massless cases. Moreover, we compute the radius of ISCO, MBCO and CPO for extreme TN black hole (BH). Interestingly, we show that these three radii coincides with the Killing horizon, i.e. the null geodesic generators of the horizon. Finally in Appendix A, we compute the center-of-mass (CM) energy for TN BH and massless TN BH. We show that in both cases, the CM energy is finite. For extreme NUT BH, we found that the diverging nature of CM energy. First, we have observed that a non-asymptotic flat, spherically symmetric and stationary extreme BH showing such feature.

  10. Socio-economic aspects of areca nut use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croucher, R; Islam, S

    2002-01-01

    The socio-economic aspects of areca nut consumption have been overlooked. A narrative review was conducted to establish some of these features of areca nut consumption. Medline, Pubmed and the World Wide Web were searched using the terms: areca nut, betel nut, areca catechu and pan masala. Further analysis was conducted of datasets describing aspects of United Kingdom areca nut sales and consumption. South Asian economies at different stages of development have varying areca nut cultivation practices, employment opportunities and marketing strategies. Attempts at regulation of areca nut import and sales are described. Retail practice among the South Asian communities of the United Kingdom was found to reflect the diverse consumer practices current in their countries of origin. A study of areca nut consumption patterns and motivations among Bangladeshi women resident in East London identified differences between those chewing areca nut in paan with and without tobacco. Further research into the socio-economic aspects of areca nut consumption is needed which should be multidisciplinary in focus, of sound scientific quality and incorporating the opinions of consumers.

  11. Nuts for Physical Health and Fitness: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Hamasaki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nuts are rich in various nutrients. Recent evidence suggests that nut consumption has beneficial effects on blood pressure, lipid profile, obesity, inflammation, and oxidative stress, which reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have shown that nut consumption improves body composition without causing weight gain, despite total energy intake increases. However, evidence regarding nut consumption and physical fitness is limited. The aim of this mini review is to summarize the evidence regarding effects of nuts on physical health, fitness, and exercise performance. Almond supplementation improves exercise performance, but pistachio supplementation does not. The effect of nuts on exercise performance was controversial. On the other hand, unsaturated fatty acid-enriched nuts had a beneficial effect on skeletal muscle mass and oxygen consumption. A diet enriched with nuts also improved physical fitness, which was enhanced by exercise. Although the characteristics of the study participants and the interventions used in the studies are heterogeneous, nuts have a potential to improve physical fitness. However, further studies are required to reveal the effects of nuts on physical fitness, exercise performance, and endurance capacity.

  12. Mezclas binarias y ternarias del aceite y grasa hidrogenada de la castaña de Brasil (Bertholletia excelsa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polakiewicz, Bronislaw

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Crude Brazilian nut oil was hydrogenated at 175ºC, 3 atm., 60 minutes (GH1, and 150ºC, 1 atm., 30 minutes (GH2, and with this products and the crude oil were prepared ternary blends. Fatty acids demonstrated the increase of stearic acid from 11.6% of crude oil to 56.7% in GH1 and 16.3% in GH2. In the blends, were determined the yield point, solid fat content, melting point and viscosity, for this blends were applied a special model of multiple regression. Results showed that the estimated properties were not dependent on the three components interactions. In general, the significant interactions, blends crude oil/GH1 and GH1/GH2, showed an antagonic, effect to consistency and solid fat content, typical of eutectic interactions of fats. The interactions were not significative for melting point and viscosity at 60ºC, attesting a perfect mixing model.El aceite de castaña de Brasil crudo se sometió a dos hidrogenaciones, a 175ºC, 3 atm, 60 minutos (GH1, y a 150ºC, 1 atm., 30 minutos (GH2, y con los productos de éstas, y el aceite original, se prepararon mezclas binarias y ternarias. Se incrementó la concentración del ácido esteárico de 11.6% del aceite original a 56.7% en GH1 y a 16.3% en GH2. Se realizaron los análisis de consistencia, contenido de grasa sólida, punto de fusión y viscosidad, y sobre estos parámetros se aplicó un modelo de regresión múltiple. Los resultados indicaron que las propiedades estimadas no dependían de las interacciones de los tres componentes. Las interacciones fueron significativas para las mezclas de aceite bruto/GH1 y GH1/GH2, demostrando efecto antagónico para la consistencia y contenido de grasa sólida. Las interacciones no fueron significativas para el punto de fusión y viscosidad a 60ºC, demostrando un modelo perfecto de mezcla.

  13. Fate of betel nut chemical constituents following nut treatment prior to chewing and its relation to oral precancerous & cancerous lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, M N

    1988-05-01

    Areca (betel) nuts are popularly used as chewing agents. The nuts are chewed as such or processed by roasting, sundrying, soaking or boiling prior to chewing. Various agents such as slaked lime, tobacco, betel leaves are often incorporated into the chew. The habits of betel chewing are closely associated with oral cancer and precancerous lesions. The literature is repleted with numerous works on carcinogenicity of areca nut. It was demonstrated that the incorporation of lime and tobacco to the nut increase the incidence of mucosal changes. Chewers of soaked or boiled nuts demonstrated lower incidence of mucosal changes than those chewers of raw, sundried or roasted nuts. Estimation of the active chemical constituents in the nuts namely arecoline and polyphenols following nut treatments by sundrying, roasting, soaking and boiling, revealed reduction in these chemical contents. Marked reductions were observed when the nuts were subjected to soaking and boiling. These reductions may explain for the different in the incidence of the mucosal changes among users of different processed nut varieties.

  14. Mixed models identify physic nut genotypes adapted to environments with different phosphorus availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, P E; Laviola, B G; Martins, L D; Amaral, J F T; Rodrigues, W N

    2016-08-19

    The aim of this study was to screen physic nut (Jatropha curcas) genotypes that differ in their phosphorous (P) use, using mixed models. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse located in the experimental area of the Centro de Ciências Agrárias of the Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, in Alegre, ES, Brazil. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design, using a 10 x 3-factorial scheme, including ten physic nut genotypes and two environments that differed in their levels of soil P availability (10 and 60 mg/dm 3 ), each with four replications. After 100 days of cultivation, we evaluated the plant height, stem diameter, root volume, root dry matter, aerial part dry matter, total dry matter, as well as the efficiency of absorption, and use. The parameters were estimated for combined selection while considering the studied parameters: stability and adaptability for both environments were obtained using the harmonic mean of the relative performance of the predicted genotypic values. High genotype by environment interactions were observed for most physic nut traits, indicating considerable influences of P availability on the phenotypic value. The genotype Paraíso simultaneously presented high adaptability and stability for aerial part dry matter, total dry matter, and P translocation efficiency. The genotype CNPAE-C2 showed a positive response to P fertilization by increasing both the total and aerial part dry matter.

  15. Bioavailability assessment of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Domínguez-González, Raquel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2016-08-15

    Bioavailability of essential and toxic metals in edible nuts and seeds has been assessed by using an in vitro dialyzability approach. The samples studied included walnuts, Brazil nuts, Macadamia nuts, pecans, hazelnuts, chestnuts, cashews, peanuts, pistachios and seeds (almond, pine, pumpkin and sunflower). Metals were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in dialyzates and also in samples after a microwave assisted acid digestion pre-treatment. Low dialyzability percentages were found for Al, Fe and Hg; moderate percentages were found for Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, P, Pb, Se, Sr, Tl and Zn; and high dialyzability ratios were found for As, Cr and Ni. The highest dialyzability percentages were found in raw chestnuts and raw hazelnuts. Metal dialyzability was found to be negatively affected by fat content. Positive correlation was found between carbohydrate content and metal dialyzability ratios. Protein and dietary fibre content did not influence metal bioavailability. Predicted dialyzability for some metals based on fat and protein content could also be established. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Allergy to pine nuts in a bird fancier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, A; Vermeulen, A; Dieges, P H; van Toorenenbergen, A W

    1996-10-01

    A patient is described with the bird-egg syndrome who experienced an anaphylactic reaction after eating some of her parrot's food (pine nuts: Pinus pinea). Specific IgE against this nut and another pine nut (P. cembra) was demonstrated by RAST. Cross-reactivity between these botanically related seeds was shown by RAST inhibition. Besides avian antigens, bird food antigens should be taken into consideration when symptoms of allergy occur on exposure to birds.

  17. In vitro availability of iron from selected nuts and oilseeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, N S; Hotwani, M S

    1993-05-01

    Availability of iron from sixteen varieties of selected nuts and oilseeds was assessed by in vitro method. Wide and significant variations were recorded in the contents of total and ionisable iron and in the bioavailability of iron of the nuts and oilseeds. The total iron content was the highest in nigre seeds and the lowest in linseed seeds. Bioavailability of iron was significantly high from pistachio nut and almond and markedly low from groundnut. Most of the nuts and oilseeds were found to have less than 10 percent of bioavailability of iron, hence, they were not considered as good sources of iron among plant foods.

  18. Allowable stem nut wear and diagnostic monitoring for MOVs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinburne, P.

    1994-01-01

    After a motor-operated valve (MOV) stem nut failure in 1991 that contributed to a forced plant shutdown, the FitzPatrick Plant staff developed criteria to check for excessive stem nut wear in MOVs. Allowable stem nut wear monitoring uses both direct dimensional measurement and diagnostic test data interpretation. The wear allowance is based on the recommended permitted backlash discussed in the Electric Power Research Institute/Nuclear Maintenance Assistance Center Technical Repair Guideline for the Limitorque SMB-000 Motor Actuator. The diagnostic analysis technique measures the time at zero load and compares this with a precalculated allowable zero force time. Excessive zero force time may be the result of other MOV problems, such as a loose stem nut lock nut or excessive free play in the drive sleeve bearing. Stress levels for new or nominal stem nuts and stem nuts with the full wear allowance were compared. Bending and shear stresses at the thread root increase for the maximum wear condition when compared with a open-quotes newclose quotes stem nut. These stresses are directly related to the thread root thickness. For typical MOV loading and common stem threading (with two diameters of thread engagement), the thread stresses are well within acceptable limits for ASTM B584-C86300 (formerly B147-863) manganese bronze (typical stem nut material)

  19. Areca nut and its role in oral submucous fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhu, Rachana V.; Prabhu, Vishnudas; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Shenai, Prashant; Suvarna, Nithin; Dandekeri, Savita

    2014-01-01

    Areca nut, commonly called as betel nut or supari, is a fruit of areca catechu palm tree, which is native of South Asia and Pacific Islands. The seed or endosperm is consumed fresh, boiled or after sun drying or curing. Chewing areca nut is thought to have central nervous system stimulating effect and along with this it is known to have salivary stimulating and digestive properties. According to the traditional Ayurvedic medicine, chewing areca nut and betel leaf is a good remedy against hali...

  20. Beyond the wild nut: moving toward profitable black walnut nut crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Hammons; Felix, Jr. Ponder; John Rickman

    2004-01-01

    Currently, about 2 million pounds of black walnut nutmeats are consumed annually, requiring about 26 million pounds of wild in-shell nuts (hulled, wet weight). Walnuts from wild trees are variable in quality, yield, and moisture, reducing the amount of good, salable nutmeats produced. Consequently, the price that can be paid to the harvester/producer is limited....

  1. Cashew nut shell liquid resin used as matrix for compound materials; O LCC (Liquido da castanha do caju) como matriz em materiais compostos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes de; Nogueira, Ricardo Emilio Ferreira Quevedo [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    1996-12-31

    Cashew nut shell liquid resin a by product of cashew processing industry is a naturally occurring phenol of low cost and are used in Brazil as fuel in the industrial production of cashew nut or as a structural material when associated with coconut fiber or rice shell. A high measured Tg points to noble applications. This paper presents some properties of LCC resin and concludes that it has good perspectives as a composite matrice to work at elevated temperatures. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Does providing written dietary advice improve the ingestion of non-allergic nuts in children with existing nut allergies? - A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M; South, C; Quinn, P; Chan, D; Palmer, S; Netting, M; Gold, M

    2016-05-01

    Allergy to one or more nuts is common in children and often complete nut avoidance is advised. More recently, introduction of non-allergic nuts into the diet is advised by some allergists. This study aims to determine whether the provision of additional written dietary advice increases the ingestion of non-allergic nuts by children with nut allergy. Secondary aims include determining which factors facilitate or prevent successful inclusion of non-allergic nuts in the diet, and how inclusion influences quality of life, sensitization and the rate of nut reactions. This is a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial of children with nut allergy who were asked to ingest one or more non-allergic nuts. Participants were 75 children aged 2-16 years (Intervention=36, Control=39), recruited in Adelaide, Australia. Randomized participants were supplied with the intervention (recipe booklet and monthly reminder text messages) or provided standard verbal dietary advice. After 6 months participants were assessed by a blinded investigator with regard to nut ingestion, quality of life, sensitization and nut reactions. The intervention did not increase the ingestion of non-allergic nuts. A negative hospital challenge was a predictor of successful introduction. Parental report of child concern about a reaction was the greatest barrier. Ingestion of non-allergic nuts did not improve quality of life or change nut sensitization. Few nut reactions occurred during the study. Ingestion of non-allergic nuts by children with nut allergy was not improved by additional dietary intervention. Selective introduction of non-allergic nuts is difficult to achieve when the child is anxious about introduction and challenges cannot be done in a medically supervised setting. This dietary intervention did not improve non-allergic nut ingestion by nut allergic children. Hospital challenge increased introduction rates, whilst parentally reported child concern about a reaction reduced success. Non

  3. Removal of tannin from Shea nut cake by Pseudomonas strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bacteria were grown in mineral salt medium supplemented with 2% shea nut cake as sole source of carbon. The bacteria isolate was identified biochemically as Pseudomonas aerugenosa and reduced total tannin concentration in shea nut cake from 54.58 g Kg-1 to 8.71 g Kg-1 (84%) in 10 days and 92% in 20 days.

  4. Effects of raw bambara nut ( Voandzeia subterranea l) waste and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results show that increasing levels of raw bambara nut waste in the diets increased (P < 0.05) average daily feed intake and feed cost per kg weight gain, but decreased (P < 0.05) final body weight, average daily weight gain, feed conversion efficiency and protein efficiency ratio. Increasing raw bambara nut waste levels ...

  5. An investigation on mechanisms of blanked nut formation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of blank nuts is common in Corylus heterophylla Fisch orchards of China. This study was aimed to find the possible mechanisms involved in blank nuts formation in wild C. heterophylla Fisch species. The effects of pollination, defoliation and girdling on fruit production of C. heterophylla Fisch were studied ...

  6. A baseline survey of tiger nut ( Cyperus esculentus ) production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus) is a minor but important crop in Ghana. In a survey conducted on the production and marketing of the crop at Aduamoa in the Kwahu South District of Ghana, it was observed that tiger nut production was predominantly the work of women, with 70 per cent of farmers being women and 30 per ...

  7. Anaphylaxis to pine nut: cross-reactivity to Artemisia vulgaris?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Alves, R; Pregal, A; Pereira-Santos, M C; Branco-Ferreira, M; Lundberg, M; Oman, H; Pereira-Barbosa, M

    2008-01-01

    The use of pine nuts, the seeds of Pinus pinea, is on the increasing in the modern Mediterranean diet. Little more than 20 cases of allergy to this tree nut have been published, and cross-reactivity with pine pollen, peanut and almond has already been reported. We describe the case of a young boy with several episodes of anaphylaxis after pine nut ingestion. Specific IgE to pine nut and Artemisia vulgaris was demonstrated by skin prick tests and in vitro determination of specific IgE, although no IgE to pine pollen or other nuts was detected. Immunoblotting of Artemisia vulgaris and pine nut revealed two matching diffuse bands, just below 14 kDa and 30 kDa. The ImmunoCAP inhibition assays showed complete inhibition of pine nut specific IgE after serum incubation with Artemisia vulgaris extract. As far as we know, this is the first reported case of documented cross-reactivity between pine nut and Artemisia vulgaris.

  8. An investigation on mechanisms of blanked nut formation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-04-12

    Apr 12, 2012 ... was aimed to find the possible mechanisms involved in blank nuts formation in wild C. heterophylla. Fisch species. The effects ... branches might be a mechanism to reduce blank nut in this species. Key words: Corylus .... attached to adhesive-treated microscope slides (polysine slides;. Menzel GmbH & Co ...

  9. Cacogeusia following pine nut ingestion: a six patient case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hampton, Rachael L.; Scully, Crispian; Gandhi, Shan; Raber-Durlacher, Judith

    2013-01-01

    This is a retrospective case series of 6 patients complaining of a bad taste (cacogeusia) specifically metallogeusia, following the ingestion of pine nuts.(1) The taste arose always within 48h of ingestion, and in all but one patient spontaneously resolved within 14 days. Pine nuts also have a

  10. Soap Production From Shea nut Butter | Warra | International ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to explore the use of shea butter for soap production. The traditional method of extraction of the shea nut oil was employed. A simple cold-process alkali hydrolysis of the shea nut oil, which is a village adoptable technology was used in producing the soap. The chemical analysis of the oil revealed ...

  11. Physical properties of wild mango fruit and nut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehiem, J. C.; Simonyan, K. J.

    2012-02-01

    Physical properties of two wild mango varieties were studied at 81.9 and 24.5% moisture (w.b.) for the fruits and nuts, respectively. The shape and size of the fruit are the same while that of nuts differs at P = 0.05. The mass, density and bulk density of the fruits are statistically different at P = 0.05 but the volume is the same. The shape and size, volume and bulk density of the nuts are statistically the same at P = 0.05. The nuts of both varieties are also the same at P = 0.05 in terms of mass and density. The packing factor for both fruits and nut of the two varieties are the same at 0.95. The relevant data obtained for the two varieties would be useful for design and development of machines and equipment for processing and handling operations.

  12. NUT carcinoma in children and adults: A multicenter retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemelle, Lauriane; Pierron, Gaëlle; Fréneaux, Paul; Huybrechts, Sophie; Spiegel, Alexandra; Plantaz, Dominique; Julieron, Morbize; Dumoucel, Sophie; Italiano, Antoine; Millot, Fréderic; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Leverger, Guy; Chastagner, Pascal; Carton, Matthieu; Orbach, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Nuclear protein of the testis (NUT) carcinoma (formerly NUT midline carcinoma) is an aggressive tumor defined by the presence of NUT rearrangement with a poor prognosis. This rare cancer is underdiagnosed and poorly treated. The primary objective of this study was to describe the clinical, radiologic, and biological features of NUT carcinoma. The secondary objective was to describe the various treatments and assess their efficacy. This retrospective multicenter study was based on review of the medical records of children and adults with NUT carcinoma with specific rearrangement or positive anti-NUT nuclear staining (>50%). This series of 12 patients had a median age of 18.1 years (ranges: 12.3-49.7 years). The primary tumor was located in the chest in eight patients, the head and neck in three patients, and one patient had a multifocal tumor. Nine patients presented regional lymph node involvement and eight distant metastases. One-half of patients were initially misdiagnosed. Specific NUT antibody was positive in all cases tested. A transient response to chemotherapy was observed in four of 11 patients. Only two patients were treated by surgery and five received radiotherapy with curative intent. At the end of follow-up, only one patient was still in remission more than 12 years after the diagnosis. Median overall survival was 4.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.1-17.7). NUT carcinoma is an aggressive disease refractory to conventional therapy. Early diagnosis by NUT-specific antibody immunostaining in cases of undifferentiated or poorly differentiated carcinoma to identify the specific rearrangement of NUT gene is useful to propose the optimal therapeutic strategy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Questionnaire about the intake of and hypersensitivity to fruits, vegetables and nuts including birch pollen related foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Asakura, Kohji; Shirasaki, Hideaki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2013-07-01

    In Hokkaido and Scandinavia, birch pollen allergic persons are common and they often report oral and pharyngeal hypersensitivity to fruits and vegetables (oral allergy syndrome, OAS), because of immunological cross-reactivity. In Scandinavia, nuts as well as Rosaceae fruits such as apples were the foods most often reported to elicit symptoms. On the other hand, nuts are minor foods causing hypersensitivity in Japan. Even in Japan, regional differences of foods causing hypersensitivity have been reported, which may be related to the regional differences of elementary habit and pollen dispersion. In the present study, we evaluated the intake history of the foods and the frequency of food hypersensitivity in adults from the general population. Three hundreds and thirty nine subjects (20-67 years old) took part in the study. With a questionnaire survey, we asked them about their intake history and hypersensitive symptoms for 33 kinds of fruit, vegetables, and nuts. 30% of subjects had eaten Brazil nuts, 80% had eaten pomegranates, and 81% had eaten hazelnuts. And over 95% of subjects had eaten the other 30 foods. Those who had lived in Hokkaido for more than 20 years had a higher frequency of plum consumption than the others. Those who had lived in Hokkaido for more than 20 years had a lower frequency of loquat, fig and pomegranate consumption than the others. Food hypersensitivity was found in 52 subjects (15.3%). The most common symptom was OAS (46 subjects, 13.6%), and foods most frequently causing OAS were peach (21 subjects, 6.2%), cherry (19 subjects, 5.6%) and apple (17 subjects, 5.0%). 26 subjects (7.7%) reported OAS to Rosaceae fruits. The ratio of having OAS to consuming Rosaceae fruits was 11.0% in the group who had lived in Hokkaido for more than 20 years, which was higher than the group who has lived in Hokkaido for less than 20 years. The intake history of hazelnuts and Brazil nuts was very low, with a correspondingly low frequency of food

  14. Several physical properties of aflatoxin-contaminated pistachio nuts: application of BGY fluorescence for separation of aflatoxin-contaminated nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Ebrahim

    2005-11-01

    The primary objective was to evaluate and find a proper method for visual identification of aflatoxin-contaminated pistachio nuts. The feasibility of using bright greenish yellow fluorescence (BGYF) in pistachio nut as a discriminating factor for identification of Aspergillus flavus-infested nuts, at harvest and in post-harvest, is investigated. Results show a strong relationship between BGYF and aflatoxin content at harvest. The factors affecting the application of this method in post-harvest stages are also discussed. The relationship between inside-brown kernels and aflatoxin presence is confirmed. At harvest, the brown kernels are a subdivision of fluorescent fraction. The share of different pistachios based on hull types (with sound hull, growth split and early-split) in contamination is studied. The early-split nuts are the most contaminated nuts, growth split nuts are less contaminated, and pistachios with sound hulls are almost clean. The effect of inappropriate handling on the percentage of fluorescent nuts is studied. The percentage of visible mould in samples is observed which shows a good relationship with the presence of BGY fluorescence.

  15. Discrimination Between Closed and Open Shell (Turkish) Pistachio Nuts Using Undecimated Wavelet Packet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to low consumer acceptance and the possibility of immature kernels, closed-shell pistachio nuts should be separated from open-shell nuts before reaching the consumer. The feasibility of a system using impact acoustics as a means of classifying closed-shell nuts from open-shell nuts has already b...

  16. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS ) Resin with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    synthetic) resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate ...

  17. [Tooth wear in Hindu betel nut chewers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerreth, Karolina

    2006-01-01

    Literature data describe the impact of certain factors on oral health. Very well known is habitual chewing of different plant products, including tobacco, which depending on the geographical area and the substances used, have various names. It has been estimated that approximately 200 million residents of the West Pacific Rim and South-East Asia indulge in betel chewing. Betel is composed of a leaf of the betel pepper, lime, tobacco and the nut of the areca palm. This study aimed to assess the degree of abrasive changes in residents of the Korunalaya Leprosy Care Center. The examinations were carried out on 85 patients (45 females and 40 males), aged 35-95 years, at the local dental surgery. Patients had their teeth assessed and they were further interviewed as to the duration of their habit with regard to their sex and age (35-44; 45-64 and > or = 65 years). The abrasive changes were evaluated using Gerasimov's 7-degree scale. Interview data indicate that 71.76% of the patients were habitual betel chewers. Among female patients, third-degree abrasion was the most frequent change while among males--fifth degree (53.3% and 45.0%, respectively). The abrasive changes, increasing with age, can be attributed to the duration of betel chewing. It is worth noticing that a vegetarian diet can be a contributing factor to abrasion as most of the food consumed by Hindus are plants.

  18. Higher dimensional Taub-NUT spaces and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelea, Cristian Ionut

    In the first part of this thesis we discuss classes of new exact NUT-charged solutions in four dimensions and higher, while in the remainder of the thesis we make a study of their properties and their possible applications. Specifically, in four dimensions we construct new families of axisymmetric vacuum solutions using a solution-generating technique based on the hidden SL(2,R) symmetry of the effective action. In particular, using the Schwarzschild solution as a seed we obtain the Zipoy-Voorhees generalisation of the Taub-NUT solution and of the Eguchi-Hanson soliton. Using the C-metric as a seed, we obtain and study the accelerating versions of all the above solutions. In higher dimensions we present new classes of NUT-charged spaces, generalising the previously known even-dimensional solutions to odd and even dimensions, as well as to spaces with multiple NUT-parameters. We also find the most general form of the odd-dimensional Eguchi-Hanson solitons. We use such solutions to investigate the thermodynamic properties of NUT-charged spaces in (A)dS backgrounds. These have been shown to yield counter-examples to some of the conjectures advanced in the still elusive dS/CFT paradigm (such as the maximal mass conjecture and Bousso's entropic N-bound). One important application of NUT-charged spaces is to construct higher dimensional generalisations of Kaluza-Klein magnetic monopoles, generalising the known 5-dimensional Kaluza-Klein soliton. Another interesting application involves a study of time-dependent higher-dimensional bubbles-of-nothing generated from NUT-charged solutions. We use them to test the AdS/CFT conjecture as well as to generate, by using stringy Hopf-dualities, new interesting time-dependent solutions in string theory. Finally, we construct and study new NUT-charged solutions in higher-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theories, generalising the known Reissner-Nordstrom solutions.

  19. Determining the reasons to buy and online marketing of nuts

    OpenAIRE

    Horáková, Monika

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor thesis focuses on the market of nuts especially their online sales. The main objectives are to determine the reasons for buying nuts, to analyse the willingness of the population to buy food online and suggest an effective online marketing communication mix. As a practical example the researcher's former e-shop www.zdrave-mlsani.net was chosen. The theoretical basis is focused on marketing and its usage within the online environment. Practical recommendations result from a quant...

  20. The phytochemical composition and antioxidant actions of tree nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolling, Bradley W; McKay, Diane L; Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being a rich source of several essential vitamins and minerals, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and fiber, most tree nuts provide an array of phytochemicals that may contribute to the health benefits attributed to this whole food. Although many of these constituents remain to be fully identified and characterized, broad classes include the carotenoids, hydrolyzable tannins, lignans, naphthoquinones, phenolic acids, phytosterols, polyphenols, and tocopherols. These phytochemicals have been shown to possess a range of bioactivity, including antioxidant, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and hypocholesterolemic properties. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the carotenoid, phenolic, and tocopherol content of tree nuts and associated studies of their antioxidant actions in vitro and in human studies. Tree nuts are a rich source of tocopherols and total phenols and contain a wide variety of flavonoids and proanthocyanidins. In contrast, most tree nuts are not good dietary sources of carotenoids and stilbenes. Phenolic acids are present in tree nuts but a systematic survey of the content and profile of these compounds is lacking. A limited number of human studies indicate these nut phytochemicals are bioaccessible and bioavailable and have antioxidant actions in vivo. PMID:20199996

  1. Managing nut-induced anaphylaxis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomas JM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeanne M Lomas, Kirsi M Järvinen Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA Abstract: The prevalence of peanut and tree nut allergy in the USA has increased, especially in the pediatric population. Nut allergy remains the leading cause of fatal anaphylactic reactions. Management of anaphylaxis includes not only treatment of symptoms during a reaction, but strict dietary avoidance and education on potential situations, which may place the patient at high risk for accidental exposure. Cross-reactivity between various nuts along with various cross-contamination sources should be discussed with all nut-allergic individuals. Exciting research continues to emerge on other potential treatments for patients allergic to nuts, including allergen immunotherapy. Results of such interventions have been encouraging, though further studies are needed regarding safety and long-term outcomes before these can be applied to clinical practice. Keywords: peanut, tree nut, anaphylaxis, cross-reactivity, avoidance, immunotherapy

  2. Machine recognition of navel orange worm damage in x-ray images of pistachio nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keagy, Pamela M.; Parvin, Bahram; Schatzki, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    Insect infestation increases the probability of aflatoxin contamination in pistachio nuts. A non- destructive test is currently not available to determine the insect content of pistachio nuts. This paper uses film X-ray images of various types of pistachio nuts to assess the possibility of machine recognition of insect infested nuts. Histogram parameters of four derived images are used in discriminant functions to select insect infested nuts from specific processing streams.

  3. Machine recognition of navel orange worm damage in X-ray images of pistachio nuts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keagy, P.M.; Schatzki, T.F. [USDA-ARS Western Regional Research Center, Albany, CA (United States); Parvin, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Insect infestation increases the probability of aflatoxin contamination in pistachio nuts. A non-destructive test is currently not available to determine the insect content of pistachio nuts. This paper presents the use of film X-ray images of various types of pistachio nuts to assess the possibility of machine recognition of insect infested nuts. Histogram parameters of four derived images are used in discriminant functions to select insect infested nuts from specific processing streams.

  4. Water relations in physic nut according to climatic seasonality, in semiarid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Monteiro Rodrigues

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the effect of climatic seasonality on physic nut (Jatropha curcas, in field, under semiarid climate conditions. Stomatal conductance (g s, transpiration (E, soluble leaf carbohydrates (SLC, free amino acids (FAA and total proteins (TP were measured in leaves, in a commercial plantation in Northeast Brazil, during the summer and autumn. Plants showed high g s and E, as well as SLC, FAA and TP contents in the summer, which gradually decreased with the lower temperatures and photosynthetically active radiation during the autumn, despite the higher water availability. Even in conditions of adequate water availability, the combination of low temperatures and reduced light drastically decreased foliar metabolism.

  5. Prevalent fatty acids in cashew nuts obtained from conventional and organic cultivation in different stages of processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Josino Soares

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is one of the three largest producers of fruits in the world, and among those fruit trees, the cashew tree stands out due to the high nutritional and commercial value of its products. During its fruit processing, there are losses in some compounds and few studies address this issue. Over the last decade the conventional system of food production has been substituted for the organic cultivation system, which is a promising alternative source of income given the global demand for healthy food. Therefore, this research aimed to characterize and quantify the prevalent fatty acids found in cashew nuts obtained from conventional and organic cultivation during various stages of processing. The prevalent fatty acids found were palmitic, linoleic, oleic, and stearic acid. The average of these fatty acids were 6.93 ± 0.55; 16.99 ± 0.61; 67.62 ± 1.00 and 8.42 ± 0.55 g/100 g, respectively. There was no reduction in the palmitic, oleic and stearic fatty acid contents during processing. Very little difference was observed between the nuts obtained from conventional and organic cultivation, indicating that the method of cultivation used has little or no influence on the content of cashew nut fatty acids.

  6. Technical intelligence and culture: Nut cracking in humans and chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Christophe; Bombjaková, Daša; Boyette, Adam; Meier, Amelia

    2017-06-01

    According to the technical intelligence hypothesis, humans are superior to all other animal species in understanding and using tools. However, the vast majority of comparative studies between humans and chimpanzees, both proficient tool users, have not controlled for the effects of age, prior knowledge, past experience, rearing conditions, or differences in experimental procedures. We tested whether humans are superior to chimpanzees in selecting better tools, using them more dexteriously, achieving higher performance and gaining access to more resource as predicted under the technical intelligence hypothesis. Aka and Mbendjele hunter-gatherers in the rainforest of Central African Republic and the Republic of Congo, respectively, and Taï chimpanzees in the rainforest of Côte d'Ivoire were observed cracking hard Panda oleosa nuts with different tools, as well as the soft Coula edulis and Elaeis guinensis nuts. The nut-cracking techniques, hammer material selection and two efficiency measures were compared. As predicted, the Aka and the Mbendjele were able to exploit more species of hard nuts in the forest than chimpanzees. However, the chimpanzees were sometimes more efficient than the humans. Social roles differed between the two species, with the Aka and especially the Mbendjele exhibiting cooperation between nut-crackers whereas the chimpanzees were mainly individualistic. Observations of nut-cracking by humans and chimpanzees only partially supported the technical intelligence hypothesis as higher degrees of flexibility in tool selection seen in chimpanzees compensated for use of less efficient tool material than in humans. Nut cracking was a stronger social undertaking in humans than in chimpanzees. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Occupational Dermatoses Among the Cashew Nut Workers in Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Pasricha

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy five female workers employed in the cashew nut industry in Karnataka to slice off the outer hard shells from the nuts and thus exposed to the chashew nut shell oil had a characteristic cauterization type of reaction manifesting as brownish-black, thickened sheets of dead skin covering the dorsal as well as the palmar aspects of hands including the fingers and feet. Smaller but similer lesions were also seen on these parts of the forearms, abdomen, neck and face which were not covered with clothes. The fingers were thinned and tapering and several nails of the hands and feet were thickened, discolored and eaten away. The other changes included loss of the dermatoglyphic patterns, maceration of the hands, small pits on the finger tips and pitted keratolysis seen in some cases only. Similar changes were also seen on the feet of both the male workers exposed to the same oil, in the section which extracts the oil from the sliced shells. In contrast 29, feamle wokers engaged to peel off the thin reddish covering on the cashew nut had normal hands and feet, except for the two callosities on the flexural aspect of the proximal phalanx of the right middle finger and proximal interphalangeal joint of the right index finger respectively, caused by the friction of the peeling knife. An open patch test with the cashew nut shell oil used as such in 17 workers produced a cauterization type of reaction in 32 workers irrespective of the nature of their duties, while the standard occluded patch test with 10% cashew nut shell oil in polyethylene glycol showed a mild cauterization type of reaction in only 6 workers. Patch tests with 1% and 0.1% concentrations of the shell oil were negative in all the workers. Two barrier creams tested to protect the workers from the cashew nut shell oil produced reasonably effective results within a week.

  8. Floristic and phytosociology in dense "terra firme" rainforest in the Belo Monte Hydroelectric Plant influence area, Pará, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, D A N; Ferreira, B G A; Siqueira, J D P; Oliveira, M M; Ferreira, A M

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterise the floristic and phytosociological composition on a stretch of dense "Terra Firme" rainforest located in the Belo Monte hydroelectric plant area of influence, located in the state of Pará, Brazil. All trees with DAP >10 cm situated in 75 permanent plots of 1 ha were inventoried. 27,126 individuals trees (361 ind.ha-1), distributed in 59 botanical families, comprising 481 species were observed. The families with the largest number of species were Fabaceae (94), Araceae (65) and Arecaceae (43), comprising 43.7% of total species. The species Alexa grandiflora (4.41), Cenostigma tocantinum (2.50) and Bertholletia excelsa (2.28) showed the highest importance values (IV). The ten species with greater IV are concentrated (22%). The forest community has high species richness and can be classified as diverse age trees, heterogeneous and of medium conservation condition.

  9. Taking actions to quit chewing betel nuts and starting a new life: taxi drivers' successful experiences of quitting betel nut chewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsui-Yun; Lin, Hung-Ru

    2017-04-01

    To understand taxi drivers' successful experiences of quitting betel nut chewing. Previous studies verified that betel nut chewing significantly increases the risk of oral cancer. In Taiwan, taxi drivers work for approximately 10-13 hours per day, and 31·7-80% of them choose to chew betel nuts for their invigorating qualities, which enable them to work more hours and receive more income. A qualitative research design was used. This study used the grounded theory method with purposive sampling to perform in-depth interviews with male taxi drivers who had successfully quit betel nut chewing for more than six months. The interviewed participants were 25 taxi drivers aged 45-67 who had chewed betel nuts for an average of 30·9 years. A constant comparative analysis of the 25 interviews revealed six categories, namely the first experience of chewing betel nuts, a part of work and life, perceiving the impact of betel nuts, trying to change, acting to quit betel nut chewing and starting a new life. During the cessation process, taxi drivers tended to be affected by their addiction to chewing betel nuts and the temptation of friends' invitations to chew betel nuts. However, their recognition of the physical effects of betel nut chewing and their sense of responsibility and commitment to family were the critical factors affecting their determination to quit betel nut chewing. Their willpower to not to chew betel nuts and the source of their motivation to exercise self-control also contributed to their success. Healthcare personnel should understand the experiences and perceptions of betel nut chewers, strengthen their understanding of the effects of betel nut chewing on physical health during the cessation period and support their self-efficacy and quitting behaviours with the assistance of significant others. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Textural, Rheological and Sensory Properties and Oxidative Stability of Nut Spreads—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanah Mohd Ghazali

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Tree nuts are rich in macro and micronutrients, phytochemicals, tocopherols and phenolic compounds. The development of nut spreads would potentially increase the food uses of nuts and introduce consumers with a healthier, non-animal breakfast snack food. Nut spreads are spreadable products made from nuts that are ground into paste. Roasting and milling (particle size reduction are two important stages for the production of nut spreads that affected the textural, rheological characteristic and overall quality of the nut spread. Textural, color, and flavor properties of nut spreads play a major role in consumer appeal, buying decisions and eventual consumption. Stability of nut spreads is influenced by its particle size. Proper combination of ingredients (nut paste, sweetener, vegetable oil and protein sources is also required to ensure a stable nut spread product is produced. Most of the nut spreads behaved like a non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic fluid under yield stress which help the producers how to start pumping and stirring of the nut spreads. Similar to other high oil content products, nut spreads are susceptible to autoxidation. Their oxidation can be controlled by application of antioxidants, using processing techniques that minimize tocopherol and other natural antioxidant losses.

  11. Textural, Rheological and Sensory Properties and Oxidative Stability of Nut Spreads—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerardekani, Ahmad; Karim, Roselina; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Chin, Nyuk Ling

    2013-01-01

    Tree nuts are rich in macro and micronutrients, phytochemicals, tocopherols and phenolic compounds. The development of nut spreads would potentially increase the food uses of nuts and introduce consumers with a healthier, non-animal breakfast snack food. Nut spreads are spreadable products made from nuts that are ground into paste. Roasting and milling (particle size reduction) are two important stages for the production of nut spreads that affected the textural, rheological characteristic and overall quality of the nut spread. Textural, color, and flavor properties of nut spreads play a major role in consumer appeal, buying decisions and eventual consumption. Stability of nut spreads is influenced by its particle size. Proper combination of ingredients (nut paste, sweetener, vegetable oil and protein sources) is also required to ensure a stable nut spread product is produced. Most of the nut spreads behaved like a non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic fluid under yield stress which help the producers how to start pumping and stirring of the nut spreads. Similar to other high oil content products, nut spreads are susceptible to autoxidation. Their oxidation can be controlled by application of antioxidants, using processing techniques that minimize tocopherol and other natural antioxidant losses. PMID:23429239

  12. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Y Hernandez

    Full Text Available Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV, and areca (betel nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether

  13. Seasonal variation in the populations of Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Tetranychus bastosi in physic nut (Jatropha curcas) plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jander F; Picanço, Marcelo C; Sarmento, Renato A; da Silva, Ricardo Siqueira; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; Carvalho, Marcos Alberto; Erasmo, Eduardo A L; Silva, Laila Cristina Rezende

    2015-07-01

    Studies on the seasonal variation of agricultural pest species are important for the establishment of integrated pest control programs. The seasonality of pest attacks on crops is affected by biotic and abiotic factors, for example, climate and natural enemies. Besides that, characteristics of the host plant, crop management, location and the pests' bioecology also affect this seasonality. The mites Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Prostigmata: Tarsonemidae) and Tetranychus bastosi (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae) are the most important pests in the cultivation of physic nut, Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae). All parts of J. curcas can be used for a wide range of purposes. In addition many researchers have studied its potential for use as neat oil, as transesterified oil (biodiesel), or as a blend with diesel. However studies about physic nut pests have been little known. The objective of this study was to assess the seasonal variation of P. latus and T. bastosi in physic nut. This study was conducted at three sites in the state of Tocantins, Brazil. We monitored climatic elements and the densities of the two mite species and of their natural enemies for a period of 2 years. Attack by P. latus occurred during rainy seasons, when the photoperiod was short and the physic nut had new leaves. In contrast, attack by T. bastosi occurred during warmer seasons with longer photoperiods and stronger winds. Populations of both mites and their natural enemies were greater in sites with greater plant diversity adjacent to the plantations. The predators found in association with P. latus and T. bastosi were Euseius concordis (Acari: Phytoseiidae), spiders, Stethorus sp. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Chrysoperla sp. (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

  14. Quality and energetic evaluation of the charcoal made of babassu nut residues used in the steel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Paula Protásio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is the only country in the world that uses large scale charcoal in steel-making blast furnaces. Meantime, the monoculture plantations of Eucalyptus are not able to meet the demand for charcoal from the steel industries.Therefore, research is necessary, in order to use lignocellulosic residues for the production of charcoal with technological properties which are suitable for the reduction of iron ore. Given the above, the objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of charcoal which was made with babassu nut shell and designed for utilization in the steel industry in the function of the final carbonization temperature. All three layers of babassu nut shell (epicarp, mesocarp and endocarp were used together. The initial temperature of the test was 100ºC and the final temperatures were: 450ºC, 550ºC, 650ºC, 750ºC and 850ºC. For the charcoals produced, the following properties were determined: apparent relative density, energy density and fixed carbon stock, in addition to chemical compositions (immediate and elemental and heating values (higher and lower. Charcoal made of babassu nut shell showed high values of apparent density and energy density, and has a potential to replace coal and wood charcoal in the steel industry. The effect of the final carbonization temperature was expressed for all characteristics evaluated, except for the nitrogen content. Babassu nut shell must be carbonized at temperatures higher than 550ºC, so that the charcoal produced can be used in steel-making blast furnaces.

  15. Fungal Presence in Selected Tree Nuts and Dried Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.H. Tournas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty-four tree nut samples (almonds, pecans, pine nuts, and walnuts and 50 dried fruit samples (apricots, cranberries, papaya, pineapple, and raisins were purchased from local supermarkets and analyzed for fungal contamination using conventional culture as well as molecular methods. The results of our study showed that the highest yeast and mold (YM counts (5.34 log 10 CFU g -1 were found in walnuts and the lowest in pecans. The most common mold in nuts was Aspergillus niger , relatively low numbers of A. flavus were found across the board, while Penicillium spp. were very common in pine nuts and walnuts. Low levels (2.00–2.84 log 10 CFU g -1 of yeasts were recovered from only two pine nut samples. Fungal contamination in dried fruits was minimal (ranging from <2.00 to 3.86 log 10 CFU g -1 . The highest fungal levels were present in raisins. All papaya samples and the majority of cranberry, pineapple, and apricot samples were free of live fungi. The most common mold in dried fruits was A. niger followed by Penicillium spp. One apricot sample also contained low levels (2.00 log 10 CFU g -1 of yeasts.

  16. Betel nut chewing and its deleterious effects on oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Anand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The habit of chewing betel nut has a long history of use. Betel nut and products derived from it are widely used as a masticatory product among various communities and in several countries across the world. Over a long period, several additives have been added to a simple betel nut preparation; thus, creating the betel quid (BQ and encompassing chewing tobacco in the preparation. Betel nut has deleterious effects on oral soft tissues. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal diseases, two major oral diseases are less well-documented. Betel-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa have been reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers, a condition called betel chewers mucosa is often found where the quid is placed. Betel nut chewing is implicated in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF and its use along with tobacco can cause leukoplakia, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes. Thus, public health measures to quit betel use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as OSF and oral cancer.

  17. Attention Inhibition Training Can Reduce Betel-Nut Chewing Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chou Ho

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Betel nut (or areca is the fourth most commonly used drug worldwide after tobacco, alcohol, and caffeine. Many chemical ingredients of betel nut are carcinogenic. We examined whether the manipulation of attentional inhibition toward the areca-related stimuli could affect betel-nut chewing time. Three matched groups of habitual chewers were recruited: inhibit-areca, inhibit-non-areca, and control. This study consisted of a Go/No-Go task for inhibition training, followed by a taste test for observing chewing behavior. The Go/No-Go task constituted three phases (pretest, training and posttest. In the taste test, the habitual chewers were asked to rate the flavors of one betel nut and one gum. The purpose (blind to the chewers of this taste test was to observe whether their picking order and chewing time were affected by experimental manipulation. Results from the Go/No-Go task showed successful training. Further, the training groups (the inhibit-areca and inhibit-non-areca groups showed a significant reduction in betel nut chewing time, in comparison to the control group. Since both training groups showed reduced chewing time, the inhibition training may affect general control ability, in regardless of the stimulus (areca or not to be inhibited. Reduced chewing time is important for reducing areca-related diseases.

  18. Deciphering the Role of microRNAs in BRD4-NUT Fusion Gene Induced NUT Midline Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ekta; Bhavya; Mishra, Divya; Atri, Neelam; Mishra, Rajeev

    2017-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a very aggressive and lethal type of squamous epithelial cell cancer caused due to fusion of BRD4 and NUT genes. The gene fusion results into a new fusion protein that promotes oncogenesis. The detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the NMC are still not clear and new findings are urgently required to complement the current efforts. Abnormal microRNAs (miRNA) expression promotes tumour formation by modulating the functional expression of critical genes other than the parent genes involved in tumour cell proliferation or survival. Here, using Insilco methods, miRNA targeting the transcripts of parent genes (BRD4 and NUT) and the BRD4-NUT fusion gene were predicted. We investigated a situation, wherein abnormal miRNA expression in malignant cells could arise due to deletion and fusion of genomic regions encompassing the target site of miRNA genes. A set of 48 dysregulated miRNAs targeting the critical genes other than the parent genes (BRD4 and NUT) was identified. Functional enrichment analysis of KEGG pathways of target genes of these Ex-miRNAs implicates their role in cancer pathways. Amplification in the expression level of these miRNAs can be used for NMC diagnosis and prognosis.

  19. The effect of tree nut, peanut, and soy nut consumption on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadifard, Noushin; Salehi-Abargouei, Amin; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Humphries, Karin; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2015-05-01

    Although several studies have assessed the effects of nut consumption (tree nuts, peanuts, and soy nuts) on blood pressure (BP), the results are conflicting. The aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to estimate the effect of nut consumption on BP. The databases MEDLINE, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched for RCTs carried out between 1958 and October 2013 that reported the effect of consuming single or mixed nuts (including walnuts, almonds, pistachios, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, peanuts, and soy nuts) on systolic BP (SBP) or diastolic BP (DBP) as primary or secondary outcomes in adult populations aged ≥18 y. Relevant articles were identified by screening the abstracts and titles and the full text. Studies that evaluated the effects for effect on DBP. We found no significant changes in DBP after the consumption of other nuts. Total nut consumption lowered SBP in participants without type 2 diabetes. Pistachios seemed to have the strongest effect on reducing SBP and DBP. Mixed nuts also reduced DBP. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Caracterização físico-química de pedúnculos e castanhas de clones de cajueiro-anão precoce nas condições do norte de Minas Gerais Physical-chemical characterization of precocious dwarf clones cashew nuts and stalks in north of the Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Cristian Toledo Pereira

    2005-01-01

    jobs. This study aimed at evaluating physical-chemical characteristics of precocious dwarf cashew nuts and stalks from Experimental Unit of EMBRAPA Technological Business, located in Nova Porteirinha district, State of Minas Gerais. Clones CCP 76, CCP 06, and CCP 1001 e CCP 09 were utilized corresponding to the four treatments. The experiment was designed in a completely-randomized block with five replications and four fruits per parcel. The stalks were harvested in September of 2002 and carried in harvest trays to Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Post-harvest Technology of Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros (UNIMONTES, situated in Campus of Janaúba-MG. Physical and Chemical characteristics were evaluated and subjected to variance analysis and Tukey test. Amongst evaluated materials, stalks of CCP 76 clone showed appropriate aspect of market purposes in nature, with deep orange coloration; pear-shaped format, good chemical features and stalks with adjusted firmness, making possible greater post-harvest conservation. Although good characteristics, the clone CCP 09 presented little intense orange coloration and low firmness. Probably the larger diameter stalk is minor firmness at post-harvest will be.

  1. Efficiency measurement of cashew nut marketing in Enugu State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, cashew nut marketing in the study area though profitable was grossly inefficient from the viewpoint of market structure and profit function measurement. Policy measures that will improve credit advancement to small-scale/micro business concerns and reduce transportation cost are advocated. Agro-Science Vol.

  2. Thermal particle production in two Taub-Nut type spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapedes, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    The Hartle-Hawking method of deriving black hole radiance has been extended to non-asymptotically flat de Sitter spacetime by Gibbons and Hawking. We extend this work to Taub-Nut spacetime and a related and more physical spacetime constructed from it by Siklos. (orig./BJ) [de

  3. micron-sized polymeric particles from cashew nut shell liquid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the type of mixers and various reaction kettle designs on the polymer particles' sizes should be studied. INTRODUCTION. Cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) Nut. Shell Liquid (CNSL) is a ... thermo-properties and cure characteristics of. CNSL-based resins. Bisanda and Ansell. (1992) reported the preparation of CNSL-.

  4. Micron-sized polymer particles from tanzanian cashew nut shell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micron-sized polymer particles (MSPP) were prepared by formaldehyde condensation polymerization of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) previously emulsified with sodium lauryl sulphate. The sizes of the MSPP were found to range from 0.1 to 4.4 mm. Increasing the emulsifier concentration had the effect of increasing the ...

  5. Synthesis of organoamine-silica hybrids using cashew nut shell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis of organoamine-silica hybrids using cashew nut shell liquid components as templates for the catalysis of a model Henry reaction. ... The prepared materials were characterized by diffuse reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Atomic Force Microscopy and acid titration. Results indicated that indeed the ...

  6. The Comparative Effects Of Chronic Consumption Of Kola Nut (Cola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: The comparative effects of chronic (28 days) consumption of kola nut and its active constituent, caffeine diets on locomotor behaviour and body weights in mice were investigated. 30 adult Swiss white mice (15- 30g body weight), were used for the study. The open field-maze was employed for the evaluation of ...

  7. Ecology and behaviour of Palm-nut Vultures Gypohierax angolensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Populations of many vulture species have undergone substantial declines. In Africa, 82% are threatened and although research on vultures has increased, the biology and ecology of several species is still poorly known. The Palm-nut Vulture Gypohierax angolensis has peculiar ecological characteristics, feeding on palm ...

  8. Antifouling potential of seaweed, sponge and cashew nut oil extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... nut oil extracts against biofilm bacteria and green mussel Perna viridisfrom Vellar estuary, Southeast coast of India. K. Prabhu*, S. Sophia Rani, S. Priyatharsini and S. Bragadeeswaran. Centre of Advanced study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai- 608 502,.

  9. Nutritional profiles of tiger Nut ( Cyperus esculentus ) plant organs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine major nutrient profiles changes of tiger nut plant during its growth period. The plant leaves, roots, tuber moisture, starch, fat and protein were analyzed by oven drying, enzymatic hydrolysis, glucose assay, soxhlet extraction and kjeldahl methods. The results show the moisture content ...

  10. Characterization of Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, Diego; Heeres, H. J.; Broekhuis, Antonius A.

    The characterization of Physic nut shells was done using the wet chemical analysis of wood components. The obtained fractions were analyzed using IR, NMR, GPC, ICP and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. TGA was used to determine the fixed carbon (+ash) and water content of the shells. The results of wet

  11. Coco Nut Meets the Gadget Maker. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, P.

    The adventures of Coco Nut, a coconut which has fallen from a palm tree in Florida, are illustrated in this booklet for elementary school students. His fall into a canal and ensuing encounters with dead and alive fish and a gadget maker (industry) are used to portray the effects of water pollution. What man can do to stop such pollution and…

  12. Cashew nut shell liquid as an alternative corrosion inhibitor for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL) has been tested as a corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in 3% aqueous NaCl solution (pH 6) saturated with carbon dioxide gas at 30°C under static conditions using ac-impedance and potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. It was found that CNSL reduces the extent of the ...

  13. Production and Quality Evaluation of Candies from Date Nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production and quality evaluation of candies produced from blends of date nuts (Phoenix dactylifera) and groundnut (Arachis hypogea) pastes was studied. The samples were analyzed for proximate, vitamin, physicochemical and sensory properties using standard methods. Results showed that, there were significant ...

  14. Mineral Analysis of Pine Nuts (Pinusspp.) Grown in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhanen, Leo P; Savage, Geoffrey P

    2013-04-03

    Mineral analysis of seven Pinus species grown in different regions of New Zealand; Armand pine ( Pinus armandii Franch), Swiss stone pine ( Pinus cembra L.), Mexican pinyon ( Pinus cembroides Zucc. var. bicolor Little), Coulter pine ( Pinus coulteri D. Don), Johann's pine ( Pinus johannis M.F. Robert), Italian stone pine ( Pinus pinea L.) and Torrey pine ( Pinus torreyana Parry ex Carrière), was carried out using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES) analysis. Fourteen different minerals (Al, B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, S and Zn) were identified in all seven varieties, except that no Al or Na was found in Pinus coulteri D. Don. New Zealand grown pine nuts are a good source of Cu, Mg, Mn, P and Zn, meeting or exceeding the recommended RDI for these minerals (based on an intake of 50 g nuts/day) while they supplied between 39%-89% of the New Zealand RDI for Fe. Compared to other commonly eaten tree-nuts New Zealand grown pine nuts are an excellent source of essential minerals.

  15. Nutritional content of roasted Anacardium Occidentae (Cashew) nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research work was aimed at determining the nutritional content of roasted cashew nut namely moisture, ash, lipids, crude fibre, protein, carbohydrate and minerals. Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) was used to determine the metals, while Kjeldahl and Soxhlet extractions were used for protein and lipids ...

  16. Effects of Enzyme Supplementation of Raw Bambara Nut ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 4-week study was conducted to investigate the effects of graded levels of raw Bambara nut waste (RBW) and supplementary enzyme (Roxazyme G) on nutrient utilization and hematological parameters of broiler finishers. Ninety-six 6-week old broiler birds were randomly divided into 8 groups of 12 birds each. The groups ...

  17. Fabrication and Performance Evaluation of a Thevetia Nut Cracking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akorede

    chute, and protruding internal hollow screw with a cylindrical cross section which houses another external screw that holds a lock nut with a short handle and a friction ball. The machine is powered by 2.5 hp electric motor which transmits motion from its driving (small) pulley to the big (driven) pulley on the worm screw.

  18. PHYSIC NUT ( JATROPHA CURCAS L. DISEASES IN LAMPUNG PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRI MARYONO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensifi ed cultivation of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. could raise the importance of plant diseases. h e objectives of this research were to diagnose diseases occurring on physic nut in Lampung Province and to determine their intensity. Field observation was conducted in four districts: South Lampung, Tanggamus, Bandarlampung, and Tulang Bawang. Disease intensity, whether expressed as disease incidence or severity, was recorded from plant samples determined by making diagonal lines across the fi eld on which fi ve observation spots were made. On each spot, fi ve plant samples were observed. Specimens were also collected and placed individually in plastic bags for laboratory observation. h e diseases found on physic nut in Lampung Province were cercospora leaf spot, alternaria leaf spot, fusarium wilt, and bacterial wilt. In addition, leaf malformation fi rst thought to be viral disease was commonly found in many locations. Further mechanical transmission failed to produce similar symptom on tested plants and higher population of mites were found on malformed leaves than that in normal leaves. Based on the disease distribution and intensity, the most likely threatening disease in physic nut cultivation is bacterial wilt. Fusarium also caused wilt, but it was only found in one subdistrict with low incidence.

  19. Antifouling potential of seaweed, sponge and cashew nut oil extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The seaweeds, Sargassum wightii, Ulva lactuca; sponge Desmopsongiae sp., and cashew nut oil extracts were tested in vitro against ten marine fouling bacteria isolated from test panels and the green mussel Perna viridis. The biofilm bacteria growth was inhibited by methanol extracts of the seaweeds S. wightii, U. lactuca, ...

  20. Biodegradation of shea nut cake by indigenous soil bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    hundred and sixty two (162) soil samples were collected at random at 0-20 cm, 20-40 cm and 40-60 cm soil depth from shea nut cake dumping sites in ... Yeast extracts enhanced growth. Pseudomanas strain G9 degraded 71.25% ..... bacterial numbers to hasten biodegradation (Ray,. 1994). The first report on soil bacteria ...

  1. Micron-sized polymer particles from Tanzanian cashew nut shell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    While petrochemicals cannot be sustained as they become either expensive or highly depleted leading to economical and environmental problems, natural products are renewable. Thus, it is necessary for the polymer industry to look for renewable monomer sources and cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) is one of the natural ...

  2. A NUT-like solution with fluid matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, B.; Newman, E.T.; Sparling, G.; Winicour, J.

    1982-08-01

    Stationary solutions of the Einstein equation are investigated when the source is a rigidly rotating fluid. Using the three-dimensional spin coefficient method the angular dependence of the metric tensor can be analytically calculated if the eigenray congruence is geodesic and shearfree. The nonstatic solutions of this class do not describe physically realistic bodies, but instead, bodies with NUT-type geometry. (author)

  3. Elemental composition of betel nut and associated chewing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridge, C.; Akanle, O.; Spyrou, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    Betel nut chewing (Area catechu), Whether plain or wrapped inside a betel leaf 'quid' together with other substances including tobacco, has been reported as a cause of the high incidence of oral and oesophageal cancers in Asian communities worldwide. Chewing of such substances results in the formation of nitrosamines, some of which may be diabetogenic to man. The incidence of Type 2 diabetes is particularly prevalent amongst Asian immigrants living in the UK and as part of a larger study we have analysed a number of popular betel nut based chewing materials to determine their elemental composition. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used for determination of elemental concentrations of short-lived radionuclides. Ag, Al. Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Dy, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ti, and V were detected, some of which are implicated in diabetes. Concentrations of these, expect for Ag, Dy and Ti, are reported and compared with values found in betel-nut and chewing materials from Taiwan. It is indicated that for certain elements the amount ingested by betel-nut chewers may be a significant fraction of their daily dietary intake. (author)

  4. Evaluation of Dyestuff Removal by Shea Nut ( Vitellaria paradoxa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The removal of textile dyestuff from waste water was investigated in a batch sorption process using shea nut (Vitellaria paradoxa) shell activated carbon. The data were tested using the Rudishkevich – Dubinin and Temkin isotherm models. The result showed that removal efficiency increases with increase in contact time.

  5. strength properties of shea-butter nuts under compressive loading

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIJOTECH

    Edible oil (shea-butter oil) is extracted from the kernel and the cake from which the oil is extracted is used in livestock production. (Purseglove [1]). According to Purseglove [1], Nigeria,. Ghana, Burkinafaso, Senegal, Mali and. Benin Republic are the principal exporters of shea-burter nuts. Formerly, Belgium and.

  6. Cashew nut shell liquid: an agricultural by-product with great ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is recommended that further work be done to scale‐up production of CNSL based products and demonstrate feasibility of the same. Production and local processing of the cashew nuts accompanied by recovery of CNSL should be enhanced. Key words: Cashew nuts, CNSL utilization, cashew nut production, Kenya ...

  7. Floristic and phytosociology in dense “terra firme” rainforest in the Belo Monte Hydroelectric Plant influence area, Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAN. Lemos

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of the present study was to characterise the floristic and phytosociological composition on a stretch of dense “Terra Firme” rainforest located in the Belo Monte hydroelectric plant area of influence, located in the state of Pará, Brazil. All trees with DAP >10 cm situated in 75 permanent plots of 1 ha were inventoried. 27,126 individuals trees (361 ind.ha-1, distributed in 59 botanical families, comprising 481 species were observed. The families with the largest number of species were Fabaceae (94, Araceae (65 and Arecaceae (43, comprising 43.7% of total species. The species Alexa grandiflora (4.41, Cenostigma tocantinum (2.50 and Bertholletia excelsa (2.28 showed the highest importance values (IV. The ten species with greater IV are concentrated (22%. The forest community has high species richness and can be classified as diverse age trees, heterogeneous and of medium conservation condition.

  8. Estimation and Comparison of Copper Content in Raw Areca Nuts and Commercial Areca Nut Products: Implications in Increasing Prevalence of Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Philips; Austin, Ravi David; Varghese, Soma Susan; Manojkumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral Squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is often preceded by potentially malignant disorders (PMDs) like oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF). The rate of transformation of OSMF to OSCC ranges from 3 to 19%. OSMF is etiologically related to chewing of areca nut (betel nut), a habit prevalent among the population groups in south-east Asia. Along with alkaloids, the high copper content in areca nut plays an important role in the pathogenesis of OSMF. The increased prevalence of OSMF in the last two decades or so corresponds with the increased processing and commercialization of areca nut products. Aim: The aim of the study was to estimate and compare the copper content of raw areca nuts in three different stages of maturity, and commercial areca nut products. Materials and Methods: Raw areca nut samples of three different maturities were obtained from four plantations in Sullia, Karnataka, India and commercial areca nut products were obtained from local shops in Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, India. The samples were grounded and subjected to Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) for copper analysis. Results: There was statistically significant difference in copper content in raw areca nuts of all three maturities (p<0.05) and was highest in the exfoliated mature nuts. Importantly copper level was significantly higher in the commercial products compared to raw areca nuts of different degrees of maturity (p<0.05). Conclusions: The copper levels in commercial products are significantly higher than that of raw areca nuts in all three stages of maturity. The increase in copper content on processing and post commercialization can be related to the increasing prevalence of OSMF. PMID:24596787

  9. Priority areas for research on the intake, composition, and health effects of tree nuts and peanuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lindsay H

    2008-09-01

    This article summarizes the main conclusions drawn from a conference on the health effects of nut consumption and identifies priority areas for future research. Individuals with higher intakes of nuts generally have higher intakes of many beneficial dietary constituents. More information is needed on nut composition, the bioavailability of nutrients, and other bioactive constituents. Better methods are needed to assess usual nut intake, including biomarkers, and the types, physical form, and amounts of nuts that are consumed. The feasibility of including nuts and seeds as a separate food group in the Dietary Guidelines should be tested, as should ways to increase nut intake. A moderate intake of nuts can be included in a weight loss regimen and further information is needed on whether nuts improve satiety as well as adherence to and efficacy of diets designed for weight reduction. There is substantial evidence that nut consumption reduces risk of cardiovascular disease. Future research should investigate their benefits for prevention of congestive heart failure, including clinical studies in patients with this condition, to evaluate the effects of nuts on markers of heart disease risk. Higher nut consumption is associated with lower risk of diabetes and associated cardiovascular disease. More remains to be learned about the effects of nuts on postprandial glycemic and insulin response, glycemic control, and improvement of disease risk factors in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes. Information is needed on nut-induced allergic reactions, including their prevalence and consequences, causes of sensitization, biomarkers of severe reactions, and cross-reactivity to different types of nuts.

  10. Physicochemical properties and composition of lipid fraction of selected edible nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derewiaka, D.; Szwed, E.; Wolosiak, R.

    2014-01-01

    The study presents the characteristics of oil fraction of 8 types of edible nuts available on the Polish market. All tested nuts were characterized with high content of dry matter. Fatty acid and sterol composition was analyzed by GC-MS. Squalene and tocopherol profiles were examined by HPLC with diode array (DAD) and fluorescence detectors (FLDs). The highest level of fat was found in macadamia (75.4 g/100 g) and the lowest in cashew nuts (46.9 g/100 g). Fatty analysis showed that nuts were rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Monounsaturated fatty acids were predominant in most cases, with the exception of Brazilian nuts, walnuts and pine nuts which were richer in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Sitosterol was the main sterol of nuts, and its content ranged from 96.9 mg/100 g of oil (in macadamia) to 474.8 mg/100 g of oil (in pistachio). Tocopherol homologue was predominant among its fraction with the largest content determined in pistachio (8.3 mg/100 g of oil) and walnuts (8.6 mg/100 g of oil). The presence of squalene was confirmed in seven types of nuts, and the richest source of it were Brazilian nuts (145.8 mg/100 g of oil). The study proofs the variation of nut oil composition, especially phytosterol and tocopherol content and can be used for better characterization of nuts derived from different geographic areas or cultivars. (author)

  11. Effect of tiger nut-derived products in gluten-free batter and bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Núria; Albanell, Elena; Miñarro, Begoña; Guamis, Buenaventura; Capellas, Marta

    2015-07-01

    Tiger nut is a tuber used to produce tiger nut milk that yields a high quantity of solid waste, which can be dried and used as fiber source. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the quality of gluten-free bread formulated with different tiger nut-derived products in order to substitute soya flour (which is an allergen ingredient) and, at the same time, increase the use of tiger nut-derived products. Four gluten-free formulations based on corn starch and containing tiger nut milk, tiger nut milk by-product, tiger nut flour, or soya flour (as reference formulation) were studied. Tiger nut milk increased G' of gluten-free batter and rendered breads with the softest crumb (502.46 g ± 102.05), the highest loaf-specific volume (3.35 cm(3)/g ± 0.25), and it was mostly preferred by consumers (61.02%). Breads elaborated with tiger nut flour had similar characteristics than soya flour breads (except in color and crumb structure). The addition of tiger nut milk by-product resulted in a hard (1047.64 g ± 145.74) and dark (L(*)  = 70.02 ± 3.38) crumb bread, which was the least preferred by consumers. Results showed that tiger nut is a promising ingredient to formulate gluten-free baked products. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Nuts, especially walnuts, have both antioxidant quantity and efficacy and exhibit significant potential health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Joe A; Cai, Yuxing

    2012-02-01

    Free and total (after basic hydrolysis) polyphenols in nine types of raw and roasted nuts and two types of peanut butter (54 commercial samples) were analyzed after methanol extraction by a single step Folin-Ciocalteu reagent using catechin as standard. Walnuts had the highest free and total polyphenols in both the combined raw and roasted samples. Total polyphenols in the nuts were significantly higher than free polyphenols. Roasting had little effect on either free or total polyphenols in nuts. Raw and roasted walnuts had the highest total polyphenols. The efficacy of raw and roasted nut antioxidants was assessed by measuring the ability of the free polyphenol nut extracts to inhibit the oxidation of lower density lipoproteins (LDL + VLDL). A nut polyphenol, catechin, was measured after binding of three nut extracts to lower density lipoproteins. Walnut polyphenols had the best efficacy among the nuts and also the highest lipoprotein-bound antioxidant activity. Based on USDA availability data, the per capita total polyphenols was 162 mg from nuts per day in 2008. This corresponds to 19% of the total polyphenols from fruits and vegetables, nuts, grains, oils and spices in the US diet. Nuts provided 158 mg of polyphenols per day to the European Union diet. Nuts are high in polyphenol antioxidants which by binding to lipoproteins would inhibit oxidative processes that lead to atherosclerosis in vivo. In human supplementation studies nuts have been shown to improve the lipid profile, increase endothelial function and reduce inflammation, all without causing weight gain. These qualities make nuts a nutritious healthy snack and food additive.

  13. Electromagnetic device of the safety screw-nut type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defaucheux, Jean; Guedj, Freddy.

    1981-01-01

    System providing for the vertical displacement of nuclear reactor control rods in a non-magnetic and cylindrical leak tight containment. This device is composed of a stator located around the upper part of the containment and, inside this containment, a rotor also in the upper part of this containment, which is free in axial translation along its shaft which it drives rotationally but which is fixed in translation. This shaft drives a threaded rod working in conjunction with a nut and able to slide vertically without turning inside the containment and supporting the reactor control rods. When the stator is not powered, the threaded rod and nut assembly falls to the bottom of the containment and may be easily raised by powering the stator [fr

  14. Polypropylene reinforced with organophilic clay and brazilian nut fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha-Gomes, L.V.; Mondelo-Garcia, F.J.; Vaccioli, K.; Valera, S.T.; Silva-Valenzuela, M.G.; Valenzuela-Diaz, F.R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites have been shown to possess better properties when compared with traditional composites. This study aims to investigate the effects of the addition of organophilic clay and Brazilian nut fiber on the polypropylene (PP). First, 5%, 10% and 20% PP/compatibilizer maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) by weight was added to Pure PP, respectively. From the results, 5% PP-g-MA was defined for preparing the nanocomposites. Samples were prepared containing 5% PP / PP-g-MA reinforced with 5% organophilic Brazilian smectite clay and 5%, 10% and 15% Brazilian nut fiber. Specimens were tested for tensile strength and impact. The materials were characterized by laser diffraction particle size and X-ray diffraction, and the nanocomposites, by mechanical strength and impact. The best result was obtained by inserting 15% fiber. (author)

  15. Tree nut allergy, egg allergy, and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffin, Jonathan M; Sheehan, William J; Morrill, Jaclyn; Cinar, Munevver; Borras Coughlin, Irene M; Sawicki, Gregory S; Twarog, Frank J; Young, Michael C; Schneider, Lynda C; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2011-02-01

    Children with food allergies often have concurrent asthma. The authors aimed to determine the prevalence of asthma in children with food allergies and the association of specific food allergies with asthma. Parental questionnaire data regarding food allergy, corroborated by allergic sensitization were completed for a cohort of 799 children with food allergies. Multivariate regression analysis tested the association between food allergy and reported asthma. In this cohort, the prevalence of asthma was 45.6%. After adjusting for each food allergy, environmental allergies, and family history of asthma, children with egg allergy (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-3.2; P < .01) or tree nut allergy (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.1-3.6; P = .02) had significantly greater odds of report of asthma. There is a high prevalence of asthma in the food-allergic pediatric population. Egg and tree nut allergy are significantly associated with asthma, independent of other risk factors.

  16. Mycology and spoilage of retail cashew nuts | Adebajo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-two samples of retail cashew nuts from Lagos, Nigeria were examined on two media. The pH values (5.1-6.3) of all the samples were conducive for fungal growth and mycotoxin production. Moisture content levels ranged between 4.1 and 6.8%. Fifteen samples had moisture contents up to or above 5.8%, the highest ...

  17. Microbiological Spoilage of Spices, Nuts, Cocoa, and Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkas, Joan M.; Battista, Karen; Morille-Hinds, Theodora

    Spices, nuts, cocoa, and coffee are raw materials that may be used alone or as ingredients in the manufacture of processed food products. The control of microbiological spoilage of these raw materials at the ingredient stage will enable the food processor to better assure the production of high-quality foods with an acceptable shelf life. While this chapter is limited to four materials, many of the spoilage control procedures recommended can also be applied to other raw materials of a similar nature.

  18. NUT Midline Carcinoma: Morphoproteomic Characterization with Genomic and Therapeutic Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongxia; McGuire, Mary F; Zhang, Songlin; Brown, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma is a rare entity arising primarily in the midline of teenagers and young adults. Genomically, it is associated with a translocation involving a nuclear protein in testis (NUT) gene with other genes, most commonly, the BRD4 gene. The resultant is a partial or near total block in differentiation of tumor cells into mature squamous elements. Such tumors are resistant to conventional therapy with a reported mean survival at less than 1 year. In this study, we investigated two cases with genomic confirmation as NUT midline carcinoma by morphoproteomic analysis using immunohistochemical antibodies. Our results showed overexpression, largely in the undifferentiated cells of the tumors of: 1) Stemness marker, SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (Sox2); 2) Constitutive activation of the mTORC2 pathway with expression of total insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R[Tyr1165/1166]), and nuclear p-mTOR (Ser 2448) and p-Akt (Ser 473); and 3) c-Myc, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Sirt1) and histone methyltransferase enhancer of Zeste, Drosophila, homolog 2 (EZH2) as molecular impediments to differentiation. These data were analyzed through the use of QIAGEN's Ingenuity(®) Pathway Analysis (IPA(®), QIAGEN Redwood City, www.qiagen.com/ingenuity). The results established the interconnection of these pathways and molecules, and identified several pharmacogenomic agents--melatonin, metformin, vorinostat, curcumin, and sulforaphane--that have the potential to remove the block in differentiation and lead to the establishment of a more benign form of NUT midline carcinoma. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  19. Weakly charged generalized Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Krtouš, Pavel; Kubizňák, David

    2017-08-01

    We find an explicit solution of the source free Maxwell equations in a generalized Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetime in all dimensions. This solution is obtained as a linear combination of the closed conformal Killing-Yano tensor hab, which is present in such a spacetime, and a derivative of the primary Killing vector, associated with hab. For the vanishing cosmological constant the obtained solution reduces to the Wald's electromagnetic field generated from the primary Killing vector.

  20. Carbon Footprint of Tree Nuts Based Consumer Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Volpe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study shows results of a calculation of carbon footprint (CFP resulting from the production of nuts added value products for a large consumer market. Nuts consumption is increasing in the world and so is the consumer awareness of the environmental impact of goods, hence the calculation of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of food production is of growing importance for producers. Calculation of CO2eq emissions was performed for all stages of the production chain to the final retail point for flour, grains, paste, chocolate covered nuts and spreadable cream produced from almonds, pistachios and hazelnuts grown and transformed in Italy and for peanuts grown in Argentina and transformed in Italy. Data from literature was used to evaluate CFP of raw materials, emissions from transport and packing were calculated using existing models, while emissions deriving from transformation were calculated empirically by multiplying the power of production lines (electrical and/or thermal by its productivity. All values were reported in kg of CO2 equivalent for each kg of packed product (net weight. Resulting values ranged between 1.2 g of CO2/kg for a 100 g bag of almond to 4.8 g of CO2/kg for the 100 g bag of chocolate covered almond. The calculation procedure can be well used for similar cases of large consumer food productions.

  1. Particularities in a Child With Cashew Nut Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Soares MD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy affects many young children and tree nut allergy is accountable for a large number of severe, life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Cross-reactivity can occur not only with foods that are in the same biological family but also between certain fruits or vegetables and latex (latex–fruit syndrome. We present the case of a previous healthy 5-year-old girl referred to Pediatric/Allergology Consultation after an episode of sialorrhea, perioral urticarial rash, tongue swelling, and immediate vomiting after oral contact with cashew nut. Investigation revealed the following: positive skin prick test to walnut and positive specific IgE for cashew nut, walnut, hazelnut, and almond. ImmunoCAP ISAC was positive for storage proteins of walnut and hazelnut (Jug r 1 e Cor a 9 and for a specific allergen of latex (Hev b 3. It is interesting that anaphylaxis was the first manifestation of allergy in a healthy child. Also, we emphasize the importance to latex sensitization with potential future clinical relevance and the sensitization to Hev b 3, which is not documented to be involved in cross-reactivity phenomena/latex–fruit syndrome or present in an otherwise healthy child.

  2. Thermal Cyclic Resistance Polyester Resin Composites Reinforce Fiber Nut Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Hendriwan

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of study is to determine the effect of fiber length and thermal cyclic of the bending strength of polyester resin composite reinforced by fibers nut shell. The materials used in this study is a nut shell fibers with fiber length of 1 cm, 2 cm and 3 cm and polyester resin with composition 70-30%wt. Fiber nut shell treated soaking in NaOH 30% for 30 minutes, then rinse with clean water so that the fiber free of alkali and then dried. Furthermore, the composite is heated in an oven to a temperature of 100°C for 1 hour and then cooled in the open with a variety of thermal cyclic 30, 40, and 50 times. Bending properties of composites known through the testing process using a three-point bending test equipment universal testing machine. The test results show that the bending strength bending highest in fiber length of 3 cm with 30 treatment cycles of thermal to the value of 53.325 MPa, while the lowest occurred in bending strength fiber length of 1 cm with no cycles of thermal treatment to the value of 30.675 MPa.

  3. Sampling plans for pest mites on physic nut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jander F; Sarmento, Renato A; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; Galdino, Tarcísio V S; Marques, Renata V; Erasmo, Eduardo A L; Picanço, Marcelo C

    2014-08-01

    The starting point for generating a pest control decision-making system is a conventional sampling plan. Because the mites Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Tetranychus bastosi are among the most important pests of the physic nut (Jatropha curcas), in the present study, we aimed to establish sampling plans for these mite species on physic nut. Mite densities were monitored in 12 physic nut crops. Based on the obtained results, sampling of P. latus and T. bastosi should be performed by assessing the number of mites per cm(2) in 160 samples using a handheld 20× magnifying glass. The optimal sampling region for T. bastosi is the abaxial surface of the 4th most apical leaf on the branch of the middle third of the canopy. On the abaxial surface, T. bastosi should then be observed on the side parts of the middle portion of the leaf, near its edge. As for P. latus, the optimal sampling region is the abaxial surface of the 4th most apical leaf on the branch of the apical third of the canopy on the abaxial surface. Polyphagotarsonemus latus should then be assessed on the side parts of the leaf's petiole insertion. Each sampling procedure requires 4 h and costs US$ 7.31.

  4. Health benefits of nut consumption with special reference to body weight control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivel, Vellingiri; Kunyanga, Catherine N; Biesalski, Hans K

    2012-01-01

    Nuts are an integral part of the Mediterranean food patterns, and their incorporation into the regular diets of human beings is believed to provide many health benefits. The recent recognition of nuts as "heart-healthy" foods by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given a major boost to the positive image of nuts. Nut consumption has been associated with several health benefits, such as antioxidant, hypocholesterolemic, cardioprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic benefits, among other functional properties. However, although nuts possess these many health benefits, their consumption has been hampered by a lack of adequate information regarding those benefits. In addition, because nuts are energy-dense foods with high-fat content, there is a misconception among consumers that increased consumption may lead to unwanted gain in body weight with the risk of developing overweight/obesity. Nonetheless, available epidemiologic studies and short-term controlled feeding trials have supported the theory that the inclusion of nuts in the typical diet does not induce weight gain, despite an expected increase in total caloric intake. To address the misperception about nuts and body weight gain, the present review focuses mainly on the relation between nut consumption and body weight gain, in the context of the many health benefits of nuts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of areca nut chewing in the middle school-going children of Indore, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Khandelwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess areca nut chewing habit among middle school-aged children in Indore, India. Areca nut is chewed by itself, and in various scented preparations. It is associated with carcinogenesis, foreign body aspiration in children, and oral submucous fibrosis and may aggravate asthma. Materials and Methods: A retrospective collection of data to evaluate the prevalence of areca nut chewing among 3896 children was done. A simple random sampling was done. Children of both sexes were included in this study. Results: 27.06% of the school-going children (1054/3896 had areca nut chewing habit. More boys chewed areca nut than girls (2:1. 45.42% of school going children of rural area pander to areca nut chewing habit, whereas in urban area 20.09% children are indulged. Government school children are more involved in areca nut chewing habit. 81.02% of the children used sweetened and flavoured form of areca nut. The majority of the users were not aware of harmful effects that the use of areca nut might be harmful for health Conclusion: To diminish the use of areca nut, the Indian Government should consider limiting trade, advertising, and actively communicating its health risks to the public and should deem heavy taxes on it.

  6. BSACI guideline for the diagnosis and management of peanut and tree nut allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, G; Anagnostou, K; Boyle, R J; Brathwaite, N; Ewan, P; Fox, A T; Huber, P; Luyt, D; Till, S J; Venter, C; Clark, A T

    2017-06-01

    Peanut nut and tree nut allergy are characterised by IgE mediated reactions to nut proteins. Nut allergy is a global disease. Limited epidemiological data suggest varying prevalence in different geographical areas. Primary nut allergy affects over 2% of children and 0.5% of adults in the UK. Infants with severe eczema and/or egg allergy have a higher risk of peanut allergy. Primary nut allergy presents most commonly in the first five years of life, often after the first known ingestion with typical rapid onset IgE-mediated symptoms. The clinical diagnosis of primary nut allergy can be made by the combination of a typical clinical presentation and evidence of nut specifc IgE shown by a positive skin prick test (SPT) or specific IgE (sIgE) test. Pollen food syndrome is a distinct disorder, usually mild, with oral/pharyngeal symptoms, in the context of hay fever or pollen sensitisation, which can be triggered by nuts. It can usually be distinguish clinically from primary nut allergy. The magnitude of a SPT or sIgE relates to the probability of clinical allergy, but does not relate to clinical severity. SPT of ≥ 8 mm or sIgE ≥ 15 KU/L to peanut is highly predictive of clinical allergy. Cut off values are not available for tree nuts. Test results must be interpreted in the context of the clinical history. Diagnostic food challenges are usually not necessary but may be used to confirm or refute a conflicting history and test result. As nut allergy is likely to be a long-lived disease, nut avoidance advice is the cornerstone of management. Patients should be provided with a comprehensive management plan including avoidance advice, patient specific emergency medication and an emergency treatment plan and training in administration of emergency medication. Regular re-training is required. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Photosynthesis rate, chlorophyll content and initial development of physic nut without micronutrient fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Ferreira dos Santos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Few studies in Brazil have addressed the need for micronutrients of physic nut focusing on physiological responses, especially in terms of photosynthesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of omission of boron (B, copper (Cu, iron (Fe, manganese (Mn and zinc (Zn on Jatropha curcas L.. The experimental design was a randomized block with four replications. The treatments were complete solution (control and solution without B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn. We evaluated the chlorophyll content (SPAD units, photosynthetic rate, dry matter production and accumulation of micronutrients in plants, resulting from different treatments. The first signs of deficiency were observed for Fe and B, followed by Mn and Zn, while no symptoms were observed for Cu deficiency. The micronutrient omission reduced the dry matter yield, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic rate of the plants differently for each omitted nutrient. It was, however, the omission of Fe that most affected the development of this species in all parameters evaluated. The treatments negatively affected the chlorophyll content, evaluated in SPAD units, and the photosynthetic rate, except for the omission of B. However this result was probably due to the concentration effect, since there was a significant reduction in the dry matter production of B-deficient plants.

  8. Dendrometria de espécies nativas em plantios homogêneos no estado de Roraima: andiroba (Carapa guianensis Aubl, castanha-do-Brasil (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl., ipê-roxo (Tabebuia avellanedae Lorentz ex Griseb e jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril L. Dendrometry of native species in homogeneous stands in the Roraima state: andiroba (Carapa guianensis Aubl, castanha-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl, ipê-roxo (Tabebuia avellanedae Lorentz ex Griseb and jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Tonini

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se o crescimento e a seleção de equações para quatro espécies florestais nativas visando identificar espécies promissoras para o plantio em programas de reflorestamentos e em sistemas agroflorestais no Estado de Roraima. O crescimento da andiroba (Carapa guianensis Aubl., da castanha-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl., do ipê-roxo (Tabebuia avellanedae Lorentz ex Griseb. e do jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril L., aos sete anos de idade, mostrou-se promissor atingindo incrementos médios anuais em volume comercial de 6.3; 14.6; 6.0 e 2.3 m³.ha-1.ano-1, respectivamente. Em relação ao crescimento em diâmetro, todas as espécies apresentaram incrementos médios anuais em diâmetro maiores do que 1 cm, sendo superiores aos observados para árvores crescendo em florestas naturais. A análise estatística, indicou a equação hipsométrica de Prodan como a de melhor ajuste para estimar a altura em função do diâmetro para as quatro espécies analisadas. No entanto, a análise gráfica indicou que a forma da curva altura/diâmetro variou com a espécie sendo necessário o ajuste em separado. O ajuste de equações de volume comercial com casca e fator de forma comercial mostraram ser necessário o ajuste de diferentes equações em função da espécie. A análise gráfica das curvas de volume comercial e fator de forma indicaram que as espécies diferiram em ambos os parâmetros, indicando que a utilização de um fator de forma médio para todas as espécies deve ser evitado, como forma de aumentar a precisão nas estimativas volumétricas.The growth and selection of equations for four native forest species was studied aiming to identify promising species for homogeneous stands, and agroflorestry systems in the Roraima state. The growth of andiroba (Carapa guianensis Aubl., castanha-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa Bonpl., ipê-roxo (Tabebuia avellanedae Lorentz ex Griseb and jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril L. to the seven years of age

  9. Contact Dermatitis Due to Cashew Nut (Anacardium Occidentale Shell Oil, Pericarp and Kernel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Pasricha

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21 year old worker developed itching, fissuring and exudative lesions on her hands and fingers, 3 year after working as a cutter in the cashew nut factory. The lesions would in, prove during holidays or after she left her job. Patch tests were postive with the 0.1% cashew nut shell oil in polyethylene glycol and also with the red pericarp covering and the kernel of cashew nuts used as such.

  10. Areca nut chewing and systemic inflammation: evidence of a common pathway for systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafique Kashif

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Areca nut, the seed of fruit of an oriental palm, known as Areca catechu, is commonly chewed in many countries. Diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, oropharyngeal and oesophageal cancers have been associated with areca nut chewing and the mechanism by which areca nut chewing increases the risk of systemic diseases remains elusive. We hypothesize that systemic inflammation may be elevated among areca nut users, which is linked with many systemic diseases. Therefore, this present study was conducted to examine the systemic inflammation among areca nut chewers and healthy controls. Methods This was an observational cross sectional study carried out on areca nut chewers and healthy individuals in Karachi, Pakistan. Participants were selected from a region of the city by invitation request sent from door to door. Information was collected regarding the socio-demographic profile and the pattern of use, and a blood sample was obtained to measure the level of C-reactive protein (CRP. We carried out multiple logistic regressions to investigate the association between socio-demographic profile, areca nut chewing and CRP levels. Results We carried out final analysis on 1112 individuals of which 556 were areca nut chewers and 556 were the age, gender and area matched controls. Areca nut chewers had a significantly higher proportion of men (15.1%, n = 84 who had an elevated CRP (>10 mg/dl as compared to controls (5.2%, n = 29. Multivariate analyses showed that areca nut chewers had significantly higher odds of an elevated CRP (OR = 3.23, 95% CI 2.08-5.02, p value Conclusions Areca nut chewing has a significant association with systemic inflammation. Further work is required to confirm that systemic inflammation is the main pathway by which areca nut use increases the risk of systemic diseases.

  11. Aqueous extract from pecan nut [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh) C. Koch] shell show activity against breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and Ehrlich ascites tumor in Balb-C mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, Josiane; Policarpi, Priscila de Britto; Grinevicius, Valdelúcia Maria Alves de Souza; Mota, Nádia Sandrine Ramos Santos; Toaldo, Isabela Maia; Luiz, Marilde Terezinha Bordignon; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi; Block, Jane Mara

    2018-01-30

    In Brazil many health disorders are treated with the consumption of different varieties of tea. Shell extracts of pecan nut (Carya illinoinensis), which have significant amounts of phenolic compounds in their composition, are popularly taken as tea to prevent diverse pathologies. Phenolic compounds from pecan nut shell extract have been associated with diverse biological effects but the effect on tumor cells has not been reported yet. The aim of the current work was to evaluate the relationship between DNA fragmentation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by pecan nut shell extract and its antitumor activity. Cytotoxicity, proliferation, cell death and cell cycle were evaluated in MCF-7 cells by MTT, colony assay, differential coloring and flow cytometry assays, respectively. DNA damage effects were evaluated through intercalation into CT-DNA and plasmid DNA cleavage. Tumor growth inhibition, survival time increase, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were assessed in Ehrlich ascites tumor in Balb/C mice. The cytotoxic effect of pecan nut shell extracts, the induction of cell death by apoptosis and also the cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 cells have been demonstrated. The survival time in mice with Ehrlich ascites tumor increased by 67%. DNA damage was observed in the CT-DNA, plasmid DNA and comet assays. The mechanism involved in the antitumor effect of pecan nut shell extracts may be related to the activation of key proteins involved in apoptosis cell death (Bcl-XL, Bax and p53) and on the cell cycle regulation (cyclin A, cyclin B and CDK2). These results were attributed to the phenolic profile of the extract, which presented compounds such as gallic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, chlorogenic, vanillic, caffeic and ellagic acid, and catechin, epicatechin, epigallocatechin and epicatechin gallate. The results indicated that pecan nut shell extracts are effective against tumor cells growth and may be considered as an alternative to the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2017

  12. Benefits of Nut Consumption on Insulin Resistance and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Multiple Potential Mechanisms of Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoona Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies have indicated that nut consumption could be a healthy dietary strategy to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes (T2DM and related cardiovascular disease (CVD. The objective of this review is to examine the potential mechanisms of action of nuts addressing effects on glycemic control, weight management, energy balance, appetite, gut microbiota modification, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial function and blood pressure with a focus on data from both animal and human studies. The favourable effects of nuts could be explained by the unique nutrient composition and bioactive compounds in nuts. Unsaturated fatty acids (monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids present in nuts may play a role in glucose control and appetite suppression. Fiber and polyphenols in nuts may also have an anti-diabetic effect by altering gut microbiota. Nuts lower serum cholesterol by reduced cholesterol absorption, inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase and increased bile acid production by stimulation of 7-α hydroxylase. Arginine and magnesium improve inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial function and blood pressure. In conclusion, nuts contain compounds that favourably influence glucose homeostasis, weight control and vascular health. Further investigations are required to identify the most important mechanisms by which nuts decrease the risk of T2DM and CVD.

  13. Acute selenium poisoning by paradise nuts (Lecythis ollaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dieter; Desel, Herbert

    2010-05-01

    Two previously healthy women developed nausea, vomiting, headache and dizziness for several days, a massive hair loss about 2 weeks later and a discoloration of the fingernails. Detailed diagnostic procedures did not reveal any pathological results. Therapeutic measures did not show any effect. Thallium and arsenic were within normal range in plasma. Delayed quantitative determination of selenium in blood, however revealed toxic values (in case I: 479 microg/L of serum, 8 weeks after ingestion, and in case II 300 microg/L of serum, 9 weeks after ingestion). In retrospect, a relation to the ingestion of paradise nuts could be established.

  14. Penicilllium discolor, a new species from cheese, nuts and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Samson, Robert A.; Rassing, Birgitte A.

    1997-01-01

    The new species Penicillum discolor, frequently isolated from nuts, vegetables and cheese is described. It is characterised by rough, dark green conidia, synnemateous growth on malt agar and the production of the secondary metabolites chaetoglobosins A, B and C, palitantin, cyclopenin, cyclopenol......, cyclopeptin, dehydrocyclopeptin, viridicatin and viridicatol. It also produces the mouldy smelling compounds geosmin and 2-methyl-isoborneol, and a series of specific orange to red pigments on yeast extract sucrose agar, hence the epithet discolor. P. discolor resembles P. echinulatum morphologically...

  15. Gravitational radiation reaction in the NUT-de Sitter spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    1988-07-01

    The equations for gravitational perturbation in the NUT-de Sitter spacetime are obtained. Using these equations, some preliminary calculations have been made with a view to constructing the retarded Green functions. Then with the help of the retarded Green functions, the radiative Green functions have been constructed. With the aid of these radiative Green functions, the reaction force on a particle is computed and this reaction force is then shown to account correctly for the energy and the angular momentum carried away by gravitational radiation to infinity and to the horizon. (author). 9 refs

  16. Hyperspectral to multispectral imaging for detection of tree nuts and peanut traces in wheat flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Mishra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In current industrial environments there is an increasing need for practical and inexpensive quality control systems to detect the foreign food materials in powder food processing lines. This demand is especially important for the detection of product adulteration with traces of highly allergenic products, such as peanuts and tree nuts. Manufacturing industries dealing with the processing of multiple powder food products present a substantial risk for the contamination of powder foods with traces of tree nuts and other adulterants, which might result in unintentional ingestion of nuts by the sensitised population. Hence, the need for an in-line system to detect nut traces at the early stages of food manufacturing is of crucial importance. In this present work, a feasibility study of a spectral index for revealing adulteration of tree nut and peanut traces in wheat flour samples with hyperspectral images is reported. The main nuts responsible for allergenic reactions considered in this work were peanut, hazelnut and walnut. Enhanced contrast between nuts and wheat flour was obtained after the application of the index. Furthermore, the segmentation of these images by selecting different thresholds for different nut and flour mixtures allowed the identification of nut traces in the samples. Pixels identified as nuts were counted and compared with the actual percentage of peanut adulteration. As a result, the multispectral system was able to detect and provide good visualisation of tree nut and peanut trace levels down to 0.01% by weight. In this context, multispectral imaging could operate in conjuction with chemical procedures, such as Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay to save time, money and skilled labour on product quality control. This approach could enable not only a few selected samples to be assessed but also to extensively incorporate quality control surveyance on product processing lines.

  17. Fabrication and Performance Evaluation of a Thevetia Nut Cracking Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Odewole

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Thevetia seed contains about 64 percent of non-edible oil in its oily kernel and this oil can be used for various purposes such as biofuel and bio-oil; making of paints, insecticides, cosmetics, lubricants and cooling oil in electrical transformers. The cakes obtained after oil extraction are incorporated on the field as manure. In order to get quality oil kernels from the hard nuts, there is need to properly crack them; this process of cracking is still a great challenge. As result of the aforementioned problem, this work focused on the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of a thevetia nut cracking machine. The machine works based on the principle of attrition force. Some of the parts designed for were diameter of shaft (13 mm solid shaft and length of belt (A55, power required to operate the machine (2.5 hp, speed of operation (9.14 m/s and the appropriate dimension of angle iron bar of 45 mm × 45 mm × 3 mm was used for the structural support. The fabrication was done systematically followed by the performance evaluation of the machine. The result of the overall cracking efficiency and throughput capacity of the machine were evaluated to be 96.65 % and 510 g⁄min respectively.

  18. Effect of vegetable oil (Brazil nut oil and mineral oil (liquid petrolatum on dental biofilm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia de Fátima Buldrini Filogônio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dental biofilm control represents a basic procedure to prevent caries and the occurrence of periodontal diseases. Currently, toothbrushes and dentifrices are used almost universally, and the employment of good oral hygiene allows for appropriate biofilm removal by both mechanical and chemical control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adding vegetable or mineral oil to a commercially available dentifrice in dental biofilm control. A comparison using the Oral Hygiene Index Simplified (OHI-S was performed in 30 individuals who were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (G1 received a commercially available dentifrice; the composition of this dentifrice was modified by addition of mineral oil (Nujol® for group 2 (G2 or a vegetable oil (Alpha Care® for group 3 (G3 at 10% of the total volume, respectively. The two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (two-way ANOVA was used to test the effect of group (G1, G2 and G3 or time (baseline, 45 days and 90 days on the OHI-S index scores. Statistical analysis revealed a significant reduction in the OHI-S at day 90 in G2 (p < 0.05 and G3 (p < 0.0001 in comparison to G1. Therefore, the addition of a vegetable or a mineral oil to a commercially available dentifrice improved dental biofilm control, suggesting that these oils may aid in the prevention and/or control of caries and periodontal disease.

  19. Biological control of phytophagous arthropods in the physic nut tree Jatropha curcas L. in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Lemes Fernandes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas has a high biofuel oil content, which could replace polluting fuels, and has great potential for large scale monoculture cultivation in the conventional system. We explored the occurrence, spatial distribution and the functional response of the main phytophagous species of this plant and their natural enemies to explore the potential for conservative biological control. We began sampling phytophagous species and predators when J. curcas plants were six months old. The most common species of phytophagous insects were nymphs and adults of Empoasca kraemeri, followed by Frankliniella schultzei and Myzus persicae. Among the predators, Ricoseius loxocheles, Iphiseioides zuluagai, Araneidae, larvae and adults of Psyllobora vigintimaculata and Anthicus sp. were the most frequently encountered. The most common parasitoids were the families Encyrtidae and Braconidae. The highest densities of E. kraemeri and F. schultzei on the edges of the J. curcas crop follow spatial patterns similar to those of their natural enemies I. zuluagai and Anthicus sp. These arthropods can be considered efficient predators of immature stages of E. kraemeri and F. schultzei on J. curcas.

  20. Nondestructive inspection of nuts for food quality and safety using NIRS (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold infection and insect infestation are significant postharvest problems for processors of nuts. Fungal disease causes direct loss of product or reduced value due to the lower-quality grade of the chest-nut lot. In most cases, fungal infection is not detectable using traditional sorting techniques...

  1. Cover crops to improve soil health and pollinator habitat in nut orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry. Van Sambeek

    2017-01-01

    Recently several national programs have been initiated calling for improving soil health and creating pollinator habitat using cover crops. Opportunities exist for nut growers to do both with the use of cover crops in our nut orchards. Because we can include perennial ground covers as cover crops, we have even more choices than landowners managing cover crops during...

  2. Nut production in response to thinning and fertilization for planted walnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix Ponder; Steve Rutledge; J.W. Van Sambeek

    2013-01-01

    Nut production from nursery-run black walnuts grown on 225 acres at the Hammons Products Company's Sho-Neff Black Walnut Farm in Stockton, MO, was evaluated from 1995 to 2010 to determine if nut production increased after thinning and fertilization in 2001. The farm consists of 11 upland and 10 bottomland plantings on sites ranging from unsuitable to well suited...

  3. Polyphenol-Rich Pomegranate Juice Reduces IgE Binding to Cashew Nut Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashew nut allergy is mediated by IgE binding to seed-storage proteins including Ana o 1, 2, and 3. Cashew nuts commonly cause severe reactions and only small amounts are needed. Polyphenol rich juices and polyphenol compounds have been demonstrated to complex with peanut allergens. The interacti...

  4. Utilization Of Diets Containing Cashew-Nut Reject Meal By Weaner ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A trial was conducted to assess the performance and digestibility of weaner pigs fed diets containing cashew nut reject meal (CNM). A control diet was formulated without cashew nut reject meal while two other diets were also formulated to contain either 50g or 100g/kg diet. The CNM replaced soybean meal in the control ...

  5. Pine Nuts: A Review of Recent Sanitary Conditions and Market Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Umair Masood Awan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pine nuts are non-wood forest products (NWFP with a constantly growing market notwithstanding a series of phytosanitary issues and related trade problems. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the relationship between phytosanitary problems and trade development. Production and trade of pine nuts in Mediterranean Europe have been negatively affected by the spreading of Diplodia sapinea (a fungus associated with an adventive insect Leptoglossus occidentalis (fungal vector, with impacts on forest management, production and profitability and thus in value chain organization. Reduced availability of domestic production in markets with a growing demand has stimulated the import of pine nuts. China has become a leading exporter of pine nuts, but its export is affected by a symptom caused by the nuts of some pine species: ‘pine nut syndrome’ (PNS. Most of the studies mentioned in the literature review concern PNS occurrence associated with the nuts of Pinus armandii. We highlight the need for a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of the pine nuts value chain organization, where research on food properties and clinical toxicology may be connected to breeding and forest management, forest pathology and entomology, and trade development.

  6. Chemical characterization of the oil of Sterculia striata St. Hil. et Naud nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, Mariana H.; Barbosa, Andrea S.; Moita Neto, Jose M.; Aued-Pimentel, Sabria; Lago, Joao Henrique G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes total lipid content, unsaponifiable fraction and the acid, refractive, saponification and iodine indices of the oil of Sterculia striata nuts. The fatty acids, the sterols and the triterpene alcohols were determined. The percentage of cyclopropenoid fatty acids (CPFA), determined by NMR 1 H (15,5%), makes the nuts of this species unsuitable for human consumption. (author)

  7. Register of New Fruit and Nut Cultivars List 45. Banana, cacao, Spanish lime, plantain

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Register of New Fruit and Nut Varieties 45 is a compilation of descriptions of new fruit and nut cultivars from around the world. In this edition, newly released cacao, banana, plantain, and genip cultivars are described in terms of their origins, important fruit traits and yield....

  8. An input-output energy analysis in pistachio nut production: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research examined the energy use pattern and energy input/output analysis of pistachio nut widely grown in the South-eastern Anatolia, Turkey. For this purpose, data from pistachio nut production were collected in 61 farms from ten villages by a questionnaire which was selected according to their regional properties.

  9. Associations between Nut Consumption and Health Vary between Omnivores, Vegetarians, and Vegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel C. Brown

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Regular nut consumption is associated with reduced risk factors for chronic disease; however, most population-based studies lack consideration of effect modification by dietary pattern. The UK Women’s Cohort Study (UKWCS provides an ideal opportunity to examine relationships between nut consumption and chronic disease risk factors in a large sample with diverse dietary patterns. Nut and nutrient intake from 34,831 women was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire among self-identified omnivores, vegetarians and vegans. In this cross-sectional analysis, higher nut consumption was associated with lower body weight (difference between highest and lowest consumption categories from adjusted model: 6.1 kg; 95% CI: 4.7, 7.6 body mass index (BMI, 2.4 units difference; 95% CI: 1.9, 2.9, and waist circumference (2.6 cm difference; 95% CI: 1.4, 3.8 (all p for linear trend < 0.001. Higher nut consumption was also associated with reduced prevalence of high cholesterol and high blood pressure; having a history of heart attack, diabetes and gallstones; and markers of diet quality (all adjusted p for linear trend ≤ 0.011. Higher nut consumption appeared overall to be associated with greater benefits amongst omnivores compared to vegetarians and vegans. Findings support existing literature around beneficial effects of nut consumption and suggest that benefits may be larger among omnivores. Nut promotion strategies may have the highest population impact by specifically targeting this group.

  10. Register of new fruit and nut cultivars list 48. Banana, cacao, plantain

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Register of New Fruit and Nut Varieties 48 is a compilation of descriptions of new fruit and nut cultivars from around the world. In this edition, newly released banana, plantain, and cacao cultivars are described in terms of their origins, important fruit traits and yield. ...

  11. Determination of high molecular mass compounds from Amazonian plant's leaves; Determinacao de compostos de massa molecular alta em folhas de plantas da Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Denilson Soares de; Pereira, Alberto dos Santos; Aquino Neto, Francisco Radler de [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: ladetec@iq.gov.br; Cabral, Jose Augusto; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Cid [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil); Simoneit, Bernd R.T. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences. Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group; Elias, Vladimir O. [Analytical Solution, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-10-01

    The fractions of dichloromethane extracts of leaves from andiroba (Carapa guianensis - Meliaceae), caapi (Banisteriopsis caapi - Malpighiaceae), cocoa (Theobroma cacao - Sterculiaceae), Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa - Lecytidaceae), cupuacu (Theobroma grandiflorum - Sterculiaceae), marupa (Simaruba amara - Simaroubaceae) and rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis - Euphorbiaceae), were analyzed by HT-HRGC and HT-HRGC-MS. Esters of homologous series of fatty acids and long chain alcohols, phytol, amyrines and tocopherols were characterized. The characterization of the compounds was based mainly in mass spectra data and in addition by usual spectrometric data ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, IR). (author)

  12. Determinação de compostos de massa molecular alta em folhas de plantas da Amazônia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Denilson Soares de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractIons of dichloromethane extracts of leaves from andiroba (Carapa guianensis - Meliaceae, caapi (Banisteriopsis caapi - Malpighiaceae, cocoa (Theobroma cacao - Sterculiaceae, Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa - Lecytidaceae, cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum - Sterculiaceae, marupá (Simaruba amara - Simaroubaceae and rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis - Euphorbiaceae, were analyzed by HT-HRGC and HT-HRGC-MS. Esters of homologous series of fatty acids and long chain alcohols, phytol, amyrines and tocopherols were characterized. The characterization of the compounds was based mainly in mass spectra data and in addition by usual spectrometric data (¹H and 13C NMR, IR.

  13. Determination of high molecular mass compounds from Amazonian plant's leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Denilson Soares de; Pereira, Alberto dos Santos; Aquino Neto, Francisco Radler de; Simoneit, Bernd R.T.

    2003-01-01

    The fractions of dichloromethane extracts of leaves from andiroba (Carapa guianensis - Meliaceae), caapi (Banisteriopsis caapi - Malpighiaceae), cocoa (Theobroma cacao - Sterculiaceae), Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa - Lecytidaceae), cupuacu (Theobroma grandiflorum - Sterculiaceae), marupa (Simaruba amara - Simaroubaceae) and rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis - Euphorbiaceae), were analyzed by HT-HRGC and HT-HRGC-MS. Esters of homologous series of fatty acids and long chain alcohols, phytol, amyrines and tocopherols were characterized. The characterization of the compounds was based mainly in mass spectra data and in addition by usual spectrometric data ( 1 H and 13 C NMR, IR). (author)

  14. Incidence of moulds and presence of aflatoxin on toasted cashew nuts (Anacardium occidentale L in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEJANDRA ACEVEDO

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to determine the incidence of fungal growth in commercial cashew nuts. The highest mould count in cashew nuts was 658.05 UFC/g (sales point 1. The incidence of moulds in cashew nuts in the first testing period was between 91,67 and 31.25% and in the second period it was between 89.58 and 62.5% for sales points 1, 2, 3 and 4. The incidence of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus in cashew nuts was 5.74% and 0.49%, respectively, and the differences were not significant. The concentrations of aflatoxins recovered from cashew nuts were between 20.67 and 11.33 ppb, for all sales points.

  15. Physicochemical Properties and Fatty Acid Profiles of Elaeagnus mollis Diels Nut Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shaohua; Yang, Ruinan; Dong, Caiwen; Yang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical properties, fatty acid profiles, content of tocopherol and sterol of the oils extracted from the nuts of Elaeagnus mollis Diels grown in different regions of China were studied in this work. The results indicated that the Elaeagnus mollis Diels nut oils contained about 0.2% sterols and the tocopherol contents were in the range of 119.6-128.6mg/100g. The nut oils were all rich in unsaturated fatty acids, especially oleic acid and linoleic acid. Furthermore, the main triacylglycerols species of the nut oils were all dilinoleoyl-monoolein (LOL), dioleoyl-monolinoleoyl (OLO) and trilinoleate (LLL). This work might be useful for developing applications for Elaeagnus mollis Diels nut oil.

  16. Betel nut use among first and second generation Bangladeshi women in London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-de la Mora, Alejandra; Jesmin, Fahmida; Bentley, Gillian R

    2007-10-01

    This study evaluated the effects of socio-economic variables and migration history on the prevalence of betel nut and smokeless tobacco use in both UK- and Bangladeshi born migrant women resident in London. No significant difference in betel nut use prevalence was found among women of different generations. However, in all groups betel nut users were significantly older and less educated than non-users. Among first generation women there was no effect of either length of time living in the UK or age at migration on use of betel nut, even after controlling for current age. No significant differences in prevalence use due to language spoken, occupation, marital status or borough of residence in London were found. We conclude that, although there are some indications of a change in behavior among younger individuals, betel nut chewing is a practice very much present among Bangladeshi women born and brought up in a bicultural context.

  17. Nanoparticles of wurtzite aluminum nitride from the nut shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Qadri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of aluminum nitride were produced from a thermal treatment of a mixture of aluminum oxide (Al2O3 and shells of almond, cashew, coconuts, pistachio, and walnuts in a nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures in excess of 1450 °C. By selecting the appropriate ratios of each nut powder to Al2O3, it is shown that stoichiometric aluminum nitride can be produced by carbo-thermal reduction in nitrogen atmosphere. Using x-ray diffraction analysis, Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, it is demonstrated that aluminum nitride consists of pure wurtzite phase. Transmission electron microscopy showed the formation of nanoparticles and in some cases nanotubes of AlN.

  18. Modelling Aspergillus flavus growth and aflatoxins production in pistachio nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Sonia; Ramos, Antonio J; Sanchis, V

    2012-12-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are the main contaminants in pistachio nuts. AFs production in pistachio has been attributed to Aspergillus flavus. The aim of this study was to apply existing models to predict growth and AFs production by an A. flavus isolated from pistachios as a function of moisture content and storage temperature of pistachios in order to test their usefulness and complementarities. A full factorial design was used: the moisture content levels assayed were 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% and incubation temperatures were 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 37 and 42 °C. Both kinetic and probability models were built to predict growth of the strain under the assayed conditions. Among the assayed models, cardinal ones gave a good quality fit for radial growth rate data. Moreover, the progressive approach, which was developed based on a reduced number of experimental points led to an improved prediction in the validation step. This is quite significant as may allow for improved experimental designs, less costly than full factorial ones. Probability model proved to be concordant in 91% of the calibration set observations. Even though the validation set included conditions around the growth/no-growth interface, there was a 100% agreement in the predictions from the data set (n = 16, cut off = 0.5) after 60 days. Similarly, the probability for AF presence was rightly predicted in 89% of the cases. According to our results EC maximum aflatoxin levels would be surpassed in a period as short as 1 month if pistachio nuts reach 20 °C, unless %mc is ≤10%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 78 FR 61365 - Assessment of the Risk of Human Salmonellosis Associated With the Consumption of Tree Nuts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... With the Consumption of Tree Nuts; Request for Comments, Scientific Data and Information; Extension of... entitled ``Assessment of the Risk of Human Salmonellosis Associated With the Consumption of Tree Nuts... of the risk of human salmonellosis associated with the consumption of tree nuts. We are taking this...

  20. Colony structure and spatial partitioning of cavity dwelling ant species in nuts of eastern US forest floors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nut-bearing trees create islands of high efficiency, low cost housing opportunities for ant colonies. Fallen nuts in leaf litter from previous seasons provide ready-made nest sites for cavity dwelling ant species, as well as affording protection from the elements. Suitable nuts for nests require an ...

  1. Formas de abertura dos frutos de Syagrus romanzoffiana (Chamisso glassman efetuadas por Sciurus ingrami Thomas (Rodentia, Sciuridae Opening forms of palm nuts Syagrus romanzoffiana (Chamisso Glassman made by Sciurus ingrami Thomas (Rodentia, Sciuridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bordignon

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work was identifyed the diferents opening forms of the palm nuts Syagrus romanzoffiana by brazilian squirrel Sciurus ingrami in four diferents points of Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. Was caracterized tive basic forms of opening, in acording with the number of incisions and opening aspects. The form with lower number of incisions (two was also the greather frequently in the four points sampled (66,25%; N = 5194 well as registred the lower opening time (7,2 ± 1,7 min in relationship with other forms (9,2 ± 2,3 min. To explicate the diferences in the frequences of forms discovered, is proposed "apprenticeship's hypothesis" which the young squirrels of the population, along the opening nuts apprenticeship, to passing of the forms with larger number of incisions to forms with lower number of incisions, ending in the form of more frequence, which is maintained by adult squirrels.

  2. Reproducing the experimental torque-to-turn resistance of blind rivet nuts using FEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Arne; Coppieters, Sam; Denys, Kristof; Maeyens, Jan; Debruyne, Dimitri

    2017-10-01

    A blind rivet nut is a mechanical fastener enabling a fast installation from one side. The setting process relies on plastic deformation due to axial compression of the rivet nut in such a way that a bulge is formed on the underside of the work piece. The mechanical performance of such a connection partly depends on the final geometry of the rivet nut after forming. In this contribution, the torque-to-turn resistance of an internally threaded round tubular rivet is studied with the aid of finite element techniques. A strategy is presented to simulate the setting process involving large plastic strains and contact pressures. An FE-based inverse method was used to identify the local plastic material properties of the blind rivet nut. The forming simulation was validated in terms of predicted shape of the rivet nut and the evolution of the setting force. A quasi-static FE model using the shape and solution variables of the deformed rivet nut was used to reproduce the torque-to-turn resistance as a function of the setting force. Finally, the aim is to apply the presented modelling strategy to explore innovative possibilities to increase the torque-to-turn resistance of a blind rivet nut.

  3. Fungal flora and mycotoxins of six kinds of nut seeds for human consumption in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gawad, K M; Zohri, A A

    1993-10-01

    A wide range of moulds representing several genera and species, was recorded in this study from 5 seed samples of each almond, cashew nut, chestnut, hazelnut, pistachio nut and walnut collected from different markets in Ar' Ar, Saudi Arabia. The total counts of fungi were widely fluctuated between 1960-7704 and 1948-7434 colonies/g dry seeds on glucose-Czapek's and glycerol agar media at 28 degrees C, respectively, and represented twenty genera, 53 species and 2 varieties of fungi. The prevalent fungi on the 2 agar media were Aspergillus flavus, A. niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. On glucose-Czapek's agar, Rhizopus stolonifer and Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris were isolated from all 6 kinds of nut, A. parasiticus from 5 kinds and A. fumigatus from 4 kinds with high frequencies. Eurotium species were completely absent on glucose-Czapek's agar but they were isolated in high frequency from all kinds of nut on glycerol agar medium. The different nut samples were analyzed by thin layer chromatography for the presence of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 & G2, citrinin, ochratoxins, patulin, sterigmatocystin, diacetoxyscirpenol, T-2 toxin and zearalenone. Aflatoxins B1 & G1 were detected in 3 out of the 5 samples tested of chestnut at concentrations ranging between 20 to 60 micrograms/kg. All other samples of almond, cashew nut, hazelnut, pistachio nut, and walnut that were analyzed were mycotoxin free.

  4. Prevalence of areca nut chewing habit among high school children of Parsa district of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Sartaj Singh; Arora, Pallak; Kapoor, Shalini; Jayam, Raviraj; Sharma, Sugandha; Rastogi, Trisha

    2017-01-01

    Consumption of areca nut products among school going children has become very common social evil in some areas of Nepal especially adjoining the Indian subcontinent. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of areca nut chewing habit among high school children in Terai belt of Nepal. The use of areca nut has become indigenous in this part and is being used by itself and in various formulations. The regular use of areca nut has been recognized as being carcinogenic to humans. Data on areca nut chewing habit among high school children was collected from 1359 students of age group 14-18 years from 13 schools of Parsa district of Nepal by random selection and the information was obtained from self administered questionnaire. The results from this study shows that the areca nut chewing habit is significant among the students of Parsa district (30.4%) and the frequency of chewing plain Supari was reported to be high (81.6%) followed by pan masala (10.4%) and gutkha (08.0%) and the habit increased with age. It is mandatory to motivate the children not to initiate the habit and to enable the adolescent children to realize the potential health risk of areca nut products.

  5. Areca nut extracts mobilize calcium and release pro-inflammatory cytokines from various immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faouzi, Malika; Neupane, Ram P; Yang, Jian; Williams, Philip; Penner, Reinhold

    2018-01-18

    Betel nut consumption has significant implications for the public health globally, as the wide-spread habit of Areca chewing throughout Asia and the Pacific is associated with a high prevalence of oral carcinoma and other diseases. Despite a clear causal association of betel nut chewing and oral mucosal diseases, the biological mechanisms that link Areca nut-contained molecules, inflammation and cancer remain underexplored. In this study we show that the whole Areca nut extract (ANE) is capable of mobilizing Ca 2+ in various immune cell lines. Interestingly, none of the four major alkaloids or a range of other known constituents of Areca nut were able to induce such Ca 2+ signals, suggesting that the active components might represent novel or so far unappreciated chemical structures. The separation of ANE into aqueous and organic fractions has further revealed that the calcium-mobilizing molecules are exclusively present in the aqueous extract. In addition, we found that these calcium signals are associated with the activation of several immune cell lines as shown by the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased cell proliferation. These results indicate that calcium-mobilizing molecules present in the aqueous fraction of the Areca nut may critically contribute to the inflammatory disorders affecting betel nut chewers.

  6. Physicochemical, functional and pasting properties of flour produced from gamma irradiated tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocloo, Fidelis C.K.; Okyere, Abenaa A.; Asare, Isaac K.

    2014-01-01

    Tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L.) has been recognised as one of the best nutritional crops that can be used to augment the Ghanaian diet. The application of gamma irradiation as means of preserving tiger nut could modify the characteristics of resultant flour. The purpose of this study was to determine the physicochemical, functional and pasting characteristics of flour from gamma irradiated tiger nut. The yellow and black types of tiger nut were sorted, washed and dried in an air-oven at 60 o C for 24 h. The dried tiger nut samples were irradiated at 0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy and then flours produced from them. Moisture, ash, pH, titratable acidity, water and oil absorption capacities, swelling power, solubility, bulk density and pasting properties of the flours were determined using appropriate analytical methods. Results showed that irradiation did not significantly (P>0.05) affect the moisture and ash contents of the resultant flours. Gamma irradiation significantly (P≤0.05) increased titratable acidity with concomitant decrease in pH of the flours. No significant differences were observed for water and oil absorption capacities, swelling power as well as bulk density. Solubility significantly (P≤0.05) increased generally with irradiation dose. Peak viscosity, viscosities at 92 °C and 55 °C, breakdown and setback viscosities decreased significantly with irradiation dose. Flour produced from irradiated tiger nut has a potential in complementary food formulations due to its low viscosity and increased solubility values. - Highlights: • Physicochemical, functional and pasting characteristics of flour from gamma irradiated tiger nut were studied. • Irradiation did not affect the moisture and ash contents of the resultant flours. • Titratable acidity increased with decrease in pH of the flours from the irradiated tiger nut. • Solubility increased whereas peak viscosity decreased with irradiation dose. • Flour produced from irradiated tiger nut has a

  7. Direct-acting DNA alkylating agents present in aqueous extracts of areca nut and its products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chao, Mu-Rong

    2012-11-19

    Areca nut is a carcinogen to humans and has been strongly associated with oral premalignant and malignant diseases. Previous studies speculated the presence of unknown direct-acting mutagens present in aqueous extracts of areca nut. We hypothesized whether any direct-acting alkylating agents are present in areca nut and its commercial products. In this study, calf thymus DNA was treated with four different aqueous extracts obtained from unripe and ripe areca nuts or their commercial products, namely, pan masala (without tobacco) and gutkha (with tobacco). Three N-alkylated purines including N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG), N3-methyladenine (N3-MeA), and N7-ethylguanine (N7-EtG) were detected using sensitive and specific isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. The results showed that four types of aqueous extracts significantly induced the formation of N7-MeG and N3-MeA in a linear dose-response manner. Extracts from unripe areca nut exhibited higher methylating potency than those of ripe areca nut, while gutkha had higher methylating potency than pan masala. Meanwhile, gutkha made with areca nut and tobacco, was the only extract found to induce the formation of N7-EtG. Overall, this study first demonstrated that the presence of direct-acting alkylating agents in areca nut and its commercial products exist at a level that is able to cause significant DNA damage. Our findings may provide another mechanistic rationale for areca nut-mediated oral carcinogenesis and also highlight the importance and necessity of the identification of these direct-acting alkylating agents.

  8. Influence of Cyperus esculentus tubers (tiger nut) on male rat copulatory behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouh, Mohammed Z; Daradka, Haytham M; Abu Ghaida, Jamaledin H

    2015-09-23

    Cyperus esculentus tubers (tiger nut) are one of the ancient food sources known to humanity. It is traditionally used in the Middle East to stimulate sexual arousal in men. However, there has been no scientific evidence about its assumed aphrodisiac properties. This study aimed to investigate the influence of tiger nut on the copulatory behavior of sexually active male rats. Two sets of sexually active male rats -highly active and moderately active- were identified depending on baseline sexual activity. Rats in each set were randomly divided into a control and treated groups. Highly active rats were treated with doses of 1 and 2 g/kg/d of raw tiger nut powder, while moderately active rats were treated with a dose of 2 g/kg/d. After 30 days' treatment, copulatory behavior and serum hormonal levels were measured and compared between the groups within each experimental set. Phytochemical analyses including liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and atomic absorption were performed to elucidate the main constituents of tiger nut that may be responsible for altering serum hormones. Tiger nut stimulated sexual motivation in both highly and moderately active rats, indicated by reduced mount and intromission latencies in these rats compared to controls. Furthermore, tiger nut improved sexual performance, indicated by increased intromission frequency and ratio, in treated moderately active rats compared to controls. Serum testosterone levels increased significantly after tiger nut administration. Lastly, phytochemical analyses revealed the presence of quercetin, vitamin C, vitamin E, and mineral zinc in tiger nut. Tiger nut has positive effects on the copulatory behavior of adult male rats.

  9. Hawking radiation of Dirac particles in the hot NUT-Kerr-Newman spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Hawking radiation of charged Dirac particles on the horizons of the hot NUT-Kerr-Newman spacetime is studied in this paper. To this end, we obtain the radial decoupled Dirac equation for the electron in the hot NUT-Kerr-Newman spacetime. Next we solve the Dirac equation near the horizons. Finally, by analytic continuation, the Hawking thermal spectrum formula of Dirac particles is obtained. The problem of the Hawking evaporation of Dirac particles in the hot NUT-Kerr-Newman background is thus solved. (orig.)

  10. Gnomoniopsis castanea is the main agent of chestnut nut rot in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca G. DENNERT

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nuts of sweet chestnut have been an important food source for the alpine population in Switzerland since the Middle Ages and are still valued today for the preparation of traditional food commodities. Nut quality is reduced by insect damage and by various pathogenic fungi. In the last few years, producers and consumers perceived an increase of brown nut rot; while the nut rot agent Gnomoniopsis castanea was reported locally in southern Switzerland, its presence has not been investigated over large areas until now. This study assessed the incidence of brown nut rot and identified the causal agent present in Switzerland. Fully ripened nuts were collected from the main sweet chestnut growing areas of Switzerland. A filamentous fungus morphologically identified as G. castanea was isolated from 10 to 91% of the sampled nuts, despite only 3 to 21% of the sampled nuts showing brown rot symptoms. This fungus was isolated from symptomatic chestnuts as well as from apparently healthy chestnuts. Our results suggest a possible endophytic lifestyle in ripened nuts as well as in branches, leaves and unripe nuts as previously found. Species identity of 45 isolates was confirmed by EF-1alpha, beta-tubulin and ITS sequencing. Concatenation of β-tubulin and calmodulin sequences showed that several haplotypes were present at each sampling locality. No other nut rot pathogens could be isolated in this study, suggesting that G. castanea is the main causal agent of nut rot in Switzerland. The presence of this species is reported for the first time in a site in northern Switzerland. Further studies are needed to assess the influence of meteorological conditions and chestnut varieties on the incidence of G. castanea in order to provide prevention strategies for chestnut growers. Normal 0 21 false false false FR-CH X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso

  11. The Application of Bio-organic Fertilizer on Physic nut Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumavip, Amnag; Piadiang, Nattaya

    2006-09-01

    The Application of bio-organic fertilizers on Physics nut production were conduction in an area of Agricultural Occupational Promotion and Development Center, Cholburi Province (Plant Cultural) Cholburi. The period of 3 months (August - November 2006), Physic nut production both with and without husk were on the field. Experimental design was RCBD with 5 treatments. Results revealed that no significant difference between treatments (P>0.05). physic nut applied with the microbial fertilizer (OAP) produced greater yields with husks (71.21 Kg/rai) and without husks( 24.30 kg/rai) than chemical treatment 45.18 and 17.22 kg/rai respectively.

  12. Brazil`s mineral policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, C.A.V. [Pinheiro Neto-Advogados, Brasilia (Brazil)

    1997-06-01

    Brazil is a large producer of many minerals, with a favourable regulatory framework, tax policy and foreign investment legislation. Although there are strict environmental requirements, mining ventures can cope with them and they represent no obstacle to mining activities. Efficient regulatory agencies are in place, such as the Department of Mines (DNPM) and the Geological Survey (CPRM). The Brazilian mineral policy is set out in a number of different documents, the more important being the Federal Constitution and the Mining Code. Important constitutional amendments have been recently passed, so as to open Brazil`s economy to foreign investments.

  13. Cashew nut analysis by magnetic resonance tomography; Analise da castanha do cajueiro por tomografia de ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Joao Rodrigues de; Lima, Antonio Calixto [EMBRAPA, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Agroindustria Tropical]. E-mail: paiva@cnpat.embrapa.br; Biscegli, Clovis Isberto [EMBRAPA, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Agroindustria Tropical]. E-mail: clovis@cnpdia.embrapa.br

    2004-11-15

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the technique of magnetic resonance tomography for cashew nut analysis, compared to the traditional method of clone selection. Samples of cashew nut from 40 clones harvested in 2002 were analyzed using both methods. Using traditional method most of clones showed high and medium values of the industrial indicators nut and seed mass and industrial yield and low values of seed breakage. By magnetic resonance tomography majority of clones showed cashew nuts with empty spaces between the nut and the endocarp, which can protect the seed during decortication. The results for the two methods were complementary and the tomography, besides being a promising option for the quality evaluation of cashew nut, can give support to other researches related to cashew nut study. (author)

  14. Evaluation of effective dose in consequence of Para chestnut ingestion; Avaliacao da dose efetiva em consequencia da ingestao de castanha do Para

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellintani, Sandra A.; Oliveira, Joselens de; Carvalho, Jurandyr S. de; Hiromoto, Goro [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    Commercial samples of Brazil nut tree seed (Bertholletia excelsa) were analysed for the presence or uranium and thorium series of natural radionuclides. The samples were analysed for the content of {sup 238} U, {sup 226} Ra, {sup 210} Pb, {sup 232} Th, {sup 228} Th. Mean values 1.4 {+-} 0.4 Bq/kg for {sup 238} U, 26.3{+-}4.1 Bq/kG for {sup 226} Ra, 4.7{sup {+-}}1.8 Bq/kg for {sup 210} Pb, 16.5{+-}4.3 Bq/kg for {sup 232} Th, 31.3{+-}6.4 Bq/Kg for {sup 228} Ra and 12.3{+-}5.1 Bq/kg for {sup 228} Th. The effective dose due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides contained in the Brazil nuts, is 2.6 x 10{sup -2} mSv/kg ingested per year. (author). 9 refs., 1 tab.

  15. One-year monitoring of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in tiger-nuts and their beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, J; Sebastià, N; Soriano, J M; Soler, C; Mañes, J

    2011-07-15

    A sensitive and selective liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method was developed for the routine analysis of aflatoxins (AFB(1), AFB(2), AFG(1) and AFG(2)) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in tiger nuts and tiger-nut beverage (horchata). A matrix solid phase dispersion was adapted to eliminate lipidic interferences. The solid support was C(18), while the elution solvent was acetonitrile. Mean recoveries obtained at two fortification levels were 72-83% and 71-81% for horchata and tiger nut respectively with relative standard deviations (RSDs) nuts and horchata samples collected from different supermarkets of Valencia (Spain) during one year (March 2009-March 2010). A total of 238 samples were analysed and 32 samples were found positives for OTA, AFB(1), AFB(2) and AFG(2). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Deflection of light in equatorial plane due to Kerr-Taub-NUT body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Sarani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to General Relativity, there are factors like mass, rotation, charge and presence of Cosmological constant that can influence the path of light ray. Apart from these factors, many authors have also reported the influence of gravitomagnetism on the path of light ray. In this study we have discussed the effect of a rotating Kerr-Taub-NUT body where the strength of the gravitomagnetic monopole is represented by the NUT factor or magnetic mass. We use the null geodesic of photon method to obtain the deflection angle of light ray for a Kerr-Taub-NUT body in equatorial plane upto the fourth order term. Our study shows that the NUT factor has a noticeable effect on the path of the light ray. By considering the magnetism to be zero, the expression of bending angle gets reduced to the Kerr bending angle. However, we obtained a non-zero bending angle for a hypothetical massless, magnetic body.

  17. Euler Characteristic and Topological Phase Transition of NUT-Kerr-Newman Black Hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Jinghua; Yang Guohong; Tian Lijun; Zhu Shu

    2008-01-01

    From the Gauss-Bonnet-Chern theorem, the Euler characteristic of NUT-Kerr-Newman black hole is calculated to be some discrete numbers from 0 to 2. We find that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy is the largest entropy in topology by taking into account of the relationship between the entropy and the Euler characteristic. The NUT-Kerr-Newman black hole evolves from the torus-like topological structure to the spherical structure with the changes of mass, angular momentum, electric and NUT charges. In this process, the Euler characteristic and the entropy are changed discontinuously, which give the topological aspect of the first-order phase transition of NUT-Kerr-Newman black hole. The corresponding latent heat of the topological phase transition is also obtained. The estimated latent heat of the black hole evolving from the star just lies in the range of the energy of gamma ray bursts

  18. New Lancet Oncology publication - Defining a research and policy agenda for betel quid and areca nut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betel quid and areca nut, typically made up of a mixture of areca nut and slaked lime wrapped in a betel leaf with added flavorings, is a known risk factor for many oral and other associated cancers. There are more than 600 million betel quid or areca nut users worldwide (or 10% of the world’s population), making it a critical global cancer control issue. With its use steeped in culture and tradition, the use of betel quid and areca nut is widely unregulated, and poses a significant and understudied health threat to the Asia-Pacific region where prevalence is high. Unlike many forms of smoked tobacco, the two are widely used by women in regions where common. Betel quid and areca use also extends beyond the Asia-Pacific region to diaspora and migrant communities in the U.S., South Africa, and parts of Europe and the Middle East.

  19. TIGER NUT (CYPERUS ESCULENTUS: SOURCE OF NATURAL ANTICANCER DRUG? BRIEF REVIEW OF EXISTING LITERATURE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elom Seyram Achoribo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In some parts of the world, Cyperus esculentus L. is widely used as a healthy food for both humans and animals due to their nutritional and functional properties. Current research and reviews on this plant have focused mainly on organoleptic properties, phytochemical compositions, oil content, biochemical activities, and nutritional values. The medicinal properties of Tiger nut are seldom discussed, although its medicinal use is well known in folklore activities. To explore the medicinal properties of Tiger nut, This review tries to investigate the potential anticancer properties of components issued from Tiger nut by reviewing the existing literature in the field. Based on the evidence from the review, it is recommended that there is a need for further investigation into the proposed anticancer properties of Tiger nut.

  20. Physiology and silviculture of black walnut for combined timber and nut production

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. W. Van Sambeek; George Rink

    1981-01-01

    Research literature was reviewed for evidence supporting the management of black walnut plantations for combined timber and nut production. The silviculture of the species is discussed in relation to dual cropping. Stimulation and phenology of flowering and fruiting are reviewed.

  1. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Minc, Leah D.

    2013-11-20

    Transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants is one of the key mechanisms for long-term contamination of the human food chain. Nearly all computer models that address soil-to-plant uptake of radionuclides use empirically-derived transfer factors to address this process. Essentially all available soil-to-plant transfer factors are based on measurements in annual crops. Because very few measurements are available for tree fruits, samples were taken of alfalfa and oats and the stems, leaves, and fruits and nuts of almond, apple, apricot, carob, fig, grape, nectarine, pecan, pistachio (natural and grafted), and pomegranate, along with local surface soil. The samples were dried, ground, weighed, and analyzed for trace constituents through a combination of induction-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for a wide range of naturally-occurring elements. Analysis results are presented and converted to soil-to-plant transfer factors. These are compared to commonly used and internationally recommended values. Those determined for annual crops are very similar to commonly-used values; those determined for tree fruits show interesting differences. Most macro- and micronutrients are slightly reduced in fruits; non-essential elements are reduced further. These findings may be used in existing computer models and may allow development of tree-fruit-specific transfer models.

  2. CASHEW NUT MEAL IN THE FEEDING OF BROWN LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Braga Cruz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of alternative foods to replace conventional foods is becoming a source of research for many researchers. The cashew nut meal (CNM has high energy and protein value, may be a partial substitute for corn and soybean meal for poultry feed. In this context, this research was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of CNM on the utilization of nutrients in the ration for laying hens, as well as the performance and characteristics of the eggs. The study used 180 Dekalb Brown laying hens 27 weeks of age, distributed in a completely randomized design with six treatments and five replicates of six birds. Treatments consisted of a control diet without CNM and others with the inclusion of this food at levels of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%. Upon regression analysis, a linear increase in nitrogen metabolism, crude energy and apparently metabolizable energy was seen. The dry matter digestibility and metabolizable energy corrected for rations were not affected by the inclusion of the CNM. Feed intake and egg weight were not affected by the inclusion of the CNM; however, egg production, egg mass, feed conversion, and yolk color worsened linearly with inclusion of CNM. Compared to control diet, the inclusion of CNM worsened the egg mass and feed conversion from 15%, and yolk color from 20%. As a result, it is recommended the inclusion of the CNM in the diet of laying hens at a maximum level of 10%.

  3. The relationship between nut intake and risk of colorectal cancer: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeeyoo; Shin, Aesun; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jeongseon

    2018-03-07

    Nut consumption is known to reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. However, in previous studies, portion sizes and categories of nut consumption have varied, and few studies have assessed the association between colorectal cancer risk and nut consumption. In this study, we investigated the relationship between nut consumption and colorectal cancer risk. A case-control study was conducted among 923 colorectal cancer patients and 1846 controls recruited from the National Cancer Center in Korea. Information on dietary intake was collected using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire with 106 items, including peanuts, pine nuts, and almonds (as 1 food item). Nut consumption was categorized as none, consumption and colorectal cancer risk, and a polytomous logistic regression model was used for sub-site analyses. High nut consumption was strongly associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer among women (adjusted ORs: 0.30, 95%CI: 0.15-0.60 for the ≥3 servings per week group vs. none). A similar inverse association was observed for men (adjusted ORs: 0.28, 95% CI: 0.17-0.47). In sub-site analyses, adjusted ORs (95% CIs) comparing the ≥3 servings per week group vs none were 0.25 (0.09-0.70) for proximal colon cancer, 0.39 (0.19-0.80) for distal colon cancer, and 0.23 (0.12-0.46) for rectal cancer among men. An inverse association was also found among women for distal colon cancer (OR: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.04-0.48) and rectal cancer (OR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.17-0.95). We found a statistically significant association between high frequency of nut consumption and reduced risk of colorectal cancer. This association was observed for all sub-sites of the colon and rectum among both men and women, with the exception of proximal colon cancer for women.

  4. Influence of Pecan Nut Pretreatment on the Physical Quality of Oil Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Pujuan Zhang; Vincenzo Di Bari; Rhianna Briars; Zarani Mat Taher; Jiamiao Yuan; Guangqin Liu; David Gray

    2017-01-01

    A supply of pure, intact oil bodies is essential for carrying out morphological and biochemical studies of these plant organelles, and exploring their application. Preparation requires a carefully controlled breakage of plant cells, followed by separation of the oil bodies from cytoplasm and cell debris. This paper focuses on the recovery and characterisation of oil bodies from pecan nuts where no work has been published to date. The results showed that soaking softens the nut tissue, and app...

  5. Production and Evaluation of Ice Cream from Nigerian Tiger-Nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ice cream was prepared from water-soluble extracts of the yellow variety of Nigerian tiger-nut. A modified standard method was used for the production of the tiger-nut milk ice cream. The resulting ice cream had pH of 7.10, 35% Brix, specific gravity of 1.0888 and total solids of 45.67%. The proximate composition of the ice ...

  6. Voluntary ingestion of nut paste for administration of buprenorphine in rats and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Sundbom, Renée

    2012-01-01

    An adequate analgesic strategy is important to improve the postoperative recovery and welfare of laboratory rats and mice. It is desirable that the method for administering the drug is non-invasive and stress-free. We have previously validated a method for administering buprenorphine in a nut paste...... concentrations and amounts of buprenorphine/nut paste, and dosage of buprenorphine to rats and mice....

  7. The research and analysis of the chocolate nut butter with polyfunctional properties

    OpenAIRE

    Кондратюк, Наталія Вячеславівна; Гаркуша, Ігор Миколайович

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness of the protein and fat composition consisting of whey and blended mixture of vegetable oils in the production technology of chocolate nut butter with a sweet extract from stevia leaves is theoretically proved and verified under production conditions. The composition of the fatty base of the product comprising a mixture of refined sunflower oil and palm oil is developed. The paper examines the polyfunctionality of the chocolate nut butter on the human body, which is due to a hig...

  8. Joint analysis of phenotypic and molecular diversity provides new insights on the genetic variability of the Brazilian physic nut germplasm bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Alexandre Alonso; Bhering, Leonardo Lopes; Rosado, Tatiana Barbosa; Laviola, Bruno Galvêas; Formighieri, Eduardo Fernandes; Cruz, Cosme Damião

    2013-09-01

    The genetic variability of the Brazilian physic nut (Jatropha curcas) germplasm bank (117 accessions) was assessed using a combination of phenotypic and molecular data. The joint dissimilarity matrix showed moderate correlation with the original matrices of phenotypic and molecular data. However, the correlation between the phenotypic dissimilarity matrix and the genotypic dissimilarity matrix was low. This finding indicated that molecular markers (RAPD and SSR) did not adequately sample the genomic regions that were relevant for phenotypic differentiation of the accessions. The dissimilarity values of the joint dissimilarity matrix were used to measure phenotypic + molecular diversity. This diversity varied from 0 to 1.29 among the 117 accessions, with an average dissimilarity among genotypes of 0.51. Joint analysis of phenotypic and molecular diversity indicated that the genetic diversity of the physic nut germplasm was 156% and 64% higher than the diversity estimated from phenotypic and molecular data, respectively. These results show that Jatropha genetic variability in Brazil is not as limited as previously thought.

  9. Prevention and Control of Fungi Contaminated Stored Pistachio Nuts Imported to Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawar, Lubna Saleh

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the contamination risk of the improper storage of pistachio nuts was studied in the major location of Saudi Arabia by studying the fungi associated with non and salted pistachio nuts. The infection with Aspergillus flavus and A. niger and treatment of this infection with some abiotic factors , salting and fumigation with acetic acid on the invasion and colonization were also stu ded. High percentage infection (100%) were found in salted pistachio of Maidenhead , while low infection (68.75%) was found in non salted pistachio of Jihad. Referring to the total fungal counts (9845.5 and 5681.8 CFU/g nuts) were detected on malt extract yeast agar and rose bengal agar media respectively. Aspergillus niger and A. flavus were found common in all pistachio samples collected from the three locations on the two media used. The both fungi were grew at temperatures between 20 and 35 degree C, also as the relative humidity increased the fungal growth increased reached its maximum at 100% RH. Sodium chloride at 20 and 25 % completely stopped the linear of the both fungi on malt yeast extract agar medium. Application of nuts with sodium chloride was found to increased the resistance of pistachio nut to invasion and colonization by the fungi during storage. Also, the resistance to invasion was increased by increasing the doses of fumigation with acetic acid applied to the pistachio nuts reached 0% infection at the higher dose of acetic acid (60%). (author)

  10. Metabolomics unveils urinary changes in subjects with metabolic syndrome following 12-week nut consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipani, Sara; Llorach, Rafael; Jáuregui, Olga; López-Uriarte, Patricia; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Bullo, Mònica; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina

    2011-11-04

    Through an HPLC-Q-TOF-MS-driven nontargeted metabolomics approach, we aimed to discriminate changes in the urinary metabolome of subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS), following 12 weeks of mixed nuts consumption (30 g/day), compared to sex- and age-matched individuals given a control diet. The urinary metabolome corresponding to the nut-enriched diet clearly clustered in a distinct group, and the multivariate data analysis discriminated relevant mass features in this separation. Metabolites corresponding to the discriminating ions (MS features) were then subjected to multiple tandem mass spectrometry experiments using LC-ITD-FT-MS, to confirm their putative identification. The metabolomics approach revealed 20 potential markers of nut intake, including fatty acid conjugated metabolites, phase II and microbial-derived phenolic metabolites, and serotonin metabolites. An increased excretion of serotonin metabolites was associated for the first time with nut consumption. Additionally, the detection of urinary markers of gut microbial and phase II metabolism of nut polyphenols confirmed the understanding of their bioavailability and bioactivity as a priority area of research in the determination of the health effects derived from nut consumption. The results confirmed how a nontargeted metabolomics strategy may help to access unexplored metabolic pathways impacted by diet, thereby raising prospects for new intervention targets.

  11. Quantitative Characterization of Nut Yield and Fruit Components in Indigenous Coconut Germplasm in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. C. N. Perera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coconut (Cocos nucifera L. is a tropical palm offering multiple uses. Conservation of coconut germplasm has been undertaken globally in view of its economic importance. This research was designed to evaluate nine Sri Lankan indigenous coconut germplasm representing the three varieties Typica, Nana, and Aurantiaca. Total annual nut yield and the weights of fresh nut, husked nut, split nut, and fresh and dry kernel were scored and analyzed with analysis of variance. The annual average number of bunches varied from 14.9 to 16.8 which is significantly higher than the generally accepted 12–14 bunches in tall coconuts. The high potential of phenotypes Ran thembili and Gon thembili for kernel production was revealed. The high potential of Gon thembili, Sri Lanka Tall, and Ran thembili to produce fibre was also identified. Phenotypes Ran thembili and Gon thembili displayed their potential as pure cultivars and as parents in hybridization. King coconut, Red dwarf, and Bodiri were shown to be suitable as beverage coconuts due to the high production of nuts, bunches, and the quantity of nut water. This study reiterated the importance of conservation and characterization of indigenous coconut varieties globally for their effective use in the genetic improvement of the coconut palm.

  12. Associations between Nut Consumption and Health Vary between Omnivores, Vegetarians, and Vegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel C; Gray, Andrew R; Tey, Siew Ling; Chisholm, Alexandra; Burley, Victoria; Greenwood, Darren C; Cade, Janet

    2017-11-06

    Regular nut consumption is associated with reduced risk factors for chronic disease; however, most population-based studies lack consideration of effect modification by dietary pattern. The UK Women's Cohort Study (UKWCS) provides an ideal opportunity to examine relationships between nut consumption and chronic disease risk factors in a large sample with diverse dietary patterns. Nut and nutrient intake from 34,831 women was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire among self-identified omnivores, vegetarians and vegans. In this cross-sectional analysis, higher nut consumption was associated with lower body weight (difference between highest and lowest consumption categories from adjusted model: 6.1 kg; 95% CI: 4.7, 7.6) body mass index (BMI, 2.4 units difference; 95% CI: 1.9, 2.9), and waist circumference (2.6 cm difference; 95% CI: 1.4, 3.8) (all p for linear trend vegans. Findings support existing literature around beneficial effects of nut consumption and suggest that benefits may be larger among omnivores. Nut promotion strategies may have the highest population impact by specifically targeting this group.

  13. Characterization of Liquid Volatile Matter (LVM) of Cashew Nut Shell using Pyrolysis and Gas Chomatroghaphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashuni; Jahiding, Muhammad; Sitti Ilmawati, Waode; Kurniasih, Ita; Wati, Wa; Muzirah; Burhan, Muniati

    2017-05-01

    Cashew nut areexcellent products in Southeast Sulawesi. Cashew nut is one part of the cashew plant untapped waste. Cashew nut shell potential as a producer of liquidvolatile matter (LVM) and charcoal because it contains lignocellulos. LVM is the smoke condensation products obtained from the pyrolysis reactor can used foradhesive of briquettes hybridapplication. The aim of this reseach is to produce LVM of cashew nut shellby pyrolysisand analyze the content byGas Chromatography(GC). The research procedure begin with drying the cashew nut, the sample inserting into the pyrolysis reactor then heating with three variations of temperature respectively is 400°C, 500°C and 600°C. Cashew nutshell have been heating by pyrolisis processwith high temperatures resulting chorcoal and LVM separately. Volume LVM measured,then identify is components using GC. LVM obtained respectively 200ml kg-1, 340 ml kg-1, and 340 ml kg-1. Chromatogram of the GC from LVM of cashew nut shell has ammonia, hexane, acetic acid, propanone and phenol. Phenol compounds can be used as a adhesive for hybrid briquettes applications.

  14. Nut Consumption and Cardiovascular Risk in Older Chinese: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangbo Sun

    Full Text Available In Western contexts nut consumption is associated with better health. We examined the associations of nut consumption with cardiovascular disease risk in the non-Western setting of Southern China.In the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study we used multivariable linear regression to examine the associations of baseline nut (mainly peanuts consumption (none (n = 6688, <3 portions/week (n = 2596 and ≥3 portions/week (n = 2444 with follow-up assessment of Framingham cardiovascular disease score (excluding smoking and its components in older Chinese (≥50 years (follow-up 57.8%.Nut consumption was not associated with Framingham score (≥3 portions/week compared to none: 0.02 95% confidence interval (CI -0.11 to 0.15, systolic blood pressure (-0.66 mmHg 95% CI -1.94, 0.62, diastolic blood pressure (-0.69 mmHg 95% CI -1.44, 0.07, HDL-cholesterol (-0.01 mmol/L 95% CI -0.02, 0.005, LDL-cholesterol (-0.01 mmol/L 95% CI -0.05, 0.02 or fasting glucose (0.04 mmol/L 95% CI -0.02, 0.09, adjusted for baseline values, energy intake, age, sex, phase of recruitment, socio-economic position, lifestyle and baseline health status.Observations concerning the benefits of nut consumption may be contextually specific, perhaps depending on the type of nut consumed.

  15. Nut Consumption and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Mediterranean Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajka Relja

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nuts are often considered beneficial for health, yet few studies have examined determinants of their intake and the associations between nut consumption and various cardiovascular disease risk factors. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with nut intake in a Mediterranean population, in Croatia, and to investigate the association of nut intake and various cardiovascular risk factors. Methods: Subjects from the Island of Vis, Island of Korčula and the City of Split were included in this cross-sectional study (n = 4416 in total; 4011 without known cardiovascular disease. Survey responses, medical records and clinically relevant measurements were utilized. Multivariate ordinal and logistic regression models were used in the analysis, adjusting for known confounding factors. Results: As low as 5% of all subjects reported daily, and 11% reported weekly, nut consumption. The characteristics associated with more frequent nut intake were female gender (Odds ratio (OR = 1.39; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.19–1.62, highest level of education (1.42; 1.15–1.76 and material status (1.58; 1.29–1.93, smoking abstinence (1.21; 1.04–1.42 in never-smokers and 1.22; 1.02–1.46 in ex-smokers, Mediterranean diet adherence (1.87; 1.62–2.15, and absence of central obesity (1.29; 1.09–1.53, absence of diabetes (1.30; 1.02–1.66 and metabolic syndrome (1.17; 1.01–1.36. Subjects who consumed nuts had more favorable waist-to-height (overall p = 0.036 and waist-to-hip ratios (0.033, lesser odds of elevated fibrinogen (p < 0.001 in both weekly and monthly nut consumers and reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol (p = 0.026, compared to non-consumers. Conclusions: It appears that frequent nut consumption is an integral part of a healthy lifestyle and better socioeconomic status. A beneficial association of nut intake with cardiovascular risk factors was confirmed in this study.

  16. The synergistic effect of cigarette taxes on the consumption of cigarettes, alcohol and betel nuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jie-Min

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumption of cigarettes and alcoholic beverages creates serious health consequences for individuals and overwhelming financial burdens for governments around the world. In Asia, a third stimulant – betel nuts – increases this burden exponentially. For example, individuals who simultaneously smoke, chew betel nuts and drink alcohol are approximately 123 times more likely to develop oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer than are those who do not. To discourage consumption of cigarettes, the government of Taiwan has imposed three taxes over the last two decades. It now wishes to lower consumption of betel nuts. To assist in this effort, our study poses two questions: 1 Will the imposition of an NT$10 Health Tax on cigarettes effectively reduce cigarette consumption? and 2 Will this cigarette tax also reduce consumption of alcoholic beverages and betel nuts? To answer these questions, we analyze the effect of the NT$10 tax on overall cigarette consumption as well as the cross price elasticities of cigarettes, betel nuts, and alcoholic beverages. Methods To establish the Central Bureau of Statistics demand function, we used cigarette, betel nut, and alcoholic beverage price and sales volume data for the years 1972–2002. To estimate the overall demand price elasticity of cigarettes, betel nuts, and alcoholic beverages, we used a seemingly unrelated regression analysis. Results We find that the NT$10 health tax on cigarettes will reduce cigarette consumption by a significant 27.22%. We also find that cigarettes, betel nuts, and alcoholic beverages have similar inherent price elasticities of -0.6571, -0.5871, and -0.6261 respectively. Because of this complementary relationship, the NT$10 health tax on cigarettes will reduce betel nut consumption by 20.07% and alcohol consumption by 7.5%. Conclusion The assessment of a health tax on cigarettes as a smoking control policy tool yields a win-win outcome for both government and

  17. Energetic expense in the conduction of the physic nut culture: comparative between the dried and irrigated system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, Michelle Sato; Frigo, Elisandro Pires; Klar, Antonio Evaldo; Bueno, Osmar de Carvalho; Esperancini, Maura Seiko Tsuitsui [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FCA/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas], E-mail: msfrigo@fca.unesp.br

    2008-07-01

    The discussion around new vegetable raw materials for biofuel, production have been being very important for the consolidation of the National Program of Biofuel Production and Use (PNPB) in Brazil. In this scenery, a potential culture which could be pointed for such a thing is the physic nut one, however, the studies about it are very poor. Thus the goal of this present paper was to compare the energetic expense to this culture conduction, in two different productive systems, the dried and the irrigated ones, so as to identify the less dependent system on not-renewable energy, therefore, the most energetically sustainable one for these conduction operations. The selected planting was one of the areas of the company NNE Minas Agro-Florestal Ltda., in Janauba/MG; there were identified two operations for the dried system and four operations for the irrigated system. The adopted methodology was based in bibliographical revision. The dried system showed an energetic consumption of 1.151,22 MJ. ha{sup -1} and the irrigated one was 5.325,43 MJ . ha{sup -1}. In relation to the expenditure by source, the dried one used 2,72% by biological source and 97,28% by industrial source; and the irrigated system used 0,87% by biological source and 99,14% by industrial source. The conclusion is that the conduction with the dried system is the most efficient and sustainable from the energetic point of view. (author)

  18. Suvremena promjena gospodarskih nejednakosti u NUTS 3 regijama Slovenije

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lučka Lorber

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prestrukturiranje gospodarstva i prijelaz na tržišno gospodarstvo imali su različit utjecaj na gospodarski položaj regija. Utjecaj promijenjenih gospodarskih i društveno-političkih okolnosti u pojedinim regijama ovisio je o brojnim čimbenicima: gospodarskoj strukturi regija, njihovoj sposobnosti da se preorijentiraju na strana tržišta, razvojnim potencijalima, razvojnim strategijama te strateškim odlukama. Razvojni problemi su posebice izraženi u područjima koja obilježavaju strukturno nazadovanje i gospodarske slabosti vezane uz ruralnu orijentaciju, u demografski ugroženim područjima, te u područjima s niskim prihodima po stanovniku i visokim stopama nezaposlenosti. Periferan položaj slabije razvijenih područja uzrokovao je demografsko pražnjenje ruralnih područja i koncentraciju stanovništva u urbanim centrima. Nepovoljna demografska slika, iseljavanje mladog stanovništva, nepovoljan obrazovni sastav stanovništva, nedostatak stručnih kadrova, te nedostatak strateških odluka rezultirali su sve većim zaostajanjem slabije razvijenih regija za razvijenim regijama. Rezultati empirijskih analiza podjele NUTS 3 regija u Sloveniji u grupe, uzimajući u obzir odabrane razvojne pokazatelje, pokazali su da gospodarski razvoj nije bio u skladu sa suvremenim poimanjem ujednačenoga regionalnog razvoja ni u skladu s principom integriteta primjene regionalne politike na čitavom državnom teritoriju. Postojeće regionalne razvojne nejednakosti potvrđuju tezu da tržišni mehanizam sam po sebi ne može smanjiti gospodarske nejednakosti i nadomjestiti potrebu za učinkovitim provođenjem regionalne politike.

  19. Effects of babassu nut oil on ischemia/reperfusion-induced leukocyte adhesion and macromolecular leakage in the microcirculation: Observation in the hamster cheek pouch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa Maria do

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The babassu palm tree is native to Brazil and is most densely distributed in the Cocais region of the state of Maranhão, in northeastern Brazil. In addition to the industrial use of refined babassu oil, the milk, the unrefined oil and the nuts in natura are used by families from several communities of African descendants as one of the principal sources of food energy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of babassu oil on microvascular permeability and leukocyte-endothelial interactions induced by ischemia/reperfusion using the hamster cheek pouch microcirculation as experimental model. Methods Twice a day for 14 days, male hamsters received unrefined babassu oil (0.02 ml/dose [BO-2 group], 0.06 ml/dose [BO-6 group], 0.18 ml/dose [BO-18 group] or mineral oil (0.18 ml/dose [MO group]. Observations were made in the cheek pouch and macromolecular permeability increase induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R or topical application of histamine, as well as leukocyte-endothelial interaction after I/R were evaluated. Results The mean value of I/R-induced microvascular leakage, determined during reperfusion, was significantly lower in the BO-6 and BO-18 groups than in the MO one (P Conclusions Our findings suggest that unrefined babassu oil reduced microvascular leakage and protected against histamine-induced effects in postcapillary venules and highlights that these almost unexploited nut and its oil might be secure sources of food energy.

  20. Sorting of pistachio nuts using image processing techniques and an adaptive neural-fuzzy inference system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R Abdollahnejad Barough

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pistachio nut is one of the most important agricultural products of Iran and it is priced due to the quality and type. One of the significant factors of pistachio cost is its type in terms of shell. Filled split pistachio nut has the most quality and is utilized as nuts, while the closed shell type has lower cost, at the same time is economically efficient in food industry such as confectionery. Now, pistachio sorting is performed usually by human and sometimes using electromechanical apparatuses. Classification of pistachio by human is time consuming and is done with an unacceptable accuracy, on the other hand, electromechanical and electro optical apparatuses damages pistachio because the mechanism used in them while separating. So, the need to develop automated systems that could be implemented by intelligent ways is evident to increase the speed and accuracy of classification. Materials and Methods: In this study, 300 samples of pistachios contains 100 Filled split, 100 Filled non-split and 100 split blank nuts ones are used. The training set consisted of 60 samples of each type of opened nuts, closed and empty opened shell nuts a total of 180 samples and the evaluation set consisted of 40 samples of each type of opened shell, closed shell and empty opened shell nuts a total of 120 samples. The principle of this study is implemented in two steps: 1 sample imaging and image processing to extract features 2 fuzzy network design based on the characteristics of data and training. To select useful features from the hypothesis, C4.5 decision tree is used. C4.5 algorithm makes a greedy top to bottom search on the hypothesis, and is made by the question what feature must be at the root of the tree. By the help of statistical methods, extracted features from the images were prioritized and the most appropriate features for classification of training set were selected. The algorithm chooses the best features as their number is minimum

  1. Sensitive and specific detection of pine nut (Pinus spp.) by real-time PCR in complex food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garino, Cristiano; De Paolis, Angelo; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Decastelli, Lucia; Arlorio, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Pine nuts are a known source of food allergens and several cases of adverse immunological reaction after ingestion have been reported. To protect allergic consumers, methods to unequivocally detect the presence of pine nuts in complex matrices must be developed. A Taqman-based real time PCR method for the detection of Pinus spp. was set up. A homemade pesto spiked at known concentration of pine nut powder was used as model food. Moreover, DNA was purified from commercial foods declaring or not the presence of pine nuts. The method displayed a very high efficiency and specificity for the genus Pinus. The intrinsic LOD was 1pg of DNA, while the practical LOD evaluated on model foods was 0.1ppm of pine nuts powder, the lowest ever registered for the detection of food allergens via real-time PCR. Finally, the declared presence/absence of pine nut in commercial foods was confirmed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Is the awareness of the risk of nuts aspiration related to the occupation of parents?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnech Tàrrega, A B; Carazo Palacios, M E; Moratalla Jareño, T; Gutiérrez San Román, C; Vila Carbó, J J

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the social awareness of the risk of nuts aspiration and the relationship with the occupation of parents. From January 2013 to January 2014, a self-designed survey was distributed to 247 parents of patients under 14 years admitted to our centre, regardless of the reason for admission. The statistical significance was calculated using confidence intervals (CI). The Pearson Chi-square test was used to analyse the ignorance of this problem depending on the educational level extrapolated from the occupation of respondents. 247 parents responded to the survey. 60.3% (95% CI 54.1-66.2%) confirmed that nuts were included in birthday parties. 30.4% (95% CI 25-36.4%) confirmed that celebrations with nuts at their children's nursery were made. 42.1% (95% CI 36.1-48.3%) believed that nuts were harmless for their young children. The age of administration of nuts was independent on the educational level extrapolated of parents (χ2 = 10.721, p = 0.295), although it did influence on the ignorance of the danger of nuts (41.2% (95% CI 30.3-53%) of respondents with occupations that required higher educational level compared to 55.4% (95% CI 42.4-67.6%) of those with occupation that required less educational level (χ2 = 14.678, p = 0.002)). Regardless of the occupation, there is widespread ignorance concerning the age of introduction of nuts in children's diet. Given the incidence and severity of the risk of aspiration, more prevention programs are necessary, and Health Authorities should take side in public awareness of this problem.

  3. Prospective Study of Nut Consumption and Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour-Niazi, Somayeh; Hosseini, Shabnam; Mirmiran, Parvin; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-09-23

    This study aimed to assess the association of various types of nut per se, and total nut consumption with the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). A 6.2 ± 0.7-year population-based prospective study was conducted among 1265 adults, aged 19-74 years, participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. A 168-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to collect information on nut consumption. MetS was defined according to the Joint Interim Statement guidelines and 276 new cases of MetS were identified. Median ± interquartile range of nut consumption was 2.08 (0.88-5.68) servings/week. After adjusting for family history of diabetes, age, gender, smoking, physical activity, fasting serum glucose at baseline, serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) at baseline, energy intake, fiber, macronutrients, cholesterol intake, fruit, vegetables, dairy products and body mass index (BMI), a statistically significant decrease was observed in MetS in the third (≥5 servings/week) tertile of nuts (odds ratio: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.44-0.91, p trend: 0.03) compared with the lowest (≤1 serving/week). Walnut consumption showed a significant, inverse association with MetS risk; associations for other nut varieties were not significant. For each additional serving/week of walnuts consumed, incidence of MetS decreased by 3% (ORs: 0.97 CI: 0.93-0.99), after adjusting for confounding factors. Total nut consumption, especially walnuts, reduces the risk of MetS.

  4. Pre-shelling parameters and conditions that influence the whole kernel out-turn of steam-boiled cashew nuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde Sunday Ogunsina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the effect of moisture content (MC, nut size distribution and steam exposure time (SET on the whole kernel out turn (WKO of cashew nuts during shelling using a 3 x 5 x 4 factorial experiment. Three nut sizes: small (18–22 mm, medium (23–25 mm and large (26–35 mm; five levels of MC: 8.34%, 11.80%, 12.57%, 15.40%, 16.84% (wet basis and four levels of steam exposure time (SET: 28, 30, 32, and 34 min were considered. Nuts were conditioned with warm water to the desired moisture content of 8.34%,11.80%, 12.57%, 15.40% and 16.84% (wb; and steam-boiled at 700 kPa for 28, 30,32, and 34 min. The pre-treated nuts were shelled using a hand-operated cashew nuts shelling machine. The results showed that the single effect of MC, steam exposure time (SET or nut size distribution is not enough for estimating WKO; it is rather by an interaction of these parameters. The optimum WKO of steam-boiled nuts was 91.74%, 90.94% and 87.98% for large, medium and small sized nuts at MC∗SET combination of 8.34%∗30 min, 11.80%∗32 min and 8.34%∗30 min, respectively. Pre-treatment of cashew nuts by steam boiling was found to improve whole kernel out-turn of the cashew nut. Whole kernel out-turn decreased as MC increased, thereby limiting the need for moisture adjustment when nuts are to be processed by steam boiling.

  5. Conserved charges of Schwarzschild-NUT-AdS space-time using the method of regularization through relocalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashed, G. G. L.

    2015-10-01

    A tetrad field, which gives Schwarzschild-NUT-AdS metric, is provided. We calculate the total conserved charges of this tetrad. This is done by using "regularization through relocalization" for the first time. This method gives the correct value of the total charge of Schwarzschild-NUT-AdS space-time, which depends on the gravitational mass of the system. We show that the NUT parameter has no physical meaning on the conserved quantities of the Schwarzschild-NUT-AdS space-time.

  6. Nut and peanut butter consumption and the risk of esophageal and gastric cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Maryam; Murphy, Gwen; Etemadi, Arash; Dawsey, Sanford M; Liao, Linda M; Abnet, Christian C

    2017-09-01

    Background: Nut consumption has been associated with decreased risk of colorectal, endometrial, lung, and pancreatic cancers. Polyphenols, fiber, vitamins, and minerals in nuts may confer this observed protective effect. To our knowledge, no prospective study has evaluated the effect of nut consumption on esophageal and gastric cancers. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the associations between nut and peanut butter consumption and the risk of esophageal and gastric cancers and their different subtypes. Design: In this study we used data from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, which enrolled 566,407 persons who were 50-71 y old at baseline (1995-1996). The median follow-up time was 15.5 y. Intakes of nuts and peanut butter were assessed through the use of a validated food-frequency questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate HRs and 95% CIs for esophageal and gastric cancers and their subtypes. Results: We identified 966 incident cases of esophageal adenocarcinomas, 323 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 698 cases of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, and 732 cases of gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma. Compared with those who did not consume nuts or peanut butter [lowest category of consumption (C0)], participants in the highest category of nut consumption (C3) had a lower risk of developing gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma [C3 compared with C0, HR: 0.73 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.94)]. This inverse association was also seen for peanut butter consumption [C3 compared with C0, HR: 0.75 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.94)]. We observed no significant associations between the highest and lowest intakes of nuts or peanut butter and the risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, esophageal adenocarcinoma, or esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusions: Among older American adults, both nut and peanut butter consumption were inversely associated with the risk of gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015.

  7. Evaluation of cultivar susceptibility and storage periods towards aflatoxin B1 contamination on pistachio nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensassi, Fatma; Rhouma, Ali; Ghrab, Mohamed; Bacha, Hassen; Rabeh Hajlaoui, Mohamed

    2010-08-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are potent sources of health risks to both humans and animals. Among them, AFB1 is the most hazardously toxic and the most frequent in various food commodities, including pistachio nuts. In this survey, the effect of the storage period on AFB1 accumulation on pistachio nuts was investigated. A total of 49 samples collected during the crop year of 2005 from the most cultivated pistachio cultivars in Tunisia were rapidly screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) combined with an immunoaffinity step. The obtained results showed that the contamination of pistachio nuts has occurred clearly after two years of storage for all the tested cultivars except the case of Mateur variety and Thyna ecotypes. In this study, the cultivar Mateur was found to be the most susceptible cultivar to contamination by AFB1. After 4 years of storage, the average contamination levels in nut samples ranged from 2.7 ± 0.3 to 12.7 ± 2.2 µg/kg for AFB1, according to the cultivar. These levels exceeded the maximum permitted limit of 2 µg/kg set by the European Commission in nuts.

  8. B-vitamins, carotenoids and α-/γ-tocopherol in raw and roasted nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuetz, Wolfgang; Schlörmann, Wiebke; Glei, Michael

    2017-04-15

    The concentrations of B-vitamins, carotenoids and tocopherols in nuts may differ between species and might be influenced by roasting. Thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine, lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and α-/γ-tocopherol were determined in different varieties of raw and roasted nuts using HPLC (fluorescence/UV-vis detection). The analysis revealed remarkable concentrations of thiamine and pyridoxine in pistachios (57%, 79% of the recommended daily intake/100g (RDI), respectively) and riboflavin in almonds (119% of the RDI). Pistachios were rich in lutein/zeaxanthin and contained highest β-carotene levels among nuts. Almonds and hazelnuts were abundant in α-tocopherol (>4-fold the RDI for tocopherol equivalents) while pistachios and walnuts were rich in γ-tocopherol. Roasting had a diminishing effect on thiamine, carotenoids and tocopherols especially in almonds and walnuts. Nuts could make a valuable contribution to a healthy diet in regard to B-vitamins, lutein/zeaxanthin and tocopherols. A reduction in micronutrient content by roasting is reliant on the nut variety and specific micronutrient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of areca nut extracts on the functions of human neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, S L; Chen, Y L; Wan, H C; Liu, T Y; Chen, Y T; Ling, L J

    2000-08-01

    Aqueous extracts of ripe areca nut without husk (ripe ANE) and fresh and tender areca nut with husk (tender ANE) were examined for their effects on the defensive functions of human neutrophils. Exposure of peripheral blood neutrophils to ripe ANE and tender ANE inhibited their bactericidal activity against oral pathogens, including Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans, in a dose-dependent manner. At the concentrations tested, ripe and tender ANEs did not significantly affect the viability of neutrophils as verified by their ability to exclude trypan blue dye. However, both ANEs inhibited the production of bactericidal superoxide anion by neutrophils as measured by cytochrome c reduction. Moreover, the ripe ANE inhibited neutrophils more effectively than did tender ANE. Arecoline, a major alkaloid of areca nut, only exhibited an inhibitory effect on the functions of neutrophils when high concentrations were used. Therefore, arecoline could not be used to explain the inhibitory effects observed for ANEs. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that ripe and tender ANEs reduced the antibacterial activity and the superoxide anion production of neutrophils. This effect may contribute to a less efficient elimination of bacteria from the periodontal environment. Inhibition of the antimicrobial functions of neutrophils may alter the microbial ecology of the oral cavity, and this may be one possible mechanism by which areca nut compromises the oral health of users of areca nut products.

  10. In situ analysis of soybeans and nuts by probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroselli, Gabriela; Mandal, Mridul K; Chen, Lee C; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    The probe electrospray ionization (PESI) is an ESI-based ionization technique that generates electrospray from the tip of a solid metal needle. In the present work, we describe the PESI mass spectra obtained by in situ measurement of soybeans and several nuts (peanuts, walnuts, cashew nuts, macadamia nuts and almonds) using different solid needles as sampling probes. It was found that PESI-MS is a valuable approach for in situ lipid analysis of these seeds. The phospholipid and triacylglycerol PESI spectra of different nuts and soybean were compared by principal component analysis (PCA). PCA shows significant differences among the data of each family of seeds. Methanolic extracts of nuts and soybean were exposed to air and sunlight for several days. PESI mass spectra were recorded before and after the treatment. Along the aging of the oil (rancidification), the formation of oxidated species with variable number of hydroperoxide groups could be observed in the PESI spectra. The relative intensity of oxidated triacylglycerols signals increased with days of exposition. Monitoring sensitivity of PESI-MS was high. This method provides a fast, simple and sensitive technique for the analysis (detection and characterization) of lipids in seed tissue and degree of oxidation of the oil samples. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Role of Nut Consumption in the Management of Cognitive Decline - A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Kuca, Kamil; Valis, Martin; Hort, Jakub

    2018-02-01

    Currently, there is a significant increase in the number of older generation groups, which may result in serious economic and social issues. Therefore there is a need to prolong the active life of these older individuals, especially by focusing on modifying lifestyle factors such as healthy nutrition. In fact, recent research has shown that, for example, nuts are an important part of people's healthy diet because they have appeared to be neuroprotective compounds which might maintain or in some cases even improve people's cognitive functions. The purpose of this review study is to explore the role of the nut nutrition in the maintenance and delay of cognitive decline among older individuals. The findings indicate that the nut consumption may contribute to the delay of cognitive decline in aging. However, this nut diet is just one component of the multi-nutrient dietary intervention for health aging. More longitudinal controlled randomized studies have to be performed in this field to prove the efficacy of the nut nutrition for the delay of cognitive decline. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Physicochemical, functional and sensory attributes of milk prepared from irradiated tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abenaa A. Okyere

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Five tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L. cultivars were collected from four different regions of Ghana and irradiated. The aim of this study was to evaluate some physicochemical, functional and sensory qualities of milk produced from irradiated tiger nut samples. Analysis was carried out for pH, total solids, moisture, sugar brix and viscosity. Finally the consumer acceptability of the milk prepared from the nuts was determined by a taste panel using the parameters of colour, taste, aroma, mouth feel and overall acceptability. The sugar content varied from 6.0 ± 0.3% (Techiman to 15.00 ± 1.00% (Asebu Ekroful depending on the irradiation dose applied. Generally, increase in dose increased the sugar availability but decreased viscosity of the milk prepared from the nuts. The milk with the highest viscosity was from Kwahu Aduamoa and Techiman with the least viscosity from Bawjiase. Generally, no significant difference was detected by the sensory panellists with regard to mouth feel and taste among the milk samples prepared from the various tiger nut cultivars.

  13. Emissions analysis on diesel engine fuelled with cashew nut shell biodiesel and pentanol blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Yuvarajan; Munuswamy, Dinesh Babu; Nagappan, BeemKumar

    2017-05-01

    The present work is intended to investigate the emission characteristics of neat cashew nut shell methyl ester (CNSME100) by adding pentanol at two different proportions and compared with the baseline diesel. CNSME100 is prepared by the conventional transesterification process. CNSME100 is chosen due to its non-edible nature. Pentanol is chosen as an additive because of its higher inbuilt oxygen content and surface to volume ratio which reduces the drawbacks of neat CNSME100. Emission characteristics were carried out in single cylinder naturally aspirated CI engine fuelled with neat cashew nut shell methyl ester (CNSME), cashew nut shell methyl ester and pentanol by 10% volume (CNSME90P10), cashew nut shell methyl ester and pentanol by 20% volume (CNSME80P20), and diesel. This work also aims to investigate the feasibility of operating an engine fuelled with neat methyl ester and alcohol blends. Experimental results showed that by blending higher alcohol to neat cashew nut shell methyl ester reduces the emissions significantly. It is also found that the emission from neat methyl ester and pentanol blends is lesser than diesel at all loads.

  14. Amino acids profile in some nuts as potential ingredients of bakery mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednáriková, A.; Sádecká, J.

    2010-01-01

    Edible nuts are globally popular and are valued for their sensory, nutritional and health attributes. Nuts need to be kept dry and well store particularly after shelling due to the high unsaturated fat content of the oil. The current study was designed to analyze and compare amino acid profile in walnuts and hazelnuts after irradiation treatment for reduction/elimination of undesirable micro-flora. A simple, reliable and rapid LC-MS method was used for determination of 20 free amino acids. It was found that there were insignificant differences in amino acid profile after irradiation treatment at dose of 5 kGy when the nuts had been packed in paper cover although the selected dose of irradiation (5 kGy) caused dramatic increase of offlavour compound amounts

  15. Effects of processing on immunoreactivity of cashew nut (Anacardium occidentale L.) seed flour proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Monaghan, Erin K; Kshirsagar, Harshal H; Robotham, Jason M; O'Donnell, Susan E; Gerber, Mary Susan; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2008-10-08

    Cashew nut seeds were subjected to processing including autoclaving (121 degrees C for 5, 10, 20, and 30 min), blanching (100 degrees C for 1, 4, 7, and 10 min), microwave heating (1 and 2 min each at 500 and 1000 W), dry roasting (140 degrees C for 20 and 30 min; 170 degrees C for 15 and 20 min; and 200 degrees C for 10 and 15 min), gamma-irradiation (1, 5, 10, and 25 kGy), and pH (1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13). Proteins from unprocessed and processed cashew nut seeds were probed for stability using anti-Ana o 2 rabbit polyclonal antibodies and mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against Ana o 1, Ana o 2, and Ana o 3 as detection agents. Results indicate that Ana o 1, Ana o 2, and Ana o 3 are stable regardless of the processing method to which the nut seeds are subjected.

  16. Kerr-Taub-NUT General Frame, Energy, and Momentum in Teleparallel Equivalent of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal G. L. Nashed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new exact solution describing a general stationary and axisymmetric object of the gravitational field in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR is derived. The solution is characterized by three parameters “the gravitational mass M, the rotation a, and the NUT L.” The vierbein field is axially symmetric, and the associated metric gives the Kerr-Taub-NUT spacetime. Calculation of the total energy using two different methods, the gravitational energy momentum and the Riemannian connection 1-form Γα̃β, is carried out. It is shown that the two methods give the same results of energy and momentum. The value of energy is shown to depend on the mass M and the NUT parameter L. If L is vanishing, then the total energy reduced to the energy of Kerr black hole.

  17. Influence of Pecan Nut Pretreatment on the Physical Quality of Oil Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujuan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A supply of pure, intact oil bodies is essential for carrying out morphological and biochemical studies of these plant organelles and exploring their application. Preparation requires a carefully controlled breakage of plant cells, followed by separation of the oil bodies from cytoplasm and cell debris. This paper focuses on the recovery and characterisation of oil bodies from pecan nuts where no work has been published to date. The results showed that soaking softens the nut tissue and appears to reduce the damage to oil bodies during grinding and centrifugal force must be carefully selected to minimise oil bodies damage on recovery. A 24 h soaking time coupled with a 5500 RCF recovery force allows for the recovery of intact pecan nut oil bodies.

  18. Remarks on the Taub-NUT solution in Chern–Simons modified gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brihaye, Yves, E-mail: yves.brihaye@umons.ac.be [Physique-Mathématique, Universite de Mons-Hainaut, Mons (Belgium); Radu, Eugen [Departamento de Física da Universidade de Aveiro and CIDMA, Campus de Santiago, 3810-183 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2017-01-10

    We discuss the generalization of the NUT spacetime in General Relativity (GR) within the framework of the (dynamical) Einstein–Chern–Simons (ECS) theory with a massless scalar field. These configurations approach asymptotically the NUT spacetime and are characterized by the ‘electric’ and ‘magnetic’ mass parameters and a scalar ‘charge’. The solutions are found both analytically and numerically. The analytical approach is perturbative around the Einstein gravity background. Our results indicate that the ECS configurations share all basic properties of the NUT spacetime in GR. However, when considering the solutions inside the event horizon, we find that in contrast to the GR case, the spacetime curvature grows (apparently) without bound.

  19. Preparation and efficacy assessment of malva nut polysaccharide for skin hydrating products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanlayavattanakul, M; Fungpaisalpong, K; Pumcharoen, M; Lourith, N

    2017-11-01

    Scaphium scaphigerum or malva nut has long been served in Chinese medicine. However, the use of this herb in modern health care applications has, to date, been rarely reported. Maceration of the herb in water afforded malva nut polysaccharide which was standardized. Safety and skin hydrating efficacy of the polysaccharide and products were evaluated in human volunteers. Malva nut polysaccharide (41.71±0.64%) having 36.58±0.51% total sugar content was isolated, with further analysis quantifying ash, carbohydrate, reducing sugar and moisture contents to be 6.05±0.00, 40.06±1.00, 12.20±0.05 and 12.64±0.31%, respectively. The polysaccharide exhibited swelling and hydrating capacities of 0.46±0.01% and 54.46±0.02g/g, with L*, a* and b* of 52.56±0.04, 9.02±0.06 and 18.42±0.03, respectively, and a viscosity of 1263.00±2.00 cps. Accelerated testing indicated the biopolysaccharide to be stable, resulting in no skin irritation in 15 human volunteers. The skin hydrating efficacy as assessed via a randomized single-blind, placebo-controlled study in 24 volunteers highlighted the superior performance of malva nut over the vehicle (moisture retainment for 70min as examined by Corneometer ® CM 825). A stable skin moisturizing gel containing malva nut was developed and was shown to exhibit improved performance over benchmark tamarind and algae polysaccharide gels (after 180min observation). Malva nut polysaccharide has potential as a key ingredient in skin hydrating products, which should encourage its further development. Copyright © 2017 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Near infrared spectroscopy for high-throughput characterization of Shea tree (Vitellaria paradoxa) nut fat profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davrieux, Fabrice; Allal, François; Piombo, Georges; Kelly, Bokary; Okulo, John B; Thiam, Massamba; Diallo, Ousmane B; Bouvet, Jean-Marc

    2010-07-14

    The Shea tree (Vitellaria paradoxa) is a major tree species in African agroforestry systems. Butter extracted from its nuts offers an opportunity for sustainable development in Sudanian countries and an attractive potential for the food and cosmetics industries. The purpose of this study was to develop near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) calibrations to characterize Shea nut fat profiles. Powders prepared from nuts collected from 624 trees in five African countries (Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Uganda) were analyzed for moisture content, fat content using solvent extraction, and fatty acid profiles using gas chromatography. Results confirmed the differences between East and West African Shea nut fat composition: eastern nuts had significantly higher fat and oleic acid contents. Near infrared reflectance spectra were recorded for each sample. Ten percent of the samples were randomly selected for validation and the remaining samples used for calibration. For each constituent, calibration equations were developed using modified partial least squares (MPLS) regression. The equation performances were evaluated using the ratio performance to deviation (RPD(p)) and R(p)(2) parameters, obtained by comparison of the validation set NIR predictions and corresponding laboratory values. Moisture (RPD(p) = 4.45; R(p)(2) = 0.95) and fat (RPD(p) = 5.6; R(p)(2) = 0.97) calibrations enabled accurate determination of these traits. NIR models for stearic (RPD(p) = 6.26; R(p)(2) = 0.98) and oleic (RPD(p) = 7.91; R(p)(2) = 0.99) acids were highly efficient and enabled sharp characterization of these two major Shea butter fatty acids. This study demonstrated the ability of near-infrared spectroscopy for high-throughput phenotyping of Shea nuts.

  1. Numerical and experimental analysis of resistance projection welding of square nuts to sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Zhang, Wenqi; Martins, Paulo A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Projection welding of nuts to sheets is a widely utilized manufacturing process in the automotive industry. The process entails challenges due the necessity of joining different sheet thicknesses and nut sizes made from dissimilar materials, and due to the fact of experiencing large local...... materials and applications require a new level of understanding of the process by combining finite element modelling and experimentation. This paper draws from the challenge of developing a three-dimensional computer program for electro-thermo-mechanical modeling of resistance welding and presents, as far...

  2. USE OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN STABLE ISOTOPES TO DETERMINE THE IMPORTANCE OF WHITEBARK PINE NUTS TO YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a masting species that produces relatively large, fat and protein-rich nuts that are consumed by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis). Trees produce abundant nut crops in some years and poor crops in other years. Grizzly bear survival in ...

  3. An indicator based 'traffic light' model to pro-actively assess the occurrence of mycotoxins in tree nuts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Seyhan, F.; Kandhai, M.C.; Dekkers, S.; Booij, C.J.H.; Bos, P.M.J.; Fels, van der H.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an indicator based 'traffic light' model as a tool to pro-actively assess the occurrence of mycotoxins in tree nuts. The model is built using a holistic approach and, consequently, uses indicators from inside and outside the tree nut production chain as the basic elements.

  4. A note on medieval microfabrication : The visualization of a prayer nut by synchrotron-based computer X-ray tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reischig, P.; Blaas, J.; Botha, C.; Bravin, A.; Porra, L.; Nemoz, C.; Wallert, A.; Dik, J.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fascinating objects in the Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) is an early 16th century prayer nut. This spherical wooden object measures 4 cm in diameter and consists of two hemispheres connected with a small hinge so that it can be opened. The interior of the nut holds wood

  5. Chrome Tanning Leather of Giant Sea Perch Combined with Seed Extract Areca Nut on the Physical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bustami - Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tanning is the process of converting raw hide protein to leather, which are stable, not easily decompose, and is suitable for a variety of uses. The use of vegetable based tanning materials in the leather tanning process has not been carried out. Vegetable based materials that were used are betel nuts. This plant contains tannin which is the main agent in the process of leather tanning. The aim of this study was to determine the physical characteristics of snapper leather treated with betel nut extract. Soxhlet extracting method with methanol as a solvent were used to obtain tannin from betel nuts. Tanned Snapper Leather were analyzed for physical quality, elongation strength, tensile strength, tear strength, and sewing strength. The result showed that methanol extracted betel nut with 10% concentration gives the optimum physical characteristics.Keywords: areca nut, chrome, snapper, snapper

  6. Apparent digestibility of nutrients, energy, and amino acid of nontoxic and detoxified physic nut cakes for Nile tilapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Hisano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The objective of this work was to evaluate the apparent digestibility coefficients of nutrients, energy, and amino acids of nontoxic and detoxified physic nut cakes treated with solvent plus posterior extrusion, for Nile tilapia. The apparent digestibility coefficients of crude protein and gross energy were higher for detoxified than for nontoxic physic nut cake. However, the apparent digestibility coefficient of ether extract of the nontoxic physic nut cake was higher than that of the detoxified one. The apparent digestibility coefficient of amino acids of both feed ingredients was superior to 80%, except for glycine, for the nontoxic psychic nut cake, and for threonine, for the detoxified one. Nontoxic and detoxified physic nut cakes show apparent digestibility coefficient values equivalent to those of the other evaluated oilseeds and potential for inclusion in Nile tilapia diets.

  7. Feasibility demonstration of booster cross-over system for 3 1/2 inch SRB/MLP frangible nut system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Recent testing of the SRB/MLP Frangible Nut System (SOS Part Number 114850-9/Boosters P/N 114848-3) at NASA indicated a need to reduce the function time between boosters (2) within a single frangible nut. These boosters are initiated separately by electrical impulse(s). Coupling the output of each detonator with an explosive cross-over would reduce the function time between boosters (independent of electrical impulse) while providing additional redundancy to the system. The objectives of this program were to: provide an explosive cross-over between boosters, reduce function time between boosters to less than one (1) millisecond within a given nut, reduce cost of boosters, be compatible with the existing frangible nut system, and meet requirements of USBI Spec's (nut 10SPC-0030, booster 10SPC-0031).

  8. Use of sulfur and nitrogen stable isotopes to determine the importance of whitebark pine nuts to Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, L.A.; Schwartz, C.C.; Rye, R.O.; Haroldson, M.A.; Gunther, K.A.; Phillips, D.L.; Robbins, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a masting species that produces relatively large, fat- and protein-rich nuts that are consumed by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis). Trees produce abundant nut crops in some years and poor crops in other years. Grizzly bear survival in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is strongly linked to variation in pine-nut availability. Because whitebark pine trees are infected with blister rust (Cronartium ribicola), an exotic fungus that has killed the species throughout much of its range in the northern Rocky Mountains, we used stable isotopes to quantify the importance of this food resource to Yellowstone grizzly bears while healthy populations of the trees still exist. Whitebark pine nuts have a sulfur-isotope signature (9.2 ?? 1.3??? (mean ?? 1 SD)) that is distinctly different from those of all other grizzly bear foods (ranging from 1.9 ?? 1.7??? for all other plants to 3.1 ?? 2.6??? for ungulates). Feeding trials with captive grizzly bears were used to develop relationships between dietary sulfur-, carbon-, and nitrogen-isotope signatures and those of bear plasma. The sulfur and nitrogen relationships were used to estimate the importance of pine nuts to free-ranging grizzly bears from blood and hair samples collected between 1994 and 2001. During years of poor pine-nut availability, 72% of the bears made minimal use of pine nuts. During years of abundant cone availability, 8 ?? 10% of the bears made minimal use of pine nuts, while 67 ?? 19% derived over 51% of their assimilated sulfur and nitrogen (i.e., protein) from pine nuts. Pine nuts and meat are two critically important food resources for Yellowstone grizzly bears.

  9. Ground Nut Husk Ash (GHA) as a Partial Replacement of Cement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ground Nut Husk Ash (GHA) as a Partial Replacement of Cement in Mortar. ... This paper examines some properties of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and Groundnut Husk Ash (GHA) mortar. The GHA was used as a partial ... hot weather climate. Further research on the permeability and durability are also recommended.

  10. Effect of Varying Levels of Inclusion of Shea Nut ( Vitellaria paradoxa )

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty (20) rabbit does aged between 4 – 5 months with average body weight of 1. 75 kg, were used to study the effect of feeding varying level of inclusion of shea nut meal (SNM) on the reproductive performance of doe rabbits. The does were randomly assigned into five groups comprising four rabbits each and were fed ...

  11. CoCoNUT: an efficient system for the comparison and analysis of genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtz Stefan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics is the analysis and comparison of genomes from different species. This area of research is driven by the large number of sequenced genomes and heavily relies on efficient algorithms and software to perform pairwise and multiple genome comparisons. Results Most of the software tools available are tailored for one specific task. In contrast, we have developed a novel system CoCoNUT (Computational Comparative geNomics Utility Toolkit that allows solving several different tasks in a unified framework: (1 finding regions of high similarity among multiple genomic sequences and aligning them, (2 comparing two draft or multi-chromosomal genomes, (3 locating large segmental duplications in large genomic sequences, and (4 mapping cDNA/EST to genomic sequences. Conclusion CoCoNUT is competitive with other software tools w.r.t. the quality of the results. The use of state of the art algorithms and data structures allows CoCoNUT to solve comparative genomics tasks more efficiently than previous tools. With the improved user interface (including an interactive visualization component, CoCoNUT provides a unified, versatile, and easy-to-use software tool for large scale studies in comparative genomics.

  12. Effects of Caffeine from Different Kola Nut Extracts on Kidney and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of caffeine from different kola nut extracts on kidney and liver functions of male wistar rats were investigated using standard methods. Twelve male wistar rats were used for the study. They were randomly divided into four groups A, B, C and D made up of 3 rats each. The control group (A) received water + food ad ...

  13. Egg quality and yolk lipid composition of laying hens fed diets containing cashew nut meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Fontoura Vidal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effect of the addition of cashew nuts meal (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25% to laying hen diets on egg quality and yolk composition. The variables studied were: egg weight, specific gravity, Haugh Units, percentages of shell, albumen, and yolk, moisture, total solids, total lipids, fatty acids profile, and yolk cholesterol. The addition of up to 25% of cashew nuts meal to hen diets did not affect egg quality and freshness, moisture and total solids content. However, an increase in total lipid content and a decrease in yolk pigmentation was observed. Oleic acid level increased in the yolk, whereas palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acid levels decreased. The addition of cashew nuts meal increased the monounsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio in the yolk and reduced the cholesterol content. Therefore, the use of cashew nuts meal in laying hen diets favorably modifies the fatty acid composition of egg yolk and contributes to a better acceptance of this food by consumers since it also reduces yolk cholesterol levels.

  14. Ball Nut Preload Diagnosis of the Hollow Ball Screw through Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Cheng Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the diagnostic results of hollow ball screws with different ball nut preload through the support vector machine (SVM process. The method is testified by considering the use of ball screw pretension and different ball nut preload. SVM was used to discriminate the hollow ball screw preload status through the vibration signals and servo motor current signals. Maximum dynamic preloads of 2%, 4%, and 6% ball screws were predesigned, manufactured, and conducted experimentally. Signal patterns with different preload features are separatedby SVM. The irregularity development of the ball screw driving motion current and rolling balls vibration of the ball screw can be discriminated via SVM based on complexity perception. The experimental results successfully show that the prognostic status of ball nut preload can be envisaged by the proposed methodology. The smart reasoning for the health of the ball screw is available based on classification of SVM. This diagnostic method satisfies the purposes of prognostic effectiveness on knowing the ball nut preload status

  15. Sighting of rare vagrant Palm-nut Vulture Gypohierax angolensis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The status and conservation of birds of prey in the Transvaal. Transvaal Museum, Pretoria. Keywords: Vagrant, Limpopo, Province, South Africa. Palm-nut Vulture Gypohierax angolensis. Authors' addresses: Zephné Bernitz, P.O. Box 1276, Middelburg MPU, 1050,. South Africa; e-mail address: bernitz@iafrica.com. Herman ...

  16. 76 FR 4201 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations, Macadamia Nut Crop Insurance Provisions; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... #0; #0;Rules and Regulations #0; Federal Register #0; #0; #0;This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER...;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 16 / Tuesday, January 25, 2011 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; [[Page 4201... sentence in the background stated ``The 2011 contract change date for the Macadamia Nut Crop Insurance...

  17. [Studies on the increasing-effect components for molluscicides in nut of Areca catech].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Q; Li, G; Yang, Y; Gao, J

    1999-11-01

    The increasing-effect components for molluscicides isolated from the dry nut of Areca catech L. were studied. The results showed that arecoline was the most effective and it could decrease remarkably the amount of drugs i.e. saponium of Phytolacca acinosa, SPA, and sodium pentachloro phenate, NaPCP, when used together.

  18. Effect of nut coke on the performance of the ironmaking blast furnace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Q.

    2013-01-01

    The blast furnace consumes a large amount of high quality metallurgy coke (size 35-80 mm) in addition to ore in the form of pellets and sinter. This coke is the coarse fraction, derived from the coke plant. The fine fraction (8 -35 mm), arise after sieving, named nut coke, can’t be directly used in

  19. Drip irrigation with treated wastewater from cashew nut industry under service pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketson Bruno da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural use of wastewater generated in the processing of cashew nuts enables the rationalization of water use, as well as the minimization of pollution and environmental degradation. The study aimed to analyze the effect of service pressures in the distribution uniformity of drip irrigation units applying treated wastewater from cashew nut industry. The experiment was conducted in split-split plots scheme having the service pressures (70, 140, 210 and 280 kPa on parcels, the emitters models (G1, G2 and G3 on subplots and the evaluation periods (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140 and 160 h of operation of the irrigation units on subsubplots. The treatments were distributed in a completely randomized design with three replications. The coefficient of uniformity of distribution of irrigation units, as well as the physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the effluent were determined every 20 hours of operation the irrigation units to totalize 160 h. The combination of dripper G3 and service pressure of 140 kPa provided excellent levels of distribution uniformity of effluent on irrigation units operating with treated wastewater of cashew nut industry. For application of treated wastewater from cashew nut it is not recommended the use of drippers with low flow rate (? 1.6 L h-1 and labyrinth of greater length (? 58 mm.

  20. evaluation of growth of young coconut and nut yield of old coconut

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    EVALUATION OF GROWTH OF YOUNG COCONUT AND. NUT YIELD OF OLD COCONUT AND THEIR NUTRIENT. STATUS UNDER COCONUT-CASSAVA INTERCROPPING. SYSTEMS. E. Andoh-Mensah,1 R. Nuhu Issaka2 and A. S. Ennin3. 1CSIR - Oil Palm Research Institute, Coconut Programme, Box 245, Sekondi, ...

  1. Mineral Analysis of Pine Nuts (Pinus spp. Grown in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo P. Vanhanen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mineral analysis of seven Pinus species grown in different regions of New Zealand; Armand pine (Pinus armandii Franch, Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra L., Mexican pinyon (Pinus cembroides Zucc. var. bicolor Little, Coulter pine (Pinus coulteri D. Don, Johann’s pine (Pinus johannis M.F. Robert, Italian stone pine (Pinus pinea L. and Torrey pine (Pinus torreyana Parry ex Carrière, was carried out using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES analysis. Fourteen different minerals (Al, B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, S and Zn were identified in all seven varieties, except that no Al or Na was found in Pinus coulteri D. Don. New Zealand grown pine nuts are a good source of Cu, Mg, Mn, P and Zn, meeting or exceeding the recommended RDI for these minerals (based on an intake of 50 g nuts/day while they supplied between 39%–89% of the New Zealand RDI for Fe. Compared to other commonly eaten tree-nuts New Zealand grown pine nuts are an excellent source of essential minerals.

  2. Mineral Analysis of Pine Nuts (Pinus spp.) Grown in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhanen, Leo P.; Savage, Geoffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral analysis of seven Pinus species grown in different regions of New Zealand; Armand pine (Pinus armandii Franch), Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra L.), Mexican pinyon (Pinus cembroides Zucc. var. bicolor Little), Coulter pine (Pinus coulteri D. Don), Johann’s pine (Pinus johannis M.F. Robert), Italian stone pine (Pinus pinea L.) and Torrey pine (Pinus torreyana Parry ex Carrière), was carried out using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES) analysis. Fourteen different minerals (Al, B, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, S and Zn) were identified in all seven varieties, except that no Al or Na was found in Pinus coulteri D. Don. New Zealand grown pine nuts are a good source of Cu, Mg, Mn, P and Zn, meeting or exceeding the recommended RDI for these minerals (based on an intake of 50 g nuts/day) while they supplied between 39%–89% of the New Zealand RDI for Fe. Compared to other commonly eaten tree-nuts New Zealand grown pine nuts are an excellent source of essential minerals. PMID:28239104

  3. Alkylating efficiency of sodium azide on pod yield, nut size and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mutation has been utilised to improve growth and yield of many food crops, but only little effort has been made to ascertain the nutritional advantages in such improved crops. The present study evaluates the alkylating efficiency of sodium azide of different concentrations on pod yield, nut size and nutritional composition of ...

  4. Penile Gangrene due to Strangulation by a Metallic Nut: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    METHODS: We summarise the case history, physical findings, investigations and operative treatment of a middle aged man who slipped a round metallic nut over his penis, entrapping it for five days causing strangulation and subsequent gangrene. The literature on penile entrapment, strangulation and gangrene is also ...

  5. Evaluation of growth of young coconut and nut yield of old coconut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two on-farm experiments were carried out in the coconut belt of Southern Ghana from 2006 to 2009 to evaluate growth of young coconut plantings and nut yield of old coconut fields and their nutrient status under coconut-cassava intercropping systems. Experiment I was carried out in young MYD x VTT coconut plantings.

  6. Physic nut ( Jatropha curcas ): miracle plant or a treat in Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physic nut or Ayderkie in Amharic and Gullo in Oromiffa is a bush or small tree adapted in the drier and warmer areas of Ethiopia. It endures moisture stress by dropping its leaves during dry period and flourishes when the rain comes. The plant has received enormous attention of the government as raw material for biodiesel ...

  7. In vitro regeneration from different ages of petioles of physic nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro regeneration from different ages of petioles of physic nut ( Jatropha curcas L.) ... Jatropha curcas L. is an important non-edible oil yielding plant growing in wasteland and dry lands. The experiment was conducted to ... Keywords: Euphorbiaceae, petiole, callus, indirect organogenesis, biodiesel, plant growth regulator

  8. Comparative Efficacy of Neem, False Sesame and the Physic Nut in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to evaluate the insecticidal properties of some plants was undertaken. Powder and aqueous extracts of Neem, Azadirachta indica, False sesame, Ceratotheca sesamoides and the Physic nut, Jatropha curcas were evaluated as grain protectants against the cowpea seed beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) in the ...

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the GRAS gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z Y; Wu, P Z; Chen, Y P; Li, M R; Wu, G J; Jiang, H W

    2015-12-29

    GRAS proteins play vital roles in plant growth and development. Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) was found to have a total of 48 GRAS family members (JcGRAS), 15 more than those found in Arabidopsis. The JcGRAS genes were divided into 12 subfamilies or 15 ancient monophyletic lineages based on the phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins from both flowering and lower plants. The functions of GRAS genes in 9 subfamilies have been reported previously for several plants, while the genes in the remaining 3 subfamilies were of unknown function; we named the latter families U1 to U3. No member of U3 subfamily is present in Arabidopsis and Poaceae species according to public genome sequence data. In comparison with the number of GRAS genes in Arabidopsis, more were detected in physic nut, resulting from the retention of many ancient GRAS subfamilies and the formation of tandem repeats during evolution. No evidence of recent duplication among JcGRAS genes was observed in physic nut. Based on digital gene expression data, 21 of the 48 genes exhibited differential expression in four tissues analyzed. Two members of subfamily U3 were expressed only in buds and flowers, implying that they may play specific roles. Our results provide valuable resources for future studies on the functions of GRAS proteins in physic nut.

  10. Global analysis of gene expression profiles in developing physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Pingzhi; Zhang, Sheng; Song, Chi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jia, Yongxia; Fang, Xiaohua; Chen, Fan; Wu, Guojiang

    2012-01-01

    Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is an oilseed plant species with high potential utility as a biofuel. Furthermore, following recent sequencing of its genome and the availability of expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries, it is a valuable model plant for studying carbon assimilation in endosperms of oilseed plants. There have been several transcriptomic analyses of developing physic nut seeds using ESTs, but they have provided limited information on the accumulation of stored resources in the seeds. We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of developing physic nut seeds 14, 19, 25, 29, 35, 41, and 45 days after pollination (DAP). The acquired profiles reveal the key genes, and their expression timeframes, involved in major metabolic processes including: carbon flow, starch metabolism, and synthesis of storage lipids and proteins in the developing seeds. The main period of storage reserves synthesis in the seeds appears to be 29-41 DAP, and the fatty acid composition of the developing seeds is consistent with relative expression levels of different isoforms of acyl-ACP thioesterase and fatty acid desaturase genes. Several transcription factor genes whose expression coincides with storage reserve deposition correspond to those known to regulate the process in Arabidopsis. The results will facilitate searches for genes that influence de novo lipid synthesis, accumulation and their regulatory networks in developing physic nut seeds, and other oil seeds. Thus, they will be helpful in attempts to modify these plants for efficient biofuel production.

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of the NAC Gene Family in Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenying; Xu, Xueqin; Xiong, Wangdan; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Wu, Guojiang; Jiang, Huawu

    2015-01-01

    The NAC proteins (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) are plant-specific transcriptional regulators that have a conserved NAM domain in the N-terminus. They are involved in various biological processes, including both biotic and abiotic stress responses. In the present study, a total of 100 NAC genes (JcNAC) were identified in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.). Based on phylogenetic analysis and gene structures, 83 JcNAC genes were classified as members of, or proposed to be diverged from, 39 previously predicted orthologous groups (OGs) of NAC sequences. Physic nut has a single intron-containing NAC gene subfamily that has been lost in many plants. The JcNAC genes are non-randomly distributed across the 11 linkage groups of the physic nut genome, and appear to be preferentially retained duplicates that arose from both ancient and recent duplication events. Digital gene expression analysis indicates that some of the JcNAC genes have tissue-specific expression profiles (e.g. in leaves, roots, stem cortex or seeds), and 29 genes differentially respond to abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, phosphorus deficiency and nitrogen deficiency). Our results will be helpful for further functional analysis of the NAC genes in physic nut.

  12. European survey on sterigmatocystin in cereals, cereals-based products, beer and nuts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, H.G.J.; MacDonald, S.J.; Anagnostopoulos, C.; Spanjer, M.; Bertuzzi, T.; Pietri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the EFSA proposal 'Survey on sterigmatocystin in food' (GP/EFSA/CONTAM/2013/02), this study provides a survey on the occurrence of this mycotoxin. A total of 1,259 samples of cereal grains (429), cereal products (713), beer (53) and nuts (64) were analysed for the presence of

  13. Research on wild relatives of fruit and nut crops at the Davis repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA germplasm repository in Davis is responsible for acquiring, conserving and distributing a broad spectrum of diversity of subtropical and temperate fruit and nut species germplasm to stakeholders around the world. Currently the repository holds over 7000 accessions of germplasm including Act...

  14. Smoothness of the future and past trapped sets in Kerr–Newman–Taub-NUT spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Claudio F.; Oancea, Marius A.

    2018-03-01

    We consider the sets of future/past trapped null geodesics in the exterior region of a sub-extremal Kerr–Newman–Taub-NUT spacetime. We show that from the point of view of any timelike observer outside of such a black hole, trapping can be understood as two smooth sets of spacelike directions on the celestial sphere of the observer.

  15. Molecular and Functional Properties of Protein Fractions and Isolate from Cashew Nut (Anacardium occidentale L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-Mei; Peng, Qian; Zhong, Jun-Zhen; Liu, Wei; Zhong, Ye-Jun; Wang, Fang

    2018-02-12

    Some molecular and functional properties of albumin (83.6% protein), globulin (95.5% protein), glutelin (81.3% protein) as well as protein isolate (80.7% protein) from cashew nut were investigated. These proteins were subjected to molecular (circular dichroism, gel electrophoresis, scanning electron microscopy) and functional (solubility, emulsification, foaming, water/oil holding capacity) tests. Cashew nut proteins represent an abundant nutrient with well-balanced amino acid composition and could meet the requirements recommended by FAO/WHO. SDS-PAGE pattern indicated cashew nut proteins were mainly composed of a polypeptide with molecular weight (MW) of 53 kDa, which presented two bands with MW of 32 and 21 kDa under reducing conditions. The far-UV CD spectra indicated that cashew proteins were rich in β-sheets. The surface hydrophobicity of the protein isolate was higher than that of the protein fractions. In pH 7.0, the solubility of protein fractions was above 70%, which was higher than protein isolate at any pH. Glutelin had the highest water/oil holding capacity and foaming properties. Protein isolate displayed better emulsifying properties than protein fractions. In summary, cashew nut kernel proteins have potential as valuable nutrition sources and could be used effectively in the food industry.

  16. A Newly Observed Inhibitory Effect of Cashew Nut Extract on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 120 organisms comprising 20 Proteus species, 20 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 Candida albicans and 10 Enterococcus faecalis were used for this assay. The following organisms were susceptible to crude extract of cashew nut with mean zone diameters of 14mm for Escherichia coli, 22mm for Pseudomonas ...

  17. Influence of foliar fertilization on walnut foliar zinc levels and nut production in black walnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Reid; Andrew L. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The impact of foliar zinc fertilizer application on nut-bearing black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) trees was studied. Foliar sprays were applied three times per season on two cultivars during four growing seasons by wetting the foliage of the entire crown using a tank mix containing 500 ppm zinc, starting at leaf burst and continuing at 2 week intervals...

  18. What Is the "Areca" in "Areca Nuts"? Extraction and Neuroactive Bioassay of Arecoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locock, Katherine; Bakas, Tim; Sanai, Farid; Allan, Robin; Hinton, Tina

    2016-01-01

    A series of three practical sessions are designed to give students firsthand experience with the preparation of natural product extracts and assay using a live tissue preparation. Areca or betel nuts are the seeds from the fruit of the "Areca catechu" palm tree that is known to contain a number of pharmacologically active alkaloids. The…

  19. The areca nut chewing habit and oral squamous cell carcinoma in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    catechu. The areca nut-chewing habir involves the. Oral and Dental Research Unit, University ofStellenbosch. C. W. VAN WYK, PH.D., F.D.S. R.e.s., B.CH.D. A. PADAYACHEE, M.CH.D, B.D.S.. Institute for Biostatistics and Centre for Molecular and Cellular. Biology, South African Medical Research Council, Parowvallei,. CP.

  20. Beyond labelling: what strategies do nut allergic individuals employ to make food choices? A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Barnett

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Food labelling is an important tool that assists people with peanut and tree nut allergies to avoid allergens. Nonetheless, other strategies are also developed and used in food choice decision making. In this paper, we examined the strategies that nut allergic individuals deploy to make safe food choices in addition to a reliance on food labelling. METHODS: THREE QUALITATIVE METHODS: an accompanied shop, in-depth semi-structured interviews, and the product choice reasoning task - were used with 32 patients that had a clinical history of reactions to peanuts and/or tree nuts consistent with IgE-mediated food allergy. Thematic analysis was applied to the transcribed data. RESULTS: Three main strategies were identified that informed the risk assessments and food choice practices of nut allergic individuals. These pertained to: (1 qualities of product such as the product category or the country of origin, (2 past experience of consuming a food product, and (3 sensory appreciation of risk. Risk reasoning and risk management behaviours were often contingent on the context and other physiological and socio-psychological needs which often competed with risk considerations. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding and taking into account the complexity of strategies and the influences of contextual factors will allow healthcare practitioners, allergy nutritionists, and caregivers to advise and educate patients more effectively in choosing foods safely. Governmental bodies and policy makers could also benefit from an understanding of these food choice strategies when risk management policies are designed and developed.

  1. [Consumption of nuts and vegetal oil in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-García, Juan Carlos; Granell Vidal, Lina; Muñoz Izquierdo, Amparo; Sánchez Juan, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the cardiovascular benefits of the Mediterranean Diet, enriched with olive oil and nuts. People with diabetes, who have an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, could benefit greatly from following this type of eating pattern. Analysis of vegetable fats intake from nuts and olive oil in patients with 1 Diabetes Mellitus type (DM1). Transverse descriptive study comparing 60 people with type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM1) with 60 healthy individuals. We collect the frequency of consumption of vegetable oils and nuts and calculate the contribution of these foods in mono and polyunsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid). For data collection we designed a food frequency questionnaire specifically. We also collect anthropometric variables, cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes-related variables. Vegetable fat intake from vegetable oils (3.02 ± 1.14 vs 3.07 ± 1.27 portions/day, P = 0.822) and nuts (1.35 ± 2.24 vs 1.60 ± 2.44 portions/week, P = 0.560), was similar in both groups. The DM1 group consumed fewer portions of olive oil daily than the control group (2.55 ± 1.17 vs 3.02 ± 1.34 portions/day, P = 0.046). We detected a significantly lower intake of α-linolenic acid in the control group (1.13 ± 2.06 versus 2.64 ± 4.37 g/day, p = 0.018) while there were not differences in the rest of fatty acids (oleic acid 28.30 ± 18.13 vs 29.53 ± 16.90 g/day, P = 0.703; linoleic 13.70 ± 16.80 vs 15.45 ± 19.90 g/day, P = 0.605). In DM1, it not demonstrated an influence of the intake of vegetable fats and oils from nuts in the anthropometric, metabolic and diabetes-specific variables. In people with DM1, total intake of vegetable oils and nuts do not differ from the general population. However, the consumption of olive oil and the contribution of α-linolenic fatty acid derived from such fats are slightly lower than the general population. Although intake of vegetable oils and nuts in people with DM1

  2. Aflatoxins in food products consumed in Brazil: a preliminary dietary risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, P D; de Mello, M Homem; França, J A; Caldas, E D

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary dietary exposure assessment for aflatoxins (AFs; AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2) was conducted to evaluate the potential carcinogenic risks for the Brazilian population. AF concentration data in food were obtained from analysis reports issued by the Central Public Health Laboratory of the Federal District (LACEN-DF) and from published work. Food consumption and body weight (bw) data were obtained from a national survey conducted in 2008/2009. Cancer risks arising from exposure to aflatoxins were assessed using the carcinogenic potency of AFs estimated by the JECFA, and hepatitis B virus prevalence in the Brazilian population. Additionally, margins of exposure (MOE) were also calculated for the various scenarios investigated. A total of 942 food samples were analysed for AFs in the Federal District between 2002 and 2011 with 4.5% of them being positive for at least one aflatoxin (LOQ = 2 µg kg(-1)). The highest percentage of contamination was found in peanuts (8.1%) and Brazil nuts (6.0%), with mean levels ranging from 6.7 µg kg(-1) in peanut products to 36.9 µg kg(-1) in Brazil nuts. Most of the studies conducted elsewhere in Brazil found similar results. Total AF intake for the total Brazilian population and high consumers of food relevant for AF contamination in Brazil (upper bound; samples Aflatoxins are genotoxic carcinogens, and government action should be maintained and continuously improved in order to guarantee that human exposure levels are kept as low as possible.

  3. Nut consumption, serum fatty acid profile and estimated coronary heart disease risk in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, S K; Kendall, C W C; Bazinet, R P; Bashyam, B; Ireland, C A; Augustin, L S A; Blanco Mejia, S; Sievenpiper, J L; Jenkins, D J A

    2014-08-01

    Nut consumption has been associated with decreased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes which has been largely attributed to their healthy fatty acid profile, yet this has not been ascertained. Therefore, we investigated the effect of nut consumption on serum fatty acid concentrations and how these relate to changes in markers of glycemic control and calculated CHD risk score in type 2 diabetes. 117 subjects with type 2 diabetes consumed one of three iso-energetic (mean 475 kcal/d) supplements for 12 weeks: 1. full-dose nuts (50-100 g/d); 2. half-dose nuts with half-dose muffins; and 3. full-dose muffins. In this secondary analysis, fatty acid concentrations in the phospholipid, triacylglycerol, free fatty acid, and cholesteryl ester fractions from fasting blood samples obtained at baseline and week 12 were analyzed using thin layer and gas chromatography. Full-dose nut supplementation significantly increased serum oleic acid (OA) and MUFAs compared to the control in the phospholipid fraction (OA: P = 0.036; MUFAs: P = 0.024). Inverse associations were found with changes in CHD risk versus changes in OA and MUFAs in the triacylglycerol (r = -0.256, P = 0.011; r = -0.228, P = 0.024, respectively) and phospholipid (r = -0.278, P = 0.006; r = -0.260, P = 0.010, respectively) fractions. In the cholesteryl ester fraction, change in MUFAs was inversely associated with markers of glycemic control (HbA1c: r = -0.250, P = 0.013; fasting blood glucose: r = -0.395, P consumption increased OA and MUFA content of the serum phospholipid fraction, which was inversely associated with CHD risk factors and 10-year CHD risk. NCT00410722, clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of the MYB gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changpin; Chen, Yanbo; Wu, Zhenying; Lu, Wenjia; Han, Jinli; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2015-11-01

    The MYB proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants, and play key roles in regulatory networks controlling development, metabolism, and stress responses. A total of 125 MYB genes (JcMYB) have been identified in the physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) genome, including 120 2R-type MYB, 4 3R-MYB, and 1 4R-MYB genes. Based on exon-intron arrangement of MYBs from both lower (Physcomitrella patens) and higher (physic nut, Arabidopsis, and rice) plants, we can classify plant MYB genes into ten groups (MI-X), except for MIX genes which are nonexistent in higher plants. We also observed that MVIII genes may be one of the most ancient MYB types which consist of both R2R3- and 3R-MYB genes. Most MYB genes (76.8% in physic nut) belong to the MI group which can be divided into 34 subgroups. The JcMYB genes were nonrandomly distributed on its 11 linkage groups (LGs). The expansion of MYB genes across several subgroups was observed and resulted from genome triplication of ancient dicotyledons and from both ancient and recent tandem duplication events in the physic nut genome. The expression patterns of several MYB duplicates in the physic nut showed differences in four tissues (root, stem, leaf, and seed), and 34 MYB genes responded to at least one abiotic stressor (drought, salinity, phosphate starvation, and nitrogen starvation) in leaves and/or roots based on the data analysis of digital gene expression tags. Overexpression of the JcMYB001 gene in Arabidopsis increased its sensitivity to drought and salinity stresses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrability in conformally coupled gravity: Taub-NUT spacetimes and rotating black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoux, Yannis; Caldarelli, Marco M.; Charmousis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    We consider four dimensional stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes for conformally coupled scalar-tensor theories. We show that, in analogy to the Lewis-Papapetrou problem in General Relativity (GR), the theory at hand can be recast in an analogous integrable form. We give the relevant rod formalism, introduced by Weyl for vacuum GR, explicitly giving the rod structure of the black hole of Bocharova et al. and Bekenstein (BBMB), in complete analogy to the Schwarzschild solution. The additional scalar field is shown to play the role of an extra Weyl potential. We then employ the Ernst method as a concrete solution generating example to obtain the Taub-NUT version of the BBMB hairy black hole. The solution is easily extended to include a cosmological constant. We show that the anti-de Sitter hyperbolic version of this solution is free of closed timelike curves that plague usual Taub-NUT metrics, and thus consists of a rotating, asymptotically locally anti-de Sitter black hole. This stationary solution has no curvature singularities whatsoever in the conformal frame, and the NUT charge is shown here to regularize the central curvature singularity of the corresponding static black hole. Given our findings we discuss the anti-de Sitter hyperbolic version of Taub-NUT in four dimensions, and show that the curvature singularity of the NUT-less solution is now replaced by a neighbouring chronological singularity screened by horizons. We argue that the properties of this rotating black hole are very similar to those of the rotating BTZ black hole in three dimensions.

  6. Integrability in conformally coupled gravity: Taub-NUT spacetimes and rotating black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardoux, Yannis [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique (LPT), Université Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8627, F-91405 Orsay (France); Caldarelli, Marco M. [Mathematical Sciences and STAG research centre, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Charmousis, Christos [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique (LPT), Université Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8627, F-91405 Orsay (France); Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique (LMPT), Université Tours, UFR Sciences et Techniques, Parc de Grandmont, F-37200 Tours (France)

    2014-05-09

    We consider four dimensional stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes for conformally coupled scalar-tensor theories. We show that, in analogy to the Lewis-Papapetrou problem in General Relativity (GR), the theory at hand can be recast in an analogous integrable form. We give the relevant rod formalism, introduced by Weyl for vacuum GR, explicitly giving the rod structure of the black hole of Bocharova et al. and Bekenstein (BBMB), in complete analogy to the Schwarzschild solution. The additional scalar field is shown to play the role of an extra Weyl potential. We then employ the Ernst method as a concrete solution generating example to obtain the Taub-NUT version of the BBMB hairy black hole. The solution is easily extended to include a cosmological constant. We show that the anti-de Sitter hyperbolic version of this solution is free of closed timelike curves that plague usual Taub-NUT metrics, and thus consists of a rotating, asymptotically locally anti-de Sitter black hole. This stationary solution has no curvature singularities whatsoever in the conformal frame, and the NUT charge is shown here to regularize the central curvature singularity of the corresponding static black hole. Given our findings we discuss the anti-de Sitter hyperbolic version of Taub-NUT in four dimensions, and show that the curvature singularity of the NUT-less solution is now replaced by a neighbouring chronological singularity screened by horizons. We argue that the properties of this rotating black hole are very similar to those of the rotating BTZ black hole in three dimensions.

  7. Morfologia da copa para avaliar o espaço vital de quatro espécies nativas da Amazônia Crown morphology to evaluate the growing space of four Amazon native species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Tonini

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi o de definir diretrizes para o desbaste de quatro espécies nativas: a castanha-do-pará ou castanheira-do-brasil (Bertholletia excelsa, a andiroba (Carapa guianensis, o ipê-roxo (Tabebuia avellanedae e o jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril, plantadas em plantios homogêneos no Estado de Roraima. Foi feita a análise das relações entre os principais índices morfométricos da copa e o crescimento em diâmetro e altura; para isso foram medidos o diâmetro à altura do peito, altura total, altura de inserção e diâmetro da copa de 87 árvores. Na análise dos parâmetros de copa, a castanheira-do-brasil demonstrou superioridade em diâmetro e área, o que indica que essa espécie necessita de um maior espaço vital e maiores espaçamentos iniciais; no entanto, sua copa foi menos eficiente em manter um mesmo incremento médio anual em diâmetro.This work aimed at defining guidelines for thinning of four native species in pure stands, in Roraima State: Brazil nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa, Andiroba (Carapa guianensis, Ipê-roxo (Tabebuia avellanedae, and Jatobá (Hymenea courbaril. Analyses were made on the relations between main crown morphometric index, and diameter and height growth of these species. Eighty-seven trees were measured, and data taken are: diameter at breast height, total height, crown insertion height and crown diameter. Crown parameters analysis showed diameter and crown area superiority of Brazil nut, which indicates its need of a proper initial spacing and bigger growing space. However, Brazil nut crown was less efficient to maintain the same mean annual diameter increment.

  8. Status of food irradiation in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, O.K. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    Research on food irradiation in Brazil started in 1968 at the Center of Nuclear Energy for Agriculture (CENA), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo. At the Institute of Nuclear and Energy Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, research on detection of irradiated foods is in progress. In 1973, the Brazilian government established a regulation about food irradiation. Nowadays, the products authorized to be irradiated are: rice, poultry, fish and fish products, potatoes, onions, avocados, persimmons, pineapples, wheat flour, maize, beans, spices, tomatoes, guavas, oranges, lemons, strawberries, mangoes, melons and papayas. The other recommended products to be approved in the future are: acerolas, apples, beans (dose > 1 kGy), beef, blueberries, cherries, cheeses, coffee, figs, fresh guaranas, garlics, grapefruits, grapes, mushrooms, nuts and pork. Today, there is only one commercial facility for irradiation services in the country, the Empresa Brasileira de Radiacoes Ltda. (EMBRARAD). This company operates a Nordion JS-7500 irradiator, with a present activity of about 1,000 kCi, designed for sterilizing medical devices. It also irradiates spices, dried foods, gemstones, cosmetics, wood and raw materials for pharmaceuticals. The plant operates 24 hours a day and the spices and dried foods represent 15% of the business. Powder of guarana seeds is irradiated also for exportation. There are two other commercial facilities for radiation sterilization in Brazil, operating exclusively for their own production. (J.P.N.)

  9. Status of food irradiation in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, O.K.

    1996-01-01

    Research on food irradiation in Brazil started in 1968 at the Center of Nuclear Energy for Agriculture (CENA), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo. At the Institute of Nuclear and Energy Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, research on detection of irradiated foods is in progress. In 1973, the Brazilian government established a regulation about food irradiation. Nowadays, the products authorized to be irradiated are: rice, poultry, fish and fish products, potatoes, onions, avocados, persimmons, pineapples, wheat flour, maize, beans, spices, tomatoes, guavas, oranges, lemons, strawberries, mangoes, melons and papayas. The other recommended products to be approved in the future are: acerolas, apples, beans (dose > 1 kGy), beef, blueberries, cherries, cheeses, coffee, figs, fresh guaranas, garlics, grapefruits, grapes, mushrooms, nuts and pork. Today, there is only one commercial facility for irradiation services in the country, the Empresa Brasileira de Radiacoes Ltda. (EMBRARAD). This company operates a Nordion JS-7500 irradiator, with a present activity of about 1,000 kCi, designed for sterilizing medical devices. It also irradiates spices, dried foods, gemstones, cosmetics, wood and raw materials for pharmaceuticals. The plant operates 24 hours a day and the spices and dried foods represent 15% of the business. Powder of guarana seeds is irradiated also for exportation. There are two other commercial facilities for radiation sterilization in Brazil, operating exclusively for their own production. (J.P.N.)

  10. The relationship between nut consumption and lipid profile among the Iranian adult population; Isfahan Healthy Heart Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, G; Yazdekhasti, N; Mohammadifard, N; Sarrafzadegan, N; Bahonar, A; Badiei, M; Sajjadi, F; Taheri, M

    2013-04-01

    The study was carried out to assess the relationship between nut consumption and lipid profile among Iranian adults. The study was based on data from the Isfahan Healthy Heart Program across three counties in central Iran in 2007. A cross-sectional survey of 9660 randomly selected adults aged ≥ 19 years were chosen based on sex, age and settlement distributions in each community. Nutritional behaviors were assessed by validated qualitative 48-item food frequency questionnaires, which covered regular intakes of four types of nuts: walnuts, almonds, pistachios and hazelnuts. Analysis of covariance and logistic regression tests were utilized to determine odds ratio (OR) 95% confidence interval of hyperlipidemia according to nut consumption patterns in unadjusted and three-adjusted models. The results showed a significant link between high nut consumption and lower total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and apo B/apo A ratio (Pconsumption was inversely associated with dyslipidemia, especially for those who had consumed nuts ≥ 4 times weekly (0.67 (0.57-0.79)). After adjusting for sex, age and other potential confounders, ORs increased enormously. Except for low apo A and high LDL-C, more frequent nut consumption (4 ≤ times per week) had a significant inverse effect on other dyslipidemia risk factors in all four models. We concluded that frequent consumption of nuts, particularly ≥ 4 times a week, may result in lower dyslipidemia occurrences and may exert cardioprotective effects.

  11. Gender Roles and Challenges of Small Scale Processed Cashew Nut Marketers in Enugu North Senatorial Zone of Enugu State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Enwelu I. A; Ugwu S. T; Irohibe I.

    2013-01-01

    The study examined gender roles and challenges of small scale processed cashew nut marketers in Enugu North senatorial zone of Enugu State. Interview schedule was used to collect data from 72 respondents. The data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics. Small scale processed cashew nut marketers were dominated by female youths with mean age of 31 years and making a monthly income of between ₦10,000.00 - ₦14,999.00 from cashew nut marketing. The marketing strategy mostly used by ...

  12. Analysis of volatile flavour compounds and acrylamide in roasted Malaysian tropical almond (Terminalia catappa) nuts using supercritical fluid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasekan, Ola; Abbas, Kassim

    2010-01-01

    Considering the importance of tropical almond nuts as a snack item, a study was conducted to identify the flavour volatiles and acrylamide generated during the roasting of the nuts. The supercritical fluid extracted flavour components revealed 74 aroma active compounds made up of 27 hydrocarbons, 12 aldehydes, 11 ketones, 7 acids, 4 esters, 3 alcohols, 5 furan derivatives a pyrazine, and 2 unknown compounds. While low levels of acrylamide (8-86 microg/kg) were obtained in the roasted nuts, significant (P0.05) concentration of acrylamide was generated with mild roasting and shorter roasting period. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fracture of an industrial steam turbine horizontal joint nut upon tightening; Bruch der Mutter einer Horizontalteilfugenverschraubung einer Industriedampfturbine beim Anziehen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Boromir; Giller, Madeleine; Neidel, Andreas; Riesenbeck, Susanne [Siemens AG - Gasturbinenwerk Berlin (Germany). Energy Sector Werkstoffprueflabor

    2017-11-01

    The nut of a horizontal joint fastener cracked upon tightening during assembly in an industrial steam turbine factory. It was previously used in an over-pressure test, but was otherwise not yet used in service. Nut and bolt were made of the nickel-based superalloy Nimonic 80A, a precipitation-hardenable wrought high-strength alloy with excellent creep and corrosion properties. Such alloys usually get a complex heat treatment after hot-rolling, comprising homogenizing and multiple ageing cycles. The subject nut failed due to an extreme case of mixed grain size which detrimentally affected mechanical properties and was attributed to an insufficient degree of deformation during hot rolling.

  14. APPLICABILITY OF FS-ALL-METAL SELF-LOCK NUTS FOR RAILWAY ROLLING STOCK OF 1520 MM GAUGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Кreis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. One of key requirements for rolling stock of next generation is essential increase of warranty period or running between maintenance depots and in periods between programming repair works. This will lead to a reduction of costs to maintenance and repair during service life of rolling stock. In this regard, the industry aspires to use (during construction, repairs, modernization of rolling stock a modern screw joints in structures for fixing parts. These screw joints could provide a high reliability under the action of vibration load. FS-hexagon all-metal self-lock nuts of multiple use, Flaig + Hommel GmbH company meets these requirements. Therefore, there is the need to consider the results of tests to confirm the reliability of FS-nuts in the new environment. Methodology. Test complex of developed programs and methods was carried out on railway rolling stock for functional demonstration of screw joints with FS-nuts. These tests include: 1 proof test and locking moment test as specified in ISO 2320 under normal climatic conditions and after low temperatures impact; 2 running test for rolling stock, secured the most load condition and according to supervised operation of next generation cars on the railway. Findings. Results of the tests testify that FS-all-metal self-lock nuts meet the requirements of international standards and confirm the reliability of the next generation rolling stock during its operation on the railway of 1520 mm gauge. Namely, locking moment and tightening torque is maintained in screw joints both on spring-suspended and unspring parts of freight car bogies by the action of vibration load under multiple use of FS-nuts. Originality. The developed software and methods was improved by conducting additional tests after exposure of screw joints with FS-nuts to low temperatures, as well as by control operations for assessing the condition of screw joints with FS-nuts, in the conditions of controlled operation of rolling

  15. Is areca innocent? The effect of areca (betel) nut chewing in a population of pregnant women on the Thai-Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chue, Amy L; Carrara, Verena I; Paw, Moo Kho; Pimanpanarak, Mupawjay; Wiladphaingern, Jacher; van Vugt, Michele; Lee, Sue J; Nosten, François; McGready, Rose

    2012-09-01

    Eight manuscripts have specifically examined the effects of areca (betel) nut use in pregnant women, seven of which have documented adverse effects on birth weight, newborn neurological status, gender ratio and pregnancy outcomes such as anaemia and miscarriage following areca nut use during pregnancy. A retrospective cohort analysis of migrant and refugee pregnant women attending antenatal clinics along the Thai-Myanmar border (July 1997 to November 2006) was conducted to examine the adverse effects of areca nut use routinely recorded on enrolment. Of 7685 women, 2284 (29.7%) never used areca or smoked (cheroots), 2484 (32.3%) only used areca, 438 (5.7%) only smoked cheroots and 2479 (32.3%) used both areca and cheroots. Pieces of ripe areca nut in a leaf with lime, without tobacco, were used particularly among older multigravid women. Adverse pregnancy effects were not observed in areca nut users compared with non-users. Smoking, but not areca nut use, had a dose-related effect on miscarriage. Areca nut use in conjunction with smoking reduced the adverse effects of smoking on birth weight, further supporting a lack of effect of areca nut. Areca (betel) nut-related adverse pregnancy outcomes were not observed in this population, whereas smoking was clearly harmful. Differences from previous reports may result from the amount or types of areca nut, or quid content, consumed between countries. Smoking, but not areca nut, reduction is likely to improve pregnancy outcomes on the Thai-Myanmar border.

  16. Radiation preservation of tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L.) with special reference to fungi and the effect of the physico-chemical properties of the nuts before and after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agyeman, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Tiger nut (Cyperus Esculentus L.) is an important minor crop in Ghana and is cultivated in at least four major Regions of Ghana (Central, Eastern, Brong Ahafo and Northern). A structured rapid appraisal questionnaire was designed to provide information on the sex distribution, age structure, educational level of respondents, knowledge of local names, types of cultivars or varieties, packaging and storage material, post-harvest losses, local utilisation and knowledge of its nutritional value. The sources of tiger nuts on the local market were also ascertained. To provide further information on its keeping quality in prolonged storage, moisture sorption isotherms of the nuts (using Glycerol: water mixture to simulate Equilibrium Relative Humidities ERH's of 20, 55, 65, 75, 85, 95%) was studied at 28 degrees Celsius to 30 degrees Celsius for 30 days. Some physical (length, width, water absorption capacity; moisture loss under ambient conditions) characteristics were investigated using conventional methods. These were supplemented with anatomical studies of the transverse section of the nuts to provide knowledge on the anatomical barrier characteristics of the cultivars from the various Regions. Resident mycoflora in the tiger nuts from Asebu Ekroful (Central Region), Bawjiase (Central Region), Kwahu Aduamoa (Eastern Region), Techiman (Brong Ahafo Region) and Bole (Northern Region) was ascertained by the decimal serial dilution technique up to 1:10 4 dilutions. The samples from Asebu Ekroful, Bawjiase and Kwahu Aduamoa were treated with gamma irradiation doses of 0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.00 kGy in different packaging material (polyethylene terephthalate bottle, perforated and non-perforated polythene bags for 3 months. Moisture content (%), ash content (%), oil content (%) and total carbohydrate content of the samples were determined before and after irradiation using conventional methods. Elemental composition of tiger nuts were also determined using X-Ray Fluorescence

  17. Safety data on single application of emu and macadamia nut oil on human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayoshi Miyashita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article provides the results of skin sensitization testing for emu and macadamia nut oil on 20 participants (ages 22–59 years old, including 3 men and 17 women. The test was carried out by performing a standard patch test using a Finn Chamber on Scanpor tape. The oils were applied to the participant's back using the tape and left in place for 24 h. After 1- and 24-h from removal of the tape, the reaction of the participant's skin was judged based on a scoring method recommended by Japanese Patch Test Research Group. Results are shown in table format. Keywords: Emu, Macadamia nut, Safety, Patch test

  18. Tunneling of Charged and Magnetized Fermions from a Rotating Dyonic Taub-NUT Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Kausari

    2017-12-01

    We investigate tunneling of charged and magnetized Dirac particles from a rotating dyonic Taub-NUT (TN) black hole (BH) called the Kerr-Newman-KasuyaTub-NUT (KNKTN) BH endowed with electric as well as magnetic charges. We derive the tunneling probability of outgoing charged particles by using the semiclassical WKB approximation to the covariant Dirac equation and obtain the corresponding Hawking temperature. The emission spectrum deviates from the purely thermal spectrum with the leading term exactly the Boltzman factor, if energy conservation and the backreaction of particles to the spacetime are considered. The results provides a quantumcorrected radiation temperature depending on the BH background and the radiation particles energy, angular momentum, and charges. The results are consistent with those already available in literature.

  19. 3D numerical simulation of projection welding of square nuts to sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Zhang, W.; Martins, P. A. F.

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of developing a three-dimensional finite element computer program for electro-thermo-mechanical industrial modeling of resistance welding is presented, and the program is applied to thesimulation of projection welding of square nuts to sheets. Results are compared with experimental...... obser-vations and measurements produced by the authors with the aim and objective of assessing the accuracy,reliability and validity of the theoretical and numerical developments. The numerical developmentsinclude implementation of friction between deformable objects in the finite element flow...... formulation inorder to model the frictional sliding between the square nut projections and the sheets during the weld-ing process. It is proved that the implementation of friction increases the accuracy of the simulations,and the dynamic influence of friction on the process is explained.© 2014 Elsevier B...

  20. Separation of cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) nut shell liquid with supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R L; Malaluan, R M; Setianto, W B; Inomata, H; Arai, K

    2003-05-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) represents the largest readily available bioresource of alkenyl phenolic compounds. In this work, separation of CNSL from the pericarp of the cashew nut with supercritical carbon dioxide was studied. In the initial extractions with CO(2) at 40-60 degrees C and at pressures from 14.7 to 29.4 MPa, low yields were obtained. However, when the extractions were performed with one or more intermediate depressurization steps, the yield of CNSL increased to as high as 94%. Most of the oil did not separate from the shell during the depressurization step, but was obtained during the subsequent repressurization. The CNSL extract had a clear light brownish pink color and exhibited no evidence of polymerization or degradation. The pressure profile extraction method proposed in this work increases the possible CNSL extraction yields and greatly reduces the amount of CO(2) required for CNSL separation.

  1. Original study of the biochemical and oil composition of the Cambodia nut Irvingia malayana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelier, J; Chunhieng, T; Olle, M; Montet, D

    2002-03-13

    Analysis of the biochemical composition of Irvingia malayana was carried out. This Cambodian nut contains 7.5% water and 70% oil. Most of the fatty acids are saturated and include 42% C12:0 and 41.8% C14:0; the sterol composition is similar to that of other vegetable oils. This oil is less rich in alpha-tocopherol than in gamma-tocopherol. Analysis of the solid content of the oil with respect to the temperature by NMR shows a fast fall of solid content around its fusion range at 38-39 degrees C. The main differences in the properties of the indigenous Cambodia nut from other known oleaginous seeds are in its selenium content, fatty acid composition, fusion temperature profile, and content of antioxidants. These important characteristics can soon make possible its application in pharmacology, cosmetics, the margarine industry, etc.

  2. Mycotoxins and mycotoxigenic moulds in nuts and sunflower seeds for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, M; Mateo, R; Querol, A; Huerta, T; Hernández, E

    1991-08-01

    A survey was carried out to obtain data on the occurrence of mycotoxins and the mycotoxin-producing potential of fungi isolated from nuts (almonds, peanuts, hazelnuts, pistachio nuts) and sunflower seeds in Spain. Thin-layer chromatography was used to separate the toxins. Aflatoxins were detected in one sample of almonds (95 ppb aflatoxin B1 and 15 ppb aflatoxin B2) and in one sample of peanuts at a level below 10 ppb of aflatoxin B1. 100% of samples showed variable incidence of fungal contamination. The predominant fungi present in samples were Penicillium spp, Aspergillus niger, A. flavus, A. glaucus and Rhizopus spp. The results showed that isolates of different species were able to produce aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2, sterigmatocystin, ochratoxin A, patulin, citrinin, penicillic acid, zearalenone, and griseofulvin.

  3. Consumption of baru nuts (Dipteryx alata in the treatment of obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Cristina Ferraz Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the effects of baru nut consumption on body weight, percent adiposity, amount of adipose tissue and blood levels in obese male Swiss mice. After inducing obesity by providing high-glucose diet (60 days, the mice were divided into 4 groups (7 animals per group and were fed on a control diet (C, high-glucose diet (HG or high-glucose diet added with baru (HGBA or soybean oil (HGSO. Groups fed with diet HGBA had a decrease in the weight gain and glucose and triglyceride levels when compared to diet HG. Aimals fed with HG exhibited a higher proportion of epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue. The inclusion of baru nut in the diet improved the control of weight gain and glucose and triglyceride levels in obese mice.

  4. Penicillium excelsum sp. nov from the Brazil Nut Tree Ecosystem in the Amazon Basin'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Pitt, John I; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.

    2015-01-01

    as bees and ants from the tree ecosystem in the Amazon rainforest. The species produces andrastin A, curvulic acid, penicillic acid and xanthoepocin, and has unique partial β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences. The holotype of P. excelsum is CCT 7772, while ITAL 7572 and IBT 31516 are cultures derived...

  5. Effect of antibloom fat migration from a nut oil filling on the polymorphic transformation of cocoa butter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin W; Zand, Imro't; Talbot, Geoff

    2008-03-12

    In confectionery products, loss in texture contrast between chocolate and filling and the appearance of fat bloom on the surface of the chocolate can be caused by fat migration. Bloom is often linked to the transformation of the cocoa butter betaV polymorph into betaVI. A previous study showed that small additions (1%) of nut oil can have a significant impact on the rate of transformation and that migration of nut oil from a filling would increase polymorphic transformation of cocoa butter. In the present study, antibloom fat was added to the filling in a model system. The antibloom fat migrated with the nut oil and inhibited the transformation of cocoa butter from the betaV polymorph into betaVI. Despite experiencing migration of greater amounts of nut oil, cocoa butter closest to the filling transformed more slowly than that farther away (i.e., the reverse of the situation in the absence of antibloom fat).

  6. Cover crops to improve soil health and pollinator habitat in nut orchards: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry. Van Sambeek

    2017-01-01

    Integrating cover crops into a nut orchard can have some unique benefits and problems not found when used cover crops during the fallow period between cash crops. Studies show ground covers can reduce hardwood tree growth anywhere from a few percent to more than 70 percent in the case of tall fescue. This means if it takes 3 years to put on one inch of diameter growth...

  7. Global analysis of gene expression profiles in developing physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawu Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. is an oilseed plant species with high potential utility as a biofuel. Furthermore, following recent sequencing of its genome and the availability of expressed sequence tag (EST libraries, it is a valuable model plant for studying carbon assimilation in endosperms of oilseed plants. There have been several transcriptomic analyses of developing physic nut seeds using ESTs, but they have provided limited information on the accumulation of stored resources in the seeds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of developing physic nut seeds 14, 19, 25, 29, 35, 41, and 45 days after pollination (DAP. The acquired profiles reveal the key genes, and their expression timeframes, involved in major metabolic processes including: carbon flow, starch metabolism, and synthesis of storage lipids and proteins in the developing seeds. The main period of storage reserves synthesis in the seeds appears to be 29-41 DAP, and the fatty acid composition of the developing seeds is consistent with relative expression levels of different isoforms of acyl-ACP thioesterase and fatty acid desaturase genes. Several transcription factor genes whose expression coincides with storage reserve deposition correspond to those known to regulate the process in Arabidopsis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results will facilitate searches for genes that influence de novo lipid synthesis, accumulation and their regulatory networks in developing physic nut seeds, and other oil seeds. Thus, they will be helpful in attempts to modify these plants for efficient biofuel production.

  8. Correction to Hawking radiation of the stationary axisymmetric NUT-Taub black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huiling; Lin Rong; Cai Min; Qi Dejiang; Jiang Qingquan

    2007-01-01

    Adopting a new method of quantum radiation as tunnelling, and taking energy conservation into account, the tunnelling radiation characteristics of the stationary axial symmetric NUT-Taub black hole are studied. The result shows that the tunnelling rate of particles at the event horizon of the black hole is relevant to Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the real spectrum is not precisely thermal at all

  9. Addressing a silent killer - The International Conference on Betel Quid and Areca Nut

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Global Health, National Cancer Institute, in coordination with the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research , The University of Texas at MD Anderson Cancer Center, Oral Cancer Research Coordinating Center, University of Malaya, Taiwan Health Promotion Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, and with the generous support of the Malaysia Ministry of Health, hosted the International Conference on Betel Quid and Areca Nut in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia on April 27-28, 2016.

  10. Using 'may contain' labelling to inform food choice: a qualitative study of nut allergic consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowland M Hazel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precautionary 'may contain' warnings are used to indicate possible allergen contamination. Neither food safety nor foods labelling legislation address this issue. The aim of this study is to understand how peanut and nut allergic adults interpret 'may contain' labelling and how they use this information when purchasing food. Methods Qualitative methods were used to explore both behaviour and attitudes. The behaviour and 'thinking aloud' of 32 participants were recorded during their normal food shop. A semi-structured interview also explored participants' views about 13 potentially problematic packaged foods. Transcribed data from these tasks were analysed to explore the interpretation of 'may contain' labelling and how this influenced food choice decisions. Results Peanut and nut allergic individuals adopt a complex range of responses and strategies to interpret 'may contain' labelling. Many claimed such labelling was not credible or desirable; many ignored it whilst some found it helpful and avoided products with all such labelling. Interpretation and consequent decisions were not only based on the detail of the labelling but also on external factors such as the nature of the product, the perceived trustworthiness of the producer and on the previous experience of the nut allergic individual. Conclusions 'May contain' labelling was interpreted in the light of judgements about the product, producer and previous personal experience. It is vital that these interpretation strategies are taken into account by those responsible for labelling itself and for the provision of advice to nut allergic individuals. Suggestions to improve labelling and advice to the allergic individual are considered.

  11. Influence of Production Variables on Eco-Friendly Briquettes from Coconut and Bambara Nut Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Sotannde

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of production variables on the properties of molasses-induced fuel briquettes from Coconut (Cocos nucifera L. and Bambara nut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc. shells. The milled samples of both raw materials were mixed with molasses at ratios 100:20, 100:25, 100:30 and 100:35 by weight respectively, and briquetted using a Jack press at an average pressure of 1.2KN/m2. A 3x4 factorial experiment in completely randomized design was used. The briquettes produced were subjected to both physical and combustion tests. The tests revealed that majority of the variations in briquette properties were largely influenced by the type of biomass residues used while molasses’ content also contributed significant effect atp < 0.05. Coconut shell briquettes had higher compressed density though lower in relaxed form (0.80 g·cm-3vs 0.78 g·cm-3 when compared to Bambara nut shell briquettes (0.77 g.cm-3vs0.75 g.cm-3. Both physical and combustion properties were significantly improved when both bio-residue mixtures were used. Briquettes from the mixtures had the highest average fixed carbon and heating values of 85.21% and 32.80 MJ·kg-1 respectively, though it was 83.83% and 32.12 MJ·kg-1for coconut shell briquette and 82.18% and 32.03 MJ·kg-1for Bambara nut shell briquette. Therefore, based on physical and combustion characteristics, the best Bambara nut briquettes and its mixture with coconut shell were produced when molasses content was 30%. In contrast, the best coconut shell briquette was produced when molasses content was 35%. These two level are therefore recommended for production of quality briquettes from these agro-residues.

  12. Deforestation near Rio Branco, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Settlement and deforestation surrounding the Brazilian town of Rio Branco are seen here in the striking 'herring bone' deforestation patterns that cut through the rainforest. Rio Brancois the capital of the Brazilian state of Acre and is situated near the border with northeastern Bolivia. The town is a center for the distribution of goods, including rubber, metals, medicinal plants, Brazil nuts and timber. Colonization projects in the region are supported by farming, logging activities, and extensive cattle ranching. Much of the surrounding terrain is of a poorly-draining clay hardpan soil, and heavy rainfall periodically converts parts of the forested region to swamp.The large overview image was acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on July 28, 2000, and covers an area of 336 kilometers x 333 kilometers. A plume of smoke is visible north of the Rio Branco road, which roughly parallels the slender, twisting Rio Abuna. Most of the major rivers in the image provide reference points for state or international (Bolivia-Brazil) boundaries, and flow northeast to the Rio Madeira (east of the smoke plume). The border between Acre and the Bolivian department of Pando is marked by the Rio Abuna. Pando's southern boundary with the department of Beni is marked by the Rio Madre de Dios, the large river in the lower half of the image.The two higher-resolution inset images highlight a settled area north of the town of Rio Branco. These nadir views cover an area of 60 kilometers x 67 kilometers, and were acquired eleven months apart during Terra orbits 3251 and 8144. In the later image, more haze is present, possibly due to smoke from fires on that day. Comparing the two images provides a method of measuring the changes and expansion in the area of cleared land. One newly cleared patch is apparent near the middle of the later image, slightly off to the right. This polygon represents an area of about 16 square kilometers, or 4000

  13. Bioactive compounds in cashew nut (Anacardium occidentale L.) kernels: effect of different shelling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trox, Jennifer; Vadivel, Vellingiri; Vetter, Walter; Stuetz, Wolfgang; Scherbaum, Veronika; Gola, Ute; Nohr, Donatus; Biesalski, Hans Konrad

    2010-05-12

    In the present study, the effects of various conventional shelling methods (oil-bath roasting, direct steam roasting, drying, and open pan roasting) as well as a novel "Flores" hand-cracking method on the levels of bioactive compounds of cashew nut kernels were investigated. The raw cashew nut kernels were found to possess appreciable levels of certain bioactive compounds such as beta-carotene (9.57 microg/100 g of DM), lutein (30.29 microg/100 g of DM), zeaxanthin (0.56 microg/100 g of DM), alpha-tocopherol (0.29 mg/100 g of DM), gamma-tocopherol (1.10 mg/100 g of DM), thiamin (1.08 mg/100 g of DM), stearic acid (4.96 g/100 g of DM), oleic acid (21.87 g/100 g of DM), and linoleic acid (5.55 g/100 g of DM). All of the conventional shelling methods including oil-bath roasting, steam roasting, drying, and open pan roasting revealed a significant reduction, whereas the Flores hand-cracking method exhibited similar levels of carotenoids, thiamin, and unsaturated fatty acids in cashew nuts when compared to raw unprocessed samples.

  14. Elimination of Aspergillus parasiticus from nut surface with low pressure cold plasma (LPCP) treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Pervin; Basaran-Akgul, Nese; Oksuz, Lutfi

    2008-06-01

    Low pressure cold plasma (LPCP) using air gases and sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) was developed and tested for anti-fungal efficacy against Aspergillus parasiticus on various nut samples. Artificially A. parasiticus contaminated hazelnuts, peanuts, and pistachio nuts were treated with air gases plasma and SF(6) plasma for up to 20 min duration. The sterilizing effect of LPCP on A. parasiticus was higher during the early treatment period than the later treatment period. Air gases plasma treatment for 5 min resulted in 1-log reduction of A. parasiticus and a further 5 min treatment resulted in additional 1-log reduction. SF(6) plasma application was more effective resulting in approximately a 5-log decrease in fungal population for the same duration. When effectiveness of plasma treatment against aflatoxins were tested, 20 min air gases plasma treatment resulted in a 50% reduction in total aflatoxins (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, and AFG2), while only a 20% reduction in total aflatoxin was observed after 20 min SF(6) plasma treatment. In this study, a rapid, functional clean-up method for the elimination of aflatoxin producing fungus from shelled and unshelled nuts was investigated as a suitable fungal decontamination method.

  15. Effect of roasting on degradation of Aflatoxins in contaminated pistachio nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, Hassan; Mohammadi, Tayyebeh; Abouhossain, Giti; Cheraghali, A Majid

    2005-07-01

    With increasing knowledge and awareness of aflatoxins (AFs) as potent sources of health hazards to both human and animals, a great deal of effort has been made to completely eliminate the toxin or reduce its content in foods. Although prevention is the most effective intervention, heat has been used to inactivate AFs in contaminated foodstuff. Nuts as general and especially pistachio nuts are very sensitive commodity to AFs contamination. In this study effect of roasting on reduction of AFs content in pistachio nuts has been tested in a laboratory setting with aiming to suggest an optimal condition for the roasting. Although all treatment protocols showed some degree of AFs degradation (ranging from 17% to 63%), roasting spiked samples at 120 degrees C for 120 min and 150 degrees C for 30-120 min caused substantial reduction of AFs in samples. Treatment of naturally contaminated whole pistachio kernels at 150 degrees C for 30 min significantly reduced level of AFs contamination in samples. Degradation of AFs was both time and temperature dependent. Roasting at 150 degrees C and 120 min condition degraded more than 95% of AFB1 in pistachio. However, the resulted product was not edible. AFs in form of naturally occurrence were more resistant to degradation with heat.

  16. The aflatoxin contamination of ground red pepper and pistachio nuts sold in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Set, E; Erkmen, O

    2010-01-01

    Total aflatoxin (AFT) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) contamination, pH and water activity, and mold and yeast counts in unpacked and packed ground red pepper (GRP) and pistachio nut have been studied from September 2008 to February 2009. 17.1% (14/82) and 23.1% (19/82) unpacked GRP were over AFT and AFB1 legal limits, respectively, while only one packed sample was over legal limit of AFB1 by 89.99 ppb. Both of AFT and AFB1 were detected in 50.5% (48/95) of unpacked pistachio nuts with the contamination levels ranging from 0.007 to 7.72 ppb. Mold and yeast counts in unpacked GRP and mold counts in unpacked pistachio nut were detected over legal limits with 5.9% (5/85) and 1.1% (1/95), respectively. These cases call attention to the importance of aflatoxin content in these foods and need strict prohibition in the use of batches containing aflatoxins. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nut density and removal in Syagrus loefgrenii Glassman (Arecaceae) in the Brazilian Cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa-Netto, J

    2016-04-19

    In this study, I tested the effect of Syagrus loefgrenii nut number on the removal intensity by rodents across seasons. Also, I assessed both S. loefgrenii fruit production, and dispersion pattern to analyze the relationship between these parameters and nut removal. Trials were performed (autumn, winter, spring, and summer), in which endocarps were placed inside trays (5, 15, and 40 endocarps) in the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna). Syagrus loefgrenii exhibited clumped distribution, although its local density had no correlation with endocarp removal rate. Despite of variations, S. loefgrenii fruit production had no seasonal difference, although, high proportions of endocarps were year round removed. This mostly results from nearly complete endocarp loss in depots of 5 and 15, while the opposite occurred in those of 40. Hence, the intensity of removal consistently decreases with endocarp number, so that endocarp removal conformed to negative distance-dependence. As this palm exhibit clumped distribution and, in principle, fruit asynchronously, if, at least, a group of neighboring stems bore fruits simultaneously, an enhanced number of nuts might be available at a given site. Therefore, seeds within a dense S. loefgrenii fruit patch might experience high survival rates due to satiation of post dispersal seed predators.

  18. Nut density and removal in Syagrus loefgrenii Glassman (Arecaceae in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ragusa-Netto

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, I tested the effect of Syagrus loefgrenii nut number on the removal intensity by rodents across seasons. Also, I assessed both S. loefgrenii fruit production, and dispersion pattern to analyze the relationship between these parameters and nut removal. Trials were performed (autumn, winter, spring, and summer, in which endocarps were placed inside trays (5, 15, and 40 endocarps in the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna. Syagrus loefgrenii exhibited clumped distribution, although its local density had no correlation with endocarp removal rate. Despite of variations, S. loefgrenii fruit production had no seasonal difference, although, high proportions of endocarps were year round removed. This mostly results from nearly complete endocarp loss in depots of 5 and 15, while the opposite occurred in those of 40. Hence, the intensity of removal consistently decreases with endocarp number, so that endocarp removal conformed to negative distance-dependence. As this palm exhibit clumped distribution and, in principle, fruit asynchronously, if, at least, a group of neighboring stems bore fruits simultaneously, an enhanced number of nuts might be available at a given site. Therefore, seeds within a dense S. loefgrenii fruit patch might experience high survival rates due to satiation of post dispersal seed predators.

  19. Potential health and economic benefits of three locally grown nuts in Nigeria: implications for developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayomadewa Mercy Olatunya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and lack of economic sustainability are major problems in developing countries. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the nutrients‘ contents of three locally grown nuts in Nigeria (local groundnut, Kampala groundnut and breadnut and highlight their health and economic potentials. Proximate analysis, chemical properties, minerals and fatty acids composition of the nuts were determined. The highest protein, crude fibre and carbohydrate contents were found in Kampala groundnut, local groundnut and breadnut respectively. Their sodium-potassium ratios were all less than 1.0 and their oils have mainly unsaturated fatty acids. Their acid values ranged between (2.41–6.34 mgKOH/g while the iodine values were between 36.0 and 93.0 I2 g/100 g. Analysis of the nuts and their oils indicated that they could help in solving malnutrition problem and also boost nations’ economy. Encouraging their large scale production can enhance adequate nutrition and sustain industrial growth in developing countries. Keywords: Nutrition, Food analysis, Food science

  20. Life Cycle Cost of Solar Biomass Hybrid Dryer Systems for Cashew Drying of Nuts in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanushkodi Saravanan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cashew nut farming in India is mostly carried out in small and marginal holdings. Energy consumption in the small scale cashew nut processing industry is very high and is mainly due to the high energy consumption of the drying process. The drying operation provides a lot of scope for energy saving and substitutions of other renewable energy sources. Renewable energy-based drying systems with loading capacity of 40 kg were proposed for application in small scale cashew nut processing industries. The main objective of this work is to perform economic feasibility of substituting solar, biomass and hybrid dryer in place of conventional steam drying for cashew drying. Four economic indicators were used to assess the feasibility of three renewable based drying technologies. The payback time was 1.58 yr. for solar, 1.32 for biomass and 1.99 for the hybrid drying system, whereas as the cost-benefit estimates were 5.23 for solar, 4.15 for biomass and 3.32 for the hybrid system. It was found that it is of paramount importance to develop solar biomass hybrid dryer for small scale processing industries.

  1. Separability and Killing tensors in Kerr-Taub-NUT-de Sitter metrics in higher dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Z.-W.; Gibbons, G.W.; Lue, H.; Pope, C.N.

    2005-01-01

    A generalisation of the four-dimensional Kerr-de Sitter metrics to include a NUT charge is well known, and is included within a class of metrics obtained by Plebanski. In this Letter, we study a related class of Kerr-Taub-NUT-de Sitter metrics in arbitrary dimensions D>=6, which contain three non-trivial continuous parameters, namely the mass, the NUT charge, and a (single) angular momentum. We demonstrate the separability of the Hamilton-Jacobi and wave equations, we construct a closely-related rank-2 Stackel-Killing tensor, and we show how the metrics can be written in a double Kerr-Schild form. Our results encompass the case of the Kerr-de Sitter metrics in arbitrary dimension, with all but one rotation parameter vanishing. Finally, we consider the real Euclidean-signature continuations of the metrics, and show how in a limit they give rise to certain recently-obtained complete non-singular compact Einstein manifolds

  2. Effect of dried nut fortification on functional, physicochemical, textural, and microbiological properties of yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturkoglu-Budak, S; Akal, C; Yetisemiyen, A

    2016-11-01

    In this study, walnut, hazelnut, almond, or pistachio were incorporated to produce functional yogurts. The effects on physicochemical and instrumental textural characteristics and syneresis, contents of folic acid, selenium, tocopherols, and n-3 and n-6 (omega) fatty acids, and viable counts of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus were evaluated during storage. Fortified yogurts demonstrated higher protein and total solid contents and lower syneresis compared with control yogurt on d 21. Addition of nuts, except walnut, also increased S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus counts. The concentrations of folic acid, α-tocopherol, selenium, and n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were higher in fortified yogurts compared with the levels found in the respective nut types. However, a decreasing trend was observed in all components during storage. Consequently, each nut could be incorporated into yogurt because of a specific functional property. For instance, walnut could be preferred for omega acid enrichment. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antioxidant Properties of Pecan Nut [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] Shell Infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro do Prado, A. C.; Monalise Aragao, A.; Fett, R.; Block, J. M.

    2009-07-01

    The nutritional composition of Pecan nut [Ca rya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] shells and the total phenolic and condensed tannin contents of Pecan nut shell infusion were determined and the antioxidant activity of the infusion was evaluated through ABTS, DPPH and {beta}-carotene/linoleic acid systems. The shell presented high fiber content (48% {+-} 0.06), the total phenolic content ranged from 116 to 167 mg GAE/g and the condensed tannin content was between 35 and 48 mg CE/g. The antioxidant activity varied from 1112 and 1763 {mu}mol TEAC/g in the ABTS system. In the DPPH method, the antioxidant activity was from 305 to 488 mg TEAC/g (30 minutes reaction) and from 482 to 683 mg TEAC/g (24 h reaction). The oxidation inhibition percentage obtained in the {beta}-carotene/linoleic acid system varied from 70 to 96%. The results indicated the high phenolic content and antioxidant activity of Pecan nut shell infusion. (Author) 28 refs.

  4. Synthesis and utilization of catalytically cracked cashew nut shell liquid in a diesel engine

    KAUST Repository

    Vedharaj, S.

    2015-09-30

    In this study, CNSL (Cashew nut shell liquid), an economically viable feedstock among the other contemporary resources, has been considered as an appropriate source of alternate fuel. Herein, CNSL was extracted from cashew nut outer shell, a waste product, through a unique approach of steam treatment process followed by mechanical crushing technique. In contrast to the past studies that have attempted to use unprocessed CNSL directly as substitute for diesel, this study has resorted to use processed CNSL by cracking it using zeolite catalyst. Thus, both the extraction of CNSL from cashew nut outer shell and processing of it through catalytic cracking process to help synthesize CC-CNSL (catalytically cracked CNSL) are different, which underscores the significance of the current work. In wake of adopting such distinct methodologies with fuel characterization, the properties of CC-CNSL such as viscosity and calorific value were figured out to be improved. Subsequently, CC-CNSL20 (20% CC-CNSL and 80% diesel) was tested at different fuel injection pressure such as 200 bar, 235 bar, 270 bar and 300 bar so as to optimize its use in a single cylinder diesel engine. From the engine experimental study, CC-CNSL20 was found to evince better engine performance than diesel and the composite emissions of CO (carbon monoxide), HC (hydrocarbon), NOX (oxides of nitrogen) and smoke, computed based on ISO 8178 D2 standard test cycle, were found to be better than diesel and incompliance with the legislative norms for genset.

  5. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS Resin with Polyester Resin in Composite Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Ugoamadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resins can compete effectively with the synthetic ones in composite development. In this research, cashew nuts were picked and processed for the extraction of the resin content. The resin (natural resin so obtained was mixed with cobalt amine (accelerator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (catalyst to develop two sets of composite specimens – specimens without fibres and specimens reinforced with glass fibres. This method of sample specimen development was repeated with polyester (synthetic resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate compressive strength of 55MPa compared to that of polyester resin with an ultimate strength of 68MPa. The result of tensile strength proved cashew nut shell liquid resin (with ultimate strength of 44MPa to be better than polyester resin with 39MPa as ultimate tensile strength. This means that natural resins could be a better substitute for the synthetic ones when the required quantities of fibers (reinforcements and fillers are used in the fibre-reinforced plastic composite developments.

  6. Topological invariants and absence of an axial anomaly for a Euclidean Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, T.; Gilkey, P.B.; Hanson, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    Hawking has suggested that a particular Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) metric might give rise to the gravitational analog of the Yang-Mills pseudoparticle. We extend Hawking's treatment by using the Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem for manifolds with boundaries and conclude that the Taub-NUT metric makes no contribution to the axial anomaly. Thus this metric does not induce chiral-symmetry breakdown as does the Yang-Mills pseudoparticle of Belavin, Polyakov, Schwartz, and Tyupkin

  7. Restrukturisasi Lemak Kakao Dengan Minyak Kelapa (Coconut Oil) Dan Dengan Minyak Kemiri (Candle Nut Oil) Melalui Reaksi Interesterifikasi Enzimatis

    OpenAIRE

    Lelya, Hilda

    2010-01-01

    Enzymatic interesterification is one of the most important processes for modifying the physicochemical characteristics of oils and fats. The industry is now relying more on interesterification to produce low or zero trans fats. Restructuritation of cocoa butter with coconut oil and with chandle nut oil in different ratios from (90:10); (80:20); (70:30) and (60:40) were subjected to enzymatic interesterification with palm kernel lipase, chandle nut lipase and cocoa lipase as catalyst and lipoz...

  8. A survey of pathogens associated with Cyperus esculentus L (tiger nuts) tubers sold in a Ghanaian city

    OpenAIRE

    Ayeh-Kumi, Patrick F; Tetteh-Quarcoo, Patience B; Duedu, Kwabena O; Obeng, Akua S; Addo-Osafo, Kantanka; Mortu, Samuel; Asmah, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Background Cyperus esculentus L, is a minor but important crop in Ghana. They are noted mostly by their aphrodisiac properties among others. The nuts are often eaten raw as an unprocessed snack due to its rich flavour and texture. Though eaten raw, the nuts are sometimes handled unhygienically, posing a public health threat. This study therefore aimed at determining the level and distribution of parasitic and bacterial contaminants associated with the crop as it is sold. Results Four types of...

  9. Cross sectional survey on association between alcohol, betel- nut, cigarette consumption and health promoting behavior of industrial workers in Ghaziabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Dimple; Marya, Charu Mohan; Menon, Ipseeta; Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Dhingra, Chandan; Anand, Richa

    2015-01-01

    The work force in industries are at risk of developing unduly high rates of health and behaviour related problems including abuse of alcohol, betel nut and cigarette (alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption). This study describes the relationships between alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption and health promoting behaviour among industrial workers. A cross sectional survey was conducted on workers in various industries of Ghaziabad city with concerned authority permission. A sample size of 732 workers was calculated based on pilot study. Through Simple random sampling 732 workers in 20 to 50 years age group with informed consent were interviewed through structured, pretested, validated questionnaire in vernacular language by one calibrated investigator. Data on socio demography, alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption pattern and health behaviour were collected. The association between health promoting behaviour and alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption was analysed by Logistic regression and Chi-square test through SPSS 16 at pconsumption in study population was 88%. The prevalence of individual alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption were 82%, 68% and 79% respectively. Combined alcohol, betel nut and cigarette prevalence in study population was 58%. Alcohol and cigarette users were significantly higher (p<0.001) in 30 to 40 years age group with lower level of education having poor attitude towards health promoting behaviour, poor oral hygiene practices and rare indulgence in regular physical exercise. This study stimulate further research on exploring methods to prevent initiation of health risk behaviour and promote healthy behaviour with cessation help for the current alcohol, betel nut and cigarette users.

  10. Study of the proteins in the defatted flour and protein concentrate of baru nuts (Dipteryx alata Vog)

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães,Rita de Cássia Avellaneda; Favaro,Simone Palma; Viana,Antonio Camilo Arguelho; Braga Neto,José Antônio; Neves,Valdir Augusto; Honer,Michael Robin

    2012-01-01

    Baru (Dipteryx alata Vog.) is an abundant legume in the Brazilian Savanna. Its nuts can be exploited sustainably using its protein and lipid fractions. This study aimed to analyze the proteins of the nuts present in the defatted flour and protein concentrate in terms of their functional properties, the profile of their fractions, and the in vitro digestibility. The flour was defatted with hexane and extracted at the pH of higher protein solubility to obtain the protein concentrate. The electr...

  11. Physic nut seed productivity (Jatropha curcas L.), in rainy season, under different drip irrigation levels and potassium dosages; Produtividade de sementes de pinhao-manso (Jatropha curcas L.), da estacao chuvosa, submetido a diferentes laminas de irrigacao e adubacao potassica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deus, Fabio Ponciano de; Faria, Manoel Alves de; Portela, Jaqueline Damyane [Universidade Federal de Lavras (DEG/UFLA), Lavras, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia], E-mail: fpdagricola@yahoo.com.br; Oliveira, Ednaldo Liberato de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Januaria, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this research was to value the Physic nut seed productivity, in rainy season, under different drip irrigation levels and potassium dosages, for 2008, 2009 and for the accumulated of theses years, in Lavras - MG, Brazil. The experimental design was the one of randomized blocks, in split plot design, with four replicates. The treatment levels were four water levels (plots) and four potassium dosages (subplots). The irrigation was applied based on the amount estimated by the water balance considering the class A pan evaporation (ECA) and rain depths - L{sub 0} (non irrigated), L{sub 40}, L{sub 80} and L{sub 120} (40, 80 and 120% of the balance respectively). The potassium dosages were K{sub 30}, K{sub 60}, K{sub 90} and K{sub 120} (30, 60, 90 and 120 kg.ha{sup -1} respectively). It was used the drip irrigation system. It was used the Sisvar 4.0 software, for analysis of variance and the Tukey test at 5% level of probability to compare the means. However, it was possible to observe in rainy season, that the irrigation has not changed the Physic nut seed productivity. The potassium level 120 kg.ha{sup -1} in all significant situations was the treatment with higher productivity. (author)

  12. Acute Toxicity of Cashew Nut Shell Extract (Anacardium occidentale L.) In Albino Rat (Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout 1769).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlita; Satuti, N H Niken; Sagi, Mammed; Astuti, Pudji

    2016-01-01

    Cashew plant (Anacardium occidentale L.) is a crop producing cashew nut shell that contain phenolic compounds such as lacquer oil (cashew nut shell liquid) which can be used for many studies. This study was conducted to determine the potency of acute toxicity (LD50) of cashew nut shell extract on female albino Wistar rats using Weil method. Twenty rats used in this study. The rats was divided into five groups, each consist of four rats after acclimatization. Each group was given the extract of cashew nut shell orally (force-fed). The amount of cashew nut shell extract that were given to group I, II, III and IV were 2.5, 25, 250 and 2,500 mg kg-1 b.wt., respectively, while group V were given 0.5% sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMCNa) solution. Clinical symptoms were observed 24 h after the administration of extract include behavioral changes i.e., licking, scratching, twitching, tremors, wrihing, reactivity to stimuli, cerebral and spinal reflexes, secretions, breath, skin, hair and death. Probit analysis using Weil method was used as an effective dose. The results showed that the potency for acute toxicity (LD50) of cashew nut shell extract was 2,018 mg kg-1 which classified as moderately toxic category. The administration of extract also causes behavioral changes in animal including passivity and mucus secretion. All doses of the extract did not affect the development body weight and the weight of organs (spleen, liver, heart, kidneys and lungs) in female rats.

  13. Aflatoxin B1 in betel nuts (Areca catechu L.) imported to Pakistan from different regions of South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Muhammad Asif; Iqbal, Javed; Ahmed, Aftab; Khan, Mobeen Ahmed; Shamsuddin, Zuzzer Ali

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) levels were evaluated in betel nuts (Areca catechu L.) being imported to Pakistan during 2010-2011. In total, 278 betel nut samples (India = 21, Indonesia = 51, Sri-Lanka = 34 and Thailand = 172) were received from the Department of Customs and were analysed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). All Indian origin betel nuts showed AFB1 contamination ranging from 11.7-262.0 µg kg(-1) with a mean of 92.5 µg kg(-1). Among Indonesian and Sri Lankan shipments, 80.4% and 73.5% betel nuts were contaminated with AFB1 ranging between 3.3-39.2 and 6.5-103.4 µg kg(-1) with a mean of 11.6 and 35.0 µg kg(-1), respectively. However, only 30.2% of Thailand origin samples showed AFB1 contamination ranging 3.3-77.0 µg kg(-1) with a mean of 6.6 µg kg(-1). The widespread occurrence of AFB1 increases the hazard associated with betel nuts. Thus, strict control is a pre-requisite for the production and import/export of psychoactive substances as betel nuts.

  14. Podostemaceae in Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Mello,Anderson Santos de; Tavares,Aldaléa Sprada; Trevisan,Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study provides a taxonomic treatment of the Podostemaceae family in southern Brazil. Podostemaceae is the largest family of strictly aquatic angiosperms. The center of family richness is the equatorial region of South America. Taxonomic studies are still scarce in Brazil. For southern Brazil there are six genera and 10 species recognized. Dichotomous key and illustrations are presented for species identification.

  15. Biochemical Education in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, F.

    1988-01-01

    Described are discussions held concerning the problems of biochemical education in Brazil at a meeting of the Sociedade Brazileira de Bioquimica in April 1988. Also discussed are other visits that were made to universities in Brazil. Three major recommendations to improve the state of biochemistry education in Brazil are presented. (CW)

  16. Variability studies of allochthonous stone pine (Pinus pinea L.) plantations in Chile through nut protein profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewe, V; Navarro-Cerrillo, R M; Sánchez Lucas, R; Ruiz Gómez, F J; Jorrín-Novo, J

    2018-01-11

    Stone pine (Pinus pinea) is characterized by low differentiation of growth parameters, high phenotypic plasticity and low genetic variability; detecting its diversity in introduced Chilean populations is therefore relevant for conservation and breeding programs. Here, variability among allochthonous Stone pine populations in Chile was explored using electrophoresis-based proteomic analysis of pine nuts. Cones from 30 populations distributed along a climatic gradient in Chile were surveyed and sampled, and proteins were extracted from seed flour using the TCA-acetone precipitation protocol. Extracts were subjected to SDS-PAGE and 2-DE for protein resolution, gel images captured, and spot or bands intensity quantified and subjected to statistical analysis (ANOVA, unsupervised Hierarchical Analysis Clustering and PLS regression). Protein yield ranged among populations from 161.7 (North populations) to 298.7 (South populations) mg/g dry weight. A total of 50 bands were resolved by SDS-PAGE in the 6.5-200 kDa Mr. range, of which 17 showed quantitative or qualitative differences, with 12 proteins identified. Pine nut extracts from the most distant populations were analyzed by 2-DE and a total of 129 differential spots were observed, out of which 13 were proposed as putative protein markers of variability. Out of the 129 spots, 118 proteins were identified after MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. Identified proteins were classified into two principal categories: reserve and stress related. We provide the first protein map of P. pinea nuts. The use of a proteomic approach was useful to detect variability of Stone pine across three Chilean macrozones, with correlations between protein profiles and geoclimatic parameters, suggesting a new approach to study the variability of this species. This study presents the first protein map of Stone pine nuts, relevant for the advancement of protein characterization in pine nuts. Putative protein markers are proposed, evidencing that a

  17. Consumption of baked nuts or seeds reduces dental plaque acidogenicity after sucrose challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Cheng, Chuoyue; Ge, Chunling; Wang, Bing; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2016-06-01

    To assess the acidogenic potential of eight different types of baked nuts or seeds eaten alone and after a sucrose challenge using in-dwelling electrode telemetry. Six participants wearing a mandibular partial prosthesis incorporated with a miniature glass pH electrode were enrolled. The plaque pH was measured after 5 or 6 days of plaque accumulation. To establish a control, the subjects were instructed to rinse with sucrose, without any subsequent treatment, at the first visit. At each subsequent test visit, the subjects were asked to chew sugar free xylitol gum or consume 10 g of baked (180 degrees C, 5 minutes) peanuts, walnuts, pistachios, cashews, almonds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, or watermelon seeds alone and 10 minutes after a sucrose rinse. The minimum plaque pH value and area of plaque pH curve under 5.7 (AUC5.7) during and after nut/seed consumption or gum chewing alone, the plaque pH value at 10 minutes after the sucrose rinse, the time required for the pH to return to >5.7 and AUC5.7 after the sucrose rinse with or without nut/seed consumption or gum chewing were calculated from the telemetric curves. The sucrose rinse induced a rapid decrease in the plaque pH to 4.32 +/- 0.17 at 10 minutes; this value remained below 5.7 for the measurement period. The AUC5.7 values were 34.58 +/- 7.27 and 63.55 +/- 15.17 for 40 and 60 minutes after the sucrose challenge, respectively. With the exception of cashews and pumpkin seeds (minimum pH, 5.42 and 5.63 respectively), the nuts or seeds did not decrease the plaque pH to below 5.7 when consumed alone, with the AUC5.7 values during and after consumption (total 40 minutes) ranging from 0.24 to 2.5 (8.44 for cashews), which were significantly lower than those after the sucrose challenge. Furthermore, nut/seed consumption or gum chewing after the sucrose challenge significantly reversed the sucrose-induced decrease in the plaque pH, and the time required for the pH to return to >5.7 and the AUC5.7 values for 60

  18. Manaus, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The junctions of the Amazon and the Rio Negro Rivers at Manaus, Brazil. The Rio Negro flows 2300 km from Columbia, and is the dark current forming the north side of the river. It gets its color from the high tannin content in the water. The Amazon is sediment laden, appearing brown in this simulated natural color image. Manaus is the capital of Amazonas state, and has a population in excess of one million. The ASTER image covers an area of 60 x 45 km. This image was acquired on July 16, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface

  19. Antinociceptive and antiedematogenic effect of pecan (Carya illinoensis) nut shell extract in mice: a possible beneficial use for a by-product of the nut industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Rossato, Mateus F; Hoffmeister, Carin; Müller, Liz G; Pase, Camila; Córdova, Marina M; Rosa, Fernanda; Tonello, Raquel; Hausen, Bruna S; Boligon, Aline A; Moresco, Rafael N; Athayde, Margareth L; Burguer, Marilise E; Santos, Adair R; Ferreira, Juliano

    2014-01-27

    Abstract Background: Interest in pecan (Carya illinoensis) nut shells, a by-product of the nut industry, has increased due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The goal of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive and antiedematogenic activity and the mechanisms of the pecan shell aqueous extract (AE). Methods: First, we performed fingerprinting of C. illinoensis AE. The antinociceptive and antiedematogenic effects of AE intragastric (i.g.) administration in mice (male Swiss mice 20-30 g) were evaluated using the acetic acid test or after subcutaneous (s.c.) paw injection of diverse transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonists, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), allyl isothiocyanate, or cinnamaldehyde. We also observed AE antinociceptive and antiedematogenic effects after carrageenan s.c. paw injection and measured H2O2 production. Moreover, we observed the development of adverse effects after AE i.g. treatment. Results: The high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprinting of AE showed the presence of rutin. AE or rutin i.g. treatment produced antinociception in the acetic acid test and reduced the nociception and edema mediated by H2O2 s.c. hind paw injection or nociception induced by other TRPA1 agonists. Moreover, AE or rutin reduced the hyperalgesia, edema, and H2O2 production induced by carrageenan s.c. paw injection. No motor, gastric, or toxicological alterations were observed after AE administration. Conclusions: Collectively, the present results show that AE and its constituent rutin produced antinociceptive and antiedematogenic action in models of acute and persistent inflammatory nociception and it seems to be related to the inhibition of TRPA1 receptor activation.

  20. Chemopreventive potential of in vitro fermented nuts in LT97 colon adenoma and primary epithelial colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlörmann, Wiebke; Lamberty, Julia; Lorkowski, Stefan; Ludwig, Diana; Mothes, Henning; Saupe, Christian; Glei, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Due to their beneficial nutritional profile the consumption of nuts contributes to a healthy diet and might reduce colon cancer risk. To get closer insights into potential mechanisms, the chemopreventive potential of different in vitro fermented nut varieties regarding the modulation of genes involved in detoxification (CAT, SOD2, GSTP1, GPx1) and cell cycle (p21, cyclin D2) as well as proliferation and apoptosis was examined in LT97 colon adenoma and primary epithelial colon cells. Fermentation supernatants (FS) of nuts significantly induced mRNA expression of CAT (up to 4.0-fold), SOD2 (up to 2.5-fold), and GSTP1 (up to 2.3-fold), while GPx1 expression was significantly reduced by all nut FS (0.8 fold on average). Levels of p21 mRNA were significantly enhanced (up to 2.6-fold), whereas all nut FS significantly decreased cyclin D2 expression (0.4-fold on average). In primary epithelial cells, expression of CAT (up to 3.5-fold), GSTP1 (up to 3.0-fold), and GPx1 (up to 3.9-fold) was increased, whereas p21 and cyclin D2 levels were not influenced. Nut FS significantly inhibited growth of LT97 cells and increased levels of early apoptotic cells (8.4% on average) and caspase 3 activity (4.6-fold on average), whereas caspase 3 activity was not modulated in primary colon cells. The differential modulation of genes involved in detoxification and cell cycle together with an inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in adenoma cells might contribute to chemopreventive effects of nuts regarding colon cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Global analysis of gene expression profiles in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) seedlings exposed to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress interferes with plant growth and production. Plants have evolved a series of molecular and morphological adaptations to cope with this abiotic stress, and overexpression of salt response genes reportedly enhances the productivity of various crops. However, little is known about the salt responsive genes in the energy plant physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.). Thus, excavate salt responsive genes in this plant are informative in uncovering the molecular mechanisms for the salt response in physic nut. We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of physic nut plants (roots and leaves) 2 hours, 2 days and 7 days after the onset of salt stress. A total of 1,504 and 1,115 genes were significantly up and down-regulated in roots and leaves, respectively, under salt stress condition. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of physiological process revealed that, in the physic nut, many "biological processes" were affected by salt stress, particular those categories belong to "metabolic process", such as "primary metabolism process", "cellular metabolism process" and "macromolecule metabolism process". The gene expression profiles indicated that the associated genes were responsible for ABA and ethylene signaling, osmotic regulation, the reactive oxygen species scavenging system and the cell structure in physic nut. The major regulated genes detected in this transcriptomic data were related to trehalose synthesis and cell wall structure modification in roots, while related to raffinose synthesis and reactive oxygen scavenger in leaves. The current study shows a comprehensive gene expression profile of physic nut under salt stress. The differential expression genes detected in this study allows the underling the salt responsive mechanism in physic nut with the aim of improving its salt resistance in the future.

  2. Global analysis of gene expression profiles in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. seedlings exposed to salt stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salt stress interferes with plant growth and production. Plants have evolved a series of molecular and morphological adaptations to cope with this abiotic stress, and overexpression of salt response genes reportedly enhances the productivity of various crops. However, little is known about the salt responsive genes in the energy plant physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.. Thus, excavate salt responsive genes in this plant are informative in uncovering the molecular mechanisms for the salt response in physic nut. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of physic nut plants (roots and leaves 2 hours, 2 days and 7 days after the onset of salt stress. A total of 1,504 and 1,115 genes were significantly up and down-regulated in roots and leaves, respectively, under salt stress condition. Gene ontology (GO analysis of physiological process revealed that, in the physic nut, many "biological processes" were affected by salt stress, particular those categories belong to "metabolic process", such as "primary metabolism process", "cellular metabolism process" and "macromolecule metabolism process". The gene expression profiles indicated that the associated genes were responsible for ABA and ethylene signaling, osmotic regulation, the reactive oxygen species scavenging system and the cell structure in physic nut. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The major regulated genes detected in this transcriptomic data were related to trehalose synthesis and cell wall structure modification in roots, while related to raffinose synthesis and reactive oxygen scavenger in leaves. The current study shows a comprehensive gene expression profile of physic nut under salt stress. The differential expression genes detected in this study allows the underling the salt responsive mechanism in physic nut with the aim of improving its salt resistance in the future.

  3. Effect of copper-based fungicide (bordeaux mixture) spray on the total copper content of areca nut: Implications in increasing prevalence of oral submucous fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Philips; Austin, Ravi David; Varghese, Soma Susan; Manojkumar, A D

    2015-01-01

    Potentially malignant disorders like oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) often precede oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The rate of transformation of OSMF to OSCC ranges from 3 to 19%. OSMF is etiologically related to chewing of areca nut (betel nut), and the high copper content in areca nut plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the disorder. Even though many studies estimated and confirmed increased copper levels in areca nuts, studies tracing the source of the increased copper content are scarce. Interestingly, on review of agricultural literature, it was found that most of the areca nut plantations in South India commonly use a copper-based fungicide, bordeaux mixture (BM). The aim of the study was to estimate and compare the copper content in areca nuts from plantations with and without copper-based fungicide usage. Four areca nut plantations from Dakshina Kannada district, Karnataka (group A) and four plantations from Ernakulam district, Kerala (group B) were selected for the study. The plantations from Karnataka used copper-based fungicide regularly, whereas the latter were devoid of it. Areca nut samples of three different maturities (unripe, ripe, and exfoliated) obtained from all plantations were dehusked, ground, and subjected to atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for copper analysis. There was statistically significant difference in the copper content of areca nuts from both groups. The areca nuts from plantations treated with copper-based fungicide showed significantly higher copper levels in all maturity levels compared to their counterparts in the other group (P < 0.05). The high copper content in areca nut may be related to the copper-based fungicide treatment on the palms. These areca nuts with high copper content used in quid or commercial products may be responsible for the increasing prevalence of OSMF.

  4. Characterization of the soluble allergenic proteins of cashew nut (Anacardium occidentale L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Peterson, W Rich; Roux, Kenneth H

    2002-10-23

    The allergens associated with cashew food allergy have not been well-characterized. We sought to identify the major allergens in cashew nut by performing IgE immunoblots to dissociated and reduced or nonreduced cashew protein extracts, followed by sequencing of the peptides of interest. Sera from 15 subjects with life-threatening reactions to cashews and 8 subjects who tolerate cashews but have life-threatening reactions to other tree nuts were compared. An aqueous cashew protein extract containing albumin/globulin was separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and subjected to IgE immunoblotting using patient sera. Selected IgE reactive bands were subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Each of the 15 sera from cashew-allergic subjects showed IgE binding to the cashew protein extract. The dominant IgE-binding antigens in the reduced preparations included peptides in the 31-35 kD range, consistent with the large subunits of the major storage 13S globulin (legumin-like protein). Low-molecular-weight polypeptides of the 2S albumin family, with similarity to the major walnut allergen Jug r 1, also bound IgE. The sera from eight patients who tolerate cashew but displayed allergies to other tree nuts showed only minimal or no IgE binding to cashew. Cashew food allergy is associated with the presence of IgE directed against the major seed storage proteins in cashew, including the 13S globulin (legumin group) and 2S albumins, both of which represent major allergen classes in several plant seeds. Thus, the legumin-group proteins and 2S albumins are again identified as major food allergens, which will help further research into seed protein allergenicity.

  5. Epithelial atrophy in oral submucous fibrosis is mediated by copper (II) and arecoline of areca nut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Pant, Ila; Narra, Sivakrishna; Radhesh, Rekha; Ranganathan, Kannan; Rao, Somanahalli Girish; Kondaiah, Paturu

    2015-10-01

    Exposure of oral cavity to areca nut is associated with several pathological conditions including oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). Histopathologically OSF is characterized by epithelial atrophy, chronic inflammation, juxtaepithelial hyalinization, leading to fibrosis of submucosal tissue and affects 0.5% of the population in the Indian subcontinent. As the molecular mechanisms leading to atrophied epithelium and fibrosis are poorly understood, we studied areca nut actions on human keratinocyte and gingival fibroblast cells. Areca nut water extract (ANW) was cytotoxic to epithelial cells and had a pro-proliferative effect on fibroblasts. This opposite effect of ANW on epithelial and fibroblast cells was intriguing but reflects the OSF histopathology such as epithelial atrophy and proliferation of fibroblasts. We demonstrate that the pro-proliferative effects of ANW on fibroblasts are dependent on insulin-like growth factor signalling while the cytotoxic effects on keratinocytes are dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Treatment of keratinocytes with arecoline which is a component of ANW along with copper resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity which becomes comparable to IC(50) of ANW. Furthermore, studies using cyclic voltammetry, mass spectrometry and plasmid cleavage assay suggested that the presence of arecoline increases oxidation reduction potential of copper leading to enhanced cleavage of DNA which could generate an apoptotic response. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling assay and Ki-67 index of OSF tissue sections suggested epithelial apoptosis, which could be responsible for the atrophy of OSF epithelium. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Polyphenol-rich pomegranate juice reduces IgE binding to cashew nut allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yichen; Mattison, Christopher P

    2018-03-01

    Food allergy negatively impacts quality of life and can be life-threatening. Cashew nuts can cause severe reactions in very small amounts, and they are included in a group of foods most commonly responsible for causing food allergy. Polyphenols and polyphenol-rich juices have been demonstrated to complex with peanut allergens. Here, the interaction between cashew nut allergens and polyphenol-rich juices is evaluated biochemically and immunologically. Various juices, including pomegranate (POM), blueberry (BB), and concord grape (CG) juices, were evaluated for polyphenol content and formation of polyphenol-cashew allergen complexes. Among the various juices studied, POM juice showed a greater capacity to form complexes with cashew proteins. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) demonstrated a sharp increase in cashew protein extract particle size to around 3580 nm, and fewer cashew proteins were resolved by electrophoresis after treatment with POM juice. Immunoassays demonstrated reduced IgG and IgE binding to cashew allergens due to allergen precipitation by POM juice. These observations support the formation of complexes between polyphenol and cashew proteins that can prevent antibody recognition of cashew allergens through allergen precipitation. POM juice treatment of cashew extract effectively reduces antibody binding through allergen precipitation, and these findings could be applied to the development of less allergenic cashew nut products and oral immunotherapy. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Residue Levels and Risk Assessment of Pesticides in Pistachio Nuts in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Emami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pistachio is one of the main nutrients, not only as a strategic crop but also as a main type of nut, in Iranians’ food cycle. The aim of this study was to measure the relative safety of Iranian pistachio based on the standard pesticide’s residue limits, which should be monitored and assessed in the cultivation of pistachio in order to confirm its public health. Methods: Fifty samples of pistachios of different brands were collected from Tehran markets in 2015. QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe sampling method was used in order to determine the pesticide’s residue in the pistachio nuts by Gas chromatography/Mass spectrometry (GC/MS.The method was validated with related parameters. Recovery took place at five concentration rates (n=3 ranging from 81.40% to 93.08% with the majority of RelativeStandard Deviation being lower than 20%. Limits of detection and quantification for all the pesticides were 2µg/kg and10µg/kg, respectively. The validated method seemed to be appropriate for the analysis of pesticide’s residue in pistachio nuts. Results: Identified pesticides included Fenitrothion, Carbaryl and Diazinon. Detectable pesticide’s residue existed in 10% (5 samples of the samples. Conclusion: All the results were compared with the Iran’s National Standards and the European Maximum Residue Limits. As compared to the acceptable daily intake, the calculated daily intake of each pesticide was much lower than the standard level, which could not cause any public health problem.

  8. Demographic Predictors of Peanut, Tree Nut, Fish, Shellfish, and Sesame Allergy in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ben-Shoshan

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To identify potential demographic predictors of food allergies. Methods. We performed a cross-Canada, random telephone survey. Criteria for food allergy were self-report of convincing symptoms and/or physician diagnosis of allergy. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess potential determinants. Results. Of 10,596 households surveyed in 2008/2009, 3666 responded, representing 9667 individuals. Peanut, tree nut, and sesame allergy were more common in children (odds ratio (OR 2.24 (95% CI, 1.40, 3.59, 1.73 (95% CI, 1.11, 2.68, and 5.63 (95% CI, 1.39, 22.87, resp. while fish and shellfish allergy were less common in children (OR 0.17 (95% CI, 0.04, 0.72 and 0.29 (95% CI, 0.14, 0.61. Tree nut and shellfish allergy were less common in males (OR 0.55 (95% CI, 0.36, 0.83 and 0.63 (95% CI, 0.43, 0.91. Shellfish allergy was more common in urban settings (OR 1.55 (95% CI, 1.04, 2.31. There was a trend for most food allergies to be more prevalent in the more educated (tree nut OR 1.90 (95% CI, 1.18, 3.04 and less prevalent in immigrants (shellfish OR 0.49 (95% CI, 0.26, 0.95, but wide CIs preclude definitive conclusions for most foods. Conclusions. Our results reveal that in addition to age and sex, place of residence, socioeconomic status, and birth place may influence the development of food allergy.

  9. Effect of roasting conditions on color development and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) analysis of Malaysian-grown tropical almond nuts (Terminalia catappa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siewsee; Lasekan, Ola; Muhammad, Kharidah; Sulaiman, Rabiha; Hussain, Norhayati

    2014-01-01

    Proper roasting is crucial to flavor, color, and texture development in the final product. In recent years, several research studies have been carried out to establish the best optimum roasting conditions for some common edible nuts such as; hazelnut, peanut, and pistachio nut. Although roasting is an important process for nuts and oilseeds, there is little or no information on the development of color, aroma, and textural changes in Terminalia catappa nuts during roasting. Results showed that color formation and browning index were significantly (P catappa).

  10. Dirac operators on the Taub-NUT space, monopoles and SU(2) representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jante, Rogelio; Schroers, Bernd J. [Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences and Department of Mathematics,Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-22

    We analyse the normalisable zero-modes of the Dirac operator on the Taub-NUT manifold coupled to an abelian gauge field with self-dual curvature, and interpret them in terms of the zero modes of the Dirac operator on the 2-sphere coupled to a Dirac monopole. We show that the space of zero modes decomposes into a direct sum of irreducible SU(2) representations of all dimensions up to a bound determined by the spinor charge with respect to the abelian gauge group. Our decomposition provides an interpretation of an index formula due to Pope and provides a possible model for spin in recently proposed geometric models of matter.

  11. Physicochemical studies on sunflower oil blended with cold pressed tiger nut oil during deep frying process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rehab, F. M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sunflower oils were blended with different levels of cold pressed tiger nut oil. Blended oils were obtained by mixing tiger nut oil with sunflower oil at the volume ratios of 0:100, 10: 90, 20: 80, 30: 70, 40: 60, 50:50 and 100: 0. The effects of deep frying on physico-chemical parameters (Free Fatty Acid (FFA, Peroxide Value (PV, thiobarbituric acid value (TBA, iodine value, Total Polar Compounds (TPC, color and viscosity were evaluated over 30 hours of the frying process. The total phenolic content of native oils was determined. GLC analysis was performed to illustrate the fatty acid composition of sunflower oil, tiger nut oil and binary mixtures of them as well as their oxidation rates. The pure and blended oils were heated at 180 °C ± 5 °C, then frozen French fried potatoes were fried every 30 min. Oil samples were taken every 5 h and the entire continuous frying period was 30 h. The results showed that fresh sunflower oil had significantly the highest value of COX (7.25; while tiger nut oil had significantly the lowest (2.24. Mixing sunflower oil with different levels of tiger nut oil led to an increase in its stability against oxidation. The phenolic content of cold pressed tiger nut oil was about 3.3 times as high as that of sunflower oil. The analytical data showed that the lowest deterioration during the frying process occurred in tiger nut oil and the highest in sunflower. The changes in the physico-chemical parameters were controlled and significantly (P < 0.05 decreased when tiger nut /sunflower oil (W/W proportions were varied between 20/80 to 50/50. The obtained results indicate that mixing sunflower oil with cold pressed tiger nut oil increased the stability and hence improved the quality of sunflower oil during the frying process.

    Aceites de girasol se mezclaron con diferentes niveles de aceite de chufa prensado en frío. Se obtuvieron mezclas de aceite de chufa con girasol en las proporciones: 0:100, 10: 90, 20: 80, 30

  12. Determination of aflatoxins in nuts of Tabriz confectionaries by ELISA and HPLC methods

    OpenAIRE

    siahi Shadbad, mohammad reza; Ansarin, masoud; Tahavori, Ali; Ghaderi, Faranak; Nemati, Mahboob

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Aflatoxins (AFs) are a group of mycotoxins and secondary metabolites of various species of Aspergillus. There are various forms of aflatoxins including B1, B2, G1, G2, M1 and M2 types. Aflatoxins cause important health problems and have high potential effect on liver cancer. Therefore, numerous investigations have been conducted during last three decades. The aim of this work is to determine the contamination levels of nuts used by the confectionaries in Tabriz. Methods: A total of 1...

  13. Hidden Symmetries of Euclideanised Kerr-NUT-(AdS Metrics in Certain Scaling Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Visinescu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hidden symmetries of higher dimensional Kerr-NUT-(AdS metrics are investigated. In certain scaling limits these metrics are related to the Einstein-Sasaki ones. The complete set of Killing-Yano tensors of the Einstein-Sasaki spaces are presented. For this purpose the Killing forms of the Calabi-Yau cone over the Einstein-Sasaki manifold are constructed. Two new Killing forms on Einstein-Sasaki manifolds are identified associated with the complex volume form of the cone manifolds. Finally the Killing forms on mixed 3-Sasaki manifolds are briefly described.

  14. The nuts and bolts of proofs an introduction to mathematical proofs

    CERN Document Server

    Cupillari, Antonella

    2005-01-01

    The Nuts and Bolts of Proof instructs students on the basic logic of mathematical proofs, showing how and why proofs of mathematical statements work. It provides them with techniques they can use to gain an inside view of the subject, reach other results, remember results more easily, or rederive them if the results are forgotten.A flow chart graphically demonstrates the basic steps in the construction of any proof and numerous examples illustrate the method and detail necessary to prove various kinds of theorems.* The "List of Symbols" has been extended.* Set Theory section has been strengthened with more examples and exercises.* Addition of "A Collection of Proofs"

  15. Detection of irradiated food: Electron spin resonance measurement of irradiated meat, fish and nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, B.; Helle, N.; Mager, M.; Schreiber, G.A.; Boegl, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    In an intercomparison study organized by the German Federal Health Office (BGA) the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy as a routine method according to paragraph 35 of the German Food Legislation (LMBG) was tested for bone containing meat, fish and nuts (shells). Each participating laboratory examined six chicken, six rainbow trout and four pistachio samples. The examinations were successful, only three samples were not identified correctly and moreover these mistakes were caused by misinterpretation of the ESR spectra. 13 out of 18 participating laboratories used a new routine ESR spectrometer and all samples were identified correctly with this instrument. (orig.) [de

  16. Comparison of Oil Content and Fatty Acids Profile of Western Schley, Wichita, and Native Pecan Nuts Cultured in Chihuahua, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Rivera-Rangel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different extraction processes, Soxhlet and ultrasound, were used to obtain the oil extracts of Western Schley, Wichita, and Native pecan nuts cultured in Chihuahua, Mexico. The aspects evaluated in this study were the extraction yield of the processes and fatty acids’ profile of the resulting extracts. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS was used to identify and determine the composition percentage of fatty acids present in pecan nuts oils extracted. The results obtained show that higher oil extraction yields were obtained by Soxhlet method with hexane (69.90% in Wichita varieties. Wichita, Western Schley, and Native pecan nuts from Chihuahua are rich in PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids and MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acids and have low levels of SFA (saturated fatty acids. The predominant fatty acid present in all pecan nuts oils was linoleic acid followed by oleic acid. Myristic acid, palmitic acid, and linolenic acid were also identified in representative quantities. The results from this study suggest that there are statistically significant differences in the chemical composition of the pecan nuts oils extracted from the varieties cultured in Chihuahua, Mexico, and those cultivated in other regions of the world.

  17. The visual effect and the necessity of determinating the superficial whitening method of the macadamia’s nut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Jijón

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Macadamia nut is considered "the queen of nuts", because of its high energy content and nutritional value. Certain types of nuts are considered to be non-commercial due to their color; therefore, the aim of this study was determining a method of surface bleaching using additives that do not affect the taste, smell and texture of the walnut. Color is a sensory quality of food; it’s an indicator and a critical quality factor in fresh and processed products. Three food additives were used as bleaching agents: 1% citric acid for 2 minutes and 3% for 1 minute, 0.1% ascorbic acid for 1 minute and 0.3% for 3 minutes, and 5 and 10% sodium bicarbonate for 1 minute. For all treatments, color analysis, walnut moisture, sensory analysis of odor, taste and texture were carried out. Walnuts were bleached superficially after drying. The results indicate that the best treatment for bleaching macadamia nut is ascorbic acid at 0.3%, with this it is possible to add a more homogeneous and natural color to the nut, free of blackish spots.

  18. Podostemaceae in Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Anderson Santos de; Tavares, Aldaléa Sprada; Trevisan, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study provides a taxonomic treatment of the Podostemaceae family in southern Brazil. Podostemaceae is the largest family of strictly aquatic angiosperms. The center of family richness is the equatorial region of South America. Taxonomic studies are still scarce in Brazil. For southern Brazil there are six genera and 10 species recognized. Dichotomous key and illustrations are presented for species identification. Resumo O presente estudo apresenta um tratamento taxonômico par...

  19. The effect of size and density on nut removal in Syagrus loefgrenii Glassman (Arecaceae in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ragusa-Netto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study I tested the effect of Syagrus loefgrenii nut size and number on the intensity of removal by rodents across seasons. Trials were performed in which piles of either small or large endocarps (1, 3, 6, 12, and 25 were subjected to removal by rodents in the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna. Despite of variations in the intensity of removal, always this process decrease conform endocarp number. Also, mean proportion of endocarp removal was unrelated to year period, initial number, and size of endocarps. Hence, endocarp removal was consistently negative density-dependent. As, in principle, the observed patterns of nut removal point out similar survival chances for both nut sizes, the pervasive negative density-dependent response emerges as a strategy in S. loefgrenii to swamp rodents all year round irrespective of seed size.

  20. The effect of size and density on nut removal in Syagrus loefgrenii Glassman (Arecaceae) in the Brazilian Cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa-Netto, J

    2018-02-01

    In this study I tested the effect of Syagrus loefgrenii nut size and number on the intensity of removal by rodents across seasons. Trials were performed in which piles of either small or large endocarps (1, 3, 6, 12, and 25) were subjected to removal by rodents in the Cerrado (Brazilian savanna). Despite of variations in the intensity of removal, always this process decrease conform endocarp number. Also, mean proportion of endocarp removal was unrelated to year period, initial number, and size of endocarps. Hence, endocarp removal was consistently negative density-dependent. As, in principle, the observed patterns of nut removal point out similar survival chances for both nut sizes, the pervasive negative density-dependent response emerges as a strategy in S. loefgrenii to swamp rodents all year round irrespective of seed size.