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Sample records for brazil lab for synchrotron radiation

  1. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. Although this proof-of-principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser 'time-slicing' technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend-magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness

  2. A LabVIEW-based data acquisition and processing system for synchrotron radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam size measurement of an accelerator is very important to parameter optimization of the system's operation. The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) adopts synchrotron light measurement to perform real-time monitoring of the beam size without let or hindrance. In this paper, we introduce the light measurement system, including the light path control, data acquisition and data processing, in which LabVIEW is used to treat data from double slits interferometer. Precision of the beam size measurement can be at μm level. (authors)

  3. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A L

    2000-01-01

    A team at Berkeley's Advanced Light Source has shown how a laser time-slicing technique provides a path to experiments with ultrafast time resolution. A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. The team's members come from the Materials Sciences Division (MSD), the Center for Beam Physics in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division and the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Although this proof-of principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser "time-slicing" technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness. The use of X-rays to study the c...

  4. Preliminar plan of a machine for the synchrotron radiation production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminar plan, with all the technical specifications, for the construction of a machine for the synchrotron radiation production to be done by the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory in Brazil is presented. (L.C.)

  5. Synchrotron radiation XRF imaging techniques at the Brazil-LNLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established method for quantitative multi-elemental bulk analysis. The use of a synchrotron radiation source allows constructing effective x-ray microprobes for study trace elements in small (nanogram) samples or their distributions with high spatial resolution. Since its operation, the XRF fluorescence beamline of the LNLS has offered to the user community several hard x-ray microprobes configurations to develop microscopic x-ray fluorescence analysis. The initially developed setup consisted of a fine conical monocapillary that allows condensing the polychromatic synchrotron beam down to an area of 20 microns in diameter. Novel strategies are now routinely in use or being installed at several synchrotron laboratories that require determining the 3D compositional structure of minor and trace elements in specific samples. These experimental setups take advantages of the high penetration depth of the x-rays (several orders of magnitude higher than the microbeam size). These alternative (microanalytical) methods are called x-ray fluorescence microtomography and confocal micro-XRF. This lecture intends to give a general description of all above configurations, showing their advantages/disadvantages and also pretends to show some specific applications carried out at the XRF Fluorescence beamline of the LNLS. (author)

  6. Synchrotron radiation XRF imaging techniques at the Brazil-LNLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Carlos A., E-mail: perez@lnls.br [X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Group, Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established method for quantitative multi-elemental bulk analysis. The use of a synchrotron radiation source allows constructing effective x-ray microprobes for study trace elements in small (nanogram) samples or their distributions with high spatial resolution. Since its operation, the XRF fluorescence beamline of the LNLS has offered to the user community several hard x-ray microprobes configurations to develop microscopic x-ray fluorescence analysis. The initially developed setup consisted of a fine conical monocapillary that allows condensing the polychromatic synchrotron beam down to an area of 20 microns in diameter. Novel strategies are now routinely in use or being installed at several synchrotron laboratories that require determining the 3D compositional structure of minor and trace elements in specific samples. These experimental setups take advantages of the high penetration depth of the x-rays (several orders of magnitude higher than the microbeam size). These alternative (microanalytical) methods are called x-ray fluorescence microtomography and confocal micro-XRF. This lecture intends to give a general description of all above configurations, showing their advantages/disadvantages and also pretends to show some specific applications carried out at the XRF Fluorescence beamline of the LNLS. (author)

  7. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on synchrotron radiation is the appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) annual report, 1985/86. The bulk of the volume is made up of the progress reports for the work carried out during the year under review using the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at Daresbury. The Appendix also contains: the scientific programmes at the the SRS, progress on beamlines, instrumentation and computing developments, and activities connected with accelerator development. (U.K.)

  8. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamt of just a decade or so ago. In this paper, the authors discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others

  9. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on Synchrotron Radiation contains the appendix to the Daresbury Annual Report 1987/88. The appendix is mainly devoted to the scientific progress reports on the work at the Synchrotron Radiation Source in 1987/8. The parameters of the Experimental Stations and the index to the Scientific Reports are also included in the appendix. (U.K.)

  10. Metrology of reflection optics for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent years have seen an almost explosive growth in the number of beam lines on new and existing synchrotron radiation facilities throughout the world. The need for optical components to utilize the unique characteristics of synchrotron radiation has increased accordingly. Unfortunately, the technology to manufacture and measure the large, smooth, exotic optical surfaces required to focus and steer the synchrotron radiation beam has not progressed as rapidly as the operational demands on these components. Most companies do not wish to become involved with a project that requires producing a single, very expensive, aspheric optic with surface roughness and figure tolerances that are beyond their capabilities to measure. This paper will review some of the experiences of the National Synchrotron Light Source in procuring grazing incidence optical components over the past several years. We will review the specification process - how it is related to the function of the optic, and how it relates to the metrology available during the manufacturing process and after delivery to the user's laboratory. We will also discuss practical aspects of our experience with new technologies, such as single point diamond turning of metal mirrors and the use of SiC as a mirror material. Recent advances in metrology instrumentation have the potential to move the measurement of surface figure and finish from the research laboratory into the optical shop, which should stimulate growth and interest in the manufacturing of optics to meet the needs of the synchrotron radiation user community

  11. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed account of the research work associated with the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory, United Kingdom, in 1984/85, is presented in the Appendix to the Laboratory's Annual Report. (U.K.)

  12. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given on the work involving the Synchrotron Radiation Division of the Daresbury Laboratory during the period January 1981 - March 1982. Development of the source, beamlines and experimental stations is described. Progress reports from individual investigators are presented which reveal the general diversity and interdisciplinary nature of the research which benefits from access to synchrotron radiation and the associated facilities. Information is given on the organisation of the Division and publications written by the staff are listed. (U.K.)

  13. The Synchrotron Radiation for Steel Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyada Suwanpinij

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synchrotron X-ray radiation is a great tool in materials characterization with several advantageous features. The high intensity allows clear interaction signals and high energy of X-ray yields higher sampling volume. The samples do not need extra preparation and the microstructure is therefore not affected. With the tunability of the X-ray energy, a large range of elements and features in the samples can be investigated by different techniques, which is a significant difference between a stand-alone X-ray tube and synchrotron X-ray. Moreover, any experimental equipment can be installed through which the synchrotron beam travels. This facilitates the so-called in situ characterization such as during heat treatment, hot deformation, chemical reaction or welding. Although steel which possesses rather high density requires very high energy X-ray for large interaction volume, lower energy is still effective for the investigation of local structure of nanoconstituents. This work picks up a couple examples employing synchrotron X-ray for the characterization of high strength steels. The first case is the quantification of precipitates in high strength low alloyed (HSLA steel by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The other case is the in situ X-ray diffraction for phase fraction and carbon partitioning in multiphase steels such as transformation induced plasticity (TRIP steel.

  14. Analysis of mineral water from Brazil using total reflection X-ray fluorescence by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total reflection X-ray fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF) has become a competitive technique for the determination of trace elements in samples that the concentrations are lower than 100 ng ml-1. In this work, thirty-seven mineral waters commonly available in supermarkets of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were analyzed by SRTXRF. The measurements were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence Beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo, using a polychromatic beam with maximum energy of 20 keV for the excitation. Standard solutions with gallium as internal standard were prepared for calibration of the system. Mineral water samples of 10 μl were added to Perspex sample carrier, dried under infrared lamp and analyzed for 200 s measuring time. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb. The elemental concentration values were compared with the limits established by the Brazilian legislation

  15. Precision geometric parameter gage for synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Gubrienko, K I; Makonin, S; Seleznev, V; Solodovnik, F; Sytin, A N; Vrazhnov, M; Wittenburg, K

    2001-01-01

    This article includes the description of the geometric parameter gage device prototype for synchrotron radiation of HERA collider (DESY). The system construction which capable to measure photo current, caused by such a radiation in a refractory metal, described here. The system component parts are: measuring heads and photo current measuring electronics designed by IHEP, stepper motor by Vacuum Generators with HEDS-550X encoder by Hewlett Packard, PCI-STEP-4CX 4-Axis Closed Loop Step controller by National Instruments. The device is controlled by means of Microsoft Visual Basic program using Value Motion Windows Libraries. The device prototype was tested in the beam of the DORIS storage ring.

  16. A program for synchrotron radiation dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer program PHOTON was obtained from Brookhaven National Laboratory (courtesy D. Chapman, NSLS), and has now been installed at APS VAX. In the following a brief description of the program and how to access to it is described with an example. A detailed manual for the program is also available. The program is developed to calculate the transmitted and scattered spectra of the synchrotron radiation, as it passes through series of filters. The source can be a bending magnet or a wiggler. This can be generated for any bending magnet or a wiggler source by varying ring energy, the critical energy and opening angles of the radiation beam. Monochromatic beams to white radiation can be treated. Filter materials can be pure elements or composites. The absorption cross-sections of all elements for covering 10-2 to 106 keV are now included in a table, which can be accessed by giving the atomic symbol

  17. Thermal loading considerations for synchrotron radiation mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grazing incidence mirrors used to focus synchrotron radiation beams through small distant apertures have severe optical requirements. The surface distortion due to heat loading of the first mirror in a bending magnet beam line is of particular concern when a large fraction of the incident beam is absorbed. In this paper we discuss mirror design considerations involved in minimizing the thermal/mechanical loading on vertically deflecting first surface mirrors required for SPEAR synchrotron radiation beam lines. Topics include selection of mirror material and cooling method, the choice of SiC for the substrate, optimization of the thickness, and the design of the mirror holder and cooling mechanism. Results obtained using two-dimensional, finite-element thermal/mechanical distortion analysis are presented for the case of a 60 grazing incidence SiC mirror absorbing up to 260 W at Beam Line VIII on the SPEAR ring. Test descriptions and results are given for the material used to thermally couple this SiC mirror to a water-cooled block. The interface material is limited to applications for which the equivalent normal heat load is less than 20 W/cm2

  18. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work at the Daresbury SRS has of necessity been interrupted this year (1991/92) due to the incorporation of Wiggler II. However, considerable beamtime was awarded before the shutdown and the major part of this appendix is concerned with the progress reports of the research undertaken then. The reports have been organised under the following broad headings: Molecular Science (19 papers), Surface and Materials Science (169 papers), Biological Science (85 papers), Instrumental and Technique Developments (13 papers) and Accelerator Physics (3 papers). It is hoped that in time the number of contributions on accelerator physics will grow to reflect the in-house activity on, for example, accelerator improvement and design. The research reports are preceded by the Annual Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Facilities Committee, which outlines the research highlights identified by that Committee (also included are details of the current membership of the SRFC and the chairmen of the Beamtime Allocation Panels). Following the reports are the specifications for the beamlines and stations. This year Section 3 contains 289 reports (nearly 100 more than last year) and the number of publications, generated by scientists and engineers who have used or are associated with Daresbury Laboratory facilities, has topped 500 for the first time. (author)

  19. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnet of a circular electron (positron) accelerator is a brilliant source in the vacuum ultraviolet, soft- and hard-x ray regions. First the characteristics of the bending SR are delete discussed. Though the brilliance of SR was improved dramatically in the last decade, neither bending, wiggler SR nor undulator SR is coherent. Coherent far infrared radiation in the mm wavelength region has recently been observed from a short electron bunch (∼ 2.5 mm long) in a bending magnet connected to a linac at Tohoku University. Coherent radiation due to higher harmonics generation by laser excitation of electron bunches in an undulator is then described. Finally a free electron laser (FEL) using optical klystron in a storage ring is reviewed. (author)

  20. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Paquin, R.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Optical Sciences Center

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.

  1. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop trademark, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research

  2. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature.

  3. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude

  4. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  5. Synchrotron radiation direct photoetching of polymers and crystals for micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation etching of polymers and optical crystals which are transparent throughout the spectral range from visible to ultraviolet has been carried out without using any chemicals, successfully creating high-aspect-ratio microstructures for micromachining. A detailed study of the etching rates by varying the synchrotron beam current, sample temperature, beam size and aspect ratio showed that this synchrotron radiation process is essentially different from laser ablation, while an in situ mass spectrometric analysis of gaseous etching products showed that the dissociation mechanism involved with the synchrotron radiation processing, even with heating, is completely different from the thermal dissociation of the laser ablation

  6. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the activities in synchrotron radiation and related areas at Daresbury Laboratory during 1989/90. The number and scope of the scientific reports submitted by external users and in-house staff is a reflection of the large amount of scheduled beamtime and high operating efficiency achieved at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) during the past year. Over 4000 hours of user beam were available, equivalent to about 80% of the total scheduled time. Many of the reports collected here illustrate the increasing technical complexity of the experiments now being carried out at Daresbury. Provision of the appropriate technical and scientific infrastructure and support is a continuing challenge. The development of the Materials Science Laboratory together with the existing Biological Support Laboratory will extend the range of experiments which can be carried out on the SRS. This will particularly facilitate work in which the sample must be prepared or characterised immediately before or during an experiment. The year 1989/90 has also seen a substantial upgrade of several stations, especially in the area of x-ray optics. Many of the advantages of the High Brightness Lattice can only be exploited effectively with the use of focusing optics. As the performance of these stations improves, the range of experiments which are feasible on the SRS will be extended significantly. (author)

  7. A synchrotron radiation facility for x-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, C.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Christensen, Finn Erland;

    1997-01-01

    A proposal for an x-ray optics test facility based at a synchrotron radiation source is presented. The facility would incorporate a clean preparation area, and a large evacuable test area. The advantages of using a synchrotron as the source of the test radiation are discussed. These include the a...

  8. Basic design for the synchrotron in the large synchrotron radiation facility, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron Radiation Facility Project Team in JAERI had tried to preliminarily design the injection system of Large Synchrotron Radiation Facility in the fiscal year 1988. Concentrating on the basic design for the booster synchrotron in this injection system, we describe the general method to design the separated function synchrotron which is used to accelerate high energy electrons or positrons. The content of this paper is founded on the physics of single particle motion. And in the next report we will discuss about the collective beam dynamics, the phenomena occurred during acceleration, and so on. (author)

  9. The Synchrotron Radiation for Steel Research

    OpenAIRE

    Piyada Suwanpinij

    2016-01-01

    The synchrotron X-ray radiation is a great tool in materials characterization with several advantageous features. The high intensity allows clear interaction signals and high energy of X-ray yields higher sampling volume. The samples do not need extra preparation and the microstructure is therefore not affected. With the tunability of the X-ray energy, a large range of elements and features in the samples can be investigated by different techniques, which is a significant difference between a...

  10. Studies Of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation And Longitudinal Space Charge In The Jefferson Lab FEL Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Tsai, C.-Y. [Virginia Polytechnic University

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL Driver provides an ideal test bed for studying a variety of beam dynamical effects. Recent studies focused on characterizing the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with the goal of benchmarking measurements with simulation. Following measurements to characterize the beam, we quantitatively characterized energy extraction via CSR by measuring beam position at a dispersed location as a function of bunch compression. In addition to operating with the beam on the rising part of the linac RF waveform, measurements were also made while accelerating on the falling part. For each, the full compression point was moved along the backleg of the machine and the response of the beam (distribution, extracted energy) measured. Initial results of start-to-end simulations using a 1D CSR algorithm show remarkably good agreement with measurements. A subsequent experiment established lasing with the beam accelerated on the falling side of the RF waveform in conjunction with positive momentum compaction (R56) to compress the bunch. The success of this experiment motivated the design of a modified CEBAF-style arc with control of CSR and microbunching effects.

  11. Discussions for the shielding materials of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many synchrotron radiation facilities are now under operation such as E.S.R.F., APS, and S.P.ring-8. New facilities with intermediated stored electron energy are also under construction and designing such as D.I.A.M.O.N.D., S.O.L.E.I.L., and S.S.R.F.. At these third generation synchrotron radiation facilities, the beamline shielding as well as the bulk shield is very important for designing radiation safety because of intense and high energy synchrotron radiation beam. Some reasons employ lead shield wall for the synchrotron radiation beamlines. One is narrow space for the construction of many beamlines at the experimental hall, and the other is the necessary of many movable mechanisms at the beamlines, for examples. Some cases are required to shield high energy neutrons due to stored electron beam loss and photoneutrons due to gas Bremsstrahlung. Ordinary concrete and heavy concrete are coming up to shield material of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches. However, few discussions have been performed so far for the shielding materials of the hutches. In this presentation, therefore, we will discuss the characteristics of the shielding conditions including build up effect for the beamline hutches by using the ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, and lead for shielding materials with 3 GeV and 8 GeV class synchrotron radiation source. (author)

  12. Plans for use of synchrotron radiation from the Tristan rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon after the first success of storing electrons at PF in 1982, some preliminary experiments using synchrotron radiation were started. Since then the rumber of experiments and associated experiences using synchrotron x-radiation has grown so much taht requirements for the beam characteristics of synchrotron x-radiation are now much clearer. Following are some of the requirements: high intensity in the current energy region, higher brightness, more photons in the higher energy region, and sometimes a larger beam size. In order to meet some of these requirements the Tristan rings, the Accumulation and the Main Ring seem to be very suitable in the higher energy region so that plans for use of those rings are under way as a joint project between the Photon Factory and the users' community. The following material has been collected for discussion on the above mentioned use of synchrotron radiation. Further details will be published as proceedings of the planned meetings. (author)

  13. Coherent synchrotron radiation experiments for the LCLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a coherent synchrotron radiation experiment planned at Los Alamos to support the design of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray FEL. Preliminary simulations of the LCLS compressors show that a clever tuning strategy can be used to minimize the electron's beam emittance growth due to noninertial space-charge forces by employing a delicate cancellation of these forces. The purpose of the Los Alamos experiment, using a sub-picosecond chicane compressor, is to benchmark these simulations tools. In this paper, the authors present detailed numerical simulations of the experiment, and point out unique signatures of this effect that are measurable. As predicted previously, the largest emittance growths and induced energy spreads result from the nonradiative components of this space-charge force

  14. Numerical simulations for the super radiation of FER synchrotron sidebands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic equations to describe the super-radiation of FEL synchrotron sidebands and also the solving process and the corresponding numerical calculation code for these equations are presented. Using this code, the spectrum and the intensity of sideband super-radiation have been studied systematically. The numerical results show that the induced radiation is dominant for sideband radiation. This result is consistent with the theoretical analysis

  15. Possible applications of synchrotron radiation for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past 20 years, synchrotron radiation has become an important aid for solid-state physicists, chemists and biologists. On the other hand, the use of synchrotron radiation for experimental studies of a large series of specimens is still in the preliminary stage, however, is necessary for the analyzation of materials. In this paper, present and future possible applications of synchrotron radiation for the characterization of advanced materials are discussed. Beside the further optimization of techniques for the analysis of the atomic structure (e.g. diffraction, absorption spectroscopy), essential progress has to be expected in the field of nondestructive, threedimensional characterization of the microstructure of metallic and ceramic materials, especially during the synthesis of materials. (orig.)

  16. High-temperature diffraction gratings for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SiC-based mechanically ruled master gratings and replicas are developed for synchrotron radiation instruments. An SiC-based gold replica grating without any thermal deformation due to active cooling is used in a high-photon-flux-soft x-ray monochromator that is installed in a bending magnet beamline. An SiC-based gold master grating is used in a vacuum ultraviolet/soft x-ray monochromator installed in an undulator beamline with slight groove shape deformation. This deformation is caused by the thermal change of the gold film occurring at higher than 250--300 degree C. A method for cleaning carbon-contaminated synchrotron radiation optics is tested. The ultraviolet ozone ashing method effectively cleans carbon contamination on the optics and is useful for extending the lifetime of synchrotron radiation optics

  17. Extended 1D Method for Coherent Synchrotron Radiation including Shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Sagan, David; Mayes, Christopher; Sae-Ueng, Udom

    2008-01-01

    Coherent Synchrotron Radiation can severely limit the performance of accelerators designed for high brightness and short bunch length. Examples include light sources based on ERLs or FELs, and bunch compressors for linear colliders. In order to better simulate Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, the established 1-dimensional formalism is extended to work at lower energies, at shorter bunch lengths, and for an arbitrary configuration of multiple bends. Wide vacuum chambers are simulated by means of vertical image charges. This formalism has been implemented in the general beam dynamics code "Bmad" and its results are here compared to analytical approximations, to numerical solutions of the Maxwell equations, and to the simulation code "elegant".

  18. Engineering application of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synchrotron radiation which is generated when the circular motion of fast electrons is carried out in vacuum has been studied as the source of X-ray and ultraviolet ray for physical property research, but recently attention has been paid to its industrial application. In this report, from the viewpoint of how to utilize the properties of synchrotron radiation to electronic industries, the recent trend of research is explained. Synchrotron radiation is the electromagnetic waves radiated in the tangential direction to their track when the electrons at the velocity close to light velocity carry out acceleration motion. The synchrotron radiation generator is an electron storage ring. Synchrotron radiation is the beam having good parallelism, concentrating in the orbit plane of electrons, and is led to respective experimental devices with beam lines. Synchrotron radiation lithography has become the start of its industrial application. The process technology being excited by synchrotron radiation, the evaluation of materials using synchrotron radiation, small synchrotron radiation generators and the new sources of light are reported. Synchrotron radiation is the important technological field developed by the joint work of physics and engineering in the latter half of 20th century, following semiconductors, lasers and superconductivity. (K.I.)

  19. HSC5: synchrotron radiation and neutrons for cultural heritage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron and neutron sources offer recent and additional insight into the records of our cultural past. Over the last years, there has been an increasing demand for access to synchrotron radiation- and neutron-based techniques, and their applications in the fields of archaeological science and cultural heritage. The purpose of this Hercules Specialized Course is to give the participants an introduction to the basic principles of synchrotron radiation and neutron techniques (imaging, microscopy, diffraction, absorption and fluorescence, IR spectroscopy). The school provides cross-disciplinary examples illustrating the abilities of these techniques in a representative range of scientific cases concerning painting, archaeological artefacts, inks, pigments, fossils and the Dead Sea scrolls. This document gathers only the resumes of the lectures

  20. HSC5: synchrotron radiation and neutrons for cultural heritage studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Anne [Institut Neel - CNRS, 38 - Grenoble (France); Artioli, G. [Padova Univ. (Italy); Bleuet, P.; Cotte, M.; Tafforeau, P.; Susini, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Dumas, P.; Somogyl, A. [SOLEIL Synchrotron, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Cotte, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, UMR171, 75 - Paris (France)]|[European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Kockelmann, W. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom); Kolar, J. [Ljubljana Univ., Morana RTD, Slovenia, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (Slovenia); Areon, I. [Nova Gorica Univ. (Slovenia); Meden, A.; Strlie, M. [Ljubljana Univ., Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (Slovenia); Pantos, M. [Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Vendrell, M. [Barcelona Univ., dept. of Crystallography and Mineralogy (Spain); Wess, T. [Cardiff Univ., School of Optometry and Institute of Vision (Ireland); Gunneweg, J. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)

    2007-07-01

    Synchrotron and neutron sources offer recent and additional insight into the records of our cultural past. Over the last years, there has been an increasing demand for access to synchrotron radiation- and neutron-based techniques, and their applications in the fields of archaeological science and cultural heritage. The purpose of this Hercules Specialized Course is to give the participants an introduction to the basic principles of synchrotron radiation and neutron techniques (imaging, microscopy, diffraction, absorption and fluorescence, IR spectroscopy). The school provides cross-disciplinary examples illustrating the abilities of these techniques in a representative range of scientific cases concerning painting, archaeological artefacts, inks, pigments, fossils and the Dead Sea scrolls. This document gathers only the resumes of the lectures.

  1. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  2. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Winick, Herman

    2003-01-01

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, micr...

  3. For the first time: Moessbauer effect with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After 9 years of preparation a group of scientists under the leadership of Prof. Erich Gerdau from the University of Hamburg succeeded in observing the Moessbauer Effect (recoilless emission of a gamma quantum) with the help of synchrotron radiation in October last year. The experiments were carried out at the Hamburg Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, HASYLAB, at the DORIS II storage ring. (orig.)

  4. Precision mirror mounting system for UHV compatible synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ultra high vacuum compatible system for precision adjustment of the orientation and location of a mirror with respect to incident synchrotron radiation beam has been designed. This will be used for the upcoming photoelectron spectroscopy beamline to be installed on Indus-1. Our ray tracing calculations indicate that positioning of mirror with respect to synchrotron radiation beam direction and other beam line optical components is very critical for good resolution and photon flux. This requires the mirror to have various motions with a precision control over these motions of the order of millidegree for angular and five micron for linear motions. Based on these calculations, design of mirror mount system having various kinematic motions in ultra high vacuum has been worked out and incorporated in the mechanical design of the system. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs

  5. Synchrotron radiation: science & applications

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda, Miguel A. G.

    2015-01-01

    This general talk is devoted to briefly introduce the main uses and applications of synchrotron radiation. An initial introduction will be dedicated to describe a synchrotron as a Large Facility devoted to produce photons that will be used to carry out excellent science. The five outstanding main characteristics of synchrotron radiation are: i) High brilliance and collimation ii) Wavelength tunability iii) Beamsize tunability iv) Defined polarization v) Time structure vi)...

  6. Synchrotron radiation source Indus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indus-1 is a 450 MeV electron storage ring for the production of the synchrotron radiation in VUV range with a critical wavelength of 61 A. In this paper we discuss the synchrotron radiation source Indus-1 and report some results of its present performance. Besides, results of beam lifetime studies are also reported. (author)

  7. Report of meeting on monochromator technology for MR synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting was held on June 12, 1996 at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. The MR was reconstructed so as to be used for synchrotron radiation in the summer of the last year, and has been stably operated at 8-10 GeV. The synchrotron radiation of ultrahigh luminance was taken out, and by using this light, the experiments of 14 subjects were carried out, and a number of the data which have the highest quality in the world were obtained. By having carried out the researches, the perspective for future was able to be slightly obtained. As the technologies which supported these activities, there were many such as accelerators, beam lines and others, but especially the splendid working of the monochromator must be remembered. The monochromator is composed of the vacuum tanks for first crystal and second crystal, the bellows connecting both crystals and the translating table, and is cooled with liquid nitrogen. At the meeting, lectures were given on MR synchrotron radiation project, the concept of design of the monochromator, the precision control of goniometers, the detailed design, the table for first crystal, the assembling and installation, control software, the adjustment of light paths and others. (K.I.)

  8. Note on the preliminar proposal of the feasibility study for the implantation of a national laboratory of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some socio-economic and political aspects on the implantation of a National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation in Brazil are discussed. Some applications of such a radiation, including technological ones, are presented. (L.C.)

  9. From synchrotron radiation to lab source: advanced speckle-based X-ray imaging using abrasive paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-02-01

    X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques provide complementary and inaccessible information compared to conventional X-ray absorption or visible light imaging. However, such methods typically require sophisticated experimental apparatus or X-ray beams with specific properties. Recently, an X-ray speckle-based technique has shown great potential for X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a simple experimental arrangement. However, it still suffers from either poor resolution or the time consuming process of collecting a large number of images. To overcome these limitations, in this report we demonstrate that absorption, dark-field, phase contrast, and two orthogonal differential phase contrast images can simultaneously be generated by scanning a piece of abrasive paper in only one direction. We propose a novel theoretical approach to quantitatively extract the above five images by utilising the remarkable properties of speckles. Importantly, the technique has been extended from a synchrotron light source to utilise a lab-based microfocus X-ray source and flat panel detector. Removing the need to raster the optics in two directions significantly reduces the acquisition time and absorbed dose, which can be of vital importance for many biological samples. This new imaging method could potentially provide a breakthrough for numerous practical imaging applications in biomedical research and materials science.

  10. Brazilian Synchrotron Radiation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposal for a Brazilian national laboratory for synchrotron radiation is presented. The first design study led to a system consisting of a LINAC, an injection ring and a low emittance storage ring. The main ring is designed to be upgraded to 3GeV with an emittance of 4 x 10-8 rad.m. The design study also indicated the possibility of using the injection ring as a soft x-Rays/VUV source

  11. The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Materlik, G.

    In recent years, X-ray synchrotron radiation became a powerful tool for studies of condensed matter, and in view of that a proposal for the construction of a European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) was elaborated in some detail by the European Synchrotron Radiation Project. The heart of the...... great flexibility and a small emittance (7×10−9 rad m) leading to a very high brilliance (1019 photons/(s mm2 mrad2) in a relative bandwidth of 0.1% in case of a 1 Å undulator). The overview, as seen from the users point of view, gives a brief account of the storage ring, emitted radiation...

  12. Synchrotron Radiation as CMB Foreground

    OpenAIRE

    Smoot, George F.

    1999-01-01

    Synchrotron emission is an important process in Galactic dynamics and a potentially confusing foreground for cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation observations. Though the mechanism of synchrotron emission is well understood, the details for the Galaxy and many external sources are not well characterized. Quality maps at multiple frequencies are lacking but needed for a full understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission, including intensity, spectrum, and spectral variation. At hig...

  13. The synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron Radiation is a fantastic source of electromagnetic radiation the energy spectrum of which spreads continuously from the far infrared to hard X-rays. For this reason a wide part of the scientific community, fundamentalists as well as industry, is concerned by its use. We shall describe here the main properties of this light source and give two examples of application in the field of characterization of materials: EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure) and X-ray fluorescence. (author). 8 figs., 21 refs

  14. Open Cell Conducting Foams for High Synchrotron Radiation Beam Liners

    OpenAIRE

    Petracca, Stefania; Stabile, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The possible use of open-cell conductive foams in high synchrotron radiation particle accelerator beam liners is considered. Available materials and modeling tools are reviewed, potential pros and cons are discussed, and preliminary conclusions are drawn.

  15. Accelerator system for the Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator system for Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility that consists of 50MeV electron S-band linac, 1.2GeV full energy booster synchrotron and 1.2GeV storage ring, has been constructed. Eight 1.4T bending magnets and four 5T superconducting magnet with compact refrigerator system provide beam lines. For top-up operation, the 1ns single bunch electron beam from 50MeV injector linac is injected by on-axis injection scheme and accelerated up to 1.2GeV at booster synchrotron. The timing system is designed for injection from booster ring is possible for any bunch position of storage ring. To improve efficiency of booster injection, the electron gun trigger and RF frequency of 2856MHz is synchronized with storage ring frequency of 499.654MHz. The EPICS control system is used with timing control system for linac, pulse magnet and also for booster pattern memory system. The beam commissioning for 1.2GeV storage ring has been progressing. (author)

  16. Synchrotron-Radiation Photon Distribution for Highest Energy Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, GHI; Dugan, G; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    At high energies, beam-induced synchrotron radiation is an important source of heating, beam-related vacuum pressure increase, and primary photoelectrons, which can give rise to an electron cloud. The photon distribution along the beam pipe wall is a key input to codes such as ECLOUD and PyECLOUD, which model the electron cloud build-up. For future high-energy colliders, like TLEP or SHE-LHC, photon stops and antechambers are considered in order to facilitate cooling and vacuum pressure control. We use the Synrad3D code developed at Cornell to simulate the photon distribution for the LHC.

  17. Synchrotron-Radiation Photon Distributions for Highest Energy Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, G H I; Dugan, G; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    At high energies, beam-induced synchrotron radiation is an important source of heating, beam-related vacuum pressure increase, and primary photoelectrons, which can give rise to an electron cloud. The photon distribution along the beam pipe wall is a key input to codes such as ECLOUD and PyECLOUD, which model the electron cloud build-up. For future high-energy colliders, like TLEP or SHE-LHC, photon stops and antechambers are considered in order to facilitate cooling and vacuum pressure control. We use the Synrad3D code developed at Cornell to simulate the photon distribution for the LHC.

  18. Synchrotron Radiation as CMB Foreground

    CERN Document Server

    Smoot, G F

    1999-01-01

    Synchrotron emission is an important process in Galactic dynamics and a potentially confusing foreground for cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation observations. Though the mechanism of synchrotron emission is well understood, the details for the Galaxy and many external sources are not well characterized. Quality maps at multiple frequencies are lacking but needed for a full understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission, including intensity, spectrum, and spectral variation. At high frequencies (> 70 GHz) synchrotron emission is not a severe limitation to precise CMB observations well away from the Galactic plane.

  19. Opportunities for atomic physics with hard synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities places atomic and molecular scientists at the threshold of extraordinary opportunities. Areas of potential interest for the APS in atomic physics are: (1) exploration of relativistic and QED effects which become prominent in inner shells and at high Z; (2) total photon interaction cross sections; (3) scattering; (4) fluorescence; (5) photo- and Auger-electron spectrometries; and (6) ion spectrometry. A special regime in which the APS will lend access to unprecedented exploration is atomic inner-shell phenomena

  20. Biomedical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation techniques application in medical diagnostics have been presented especially for: trace element analysis in tissues, elemental mapping, chemical speciation at trace levels, chemical structure determination. Presented techniques are very useful for early cancer discovery

  1. Experimental study for cancer treatment using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the most powerful treatments for brain tumor. Penetrating ionizing particles is aimed toward the tumor, delivering as high radiation to it as is usefully suppressive of tumor growth, and tolerated by normal vital tissues inevitably irradiated with the tumor. The use of a high-energy synchrotron-radiation thin X-ray beams (microplanar beams, or microbeams) produced through a multi-slit collimator has been reported to enhance the tolerance of normal tissue to radiation. The high collimation and dose rate of synchrotron X-ray beams favor radiotherapy. Irradiation with parallel arrays of microbeam, planar slices of spares normal brain, and preferentially damages tumors. The width of the peak region was 20-25 μm, and the spacing between the regions was 100-300 μm. We firstly examined the dose distribution with micro-scale resolution in order to clarify this phenomenon. Secondary, radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors in rats was performed. The treatment results in extended median survival time. The effects are mediated, at least in part, by the tissue's microvasculature that seems to effectively repair itself in normal brain but fails to do so in tumors. (author)

  2. Study of silicon pixel sensor for synchrotron radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Jie; Jia, Yun-Cong; Hu, Ling-Fei; Liu, Peng; Yin, Hua-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    The silicon pixel sensor (SPS) is one of the key components of hybrid pixel single-photon-counting detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray detection (SRD). In this paper, the design, fabrication, and characterization of SPSs for single beam X-ray photon detection is reported. The designed pixel sensor is a p+-in-n structure with guard-ring structures operated in full-depletion mode and is fabricated on 4-inch, N type, 320 μm thick, high-resistivity silicon wafers by a general Si planar process. To achieve high energy resolution of X-rays and obtain low dark current and high breakdown voltage as well as appropriate depletion voltage of the SPS, a series of technical optimizations of device structure and fabrication process are explored. With optimized device structure and fabrication process, excellent SPS characteristics with dark current of 2 nA/cm2, full depletion voltage 150 V are achieved. The fabricated SPSs are wire bonded to ASIC circuits and tested for the performance of X-ray response to the 1W2B synchrotron beam line of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The measured S-curves for SRD demonstrate a high discrimination for different energy X-rays. The extracted energy resolution is high (10 keV) and the linear properties between input photo energy and the equivalent generator amplitude are well established. It confirmed that the fabricated SPSs have a good energy linearity and high count rate with the optimized technologies. The technology is expected to have a promising application in the development of a large scale SRD system for the Beijing Advanced Photon Source. Supported by Prefabrication Research of Beijing Advanced Photon Source (R&D for BAPS) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335010)

  3. Mossbauer spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles underlying observation of the Mossbauer effect with synchrotron radiation are explained. The current status of the field is reviewed, and prospects for dedicated experimental stations on third generation machines are discussed

  4. Avalanche photodiodes as large dynamic range detectors for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated silicon-based avalanche photodiodes (APDs) as X-ray detectors in terms of their linearity, maximum counting rates, and dynamic range with 8.4 keV synchrotron radiation. Measurements resulted in counting rates that extend from the APD's noise level of 10-2 Hz to saturation counting rates in excess of 108 Hz. In addition, by monitoring the APD's noise level and photon counting efficiency between synchrotron bursts, we demonstrate nine orders of magnitude dynamic range. ((orig.))

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  6. A Method for Ultrashort Electron Pulse Shape-Measurement Using Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Geloni, G. A.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a method for nondestructive measurements of the longitudinal profile of sub-picosecond electron bunches for X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs). The method is based on the detection of the Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) spectrum produced by a bunch passing a dipole magnet system. This work also contains a systematic treatment of synchrotron radiation theory which lies at the basis of CSR. Standard theory of synchrotron radiation uses several approximations whose ...

  7. A phase-space beam position monitor for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samadi, Nazanin, E-mail: nazanin.samadi@usask.ca [University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Bassey, Bassey; Martinson, Mercedes [University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Belev, George; Dallin, Les; Jong, Mark de [Canadian Light Source, 44 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chapman, Dean [University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-06-25

    A system has been developed to measure the vertical position and angle of the electron beam at a single location from a synchrotron source. The system uses a monochromator tuned to the absorption edge of a contrast material and has a sensitivity comparable with other beam position monitors. The stability of the photon beam position on synchrotron beamlines is critical for most if not all synchrotron radiation experiments. The position of the beam at the experiment or optical element location is set by the position and angle of the electron beam source as it traverses the magnetic field of the bend-magnet or insertion device. Thus an ideal photon beam monitor would be able to simultaneously measure the photon beam’s position and angle, and thus infer the electron beam’s position in phase space. X-ray diffraction is commonly used to prepare monochromatic beams on X-ray beamlines usually in the form of a double-crystal monochromator. Diffraction couples the photon wavelength or energy to the incident angle on the lattice planes within the crystal. The beam from such a monochromator will contain a spread of energies due to the vertical divergence of the photon beam from the source. This range of energies can easily cover the absorption edge of a filter element such as iodine at 33.17 keV. A vertical profile measurement of the photon beam footprint with and without the filter can be used to determine the vertical centroid position and angle of the photon beam. In the measurements described here an imaging detector is used to measure these vertical profiles with an iodine filter that horizontally covers part of the monochromatic beam. The goal was to investigate the use of a combined monochromator, filter and detector as a phase-space beam position monitor. The system was tested for sensitivity to position and angle under a number of synchrotron operating conditions, such as normal operations and special operating modes where the photon beam is intentionally altered

  8. Synchrotron radiation sources: general features and vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last years the electron or positron storage rings, which were until 1970 only used for high energy physics experiments, begun to be built in several countries exclusively as electromagnetic radiation source (synchrotron radiation). The sources are generally made up by injector (linear accelerator or microtron), 'booster' (synchrotron), storage ring, insertions ('Wigglers' and ondulators) and light lines. The interest by these sources are due to the high intensity, large spectrum (from infrared to the X-rays), polarization and pulsed structure of the produced radiation. For the ultra-vacuum obtainement, necessary for the functioning storage rings (p=10-9 Torr), several special procedures are used. In Brazil the Synchrotron Radiation National Laboratory of the CNPq worked out a conceptual project of synchrotron radiation source, whose execution should begin by the construction of the several components prototypes. (L.C.)

  9. Study of Silicon Pixel Sensors for Synchrotron Radiation Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhen-Jie; Hu, Ling-Fei; Liu, Peng; Yin, Hua-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid pixel single-photon-counting detectors have been successfully employed and widely used in Synchrotron radiation X-ray detection. In this paper, the silicon pixel sensors for single X-ray photon detection, which operate in full-depletion mode have been studied. The pixel sensors were fabricated on 4-inch, N type, 320{\\mu}m thick, high-resistivity silicon wafers. The pixel sensors has a p+-in-n structure with varies of pixel size and gap size including guard-ring structures. Later, the pixel sensor was wire bonded to the ASIC circuits and tested for the performance of X-ray response in the synchrotron beam line (BSRF, 1W2B). From the S-curve scan, we could get the energy resolution and the linear properties between input energy and the equivalent generator amplitude. The pixel sensors we fabricated have a good energy linear and high count rate depending on the ASIC readout circuit. We get the 20% energy resolution above 10 keV photon energy via wire bonding. The energy resolution would get better if we b...

  10. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques. PMID:27304296

  11. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fugui; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities, because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as sub-nanometer scale, and that variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach towards effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques.

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL's users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL's experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  14. Basic design for the RF system of the synchrotron in the large synchrotron radiation facility (SPring-8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large synchrotron radiation facility (SPring-8) is planned to be built at Nishiharima in Hyogo-ken. This paper describes basic designs, its philosophy and specifications of the ratio frequency system in the synchrotron. (author)

  15. Synchrotron radiation computed laminography for polymer composite failure studies

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Feng; Helfen, Lukas; Moffat, Andrew J.; Johnson, Gregory; Sinclair, Ian; Baumbach, Tilo

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation computed laminography is applied to the three-dimensional micro-imaging of damage in large polymer composite plates with high spatial resolution. The influence of different experimental conditions is studied with respect to measurement time optimization, dose minimization and reduction of artefacts in the reconstructed images. Failures like delaminations, transverse ply cracks and splits are observed under in situ loads. The propagation of up to 2 mm-long cracks is non-d...

  16. Crossed undulator system for a variable polarization synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A crossed undulator system can produce synchrotron radiation whose polarization is arbitrary and adjustable. The polarization can be linear and modulated between two mutually perpendicular directions, or it can be circular and can be modulated between right and left circular polarizations. The system works on low emittance electron storage rings and can cover a wide spectral range. Topics discussed include the basic principle of the system, the design equations and the limitations in performance

  17. Translation of atherosclerotic plaque phase-contrast CT imaging from synchrotron radiation to a conventional lab-based X-ray source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Saam

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Phase-contrast imaging is a novel X-ray based technique that provides enhanced soft tissue contrast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing human carotid arteries by grating-based phase-contrast tomography (PC-CT at two different experimental set-ups: (i applying synchrotron radiation and (ii using a conventional X-ray tube. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five ex-vivo carotid artery specimens were examined with PC-CT either at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility using a monochromatic X-ray beam (2 specimens; 23 keV; pixel size 5.4 µm, or at a laboratory set-up on a conventional X-ray tube (3 specimens; 35-40 kVp; 70 mA; pixel size 100 µm. Tomographic images were reconstructed and compared to histopathology. Two independent readers determined vessel dimensions and one reader determined signal-to-noise ratios (SNR between PC-CT and absorption images. RESULTS: In total, 51 sections were included in the analysis. Images from both set-ups provided sufficient contrast to differentiate individual vessel layers. All PCI-based measurements strongly predicted but significantly overestimated lumen, intima and vessel wall area for both the synchrotron and the laboratory-based measurements as compared with histology (all p0.53 per mm(2, 95%-CI: 0.35 to 0.70. Although synchrotron-based images were characterized by higher SNRs than laboratory-based images; both PC-CT set-ups had superior SNRs compared to corresponding conventional absorption-based images (p0.98 and >0.84 for synchrotron and for laboratory-based measurements; respectively. CONCLUSION: Experimental PC-CT of carotid specimens is feasible with both synchrotron and conventional X-ray sources, producing high-resolution images suitable for vessel characterization and atherosclerosis research.

  18. Synchrotron radiation microprobe quantitative analysis method for biomedical specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relative changes of trace elemental content in biomedical specimens are obtained easily by means of synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis (SXRFM). However, the accurate assignment of concentration on a g/g basis is difficult. Because it is necessary to know both the trace elemental content and the specimen mass in the irradiated volume simultaneously. the specimen mass is a function of the spatial position and can not be weighed. It is possible to measure the specimen mass indirectly by measuring the intensity of Compton scattered peak for normal XRF analysis using a X-ray tube with Mo anode, if the matrix was consisted of light elements and the specimen was a thin sample. The Compton peak is not presented in fluorescence spectrum for white light SXRFM analysis. The continuous background in the spectrum was resulted from the Compton scattering with a linear polarization X-ray source. Biomedical specimens for SXRFM analysis, for example biological section and human hair, are always a thin sample for high energy X-ray, and they consist of H,C,N and O etc. light elements, which implies a linear relationship between the specimen mass and the Compton scattering background in the high energy region of spectrum. By this way , it is possible to carry out measurement of concentration for SXRFM analysis

  19. X-ray intensity interferometer for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to measure the transverse coherence of an x-ray beam, for the first time, by Hanbury Brown intensity interferometry. Our approach is to use an intensity interferometer adapted to the soft x-ray region. The X1 or X13 soft x-ray undulator at the National Synchrotron Light Source will supply the partially coherent x-rays. We are developing this technique to characterize the coherence properties of x-ray beams from high brilliance insertion devices at third-generation synchrotron light facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source

  20. A Method for Ultrashort Electron Pulse Shape-Measurement Using Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, G A; Schneidmiller, E A; Yurkov, M V

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a method for nondestructive measurements of the longitudinal profile of sub-picosecond electron bunches for X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs). The method is based on the detection of the Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) spectrum produced by a bunch passing a dipole magnet system. This work also contains a systematic treatment of synchrotron radiation theory which lies at the basis of CSR. Standard theory of synchrotron radiation uses several approximations whose applicability limits are often forgotten: here we present a systematic discussion about these assumptions. Properties of coherent synchrotron radiation from an electron moving along an arc of a circle are then derived and discussed. We describe also an effective and practical diagnostic technique based on the utilization of an electromagnetic undulator to record the energy of the coherent radiation pulse into the central cone. This measurement must be repeated many times with different undulator resonant frequencies in or...

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  2. Synchrotron radiation computed laminography for polymer composite failure studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Helfen, Lukas; Moffat, Andrew J.; Johnson, Gregory; Sinclair, Ian; Baumbach, Tilo

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation computed laminography is applied to the three-dimensional micro-imaging of damage in large polymer composite plates with high spatial resolution. The influence of different experimental conditions is studied with respect to measurement time optimization, dose minimization and reduction of artefacts in the reconstructed images. Failures like delaminations, transverse ply cracks and splits are observed under in situ loads. The propagation of up to 2 mm-long cracks is non-destructively followed in situ and investigated in detail. By phase retrieval using a single detector distance, the failures can be easily visualized in three dimensions. PMID:20157275

  3. Synchrotron radiation computed laminography for polymer composite failure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Helfen, Lukas; Moffat, Andrew J; Johnson, Gregory; Sinclair, Ian; Baumbach, Tilo

    2010-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation computed laminography is applied to the three-dimensional micro-imaging of damage in large polymer composite plates with high spatial resolution. The influence of different experimental conditions is studied with respect to measurement time optimization, dose minimization and reduction of artefacts in the reconstructed images. Failures like delaminations, transverse ply cracks and splits are observed under in situ loads. The propagation of up to 2 mm-long cracks is non-destructively followed in situ and investigated in detail. By phase retrieval using a single detector distance, the failures can be easily visualized in three dimensions. PMID:20157275

  4. Synchrotron radiation in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review on the several experimental techniques (XRD, SAXS, EXAFS, IRRS, etc...) which, utilizing of synchrotron radiation can be applied in glass structural studies, is presented. The major part of these techniques can be also used for studies of other materials such as polymers, metals, etc... (L.C.)

  5. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved

  6. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  7. Application of coherent synchrotron radiation to the bunch length monitor for JLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete spectrum of coherent synchrotron radiation were measured at wavelengths from 0.16 to 3.5 mm. A bunch shape was estimated by the Fourier analysis for this spectrum. This result agree with that of simulation for the bunching process in the injector of the accelerator. These properties of coherent synchrotron radiation can be applied to the bunch length monitor for JLC. (author)

  8. Compact synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact 800 MeV synchrotron radiation source is discussed. The storage ring has a circumference of 30.3 m, two 90 degree and four 45 degree bending magnet sections, two long straight sections and four short straight sections. The radius of the bending magnet is 2.224m. The critical wave length is 24A. The injector is a 15 Mev Microtron Electrons are accelerated from 15 Mev to 800 Mev by ramping the field of the ring. The expected stored current will be around 100 ma

  9. A Monitor and Control System for the Synchrotron Radiation Beam Lines at DAΦNE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Three synchrotron radiation beam lines have been built on DAΦNE,the Frascati electron-positron accelerator.It is Possible to monitor and control all the elements on the beam lines using a modular network distributed I/O system by National Instrunments (FieldPoint) with Bridge VIEW/Lab VIEW programs,Two of these beam lines have radiation safety problems solved by two independent and redundant systems,using mechanical switches ,and S7-200 PLC's by Siemens.In this article our solution will be described in details.

  10. Tetrode bias power supply for Indus-1, synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An AC regulator based 7 kV, 3 A high voltage DC power supply is designed, fabricated and tested on dummy load for BEL make Tetrode type 15000CX, used in the high power RF amplifier at 31.613 MHz employed with INDUS-1, Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS). Various protections features like over voltage, under voltage, over current, phase failure and phase reversal are incorporated in this power supply and presented in this paper. As Tetrode amplifier requires various other power supplies in addition to this bias power supply and they are operated in a particular sequence for its healthy operation, suitable interlock arrangements have been incorporated and also presented in this paper. The reliable operation of protection and interlock features incorporated in this power supply has been checked with dummy load under simulated conditions. Three numbers of series limiting inductors, one in each phase, have been incorporated in this power supply to limit fault currents under unfavourable conditions and there by increasing the overall life of this power supply. It will replace existing 7 kV, 3 A HVDC power supply, which is in operation for more than fifteen years with Indus-1 SRS and is likely to be helpful in reducing the down time of Indus-1 SRS. It has better performance features than the existing power supply. The long term voltage stability better than 0.3 % and output ripple less than 0.3 % have been achieved for this Tetrode bias power supply. This power supply is likely to be integrated with INDUS-1 SRS soon. (author)

  11. Beam diagnostics with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation is often used to measure the dimensions of an electron beam. The transverse size is obtained from an image of the beam cross section formed by means of the emitted synchrotron radiation. Because of the small natural opening angle the resolution is limited by diffraction. The angular spread of the particles in the beam can be measured by observing the radiation directly. Here, the resolution is limited by the natural opening angle of the emitted light. Measuring both beam cross section and angular spread gives the emittance of the beam. However, in most cases only one of these two parameters is observed and the other deduced from the known particle beam optics at the source of the radiation. Usually one observes radiation emitted in long bending magnets. However, short magnets and undulators are also useful sources for these measurements. For practical reasons the beam diagnostics is carried out using visible or ultraviolet light. This part of the spectrum is usually far below the critical frequency, and corresponding approximations can be applied. Synchrotron radiation is an extremely useful tool for diagnostics in electron (or positron) rings. In some cases it has also served in proton rings using special magnets. (author)

  12. Quantification estimate methods for synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bewer, Brian, E-mail: brian.bewer@lightsource.ca

    2015-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is a method which allows low elemental concentrations to be measured within a sample. To maintain biological or medical relevance increased importance is being placed on quantifying these in situ localized elemental concentrations. For third generation synchrotron light sources, which have the potential for high sample throughput, a rapid method of obtaining a quantification estimate is needed. Non-destructive transmission and surface analysis techniques for first transition metals, or elements of higher atomic number, using reference standards are examined for different sample property regimes to elucidate methods of quantitative synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

  13. Prospects for studying vacuum polarisation using dipole and synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ilderton, Anton

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of vacuum polarisation effects, in particular vacuum birefringence, using combined optical and x-ray laser pulses is now actively pursued. Here we briefly examine the feasibility of two alternative setups. The first utilises an alternative target, namely a converging dipole pulse, and the second uses an alternative probe, namely the synchrotron-like emission from highly energetic particles, themselves interacting with a laser pulse. The latter setup has been proposed for experiments at ELI-NP.

  14. Prospects for studying vacuum polarisation using dipole and synchrotron radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of vacuum polarisation effects, in particular vacuum birefringence, using combined optical and x-ray laser pulses is now actively pursued. Here we briefly examine the feasibility of two alternative setups. The first utilises an alternative target, namely a converging dipole pulse, and the second uses an alternative probe, namely the synchrotron-like emission from highly energetic particles, themselves interacting with a laser pulse. The latter setup has been proposed for exper...

  15. Current advances in synchrotron radiation instrumentation for MX experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Juanhuix, Jordi; Fuchs, Martin

    2016-07-15

    Following pioneering work 40 years ago, synchrotron beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX) have improved in almost every aspect as instrumentation has evolved. Beam sizes and crystal dimensions are now on the single micron scale while data can be collected from proteins with molecular weights over 10 MDa and from crystals with unit cell dimensions over 1000 Å. Furthermore it is possible to collect a complete data set in seconds, and obtain the resulting structure in minutes. The impact of MX synchrotron beamlines and their evolution is reflected in their scientific output, and MX is now the method of choice for a variety of aims from ligand binding to structure determination of membrane proteins, viruses and ribosomes, resulting in a much deeper understanding of the machinery of life. A main driving force of beamline evolution have been advances in almost every aspect of the instrumentation comprising a synchrotron beamline. In this review we aim to provide an overview of the current status of instrumentation at modern MX experiments. The most critical optical components are discussed, as are aspects of endstation design, sample delivery, visualisation and positioning, the sample environment, beam shaping, detectors and data acquisition and processing. PMID:27046341

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL's history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia's leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR's performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY '91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL's three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL's users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  18. High-Intensity Synchrotron Radiation Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Suetsugu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Various effects of intense synchrotron radiation on the performance of particle accelerators, especially for storage rings, are discussed. Following a brief introduction to synchrotron radiation, the basic concepts of heat load, gas load, electron emission, and the countermeasures against these effects are discussed.

  19. Superpower monochromatic coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here a special case of coherent synchrotron radiation from relativistic electron bunches distributed uniformly on a circular orbit is investigated. The possibility to obtain a monochromatic intense coherent radiation in the long-wavelength region is shown

  20. The First Pulse of the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A: A Test Lab for Synchrotron Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; von Kienlin, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Byrne, D.; Chaplin, V.; Cleveland, W.; Collazzi, A. C.; Connaughton, V.; Diekmann, A.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gibby, M.; Giles, M.; Goldstein, A.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pelassa, V.; Tierney, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Xiong, S.; Younes, G.; Yu, H.-F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Iyyani, S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sartori, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Zhu, S.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A is one of the most energetic GRBs ever observed. The initial pulse up to 2.5 seconds is possibly the brightest well-isolated pulse observed to date. A fine time resolution spectral analysis shows power-law decays of the peak energy from the onset of the pulse, consistent with models of internal synchrotron shock pulses. However, a strongly correlated power-law behavior is observed between the luminosity and the spectral peak energy that is inconsistent with curvature effects arising in the relativistic outflow. It is difficult for any of the existing models to account for all of the observed spectral and temporal behaviors simultaneously.

  1. The First Pulse of the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A: A Test Lab for Synchrotron Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Preece, R; von Kienlin, A; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Byrne, D; Chaplin, V; Cleveland, W; Collazzi, A C; Connaughton, V; Diekmann, A; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Gibby, M; Giles, M; Goldstein, A; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; McBreen, S; Meegan, C; Paciesas, W S; Pelassa, V; Tierney, D; van der Horst, A J; Wilson-Hodge, C; Xiong, S; Younes, G; Yu, H -F; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bonamente, E; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Granot, J; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Iyyani, S; Jogler, T; Jóannesson, G; Kawano, T; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Nymark, T; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Racusin, J L; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sartori, A; Scargle, J D; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Zhu, S

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A is one of the most energetic GRBs ever observed. The initial pulse up to 2.5 s is possibly the brightest well-isolated pulse observed to date. A fine time resolution spectral analysis shows power-law decays of the peak energy from the onset of the pulse, consistent with models of internal synchrotron shock pulses. However, a strongly correlated power-law behavior is observed between the luminosity and the spectral peak energy that is inconsistent with curvature effects arising in the relativistic outflow. It is difficult for any of the existing models to account for all of the observed spectral and temporal behaviors simultaneously.

  2. Threedimensional microfabrication using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For fabricating microstructures with extreme structural heights a technology has been developed which is based on deep-etch lithography and subsequent replication processes. A particularly high precision is achieved if the lithographic process is carried out by means of synchrotron radiation. Electroforming and molding processes are used for the replication of microstructures from a large variety of materials. The field of application comprises sensors, electrical and optical microconnectors, components for fluid technology, microfiltration systems and novel composite materials. (author)

  3. eBooking of beam-time over internet for beamlines of Indus synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Users from various research labs and academic institutes carry out experiments on beamlines of two Synchrotron Radiation Sources Indus-1 and Indus-2 available at RRCAT, Indore. To carry out experimental work on beamlines of both synchrotron radiation sources, beam-time is booked over Internet by the users of beamlines using user portal designed, developed and deployed over Internet. This portal has made the process of beamtime booking fast, hassle free and paperless as manual booking of beam-time for carrying out experiment on a particular beamline is cumbersome. The portal facilitates in-charge of Indus-1 and Indus-2 beamlines to keep track of users' records, work progress and other activities linked to experiments carried on beamlines. It is important to keep record and provide statistics about the usage of the beam lines from time-to-time. The user portal for e-booking of beam-time has been developed in-house using open source software development tools. Multi-step activities of users and beamline administrators are workflow based with seamless flow of information across various modules and fully authenticated using role based mechanism for different roles of software usage. The software is in regular use since November 2013 and has helped beamline in- charges in efficiently managing various activities related to user registration, booking of beam-time, booking of Guest House, Generation of Security permits, User feedback etc. Design concept, role based authentication mechanism and features provided by the web portal are discussed in detail in this paper. (author)

  4. Report of the second workshop on synchrotron radiation sources for x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reported workshop is part of an effort to implement a US-based x-ray lithography program. Presentations include designs for three storage rings (one superconducting and two conventional) and an overview of a complete lithography program. The background of the effort described, the need for synchrotron radiation, and the international competition in the area are discussed briefly. The technical feasibility of x-ray lithography is discussed, and synchrotron performance specifications and construction options are given, as well as a near-term plan. It is recommended that a prototype synchrotron source be built as soon as possible, and that a research and development plan on critical technologies which could improve cost effectiveness of the synchrotron source be established. It is further recommended that a small number of second generation prototype synchrotrons be distributed to IC manufacturing centers to expedite commercialization

  5. Medical applications with synchrotron radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, various medical applications of synchrotron X-ray imaging, such as angiography, monochromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT), radiography and radiation therapy, are being developed. In particular, coronary arteriography (CAG) is quite an important clinical application of synchrotron radiation. Using a two-dimensional imaging method, the first human intravenous CAG was carried out at KEK in May 1996; however, further improvements of image quality are required in clinical practice. On the other hand, two-dimensional aortographic CAG revealed canine coronary arteries as clearly as those on selective CAG, and coronary arteries less than 0.2 mm in diameter. Among applications of synchrotron radiation to X-ray CT, phase-contrast X-ray CT and fluorescent X-ray CT are expected to be very interesting future applications of synchrotron radiation. For actual clinical applications of synchrotron radiation, a medical beamline and a laboratory are now being constructed at SPring-8 in Harima

  6. Emittance Adapter for a Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Radiation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC; Raimondi, Pantaleo; /Frascati

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of reaching very small horizontal and vertical emittances inside an undulator in a storage ring, by means of a local exchange of the apparent horizontal and vertical emittances, performed with a combination of skew quadrupoles and one solenoid in a dedicated insertion line in the storage ring. The insertion leaves the ring parameters and its optical properties unaffected. This scheme could greatly relax the emittance requirements for a diffraction limited synchrotron light source. The lattice derivation and design is described.

  7. A study on radiation shielding and safety analysis for a synchrotron radiation beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of shielding design and safety analysis are presented for a beam-line of synchrotron radiation. This paper consists of the shielding and safety study of synchrotron radiation with extremely intense and low energy photon below several hundreds keV, and the study for the behavior of remarkable high-energy photons up to 8 GeV, which can creep into beam-lines. A new shielding design code, STAC8 was developed to estimate the leakage dose outside the beam line hutch (an enclosure of the beam, optical elements or experimental instruments) easily and quickly with satisfactory accuracy. The code can calculate consistently from sources of synchrotron radiation to dose equivalent outside hutches with considering the build up effect and polarization effect. Validity of the code was verified by comparing its calculations with those of Monte Carlo simulations and measurement results of the doses inside the hutch of the BL14C of Photon Factory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), showing good agreements. The shielding design calculations using STAC8 were carried out to apply to the practical beam-lines with the considering polarization effect and clarified the characteristics of the typical beam-line of the third generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8. In addition, the shielding calculations were compared with the measurement outside the shield wall of the bending magnet beam-line of SPring-8, and showed fairly good agreement. The new shielding problems, which have usually been neglected in shielding designs for existing synchrotron radiation facilities, are clarified through the analysis of the beam-line shielding of SPring-8. The synchrotron radiation from the SPring-8 has such extremely high-intensity involving high energy photons that the scattered synchrotron radiation from the concrete floor of the hutch, the ground shine, causes a seriously high dose. The method of effective shielding is presented. For the estimation of the gas

  8. A study on radiation shielding and safety analysis for a synchrotron radiation beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Mikazuhi, Hyogo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    Methods of shielding design and safety analysis are presented for a beam-line of synchrotron radiation. This paper consists of the shielding and safety study of synchrotron radiation with extremely intense and low energy photon below several hundreds keV, and the study for the behavior of remarkable high-energy photons up to 8 GeV, which can creep into beam-lines. A new shielding design code, STAC8 was developed to estimate the leakage dose outside the beam line hutch (an enclosure of the beam, optical elements or experimental instruments) easily and quickly with satisfactory accuracy. The code can calculate consistently from sources of synchrotron radiation to dose equivalent outside hutches with considering the build up effect and polarization effect. Validity of the code was verified by comparing its calculations with those of Monte Carlo simulations and measurement results of the doses inside the hutch of the BL14C of Photon Factory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), showing good agreements. The shielding design calculations using STAC8 were carried out to apply to the practical beam-lines with the considering polarization effect and clarified the characteristics of the typical beam-line of the third generation synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8. In addition, the shielding calculations were compared with the measurement outside the shield wall of the bending magnet beam-line of SPring-8, and showed fairly good agreement. The new shielding problems, which have usually been neglected in shielding designs for existing synchrotron radiation facilities, are clarified through the analysis of the beam-line shielding of SPring-8. The synchrotron radiation from the SPring-8 has such extremely high-intensity involving high energy photons that the scattered synchrotron radiation from the concrete floor of the hutch, the ground shine, causes a seriously high dose. The method of effective shielding is presented. For the estimation of the gas

  9. An assessment of research opportunities and the need for synchrotron radiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The workshop focused on six topics, all of which are areas of active research: (1) speciation, reactivity and mobility of contaminants in aqueous systems, (2) the role of surfaces and interfaces in molecular environmental science, (3) the role of solid phases in molecular environmental science, (4) molecular biological processes affecting speciation, reactivity, and mobility of contaminants in the environment, (5) molecular constraints on macroscopic- and field-scale processes, and (6) synchrotron radiation facilities and molecular environmental sciences. These topics span a range of important issues in molecular environmental science. They focus on the basic knowledge required for understanding contaminant transport and fate and for the development of science-based remediation and waste management technologies. Each topic was assigned to a working group charged with discussing recent research accomplishments, significant research opportunities, methods required for obtaining molecular-scale information on environmental contaminants and processes, and the value of synchrotron x-ray methods relative to other methods in providing this information. A special working group on synchrotron radiation facilities was convened to provide technical information about experimental facilities at the four DOE-supported synchrotron radiation sources in the US (NSLS, SSRL, AS and UPS) and synchrotron- based methods available for molecular environmental science research. Similar information on the NSF-funded Cornell High Energy synchrotron Source (CHESS) was obtained after the workshop was held.

  10. An assessment of research opportunities and the need for synchrotron radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop focused on six topics, all of which are areas of active research: (1) speciation, reactivity and mobility of contaminants in aqueous systems, (2) the role of surfaces and interfaces in molecular environmental science, (3) the role of solid phases in molecular environmental science, (4) molecular biological processes affecting speciation, reactivity, and mobility of contaminants in the environment, (5) molecular constraints on macroscopic- and field-scale processes, and (6) synchrotron radiation facilities and molecular environmental sciences. These topics span a range of important issues in molecular environmental science. They focus on the basic knowledge required for understanding contaminant transport and fate and for the development of science-based remediation and waste management technologies. Each topic was assigned to a working group charged with discussing recent research accomplishments, significant research opportunities, methods required for obtaining molecular-scale information on environmental contaminants and processes, and the value of synchrotron x-ray methods relative to other methods in providing this information. A special working group on synchrotron radiation facilities was convened to provide technical information about experimental facilities at the four DOE-supported synchrotron radiation sources in the US (NSLS, SSRL, AS and UPS) and synchrotron- based methods available for molecular environmental science research. Similar information on the NSF-funded Cornell High Energy synchrotron Source (CHESS) was obtained after the workshop was held

  11. Instrumentation at national facilities for synchrotron radiation topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Topography is, like most SR experiments, small science carried out on a big science machine. This is a relatively new phenomenon in applied science and causes some disorientation in both the users and the funding agencies. The users are inconvenienced by the necessity to travel, sometimes very great distances, to perform their work, by the need to work 16 or 24 hour shifts when they arrive and by the probable unreliability of very large and complex machines compared to laboratory equipment. The government agencies, on the other hand, look at the cost of a large facility and fail to understand why solid-state and materials scientists are reluctant to accept the constraints of big science. These conflicts will doubtless continue. However, the users (and especially the new users) need to know how to best plan their experiments, which means that they require to know how well matched the system at each of the major facilities is to their experiments. We therefore discuss both the storage ring and the instrumentation characteristics at each of these SR x-ray facilities

  12. A Palmtop Synchrotron-like Radiation Source

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Min; Luo, Ji; Liu, Feng; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources are immensely useful tools for scientific researches and many practical applications. Currently, the state-of-the-art synchrotrons rely on conventional accelerators, where electrons are accelerated in a straight line and radiate in bending magnets or other insertion devices. However, these facilities are usually large and costly. Here, we propose a compact all-optical synchrotron-like radiation source based on laser-plasma acceleration either in a straight or in a curved plasma channel. With the laser pulse off-axially injected in a straight channel, the centroid oscillation of the pulse causes a wiggler motion of the whole accelerating structure including the trapped electrons, leading to strong synchrotron-like radiations with tunable spectra. It is further shown that a ring-shaped synchrotron is possible in a curved plasma channel. Due to the intense acceleration and bending fields inside plasmas, the central part of the sources can be made within palm size. With its potential...

  13. The personnel protection system for a Synchrotron Radiation Accelerator Facility: Radiation safety perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Personnel Protection System (PPS) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is summarized and reviewed from the radiation safety point of view. The PPS, which is designed to protect people from radiation exposure to beam operation, consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Beam Containment System (BCS), The ACS prevents people from being exposed to the very high radiation level inside the shielding housing (also called a PPS area). The ACS for a PPS area consists of the shielding housing and a standard entry module at every entrance. The BCS prevents people from being exposed to the radiation outside a PPS area due to normal and abnormal beam losses. The BCS consists of the shielding (shielding housing and metal shielding in local areas), beam stoppers, active current limiting devices, and an active radiation monitor system. The system elements for the ACS and BCS and the associated interlock network are described. The policies and practices in setting up the PPS are compared with some requirements in the US Department of Energy draft Order of Safety of Accelerator Facilities

  14. Radiation reaction and pitch-angle changes for a charge undergoing synchrotron losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    In the derivation of synchrotron radiation formulae, it has been assumed that the pitch angle of a charge remains constant during the radiation process. However, from the radiation reaction formula, while the component of the velocity vector perpendicular to the magnetic field reduces in magnitude due to radiative losses, the parallel component does not undergo any change during radiation. Therefore, there is a change in the ratio of the two components, implying a change in the pitch angle. We derive the exact formula for the change in energy of radiating electrons by taking into account the change of the pitch angle due to radiative losses. From this, we derive the characteristic decay time of synchrotron electrons over which they turn from highly relativistic into mildly relativistic ones.

  15. Study of Synchrotron Radiation for the Electron Beam Polarimeter for the MEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-06

    This is a look at the synchrotron radiation coming from the chicane in the electron beam line for the MEIC design. The power density on the beam pipe as well as transmission through the beam pipe is studied. The optics design is version 12.

  16. Translation of Atherosclerotic Plaque Phase-Contrast CT Imaging from Synchrotron Radiation to a Conventional Lab-Based X-Ray Source

    OpenAIRE

    Saam, Tobias; Herzen, Julia; Hetterich, Holger; Fill, Sandra; Willner, Marian; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Schüller, Ulrich; Auweter, Sigrid; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Phase-contrast imaging is a novel X-ray based technique that provides enhanced soft tissue contrast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing human carotid arteries by grating-based phase-contrast tomography (PC-CT) at two different experimental set-ups: (i) applying synchrotron radiation and (ii) using a conventional X-ray tube. Materials and Methods Five ex-vivo carotid artery specimens were examined with PC-CT either at the European Synchrotron Radiat...

  17. Synchrotron radiation based microtomography (SR{mu}CT) and neutron tomography (NCT) for materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia; Donath, Tilman; Haibel, Astrid; Dose, Thomas; Vollbrandt, Juergen; Schmitz, Heinz-Werner; Pranzas, Philipp Klaus; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS-Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The GKSS-Research Centre Geesthacht, Germany, is operating the user experiment for microtomography using synchrotron radiation at the storage ring DORIS 3 at DESY Hamburg. In the recents years the beamline W2 was rebuilt. The outstanding feature of this synchrotron radiation beamline HARWI II is the use of high energy X-rays from 20 to 250 keV for materials science experiments. The features for microtomography at HARWI II and new enhancements and applications using lower photon energies at the wiggler beamline BW2 are presented. Furthermore at the research reactor FRG-1 the neutron radiography facility GENRA 3 was extended by a setup for neutron tomography. Results performing SR{mu}CT at HARWI 2 and NCT at GENRA 3 are presented. The combination of neutron and synchrotron radiation techniques will give new insight into the three-dimensional behavior of samples in materials science.

  18. A single-photon counting 'edge-on' silicon detector for synchrotron radiation mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigon, L. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)], E-mail: luigi.rigon@ts.infn.it; Arfelli, F. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Physics Department, University of Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Astolfo, A. [Physics Department, University of Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Bergamaschi, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, PSI 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Dreossi, D. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza (Italy); Longo, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Physics Department, University of Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Menk, R.-H. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, S.S. 14 km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza (Italy); Schmitt, B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, PSI 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Vallazza, E. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Castelli, E. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Physics Department, University of Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2009-09-01

    The Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn (PICASSO) project is developing an 'edge-on' silicon microstrip detector for mammography with synchrotron radiation. The sensor is equipped with a fast single-photon counting electronics based on the Mythen-II application-specific integrated circuit. A first prototype has been assembled and tested at the SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline at Elettra in Trieste, Italy. The first results are presented in this study including evidence of high-rate single-photon counting with negligible losses up to 1.2x10{sup 6} incident photons per pixel per second; spatial resolution consistent with the pixel aperture (0.3 mmx0.05 mm); high-quality imaging of test-objects, obtained with a dose comparable to the one delivered in modern full-field digital mammographic systems.

  19. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well

  20. The First Pulse of the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A: A Test Lab for Synchrotron Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Preece, R.; Burgess, J. M.; Diekmann, A.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, Michael; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Fitzpatrick, G; Nuss, E.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A is one of the most energetic GRBs ever observed. The initial pulse up to 2.5 seconds is possibly the brightest well-isolated pulse observed to date. A fine time resolution spectral analysis shows power-law decays of the peak energy from the onset of the pulse, consistent with models of internal synchrotron shock pulses. However, a strongly correlated power-law behavior is observed between the luminosity and the spectral peak energy that is inconsistent with curva...

  1. Molecular photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truesdale, C.M.

    1983-04-01

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons were measured by electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to interpret the electronic behavior of photoionization for molecular systems.

  2. Molecular photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons were measured by electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to interpret the electronic behavior of photoionization for molecular systems

  3. Precise measurement of the lattice spacing of LaB6 standard powder by the x-ray extended range technique using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used the basis of the x-ray extended range technique to measure the lattice spacing of LaB6 standard powder samples relative to silicon 640b standard powder samples with an accuracy of 5x10-5 A. Measurements were not constrained to one energy but were carried out over a 5 keV-20 keV energy range. These measurements used powder diffraction to determine the synchrotron beam energy, to diagnose discrepancies in the nominal calibrated beam energies, and to determine beam energy bandwidths as a function of energy. More specifically, this technique is able to yield a result independent of certain energy-dependent systematics and to yield the most accurate determination of the lattice spacing of NIST SRM 660 LaB6 standard powder so far undertaken. This has direct application to beam line energy calibration, structural evaluation, edge energy calibration, and lattice spacing determinations

  4. Synchrotron radiation in inhomogeneous tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron emission in a tokamak configuration with inhomogeneous plasma parameters is considered to investigate the effects of the temperature profile and vertical elongation on the radiation loss. Using the numerical solution of the transfer equation for ITER-like plasma parameters, several new results on the radiated energy in a Maxwellian plasma have been derived. In particular: (i) synchrotron loss is profile dependent, namely, at constant average thermal energy, the emitted radiation increases with the peak temperature, (ii) an analytical formula of the global loss in inhomogeneous tokamak plasmas with arbitrary vertical elongation is established, (iii) the maximum of the frequency emission spectrum is a linear function of the volume average temperature, (iiii) high frequency synchrotron radiation is entirely due to electrons with energy much greater than the thermal energy. The need for experimental investigations on synchrotron emission in present-day large tokamaks to determine the effect of reflections of the complex tokamak first wall is stressed

  5. Self-filtering crystal monochromators for synchrotron x radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monochromator crystal heating and radiation damage may be reduced significantly by reflecting much of the incident radiated power from the surface of the crystal. This requires strong Bragg diffraction of the monochromatized beam at grazing incidence angles. Examples of such cases are described, such as extremely asymmetric diffraction and grazing angle diffraction, which would permit continuously tunable x-ray energy. Additional benefits such as increased angular acceptance, variable beam cross section, adjustable bandpass, and increased flux for self-filtering monochromators are presented, and various considerations in implementation are discussed. Finally, the possibilities for exploiting the unused reflected x rays will be explored

  6. Synchrotron radiation x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine pattern fabrication technology has been supporting the progress in LSI integration. Synchrotron radiation X-ray lithography is considered the most promising path towards mass-production of LSIs a quarter micron or less in feature size. The present report first describes some fundamental characteristics of synchrotron radiation X-ray lithography, focusing on pattern replication methods, resolution (Fresnel diffraction, penumbral blur, mask contrast, and secondary electron range), process latitude, exposure field size, throughput, and overlay accuracy. The report also addresses test device fabrication conducted at NTT LSI Laboratories in Japan. Deep-submicron test device fabrication is carried out using synchrotron radiation lithography all of five exposure levels. The characteristics of the fabricated devices are found to be satisfactory. Synchrotron radiation X-ray lithography can potentially provide an excellent tool for fabricating fine patterns in the quarter micron range. (N.K.)

  7. From synchrotron radiation to lab source: advanced speckle-based X-ray imaging using abrasive paper

    OpenAIRE

    Hongchang Wang; Yogesh Kashyap; Kawal Sawhney

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques provide complementary and inaccessible information compared to conventional X-ray absorption or visible light imaging. However, such methods typically require sophisticated experimental apparatus or X-ray beams with specific properties. Recently, an X-ray speckle-based technique has shown great potential for X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a simple experimental arrangement. However, it still suffers from either poor resolution or the time...

  8. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs

  10. Synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics

    CERN Document Server

    Pechkova, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the current state of research in both synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics from different laboratories worldwide. The book presents recent research results in the most advanced methods of synchrotron radiation analysis, protein micro- and nano crystallography, X-ray scattering and X-ray optics, coherent X-Ray diffraction, and laser cutting and contactless sample manipulation are described in details. The book focuses on biological applications and highlights important aspects such as radiation damage and molecular modeling.

  11. Some application of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous tuneable wavelength in the range 0.01A < λ < 100A, high brilliance and parallelity of the beam are the outstanding properties for all applications of synchrotron radiation in condensed matter research. High angular and time resolution in synchrotron X-ray diffraction may be achieved. Powder Diffraction pattern with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of Bragg reflections of ΔΘ - 0.02 display a resolution about five times better than laboratory equipment. Thus the investigation of structural phase transitions with only minor metric changes are feasible as well as direct determination of crystal structures from powder data. Registration of complete powder patterns in a few milliseconds opens the road to kinetic studies of crystallisation from glasses or melt and to structural phase transitions. The information from diffraction experiments which provide information on long range order is related to X-ray absorption experiments (XANES and EXAFS). X-ray absorption will provide information on the local environment of atoms (EXAFS) or on its electronic nature. Texture, strain and stress investigations with synchrotron radiation offer advantages as compared to laboratory X-ray work. The angular resolution is considerably improved due to the parallel beam geometry and the small beam size and the penetration depth may be varied by a factor of 6. Thus not only general orientation distribution functions but the anisotropy strain and complex stress behaviour at surfaces may be investigated in particular grains. Furthermore all kinds of surface studies at grazing incidence are performed with considerable advantage. (orig.)

  12. Applications of first order matricial theory to the calculation of storage ring designed for producing synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of first order matrix theory (linear approximation) used for calculating component elements of a particle accelerator employing the synchrotron principle of alternated gradient, is presented. Based on this theory, criteria for dimensioning synchrotron designed, exclusively for producing electromagnetic radiation, are established. The problem to find out optimum disposition of elements (straight line sections, quadrupolar magnetic lens, etc.) which take advantages of deflector magnets of the DCI synchrotron (Orsay Linear Accelerator Laboratory, French) aiming to construct a synchrotron designed to operate as electromagnetic radiation source, is solved. (M.C.K.)

  13. Space charge effect measurements for a multi-channel ionization chamber used for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Amgad

    2012-07-18

    In vivo coronary angiography is one of the techniques used to investigate the heart diseases, by using catheter to inject a contrast medium of a given absorption coefficient into the heart vessels. Taking X-ray images produced by X-ray tube or synchrotron radiation for visualizing the blood in the coronary arteries. As the synchrotron radiation generated by the relativistic charged particle at the bending magnets, which emits high intensity photons in comparison with the X-ray tube. The intensity of the synchrotron radiation is varies with time. However for medical imaging it's necessary to measure the incoming intensity with the integrated time. The thesis work includes building a Multi-channel ionization chamber which can be filled with noble gases N{sub 2}, Ar and Xe with controlled inner pressure up to 30 bar. This affects the better absorption efficiency in measuring the high intensity synchrotron beam fluctuation. The detector is a part of the experimental setup used in the k-edge digital subtraction angiography project, which will be used for correcting the angiography images taken by another detector at the same time. The Multi-channel ionization chamber calibration characteristics are measured using 2 kW X-ray tube with molybdenum anode with characteristic energy of 17.44 keV. According to the fast drift velocity of the electrons relative to the positive ions, the electrons will be collected faster at the anode and will induce current signals, while the positive ions is still drifting towards the cathode. However the accumulation of the slow ions inside the detector disturbs the homogeneous applied electric field and leads to what is known a space charge effect. In this work the space charge effect is measured with very high synchrotron photons intensity from EDR beam line at BESSYII. The strong attenuation in the measured amplitude signal occurs when operating the chamber in the recombination region. A plateau is observed at the amplitude signal when

  14. Comparison of Design and Practices for Radiation Safety among Five Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Asano, Yoshihiro; /JAERI-RIKEN, Hyogo; Casey, William R.; /Brookhaven; Donahue, Richard J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-06-29

    There are more and more third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities in the world that utilize low emittance electron (or positron) beam circulating in a storage ring to generate synchrotron light for various types of experiments. A storage ring based SR facility consists of an injector, a storage ring, and many SR beamlines. When compared to other types of accelerator facilities, the design and practices for radiation safety of storage ring and SR beamlines are unique to SR facilities. Unlike many other accelerator facilities, the storage ring and beamlines of a SR facility are generally above ground with users and workers occupying the experimental floor frequently. The users are generally non-radiation workers and do not wear dosimeters, though basic facility safety training is required. Thus, the shielding design typically aims for an annual dose limit of 100 mrem over 2000 h without the need for administrative control for radiation hazards. On the other hand, for operational and cost considerations, the concrete ring wall (both lateral and ratchet walls) is often desired to be no more than a few feet thick (with an even thinner roof). Most SR facilities have similar operation modes and beam parameters (both injection and stored) for storage ring and SR beamlines. The facility typically operates almost full year with one-month start-up period, 10-month science program for experiments (with short accelerator physics studies and routine maintenance during the period of science program), and a month-long shutdown period. A typical operational mode for science program consists of long periods of circulating stored beam (which decays with a lifetime in tens of hours), interposed with short injection events (in minutes) to fill the stored current. The stored beam energy ranges from a few hundreds MeV to 10 GeV with a low injection beam power (generally less than 10 watts). The injection beam energy can be the same as, or lower than, the stored beam energy

  15. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  16. Biological physics and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhol, J.M.; Chavanne, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Weckert, E. [Hasylab at Desy, Hamburg (Germany)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    This conference deals with the applications of synchrotron radiation to current problems in biology and medicine. Seven sessions take stock on the subject: sources and detectors; inelastic scattering and dynamics; muscle diffraction; reaction mechanisms; macromolecular assemblies; medical applications; imaging and spectroscopy. The document presents the papers abstracts. (A.L.B.)

  17. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs

  18. CdZnTe array detectors for synchrotron radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray linear-array detector was fabricated using high-pressure Bridgman-grown CdZnTe. The detector area was 175 x 800 μm and the pitch size was 250 μm. The measured dark current for the test 16-element detector was as low as 0.1 pA at 800 V cm-1 with excellent uniformity. Energy spectra were measured using a 57Co radiation source. Both a small-pixel effect and charge sharing were observed. For the arrays, an average 5.8% full width a half-maximum (FWHM) at the 122 keV photopeak was obtained with a standard deviation of 0.2%. A large-area detector (1 x 1 cm) of the same material before fabrication exhibited a low-energy tail at the photopeak, which limits the photopeak FWHM to 8%, typically due to hole trapping. At energies below 60 keV, charge sharing between elements was observed. The charge sharing was greatly reduced by providing a path to ground for unwanted charges. A prototype readout electronic system for an eight-channel array detector was developed. A readout system intended for a multielement solid-state detector system was also used. The array detector will be used for high-energy diffraction and Compton scattering measurements at the Advanced Photon Source. (au)

  19. Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation is an innovative tool for the treatment of brain tumors. In the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high atomic number (Z) element and it is irradiated in stereotactic conditions from several entrance angles. The aim of this work was to assess dosimetric properties of the SSRT for preparing clinical trials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To estimate the possible risks, the doses received by the tumor and healthy tissues in the future clinical conditions have been calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE code). The dose enhancement factors have been determined for different iodine concentrations in the tumor, several tumor positions, tumor sizes, and different beam sizes. A scheme for the dose escalation in the various phases of the clinical trials has been proposed. The biological equivalent doses and the normalized total doses received by the skull have been calculated in order to assure that the tolerance values are not reached.

  20. A method for ultrashort electron pulse-shape measurement using coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we discuss a method for nondestructive measurements of the longitudinal profile of sub-picosecond electron bunches for X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). The method is based on the detection of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) spectrum produced by a bunch passing a dipole magnet system. This work also contains a systematic treatment of synchrotron radiation theory which lies at the basis of CSR. Standard theory of synchrotron radiation uses several approximations whose applicability limits are often forgotten: here we present a systematic discussion about these assumptions. Properties of coherent synchrotron radiation from an electron moving along an arc of a circle are then derived and discussed. We describe also an effective and practical diagnostic technique based on the utilization of an electromagnetic undulator to record the energy of the coherent radiation pulse into the central cone. This measurement must be repeated many times with different undulator resonant frequencies in order to reconstruct the modulus of the bunch form-factor. The retrieval of the bunch profile function from these data is performed by means of deconvolution techniques: for the present work we take advantage of a constrained deconvolution method. We illustrate with numerical examples the potential of the proposed method for electron beam diagnostics at the TESLA test facility (TTF) accelerator. Here we choose, for emphasis, experiments aimed at the measure of the strongly non-Gaussian electron bunch profile in the TTF femtosecond-mode operation. We demonstrate that a tandem combination of a picosecond streak camera and a CSR spectrometer can be used to extract shape information from electron bunches with a narrow leading peak and a long tail. (orig.)

  1. LUEh-60 accelerator as an injector for technological source of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A linear electron accelerator developed as a beam injector for a compact technological sources of synchrotron radiation (SR) designed for solving the problems of X-ray lithography in the field of microelectronics is described. Physical basis for choice systems for accelerator with energy up to 60 MeV at pulse current up to 100 μA to optimize beam output parameters is presented. 7 refs.; 6 figs.; 4 tabs

  2. Evaluation of water and sediment of the Graminha and Águas da Serra streams in the city of Limeira (Sp-Brazil) by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Silvana; Fazza, Elizete Vieira

    2008-12-01

    The city of Limeira is located in the state of São Paulo, Brazil and has the second largest economy and demographic growth of the state. It comprises an expressive economy with industries in several productive sectors. The source of the Graminha and Águas da Serra streams is located within the Limeira urban zone. The streams cross part of the rural zone and unite by draining into the Piracicaba River. It is possible that these basins suffer or have already suffered the impacts of environmental pollution caused by anthropogenic factors. Since the city has galvanization industries for the production of precious and semi-precious jewels as well as imitation jewelry, the concentration descriptions and interpretations of heavy metals in waters and sediments indicate anthropogenic influence and the dumping of these compounds into the Piracicaba River. The Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (SR-TXRF) was used for determining the metals. All measurements were performed using a white beam of synchrotron radiation for excitation and a Ge hyperpure detector. Detection limits for water samples were 0.04 μg L - 1 and in sediment samples 0.03 μg g - 1 for Cu and Zn elements. In the water samples, concentrations higher than permissible as established by the Brazilian legislation (CONAMA) for Al, Fe, Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu and Pb, were observed. For sediment samples, values higher than quality reference values defined by the Brazilian legislation (CETESB) were verified for Cr, Zn, Cu, Ni and Pb.

  3. Evaluation of water and sediment of the Graminha and Aguas da Serra streams in the city of Limeira (Sp-Brazil) by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana [University of Campinas, School of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Urban Design, P. O. Box 602, Zip Code 13083-852, Campinas, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Fazza, Elizete Vieira [University of Campinas, School of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Urban Design, P. O. Box 602, Zip Code 13083-852, Campinas, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: fazzaelizete@yahoo.com

    2008-12-15

    The city of Limeira is located in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil and has the second largest economy and demographic growth of the state. It comprises an expressive economy with industries in several productive sectors. The source of the Graminha and Aguas da Serra streams is located within the Limeira urban zone. The streams cross part of the rural zone and unite by draining into the Piracicaba River. It is possible that these basins suffer or have already suffered the impacts of environmental pollution caused by anthropogenic factors. Since the city has galvanization industries for the production of precious and semi-precious jewels as well as imitation jewelry, the concentration descriptions and interpretations of heavy metals in waters and sediments indicate anthropogenic influence and the dumping of these compounds into the Piracicaba River. The Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (SR-TXRF) was used for determining the metals. All measurements were performed using a white beam of synchrotron radiation for excitation and a Ge hyperpure detector. Detection limits for water samples were 0.04 {mu}g L{sup -1} and in sediment samples 0.03 {mu}g g{sup -1} for Cu and Zn elements. In the water samples, concentrations higher than permissible as established by the Brazilian legislation (CONAMA) for Al, Fe, Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu and Pb, were observed. For sediment samples, values higher than quality reference values defined by the Brazilian legislation (CETESB) were verified for Cr, Zn, Cu, Ni and Pb.

  4. Atomic collision experiments using pulsed synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High intensity and continuous nature of the synchrotron radiation are the properties that are fundamentally important for studies of some atomic collision experiments, and many processes have been investigated by using these characteristics. However, so far the property that the radiation is highly polarized and pulsed in time has not been exploited significantly in atomic physics. As an example of the atomic processes relevant to such polarized and pulsed features of the synchrotron radiation, collisions involving optically-allowed excited atoms and molecules will be presented. (author)

  5. A new method for ultrashort electron pulse-shape measurement using synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new nondestructive method for measurement of the longitudinal profile of subpicosecond electron bunches is proposed. The method is based on measurement of spectral intensity correlations in synchrotron radiation. Statistical properties of synchrotron radiation produced by a bunch passing the bending magnet are considered. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed in terms of the degeneracy parameter. The degeneracy parameter increases approximately as a third power of the wavelength which makes the visible range of synchrotron radiation to be a natural choice for the spectral intensity correlation measurement. An example of the experimental set-up is also described. (orig.)

  6. The linac control system for the large-scale synchrotron radiation facility (SPring-8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaki, Hironao; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Itoh, Yuichi [Atomic Energy General Services Corporation, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Terashima, Yasushi [Information Technology System Co., Ltd. (ITECS), Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The linac for large-scale synchrotron radiation facilities has been operated since August of 1996. The linac deal with the user requests without any big troubles. In this report, the control system development policy, details, and the operation for the linac are presented. It is also described so that these experiences can be used for control system of a large scale proton accelerators which will be developed in the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Project. (author)

  7. The linac control system for the large-scale synchrotron radiation facility (SPring-8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linac for large-scale synchrotron radiation facilities has been operated since August of 1996. The linac deal with the user requests without any big troubles. In this report, the control system development policy, details, and the operation for the linac are presented. It is also described so that these experiences can be used for control system of a large scale proton accelerators which will be developed in the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Project. (author)

  8. Search with synchrotron radiation for superheavy elements in giant-halo inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation was used to excite x-ray spectra from monazite inclusions taken from the same piece of mica as those recently reported to show evidence of primordial superheavy elements. No evidence was found for the existence of superheavy elements in the range of Z from 105 to 129, and, in particular, no evidence was found for Z=126 at concentrations of approx.5 x 109 atoms per inclusion or approx.1--2 ppm by weight

  9. Adiabatic calorimeter for measuring absorbed dose of IHEP synchrotron secondary radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adiabatic calorimeter for measuring the value of absorbed dose of mixed radiation generated by 70 GeV proton synchrotron is described. The calorimetric system consists of a working body (a core) and a shell (a screen). The calorimeter adiabaticity is provided by the absence of the core-shell heat exchange by maintaining the shell temperature equal to the core temperature and, consequently, the whole energy generated in the core goes for its heating. The work showed the possibility of carrying out the adiabatic calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose of secondary radiation generated by un accelerated proton beam under the conditions of alternating magnetic and electric fields at the IHEP proton synchrotron at the average dose rate not less than 5x10-3 Wxkg-1

  10. Statistical optics approach to the design of beamlines for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we analyze the image formation problem for undulator radiation through an optical system, accounting for the influence of the electron beam emittance. On the one hand, image formation with Synchrotron Radiation is governed by the laws of Statistical Optics. On the other hand, the widely used Gaussian-Shell model cannot be applied to describe the coherence properties of X-ray beams from third generation Synchrotron Radiation sources. As a result, a more rigorous analysis of coherence properties is required. We propose a technique to explicitly calculate the cross-spectral density of an undulator source, that we subsequently propagate through an optical imaging system. At first we focus on the case of an ideal lens with a non-limiting pupil aperture. Our theory, which makes consistent use of dimensionless analysis, also allows treatment and physical understanding of many asymptotes of the parameter space, together with their applicability region. Particular emphasis is given to the asymptotic situation when the horizontal emittance is much larger than the radiation wavelength, which is relevant for third generation Synchrotron Radiation sources. First principle calculations of undulator radiation characteristics (i.e. ten-dimensional integrals) are then reduced to one-dimensional convolutions of analytical functions with universal functions specific for undulator radiation sources. We also consider the imaging problem for a non-ideal lens in presence of abberations and a limiting pupil aperture, which increases the dimension of the convolution from one to three. In particular we give emphasis to cases when the intensity at the observation plane can be presented as a convolution of an impulse response function and the intensity from an ideal lens. Our results may be used in practical cases as well as in benchmarks for numerical methods

  11. Fabrication of multilayer Fresnel zone plate for high brilliance synchrotron radiation X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-layer Fresnel zone plate (FZP) is expected as a high performance lens on a light at X-ray (especially hard X-ray with short wavelength) range, and is actively carried out on its R and D aiming at application to an optical element for micro area analysis using high brilliance synchrotron radiation. Authors have carried out development on the multi-layer FZP, and succeeded in formation of a high brilliance sub-micron X-ray micro beam through performance evaluation at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization and the successive Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (SPring) since 1994. In this report, were introduced on preparation of a Cu/Al multi-layer FZP, recent results on condensation experiments at high energy X-ray range and the worldwide R and D on the relative fields. (G.K.)

  12. Assessment of the national need for facilities dedicated to the production of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The report begins with an introduction, followed by conclusions and recommendations. The scientific and technological impact of synchrotron radiation is described; a broad and significant impact is documented. An estimate of the present and future utilization of synchrotron radiation is made; it is shown that current U.S. facilities are not adequate to meet future needs. In an effort to lay the groundwork for decisions about existing and future storage ring sources, a review of the capabilities, design, and operation of storage rings is provided. It is recommended that an immediate commitment be made to construct new dedicated national facilities and to expand existing facilities so that optimized XUV and x-ray capabilities are provided. 13 figures, 6 tables. (RWR)

  13. Characteristics and development of the coherent synchrotron radiation sources for THz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, J.; Evain, C.; Roussel, E.; Manceron, L.; Brubach, J.-B.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Couprie, M.-E.; Bielawski, S.; Szwaj, C.; Labat, M.; Roy, P.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the characteristics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) as a source for spectroscopy. The optimization of the source and the resulting figures of merits in terms of flux, signal to noise, spatial distribution and spectral and temporal distribution are presented together with a spectroscopic application. The emission of THz during the slicing operation is also described. The conclusion opens up perspectives made possible by the availability of this intense and stable THz source.

  14. A gradient-directed unsharp masking algorithm for synchrotron radiation angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algorithm for digital processing of synchrotron radiation digital subtraction intravenous angiographies (intravenous SYRDA) is presented. It is used in order to enhance the coronary arteries hidden behind the heart chambers and the aorta (which are normally filled with contrast medium and then are opaque). In order to remove these large structures, a gradient operator computed over a very large area is used. Some preliminary results with a synthetic image and an image taken from a human subject are also presented

  15. Studies and construction of an optical klystron for synchrotron radiation FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study and construction of an optical klystron is reported. The optical klystron will be installed at the store ring of National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation in University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) for carrying out the studies of synchrotron radiation free electron laser. This device has two working modes: (1) optical klystron, (2) normal SR undulator. For the first mode the coherent light can be got during the UV, VUV and soft X wave band. For the second mode, the device severs as a normal undulator and the synchrotron radiation of high brightness can be got. The optical klystron consists of three sections: modulation section, dispersive section and gain section. When gap = 40 mm, the average peak field is B0 0.30 T in modulation and gain section, B0 = 0.70 T in dispersive section. The RMS deviation of peak fields is within 1.0%. The 1st and 2nd fields integral at the exit of the optical klystron is 0.005 T·cm and 0.04 T·cm2. (7 refs., 11 figs.)

  16. How Can Synchrotron Radiation Techniques Be Applied for Detecting Microstructures in Amorphous Alloys?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Qing Guo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, how synchrotron radiation techniques can be applied for detecting the microstructure in metallic glass (MG is studied. The unit cells are the basic structural units in crystals, though it has been suggested that the co-existence of various clusters may be the universal structural feature in MG. Therefore, it is a challenge to detect microstructures of MG even at the short-range scale by directly using synchrotron radiation techniques, such as X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption methods. Here, a feasible scheme is developed where some state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation-based experiments can be combined with simulations to investigate the microstructure in MG. By studying a typical MG composition (Zr70Pd30, it is found that various clusters do co-exist in its microstructure, and icosahedral-like clusters are the popular structural units. This is the structural origin where there is precipitation of an icosahedral quasicrystalline phase prior to phase transformation from glass to crystal when heating Zr70Pd30 MG.

  17. MULTIPLE FUNCTIONS LONG TRACE PROFILER (LTP-MF) FOR NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY OF CHINA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    QIAN, S.; WANG, Q.; HONG, Y.; TAKACS, P.

    2005-07-31

    The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is a useful optical metrology instrument for measuring the figure and slope error of cylindrical aspheres commonly used as synchrotron radiation (SR) optics. It is used extensively at a number of synchrotron radiation laboratories around the world. In order to improve SR beam line quality and resolution, the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) of China is developing a versatile LTP that can be used to measure both SR optics and more conventional ''normal'' optical surfaces. The optical metrology laboratories at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and NSRL are collaborating in developing a multiple functions LTP (LTP-MF). Characteristics of the LTP-MF are: a very compact and lightweight optical head, a large angular test range ({+-} 16 mad) and high accuracy. The LTP-MF can be used in various configurations: as a laboratory-based LTP, an in-situ LTP or penta-prism LTP, as an angle monitor, a portable LTP, and a small radius of curvature test instrument. The schematic design of the compact optical head and a new compact slide are introduced. Analysis of different measurements modes and systematic error correction methods are introduced.

  18. Growth of crystals for synchrotron radiation Mössbauer investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrbova, M.; Hejduk, J.; Malnev, V. V.; Seleznev, V. N.; Yagupov, S. V.; Andronova, N. V.; Chechin, A. I.; Mikhailov, A. Yu.

    1991-10-01

    Iron borate crystals (FeBO 3) were flux grown at the Physical Institute (Prague) and at Simferopol State University. During the crystal growth procedure the temperature regime was held constant to 0.1°C accuracy. Crystals were investigated with the help of a double crystal X-ray diffractometer DRON-2 (SiO 2(30 overline33)FeBO 3(444), MoK α 1 radiation). The rocking curve measurements were carried out in a constant magnetic field of 1kG. Most of the crystal surface has a rocking curve 10″-15″ wide. Some parts of some crystals with the area 1 × 1 mm 2 have rocking curves of 3″-4″ width and can be considered ideal.

  19. Paraxial Green's functions in Synchrotron Radiation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, G; Schneidmiller, E; Yurkov, M; Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni; Schneidmiller, Evgeni; Yurkov, Mikhail

    2005-01-01

    This work contains a systematic treatment of single particle Synchrotron Radiation and some application to realistic beams with given cross section area, divergence and energy spread. Standard theory relies on several approximations whose applicability limits and accuracy are often forgotten. We begin remarking that on the one hand, a paraxial approximation can always be applied without loss of generality and with ultra relativistic accuracy. On the other hand, dominance of the acceleration field over the velocity part in the Lienard-Wiechert expressions is not always granted and constitutes a separate assumption, whose applicability is discussed. Treating Synchrotron Radiation in paraxial approximation we derive the equation for the slow varying envelope function of the Fourier components of the electric field vector. Calculations of Synchrotron Radiation properties performed by others showed that the phase of the Fourier components of the electric field vector differs from the phase of a virtual point sourc...

  20. Status of accelerator design for Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagoya University had a project to construct a new synchrotron light facility, called Photo-Science Nanofactory, to develop a wide range research on basic science, industrial applications, life science and environmental engineering. The project is now developed to 'Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility' as the principal facility of the project of Aichi prefecture, 'Knowledge Hub', to establish a new research center for technological innovations. The key equipment of the facility is a small electron storage ring, which is able to supply hard x-rays. The energy of the stored electron beam is 1.2 GeV, the circumference is 62.4 m, the current is 300 mA, and natural emittance is about 53 nm-rad. The storage ring consists of four triple bend cells. Eight of the twelve bending magnets are normal conducting ones. Four of them are 5 T superconducting magnets (super-bends). The bending angle of the super-bend is 12 degrees and three hard x-ray beam lines can be extracted from each super-bend. Two insertion devices will be installed in the straight sections. The electron beam is injected from a booster synchrotron with the energy of 1.2 GeV as full energy injection. A 50 MeV linac is used as an injector to the booster synchrotron. The top-up operation is also planned. (author)

  1. A fast method for computing 1-D wakefields due to coherent synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Chad E.; Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2013-07-01

    A method for computing the free-space longitudinal wakefield due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in a one-dimensional model is developed using a fast integrated Green function approach. This approach accurately captures the short-range behavior of the CSR interaction and does not require the numerical differentiation of a noisy longitudinal charge density. The transient wakefields that occur near bend entry and exit are included. This method can also be generalized to include the effect of upstream radiation that propagates through multiple lattice elements before interacting with the bunch.

  2. A fast method for computing 1-D wakefields due to coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for computing the free-space longitudinal wakefield due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in a one-dimensional model is developed using a fast integrated Green function approach. This approach accurately captures the short-range behavior of the CSR interaction and does not require the numerical differentiation of a noisy longitudinal charge density. The transient wakefields that occur near bend entry and exit are included. This method can also be generalized to include the effect of upstream radiation that propagates through multiple lattice elements before interacting with the bunch

  3. Synchrotron radiation of a relativistic magneton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordovitsyn, V.A.; Torres, R.

    1986-11-01

    The classical theory of synchrotron radiation of an electrically neutral relativistic particle with a large intrinsic magnetic moment is considered (g-factor much greater than unit). The spectral-angular composition and polarization of the radiation are studied. The magneton radiation self-polarization time is calculated. It is shown that identical results follow from the Ternov-Bagrov-Khapaev quantum theory constructed on the basis of the Dirac-Pauli equation for a neutron.

  4. X-ray diffraction microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Barroso, R C; Jesus, E F O; Oliveira, L F

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction computed tomography technique is based on the interference phenomena of the coherent scatter. For low-momentum transfer, it is most probable that the scattering interaction will be coherent. A selective discrimination of a given element in a scanned specimen can be realized by fixing the Bragg angle which produces an interference peak and then, to carry out the computed tomography in the standard mode. The image reconstructed exalts the presence of this element with respect to other ones in a sample. This work reports the feasibility of a non-destructive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction imaging technique. This research was performed at the X-ray Diffraction beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Brazil. The coherent scattering properties of different tissue and bone substitute materials were evaluated. Furthermore, diffraction patterns of some polycrystalline solids were studied due to industrial and environmental human exposure to these metals. The obtai...

  5. Synchrotron radiation microtomography of musical instruments: a non-destructive monitoring technique for insect infestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Bentivoglio-Ravasio

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available X-ray computed tomography is becoming a common technique for the structural analysis of samples of cultural relevance, providing luthiers, art historians, conservators and restorators with a unique tool for the characterization of musical instruments. Synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast microtomography is an ideal technique for the non-destructive 3D analysis of samples where small lowabsorbing details such as larvae and eggs can be detected. We report results from the first feasibility studies performed at the Elettra synchrotron laboratory, where the 1494 organ by Lorenzo Gusnasco da Pavia has been studied. Together with important information about the structural conditions, the presence of xylophages could be detected and characterized.

  6. Windowless transition between atmospheric pressure and high vacuum via differential pumping for synchrotron radiation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gog, T; Casa, D M; Kuzmenko, I; Krakora, R J; Bolin, T B

    2007-07-01

    A differential pump assembly is introduced which can provide a windowless transition between the full atmospheric pressure of an in-air sample environment and the high-vacuum region of a synchrotron radiation beamline, while providing a clear aperture of approximately 1 mm to pass through the X-ray beam from a modern third-generation synchrotron radiation source. This novel pump assembly is meant to be used as a substitute for an exit vacuum window on synchrotron beamlines, where the existence of such a window would negatively impact the coherent nature of the X-ray beam or would introduce parasitic scattering, distorting weak scattering signals from samples under study. It is found that the length of beam pipe necessary to reduce atmospheric pressure to below 10 mbar is only about 130 mm, making the expected photon transmission for hard X-rays through this pipe competitive with that of a regular Be beamline window. This result is due to turbulent flow dominating the first pumping stage, providing a mechanism of strong gas conductance limitation, which is further enhanced by introducing artificial surface roughness in the pipe. Successive reduction of pressure through the transitional flow regime into the high-vacuum region is accomplished over a length of several meters, using beam pipes of increasing diameter. While the pump assembly has not been tested with X-rays, possible applications are discussed in the context of coherent and small-angle scattering. PMID:17587659

  7. Development and validation of Monte Carlo dose computations for contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) is an innovative technique based on localized dose-enhancement effects obtained by reinforced photoelectric absorption in the tumor. Medium energy monochromatic X-rays (50 - 100 keV) are used for irradiating tumors previously loaded with a high-Z element. Clinical trials of SSRT are being prepared at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), an iodinated contrast agent will be used. In order to compute the energy deposited in the patient (dose), a dedicated treatment planning system (TPS) has been developed for the clinical trials, based on the ISOgray TPS. This work focuses on the SSRT specific modifications of the TPS, especially to the PENELOPE-based Monte Carlo dose engine. The TPS uses a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation of medium energy polarized photons to compute the deposited energy in the patient. Simulations are performed considering the synchrotron source, the modeled beamline geometry and finally the patient. Specific materials were also implemented in the voxelized geometry of the patient, to consider iodine concentrations in the tumor. The computation process has been optimized and parallelized. Finally a specific computation of absolute doses and associated irradiation times (instead of monitor units) was implemented. The dedicated TPS was validated with depth dose curves, dose profiles and absolute dose measurements performed at the ESRF in a water tank and solid water phantoms with or without bone slabs. (author)

  8. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures

  9. A program in detector development for the US synchrotron radiation community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Naday, S.; Gruner, S.; Siddons, P.; Arthur, J.; Wehlitz, R.; Padmore, H.

    2001-07-14

    There is a clear gulf between the capabilities of modern synchrotrons to deliver high photon fluxes, and the capabilities of detectors to measure the resulting photon, electron or ion signals. While a huge investment has been made in storage ring technology, there has not to date been a commensurate investment in detector systems. With appropriate detector technology, gains in data rates could be 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in some cases. The US community working in detector technology is under-funded and fragmented and works without the long term funding commitment required for development of the most advanced detector systems. It is becoming apparent that the US is falling behind its international competitors in provision of state-of-the-art detector technology for cutting edge synchrotron radiation based experiments.

  10. New Models for X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation from the Remnant of Supernova 1006 AD

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, K K; Borkowski, K J

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays up to energies of around 10^15 eV are assumed to originate in supernova remnants (SNRs). The shock wave of a young SNR like SN 1006 AD can accelerate electrons to energies greater than 1 TeV, where they can produce synchrotron radiation in the X-ray band. A new model (SRESC) designed to model synchrotron X-rays from Type Ia supernovae can constrain values for the magnetic-field strength and electron scattering properties, with implications for the acceleration of the unseen ions which dominate the cosmic-ray energetics. New observations by ASCA, ROSAT, and RXTE have provided enormously improved data, which now extend to higher X-ray energies. These data allow much firmer constraints. We will describe model fits to these new data on SN 1006 AD, emphasizing the physical constraints that can be placed on SNRs and on the cosmic-ray acceleration process.

  11. A program in detector development for the US synchrotron radiation community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a clear gulf between the capabilities of modern synchrotrons to deliver high photon fluxes, and the capabilities of detectors to measure the resulting photon, electron or ion signals. While a huge investment has been made in storage ring technology, there has not to date been a commensurate investment in detector systems. With appropriate detector technology, gains in data rates could be 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in some cases. The US community working in detector technology is under-funded and fragmented and works without the long term funding commitment required for development of the most advanced detector systems. It is becoming apparent that the US is falling behind its international competitors in provision of state-of-the-art detector technology for cutting edge synchrotron radiation based experiments

  12. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  13. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  14. Aberration analysis calculations for synchrotron radiation beamline design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of ray deviation calculations based on aberration coefficients for a single optical surface for the design of beamline optical systems is reviewed. A systematic development is presented which allows insight into which aberration may be causing the rays to deviate from perfect focus. A new development allowing analytical calculation of line shape is presented

  15. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation. Lecture 3. Monochromator systems. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General properties of monochromators are discussed, and some useful formulas for optical design are given. The discussion is limited to the Rowland reflection grating. Topics covered include focussing properties of a toroidal grating, aberrations, dispersion, resolution, and phase space acceptance

  16. The control system for the dedicated synchrotron radiation storage ring BESSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BESSY is a 800 MeV electron-storage ring dedicated to research with synchrotron radiation in the VUV and soft X-ray region. The storage ring is fed by a 800 MeV separated function synchrotron with a clasical 20 MeV microtron as preinjector. The machines are remotely controlled by four minicomputers which are linked by a local network. The computers are connected to a commercially available electronic interface system. The general philosophy for the system design was determined by boundary conditions such as reliable processor hardware, reliable and powerful multi-user multi-programming real-time operating systems, well developed software tools, a ready-to-use distributed network with high throughput, compatibility of the electronic interface system, locally available service shops, and, if possible, the avoidance of assembly coding. This paper describes in detail the system which ultimately met these criteria and was subsequently implemented at BESSY

  17. Programmable CCD imaging system for synchrotron radiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time imaging system for x-ray detection has been developed. The CAMAC-based system has a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) as its active detection element. The electronics consist of a CAMAC-crate-based dedicated microprocessor coupled to arbitrary waveform generators, programmable timing, and ADC modules. The hardware flexibility achievable through this system enables one to use virtually any commercially available CCD. A dedicated CAMAC-based display driver allows for real-time imaging on a high-resolution color monitor. An optional front end consisting of a fiber-optic taper and a focusing optical lens system coupled to a phosphor screen allows for large area imaging. Further, programming flexibility, in which the detector can be used in different read-out modes, enables it to be exploited for time-resolved experiments. In one mode, sections of the CCD can be read-out with millisecond time-resolution and, in another, the use of the CCD as a storage device is exploited resulting in microsecond time-resolution. Three different CCDs with radically different read-out timings and waveforms have been tested: the TI 4849, a 39Ox584 pixel array; TC 215, a 1024x1O24 pixel array; and the TH 7883, a 576x384 pixel array. The TC 215 and TI 4849 are single-phase CCDs manufactured by Texas Instruments, and the TH 7883 is a four-phase device manufactured by Thomson-CSF. The CCD characterized for uniformity, charge transfer efficiency (CTE), linearity, and sensitivity is the TC215

  18. Development of polishing methods for Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Material properties of Chemical Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide (CVD SiC) make it ideal for use in mirrors for synchrotron radiation experiments. We developed methods to grind and polish flat samples of CVD SiC down to measured surface roughness values as low as 1.1 Angstroms rms. We describe the processing details, including observations we made during trial runs with alternative processing recipes. We conclude that pitch polishing using progressively finer diamond abrasive, augmented with specific water based lubricants and additives, produces superior results. Using methods based on these results, a cylindrical and a toroidal mirror, each about 100 x 300mm, were respectively finished by Continental Optical and Frank Cooke, Incorporated. WYCO Interferometry shows these mirrors have surface roughness less than 5.7 Angstroms rms. These mirrors have been installed on the LLNL/UC X-ray Calibration and Standards Facility at the Stanford Synthrotron Radiation Laboratory

  19. Method and apparatus for recirculation with control of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R.; Tennant, Christopher

    2016-08-02

    A method for controlling beam quality degradation from ISR and CSR and stabilizing the microbunching instability (.mu.BI) in a high brightness electron beam. The method includes providing a super-periodic second order achromat line with each super period being individually linearly achromatic and isochronous, setting individual superperiod tunes to rational fractions of an integer (such as 4.sup.th or 6.sup.th integers), setting individual bend angles to be as small as practical to reduce driving terms due to dispersion and dispersive angle, and setting bend radii as large enough to suppress ISR but not negatively affect the radial dependence of CSR. The method includes setting the structure of the individual superperiods to minimize bend plane beam envelope values in the dipoles to reduce betatron response to a CSR event at a dispersed location, increasing beam angular divergence, and creating dispersion nodes in the dipoles to similarly reduce response to CSR events, and limit R.sub.56 modulation in order to mitigate .mu.BI.

  20. High precision mirror alignment mechanism for use in synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a synchrotron radiation beamline is highly depends on parameters, crucially on the manufacturing accuracies of the optical elements and very good alignment of optical elements in the beam path. To develop a synchrotron beamline the misalignment effects have to be estimated and the mechanical components that hold optical elements have to be designed and developed within the specified tolerance limits. The translational inaccuracies result in shifting the image spot, which affect the flux throughput. The misorientation errors i.e. the rotation of optical elements about their mean position affects the image quality. The horizontal misorientation i.e. the rotation of an optical element about an axis passing through its centre and perpendicular to the plane containing the mirror has the most sever effect on the spectral resolution of the beamline, because of an increase in the dispersive spot size at the image plane. The design development and testing of a high precision mirror alignment mechanism is reported in this abstract. Though this mirror alignment mechanism is developed for the X-ray diffraction beamline on synchrotron radiation source Indus-2, 2.5 GeV, 300 mA, the design is general purpose and can be adapted for any other synchrotron facility or a similar ultra high vacuum environment. The mirror alignment mechanism is based on a constrained kinematic chain which provides the angular motions about three co-ordinate axes in the range of 0 to ±1° with the backlash free resolution of 1 arc second. The linear motions in three orthogonal directions are performed by other kinematic mounts in the range of 0 to ± 10 mm with a fine adjustment of 10 μm. The motions are transferred from air to ultra high vacuum through bellows. The ultra high vacuum chamber has been designed, fabricated and tested as per the ASME code. The rotational motions of the mirror alignment mechanism has been tested using a laser interferometer. (author)

  1. A Furnace for Diffraction Studies using Synchrotron X-Ray Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Lebech, Bente; Kofoed, W.

    1984-01-01

    A furnace for diffraction studies using synchrotron X-ray radiation is described. The furnace can be operated between ambient temperature and 1 800 °C with a temperature stability better than 5 °C for temperatures above 300 °C. Kapton windows allow almost 360° access for the X-ray beam in the...... horizontal scattering plane and the furnace may be used in both conventional monochromatic beam angle-dispersive and white-beam energy-dispersive diffraction experiments. Details of the furnace windows, heating element, thermometry and sample mount are given....

  2. Analysis and calibration of stage axial vibration for synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Li, Chen; Liu, Zhenzhong

    2015-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography (SR nano-CT) is a powerful analysis tool and can be used to perform chemical identification, mapping, or speciation of carbon and other elements together with X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) imaging. In practical applications, there are often challenges for SR nano-CT due to the misaligned geometry caused by the sample stage axial vibration. It occurs quite frequently because of experimental constraints from the mechanical error of manufacturing and assembly and the thermal expansion during the time-consuming scanning. The axial vibration will lead to the structure overlap among neighboring layers and degrade imaging results by imposing artifacts into the nano-CT images. It becomes worse for samples with complicated axial structure. In this work, we analyze the influence of axial vibration on nano-CT image by partial derivative. Then, an axial vibration calibration method for SR nano-CT is developed and investigated. It is based on the cross correlation of plane integral curves of the sample at different view angles. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with the full-field transmission X-ray microscope nano-CT setup at the beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results demonstrate that the presented method can handle the stage axial vibration. It can work for random axial vibration and needs neither calibration phantom nor additional calibration scanning. It will be helpful for the development and application of synchrotron radiation nano-CT systems. PMID:26265032

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on applications of synchrotron radiation to trace impurity analysis for advanced silicon processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laderman, S [Integrated Circuits Business Div., Hewlett Packard Co., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Pianetta, P [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Wafer surface trace impurity analysis is essential for development of competitive Si circuit technologies. Today's grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence techniques with rotating anodes fall short of requirements for the future. Hewlett Packard/Toshiba experiments indicate that with second generation synchrotron sources such as SSRL, the techniques can be extended sufficiently to meet important needs of the leading edge Si circuit industry through nearly all of the 1990's. This workshop was held to identify people interested in use of synchrotron radiation-based methods and to document needs and concerns for further development. Viewgraphs are included for the following presentations: microcontamination needs in silicon technology (M. Liehr), analytical methods for wafer surface contamination (A. Schimazaki), trace impurity analysis of liquid drops using synchrotron radiation (D. Wherry), TRXRF using synchrotron sources (S. Laderman), potential role of synchrotron radiation TRXRF in Si process R D (M. Scott), potenital development of synchrotron radiation facilities (S. Brennan), and identification of goals, needs and concerns (M. Garner).

  4. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ''gold standards'' to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications

  5. Formulas for coherent synchrotron radiation microbunching in a bunch compressor chicane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je

    2002-07-01

    A microbunching instability driven by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in a bunch compressor chicane is studied using an iterative solution of the integral equation that governs this process. By including both one-stage and two-stage amplifications, we obtain analytical expressions for CSR microbunching that are valid in both low-gain and high-gain regimes. These formulas can be used to explore the dependence of CSR microbunching on compressed beam current, energy spread, and emittance, and to design stable bunch compressors required for an x-ray free-electron laser.

  6. A photoelectron velocity map imaging spectrometer for experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keeffe, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Coreno, M.; Avaldi, L. [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Italy); Moise, A.; Richter, R.; Cautero, G.; Stebel, L.; Sergo, R. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Pravica, L. [The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Ovcharenko, Y. [Institute of Electron Physics, 88017 Uzhgorod (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15

    A velocity map imaging/ion time-of-flight spectrometer designed specifically for pump-probe experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations is described. The in-house built delay line detector can be used in two modes: the high spatial resolution mode and the coincidence mode. In the high spatial resolution mode a kinetic energy resolution of 6% has been achieved. The coincidence mode can be used to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the pump-probe experiments either by using a gate to count electrons only when the laser is present or by recording coincidences with the ion formed in the ionization process.

  7. Simulation of absorbed dose rate due to synchrotron radiation and shielding thickness for radiation safety at Indus-2 using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indus-2 is a 2.5 GeV electron synchrotron radiation source at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), India. 26 synchrotron radiation (SR) beam lines are planned in Indus-2 for various research applications, of several are in operation and many are in installation stage. For experiments SR beam is brought in air. Due to intense flux of SR and low energy, the dose rate in the direct beam is high and there is a potential for radiation exposure. Appropriate shielding hutches are needed to house the beamlines and protect the workers from the radiation hazard. Simulations were carried out using computer code FLUKA to find out the absorbed dose in water due to SR and required shielding thickness in the forward direction to reduce dose within acceptable limits. SR spectrum from Indus-2 in the range 4-100 keV was used for simulating the absorbed dose and shielding thickness. It was found that the absorbed dose rate is of the order of 105 Gy/h for the design parameters of Indus-2 (2.5 GeV and 300 mA). Forward shielding thickness of 3 mm lead was found to be sufficient to reduce the dose rate to acceptable level for continuously occupied area (<1μSv/h). The details of the simulation and results are presented in the paper. (author)

  8. New synchrotron radiation facility project. Panel on new synchrotron radiation facility project

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, S; Kimura, Y

    2003-01-01

    The project for constructing a new synchrotron radiation facility dedicated to the science in VUV (or EUV) and Soft X-ray (SX) region has been discussed for these two years at the Panel on New Synchrotron Radiation Facility Project. The Panel together with the Accelerator Design Working Group (WG), Beamline Design WG and Research Program WG suggested to the Ministry of Education, Science, Culture and Sports the construction of a 1.8 GeV electron storage ring suitable for 'Top-Up' operation and beamlines and monochromators designed for undulator radiation. The scientific programs proposed by nationwide scientists are summarized with their requirements of the characteristics of the beam. (author)

  9. Interest of synchrotron radiation for the therapy of brain tumors: methodology and preclinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbeam radiation (M.R.T.) and stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (S.S.R.T.) are innovative techniques currently developed at the european Synchrotron radiation facility. these techniques led to promising, but rarely reproduced, results. the use of different tumoral models for each techniques limit comparisons. M.R.T. experiments on rats bearing 9L tumors 14 days after implantation displayed a double median survival time ( from 20 to 40 days) with a 200 μm spacing irradiation, while a 100 μm spacing irradiation tripled this median (67 days) but damaged normal tissue. the impact of the device dividing synchrotron beam into micro-beams, named multi sit collimator, was also demonstrated. combination of drugs with M.R.T. irradiation was tested. promising results (median survival time: 40 days and 30% of long term survivors) were obtained with an intratumoral injection of gadolinium coupled with a crossing M.R.T. irradiation at 460 Gy. Moreover, earlier M.R.T. irradiation (tumor at D10) quadrupled the median survival time (79 days) with 30% of long term survivors. A new imaging device to target the tumor before irradiation and an adapted collimator will increase the M.R.T. results. As the differences existing between tumoral models used in M.R.T. (9L models) and in S.S.R.T. (F98 models) are major, M.R.T./S.S.R.T. comparative experiments were realised on these two models. Results showed that the two techniques have the same efficacy on F98 model and that the M.R.T. is more effective on 9L model. This can help to define adapted tumor type for these techniques. (author)

  10. Design concept for a direct water-cooled silicon crystal for use in a high-power synchrotron radiation beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset of high-power Synchrotron Radiation beams, now available at several of the Synchrotron Radiation facilities, has resulted in a search for new ways on how to handle the increased thermal load on optical components that are directly exposed to these beams. This report examines one possible way of the direct water-cooling of a silicon crystal as used in monochromators and how to get the water to the crystal with the least possible strain on the crystal. Suggestions are made on how to mount the crystal assembly in an experimental setup, so that physical properties of the crystal can be measured during direct exposure to a suitable high-power Synchrotron Radiation beam. Ways of making small correction movements to the crystal in two directions are outlined. (author)

  11. Using of Synchrotron radiation for study of multielement composition of the small mammals diet and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezel, V. S.; Koutzenogii, K. P.; Mukhacheva, S. V.; Chankina, O. V.; Savchenko, T. I.

    2007-05-01

    The Synchrotron radiation X-ray Fluorescence analysis (SRXRF) was used for estimation of "geochemical selection" of elements by small mammals, which belong to different trophic groups and inhabit polluted and background areas (the Middle Ural). The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Cd, Pb in the diet and into hepar of a herbivorous ( bank vole) and carnivorous ( Laxmann's shrew) small mammals were compared. Herbivores play a particular role in chemical elements translocation between trophic levels, limiting element transition to consumers of the consequent levels. Whereas, insectivores concentrate most elements in their tissues under the same conditions.

  12. Synchrotron radiation damping, intrabeam scattering and beam-beam simulations for HE-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Valishev, A

    2011-01-01

    The proposed High-Energy LHC project presents an unusual combination of strong synchrotron radiation (SR) damping and intrabeam scattering (IBS), which is not seen in present-day hadron colliders. The subject of investigation reported in this paper was the simulation of beam-beam effect for the HE-LHC parameters. Parameters of SR and IBS are calculated, and the luminosity evolution is simulated in the absence of beambeam interaction. Then, a weak-strong numerical simulation is used to predict the effect of beam-beam interaction on particle losses and emittance evolution.

  13. Development of optical thin film technology for lasers and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectric multilayer optical thin film devices play an important role not only in the working of lasers but also in different front line research activities using high power lasers and high intensity synchrotron radiation sources. Facilities are set up recently in the Spectroscopy Division to develop the optical thin film design and fabrication technologies indigeneously. Using the facilities thin film devices for different laser applications working in the wavelength range from 300 nm to 1064 nm were developed. Different technical aspects involved in the technology development are briefly described. (author)

  14. A Spectrometer for X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Diffraction using Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun Olsen, Janus; Buras, B; Gerward, Leif;

    1981-01-01

    Describes a white-beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometer built for Hasylab in Hamburg, FRG, using the synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring DORIS. The following features of the instrument are discussed: horizontal or vertical scattering plane, collimators, sample environment, ......, remote control of the goniometer, data acquisition, energy-sensitive detectors using small-area and large-area detector crystals, modes of operation, powder and single crystal diffraction. An example is given from a high-pressure study of YbH2 using a diamond anvil cell....

  15. A Spectrometer for X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Diffraction using Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun Olsen, Janus; Buras, B; Gerward, Leif;

    1981-01-01

    Describes a white-beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometer built for Hasylab in Hamburg, FRG, using the synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring DORIS. The following features of the instrument are discussed: horizontal or vertical scattering plane, collimators, sample environment......, remote control of the goniometer, data acquisition, energy-sensitive detectors using small-area and large-area detector crystals, modes of operation, powder and single crystal diffraction. An example is given from a high-pressure study of YbH2 using a diamond anvil cell....

  16. Using of Synchrotron radiation for study of multielement composition of the small mammals diet and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Synchrotron radiation X-ray Fluorescence analysis (SRXRF) was used for estimation of 'geochemical selection' of elements by small mammals, which belong to different trophic groups and inhabit polluted and background areas (the Middle Ural). The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Cd, Pb in the diet and into hepar of a herbivorous (bank vole) and carnivorous (Laxmann's shrew) small mammals were compared. Herbivores play a particular role in chemical elements translocation between trophic levels, limiting element transition to consumers of the consequent levels. Whereas, insectivores concentrate most elements in their tissues under the same conditions

  17. Source size conserving broad band monochromators of fixed exit geometry for high energy synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of the effective source size by energy tunable, fixed exit, broad band monochromators for high energy synchrotron radiation (40-100 keV) is measured to be below 2 μrad. Two monochromator schemes consisting of either two bent Laue crystals or two SiGe gradient crystals in a non-dispersive setting are characterized. The relative energy bandwidth is about 0.1% and reflectivities are above 80%. The source size broadening and band widths are found to be in agreement with predictions by a kinematical model

  18. Materials science and technology by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, features of the Photon Factory, a facility for synchrotron research installed at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan, are outlined, and then the impact of the advent of synchrotron radiation is discussed in relation to its outcome during the past seven years. Prospects for future development of synchrotron radiation are also presented. The facility consists of an injector linac to accelerate electrons up to 2.5 GeV and a ring to store the accelerated electrons in a closed orbit. In the Photon Factory, a 400m-long linac has been constructed for use as injector for both the Photon Factory and the TRISTAN electron-positron collider. The storage ring is operated at the same electron energy of 2.5 GeV. The present report also describes some applications of synchrotron radiation, focusing on spectroscopy (X-ray fluorescence technique and time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy), diffraction and scattering (surface structure studies and protein crystallography), and photo-chemical processing. (N.K.)

  19. Fast response amplitude scintillation detector for X-ray synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes a scintillation detector for X-ray synchrotron radiation. This detector has been created on the basis of a scintillator and a photoelectron multiplier (FEU-130) and its construction allows one to use the specific features of the time characteristics of synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring. In a given range of amplitudes, the detector electronics makes a 64-channel amplitude analysis of the FEU-130 signal strobed by the revolution frequency of an electron bunch in the storage ring (f0 = 818 kHz). There is the possibility of operating the detector at high intensities of the monochromatic radiation incident on the scintillator. Such a possibility is directly provided by the time structure of SR and is not realizable with the use of other X-ray sources. The detector will find wide application in studies on X-ray structural analysis, transmission and fluorescent EXAFS- and XANES-spectroscopy, transmission scanning microscopy and microtomography, calibration of X-ray detectors and as a monitor on SR beams from the storage ring VEPP-4. (orig.)

  20. Proceedings of the Meeting on Techniques and Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several techniques and applications of the synchrotron radiation used in Physics, Biophysics and Chemistry are extensively discussed. The major part of the subjects of the works treat with the possible implantation of a national synchrotron radiation laboratory in Brazil. (L.C.)

  1. Design optimization of straight groove toroidal grating monochromators for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of storage rings giving intense broadband radiation in the spectral range 10-500A has prompted renewed interest in the improvement of grazing incidence monochromators. Of particular importance is the moderate resolution case designed for highest throughput. This report outlines the reasons behind the various choices leading to a toroidal grating monochromator design, and indicates a method for finding optimum values for some of the parameters in the straight grooved case. This case is chosen because, at present, all aberration corrected gratings contain photoresist on their surfaces, and are therefore unsuited for use with high intensity synchrotron radiation. Fixed entrance and exit slit to grating distances and wavelength scanning by simple rotation of the grating about its pole are assumed

  2. Evaluation of ozone concentration for a white beam line hutch at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the synchrotron radiation source Indus-2, 26 synchrotron radiation beam lines are planned, out of which 7 beam lines are operational and several are in installation stage. For carrying out experiments, SR beam is brought out to air through the beam lines (which are housed in shielded hutches). Due to the interaction of SR with air, ozone is produced, which is a noxious gas and is hazardous, if inhaled in excess. The production of ozone is high in white beam lines in comparison with pink and monochromatic beam lines. In the present paper ozone generation for a white beam line of Indus-2 is estimated. The ozone production rate, saturation concentration, ventilation rate and delay time are also estimated. The saturation concentration of ozone for the white beam line (energy dispersive X-ray diffraction beam line) BL-11 was found to be 0.965 ppm for 100 cm interaction path length and 51.45 m3 hutch volume without any ventilation. The paper presents the details of the calculation and the results. (author)

  3. Exact 1-D Model for Coherent Synchrotron Radiation with Shielding and Bunch Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Mayes, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Coherent Synchrotron Radiation has been studied effectively using a 1-dimensional model for the charge distribution in the realm of small angle approximations and high energies. Here we use Jefimenko's form of Maxwell's equations, without such approximations, to calculate the exact wake-fields due to this effect in multiple bends and drifts. It has been shown before that the influence of a drift can propagate well into a subsequent bend. We show, for reasonable parameters, that the influence of a previous bend can also propagate well into a subsequent bend, and that this is especially important at the beginning of a bend. Shielding by conducting parallel plates is simulated using the image charge method. We extend the formalism to situations with compressing and decompressing distributions, and conclude that simpler approximations to bunch compression usually overestimates the effect. Additionally, an exact formula for the coherent power radiated by a Gaussian bunch is derived by considering the coherent sync...

  4. Beam lifetime calculation in an electron storage ring for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an electron storage ring dedicated for synchrotron radiation, the beam lifetime should be of a few hours, so that the radiation is available to the users for sufficient time. The beam lifetime in an electron storage ring is the average of the finite lifetimes arising due to betatron and energy oscillations, Coulomb scattering and elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons due to residual gases present in the beam tube. A computer program has been written to study the variation of beam lifetime with various machine parameters such as lattice functions, rf voltage, tube aperture etc. The program has been developed to take input data from AGS computer program output. The lifetime of electron beam at lower energies has been studied for a weak focussing electron storage ring and is found to be governed mainly by Coulomb scattering. (author). 3 figs

  5. Paraxial Green's functions in synchrotron radiation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work contains a systematic treatment of single particle synchrotron radiation and some application to realistic beams with given cross section area, divergence and energy spread. Standard theory relies on several approximations whose applicability limits and accuracy are often forgotten. We begin remarking that on the one hand, a paraxial approximation can always be applied without loss of generality and with ultra relativistic accuracy. On the other hand, dominance of the acceleration field over the velocity part in the Lienard-Wiechert expressions is not always guaranteed and constitutes a separate assumption, whose applicability is discussed. Treating synchrotron radiation in paraxial approximation we derive the equation for the slow varying envelope function of the Fourier components of the electric field vector. Calculations of Synchrotron Radiation properties performed by others showed that the phase of the Fourier components of the electric field vector differs from the phase of a virtual point source. In this paper we present a systematic, analytical description of this phase shift, calculating amplitude and phase of electric field from bending magnets, short magnets, two bending magnet system separated by a straight section (edge radiation) and undulator devices. We pay particular attention to region of applicability and accuracy of approximations used. Finally, taking advantage of results of analytical calculation presented in reduced form we analyze various features of radiation from a complex insertion device (set of two undulators with a focusing triplet in between) accounting for the influence of energy spread and electron beam emittance. (orig.)

  6. Impact parameter profile of synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Artru, X

    2005-01-01

    The horizontal impact parameter profile of synchrotron radiation, for fixed vertical angle of the photon, is calculated. This profile is observed through an astigmatic optical system, horizontally focused on the electron trajectory and vertically focused at infinity. It is the product of the usual angular distribution of synchrotron radiation, which depends on the vertical angle $\\psi$, and the profile function of a caustic staying at distance $\\bcl = (\\gamma^{-2} + \\psi^2) \\RB/2 $ from the orbit circle, $\\RB$ being the bending radius and $\\gamma$ the Lorentz factor. The {\\it classical impact parameter} $\\bcl$ is connected to the Schott term of radiation damping theory. The caustic profile function is an Airy function squared. Its fast oscillations allow a precise determination of the horizontal beam width.

  7. Use of XR-QA2 radiochromic films for quantitative imaging of a synchrotron radiation beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of an ongoing project, promoted by INFN, at the SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy) for phase-contrast breast X-ray computed tomography, the assessment of the dose to the breast is one of the issues, requiring the determination of the distribution of X-ray incident photon fluence. This work investigates the use of XR-QA2 radiochromic films for quantitative imaging of the synchrotron radiation (SR) beam. XR-QA2 films were irradiated in a plane transverse to the beam axis, with a monochromatic beam of energy of 28, 35, 38 or 40 keV. The response of the radiochromic film was calibrated in terms of average air kerma measured with an ionization chamber. The net reflectance of the exposed film was then converted to photon fluence per unit air kerma (mm−2mGy−1). The SR beam profile was acquired also with a scintillator (GOS) based, fiber optic coupled CCD camera as well as with a scintillator based flat panel detector. Horizontal and vertical line profiles acquired with the radiochromic films show the 2D distribution of the beam intensity, with variations in the order of 15–20% in the horizontal direction. The response of the radiochromic film is comparable to that of the other imaging detectors, within less than 5% variation

  8. Application of Synchrotron Radiation Imaging for Non-destructive Monitoring of Mouse Rheumatoid Arthritis Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to observe microstructures of the rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet using a synchrotron radiation beam and to compare findings with histological observations. X-ray refraction images from ex-vivo rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet were obtained with an 8KeV white (unmonochromatic) beam and 20 micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal. The visual image was magnified using a x 10 microscope objective and captured using digital CCD camera. Experiments were performed at 1B2 bending magnet beamline of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea. Obtained images were compared with histopathologic findings from same sample. Cartilage destruction and thickened joint capsule with joint space narrowing were clearly identified at each grade of rheumatoid model with spatial resolution of as much as 1.2 micron and these findings were directly correlated with histopathologic findings. The results suggest that x-ray microscopy study of the rheumatoid arthritis model using synchrotron radiation demonstrates the potential for clinically relevant micro structure of mouse feet without sectioning and fixation

  9. Application of Synchrotron Radiation Imaging for Non-destructive Monitoring of Mouse Rheumatoid Arthritis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Hyuk; Kim, Hong-Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Jong Ki; Youn, Hwa Shik

    2007-01-01

    This study was performed to observe microstructures of the rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet using a synchrotron radiation beam and to compare findings with histological observations. X-ray refraction images from ex-vivo rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet were obtained with an 8KeV white (unmonochromatic) beam and 20 micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal. The visual image was magnified using a × 10 microscope objective and captured using digital CCD camera. Experiments were performed at 1B2 bending magnet beamline of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea. Obtained images were compared with histopathologic findings from same sample. Cartilage destruction and thickened joint capsule with joint space narrowing were clearly identified at each grade of rheumatoid model with spatial resolution of as much as 1.2 micron and these findings were directly correlated with histopathologic findings. The results suggest that x-ray microscopy study of the rheumatoid arthritis model using synchrotron radiation demonstrates the potential for clinically relevant micro structure of mouse feet without sectioning and fixation.

  10. Photostimulated phosphor based image plate detection system for HRVUV beamline at Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Haris, K; Shastri, Aparna; K., Sunanda; K., Babita; Rao, S V N Bhaskara; Ahmad, Shabbir; Tauheed, A

    2014-01-01

    A high resolution vacuum ultraviolet (HRVUV) beamline based on a 6.65 meter off-plane Eagle spectrometer is in operation at the Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source, RRCAT, Indore, India. To facilitate position sensitive detection and fast spectral recording, a new BaFBr:Eu2+ phosphor based image plate (IP) detection system interchangeable with the existing photomultiplier (PMT) scanning system has been installed on this beamline. VUV photoabsorption studies on Xe, O2, N2O and SO2 are carried out to evaluate the performance of the IP detection system. An FWHM of ~ 0.5 {\\AA} is achieved for the Xe atomic line at 1469.6 {\\AA}. Reproducibility of spectra is found to be within the experimental resolution. Compared to the PMT scanning system, the IP shows several advantages in terms of sensitivity, recording time and S/N ratio, which are highlighted in the paper. This is the first report of incorporation of an IP detection system in a VUV beamline using synchrotron radiation. Commissioning of the new detection sys...

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of ultra high vacuum and synchrotron radiation for particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082330; Leonid, Rivkin

    With preparation of Hi-Lumi LHC fully underway, and the FCC machines under study, accelerators will reach unprecedented energies and along with it very large amount of synchrotron radiation (SR). This will desorb photoelectrons and molecules from accelerator walls, which contribute to electron cloud buildup and increase the residual pressure - both effects reducing the beam lifetime. In current accelerators these two effects are among the principal limiting factors, therefore precise calculation of synchrotron radiation and pressure properties are very important, desirably in the early design phase. This PhD project shows the modernization and a major upgrade of two codes, Molflow and Synrad, originally written by R. Kersevan in the 1990s, which are based on the test-particle Monte Carlo method and allow ultra-high vacuum and synchrotron radiation calculations. The new versions contain new physics, and are built as an all-in-one package - available to the public. Existing vacuum calculation methods are overvi...

  12. The development of non-destructive analysis for archaeological samples using high energy synchrotron radiation and laser electron photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop the non-destructive analysis methods for archaeological samples using high energy synchrotron radiation and laser electron photon (inverse compton scattered photons). High energy synchrotron radiation is used for non destructive elemental analysis of heavy elements to efficient analysis with less overlapped peaks. Faiences which are made recently are tested as samples. Glaze has many elements and there is difference between Iran's glaze and Egypt's glaze. As a result, high energy synchrotron radiation has possibility to solve the provenance issues. Moreover, Pb and Ba, which are detected by elemental analysis, are appropriate for isotope analysis to obtain farther information. Pb and Ba can be indices for glaze and basement respectively. The elements of excavated faience will be analyzed in future. The non destructive isotope analysis using laser electron photons will be developed at the same time. (author)

  13. Computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a widely used method of obtaining cross-sectional views of objects. The high intensity, natural collimation, monochromaticity and energy tunability of synchrotron x-ray sources could potentially be used to provide CT images of improved quality. The advantages of these systems would be that images could be produced more rapidly with better spatial resolution and reduced beam artifacts. In addition, images, in some cases, could be acquired with elemental sensitivity. As a demonstration of the capability of such a system, CT images were obtained of four slices of an excised pig heart in which the arteries and the cardiac chambers were filled with an iodinated medium. Images were taken with incident x-rays tuned successively to energies just above and below the iodine K edge. Iodine specific images were obtained by logarithmically subtracting the low energy image data from the high energy data and then reconstructing the image. CT imaging using synchrotron radiation may become a convenient and non-destructive method of imaging samples difficult to study by other methods

  14. Applications of synchrotron radiation in Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short introduction to the generation of the synchrotron radiation is made. Following, the applications of such a radiation in biophysics with emphasis to the study of the hemoglobin molecule are presented. (L.C.)

  15. Carbyne formation by synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaito, C; Hanamoto, K; Sasaki, M; Kimura, S; Nakada, Tatsuya; Saitô, Y; Koike, C; Nakayama, Y

    2001-01-01

    Thin carbon films prepared by vacuum evaporation using the arc method were mounted on a standard electron microscope copper grid. They were irradiated by white synchrotron radiation (SR) beam by the use of cylindrical and toroidal mirrors. The irradiated film was examined using a high-resolution electron microscope. alpha and alpha+beta mixture carbyne crystals were grown in round and the elongated shapes. The round crystals were composed of 5-10 nm crystallites of a carbyne form. The elongated crystal grew into a single crystal 100 nm in size. The c-axes of both grown crystals were oblique to the film. The growth of the carbynes was discussed as being the result of nucleation due to graphite microcrystallites formed by SR beam irradiation.

  16. Synchrotron radiation from a Helical Wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of Wiggler magnets as an improved source of synchrotron radiation from high energy electron storage rings was proposed a few years ago. Since then it has also been suggested that synchrotron radiation from Wiggler magnets placed in proton machines can be used to monitor energy, dimensions and position of the beam and that this effect is even more interesting in proton storage rings where the need to see the beam is greater. Most of the calculations carried out so far consider radiation from a single particle in a Wiggler which is appropriate when the beam is radiating incoherently. In this paper a general formalism is developed for the case when the beam radiates coherently. These results are then applied to both electron and proton storage rings. For the electron case, an expression is derived for the length of the bunch to be used as a more intense coherent radiation source. For proton machines the radiation can be used to measure energy, current, transverse dimensions and longitudinal density variations in the beam

  17. Structural analysis with high brilliance synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    The research subjects in diffraction and scattering of materials with high brilliance synchrotron radiation such as SPring-8 (Super Photon ring 8 GeV) are summarized. The SPring-8 project is going well and 10 public beamlines will be opened for all users in October, 1997. Three JAERI beamlines are also under construction for researches of heavy element science, physical and structural properties under extreme conditions such as high temperature and high pressure. (author)

  18. Synchrotron radiation CT from the micro to nanoscale for the investigation of bone tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrin, Francoise; Dong, Pei; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Zuluaga, Maria; Olivier, Cécile; Langer, Max; Cloetens, Peter

    2012-10-01

    During the last decade, X-ray micro Computerized Tomography (CT) has become a conventional technique for the three-dimensional (3D) investigation of trabecular bone micro-architecture. Coupling micro-CT to synchrotron sources possesses significant advantages in terms of image quality and gives access to information on bone mineralization which is an important factor of bone quality. We present an overview of the investigation of bone using Synchrotron Radiation (SR) CT from the micro to the nano scale. We introduce two synchrotron CT systems developed at the ESRF based on SR parallel-beam micro-CT and magnified phase CT respectively, achieving down to submicrometric and nanometric spatial resolution. In the latter, by using phase retrieval prior to tomographic reconstruction, the system provides maps of the 3D refractive index distribution. Parallel-beam SR micro-CT has extensively been used for the analysis of trabecular or cortical bone in human or small animals with spatial resolution in the range [3-10] μm. However, the characterization of the bone properties at the cellular scale is also of major interest. At the micrometric scale, the shape, density and morphology of osteocyte lacunae can be studied on statistically representative volumes. At the nanometric scale, unprecedented 3D displays of the canaliculi network have been obtained on fields of views including a large number of interconnected osteocyte lacunae. Finally SR magnified phase CT provides a detailed analysis of the lacuno-canalicular network and in addition information on the organization of the collagen fibers. These findings open new perspectives for three-dimensional quantitative assessment of bone tissue at the cellular scale.

  19. Discussion on spin-flip synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bordovitsyn, V A; Myagkii, A N

    1998-01-01

    Quantum spin-flip transitions are of great importance in the synchrotron radiation theory. For better understanding of the nature of this phenomenon, it is necessary to except the effects connected with the electric charge radiation from observation. This fact explains the suggested choice of the spin-flip radiation model in the form of radiation of the electric neutral Dirac-Pauli particle moving in the homogeneous magnetic field. It is known that in this case, the total radiation in the quantum theory is conditioned by spin-flip transitions. The idea is that spin-flip radiation is represented as a nonstationary process connected with spin precession. We shall shown how to construct a solution of the classical equation of the spin precession in the BMT theory having the exact solution of the Dirac-Pauli equation.Thus, one will find the connection of the quantum spin-flip transitions with classical spin precession.

  20. Heat transfer studies for a crystal in a synchrotron radiation beamline

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Sinha

    2009-04-01

    Heat load studies have been performed for the first crystal of a double crystal monochromator to be installed in a beamline of the 2·5 GeV synchrotron radiation source Indus-2. Finite element analysis (FEA) has been used to calculate the temperature distribution and the mechanical distortions on these crystals. Several cases of cooling schemes and heat loads have been studied. Based on these FEA results, the analytical relationships available in the literature have been modified. It is shown that modified analytical results compare well with the empirical results obtained from FEA. The optimisation of the cooling conditions can be achieved by doing FEA calculations for only one case. All other cases can then be calculated by using analytical relations proposed here. The proposed analytical equations are generic in nature and can be applied for any source—crystal combination and therefore would be useful for performance prediction of any new monochromator on a new synchrotron source without taking recourse to time consuming, computation-intensive FEA.

  1. Synchrotron radiation. Basics, methods and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobilio, Settimio; Meneghini, Carlo [Roma Tre Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Science; Boscherini, Federico (ed.) [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2015-02-01

    Synchrotron radiation is today extensively used for fundamental and applied research in many different fields of science. Its exceptional characteristics in terms of intensity, brilliance, spectral range, time structure and now also coherence pushed many experimental techniques to previously un-reachable limits, enabling the performance of experiments unbelievable only few years ago. The book gives an up-to-date overview of synchrotron radiation research today with a view to the future, starting from its generation and sources, its interaction with matter, illustrating the main experimental technique employed and provides an overview of the main fields of research in which new and innovative results are obtained. The book is addressed to PhD students and young researchers to provide both an introductory and a rather deep knowledge of the field. It will also be helpful to experienced researcher who want to approach the field in a professional way.

  2. Diffusive synchrotron radiation from extragalactic jets

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, G D

    2006-01-01

    Flattenings of nonthermal radiation spectra observed from knots and interknot locations of the jets of 3C273 and M87 in UV and X-ray bands are discussed within modern models of magnetic field generation in the relativistic jets. Specifically, we explicitly take into account the effect of the small-scale random magnetic field, probably present in such jets, which gives rise to emission of Diffusive Synchrotron Radiation, whose spectrum deviates substantially from the standard synchrotron spectrum, especially at high frequencies. The calculated spectra agree well with the observed ones if the energy densities contained in small-scale and large-scale magnetic fields are comparable. The implications of this finding for magnetic field generation, particle acceleration, and jet composition are discussed.

  3. Plasma diagnostics using synchrotron radiation in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidone, I.; Giruzzi, G.; Granata, G.

    1995-09-01

    This report deal with the use of synchrotron radiation in tokamaks. The main advantage of this new method is that it enables to overcome several deficiencies, caused by cut-off, refraction, and harmonic overlap. It also makes it possible to enhance the informative contents of the familiar low harmonic scheme. The basic theory of the method is presented and illustrated by numerical applications, for plasma parameters of relevance in present and next step tokamaks. (TEC). 10 refs., 13 figs.

  4. An ultra-fast data acquisition system for coherent synchrotron radiation with terahertz detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recording of coherent synchrotron radiation requires data acquisition systems with a temporal resolution of tens of picosecond. This paper describes a new real-time and high-accuracy data acquisition system suitable for recording individual ultra-short pulses generated by a fast terahertz (THz) detector (e.g. YBCO, NbN, Zero Biased Schottky Diode). The system consists of a fast sampling board combined with a high data throughput readout. The first board is designed for sampling the fast pulse signals with a full width half maximum (FWHM) between a few tens to one hundred picoseconds with a minimum sampling time of 3 ps. The high data throughput board consists of a PCIe-Bus Master DMA architecture used for fast data transfer up to 3 GByte/s. The full readout chain with fast THz detectors and the acquisition system has been successfully tested at the synchrotron ANKA. An overview of the electronics system and preliminary results with multi-bunch filling pattern will be presented

  5. A novel approach to synchrotron radiation simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Trad, G; Goldblatt, A; Mazzoni, S; Roncarolo, F

    2014-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, synchrotron radiation (SR) is used to continuously monitor the transverse properties of the beams. Unfortunately the machine and beam parameters are such that the useful radiation emitted inside a separation dipole, chosen as source, is diffraction limited heavily affecting the accuracy of the measurement. In order to deconvolve the diffraction effects from the acquired beam images and in order to design an alternative monitor based on a double slit interferometer an extensive study of the synchrotron light source and of the optical propagation has been made. This study is based on simulations combining together several existing tools: SRW for the source, ZEMAX for the transport and MATLAB for the “glue” and analysis of the results. The resulting tool is very powerful and can be easily adapted to other synchrotron radiation problems. In this paper the simulation package and the way it is used will be described as well as the results obtained for the LHC and SPS.

  6. High-resolution detectors for medical applications and synchrotron radiation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Groshev, V. R.; Leonov, V. V.; Papushev, P. A.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.; Shayakhmetov, V. R.; Shekhtman, L. I.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Ukraintsev, Yu. G.; Yurchenko, Yu. B.

    2011-02-01

    In the present report, we summarize our experience in the development of high-resolution position sensitive gas detectors for medicine and synchrotron radiation experiments at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for the last years. We have designed several versions of Multistrip Ionisation Chambers with a channel pitch varying from 0.4 down to 0.1 mm. The high quantum efficiency (>65%) of these detectors allow its application in high quality diagnostic imaging. The detector with 0.1 mm strip pitch and 20 atm pressure of Xe demonstrates the best possible DQE and spatial resolution for gaseous detectors in a wide range of X-ray energies. Additionally, the initial results of feasibility study of the detector for beam position monitoring for Heavy Ion Therapy System are presented too.

  7. Synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM of brachiopod shell interiors for taxonomy: Preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motchurova-Dekova Neda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM is a non-destructive technique for the investigation and visualization of the internal features of solid opaque objects, which allows reconstruction of a complete three-dimensional image of internal structures by recording of the differences in the effects on the passage of waves of energy reacting with those structures. Contrary to X-rays, produced in a conventional X-ray tube, the intense synchrotron light beams are sharply focused like a laser beam. We report encouraging results from the use of SRXTM for purely taxonomic purposes in brachiopods: an attempt to find a non-destructive and more efficient alternative to serial sectioning and several other methods of dissection together with the non-destructive method of X-ray computerised micro-tomography. Two brachiopod samples were investigated using SRXTM. In “Rhynchonella” flustracea it was possible to visualise the 3D shape of the crura and dental plates. In Terebratulina imbricata it was possible to reveal the form of the brachidium. It is encouraging that we have obtained such promising results using SRXTM with our very first two fortuitous samples, which had respectively fine-grained limestone and marl as infilling sediment, in contrast to the discouraging results communicated to us by some colleagues who have tested specimens with such infillings using X-ray micro-tomography. In future the holotypes, rare museum specimens or delicate Recent material may be preferentially subjected to this mode of analysis.

  8. High flux and high resolution VUV beam line for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam line has been optimized for high flux and high resolution in the wavelength range from 30 nm to 300 nm. Sample chambers for luminescence spectroscopy on gaseous, liquid and solid samples and for photoelectron spectroscopy have been integrated. The synchrotron radiation from the storage ring DORIS (at DESY, Hamburg) emitted into 50 mrad in horizontal and into 2.2 mrad in vertical direction is focused by a cylindrical and a plane elliptical mirror into the entrance slit of a 2m normal incidence monochromator. The light flux from the exit slit is focused by a rotational elliptic mirror onto the sample yielding a size of the light spot of 4 x 0.15 mm2. The light flux at the sample reaches 7 x 1012 photons nm-1s-1 at 8 eV photon energy for a current of 100 mA in DORIS. A resolution of 0.007 nm has been obtained. (orig.)

  9. A novel DC Magnetron sputtering facility for space research and synchrotron radiation optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, A.M.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Pareschi, G.; Poulsen, H.F.

    1998-01-01

    A new DC magnetron sputtering facility has been build up at the Danish Space Research Institute (DSRI), specially designed to enable uniform coatings of large area curved optics, such as Wolter-I mirror optics used in space telescopes and curved optics used in synchrotron radiation facilities. The...

  10. Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy - An Enhanced Method for Examining Protein Conformations and Protein Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Wallace; R Janes

    2011-12-31

    CD (circular dichroism) spectroscopy is a well-established technique in structural biology. SRCD (synchrotron radiation circular dichroism) spectroscopy extends the utility and applications of conventional CD spectroscopy (using laboratory-based instruments) because the high flux of a synchrotron enables collection of data at lower wavelengths (resulting in higher information content), detection of spectra with higher signal-to-noise levels and measurements in the presence of absorbing components (buffers, salts, lipids and detergents). SRCD spectroscopy can provide important static and dynamic structural information on proteins in solution, including secondary structures of intact proteins and their domains, protein stability, the differences between wild-type and mutant proteins, the identification of natively disordered regions in proteins, and the dynamic processes of protein folding and membrane insertion and the kinetics of enzyme reactions. It has also been used to effectively study protein interactions, including protein-protein complex formation involving either induced-fit or rigid-body mechanisms, and protein-lipid complexes. A new web-based bioinformatics resource, the Protein Circular Dichroism Data Bank (PCDDB), has been created which enables archiving, access and analyses of CD and SRCD spectra and supporting metadata, now making this information publicly available. To summarize, the developing method of SRCD spectroscopy has the potential for playing an important role in new types of studies of protein conformations and their complexes.

  11. Application of synchrotron radiation for elemental microanalysis of human central nervous System tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, M.; Lankosz, M.; Ostachowicz, J.; Adamek, D.; Krygowska-Wajs, A.; Tomik, B.; Szczudlik, A.; Simionovici, A.; Bohic, S.

    2003-03-01

    The pathogenesis of two neurodegenerative diseases i.e. Parkinson's Disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are still not known. It is supposed that disturbance of metal ions homeostasis may promote degeneration and atrophy of neurones. As a preliminary study. the quantitative and topographic elemental analysis of selected parts of human brain and spinal cord was performed using synchrotron microbeam-X ray fluorescence (μ-SXRF) technique. The samples were taken during the autopsy from patients with PD, ALS and from patients died due to non-neurological conditions events. X-ray fluorescence imaging showed that increased concentration of selected elements are observed in neurons perikarial parts in compare with surrounding area. Moreover, comparable analysis showed significant differences in accumulation of selected elements between the pathological and control cases. The investigations indicate that micro-beam of synchrotron radiation can be satisfactory applied for analysis of central nervous System tissue providing useful information about distribution and contents of elements at the single cell level.

  12. Instrumentation for high-precision x-ray optics at the synchrotron radiation source ''Zelenograd''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-precision x-ray optics station is to be installed on one of the five branches of the wiggler beamline at the new dedicated synchrotron radiation source ''Zelenograd.'' It is intended for the precision x-ray diffraction measurements using different methods which have been developed in the last decade for the structure studies of nearly perfect crystals and interfaces. The station consists of the double-crystal monochromator unit, the main goniometer with the crystal analyzer, the slit system with ion chambers, and the control and data acquisition system. The design of principal units and modules of the station is treated. The x-ray optics schemes which can be implemented on the station are described. The control and measuring system for x-ray experiments is presented

  13. Synchrotron-radiation experiments with recoil ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Studies of atoms, ions and molecules with synchrotron radiation have generally focused on measurements of properties of the electrons ejected during, or after, the photoionization process. Much can also be learned, however, about the atomic or molecular relaxation process by studies of the residual ions or molecular fragments following inner-shell photoionization. Measurements are reported of mean kinetic energies of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon recoil ions produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell photoionization using white and monochromatic synchrotron x radiation. Energies are much lower than for the same charge-state ions produced by charged-particle impact. The results may be applicable to design of future angle-resolved ion-atom collision experiments. Photoion charge distributions are presented and compared with other measurements and calculations. Related experiments with synchrotron-radiation produced recoil ion, including photoionization of stored ions and measurement of shakeoff in near-threshold excitation, are briefly discussed. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Inclined-incidence quasi-Fresnel lens for prefocusing of synchrotron radiation x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inclined-incidence quasi-Fresnel lens made of acrylic resin has been developed for prefocusing in synchrotron radiation x-ray beamlines. By inclining the lens, the grating aspect ratio is large enough for x-ray use. As it operates in transmission mode with negligible beam deflection and offset, little additional equipment is needed to introduce it into existing beamlines. It is fabricated by sheet-press forming, enabling inexpensive mass production. The prototype was able to focus a 730-μm-wide beam to a width of 80 μm with a photon flux density gain of 5.6 at an x-ray energy of 10 keV.

  15. Filter and window assemblies for high power insertion device synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The powerful beams of x-ray radiation generated by insertion devices at high power synchrotron facilities deposit substantial amounts of localized heat in the front end and optical components that they intercept. X-ray beams from undulator sources, in particular, are confined to very narrow solid angles and therefore impose very high absorbed heat fluxes. This paper is devoted to a detailed study of the design of windows for the Advanced Photon Source undulators and wigglers, emphasizing alternative design concepts, material considerations, and cooling techniques necessary for handling the high heat load of the insertion devices. Various designs are thermally and structurally analyzed by numerically simulating full-power operating conditions. This analysis also has relevance to the design and development of other beam line components which are subjected to the high heat loads of insertion devices

  16. New Particle-in-Cell Code for Numerical Simulation of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsa Terzic, Rui Li

    2010-05-01

    We present a first look at the new code for self-consistent, 2D simulations of beam dynamics affected by the coherent synchrotron radiation. The code is of the particle-in-cell variety: the beam bunch is sampled by point-charge particles, which are deposited on the grid; the corresponding forces on the grid are then computed using retarded potentials according to causality, and interpolated so as to advance the particles in time. The retarded potentials are evaluated by integrating over the 2D path history of the bunch, with the charge and current density at the retarded time obtained from interpolation of the particle distributions recorded at discrete timesteps. The code is benchmarked against analytical results obtained for a rigid-line bunch. We also outline the features and applications which are currently being developed.

  17. Inclined-incidence quasi-Fresnel lens for prefocusing of synchrotron radiation x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagoshima, Yasushi; Takano, Hidekazu; Takeda, Shingo

    2012-10-01

    An inclined-incidence quasi-Fresnel lens made of acrylic resin has been developed for prefocusing in synchrotron radiation x-ray beamlines. By inclining the lens, the grating aspect ratio is large enough for x-ray use. As it operates in transmission mode with negligible beam deflection and offset, little additional equipment is needed to introduce it into existing beamlines. It is fabricated by sheet-press forming, enabling inexpensive mass production. The prototype was able to focus a 730-μm-wide beam to a width of 80 μm with a photon flux density gain of 5.6 at an x-ray energy of 10 keV.

  18. Biological effects of synchrotron radiation on crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐掌雄; 董保中; 等

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of germinating seeds of barley,winter wheat and spring one to synchrotron ultraviolet radiation is barley>winter wheat and spring one.But when dry seeds of the three crops are irradiated by 3.5-22keV X-rays,the sequence of their sensitivity to radiation can be changed.for irradiation of 0.6-3keV ultra soft X-rays,0.40-0.90 of the seedlings of the first generation appear mutation of striped chlorophyll defect.This biological effect has never been found for irradiation of other rays.

  19. Using of Synchrotron radiation for study of multielement composition of the small mammals diet and tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezel, V.S. [Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 8 Marta str., 202, 620144, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Koutzenogii, K.P. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskaya str., 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Mukhacheva, S.V. [Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 8 Marta str., 202, 620144, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: msv@ipae.uran.ru; Chankina, O.V. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskaya str., 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Savchenko, T.I. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskaya str., 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-21

    The Synchrotron radiation X-ray Fluorescence analysis (SRXRF) was used for estimation of 'geochemical selection' of elements by small mammals, which belong to different trophic groups and inhabit polluted and background areas (the Middle Ural). The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Cd, Pb in the diet and into hepar of a herbivorous (bank vole) and carnivorous (Laxmann's shrew) small mammals were compared. Herbivores play a particular role in chemical elements translocation between trophic levels, limiting element transition to consumers of the consequent levels. Whereas, insectivores concentrate most elements in their tissues under the same conditions.

  20. A novel non-contact profiler design for measuring synchrotron radiation mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel optical profiler is described in this paper for measurement of surface profiles of synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The measurement is based on a combination of an optical heterodyne technique and a precise phase measurement procedure without a reference surface. A Zeeman two-frequency He-Ne laser is employed as the light source. The common-path optical system, which uses a birefringent lens as the beam splitter, minimizes the effects of air turbulence, sample vibration and temperature variation. A special autofocus system allows the profiler to measure the roughness and shape of a sample surface. The optical system is mounted on a large linear air-bearing slide, and is capable of scanning over distances covering the spatial period range from several microns to nearly one meter with a high measurement accuracy. 9 refs., 5 figs

  1. Recent advances in the use of synchrotron radiation for the analysis of coal combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Two major coal combustion problems are the formation and build-up of slag deposits on heat transfer surfaces and the production and control of toxic species in coal combustion emissions. The use of synchrotron radiation for the analysis of coal combustion products can play a role in the better understanding of both these phenomena. An understanding of the chemical composition of such slags under boiler operating conditions and as a function of the mineral composition of various coals is one ultimate goal of this program. The principal constituents in the ash of many coals are the oxides of Si, Al, Fe, Ca, K, S, and Na. The analytical method required must be able to determine the functional forms of all these elements both in coal and in coal ash at elevated temperatures. One unique way of conducting these analyses is by x-ray spectroscopy.

  2. Characterization of electrode materials for lithium ion and sodium ion batteries using synchrotron radiation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C; Conry, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Intercalation compounds such as transition metal oxides or phosphates are the most commonly used electrode materials in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. During insertion or removal of alkali metal ions, the redox states of transition metals in the compounds change and structural transformations such as phase transitions and/or lattice parameter increases or decreases occur. These behaviors in turn determine important characteristics of the batteries such as the potential profiles, rate capabilities, and cycle lives. The extremely bright and tunable x-rays produced by synchrotron radiation allow rapid acquisition of high-resolution data that provide information about these processes. Transformations in the bulk materials, such as phase transitions, can be directly observed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) gives information about the local electronic and geometric structures (e.g. changes in redox states and bond lengths). In situ experiments carried out on operating cells are particularly useful because they allow direct correlation between the electrochemical and structural properties of the materials. These experiments are time-consuming and can be challenging to design due to the reactivity and air-sensitivity of the alkali metal anodes used in the half-cell configurations, and/or the possibility of signal interference from other cell components and hardware. For these reasons, it is appropriate to carry out ex situ experiments (e.g. on electrodes harvested from partially charged or cycled cells) in some cases. Here, we present detailed protocols for the preparation of both ex situ and in situ samples for experiments involving synchrotron radiation and demonstrate how these experiments are done. PMID:24300777

  3. Laser synchrotron radiation and beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of intense {approx_gt} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, short pulse ({approx_lt} 1 ps) lasers with electron beams and plasmas can lead to the generation of harmonic radiation by several mechanisms. Laser synchrotron radiation may provide a practical method for generating tunable, near monochromatic, well collimated, short pulse x-rays in compact, relatively inexpensive source. The mechanism for the generation of laser synchrotron radiation is nonlinear Thomson scattering. Short wavelengths can be generated via Thomson scattering by two methods, (i) backscattering from relativistic electron beams, in which the radiation frequency is upshifted by the relativistic factor 4{gamma}{sup 2}, and (ii) harmonic scattering, in which a multitude of harmonics are generated with harmonic numbers extending out to the critical harmonic number nc{approx_equal}a{sub 0}{sup 3} {much_gt} 1, where a{sub 0} {approx_equal}10{sup -9}{lambda}I{sup 1/2}, {lambda} is the laser wavelength in {mu}m and I is the laser intensity in W/cm{sup 2}. Laser synchrotron sources are capable of generating short ({approx_lt} ps) x-ray pulses with high peak flux ({approx_gt} 10{sup 21} photons/s) and brightness ({approx_gt}{sup 19} photons/s-mm{sup 2}-mrad{sup 2} 0.1%BW. As the electron beam radiates via Thomson scattering, it can subsequently be cooled, i.e., the beam emittance and energy spread can be reduced. This cooling can occur on rapid ({approximately} ps) time scales. In addition, electron distributions with sufficiently small axial energy spreads can be used to generate coherent XUV radiation via a laser-pumped FEL mechanism.

  4. Synchrotron radiation - Applications in the earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, W. A.; Brown, G. E., Jr.

    Synchrotron-radiation sources and their characteristics are overviewed along with recent synchrotron-based research on earth materials and future earth-science applications utilizing the next generation of synchrotron-radiation sources presently under construction. Focus is placed on X-ray scattering studies of earth materials (crystalline and noncrystalline) under ambient conditions, diffraction studies of earth materials at high pressures and/or temperatures, spectroscopic studies, primarily X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and spatially resolved X-ray fluorescence studies of compositional variations in earth materials. It is noted that other synchrotron-based methods, such as X-ray tomography and topography may become important in characterizing earth materials, while soft X-ray/vacuum ultraviolet radiation from synchrotron sources can be applied to problems involving the structural environments of low-atomic-number elements and the characterization of surface reactions of minerals with liquids and gases.

  5. Using the electron synchrotron radiation for the calibration of the spectral density in UV and long-wave vacuum UV range (160 nm to 340 nm)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron synchrotron radiation was investigated with a view to the development of methods for the calibration of the spectral density in the UV and long-wave vacuum UV spectral regions. The relative spectral radiation flow of a synchrotron can be calculated over a wide spectral region. In order to determine the absolute radiation flow in the vaccum UV, the synchrotron radiation in the visible region is compared with a reference source (calibrated tungsten filament lamp). Between 160 nm and 340 nm, the spectral beam density calibration with the synchrotron radiation is uncertain by about +- 5%. Between 280 nm and 340 nm, calibrations of deuterium lamps at the synchrotron and at a cavity radiator vary by less than 10%. (orig./WL)

  6. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation. Ch. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation has a number of properties which make it uniquely suited for medical diagnostic imaging. The radiation is intense and can be readily monochromatized. With these highly intense, mono-chromatized X-ray beams, iodine K-edge di-chromatography can yield images which greatly enhance the visualization of iodine containing structures. As this technology continues to improve, the possibility of performing diagnostic cardiac, neuroradiological, and other vascular examinations with minimally invasive peripheral venous injections of iodinated contrast agent becomes increasingly practical. (author). 10 refs.; 6 figs

  7. Dose enhancement by synchrotron radiation and heavy atoms for the treatment of gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High grade gliomas are brain tumors of bad prognosis. The standard therapeutic treatment combines surgery, radiotherapy and sometimes use of temozolomide (chemotherapy agent). Healthy tissues radio-sensitivity is a major limitation for radiotherapy treatment. The stereotactic radiotherapy by synchrotron radiation is an innovative technique which combines a low energy radiation (lower 100 keV) with the presence of heavy atoms in the tumoral zone. Such an approach is used to increase the differential of dose deposited in the tumor compared to surrounding healthy tissues. In this study, several compounds containing heavy atoms such as chemotherapy agents: cisplatin/carbo-platin, a DNA base analog: 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IUdR) and gold nano-particles were considered. The dose enhancement factor induced by the presence of these compounds located for some of them in the extracellular medium or inside the cells for others, was determined using in vitro studies. Thereafter, in vivo studies on rats bearing gliomas, were performed to study the toxicity, the kinetic of distribution and the localization of these compounds together with their potential efficacy of treatment combining intracerebral injection with low energy radiation. (author)

  8. High pressure and synchrotron radiation satellite workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, J.; Guignot, N.; Morard, G.; Mezouar, M.; Andrault, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Sturhahn, W.; Daniel, I.; Reynard, B.; Simionovici, A.; Sanchez Valle, C.; Martinez, I.; Kantor, I.; Dubrovinsky, I.; Mccammon, C.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Kurnosiv, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Goncharenko, I.; Loubeyre, P.; Desgreniers, S.; Weck, G.; Yoo, C.S.; Iota, V.; Park, J.; Cynn, H.; Gorelli, F.; Toulemonde, P.; Machon, D.; Merlen, A.; San Miguel, A.; Amboage, M.; Aquilanti, G.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.; Itie, J.P.; Mcmillan, P.F.; Trapananti, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Panfilis, S. de; Filipponi, A.; Kreisel, J.; Bouvier, P.; Dkhil, B.; Chaabane, B.; Rosner, H.; Koudela, D.; Schwarz, U.; Handestein, A.; Hanfland, M.; Opahle, I.; Koepernik, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Mueller, K.H.; Mydosh, J.; Richter, M.; Hejny, C.; Falconi, S.; Lundegaard, L.F.; Mcmahon, M.I; Loa, I.; Syassen, K.; Wang, X.; Roth, H.; Lorenz, T.; Farber Daniel, I.; Antonangeli Daniele, I.; Krisch, M.; Badro, J.; Fiquet, G.; Occelli, F.; Mao, W.L.; Mao, H.K.; Eng, P.; Kao, C.C.; Shu, J.F.; Hemley, R.J.; Tse, J.S.; Yao, Y.; Deen, P.P.; Paolasini, I.; Braithwaite, D.; Kernavanois, N.; Lapertot, G.; Rupprecht, K.; Leupold, O.; Ponkratz, U.; Wortmann, G.; Beraud, A.; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Aracne, C.; Zarestky, J.L.; Mcqueeney, R.; Mathon, O.; Baudelet, F.; Decremps, F.; Itie, J.P.; Nataf, I.; Pascarelli, S.; Polian, A

    2006-07-01

    The workshop is dedicated to recent advances on science at high pressure at third generation synchrotron sources. A variety of experiments using synchrotron radiation techniques including X-ray diffraction, EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), inelastic X-ray scattering, Compton scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy of crystalline, liquid or amorphous samples, are reported. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  9. High pressure and synchrotron radiation satellite workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop is dedicated to recent advances on science at high pressure at third generation synchrotron sources. A variety of experiments using synchrotron radiation techniques including X-ray diffraction, EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), inelastic X-ray scattering, Compton scattering and Moessbauer spectroscopy of crystalline, liquid or amorphous samples, are reported. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations

  10. Education and training program for graduate school student with synchrotron radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the education and training program for graduate students of Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology Okayama University made at synchrotron facilities, SPring-8 and HiSOR. This program is a joint course of graduate school lecture and synchrotron facility training with company researchers, that was authorized by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The purpose of this program is the development of human resources who can understand the potential ability of synchrotron experiment. We report our plan and actual activity of the training program. (author)

  11. Bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation from planet magnetospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation from the moving charged particles was calculated in planet magnetospheres. A program package RADIATION was developed for these calculations. The radiative intensity is projected on a far sphere. The directional dependence of the radiation during the penetration of charged particles through the polar cusp was calculated. The program package RADIATION can be also used for treating the radiation of plasma cluster penetrating through the electric double layer, MHD and compress magnetic bow shock, plasma fibers and pinches and in other important situations. Intensity of radiation was derived from advanced and retarded potentials calculated from the Maxwell set of equations. Only radiative fields are displayed (I ∼ 1/r2) and the space intensity distribution does not depend on the distance of the projection sphere. In future non-radiative fields will be treated as well. In this case the distance of the projection sphere will be important parameter. The program was written in FORTRAN CVF 6.5A. The Earth magnetosphere and ionosphere form a natural protective shield from cosmic radiation and solar wind. Various models of the magnetosphere are compared (Tsyganenko, Safrankova-Nemecek, IGRF, and others) in the end of the contribution. (author)

  12. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal's photo multiplier tube (PMT)

  13. A simplified edge illumination set-up for quantitative phase contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation at clinical doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Mariaconcetta; Rigon, Luigi; Lopez, Frances C. M.; Chen, Rongchang; Dreossi, Diego; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Longo, Renata

    2015-02-01

    This work presents the first study of x-ray phase contrast imaging based on a simple implementation of the edge illumination method (EIXPCi) in the field of mammography with synchrotron radiation. A simplified EIXPCi set-up was utilized to study a possible application in mammography at clinical doses. Moreover, through a novel algorithm capable of separating and quantifying absorption and phase perturbations of images acquired in EIXPCi modality, it is possible to extract quantitative information on breast images, allowing an accurate tissue identification. The study was carried out at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy), where a mastectomy specimen was investigated with the EIXPCi technique. The sample was exposed at three different energies suitable for mammography with synchrotron radiation in order to test the validity of the novel algorithm in extracting values of linear attenuation coefficients integrated over the sample thickness. It is demonstrated that the quantitative data are in good agreement with the theoretical values of linear attenuation coefficients calculated on the hypothesis of the breast with a given composition. The results are promising and encourage the current efforts to apply the method in mammography with synchrotron radiation.

  14. A simplified edge illumination set-up for quantitative phase contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation at clinical doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the first study of x-ray phase contrast imaging based on a simple implementation of the edge illumination method (EIXPCi) in the field of mammography with synchrotron radiation. A simplified EIXPCi set-up was utilized to study a possible application in mammography at clinical doses. Moreover, through a novel algorithm capable of separating and quantifying absorption and phase perturbations of images acquired in EIXPCi modality, it is possible to extract quantitative information on breast images, allowing an accurate tissue identification. The study was carried out at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy), where a mastectomy specimen was investigated with the EIXPCi technique. The sample was exposed at three different energies suitable for mammography with synchrotron radiation in order to test the validity of the novel algorithm in extracting values of linear attenuation coefficients integrated over the sample thickness. It is demonstrated that the quantitative data are in good agreement with the theoretical values of linear attenuation coefficients calculated on the hypothesis of the breast with a given composition. The results are promising and encourage the current efforts to apply the method in mammography with synchrotron radiation. (note)

  15. Study of radioactive materials with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation brings 3 major improvements compared to other X-ray sources usually used in laboratories. Its high brilliance permits the study of size-reduced samples, the low divergency of the beam gives the possibility to increase the angular resolution of the diffractometer and the spectrum of the X-photons which is continuous, allows the experimenter to chose a particular wavelength. Synchrotron radiation is becoming an important tool to investigate radioactive materials particularly burnt nuclear fuels. Zircon is the corrosion product that appears on fuel clad during irradiation, the use of synchrotron radiation with the right wavelength and a discerning incidence angle has clearly shown a crystallographic change of the zircon induced by heavy ion irradiation. X-ray fluorescence induced by synchrotron radiation can give information on fission products which were till then undetected because of the lack of sensibility of previous methods. (A.C.)

  16. Interest of synchrotron radiation for the therapy of brain tumors: methodology and preclinical applications; Interet du rayonnement synchrotron dans la therapie des tumeurs cerebrales: methodologie et applications precliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnard, P

    2007-12-15

    Microbeam radiation (M.R.T.) and stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (S.S.R.T.) are innovative techniques currently developed at the european Synchrotron radiation facility. these techniques led to promising, but rarely reproduced, results. the use of different tumoral models for each techniques limit comparisons. M.R.T. experiments on rats bearing 9L tumors 14 days after implantation displayed a double median survival time ( from 20 to 40 days) with a 200 {mu}m spacing irradiation, while a 100 {mu}m spacing irradiation tripled this median (67 days) but damaged normal tissue. the impact of the device dividing synchrotron beam into micro-beams, named multi sit collimator, was also demonstrated. combination of drugs with M.R.T. irradiation was tested. promising results (median survival time: 40 days and 30% of long term survivors) were obtained with an intratumoral injection of gadolinium coupled with a crossing M.R.T. irradiation at 460 Gy. Moreover, earlier M.R.T. irradiation (tumor at D10) quadrupled the median survival time (79 days) with 30% of long term survivors. A new imaging device to target the tumor before irradiation and an adapted collimator will increase the M.R.T. results. As the differences existing between tumoral models used in M.R.T. (9L models) and in S.S.R.T. (F98 models) are major, M.R.T./S.S.R.T. comparative experiments were realised on these two models. Results showed that the two techniques have the same efficacy on F98 model and that the M.R.T. is more effective on 9L model. This can help to define adapted tumor type for these techniques. (author)

  17. Visualization of angiogenic vessels by synchrotron radiation microangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of synchrotron radiation microangiography for evaluating angiogenic vessels in regenerative therapy is illustrated. In a rabbit model of microvascular myocardial ischemia, angiogenic vessels in the heart were well visualized. In a rabbit model of hindlimb ischemia, vessel-regenerative therapy with fibroblast growth factor 4-gene incorporated to gelatin hydrogel well ameliorated muscle necrosis. Synchrotron radiation microangiography confirmed significant blood flow increase to adenosine administration in these treated rabbits (vascular responsiveness), but not in the control. Thus, synchrotron radiation microangiography is shown to be useful for the depiction, quantification and evaluation of angiogenic vessels in reproductive therapy. (author)

  18. Potential applications of synchrotron radiation to the treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although conventional radiotherapy remains to be one of the most useful treatments for cancer, it is not the best strategy to maximize the effects on the tumors and minimize the damage to the surrounding tissues due to its physical and biological characteristics. Synchrotron radiation (SR) with uniquely physical and biological advantages may represent an innovative approach for cancer treatment. In recent years, SR-based photon activation therapy, stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and micro-beam radiation treatment have been developed, and the results of in vitro and in vivo experiments are very promising. It is necessary to understand the physical and radiobiological principle of those novel strategies before the approach is applied to the clinic. In this paper, we summarize the advances of SR in terms of physical, radiobiological advantages and its potential clinical applications. With the successful operation of shanghai synchrotron radiation, good opportunities in China have been provided for investigations on the treatment of cancer with synchrotron radiation. (authors)

  19. Radiation reaction and the pitch angle changes for a charge undergoing synchrotron losses

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2015-01-01

    In synchrotron radiation formulas it is always assumed that the pitch angle of a charged particle remains constant during the radiation process. The argument employed is that as the radiation is beamed along the instantaneous direction of motion of the charge, the momentum loss will also be along the direction of motion. Accordingly radiation reaction should not cause any change in the direction of the velocity vector, and the pitch angle of the charge would therefore remain constant during the radiation process. However, it turns out that this picture is not relativistically covariant and that in the case of synchrotron losses, the pitch angle in general varies. While the component of the velocity vector perpendicular to the magnetic field does reduce in magnitude due to radiative losses, the parallel component does not undergo any change during radiation. Therefore there is a change in the ratio of the two components, implying a change in the pitch angle. This apparent paradox gets resolved and one gets a c...

  20. Development of a programmable CCD detector for imaging, real time studies and other synchrotron radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new CCD detector has been developed. The working of CCD and programmable detector is detailed in this thesis. The flexibility of the system allows the use of CCDs from different manufactures. The vacuum chamber of the detector is made of a beryllium window for experiments using X-radiation or of a quartz window coupled to a focusing optic system. Its temporal resolution is 2 microseconds with a X-radiation imaging. Images with a high spatial resolution have been obtained with the focusing system having a set of optical lenses and filters. The first X-ray diffraction experiments in the range of milliseconds and microseconds for the study of semiconductor heterostructures have been performed at X16 beam line at NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source) with the detector illuminated by X-rays. For the first time, a X-ray beam, horizontally focused has been used to record a X-ray diffraction spectra on a 2-D detector. Finally, a X-ray diffraction method has been used to study the first steps of the crystallisation of Fe80B20 amorphous metallic alloy at X6 beam line at NSLS

  1. Critical energies for SSB and DSB induction in plasmid DNA: Studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most frequent energy depositions along the charged-particle tracks associated with high-energy ionizing radiations are on the order of 10's of eV. There continues to be a need for experimental data that relate the magnitudes of energy-deposition events to the molecular damages that result from them. The energy range between a few and several hundred eV is of particular importance. In addition, the determination of the yields of various types of damage induced in DNA as functions of the energy deposited in it (action spectra) may provide useful insights into the initial pathways of lesion induction. With much interest currently focused on the role of lesion complexity in relation to biological effectiveness, it is important to know to what extent single energy deposition events can independently initiate damages involving more than one molecular site, for example a DNA dsb. This paper reports some of the experimental methods and initial data, also with dry plasmid DNA, obtained using VUV from a synchrotron radiation source at selected energies in the range 7 to 25 eV, determining action spectra for ssb and dsb induction

  2. Development of master CMOS test vehicle chip for space radiation effect studies using CAMD X-ray synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A master CMOS test vehicle chip using currently avilable CMOS technologies from MOSIS Foundry has been designed for use in in monitoring electrical performance of CMOS based systems on board in space flights against the total dose effect. The master test chip includes designs of selected CMOS devices and logic circuits to monitor in an integrated manner the behavior of several radiation sensitive parameters namely, I-V characteristics, speed-power product, propagation delay time and fan-out capability, CMOS latchup, hot-carrier-induced charge effects in VLSI switching circuits and critical logic path through the functional logic device by a dynamic shift register. A methodology to evaluate test vehicle chip is proposed incorporating experimental studies, analytical modeling and their correlation with the experimental data. CMOS test chip fabricated from MOSIS Foundry will be probed for static and dynamic data acquisition under preirradiated and postirradiated conditions and simulated operating environment. Space radiation exposure to the test devices will be simulated using Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) X-ray synchrotron as a radiation source. (orig.)

  3. Effective spectrum width of the synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V. G., E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.ru [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gitman, D. M., E-mail: gitman@if.usp.br [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); P.N.Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Levin, A. D., E-mail: alevin@if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Loginov, A. S.; Saprykin, A. D. [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-25

    For an exact quantitative description of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation (SR), the concept of effective width of the spectrum is introduced. In the most interesting case, which corresponds to the ultrarelativistic limit of SR, the effective width of the spectrum is calculated for the polarization components, and new physically important quantitative information on the structure of spectral distributions is obtained. For the first time, the spectral distribution for the circular polarization component of the SR for the upper half-space is obtained within classical theory.

  4. 3D IMAGING USING COHERENT SYNCHROTRON RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Cloetens

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional imaging is becoming a standard tool for medical, scientific and industrial applications. The use of modem synchrotron radiation sources for monochromatic beam micro-tomography provides several new features. Along with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and improved spatial resolution, these include the possibility of quantitative measurements, the easy incorporation of special sample environment devices for in-situ experiments, and a simple implementation of phase imaging. These 3D approaches overcome some of the limitations of 2D measurements. They require new tools for image analysis.

  5. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron radiation for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy opens the path to high-resolution imaging with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast. Here, the design and experimental results of an in-situ synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system are presented. The system is designed to allow monochromatic synchrotron radiation to enter the chamber, illuminating the sample with x-ray radiation, while an insulator-coated tip (metallic tip apex open for tunneling, electron collection) is scanned over the surface. A unique feature of the SXSTM is the STM mount assembly, designed with a two free-flex pivot, providing an angular degree of freedom for the alignment of the tip and sample with respect to the incoming x-ray beam. The system designed successfully demonstrates the ability to resolve atomic-scale corrugations. In addition, experiments with synchrotron x-ray radiation validate the SXSTM system as an accurate analysis technique for the study of local magnetic and chemical properties on sample surfaces. The SXSTM system's capabilities have the potential to broaden and deepen the general understanding of surface phenomena by adding elemental contrast to the high-resolution of STM. -- Highlights: ► Synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system designed. ► Unique STM mount design allows angular DOF for tip alignment with x-ray beam. ► System demonstrates ability to resolve atomic corrugations on HOPG. ► Studies show chemical sensitivity with STM tip from photocurrent and tunneling. ► Results show system's ability to study local magnetic (XMCD) properties on Fe films.

  6. Injection system design for the LBL [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The injection system for the LBL 1 to 2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source is designed to provide an electron beam of 400 mA at 1.5 GeV to the storage ring in a filling time of less than 5 minutes. An alternate mode of operation requires that 7.6 mA be delivered to one, or a few rf bunches in the storage ring. To accomplish these tasks, a high intensity electron gun, a 50 MeV electron linac, and a 1.5 GeV booster synchrotron are used. The performance requirements of the injector complex are summarized. The electron gun and subharmonic buncher, linac design, and linac to booster and booster to storage ring transport are discussed as well as the booster synchrotron

  7. Bent approximations to synchrotron radiation optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideal optical elements can be approximated by bending flats or cylinders. This paper considers the applications of these approximate optics to synchrotron radiation. Analytic and raytracing studies are used to compare their optical performance with the corresponding ideal elements. It is found that for many applications the performance is adequate, with the additional advantages of lower cost and greater flexibility. Particular emphasis is placed on obtaining the practical limitations on the use of the approximate elements in typical beamline configurations. Also considered are the possibilities for approximating very long length mirrors using segmented mirrors

  8. Application of synchrotron radiation in material Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years many synchrotron radiation facilities are built around the world. The properties of this radiation, it's intensity and tuneability, are leading to exciting new experiments in chemistry, physics, biology and material sciences. In X-ray crystallographic studies, data can be collected on very small samples of only a few microns in size and time as short as one millisecond. Other techniques allow us to probe the local structures of impurities in technologically important materials. In the present paper unique properties of synchrotron radiation will be described. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopic techniques are now routinely used for materials characterization. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopic techniques have been applied to study the local structural environment of host and dopant cations in complex systems. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy is useful to determine the valence state of different cations. To examine the local structure around different cations Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is the most appropriate technique. A review of these methodologies and the results on Yba/sub 2/ Cu/sub 3-x/ Sb/sub x/O/sub 7/, and SrFe/sub 1-x/ Nb/sub x/O/sub 3/ (where x = 0.0 and 0.5) will be presented. The Synchrotron light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (SESAME) is under construction in jordan, Pakistan in one of the member states of SESAME project, therefore a brief review of SESAME will be presented. (author)

  9. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc., 7844 Vervain Ct., Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States); Macrander, A. T. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08536 (United States); Baronova, E. O. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); George, K. M.; Kotick, J. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal’s x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal’s local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background.

  10. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal’s x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal’s local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background

  11. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, N. R.; Macrander, A. T.; Hill, K. W.; Baronova, E. O.; George, K. M.; Kotick, J.

    2015-10-01

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal's x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal's local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background.

  12. MICROANALYSIS OF MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.

    2000-12-01

    High intensity synchrotron radiation produces photons with wavelengths that extend from the infrared to hard x rays with energies of hundreds of keV with uniquely high photon intensities that can be used to determine the composition and properties of materials using a variety of techniques. Most of these techniques represent extensions of earlier work performed with ordinary tube-type x-ray sources. The properties of the synchrotron source such as the continuous range of energy, high degree of photon polarization, pulsed beams, and photon flux many orders of magnitude higher than from x-ray tubes have made possible major advances in the possible chemical applications. We describe here ways that materials analyses can be made using the high intensity beams for measurements with small beam sizes and/or high detection sensitivity. The relevant characteristics of synchrotron x-ray sources are briefly summarized to give an idea of the x-ray parameters to be exploited. The experimental techniques considered include x-ray fluorescence, absorption, and diffraction. Examples of typical experimental apparatus used in these experiments are considered together with descriptions of actual applications.

  13. Assessment of neural networks training strategies for histomorphometric analysis of synchrotron radiation medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-computed tomography (μCT) obtained by synchrotron radiation (SR) enables magnified images with a high space resolution that might be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique for the quantitative analysis of medical images, in particular the histomorphometry (HMM) of bony mass. In the preprocessing of such images, conventional operations such as binarization and morphological filtering are used before calculating the stereological parameters related, for example, to the trabecular bone microarchitecture. However, there is no standardization of methods for HMM based on μCT images, especially the ones obtained with SR X-ray. Notwithstanding the several uses of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in medical imaging, their application to the HMM of SR-μCT medical images is still incipient, despite the potential of both techniques. The contribution of this paper is the assessment and comparison of well-known training algorithms as well as the proposal of training strategies (combinations of training algorithms, sub-image kernel and symmetry information) for feed-forward ANNs in the task of bone pixels recognition in SR-μCT medical images. For a quantitative comparison, the results of a cross validation and a statistical analysis of the results for 36 training strategies are presented. The ANNs demonstrated both very low mean square errors in the validation, and good quality segmentation of the image of interest for application to HMM in SR-μCT medical images.

  14. Assessment of neural networks training strategies for histomorphometric analysis of synchrotron radiation medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura Meneses, Anderson Alvarenga; Pinheiro, Christiano Jorge Gomes; Rancoita, Paola; Schaul, Tom; Gambardella, Luca Maria; Schirru, Roberto; Barroso, Regina Cely; de Oliveira, Luís Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Micro-computed tomography (μCT) obtained by synchrotron radiation (SR) enables magnified images with a high space resolution that might be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique for the quantitative analysis of medical images, in particular the histomorphometry (HMM) of bony mass. In the preprocessing of such images, conventional operations such as binarization and morphological filtering are used before calculating the stereological parameters related, for example, to the trabecular bone microarchitecture. However, there is no standardization of methods for HMM based on μCT images, especially the ones obtained with SR X-ray. Notwithstanding the several uses of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in medical imaging, their application to the HMM of SR-μCT medical images is still incipient, despite the potential of both techniques. The contribution of this paper is the assessment and comparison of well-known training algorithms as well as the proposal of training strategies (combinations of training algorithms, sub-image kernel and symmetry information) for feed-forward ANNs in the task of bone pixels recognition in SR-μCT medical images. For a quantitative comparison, the results of a cross validation and a statistical analysis of the results for 36 training strategies are presented. The ANNs demonstrated both very low mean square errors in the validation, and good quality segmentation of the image of interest for application to HMM in SR-μCT medical images.

  15. Assessment of neural networks training strategies for histomorphometric analysis of synchrotron radiation medical images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga de Moura Meneses, Anderson, E-mail: ameneses@lmp.ufrj.b [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Nuclear Engineering Program, CP 68509, CEP 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Gomes Pinheiro, Christiano Jorge [State University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rancoita, Paola [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Mathematics Department, Universita degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Schaul, Tom; Gambardella, Luca Maria [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Schirru, Roberto [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, COPPE, Nuclear Engineering Program, CP 68509, CEP 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barroso, Regina Cely; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de [State University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-09-21

    Micro-computed tomography ({mu}CT) obtained by synchrotron radiation (SR) enables magnified images with a high space resolution that might be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique for the quantitative analysis of medical images, in particular the histomorphometry (HMM) of bony mass. In the preprocessing of such images, conventional operations such as binarization and morphological filtering are used before calculating the stereological parameters related, for example, to the trabecular bone microarchitecture. However, there is no standardization of methods for HMM based on {mu}CT images, especially the ones obtained with SR X-ray. Notwithstanding the several uses of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in medical imaging, their application to the HMM of SR-{mu}CT medical images is still incipient, despite the potential of both techniques. The contribution of this paper is the assessment and comparison of well-known training algorithms as well as the proposal of training strategies (combinations of training algorithms, sub-image kernel and symmetry information) for feed-forward ANNs in the task of bone pixels recognition in SR-{mu}CT medical images. For a quantitative comparison, the results of a cross validation and a statistical analysis of the results for 36 training strategies are presented. The ANNs demonstrated both very low mean square errors in the validation, and good quality segmentation of the image of interest for application to HMM in SR-{mu}CT medical images.

  16. Time-resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is reported. The timing characteristics of the SPEAR beam (pulse width less than or equal to 0.4 nsec, pulse repetition period = 780 nsec) were exploited to determine dynamic behavior of atomic, molecular, excimeric, and photodissociative gas-phase species excited by vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. Fast fluorescence timing measurements were done to determine excited-state lifetimes of Kr and Xe. Pressure-dependent timing studies on Xe gas at higher concentrations demonstrated some of the problems associated with previous kinetic modeling of the Xe2 system. It was found that even qualitative agreement of observed Xe2 lifetimes as a function of pressure required the assumption that the radiative lifetime was a strong function of internuclear separation. The radiative decays of chemically unstable fragments, CN* (B2Σ+) and XeF* (B2Σ+ and C2 Pi/sub 3/2//), were studied by pulsed photodissociation of stable parent compounds, ICN and XeF2. When the polarization of the CN* (B2Σ+) fragment fluorescence was measured, it was found to be non-zero and strongly dependent on excitation wavelength. This polarization is related to the symmetry of the photodissociative surface via a classical model, and the variations in the polarization with wavelength is attributed to symmetry and lifetime effects of a predissociating parent molecule. Despite the drawbacks of limited availability and low radiation flux, synchrotron radiation is definitely a useful spectroscopic tool for VUV studies of gas-phase systems

  17. Sub-nanosecond time resolution detector based on APD for Synchrotron Radiation ultrafast experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhen-jie; Liu, Peng; Wang, Shan-feng; Dong, Wei-wei; Zhou, Yang-fan

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation light sources produce intense beam of X-ray with ultra-short pulse and nanosecond period. This of-fers the opportunities for the time resolution experiments. Achieving higher counting rate and faster arriving time is diffi-cult for common detectors. But avalanche photodiodes (APD) based on silicon which have been commercially available1 with large active areas (e.g.10mmx10mm@ Perkin-Elmer Inc.) could satisfy the demands due to their good time resolution, low noise and large area.We investigate the high counting rate and nanosecond time resolution detector with APD. The detector's fast amplifier was designed with the gain of about 60dB (1000). The amplifier included with three stages RF-preamplifier using MAR6+ chip5 for the carefully controlling the circuit oscillation. Some measures have been taken for the preamplifiers good performance such as using resistance net between RF-preamplifier chip and the isolation of high voltage circuit from the preamplifier. The time resolution of the pr...

  18. Synchrotron radiation microimaging in rabbit models of cancer for preclinical testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umetani, Keiji; Uesugi, Kentaro; Kobatake, Makito; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Takenori; Imai, Shigeki

    2009-10-01

    Preclinical laboratory animal imaging modalities such as microangiography and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) have been developed at the SPring-8 BL20B2 bending magnet beamline. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of microangiography systems for physiological examinations of live animals and micro-CT systems for postmortem morphological examinations. Synchrotron radiation microangiography and micro-CT with contrast agents present the main advantageous capability of depicting the anatomy of small blood vessels with tens of micrometers' diameter. This paper reports two imaging instrument types and their respective applications to preclinical imaging of tumor angiogenic blood vessels in tumor-bearing rabbits, where tumor angiogenesis is characterized morphologically by an increased number of blood vessels. A microangiography system with spatial resolution around 10 μm has been used for therapeutically evaluating angiogenic vessels in a rabbit model of cancer for evaluating embolization materials in transcatheter arterial embolization and for radiation therapy. After an iodine contrast agent was injected into an artery, in vivo imaging was carried out using a high-resolution real-time detector incorporating an X-ray direct-conversion-type SATICON pickup tube. On the other hand, a micro-CT system capably performed three-dimensional visualization of tumor angiogenic blood vessels using tumor-transplanted rabbit specimens with a barium sulfate contrast agent injected into the blood vessels. For specimen imaging, a large-field high-resolution micro-CT system based on a 10-megapixel CCD camera was developed to study tumor-associated alterations in angioarchitecture. Evidence of increased vascularity by tumor angiogenesis and decreased vascularity by tumor treatments was achieved by physiological evaluation of angiogenic small blood vessels in microangiographic imaging and by morphological assessment in micro-CT imaging. These results

  19. Synchrotron radiation microimaging in rabbit models of cancer for preclinical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preclinical laboratory animal imaging modalities such as microangiography and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) have been developed at the SPring-8 BL20B2 bending magnet beamline. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of microangiography systems for physiological examinations of live animals and micro-CT systems for postmortem morphological examinations. Synchrotron radiation microangiography and micro-CT with contrast agents present the main advantageous capability of depicting the anatomy of small blood vessels with tens of micrometers' diameter. This paper reports two imaging instrument types and their respective applications to preclinical imaging of tumor angiogenic blood vessels in tumor-bearing rabbits, where tumor angiogenesis is characterized morphologically by an increased number of blood vessels. A microangiography system with spatial resolution around 10 μm has been used for therapeutically evaluating angiogenic vessels in a rabbit model of cancer for evaluating embolization materials in transcatheter arterial embolization and for radiation therapy. After an iodine contrast agent was injected into an artery, in vivo imaging was carried out using a high-resolution real-time detector incorporating an X-ray direct-conversion-type SATICON pickup tube. On the other hand, a micro-CT system capably performed three-dimensional visualization of tumor angiogenic blood vessels using tumor-transplanted rabbit specimens with a barium sulfate contrast agent injected into the blood vessels. For specimen imaging, a large-field high-resolution micro-CT system based on a 10-megapixel CCD camera was developed to study tumor-associated alterations in angioarchitecture. Evidence of increased vascularity by tumor angiogenesis and decreased vascularity by tumor treatments was achieved by physiological evaluation of angiogenic small blood vessels in microangiographic imaging and by morphological assessment in micro-CT imaging. These results

  20. Synchrotron radiation microimaging in rabbit models of cancer for preclinical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umetani, Keiji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: umetani@spring8.or.jp; Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kobatake, Makito; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Takenori; Imai, Shigeki [Kawasaki Medical School, Matsushima, Kurashiki-shi, Okayama 701-0192 (Japan)

    2009-10-01

    Preclinical laboratory animal imaging modalities such as microangiography and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) have been developed at the SPring-8 BL20B2 bending magnet beamline. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of microangiography systems for physiological examinations of live animals and micro-CT systems for postmortem morphological examinations. Synchrotron radiation microangiography and micro-CT with contrast agents present the main advantageous capability of depicting the anatomy of small blood vessels with tens of micrometers' diameter. This paper reports two imaging instrument types and their respective applications to preclinical imaging of tumor angiogenic blood vessels in tumor-bearing rabbits, where tumor angiogenesis is characterized morphologically by an increased number of blood vessels. A microangiography system with spatial resolution around 10 {mu}m has been used for therapeutically evaluating angiogenic vessels in a rabbit model of cancer for evaluating embolization materials in transcatheter arterial embolization and for radiation therapy. After an iodine contrast agent was injected into an artery, in vivo imaging was carried out using a high-resolution real-time detector incorporating an X-ray direct-conversion-type SATICON pickup tube. On the other hand, a micro-CT system capably performed three-dimensional visualization of tumor angiogenic blood vessels using tumor-transplanted rabbit specimens with a barium sulfate contrast agent injected into the blood vessels. For specimen imaging, a large-field high-resolution micro-CT system based on a 10-megapixel CCD camera was developed to study tumor-associated alterations in angioarchitecture. Evidence of increased vascularity by tumor angiogenesis and decreased vascularity by tumor treatments was achieved by physiological evaluation of angiogenic small blood vessels in microangiographic imaging and by morphological assessment in micro-CT imaging. These results

  1. A laboratory experimental setup for photo-absorption studies using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shastri, A; Saraswati, P; Sunanda, K

    2002-01-01

    The photophysics beamline, which is being installed at the 450 MeV Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), Indus-l, is a medium resolution beamline useful for a variety of experiments in the VUV region viz. 500-2000 A. One of the major applications of this beamline is gas-phase photo-absorption studies. An experimental set up to be used for these experiments was designed, developed and tested in our laboratory. The setup consists of a high vacuum absorption cell, 1/4 m monochromator and detection system. For the purpose of testing, xenon and tungsten continuum sources were used and absorption spectra were recorded in the UV region. This setup was used to record the absorption spectrum of a few molecules like acetone, ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in order to evaluate the performance of the experimental system which will subsequently be used with the photophysics beamline. Details of the design, fabrication and testing of the absorption cell and experimental procedures are presented in this repor...

  2. Concurrent measurements of SAXS/WAXS for some human tissues using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) patterns have been recorded for both colon and kidney tissues; normal and pathological using x-ray synchrotron radiation . the results exhibited a significant observation is that the pathological colon, tissues have obvious scattering peaks at the q-value of 0.295 nm -1 and 0.488 nm-1 which are the 3rd and 5th order bragg reflections of collagen; respectively . this periodicity is particularly intense in the meridional direction indicating some fibril alignment. experimentally, the normal kidney sample shows the scattering pattern of collagen protein, while the pathological sample shows a diffuse scattering and significantly less evidence of the structural collagen. the WAXS signature of both the colon and kidney tissues is typical of that for an amorphous material where the scattering is dominated by water. the signature of healthy colon tissue shows a clear peak at a momentum transfer 1.24 nm-1.the data of the pathological tissues appear to consist of broad scattering maxima at 1.7 nm-1 and the tissues can be distinguished on the basis of the peak height. the results of this study suggest that the soft tissues may have scattering patterns, which are characterized for particular tissue types and tissue disease states . on the other words these results indicate that it may be possible to use the coherent scattering as a diagnostic tool

  3. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, D J; Stevenson, A W; Wright, T E; Harty, P D; Lehmann, J; Livingstone, J; Crosbie, J C

    2015-11-21

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response. PMID:26510214

  4. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response. (paper)

  5. XNAP: a hybrid pixel detector with nanosecond resolution for time resolved synchrotron radiation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, P.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Dautet, H.; Davies, M.; Fischer, P.; Göttlicher, P.; Graafsma, H.; Hervé, C.; Rüffer, R.; Thil, C.

    2013-03-01

    The XNAP collaboration is constructing a hybrid pixel X-ray detector based on a monolithic silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) sensor array aiming at applications in synchrotron radiation facilities. The 2D detector is capable of identifying which individual electron bunch produces each detected X-ray photon, even when the storage ring operates in multibunch filling modes. This instrument is intended to be used in X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and Nuclear Resonance experiments and serve as a demonstrator for various kind of time resolved diffraction and scattering applications as well as a very high count rate device. The detector is a 1 kilopixel device with 280 μm pitch that implements both counting mode up to MHz frame rates and event-by-event readout with sub-nanosecond time resolution. The paper describes the detector design and some results obtained with small 4×4 pixel prototypes that have been built and measured to make and validate the most critical choices for the final detector.

  6. Synchrotron-radiation computed laminography for high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of flat devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfen, Lukas; Baumbach, Tilo [ANKA/Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); University of Karlsruhe (Germany); Myagotin, Anton; Rack, Alexander [ANKA/Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Pernot, Petra [ANKA/Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Mikulik, Petr [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic); Di Michiel, Marco [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2007-08-15

    Synchrotron-radiation computed laminography (SRCL) is developed as a method for high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging of regions of interest (ROIs) in all kinds of laterally extended devices. One of the application targets is the 3D X-ray inspection of microsystems. In comparison to computed tomography (CT), the method is based on the inclination of the tomographic axis with respect to the incident X-ray beam by a defined angle. With the microsystem aligned roughly perpendicular to the rotation axis, the integral X-ray transmission on the two-dimensional (2D) detector does not change exceedingly during the scan. In consequence, the integrity of laterally extended devices can be preserved, what distinguishes SRCL from CT where ROIs have to be destructively extracted (e.g. by cutting out a sample) before being imaged. The potential of the method for three-dimensional imaging of microsystem devices will be demonstrated by examples of flip-chip bonded and wire-bonded devices. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Synchrotron-radiation computed laminography for high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of flat devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron-radiation computed laminography (SRCL) is developed as a method for high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging of regions of interest (ROIs) in all kinds of laterally extended devices. One of the application targets is the 3D X-ray inspection of microsystems. In comparison to computed tomography (CT), the method is based on the inclination of the tomographic axis with respect to the incident X-ray beam by a defined angle. With the microsystem aligned roughly perpendicular to the rotation axis, the integral X-ray transmission on the two-dimensional (2D) detector does not change exceedingly during the scan. In consequence, the integrity of laterally extended devices can be preserved, what distinguishes SRCL from CT where ROIs have to be destructively extracted (e.g. by cutting out a sample) before being imaged. The potential of the method for three-dimensional imaging of microsystem devices will be demonstrated by examples of flip-chip bonded and wire-bonded devices. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Mission critical operation archiving system using a database for synchrotron radiation beam lines at the Photon Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission critical operation archiving system has been designed and built using the Oracle database for the twenty-two synchrotron radiation beam lines at the 2.5 GeV positron storage ring at the Photon Factory, where X-ray/VUV synchrotron radiation experiments are simultaneously carried out. When any one of beam lines is malfunctioning, neither injecting the 2.5 GeV beam into the storage ring nor operation of the ring is allowed due to the radiation safety reason. The system is designed for critical operation of the synchrotron radiation beam lines to provide a quick recovery from a failure, allowing a long term operation. The system has real-time capability to automatically store the database with all possible operational events of all vacuum valves/shutters and safety interlock signals, and all static operational data, including the pressures of the beam lines and the storage ring, and related operational data which represent the physical behaviors of the beam lines. By retrieving any combination of operational data, the system allows to reproduce the physical behaviors that have occurred in the beam lines. The total number of items to be inspected by the system is over 40 million in order to obtain a correlation between the faulty component and other physical components that suggests the cause of the failure. With the aid of the system, the operator at the control room can easily determine the faulty component, and recover the accelerator component. (author)

  9. HESYRL: a dedicated synchrotron radiation laboratory in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HESYRL national synchrotron radiation laboratory was first proposed in 1977 as a conclusion of a general planning meeting on nationwide development of natural science and technology at which a topic was the application of synchrotron radiation. A study group was formed in 1978 to carry out preliminary research and prototype development work. The final approval of the project was given in April 1983 and the lab was soon founded. Designs of the main facilities and building completed in Oct 1984. The ground breaking was in Nov 1984. Manufacturing and purchasing of all the equipment and components are now in progress. The overall layout of HESYRL project is shown. the main facilities are an 800 MeV electron storage ring, a 88 meter transport line and a 240 MeV linac as the injector. Some basic considerations in the selecting of major machine parameters are discussed

  10. Operation of INDUS-1, India's first synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INDUS-1 is a 450 MeV electron storage ring for the production of Synchrotron Radiation in Visible Ultra Violet (VUV) range with a critical wavelength of 61 A deg. The ring was commissioned in June 1999. Since then it is in regular operation. This Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) facility consists of a 20 MeV injector microtron, a 450 MeV booster synchrotron and a storage ring. In this paper operation aspects of INDUS-1 SRS facility will be presented. (author)

  11. Ultra-precision grinding of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide mirrors for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is the most important material of mirrors for high-brightness synchrotron radiation beamlines, though the material is too difficult to be machined. It takes quite a long time to polish SiC substrate to make mirrors. This paper intends to reduce the machining time to make CVD-SiC mirrors by using ultra-precision grinding technology. The CVD-SiC sample has been ground into 0.4nm rms in surface roughness by a resinoid-bonded diamond wheel and an ultra-precision surface grinder having a glass-ceramic spindle of extremely-low thermal expansion. The surface roughness of ground samples were measured with TOPO-3D and AFM. 88.7% reflectivity has been obtained on the ground CVD-SiC flat surface, measured with X-ray of 0.834 nm in wavelength at the grazing incident angle of 0.7--0.95 degree. The reflectivity depends upon the angle between the direction of incident beam and grinding marks on the sample. The relationship between the surface roughness and grinding conditions was also discussed

  12. Mirror movement mechanism in ultra high vacuum for synchrotron radiation mirror box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a synchrotron radiation (SR) beamline pre and post mirrors are important optical components for precisely focussing SR on a monochromator and on the target in an experimental station. These mirrors are mounted in the ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) along with high precision mirror movement mechanism. The mirror movement mechanism provides backlash free six degrees of freedom to the mirror. Three precision motions are linear in nature and three are rotational. Two rotational precision motions are performed by elastic movement of spring steel fork with a backlash free resolution of 10 arc seconds and with a range of 0 to +/-1 degree. The another rotational motion has been performed by angular displacement of a plate through precision high tensile bolts with backlash free resolution of 10 arc seconds and with a range of 0 to +/-1 degree. Three linear motions have been performed by linear displacement of a plate through precision high tensile bolts with backlash free resolution of 10 microns with a range of 0 to +/- 10 mm. Two rotational precision motions are transferred to the mirror in UHV through a bellow and other four precision motions are transferred through the UHV chamber. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs

  13. A novel monochromator for high heat-load synchrotron x-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high heat load associated with the powerful and concentrated x-ray beams generated by the insertion devices at a number of present and many of the future (planned or under construction) synchrotron radiation facilities pose a formidable engineering challenge in the designer of the monochromators and other optical devices. For example, the Undulator A source on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) ring (being constructed at the Argonne National Laboratory) will generate as much as 10 kW of heat deposited on a small area (about 1 cm2) of the first optics located some 24 m from the source. The peak normal incident heat flux can be as high as 500 W/mm2. Successful utilization of the intense x-ray beams from insertion devices critically depends on the development, design, and availability of optical elements that provide acceptable performance under high heat load. Present monochromators can handle, at best, heat load levels that are an order of magnitude lower than those generated by such sources. The monochromator described here and referred to as the open-quote inclinedclose quotes monochromator can provide a solution to high heat-load problems

  14. A Model for One-Dimensional Coherent Synchrotron Radiation including Short-Range Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ryne, Robert D; Qiang, Ji; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    A new model is presented for simulating coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in one dimension. The method is based on convolving an integrated Green function (IGF) with the longitudinal charge density. Since it is based on an IGF, the accuracy of this approach is determined by how well one resolves the charge density and not by resolving the single particle wake function. Since short-range wakefield effects are included analytically, the approach can be much more efficient than ordinary (non-IGF) approaches in situations where the wake function and charge density have disparate spatial scales. Two cases are presented: one derived from the full wake including short-range effects, and one derived from the asymptotic wake. In the latter case the algorithm contains the same physics as others based on the asymptotic approximation, but requires only the line charge density and not its derivative. Examples are presented that illustrate the limitations of the asymptotic-wake approximation, and that illustrate how mic...

  15. Sensitivity of transient synchrotron radiation to tokamak plasma parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H.

    1988-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from a hot plasma can inform on certain plasma parameters. The dependence on plasma parameters is particularly sensitive for the transient radiation response to a brief, deliberate, perturbation of hot plasma electrons. We investigate how such a radiation response can be used to diagnose a variety of plasma parameters in a tokamak. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Experimental verification of a possibility for using synchrotron radiation of an electron ring for infrared spectroscopy of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results are given on the measurements of the synchrotron radiation power of an electron ring with parameters: electron number is (3-5)x1012, ring radius is 3-5 cm, electron energy is 10-20 MeV, pulse duration is 10 ms. Measurements are carried out in the wave length range of IR radiation of 2-400 μm. The developed multimirror optical channels are used for radiation focusing and extraction. Experimental and calculational values of radiation power density at λ 300 μm coincide and are equal to 6x10-4 W/μm, i.e. some orders of magnitude higher than the power of known sources. A possibility is shown of development of the IR spectrometer with unique parameters for investigations in the solids physics

  17. Determination of biological specimen optimal thickness for small-angle X-ray experiments by use polychromatic synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is put forward the mode of evaluation of biological specimen optimal thickness for small-angle specimen thickness on various synchrotron radiation spectra are calculated. The curves allow to optimize an experiment by selecting either optimal specimen thickness for an available synchrotron radiation spectrum, or the disposition of the short-wave boundary for given specimen thickness (fibers, tissues and so on). The method gives the possibility apart from increasing both of the precision and reproducibility of X-ray experiments, either or both increase of the statistical precision upon given recording time of an X-ray pattern and decrease recording time upon retention of the same statistical precision. The 15-20 % deviation in the specimen thickness from that of optimal one is shown to lead to decrease in the scattering intensity less than 2 %. 15 refs.; 3 figs

  18. A 50-MeV mm-wave electron linear accelerator system for production of tunable short wavelength synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Wisconsin at Madison is developing a new millimeter wavelength, 50-MeV electron linear accelerator system for production of coherent tunable wavelength synchrotron radiation. Modern micromachining techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography, LIGA (Lithografie, Galvanoformung, Abformung), capable of producing high-aspect ratio structures are being considered for the fabrication of the accelerating components

  19. Inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation from electrons and nuclei for lattice dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inelastic scattering of x-rays, one of the first applications of x-rays to the field of condensed matter physics, has been rejuvenated in the last decade. The availability of synchrotrons radiation from wiggler and undulator sources combined with advances in monochromatization of the incident beam and analysis of the scattered beam with meV resolution led to the measurement of phonon dispersion relations. In addition, the use of Moessbauer nuclei as scatterer and analyzers has led to the discovery of the inelastic nuclear resonant scattering technique. This new method allows extraction of partial phonon density of states from amorphous materials, thin films, multilayers and interfaces, and liquids

  20. Looking Back at International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Gwyn

    2012-03-01

    With the 11th International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation coming up in July 2012 in Lyons, France, we thought it might be of interest to our readers to review all the past meetings in this series. We thank Denny Mills of the APS, Argonne for putting the list together. Prior to these larger meetings, and in the early days, facilities held their own meetings similar to the user meetings of today. However, the meeting held at ACO in Orsay, France in 1977 was the first such meeting with an international flavor and so it is on the list. However it is not counted as number 1 since it was agreed way back to start the numbering with the 1982 DESY meeting. The 2005 USA National Meeting scheduled at CAMD in Baton Rouge had to be canceled due to Hurricane Katrina. It was ultimately held in 2007, with the CLS hosted meeting the following year. And a personal note from the magazine - Synchrotron Radiation News was born at the 1987 meeting in Madison, Wisconsin with a proposal that was put to a special session of the meeting organized by Susan Lord. Initial proposals were to model it after the CERN Courier, but it soon adopted its own distinct flavor.

  1. Joint ICTP-IAEA School on Novel Experimental Methodologies for Synchrotron Radiation Applications in Nano-science and Environmental Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the Synchrotron Radiation School is to introduce and demonstrate advanced analytical methodologies based on X-ray spectrometry with application in the fields of Nano-Science and Environmental monitoring. The introduction of environment-friendly energy sources and the diagnosis, monitoring and understanding of environmental problems are issues of high concern for developing countries due to the destructive impact of the growing industrialization. These problems in many cases can be tackled by novel technologies based on the development of nano-structured materials that can be fully characterized due to the remarkable properties of synchrotron radiation. This two-week School is addressed to young motivated scientists with a Ph.D., or at least several years of research activity. It will offer a balanced program composed by lectures, tutorials and practical hands-on training sessions at different Elettra beamlines including the newly developed XRF beamline and the IAEA multipurpose endstation. The...

  2. A guide to synchrotron radiation science

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Shigeru; Munro, Ian; Lodha, G S

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR), as a light source is now in use around the world to provide brilliant radiation from the infrared into the soft and hard X-ray regions. It is an indispensible and essential tool to establish the physic-chemical characteristics of materials and surfaces from an atomic and molecular view point. It is being applied to topics which range from mineralogy to protein crystallography, embracing research in areas from the physical to the life sciences. This new guide is a concise yet comprehensive and easily readable introduction to an expanding area of science. It presents in a readily assimilable form the basic concepts of SR science from its generation principles, through source design and operation to the principles of instruments for SR exploitation followed by a survey of its actual applications in selected research fields, including spectroscopy, diffractometry, microanalysis and chemical processing.

  3. Characterization of Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion and Sodium Ion Batteries using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Apurva; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource; Doeff, Marca M.; Chen, Guoying; Cabana, Jordi; Richardson, Thomas J.; Mehta, Apurva; Shirpour, Mona; Duncan, Hugues; Kim, Chunjoong; Kam, Kinson C.; Conry, Thomas

    2013-04-30

    We describe the use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to probe details of intercalation/deintercalation processes in electrode materials for Li ion and Na ion batteries. Both in situ and ex situ experiments are used to understand structural behavior relevant to the operation of devices.

  4. Computerized microtomography using synchrotron radiation from the NSLS [National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of microtomography experiments that employ filtered radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source X-26 Microprobe beam line are presented. These experiments have yielded images of a freeze-dried caterpillar with a spatial resolution of the order of 30 μm and show that the limit on the spatial resolution with the present apparatus will be 1 to 10 μm. Directions for improvement in synchrotron microtomography techniques and some possible applications are discussed. 14 refs., 3 figs

  5. Bunch heating by coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss here effects which define the steady-state rms energy spread of a microbunch in a storage ring. It is implied that the longitudinal microwave instability is controlled by low α lattice. In this case the coherent synchrotron radiation, if exists, may be the main factor defining the bunch temperature. Another effect comes from the fact that a nonlinear momentum compaction of such lattices makes Haissinskii equation not applicable, and the coherent synchrotron radiation may effect not only bunch lengthening but the energy spread as well

  6. Characterization of a pnCCD for applications with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we study the response of a pnCCD by means of X-ray spectroscopy in the energy range between 6 keV and 20 keV and by Laue diffraction techniques. The analyses include measurements of characteristic detector parameters like energy resolution, count rate capability and effects of different gain settings. The limit of a single photon counting operation in white beam X-ray diffraction experiments is discussed with regard to the occurrence of pile-up events, for which the energy information about individual photons is lost. In case of monochromatic illumination the pnCCD can be used as a fast conventional CCD with a charge handling capacity (CHC) of about 300,000 electrons per pixel. If the CHC is exceeded, any surplus charge will spill to neighboring pixels perpendicular to the transfer direction due to electrostatic repulsion. The possibilities of increasing the number of storable electrons are investigated for different voltage settings by exposing a single pixel with X-rays generated by a microfocus X-ray source. The pixel binning mode is tested as an alternative approach that enables a pnCCD operation with significantly shorter readout times. -- Highlights: ► The pnCCD acts as a four-dimensional detector for white X-rays. ► Its performance for applications with synchrotron radiation is investigated. ► The pnCCD can be used for single photon counting and photon integration. ► The operation mode depends on the local frequencies of pile-up events. The pnCCD can be optimized for X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

  7. Gap-tapered undulators for high-photon-energy synchrotron radiation production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narrow-gap, short-period undulators are of interest to maximize the achievable photon energy at lower-energy storage rings. An important consideration is matching the e-beam beta function in the straight section to the vertical aperture at the insertion device so as to maximize vertical acceptance, beam lifetime, and injection efficiency. Various approaches have been considered such as in-vacuum undulators, undulators with flexible vacuum chambers, and superconducting undulators. In each of these the undulator gap is constant along the undulator length, in which case the optimum beta function is equal to one-half the length. We discuss an alternate approach in which the undulator gap is tapered to follow the transverse profile of the e-beam envelope. This allows the use of a relatively long undulator within a low-beta straight section. The undulator gap is physically and magnetically matched to the e-beam envelope throughout the straight section. The undulator period is varied to maintain constant photon resonance while everywhere maximizing the magnetic field strength. This approach optimizes the high-photon-energy synchrotron radiation generation. The achievable synchrotron radiation spectral properties and tunability of such a device are examined

  8. Synchrotron radiation monitoring for LEP2 using the DELPHI-TPC silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of the DELPHI detector suffers contamination due to Synchrotron Radiation (small ionized cloud with slow drift velocity which causes a magnetic field perturbation), specially during the new phase of operation of the LEP. Therefore one needs to monitor this radiation by means of an independent detector. This detector, which has been developed during the last 20 months, uses the silicon technique and allows precise measurements of both the energy and time of flight of the photons, either direct, or back-scattered by the quadrupoles, masks or collimations in front of the TPC. Typical time delay and energy range are of the order of 50 ns and 100 to 400 KeV, respectively. The detector being independent of the DELPHI acquisition system, it allows a good monitoring task that can give some clue on the state of the beams and non-stop trace plot

  9. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the spring of 2000, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) moved from Tanashi to Kashiwa Campus. Now, most important for SRL is to promote the future project of High-brilliance Light Source, Super SOR project, in cooperation with the nationwide user group as well as with the users of the University of Tokyo. The Super SOR will be one of the most brilliant light sources in vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regimes. In order to continue extensive efforts on research and developments (R and D) of the light source and beamlines, the SRL Experimental Building has been built at Kashiwa Campus, which acts as the Super SOR Project Office of the University of Tokyo. On the other hand, the SRL has a branch laboratory in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) at Tsukuba. The branch laboratory maintains an undulator called Revolver, two beamlines and three experimental stations (BL-18A, 19A and 19B); they are installed in the Photon Factory (PF) and fully opened to outside users. The in-house staffs not only serve the outside users with technical support and advices, but also carry out their own research works on advanced solid state spectroscopy as well as instrumentation. In the fiscal year of 2000, the operation time of the beamlines wag more than 5000 hours and the number of the users was more than 200. The main scientific interests and activities in the SRL at KEK-PF are directed to the electronic structures of new materials with new transport and optical properties. The electronic structures of solid surfaces and interfaces are also intensively studied. The study of the behavior of electrons in a synchrotron radiation source is indispensable as a part of accelerator physics for developing electron accelerators. The SRL is carrying out research works of the accelerator physics and developing the accelerator-related technology, many parts of which will be directly applied to the Super SOR light source. This report contains the activities of the SRL

  10. Application of circular polarized synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of using the polarizing property of light for physical experiment by controlling it variously has been known from old time, and the Faraday effect and the research by polarizing microscopy are its examples. The light emitted from the electron orbit of an accelerator has the different polarizing characteristics from those of the light of a laboratory light source, and as far as observing it within the electron orbit plane, it becomes linearly polarized light. By utilizing this property well, research is carried out at present in synchrotron experimental facilities. Recently, the technology related to the insert type light cources using permanent magnets has advanced remarkably, and circular polarized light has become to be producible. If the light like this can be obtained with the energy not only in far ultraviolet region but also to x-ray region at high luminance, new possibility should open. At the stage that the design of an insert type light source was finished, and its manufacture was started, the research on the method of evaluating the degree of circular polarization and the research on the utilization of circular polarized synchrotron radiation are earnestly carried out. In this report, the results of researches presented at the study meeting are summarized. Moreover, the design and manufacture of the beam lines for exclusive use will be carried out. (Kako, I.)

  11. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applications of synchrotron radiation to research in high-energy atomic physics are summarized. These lie in the areas of photoelectron spectrometry, photon scattering, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved measurements, resonance spectroscopy and threshold excitation, and future, yet undefined studies

  12. A compact and low-weight sputtering unit for in situ investigations of thin film growth at synchrotron radiation beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report on a highly variable, compact, and light high-vacuum sputter deposition unit designed for in situ experiments using synchrotron radiation facilities. The chamber can be mounted at various synchrotron beamlines for scattering experiments in grazing incidence geometry. The sample position and the large exit window allow to perform x-ray experiments up to large q values. The sputtering unit is easy to mount on existing experimental setups and can be remote-controlled. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new sputtering chamber and present the installation of the apparatus at different 3rd generation light sources. Furthermore, we describe the different measurement options and present some selected results. The unit has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users at PETRA III at DESY

  13. Progress in the development of two-dimensional multiwire detectors for X-ray synchrotron radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is presented of the developments in two-dimensional, multiwire detectors for X-ray synchrotron radiation experiments, using delay line position readout. Advances have been made in methods of cathode design and fabrication, a description is given of the trade-off between position resolution and count rate capability, and the importance of low dead-time TDCs is illustrated. A detector has been operating successfully for well over a year at the time resolved, scattering station of the National Synchrotron Light Source; results are presented from this which illustrate the very good resolution (100 μm FWHM), differential non-linearity (±4%) and absolute position stability of these devices, and the importance of low differential non-linearity for these types of experiment

  14. Progress in the development of two-dimensional multiwire detectors for X-ray synchrotron radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G.C.; Yu, B.; Capel, M.

    1993-06-01

    A report is presented of the developments in two-dimensional, multiwire detectors for X-ray synchrotron radiation experiments, using delay line position readout. Advances have been made in methods of cathode design and fabrication, a description is given of the trade-off between position resolution and count rate capability, and the importance of low dead-time TDCs is illustrated. A detector has been operating successfully for well over a year at the time resolved, scattering station of the National Synchrotron Light Source; results are presented from this which illustrate the very good resolution (100 {mu}m FWHM), differential non-linearity ({plus_minus}4%) and absolute position stability of these devices, and the importance of low differential non-linearity for these types of experiment.

  15. Brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    According to literature, while calculating the brightness of synchrotron radiation from wigglers, one needs to account for the so called `depth-of-field' effects. In fact, the particle beam cross section varies along the wiggler. It is usually stated that the effective photon source size increases accordingly, while the brightness is reduced. Here we claim that this is a misconception originating from an analysis of the wiggler source based on geometrical arguments, regarded as almost self-evident. According to electrodynamics, depth-of-field effects do not exist: we demonstrate this statement both theoretically and numerically, using a well-known first-principle computer code. This fact shows that under the usually accepted approximations, the description of the wiggler brightness turns out to be inconsistent even qualitatively. Therefore, there is a need for a well-defined procedure for computing the brightness from a wiggler source. We accomplish this task based on the use of a Wigner function formalism. I...

  16. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Cyclotron and Synchrotron Radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrov, V G; Levin, A; Tlyachev, V B

    2000-01-01

    We study the impact of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid on the radiation of a charged particle moving in a constant uniform magnetic field. With this aim in view, exact solutions of Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are found in the magnetic-solenoid field. Using such solutions, we calculate exactly all the characteristics of one-photon spontaneous radiation both for spinless and spinning particle. Considering non-relativistic and relativistic approximations, we analyze cyclotron and synchrotron radiations in detail. Radiation peculiarities caused by the presence of the solenoid may be considered as a manifestation of Aharonov-Bohm effect in the radiation. In particular, it is shown that new spectral lines appear in the radiation spectrum. Due to angular distribution peculiarities of the radiation intensity, these lines can in principle be isolated from basic cyclotron and synchrotron radiation spectra

  17. Synchrotron radiation: a new tool for biophysical spectroscopy in the visible and ultraviolet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J C

    1978-01-01

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum is extremely important in the study of biological materials. These lectures consider the applications of synchrotron radiation (SR) to this region. They are limited to measurements which do not make use of the time structure inherent in SR. Comparisons of SR with conventional sources suggests that the greatest improvements will be realized in the far and vacuum ultraviolet regions--wavelengths less than about 300 nm. Consideration of the transitions of the valence electrons of most organic and biologically important materials indicate that wavelengths less than about 120 nm will not be especially informative. In addition, spectroscopic experiments at wavelengths less than 105 nm become more difficult because of the loss of window materials and surfaces with high normal incidence reflectance. The characteristic visible and ultraviolet absorption bands of proteins, nucleic acids and sugars are reviewed. Important spectroscopic techniques such as absorption, natural and magnetic circular dichroism, fluorescence and various fluorescence polarization spectroscopies are described and their potential use in the far and vacuum ultraviolet (120 to 300 nm) using synchrotron sources is discussed.

  18. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis (μ-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed

  19. Modelisation of synchrotron radiation losses in realistic tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation losses become significant in the power balance of high-temperature plasmas envisaged for next step tokamaks. Due to the complexity of the exact calculation, these losses are usually roughly estimated with expressions derived from a plasma description using simplifying assumptions on the geometry, radiation absorption, and density and temperature profiles. In the present article, the complete formulation of the transport of synchrotron radiation is performed for realistic conditions of toroidal plasma geometry with elongated cross-section, using an exact method for the calculation of the absorption coefficient, and for arbitrary shapes of density and temperature profiles. The effects of toroidicity and temperature profile on synchrotron radiation losses are analyzed in detail. In particular, when the electron temperature profile is almost flat in the plasma center, as for example in ITB confinement regimes, synchrotron losses are found to be much stronger than in the case where the profile is represented by its best generalized parabolic approximation, though both cases give approximately the same thermal energy contents. Such an effect is not included in present approximate expressions. Finally, we propose a seven-variable fit for the fast calculation of synchrotron radiation losses. This fit is derived from a large database, which has been generated using a code implementing the complete formulation and optimized for massively parallel computing. (author)

  20. Synchrotron radiation techniques. Extension to magnetism research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently developed techniques using synchrotron radiation for the study of magnetism are reviewed. These techniques are based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and they exhibit significant advantages in element specificity. This is very important since the most attractive magnetic materials contain many magnetic elements, and those with small magnetic moments often play an essential role in the magnetic properties. Circularly polarized X-rays emitted from bending magnets or helical undulators allow us to perform magnetic circular dichroism measurements to reveal microscopic magnetic properties of various kinds of magnetic materials. X-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) is discussed in detail. This technique provides unique information on orbital magnetic moments as well as spin magnetic moments, which are useful for the study of magnetic anisotropy. X-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) and X-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry (XRMR) techniques are also described. (author)

  1. Theory of synchrotron radiation: II. Backreaction in ensembles of particles

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto AloisioINFN LNGS; Pasquale Blasi(INAF Arcetri)

    2002-01-01

    The standard calculations of the synchrotron emission from charged particles in magnetic fields does not apply when the energy losses of the particles are so severe that their energy is appreciably degraded during one Larmor rotation. In these conditions, the intensity and spectrum of the emitted radiation depend on the observation time $T_{obs}$: the standard result is recovered only in the limit $T_{obs}\\ll T_{loss}$, where $T_{loss}$ is the time for synchrotron losses. In...

  2. High-performance permanent magnetic circuit designed for small-angle X-ray scattering using synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of permanent magnetic circuit with several prominent characteristics was developed and applied to the studies of oriented macromolecular assemblies by small-angle X-ray scattering using synchrotron radiation source. (orig.)

  3. A shutter design for time domain studies using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, a variable repetition rate of the x-ray bunches is needed to explore time domain problems using x-rays. In some instances, the results of several hundreds or thousands of x-ray pulses must be averaged requiring the sample to be in the same time-dependent state each time the monitoring pulse strikes. The important point is that before a second x-ray pulse hits the sample, the system must return to its initial relaxed ground state prior to another spectrum pulse in order to prepare the same excited state again. Our key design principle employs a subsonic, rotating mirror whose period is slaved to the synchrotron intrapulse period. The synchrotron x-ray bunches will be reflected a distance of about 2 m to a narrow 0.5-mm slit just in front of the sample. A mirror rotating at a low 7500 rpm (125 Hz) is sufficient to select a single synchrotron pulse for the Advanced Photon Source. The very precise phase stability required by this method is currently available in rotating mirror devices for laser scanning

  4. Synchrotron radiation damage on insulating materials of TRISTAN magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shielding design to protect the coils of the bending magnet against synchrotron radiation was performed. The absorbed doses to the magnet components, particularly on the insulating material such as epoxy resin of coil or rubber hoses for water cooling, were measured. The property against radiation exposure was studied. 6 refs., 5 figs

  5. Synchrotron radiation and free electron laser activities in Novosibirsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of studies realized in the Siberian synchrotron radiation centre within the frameworks of wide program of synchrotron radiation and free electron laser research are summarized. The technical information on the VEPP-2M, VEPP-3 and VEPP-4M storage rings used as synchrotron radiation sources is given. 10 refs.; 8 figs.; 12 tabs

  6. New Synchrotron Radiation Center beamlines at Aladdin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past year, the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) staff has installed five new beamlines at SRC. Three of these beamlines are ''public'' beamlines operated by SRC for experiments selected from peer-reviewed proposals. Fifty to seventy-five percent of the experimental time on the other two beamlines is managed by the SRC as a consequence of the SRC being a partner in participating research teams (PRTs). These new beamlines bring the number of VUV and soft x-ray research beamlines installed on Aladdin to 17 as of August 1988. Including two storage ring optical diagnostic ports, there will be 20 ports in use on Aladdin by the end of 1988

  7. Status of Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HSRC is a synchrotron radiation facility of Hiroshima University established in 1996. The HiSOR is a compact racetrack-type storage ring having 21.95 m circumference, therefore its natural emittance of 400 nmrad is not so small compared with the other medium ∼ large storage rings. The most outstanding advantage of the facility lies in good combination with beamlines for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy in energy range in VUV ∼ soft X-ray. We report the operation status of HiSOR and the present status of beamlines and experimental stations. The user time last year was achieved 1541 hours which was at the same level with those in the past several years because there was no serious trouble. (author)

  8. Industrial Use of Synchrotron Radiation:. Love at Second Sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormes, Josef; Warner, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) has become one of the most valuable tools for many areas of basic and applied research. In some cases, techniques have been developed that rely completely on the specific properties of synchrotron radiation; in many other cases, using synchrotron radiation has opened completely new and exciting opportunities for conventional techniques. In this chapter, the challenges, problems, and advantages of the industrial use of synchrotron radiation will be highlighted, in an admittedly subjective way, based on the experience of the authors at various synchrotron radiation facilities. "Typical" examples of industrial use of SR will be discussed for all areas of industrial activities, i.e., production, quality control and control of regulatory requirements, and research and development. Emphasis will be put on examples from R&D as this is the most intensively used area. Because this field is much too broad for a complete review here, examples will focus on applications from just three major sectors: biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, and automotive and mining. Environmental research is a fourth area that will be partly covered in the section on regulatory requirements.

  9. A fast X-ray absorption spectrometer for use with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quasi-parallel and polychromatic beam of synchrotron radiation is focused and dispersed by a curved crystal, so that the energy of each ray of the focused beam varies as a function of convergence angle through the focus. The specimen is placed at the focus. By measuring the X-ray intensity distribution across the beam behind the focus, in the presence and absence of the specimen, the absorption spectra of Cu and Ni metal foils were obtained. Using an X-ray film as the detector, a spectrum from a Cu foil was obtained in 0.1 seconds when the SPEAR storage ring at Stanford was operated at 3.1 GeV and 80 mA. The energy resolution is approximately 2.0 eV and the energy range of the spectrum is approximately 1 keV. (author)

  10. Initial feasibility study of a dedicated synchrotron radiation light source for ultrafast X-ray science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an initial feasibility summary of a femtosecond synchrotron radiation x-ray source based on a flat-beam rf gun and a recirculating superconducting linac that provides beam to an array of undulators and bend magnets. Optical pulse durations of < 100 fs are obtained by a combination of electron pulse compression, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. After an introduction and initial scientific motivation, we cover the following aspects of the design: layout and lattice, ultra-fast x-ray pulse production, flat electron-beam production, the rf gun, rf systems, cryogenic systems, collective effects, photon production, and synchronization of x-ray and laser pulses. We conclude with a summary of issues and areas of development that remain to be addressed

  11. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramadhar, Timothy R. [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115 (United States); Zheng, Shao-Liang [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138 (United States); Chen, Yu-Sheng [ChemMatCARS, Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago c/o Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Clardy, Jon, E-mail: jon-clardy@hms.harvard.edu [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report describes complete practical guidelines and insights for the crystalline sponge method, which have been derived through the first use of synchrotron radiation on these systems, and includes a procedure for faster synthesis of the sponges. These guidelines will be applicable to crystal sponge data collected at synchrotrons or in-house facilities, and will allow researchers to obtain reliable high-quality data and construct chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination. A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine

  12. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes complete practical guidelines and insights for the crystalline sponge method, which have been derived through the first use of synchrotron radiation on these systems, and includes a procedure for faster synthesis of the sponges. These guidelines will be applicable to crystal sponge data collected at synchrotrons or in-house facilities, and will allow researchers to obtain reliable high-quality data and construct chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination. A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine

  13. Synchrotron radiation study of the uranium chemical species electrodeposited for alpha spectrometry sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burciaga V, D. C.; Mendez, C. G.; Esparza P, H.; Fuentes C, L.; Fuentes M, L.; Montero C, M. E. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Beesley, A. M. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Crespo, M. T., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.m [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    Alpha spectrometry (As) with semiconductor detectors has applications in nuclear decay data measurements, environmental, geological and nuclear wastes studies and other works requiring determination of actinide and other alpha emitter contents. In order to obtain accurate measurements by producing good resolution alpha spectra, As sources must be thin and uniform. As sources produced by electrodeposition consist of a radioactive deposit onto a metallic substrate (cathode of the electrolytic cell). Natural U sources prepared by the Hallstadius method have co-deposited Pt, originated from the dissolution of the anode during the electrodeposition. A recent work published else-where has reported a study on the morphology and spatial distribution of the U/Pt deposits with the related chemical speciation of U, using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure. The purpose of this work is to explain the structure of the Pt/U deposits. We have obtained new spectra of the U L III edge X-ray absorption fine structure by total electron yield at Stanford Synchrotron radiation light source, Bl 2-3. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (Gi-XRD) patterns were obtained at Stanford Synchrotron radiation light source, Bl 11-3. Gi-XRD patterns show a bimodal distribution of grain sizes of Pt, with dimensions {approx} 5 and 20 nm; schoepite diffraction signals suggest grain dimensions of {approx} 5 nm, i.e. with low crystallization. X-ray absorption fine structure spectra were fitted assuming two different structures: uranyl hydroxide and schoepite, and results were compared. U-U path shows low intensity that also may be a result of low crystallization. (Author)

  14. European synchrotron radiation facility at Risoe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the feasibility study on a potential European Synchrotron Radiation Facility site at Risoe, Denmark, can be summarized as follows: The site is located in a geologically stable area. The ground is fairly flat, free from vibrations and earth movements, and the foundation properties are considered generally good. The study is based upon the machine concept and main geometry as presented in the ESF feasibility study of May 1979. However, the proposed site could accomodate a larger machine (e.g. 900 m of circumference) or a multi-facility centre. The site is located in the vicinity of Risoe National Laboratory, a R and D establishment with 850 employees and a well-developed technical and scientific infrastructure, which can provide support to the ESRF during the plant construction and operation. In particular the possible combination of synchrotron radiation with the existing neutron scattering facilities in DR 3 is emphasized. The site is located 35 km west of Copenhagen with easy access to the scientific, technological and industrial organizations in the metropolitan area. The regional infrastructure ensures easy and fast communication between the ESRF and locations in the host country as well as abroad. The site is located 35 minutes drive from Copenhagen International Airport and on a main communication route out of Copenhagen. The estimated time duration for the design, construction and commissioning of ESRF phase 1 - taking into account national regulatory procedures - is consistent with that of the ESF feasibility study, i.e. approx. 6 years. The estimated captal costs associated with site-specific structures are consistent with those of the ESF feasibility study, taking into account price increase between 1979 and 1981. It should be emphasized that the study is based upon technical and scientific assessments only, and does not reflect any official position or approval from appropriate authorities. (author)

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SSRL at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was built in 1974 to take and use for synchrotron studies the intense x-ray beams from the SPEAR storage ring that...

  16. Solaris—National synchrotron radiation centre, project progress, May 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Polish synchrotron radiation facility Solaris is being built at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow. The project was approved for construction in February 2010 using European Union structural funds. The Solaris synchrotron is based on the 1.5 GeV facility being built for the MAX IV project at Lund University in Sweden. A general description of the facility is given together with a status of its implementation. The specific Solaris solutions taken for the linear accelerator, beamlines and civil engineering infrastructure are outlined. - Highlights: • The current status and plans for the future development of the Solaris synchrotron are presented. • The layout and basic design parameters of the accelerator are shown and described. • The powerful scientific capabilities of the innovative design of the synchrotron are pointed out

  17. 6th International School “Synchrotron Radiation and Magnetism”

    CERN Document Server

    Bulou, Hervé; Joly, Loic; Scheurer, Fabrice; Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation : Towards the Fourth Generation Light Sources

    2013-01-01

     Advances in the synthesis of new materials with often complex, nano-scaled structures require increasingly sophisticated experimental techniques that can probe the electronic states, the atomic magnetic moments and the magnetic microstructures responsible for the properties of these materials. At the same time, progress in synchrotron radiation techniques has ensured that these light sources remain a key tool of investigation, e.g. synchrotron radiation sources of the third generation are able to support magnetic imaging on a sub-micrometer scale. With the Sixth Mittelwihr School on Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation the tradition of teaching the state-of-the-art on modern research developments continues and is expressed through the present set of extensive lectures provided in this volume. While primarily aimed at postgraduate students and newcomers to the field, this volume will also benefit researchers and lecturers actively working in the field.

  18. Physics design of SSRF synchrotron radiation security

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yi; DAI Zhi-Min; LIU Gui-Min

    2009-01-01

    High brightness of SSRF brings about synchrotron radiation security problems,which will be solved in physics design.The main radiations are generated from bending magnets and insertion devices.Since the fact that radiation power and radiating area are different in these two kinds of synchrotron radiation,the arrangements of photon absorbers,diaphragms and other vacuum components need to be treated distinctively.In addition.SSRF interlock protection threshold is defined and the beam orbit in the straight line is limited.Hence.beam orbit in the bending magnets and IDs are also restricted by the threshold.The orbit restriction is calculated and helps us to arrange the vacuum components.In this paper,beam orbit distortion restricted by interlock protection threshold,radiation power,radiation angle and illuminating area are calculated.From the calculation results,the physics designs in manufacture and installation vacuum components are put forward.By commissioning,it is shown that physics requirements are met rigidly in the engineering process.

  19. The synchrotron radiation angiography program at the national synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) angiography program is under development. The program is a collaboration between the Stanford University Angiography Project and the NSLS. A 180 m2 clinical facility has been built. A beam line is being constructed to utilize a superconducting wiggler radiation source. Projected start-up date for the NSLS program is Summer 1988

  20. Diffraction measurements at sources of synchrotron radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich

    Vol. 2a. Praha : Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association, 2008, s. 15-16. ISSN 1211-5894. [Struktura 2008 - Colloquium of the Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association. Valtice (CZ), 16.06.2008-20.06.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500500701; GA ČR GA305/07/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : synchrotron radiation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  1. Initial scientific uses of coherent synchrotron radiation inelectron storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basov, D.N.; Feikes, J.; Fried, D.; Holldack, K.; Hubers, H.W.; Kuske, P.; Martin, M.C.; Pavlov, S.G.; Schade, U.; Singley, E.J.; Wustefeld, G.

    2004-11-23

    The production of stable, high power, coherent synchrotron radiation at sub-terahertz frequency at the electron storage ring BESSY opens a new region in the electromagnetic spectrum to explore physical properties of materials. Just as conventional synchrotron radiation has been a boon to x-ray science, coherent synchrotron radiation may lead to many new innovations and discoveries in THz physics. With this new accelerator-based radiation source we have been able to extend traditional infrared measurements down into the experimentally poorly accessible sub-THz frequency range. The feasibility of using the coherent synchrotron radiation in scientific applications was demonstrated in a series of experiments: We investigated shallow single acceptor transitions in stressed and unstressed Ge:Ga by means of photoconductance measurements below 1 THz. We have directly measured the Josephson plasma resonance in optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} for the first time and finally we succeeded to confine the sub-THz radiation for spectral near-field imaging on biological samples such as leaves and human teeth.

  2. Proposals for synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since it was first applied in the 1960's synchrotron radiation from an accelerating electron beam has been gaining popularity as a powerful tool for research and development in a wide variety of fields of science and technology. By now there are some 20 facilities operating either parasitically or dedicatedly for synchrotron radiation research in different parts of the world. In addition there are another 20 facilities either in construction or in various stages of proposal and design. The experiences gained from the operating facilities and the recent development of insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators as radiation sources led to a new set of requirements on the design of synchrotron radiation storage rings for optimum utility. The surprisingly uniform applicability and unanimous acceptance of these criteria give assurance that they are indeed valid criteria derived form mature considerations and experiences. Instead of describing the design of each of these new facilities it is, thus, more effective to discuss these desirable design features and indicate how they are incorporated in the design using machines listed as examples. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Polymer gels impregnated with gold nanoparticles implemented for measurements of radiation dose enhancement in synchrotron and conventional radiotherapy type beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normoxic type polyacrylamide gel (nPAG) dosimeters are established for dose quantification in three-dimensions for radiotherapy and hence represent an adequate dosimeter for quantification of the dose variation due to the existence of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the target during irradiation. This work compared the degree of polymerisation in gel doped with nanoparticles (nPAG–AuNP) with control gel samples when irradiated by various sources. Samples were irradiated with a synchrotron radiation source of mean energy 125 keV, 80 kV X-ray beams from superficial therapy machine (SXRT), 6 MV X-rays and 6 MeV electron beams from linear accelerator. Analysis of the dose–response relation was used to determine a dose enhancement factor (DEF) of 1.76 ± 0.34 and 1.64 ± 0.44 obtained for samples irradiated with kilovoltage X-rays energy from synchrotron source and SXRT respectively. Similarly, including AuNPs in gel results in a DEF of approximately 1.37 ± 0.35 when irradiated by an electron beam and 1.14 ± 0.28 for high energy X-ray beams. The results demonstrate the use of AuNPs embedded in polymer gels for measuring the enhancement of radiation caused by metallic nanoparticles.

  4. Putting synchrotron radiation to work: New opportunities for industrial R ampersand D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the basic categories of experimental techniques that have been successfully exploited at existing synchrotron facilities or, in some cases, that are expected to join the research armamentarium at the next-generation synchrotron sources now under construction, such as the ALS. In each case, a selection of typical industrial applications is noted

  5. A new setup for synchrotron radiation induced TXRF at HASYLAB, beamline L for ultra trace analysis with

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the outstanding features of synchrotron radiation such as high flux, continuous energy spectrum, natural collimation, linear polarization are the perfect prerequisites for TXRF synchrotron radiation induced total reflection x-ray analysis (SR-TXRF) allows the determination of trace elements in various kinds of samples from environment, medicine or industry at concentration levels below ng/g. SR-TXRF is especially suitable for samples where only small amounts (volumes) are available, as only a few μl or some ng of sample are required. Another advantage of TXRF is easy quantification referring to an internal standard. Additional research fields for TXRF are: layer and implant characterization (dose, thickness, profile shape, density) as well as XANES of a sample prepared or collected on the reflector. A new vacuum chamber for SR-TXRF has been installed at HASYLAB beamline L using the existing translation and rotation stages for adjustment. It can easily be exchanged with the microbeam setup. The x-ray fluorescence analysis of light elements requires a vacuum environment (10-2 mbar) to avoid absorption of the low energy characteristic radiation. In addition it is advantageous to measure in vacuum as scattering of the primary radiation in air is avoided and also the Ar K-lines at 3 keV are not present in the spectrum. The chamber is equipped with an automatic sample loader for inserting the prepared sample reflectors in the measuring position with high reproducibility. The fluorescence radiation emitted by the sample is measured by a KETEK silicon drift detector (SDD). The main advantages of these detectors light weight, electrical cooling, excellent energy resolution (140 eV at 5.9 keV), high countrate processability and high throughput up to several E5 counts per second. The active area of the detector is 5 mm 2 but the short distance (3 mm) between the crystal and the Be window leads to a large solid angle. Measurements were carried out with the Ni/C multilayer

  6. Detection and spectral measurements of coherent synchrotron radiation at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2010-02-15

    The operation of high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) underlies tremendous demands on high quality electron beams with high peak currents. At the Free-Electron-Laser in Hamburg (FLASH), two magnetic bunch compressors are used to compress the electron bunches longitudinally. In the bunch compressor magnets, these short electron bunches generate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). This CSR contains information on the longitudinal bunch profile, which is relevant for driving an FEL. In order to investigate coherent synchrotron radiation at the second bunch compressor BC3 at FLASH, a new setup behind the last dipole was installed. For the detection of coherent synchrotron radiation, which is emitted in the infrared regime, pyroelectric detectors were used. These pyroelectric detectors have been calibrated at the free-electron laser FELIX in the wavelength range from 5 {mu}m to 110 {mu}m. For characterisation of the emitted radiation, a transverse scanning device was used to measure the transverse intensity distribution. Various transmission filters were used to obtain additional information about the spectral content. In order to get spectral information with high resolution over a wide wavelength range, a rotating mirror spectrometer using reflective blazed gratings was installed. Using this spectrometer, the first spectral measurements of coherent synchrotron radiation at FLASH in a wavelength range from 10 {mu}m to 160 {mu}m were done. (orig.)

  7. A closed loop feedback system for synchrotron radiation double crystal monochromators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a dc closed loop feedback system for a fixed exit double crystal monochromator. The feedback control is part of a complete system which includes beam position and current monitors. The monochromator consists of two identical crystals mechanically coupled so that the two diffraction planes are almost parallel to each other. The feedback system controls a piezoelectric transducer to maintain the new parallelism, and it can be set under computer control to be at any point in the rocking curve at all times. The system has been thoroughly tested and found to be adequate for EXAFS measurements performed on beamline X18B at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. (orig.)

  8. Synchrotron radiation — 1873 to 1947

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, John P.

    1988-04-01

    In 1873 Maxwell's treatise "Electricity and Magnetism" made it clear that a changing electric current will emit electromagnetic radiation. By the turn of the century, J.J. Thomson was showing that currents in space could be carried by electrons; accordingly, it was reasonable to believe that electrons, when accelerated, would radiate. By 1912, the theory of radiation from accelerated electrons was worked out and buried in the literature. Radiation from accelerated relativistic electrons did not come into prominence again until the 1940's when, finally, it was observed at the Research Laboratory of the General Electric Company. This paper will discuss the early theoretical treatments and will describe the first observations with the G.E. 100 MeV betatron and 75 MeV synchrotron.

  9. Rotating crystal cube as a variable shutter for use with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam chopper together with the temporal structure of x-rays emitted by a synchrotrons storage ring can be utilized to generate x-ray bursts of variable length and time separation. A Si cube, cut for diffraction from the (220) planes, was mounted to a low-speed motor to produce a beam chopper based upon the Darwin width of the crystal. An x-ray pulse, consisting of an envelope of individual pulses characterizing the loading pattern of the storage ring, was transmitted. The width of the transmitted pulse and the time between pulses was varied by varying the rotation frequency of the Si cube. Pulses as short as ∼75 ps or as long as ∼4 micros were transmitted with pulse separation spanning from 4 ms to 167 ms

  10. India's first synchrotron radiation source Indus-1: a historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Indian synchrotron radiation source Indus-l was commissioned in May 1999. This article briefs the development of accelerator based research programme in India and discusses the historical perspectives starting from the year 1953 at and goes to the development of Indus-1 and Indus-2 at Centre for Advanced Technology at Indore

  11. Synchrotron radiation, neutron, and mass spectrometry techniques at user facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, S. R.; Caffee, M. W.; Dove, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    User research facilities around the world offer tremendous opportunities for scientific experimentation by members of the Earth science community. Synchrotron radiation sources, neutron sources, mass spectrometers, and others represent a powerful force in tackling complex scientific problems. In these techniques, Earth materials are bombarded with beams of ions, subatomic particles and/or photons to learn the secr...

  12. Evaluation of Heavy Metals in Solid Waste Disposal Sites in Campinas City, Brazil Using Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Bruna Fernanda; Moreira, Silvana

    2011-12-01

    The problem of solid waste in most countries is on the rise as a result of rapid population growth, urbanization, industrial development and changes in consumption habits. Amongst the various forms of waste disposals, landfills are today the most viable for the Brazilian reality, both technically and economically. Proper landfill construction practices allow minimizing the effects of the two main sources of pollution from solid waste: landfill gas and slurry. However, minimizing is not synonymous with eliminating; consequently, the landfill alone cannot resolve all the problems with solid waste disposal. The main goal of this work is to evaluate the content of trace elements in samples of groundwater, surface water and slurry arising from local solid waste disposals in the city of Campinas, SP, Brazil. Samples were collected at the Delta, Santa Barbara and Pirelli landfills. At the Delta and Santa Barbara sites, values above the maximum permitted level established by CETESB for Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Pb were observed in samples of groundwater, while at the Pirelli site, elements with concentrations above the permitted levels were Mn, Fe, Ba and Pb. At Delta, values above levels permitted by the CONAMA 357 legislation were still observed in surface water samples for Cr, Mn, Fe and Cu, whereas in slurry samples, values above the permitted levels were observed for Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb. Slurry samples were prepared in accordance with two extraction methodologies, EPA 3050B and EPA 200.8. Concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu and Pb were higher than the limit established by CONAMA 357 for most samples collected at different periods (dry and rainy) and also for the two extraction methodologies employed.

  13. Evaluation of Heavy Metals in Solid Waste Disposal Sites in Campinas City, Brazil Using Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of solid waste in most countries is on the rise as a result of rapid population growth, urbanization, industrial development and changes in consumption habits. Amongst the various forms of waste disposals, landfills are today the most viable for the Brazilian reality, both technically and economically. Proper landfill construction practices allow minimizing the effects of the two main sources of pollution from solid waste: landfill gas and slurry. However, minimizing is not synonymous with eliminating; consequently, the landfill alone cannot resolve all the problems with solid waste disposal. The main goal of this work is to evaluate the content of trace elements in samples of groundwater, surface water and slurry arising from local solid waste disposals in the city of Campinas, SP, Brazil. Samples were collected at the Delta, Santa Barbara and Pirelli landfills. At the Delta and Santa Barbara sites, values above the maximum permitted level established by CETESB for Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Pb were observed in samples of groundwater, while at the Pirelli site, elements with concentrations above the permitted levels were Mn, Fe, Ba and Pb. At Delta, values above levels permitted by the CONAMA 357 legislation were still observed in surface water samples for Cr, Mn, Fe and Cu, whereas in slurry samples, values above the permitted levels were observed for Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb. Slurry samples were prepared in accordance with two extraction methodologies, EPA 3050B and EPA 200.8. Concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu and Pb were higher than the limit established by CONAMA 357 for most samples collected at different periods (dry and rainy) and also for the two extraction methodologies employed.

  14. Synchrotron radiation studies of supported metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic clusters supported on refractory oxides have been used extensively for several decades in the production of chemicals and petroleum derived transportation fuels. Catalysts containing more than one metal component are of particular interest since the addition of a second metal provides a method of controlling the selectivity of the catalyst. That is, the second metal can alter the rates of competing reactions in a complex reaction sequence and thus alter the final product distribution of the reaction. In this work the reactions of cyclohexane in hydrogen over silica supported ruthenium and osmium catalysts were studied. Bimetallic catalysts represent an important class of materials that are of interest both scientifically and technologically. Despite the importance and long-standing use of supported metal catalysts, detailed information on the structure of the metal clusters has been difficult to obtain. The development of x-ray absorption spectroscopy with the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation, however, has provided a powerful and versatile tool for studying the structure of these complex systems. Using the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique, it is possible to obtain information on the local atomic structure of supported monometallic catalytic metals and their interaction with the support. In the discussion that follows the authors will focus on results that have been obtained on the structure of supported bimetallic cluster catalysts

  15. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Thurman-Keup, R; Hahn, A; Hurh, P; Lorman, E; Lundberg, C; Meyer, T; Miller, D; Pordes, S; Valishev, A

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. However, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measur...

  16. Ultra-spatial synchrotron radiation for imaging molecular chemical structure: Applications in plant and animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical features and make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very litt...

  17. METROLOGICAL CHALLENGES OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OPTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern third generation storage rings, require state-of-the-art grazing incidence x-ray optics, in order to monochromate the Synchrotrons Radiation (SR) source photons, and focus them into the experimental stations. Slope error tolerances in the order of 0.5 microRad RMS, and surface roughness well below 5 angstrom RMS, are frequently specified for mirrors and gratings exceeding 300 mm in length. Non-contact scanning instruments were developed, in order to characterize SR optical surfaces, of spherical and aspherical shape. Among these, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a double pencil slope measuring interferometer, has proved to be particularly reliable, and was adopted by several SR optics metrology laboratories. The ELETTRA soft x-rays and optics metrology laboratory, has operated an LTP since 1992. We review the basic operating principles of this instrument, and some major instrumental and environmental improvements, that were developed in order to detect slope errors lower than 1 microRad RMS on optical surfaces up to one metre in length. A comparison among measurements made on the same reference flat, by different interferometers (most of them were LTPs) can give some helpful indications in order to optimize the quality of measurement

  18. METROLOGICAL CHALLENGES OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OPTICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SOSTERO,G.

    1999-05-25

    Modern third generation storage rings, require state-of-the-art grazing incidence x-ray optics, in order to monochromate the Synchrotrons Radiation (SR) source photons, and focus them into the experimental stations. Slope error tolerances in the order of 0.5 {micro}Rad RMS, and surface roughness well below 5 {angstrom} RMS, are frequently specified for mirrors and gratings exceeding 300 mm in length. Non-contact scanning instruments were developed, in order to characterize SR optical surfaces, of spherical and aspherical shape. Among these, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a double pencil slope measuring interferometer, has proved to be particularly reliable, and was adopted by several SR optics metrology laboratories. The ELETTRA soft x-rays and optics metrology laboratory, has operated an LTP since 1992. We review the basic operating principles of this instrument, and some major instrumental and environmental improvements, that were developed in order to detect slope errors lower than 1 {micro}Rad RMS on optical surfaces up to one metre in length. A comparison among measurements made on the same reference flat, by different interferometers (most of them were LTPs) can give some helpful indications in order to optimize the quality of measurement.

  19. Synchrotron Radiation Studies of Environmental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Daniel; Terry, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    In the case of environmental contaminants, the mobility of elements changes depending on oxidation state. Remediation techniques often focus on changing the oxidation state in order to immobilize, by forming an insoluble species, or removing by binding a soluble species to an insoluble material. In order to accomplish this immobilization one has to understand all the possible reactions that can change the oxidation state. One of the techniques that can be used to determine the oxidation state and local atomic structure of environmental contaminants under aqueous conditions is x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Synchrotron radiation was used to excite the absorption edges of As, Tc, and Pu, in order to characterize their oxidation states and structures under environmentally relevant conditions. Granular activated carbon treated with iron has shown promise for the removal of arsenic from contaminated ground water, where XAS measurements have determined that the arsenic bound to iron oxide as AsO4^3-. Pertechnetate (TcO4^-) was found to be reduced to TcO2 in a reaction with amorphous iron sulfide (FeS). Bio-reduction of plutonium has also been studied using bacteria that may be found in nuclear waste repositories resulting in an end product of Pu(III).

  20. Synchrotron radiation - a perfect mimic of star light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotrons are an ideal solar mimic (or more generally a mimic of star light). Continuously tuneable from the IR to the VUV (and beyond into the X ray region) they produce light beams with intensities compatible with sunlight, not the multiphoton processes induced by lasers, and therefore have become a standard tool in environmental studies. In this talk I will review how synchrotron facilities have been used to study the photochemical processes in the Earth's stratosphere that lead to ozone formation, and its destruction by CFCs and other anthropogenic pollutant sources and how by exploring the VUV-vis spectroscopy the role of chemical species in both ozone depletion and global warming is being evaluated and used to suggest new more environmental friendly chemical for industry. Synchrotrons may also be used to study the biological effects of environmental change for example by exploring the effect of enhanced UV levels due to loss of stratospheric ozone (the so called ozone hole). Synchrotron radiation may be used to explore the effects of enhanced UV levels of plants and the mechanisms leading to skin cancers, the latter by studying DNA damage. In this talk I will discuss recent experiments using synchrotron radiation to explore DNA damage and what such experiments tell us about mechanisms involved

  1. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials

  2. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis

  3. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  4. Anisotropic Compton scattering in LiF using synchrotron radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Loupias, G.; Petiau, J.

    1980-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation, the electronic momentum distribution is measured with a 0.15 atomic unit resolution in a LiF single crystal for the and directions. This resolution is about four times better than obtained in γ experiments. The spectrometer uses the LURE-DCI radiation with a channel-cut monochromator, a focusing crystal analyser and a position sensitive detector. The measurements performed confirm the significant anisotropy of the electron distribution in LiF. The ...

  5. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections

  6. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections.

  7. A new facility for the synchrotron radiation-based calibration of transfer radiation sources in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornagel, Reiner; Fliegauf, Rolf; Klein, Roman, E-mail: roman.klein@ptb.de; Kroth, Simone; Paustian, Wolfgang; Richter, Mathias [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has a long tradition in the calibration of radiation sources in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet spectral range, with traceability to calculable synchrotron radiation. Within this context, new instrumentation in the PTB laboratory at the Metrology Light Source (MLS) has been put into operation that opens up extended and improved calibration possibilities. A new facility for radiation source calibrations has been set up in the spectral range from 7 nm to 400 nm based on a combined normal incidence-grazing incidence monochromator. The facility can be used for the calibration of transfer sources in terms of spectral radiant intensity or mean spectral radiance, with traceability to the MLS primary source standard. We describe the design and performance of the experimental station and give examples of some commissioning results.

  8. Synchrotron radiation facilities in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the successful commissioning and achievement of significant milestones at both the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) and the 1.5- GeV Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, synchrotron radiation research capability in the United States holds the promise of many important discoveries in the decade to come. An overview of current accelerator commissioning performance at the American third-generation light sources, state-of-the-art developments at first- and second-generation sources, and a preview of fourth-generation source progress is presented

  9. Emittance growth from transient coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the energies of individual particles in a bunch change as the bunch traverses a bending system, even if it is achromatic, betatron oscillations can be excited. Consequently, the transverse emittance of the bunch will grow as it moves downstream. Short bunches may be particularly susceptible to emission of coherent synchrotron radiation which can act back on the particles to change their energies and trajectories. Because a bend spans a well-defined length and angle, the bunch-excited wakefield and its effect back on the bunch are inherently transient. We outline a recently developed theory of this effect and apply it to example bending systems

  10. Synchrotron radiation facilities in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, G.

    1996-07-01

    With the successful commissioning and achievement of significant milestones at both the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) and the 1.5- GeV Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, synchrotron radiation research capability in the United States holds the promise of many important discoveries in the decade to come. An overview of current accelerator commissioning performance at the American third-generation light sources, state-of-the-art developments at first- and second-generation sources, and a preview of fourth-generation source progress is presented.

  11. Synchrotron radiation at close distances to the orbital ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation in the power radiated by electrons in a circular orbit through an aperture was investigated numerically as a function of the distance along a tangent to the orbital ring. For electron energies above 0.1 GeV, the power radiated into a rectangular aperture, placed at a distance greater than the radius of curvature of the orbit, does not differ by more than 4 parts in 106 from the power radiated into a similarly sized rectangular aperture (subtending the same solid angle) placed at a large distance from the orbital ring. Our conclusion is that, within the limits considered, synchrotron radiation can be calculated accurately for practical radiometric calibrations

  12. Synchrotron Radiation Studies for a Ring-Ring LHeC Interaction Region and Long Straight Section

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, L; Appleby, RB; Kostka, P; Bernard, NR; Nagorny, B; Klein, M; Holzer, BJ

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Electron Collider project is a proposal to study e-p and e-A interactions at the LHC. In the design for an electron synchrotron (alternative designs for a linac are also under development), a 60GeV e beam is collided with a 7TeV LHC proton beam to produce TeVscale collisions. Despite being much lower energy than the proton beam, the electron beam is high enough energy to produce significant amounts of synchrotron radiation (SR). This places strong constraints on beam optics and bending. In particular challenges arise with the complex geometry required by the long straight section (LSS) and interaction region (IR). This includes the coupled nature of the proton and electron optics, as SR produced by the electron beam must not be allowed to quench the superconducting proton magnets or create problems with beam-gas backgrounds. Despite this, the electron beam must be deflected signifi- cantly within the IR to produce sufficient separation from the proton beam.

  13. Synchrotron radiation photoelectron studies for primary radiation effects using a liquid water jet in vacuum: Total and partial photoelectron yields for liquid water near the oxygen K-edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukai, Masatoshi [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)], E-mail: ukai3@cc.tuat.ac.jp; Yokoya, Akinari [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nonaka, Yusuke [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Fujii, Kentaro [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Saitoh, Yuji [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    A new spectroscopy to identify the hydration structure playing important role in liquid-phase radiation damage is in progress using a laminar liquid water jet sample in vacuum in combination with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation. We present the total and partial electron yields for liquid water using a photoelectron spectroscopy. Partial electron yields for the K{sup -1}1b{sub 1}1b{sub 1} Auger transition are obtained for the first time by measuring the electrostatically dispersed electron kinetic energy spectra as a function of photon energy of synchrotron radiation.

  14. Energy dispersive spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation: intensity considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed considerations are given to the reliability of energy dependent integrated intensity data collected from the pressure cavity of a diamond-anvil pressure cell illuminated with heterochromatic radiation from a synchrotron storage ring. It is demonstrated that at least in one run, the electron beam current cannot be used to correct for energy-intensity variations of the incident beam. Rather there appears to be an additional linear relationship between the decay of the synchrotron beam and the magnitude of the background intensity. 13 refs., 7 figs

  15. Design of a wire imaging synchrotron radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper documents the design of a detector invented to measure the positions of synchrotron radiation beams for the precision energy spectrometers of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The energy measurements involve the determination, on a pulse-by-pulse basis, of the separation of pairs of intense beams of synchrotron photons in the MeV energy range. The detector intercepts the beams with arrays of fine wires. The ejection of Compton recoil electrons results in charges being developed in the wires, thus enabling a determination of beam positions. 10 refs., 4 figs

  16. Brain tumors and synchrotron radiation: new methods for mini-beams radiation therapy and treatment follow-up by functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An innovative method of synchrotron radiation therapy, called mini-beams, was proposed by A. Dilmanian et al. in 2006. Mini-beams consists in tumor irradiation with monochromatic sub-millimetric x-ray beams spatially fractionated produced by a synchrotron source. To obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume, an interleaving is realized using two orthogonal incidences. Adjacent healthy tissue is only partially irradiated by mini-beams, the areas between the beams only receive scattered radiation and therefore the energy deposited is 10 to 15 times lower than on one mini-beam axis, leading to a sparing effect of healthy tissue even when a high dose is deposited in the target volume. The thesis project is the development of this experimental method of monochromatic mini-beams, which involves the control of the irradiation geometry, the control of dosimetry and its modeling by Monte Carlo simulations. To evaluate the method, preclinical experiments on models of brain tumors implanted in rats (F98) are performed. Follow-up by anatomical and functional imaging is carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Functional imaging of cerebral perfusion (volume and cerebral blood flow, mean transit time of heavy elements) appears to be associated in the literature as a relevant method for monitoring prognostic. The key parameters of the cerebral vasculature are mainly studied in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because of the harmlessness of this imaging modality. The relation between MRI signal and contrast agent concentration is very complex and no quantitative relationship is well known. Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography (SRCT) is an imaging modality with performances to measure absolute contrast agent concentration very close to the theoretical limits and can be used as gold-standard. The used pharmacokinetic models need as input parameters a contrast agent concentration versus time. A comparison of perfusion measurements between MRI and SRCT

  17. Deflection gating for time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism–photoemission electron microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present a newly developed gating technique for a time-resolving photoemission microscope. The technique makes use of an electrostatic deflector within the microscope's electron optical system for fast switching between two electron-optical paths, one of which is used for imaging, while the other is blocked by an aperture stop. The system can be operated with a switching time of 20 ns and shows superior dark current rejection. We report on the application of this new gating technique to exploit the time structure in the injection bunch pattern of the synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for time-resolved measurements in the picosecond regime.

  18. Deflection gating for time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism-photoemission electron microscopy using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemann, C; Kaiser, A M; Cramm, S; Schneider, C M

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a newly developed gating technique for a time-resolving photoemission microscope. The technique makes use of an electrostatic deflector within the microscope's electron optical system for fast switching between two electron-optical paths, one of which is used for imaging, while the other is blocked by an aperture stop. The system can be operated with a switching time of 20 ns and shows superior dark current rejection. We report on the application of this new gating technique to exploit the time structure in the injection bunch pattern of the synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for time-resolved measurements in the picosecond regime. PMID:22755633

  19. Results of a direct search using synchrotron radiation for the low-energy $^{229}$Th nuclear isomeric transition

    CERN Document Server

    Jeet, Justin; Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Mirzadeh, Saed; Cassanho, A; Jenssen, H P; Tkalya, Eugene V; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a direct search for the $^{229}$Th ($I^{p} = 3/2^+\\leftarrow 5/2^+$) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing $^{229}$Th-doped LiSrAlF$_6$ crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between $7.3 \\mbox{eV}$ and $8.8 \\mbox{eV}$ with transition lifetime $(1-2)\\mbox{s} \\lesssim \\tau \\lesssim (2000-5600)\\mbox{s}$. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches.

  20. Results of a Direct Search Using Synchrotron Radiation for the Low-Energy (229)Th Nuclear Isomeric Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeet, Justin; Schneider, Christian; Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Mirzadeh, Saed; Cassanho, A; Jenssen, H P; Tkalya, Eugene V; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-06-26

    We report the results of a direct search for the (229)Th (I(π)=3/2(+)←5/2(+)) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing (229)Th-doped LiSrAlF(6) crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between 7.3 eV and 8.8 eV with transition lifetime (1-2) s≲τ≲(2000-5600)  s. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches. PMID:26197124

  1. Contamination experiments for Mo/Si multilayer mirrors with the use of single-bunch synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation experiment with the use of single-bunch synchrotron radiation (SR) was carried out to evaluate the optics lifetime for EUV lithography due to contaminations. The sequential change in the reflectivity of Ru-capped Mo/Si multilayer mirrors was measured during EUV irradiation in the presence of hydrocarbon gas or water vapor vacuum environment. The EUV dose dependence of decreases in reflectivity for single-bunch SR was almost the same as that for light-attenuated multibunch SR. From the results, there was no marked difference in the dependence of decrease in reflectivity on pulse structure in the frequency range of 2.5 to 500 MHz.

  2. Investigation of high thermal contact conductance at low contact pressure for high-heat-load optical elements of synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Ohashi, H.; Goto, S.

    2013-09-01

    We measured the thermal-contact-conductance (TCC) of indirect cooling components in synchrotron radiation beamlines. To reduce the strain on the optical element, we explored conditions for insertion materials with a high TCC in region with low contact pressures of 0.1-1.0 MPa. We examined the TCC at the interface between oxygen-free copper (OFC) and insertion materials such as indium, graphite, and gold foil. The TCC depended on the hardness and thickness of the insertion material. Thin indium (20 μm thick) showed the highest TCC. Nickel and gold passivation on the OFC surface reduced the TCC to 30% of that for the bare OFC. Future work will involve exploring the passivation conditions of OFC for higher TCC is and measuring the TCC under cryogenic-cooling conditions.

  3. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for materials science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since Roentgen's discovery of X-rays just over a century ago the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. Recently the possibility of obtaining new and complementary information in X-ray images by utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, both in the laboratory context and at synchrotron sources (where much of this activity is a consequence of the highly coherent X-ray beams which can be produced). Phase-contrast X-ray imaging is capable of providing improved information from weakly absorbing features in a sample, together with improved edge definition. Four different experimental arrangements for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray regime, for the purpose of non-destructive characterization of materials, will be described. Two of these, demonstrated at ESRF in France and AR in Japan, are based on parallel-beam geometry; the other two, demonstrated at PLS in Korea and APS in USA, are based on spherical-beam geometry. In each case quite different X-ray optical arrangements were used. Some image simulations will be employed to demonstrate salient features of hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging and examples of results from each of the experiments will be shown

  4. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for materials science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, A.W. E-mail: andrew.stevenson@csiro.au; Gureyev, T.E.; Paganin, D.; Wilkins, S.W.; Weitkamp, T.; Snigirev, A.; Rau, C.; Snigireva, I.; Youn, H.S.; Dolbnya, I.P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Garrett, R.F.; Cookson, D.J.; Hyodo, K.; Ando, M

    2003-01-01

    Since Roentgen's discovery of X-rays just over a century ago the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. Recently the possibility of obtaining new and complementary information in X-ray images by utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, both in the laboratory context and at synchrotron sources (where much of this activity is a consequence of the highly coherent X-ray beams which can be produced). Phase-contrast X-ray imaging is capable of providing improved information from weakly absorbing features in a sample, together with improved edge definition. Four different experimental arrangements for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray regime, for the purpose of non-destructive characterization of materials, will be described. Two of these, demonstrated at ESRF in France and AR in Japan, are based on parallel-beam geometry; the other two, demonstrated at PLS in Korea and APS in USA, are based on spherical-beam geometry. In each case quite different X-ray optical arrangements were used. Some image simulations will be employed to demonstrate salient features of hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging and examples of results from each of the experiments will be shown.

  5. $YB_{66} a new soft X-ray monochromator for synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, J; Rowen, M; Schäfers, F; Müller, B R; Rek, Z U

    1999-01-01

    For pt.I see Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., vol.A291, p.243-8, 1990. YB/sub 66/, a complex boron-rich man-made crystal, has been singled out as a potential monochromator material to disperse synchrotron soft X-rays in the 1-2 keV region. Results of a series of systematic property characterizations pertinent for this application are presented in this paper. These include Laue diffraction patterns and high-precision lattice-constant determination, etch rate, stoichiometry, thermal expansion, soft X-ray reflectivity and rocking-curve measurements, thermal load effects on monochromator performance, nature of intrinsic positive glitches and their reduction. The 004 reflection of YB/sub 66/ has a reflectance of ~3 in this spectral region. The width of the rocking curve varies from 0.25 eV at 1.1 keV to 1.0 eV at 2 keV, which is a factor of two better than that of beryl(1010) in the same energy range, and enables measurements of high-resolution XANES spectra at the Mg, Al and Si K- edges. The thermal bump on the...

  6. The pressure behaviour of actinides via synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects of performing high-pressure studies with radioactive f-elements using synchrotrons as sources of X-rays are discussed. For ultra-high pressures, intense well-focused beams of 10 to 30 microns in diameter and a single wavelength of 0.3 to 0.7 angstrom are desired for angle dispersive diffraction measurements. Special considerations are necessary for the studies of transuranium elements under pressure at synchrotron facilities. Normally, with these actinides the pressure cells are prepared off-site and shipped to the synchrotron for study. Approved containment techniques must be provided to assure there is not a potential for the release of sample material. The goal of these high-pressure studies is to explore the fundamental science occurring as pressure is applied to the actinide samples. One of the primary effects of pressure is to reduce interatomic distances, and the goal is to ascertain the changes in bonding and electronic nature of the system that result as atoms and electronic orbitals are forced closer together. Concepts of the science being pursued with these f-elements are outlined. A brief discussion of the behaviour of americium metal under pressure performed recently at the ESRF is provided as an example of the high-pressure research being performed with synchrotron radiation. Also discussed here is the important role synchrotrons play and the techniques/procedures employed in high-pressure studies with actinides. (authors)

  7. A simple external resistance heating diamond anvil cell and its application for synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple external heating assemblage allowing diamond anvil cell experiments at pressures up to 34 GPa and temperatures up to 653 K was constructed. This cell can be connected to the synchrotron radiation conveniently. The design and construction of this cell are fully described, as well as its applications for x-ray diffraction. Heating is carried out by using an external-heating system, which is made of NiCr resistance wire, and the temperature was measured by a NiCr-NiSi or PtRh-Pt thermocouple. We showed the performance of the new system by introducing the phase transition study of cinnabar (α-HgS) and thermal equation of state study of almandine at high pressure and temperature with this cell.

  8. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  9. Transvenous coronary angiography in humans with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1994-10-01

    The transvenous coronary angiography project at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is presently undergoing a significant upgrade to the hardware and software in the synchrotron medical facility. When completed, the project will have reached a level of maturity in the imaging technology which will allow the research team to begin to concentrate on medical research programs. This paper will review the status of the project and imaging technology and will discuss the current upgrades and future advanced technology initiatives. The advantages of using the radiation from a synchrotron, over that from a standard x-ray source, were the motivation for the project. A total of 23 human imaging sessions have been carried out with in the project. The primary goals have been to establish the imaging parameters and protocol necessary to obtain clinically useful images.

  10. Transvenous coronary angiography in humans with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transvenous coronary angiography project at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is presently undergoing a significant upgrade to the hardware and software in the synchrotron medical facility. When completed, the project will have reached a level of maturity in the imaging technology which will allow the research team to begin to concentrate on medical research programs. This paper will review the status of the project and imaging technology and will discuss the current upgrades and future advanced technology initiatives. The advantages of using the radiation from a synchrotron, over that from a standard x-ray source, were the motivation for the project. A total of 23 human imaging sessions have been carried out with in the project. The primary goals have been to establish the imaging parameters and protocol necessary to obtain clinically useful images

  11. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  12. Design and project status of the National Synchrotron Light Source; storage rings (2.5 GeV, 0.7 GeV) for the generation of bright synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two high intensity storage rings are being constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the generation of intense fluxes of synchrotron radiation in the vuv wavelength region (700 MeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 31.5 A) and in the x-ray wavelength region (2.5 GeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 2.5 A). A description is given of the facility, the main features of the storage rings are presented and the basic parameters are enumerated. High field superconducting wigglers, to lower the short wavelength cutoff in the x-ray ring, and undulators, for flux enhancement or a free electron laser experiment will be incorporated and parameters are given here. Special design aspects to optimize the electron storage rings as dedicated synchrotron radiation sources will be emphasized and the status of the project will be given

  13. On the possibilities of polychromatic synchrotron radiation microtomography for visualization of internal structures of Rhodnius prolixus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, G.; Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Soares, J.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    The recent years advancements in microtomography have increased the achievable resolution and contrast, making this relatively inexpensive and a widely available technology, potentially useful for studies of insect's internal morphology. Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchrotron Microtomography (SR-PhC-μCT) is a non-destructive technique that allows the microanatomical investigations of Rhodnius prolixus, one of the most important insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. In Latin America, vector control is the most useful method to prevent Chagas' disease, and a detailed knowledge of R. prolixus' interior structures is crucial for a better understanding of their function and evolution. Traditionally, in both biological morphology and anatomy, the internal structures of whole organisms or parts of them are accessed by dissecting or histological serial sectioning; so studying the internal structures of R. prolixus' head using SR-PhC-μCT is of great importance in researches on vector control. In this work, volume-rendered SR-PhC-μCT images of the heads of selected R. prolixus were obtained using the new set-up available at the SYRMEP beamline of ELETTRA (Trieste, Italy). In this new set-up, the outcoming beam from the ring is restrained before the monochromator and in a devoted end-station, absorption and phase contrast radiography and tomography set-up are available. The images obtained with polychromatic X-ray beam in phase contrast regimen and 2 μm resolution, showed details and organs of R. prolixus never seen before with SR-PhC-μCT.

  14. On the possibilities of polychromatic synchrotron radiation microtomography for visualization of internal structures of Rhodnius prolixus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent years advancements in microtomography have increased the achievable resolution and contrast, making this relatively inexpensive and a widely available technology, potentially useful for studies of insect’s internal morphology. Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchrotron Microtomography (SR-PhC-µCT) is a non-destructive technique that allows the microanatomical investigations of Rhodnius prolixus, one of the most important insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas’ disease. In Latin America, vector control is the most useful method to prevent Chagas’ disease, and a detailed knowledge of R. prolixus’ interior structures is crucial for a better understanding of their function and evolution. Traditionally, in both biological morphology and anatomy, the internal structures of whole organisms or parts of them are accessed by dissecting or histological serial sectioning; so studying the internal structures of R. prolixus’ head using SR-PhC-µCT is of great importance in researches on vector control. In this work, volume-rendered SR-PhC-µCT images of the heads of selected R. prolixus were obtained using the new set-up available at the SYRMEP beamline of ELETTRA (Trieste, Italy). In this new set-up, the outcoming beam from the ring is restrained before the monochromator and in a devoted end-station, absorption and phase contrast radiography and tomography set-up are available. The images obtained with polychromatic X-ray beam in phase contrast regimen and 2 µm resolution, showed details and organs of R. prolixus never seen before with SR-PhC-µCT. - Highlights: • SR-PhC-µCT were performed using the set-up available at SYRMEP beamline. • 3D sections of Rhodnius Prolixus head were obtained using SR-PhC-µCT. • Results showed structures of R. prolixus head with SR-PhC-µCT

  15. Expectation for medium-sized highly brilliant synchrotron radiation ring. Prospects for soft X-ray surface/interface sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of medium-sized highly brilliant soft X-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) enables analyses with much better spatial, energy and time resolution, resulting in visualizing surface/interface electronic structure in nano regions. In order to improve performances of electronic, magnetic and energy devices, it is required to characterize and control electronic structures. In the world, several SR rings with the emittance of less than 1 nmrad are being constructed, aiming at revolutionary progress of surface/interface sciences using soft X-rays. Although we have constructed the University of Tokyo Outstation at SPring-8 for soft X-ray surface/interface sciences, medium-sized highly brilliant SR ring is strongly required for further development in this field. In this article, nano-region photoelectron spectroscopy for graphene FET and ReRAM, soft X-ray emission spectroscopy for fuel cells and Li ion batteries, and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy for photocatalysts are introduced, and future prospects of soft X-ray surface/interface sciences are discussed. (author)

  16. Synchrotron radiation in art and archaeology SRA 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, A.M.; Janssens, K.; Artioli, G.; Young, M.L.; Casadio, F.; Schnepp, S.; Marvin, J.; Dunand, D.C.; Almer, J.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.K.; Haeffner, D.R.; Reguer, S.; Dillmann, Ph.; Mirambet, F.; Susini, J.; Lagarde, P.; Pradell, T.; Molera, J.; Brunetti, B.; D' acapito, F.; Maurizio, C.; Mazzoldi, P.; Padovani, S.; Sgamellotti, A.; Garges, F.; Etcheverry, M.P.; Flank, A.M.; Lagarde, P.; Marcus, M.A.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Grolimund, D.; Pallot-Frossard, I.; Smith, A.D.; Jones, M.; Gliozzo, E.; Memmi-Turbanti, I.; Molera, J.; Vendrell, M.; Mcconachie, G.; Skinner, T.; Kirkman, I.W.; Pantos, E.; Wallert, A.; Kanngiesser, B.; Hahn, O.; Wilke, M.; NekaT, B.; Malzer, W.; Erko, A.; Chalmin, E.; Vignaud, C.; Farges, F.; Susini, J.; Menu, M.; Sandstrom, M.; Cotte, M.; Kennedy, C.J.; Wess, T.J.; Muller, M.; Murphy, B.; Roberts, M.A.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, C.; Gunneweg, J.; Pantos, E.; Dik, J.; Tafforeau, P.; Boistel, R.; Boller, E.; Bravin, A.; Brunet, M.; Chaimanee, Y.; Cloetens, P.; Feist, M.; Hoszowska, J.; Jaeger, J.J.; Kay, R.F.; Lazzari, V.; Marivaux, L.; Nel, A.; Nemoz, C.; Thibault, X.; Vignaud, P.; Zabler, S.; Sciau, P.; Goudeau, P.; Tamura, N.; Doormee, E.; Kockelmann, W.; Adriaens, A.; Ryck, I. de; Leyssens, K.; Hochleitner, B.; Schreiner, M.; Drakopoulos, M.; Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.; Sanchez Del Rio, M.; Martinetto, P.; Dooryhee, E.; Suarez, M.; Sodo, A.; Reyes-Valerio, C.; Haro Poniatowski, E.; Picquart, M.; Lima, E.; Reguera, E.; Gunneweg, J.; Reiche, I.; Berger, A.; Bevers, H.; Duval, A

    2005-07-01

    Materials - bones, artifacts, artwork,.... - lie at the heart of both archaeology and art conservation. Synchrotron radiation techniques provide powerful ways to interrogate these records of our physical and cultural past. In this workshop we will discuss and explore the current and potential applications of synchrotron radiation science to problems in archaeology and art conservation. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  17. Synchrotron radiation in art and archaeology SRA 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials - bones, artifacts, artwork,.... - lie at the heart of both archaeology and art conservation. Synchrotron radiation techniques provide powerful ways to interrogate these records of our physical and cultural past. In this workshop we will discuss and explore the current and potential applications of synchrotron radiation science to problems in archaeology and art conservation. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations

  18. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe2 and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials

  19. Techniques of production and analysis of polarized synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the unique polarization properties of synchrotron radiation in the hard x-ray spectral region (E>3 KeV) is becoming increasingly important to many synchrotron radiation researchers. The radiation emitted from bending magnets and conventional (planar) insertion devices (IDs) is highly linearly polarized in the plane of the particle's orbit. Elliptically polarized x-rays can also be obtained by going off axis on a bending magnet source, albeit with considerable loss of flux. The polarization properties of synchrotron radiation can be further tailored to the researcher's specific needs through the use of specialized insertion devices such as helical and crossed undulators and asymmetrical wigglers. Even with the possibility of producing a specific polarization, there is still the need to develop x-ray optical components which can manipulate the polarization for both analysis and further modification of the polarization state. A survey of techniques for producing and analyzing both linear and circular polarized x-rays will be presented with emphasis on those techniques which rely on single crystal optical components

  20. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084568; Baglin, Vincent; Schaefers, Franz

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic...

  1. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, R; Baglin, V; Schäfers, F

    2015-12-31

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic vacuum issues, etc. If experimentally fully validated, a highly reflecting beam screen surface will provide a viable and solid solution to be eligible as a baseline design in FCC-hh projects to come, rendering them more cost effective and sustainable. PMID:26764998

  2. Potential Remedies for the High Synchrotron-Radiation-Induced Heat Load for Future Highest-Energy-Proton Circular Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, R.; Baglin, V.; Schäfers, F.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new method for handling the high synchrotron radiation (SR) induced heat load of future circular hadron colliders (like FCC-hh). FCC-hh are dominated by the production of SR, which causes a significant heat load on the accelerator walls. Removal of such a heat load in the cold part of the machine, as done in the Large Hadron Collider, will require more than 100 MW of electrical power and a major cooling system. We studied a totally different approach, identifying an accelerator beam screen whose illuminated surface is able to forward reflect most of the photons impinging onto it. Such a reflecting beam screen will transport a significant part of this heat load outside the cold dipoles. Then, in room temperature sections, it could be more efficiently dissipated. Here we will analyze the proposed solution and address its full compatibility with all other aspects an accelerator beam screen must fulfill to keep under control beam instabilities as caused by electron cloud formation, impedance, dynamic vacuum issues, etc. If experimentally fully validated, a highly reflecting beam screen surface will provide a viable and solid solution to be eligible as a baseline design in FCC-hh projects to come, rendering them more cost effective and sustainable.

  3. Application of synchrotron radiation in archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports current status of archaeological application of synchrotron radiation (SR). The advantages of SR in archaeological research and various application possibilities of X-ray powder diffraction (XPD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses of objects and materials of cultural heritage value are demonstrated through a number of case studies from literatures. They include XPD characterizations of Egyptian cosmetic powder, Attic Black Gloss, and pigments in Gothic altarpieces, provenance analysis of Old-Kutani china wares by high energy XRF, and XAFS analyses to reveal to origin of red color in Satsuma copper-ruby glass and role of iron in Maya blue. (author)

  4. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  5. Study on Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Excited by Synchrotron Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-jia Guo; Wu-er Gan; Guo-bin Zhang; Qing-de Su

    2008-01-01

    A novel analysis approach using atomic fluorescence excited by synchrotron radiation is presented. A system for synchrotron radiation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry is developed, and experimental conditions such as flow rate, analyte acidity, concentration of pre-reducing and hydrogenation system are optimized. The proposed method is successfully applied to get an excitation spectrum of arsenic. Seven of ten primary spectral lines, four of which have never been reported by means of atomic fluorescence spectrometry, agree well with the existing reports. The other three are proposed for the first time. Excitation potentials and possible transitions are investigated. Especially for the prominent line at 234.99 nm, the mechanism of generation is discussed and a model of energy transition processes is proposed.

  6. Time- and frequency domain spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettig, W.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Herbert, T.; Ding, A.

    1989-05-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting experiments show that the time structure of the synchrotron radiation from BESSY can be usefully applied for subnanosecond and nanosecond time-resolved experiments both in the single-bunch (4.8 MHz) and multibunch (500 MHz, 62.5 MHz) operation modes. Also experiments without the need for time resolution can profit by application of these correlation techniques. The possible use of transformation methods using Hadamard sequences is discussed.

  7. Photoionization of atoms and small molecules using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of synchrotron radiation and time-of-flight electron spectroscopy has been used to study the photoionization dynamics of atoms (Li) and small molecules (SF6, SiF4, and SO2). Partial cross sections and angular distribution asymmetry parameters have been measured for Auger electrons and photoelectrons as functions of photon energy. Emphasis is on the basic understanding of electron correlation and resonant effects as manifested in the photoemission spectra for these systems. 254 refs., 46 figs., 10 tabs

  8. THE ORGANIC LED SURFACE: A SYNCHROTRON RADIATION PHOTOEMISSION STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    TUN-WEN PI; T. C. YU

    2007-01-01

    Tris(8-hydroxyquinolato) aluminum (Alq3), a prototypical molecule for organic light-emitting devices, has been studied via synchrotron radiation photoemission to investigate (1) the surface electronic structure of the molecules at room temperature and at elevated temperatures, (2) adsorption onto the inorganic Si(001)-2×1 surface, and (3) doping with the alkaline metal Mg. For case (1), three chemical environments of carbon are resolved. Moreover, the shake-up satellite structures are detecte...

  9. FLUX – Software to Calculate the Synchrotron Radiation Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.I. Gladkikh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the main characteristics of quantum flow of synchrotron radiation (SR of relativistic electron beam in the storage ring NSC KIPT with maximal energy of 225 MeV are represented. Analytical expressions for quantum flow intensity of SR with given wavelength and the geometry of registration are obtained. The algorithms for calculation of the last ones are proposed. The dependences which characterize the intensity and spectrally-angular properties of photon flux of SR are shown.

  10. Action spectra for single- and double-strand break induction in plasmid DNA: studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations deposit a wide range of energies in and around DNA and this leads to a corresponding spectrum of complexity of the lesions induced. The relationships between the amount of energy deposited and the yields and types of damage induced are important in modelling the physical and chemical stages of radiation effect and linking them to biological outcome. To study these relationships experimentally, plasmids were mounted as a monolayer and exposed in vacuum to near-monoenergetic photons from the Daresbury Synchrotron. After irradiation, the DNA was washed off and assayed for single-(ssb) and double-strand breaks (dsb) using agarose gel electrophoresis. Dose-effect relationships for ssb and dsb induction were obtained at various energies in the range 8-25 eV. The initial responses in the low-dose region allowed damage yields to be estimated. The data appear to show that the yields of ssb and dsb increase only slowly with photon energies > 10 eV, with a suggestion of similar threshold energies for both lesions. In the energy range covered, the yield of ssb is 12-20-fold greater than that of dsb. The data indicate that ssb and dsb may have a common precursor in this system. Earlier work with low-energy electrons showed that at 25 eV ssb were induced but no dsb were detected. (author)

  11. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xu, Lisa X [Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Sun Jianqi; Gu Xiang; Liu Ping [Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Xiao Tiqiao [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: pingliu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: lisaxu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2010-04-21

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  12. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Jianqi; Gu, Xiang; Xiao, Tiqiao; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-04-01

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  13. Impact of synchrotron radiation on macromolecular crystallography: a personal view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article, largely based on personal experiences of the authors, reviews the early history of the application of synchrotron radiation to structural biology, and particularly protein crystallography, to show the tremendous impact that this experimental innovation has had on these disciplines. The introduction of synchrotron radiation sources almost four decades ago has led to a revolutionary change in the way that diffraction data from macromolecular crystals are being collected. Here a brief history of the development of methodologies that took advantage of the availability of synchrotron sources are presented, and some personal experiences with the utilization of synchrotrons in the early days are recalled

  14. A future perspective of the medical programme using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical activities with synchrotron radiation using the Photon Factory ring and the Accumulation Ring at KEK since 1984 are reviewed. Some of the activities are (1) Intravenous Coronary Angiography (2) Observation of Microvasculars (3) Intraarterial Coronary Angiography (4) X-ray Phase-Contrast Imaging (5) CT Using Monochromatic X rays (6) CT Using Fluorescent X rays (7) X-ray Microscopy. As characteristic features of x rays particularly (a) high brilliance and (b) tunability of synchrotron radiation are employed. In reference to each of the above numbers (1) a first clinical application to humans was successfully done recently, (2), (3) and (4) feasibility studies were completed to be ready for clinical requirements. (5) and (6) are also under development. (7) has been fully developed in case of dry sample, however in case of vivo not yet fully done. Their associated source characteristics and performances are precisely described. (author)

  15. Control of synchrotron radiation effects during recirculation with bunch compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of beam quality during recirculation have been extended to an arc providing bunch compression with positive momentum compaction. It controls both incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation (ISR and CSR) using methods including optics balance and generates little microbunching gain. We detail the dynamical basis for the design, discuss the design process, give an example, and provide simulations of ISR and CSR effects. Reference will be made to a complete analysis of microbunching effects.

  16. Control of synchrotron radiation effects during recirculation with bunch compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Benson, Stephen [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tennant, Christopher [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Terzic, Balsa [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Tsai, Cheng [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Studies of beam quality during recirculation have been extended to an arc providing bunch compression with positive momentum compaction. It controls both incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation (ISR and CSR) using methods including optics balance and generates little microbunching gain. We detail the dynamical basis for the design, discuss the design process, give an example, and provide simulations of ISR and CSR effects. Reference will be made to a complete analysis of microbunching effects.

  17. Synchrotron Radiation Lithography and MEMS Technique at NSRL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two beamlines and stations for soft X-ray lithography and hard X-ray lithography at NSRL are presented. Synchrotron radiation lithography (SRL) and mask techniques are developed, and the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) techniques are also investigated at NSRL. In this paper, some results based on SRL and MEMS techniques are reported, and sub-micron and high aspect ratio microstructures are given. Some micro-devices, such as microreactors are fabricated at NSRL.

  18. Investigating spintronics thin film systems with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spintronics is a research field involving a wide variety of different magnetic materials. Synchrotron radiation in the VUV and soft X-ray regime is ideally suited to investigate the relationships between magnetic properties and electronic structure of spintronics thin film stacks. Complex layered structures and nanomagnets are the main building blocks for current and future spintronics applications. In this contribution we describe the study of spintronics model systems with respect to the static and dynamic behavior with an emphasis on interfaces.

  19. Experiments planned to be made with the synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For this working meeting, various research groups from the Land Sachsen and from the neighbouring countries Poland and the Czech Republic have been invited in order to present their materials research programmes or task-specific experiments intended to be carried out with the synchrotron radiation source to be installed in the near future. The proceedings volume in hand presents the discussion papers, which have been directly reproduced from the original foils. (orig.)

  20. X-ray microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system for x-ray microscopy now being developed at the X-26 beam line of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described here. Examples of the use of x-ray microscopy for trace element geochemistry, biology and medicine, and materials investigations are given to emphasize the scientific applications of the technique. Future directions for the improvement and further development of the X-26 microscope and of the x-ray microscopy field in general are discussed. 11 refs., 7 figs

  1. Simulation of synchrotron radiation in an electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied a method of using symplectic integrator to simulate incoherent synchrotron radiation in an electron storage ring. The simulation includes both classical radiation and its quantum fluctuations. They found that the emission process of photon using a compound Poisson process cannot be applied to the fourth-order integrator because it has negative path length which implies a negative number of emitted photons. The simulations are carried out using only the second-order integrator. The result of equilibrium beam size agrees with the analytical calculation well. The method can be applied for all types of magnets

  2. Microbunching Due to Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Bunch Compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coherent synchrotron radiation of a bunch in a bunch compressor may lead to the microwave instability producing longitudinal modulation of the bunch. This modulation generates coherent radiation with the wave length small compared to the bunch length. It can also be a source of an undesirable emittance growth in the compressor. We derive and analyze the equation that describes linear evolution of the microwave modulation. Numerical solution of this equation for the LCLS bunch compressor reveals such an instability, in qualitative agreement with numerical simulations

  3. Synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry of laser ablated species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Ruiz, J., E-mail: j.alvarez@iqfr.csic.e [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Casu, A. [University of Cagliari, 09042 Monserrato (Italy); Coreno, M. [CNR-IMIP, c/o Lab. Elettra Trieste, 00016 Montelibretti (Italy); Simone, M. de [CNR-INFM, Laboratorio Nazionale TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Hoyos Campo, L.M.; Juarez-Reyes, A.M. [ICF-UNAM Cuernavaca (Mexico); Kivimaeki, A. [CNR-INFM, Laboratorio Nazionale TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Orlando, S. [CNR-IMIP, c/o Lab. Elettra Trieste, 00016 Montelibretti (Italy); Sanz, M. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Spezzani, C. [Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Stankiewicz, M. [Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Trucchi, D.M. [CNR - ISC, 00016 Montelibretti (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The present paper describes an experimental apparatus suitable to create and study free clusters by combining laser ablation and synchrotron radiation. First tests on sulfur samples, S, showed the production, through laser ablation, of neutral S{sub n} clusters (n = 1-8). These clusters were ionized using synchrotron radiation at photon energies from 160 eV to 175 eV, across the S 2p core edge. The feasibility of such combined ablation-synchrotron radiation experiments is demonstrated, opening new possibilities on the investigation of free clusters and radicals.

  4. Synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry of laser ablated species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes an experimental apparatus suitable to create and study free clusters by combining laser ablation and synchrotron radiation. First tests on sulfur samples, S, showed the production, through laser ablation, of neutral Sn clusters (n = 1-8). These clusters were ionized using synchrotron radiation at photon energies from 160 eV to 175 eV, across the S 2p core edge. The feasibility of such combined ablation-synchrotron radiation experiments is demonstrated, opening new possibilities on the investigation of free clusters and radicals.

  5. HERCULES Specialized Course on Synchrotron radiation and neutrons for extreme conditions studies - HSC12 - slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Hercules Specialized Course (HSC12) is to give the participants an introduction to high pressure research at large experimental facilities such as the synchrotron and the neutron reactor. The basic principles of synchrotron radiation and neutrons techniques at extreme conditions of pressure have been illustrated. Cross-disciplinary examples in a representative range of scientific areas, covering fundamental physics, earth and planetary science, chemistry and material science have been dealt with. Most presentations are dedicated to X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption and neutron scattering of materials (solids, liquids or glasses) at high pressure. Several presentations deal with the experimental set-up and especially the preparation of the diamond anvil. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations. (A.C.)

  6. NIKOS - a system for non-invasive examination of coronary arteries by means of DSA with synchrotron radiation. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For routine investigations a non-invasive method of coronary angiography without using a catheter is necessary. When introducing the contrast medium into a peripheral vein, due to dilution in the central circulation it is not possible to get sufficiently good images of the anatomical situation with conventional radiologic equipment. These difficulties can be overcome with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in energy-subtraction-mode at the K-absorption-edge of iodine (33.17 keV). Today only synchrotron radiation offers enough intensity for this method. The system NIKOS was developed for DSA in energy-subtraction-mode. Main parts of the system are a two beam double crystal monochromator, a scanning device, a two line photodiode detector with large dynamic range and a computer system for data acquisition and image processing. With this arrangement in-vivo investigations of 8 dogs were carried out. The resulting images show, that it should be possible to visualize human coronary arteries down to 1 mm diameter when 10-20 ml contrast medium is rapidly injected into the brachial vein. The necessary extensions of NIKOS for these investigations are under construction. (orig.)

  7. High-Precision Time Delay Control with Continuous Phase Shifter for Pump-Probe Experiments Using Synchrotron Radiation Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilliant pulsed x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) is useful for pump-probe experiment such as time-resolved x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray spectroscopy. For laser pump-SR x-ray probe experiments, short pulsed lasers are generally synchronized to the SR master oscillator controlling the voltage for acceleration of electron bunches in an accelerator, and the interval between the laser and the SR pulses is changed around the time scale of target phenomenon. Ideal delay control produces any time delay as keeping the time-precision and pointing-stability of optical pulses at a sample position. We constructed the time delay control module using a continuous phase shifter of radio frequency signal and a frequency divider, which can produce the delayed trigger pulses to the laser without degradation of the time precision and the pointing stability. A picoseconds time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment was demonstrated at SPring-8 storage ring for fast lattice response by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation, and suggested the possibility of accurate sound velocity measurement. A delay control unit operating with subpicosecond precision has also been designed for femtosecond pump-probe experiments using a free electron laser at SPring-8 campus.

  8. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of 57Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2±0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1 1/2 natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei

  9. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After moved from Tanashi to Kashiwa Campus in the spring of 2000, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) has been promoting the High-brilliance Light Source project, Super SOR project, in cooperation with the nationwide user group as well as with the users of the University of Tokyo. In May of 2001, the project has met with a dramatic progress. The Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture organized the Advisory Board and started to discuss the future synchrotron radiation facilities in EUV and SX regime in Japan. Based on extensive discussion, they proposed the new facility consisting of a 1.8 GeV storage ring of 3rd generation type. The University of Tokyo approved to construct the proposed facility in the Kashiwa campus. The plan is supported not only by researchers in academic institutions but also bio- and chemical-industries. We strongly hope the plan will be realized in near future. On the other hand, SRL maintains a branch laboratory in the Photon Factory (PF) High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) at Tsukuba with a Revolver undulator, two beamlines and three experimental stations (BL-18A, 19A and 19B), which are and fully opened to the outside users. In the fiscal year of 2001, the operation time of the beamlines was more than 5000 hours and the number of the users was about 200. The main scientific interests and activities in the SRL at KEK-PF are directed to the electronic structures of new materials with new transport, magnetic and optical properties. The electronic structures of solid surfaces and interfaces are also intensively studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron microscopy. The accelerator group of SRL is carrying out research works of the accelerator physics and developing the accelerator-related technology, many parts of which will be directly applied to the new light source project. This report contains the activities of the staff members of SRL and users of the three beamlines in FY2001. The status of

  10. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy for characterization of the protein/peptide distribution in single microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Manli; Lu, Xiaolong; Yin, Xianzhen; Tong, Yajun; Peng, Weiwei; Wu, Li; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Zhang, Jiwen

    2015-05-01

    The present study establishes a visualization method for the measurement of the distribution and localization of protein/peptide constituents within a single poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microsphere using synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy (SR-FTIR). The representative infrared wavenumbers specific for protein/peptide (Exenatide) and excipient (PLGA) were identified and chemical maps at the single microsphere level were generated by measuring and plotting the intensity of these specific bands. For quantitative analysis of the distribution within microspheres, Matlab software was used to transform the map file into a 3D matrix and the matrix values specific for the drug and excipient were extracted. Comparison of the normalized SR-FTIR maps of PLGA and Exenatide indicated that PLGA was uniformly distributed, while Exenatide was relatively non-uniformly distributed in the microspheres. In conclusion, SR-FTIR is a rapid, nondestructive and sensitive detection technology to provide the distribution of chemical constituents and functional groups in microparticles and microspheres. PMID:26579456

  11. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SRμCT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SRμCT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SRμCT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SRμCT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SRμCT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  12. Beam focusing limitation from synchrotron radiation in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, O. R.; Tomás, R.; Bambade, P.

    2016-02-01

    The Oide effect considers the synchrotron radiation in the final focusing quadrupole, and it sets a lower limit on the vertical beam size at the interaction point, particularly relevant for high-energy linear colliders. The theory of the Oide effect was derived considering only the second moment of the radiation in the focusing plane of the magnet. This article addresses the theoretical calculation of the radiation effect on the beam size considering the first and second moments of the radiation and both focusing and defocusing planes of the quadrupole. The effect for a Gaussian beam is referred to as 2D-Oide; however, an alternative beam size figure is given that could represent better the effect on the minimum achievable βy* . The CLIC 3 TeV final quadrupole (QD0) and beam parameters are used to compare the theoretical results from the Oide effect and the 2D-Oide effect with particle tracking in placet. The 2D-Oide effect is demonstrated to be important, as it increases by 17% the contribution to the beam size. Further insight into the aberrations induced by the synchrotron radiation opens the possibility to partially correct the 2D-Oide effect with octupole magnets. A beam size reduction of 4% is achieved in the simplest configuration, using a single octupole.

  13. Towards Establishing of National Centre of Synchrotron Radiation in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation facilities (SRF) are established part of contemporary world research landscape. They facilitate fast advances of life, health, and physical sciences as well as development of new technologies. The extent of synchrotron radiation (SR) use has been growing up steadily for the last two decades all over the world and it is anticipated that the growth will continue in future. Growing community of SR users has generated increasing demand for the beam-time in infrared, vacuum UV and X-ray ranges. In response, many new SR facilities are now being constructed and planned, not only in large countries of strong economy but also in developing countries. It is expected that such trends will be followed in other parts of the world. No doubt, the ''cutting edge'' of research activity will continue to create the demand for beams of higher brightness, flux and photon energy but it is predictable that the increasing fraction of research done presently with laboratory radiation sources will be shifting towards small-scale SR facilities. Several hundred Polish scientists, a meaningful fraction of all SR users, take part in experiments using synchrotron sources all over the world. Many of them belong to the Polish Synchrotron Radiation Society - an active body promoting the use of SR. Present European Union priorities include knowledge, research and innovation as the key priorities and a pillar of development and stable welfare of Europe. Poland as a new member of EU will have to conform to the EU policy. The government strategy assumes a fast increase of investments in research and development sector starting from 2005. No other scientific research installations has had such major impact on advances in science an technology as the SRF. It is obvious that the time is ripe now for establishing a National Centre of Synchrotron Radiation in Poland. Recently, several Polish educational and research institutions constituted around the idea of Polish SRF. The initiative

  14. Progress on a Vlasov Treatment of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Arbitrary Planar Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Bassi, Gabriele; Warnock, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    We study the influence of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on particle bunches traveling on arbitrary planar orbits between parallel conducting plates (shielding). The time evolution of the phase space distribution is determined by solving the Vlasov-Maxwell equations in the time domain. This provides lower numerical noise than the macroparticle method, and allows the study of emittance degradation and microbunching in bunch compressors. We calculate the fields excited by the bunch in the lab frame using a formula simpler than that based on retarded potentials.* We have developed an algorithm for solving the Vlasov equation in the beam frame using arc length as the independent variable and our method of local characteristics (discretized Perron-Frobenius operator).We integrate in the interaction picture in the hope that we can adopt a fixed grid. The distribution function will be represented by B-splines, in a scheme preserving positivity and normalization of the distribution. The transformation between l...

  15. Dosimetric systems developed in Brazil for the radiation processes quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to apply new technologies to the industrial processing of materials aiming economy, efficiency, speed and high quality, ionizing radiation has been used in medicine, archaeology, chemistry, food preservation and other areas. For this reason, the dosimetry area looks for improve current dosimeters and develop new materials for application on quality control of these processes. In Brazil, the research in the dosimetry area occurs with great speed providing many different dosimetric systems. The chemical dosimetry is the most used technique in routine dosimetry, which requires fast and accurate responses. This technique involves determination of absorbed dose by measuring chemical changes radiation induced in the materials. Different dosimetric systems were developed at IPEN for application on radiation process quality and all of them present excellent results; the low cost of these materials allows a more effective dose control, therefore, a larger area or volume can be monitored. (author).

  16. Dosimetric systems developed in Brazil for the radiation processes quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galante, Ana Maria Sisti; Campos, Leticia Lucente, E-mail: sgalante@ipen.b, E-mail: lcrodri@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In order to apply new technologies to the industrial processing of materials aiming economy, efficiency, speed and high quality, ionizing radiation has been used in medicine, archaeology, chemistry, food preservation and other areas. For this reason, the dosimetry area looks for improve current dosimeters and develop new materials for application on quality control of these processes. In Brazil, the research in the dosimetry area occurs with great speed providing many different dosimetric systems. The chemical dosimetry is the most used technique in routine dosimetry, which requires fast and accurate responses. This technique involves determination of absorbed dose by measuring chemical changes radiation induced in the materials. Different dosimetric systems were developed at IPEN for application on radiation process quality and all of them present excellent results; the low cost of these materials allows a more effective dose control, therefore, a larger area or volume can be monitored. (author).

  17. Monitoring system for a synthesizer at SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility and obtained results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam orbit distortion in all dispersive sections was observed in the SPring-8 storage ring during beam commissioning. In order to confirm the stability of the radio frequency (RF) synthesizer, a monitoring system was developed. The system consists of a frequency counter referenced to a global positioning system (GPS) receiver. With this system, the output of the synthesizer, which uses an external 10 MHz-Rubidium atomic clock with the time accuracy of Δt/t=10−12, is correctly monitored with 11 digits absolute accuracy, verifying that the synthesizer works well. Measurement of the circumference of the SPring-8 storage ring reveals the effect of tidal forces and seasonal temperature variations on beam orbit. To maintain the center axis of photon radiation in experimental beam lines, a beam energy correction is carried out. The frequency of the RF synthesizer is changed every 5 min with 10-digit accuracy. This corresponds to an energy accuracy of ΔE/E=1.16×10−6. The monitoring system for the synthesizer and obtained results are described.

  18. Synchrotron radiation two-dimensional focusing by the Fresnel lenses of grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of complex research directed to creation of scanning X-ray microscope for local fluorescent analysis on the RSC Kurchatov Institute synchrotron radiation source are presented. Using grazing incidence multilevel diffraction optics elements 2D-focus of synchrotron radiation beam in a focal point of 3.5 x 10.5 μm in size is achieved. The factor of radiation intensity increase in the focal point is about 35

  19. Compliance with technical standards for radiological protection at radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy services provide essential therapeutic procedures for cancer, one of the main causes of population morbidity and mortality. Despite their importance in the health system and their potential risks due to the use of ionizing radiation, there are few studies on such services. We evaluated compliance with technical standards for radiological protection in radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Forty-nine services were studied in 2000 through interviews with technical staff. Typologies of performance profiles focusing on structure and process variables were constructed and services compared. Important differences were observed in the services' positions in the health care system, level of complexity, and geographic distribution, with better average performance in structural conditions but very inadequate performance in patient protection, indicating the need for more effective health surveillance. (author)

  20. Large scale facilities for synchrotron radiation and neutrons. New possibilities for Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feidenhans' l, R

    2003-02-01

    New large-scale facilities for investigating the structure and dynamics of matter and biological systems are currently under construction or are being planned at many locations around Europe. These facilities are likely to have a large impact on the science landscape in Europe, and more locally, as some will be located in the immediate neighbourhood of Denmark. The facilities will enable new analytical capabilities of matter, which will push the frontiers of science and technology in many areas of research of importance for Denmark. This report provides an overview of the new facilities (including very rough funding estimates) of importance for Danish science, describes possible ways of engaging in the various projects and identifies potential user groups. The report also includes a summary of the status of the current use of existing facilities as a benchmark. This is done by showing different cross sections through this multiple parameter space of activities. The intention is that the report should serve as guideline for making a long-term national strategy for the exploitation of large-scale facilities in order to help to optimise their impact on science, education and industry within Denmark, and to safeguard the prominent internationally leading role that Denmark has in this area. (LN)

  1. Large scale facilities for synchrotron radiation and neutrons. New possibilities for Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New large-scale facilities for investigating the structure and dynamics of matter and biological systems are currently under construction or are being planned at many locations around Europe. These facilities are likely to have a large impact on the science landscape in Europe, and more locally, as some will be located in the immediate neighbourhood of Denmark. The facilities will enable new analytical capabilities of matter, which will push the frontiers of science and technology in many areas of research of importance for Denmark. This report provides an overview of the new facilities (including very rough funding estimates) of importance for Danish science, describes possible ways of engaging in the various projects and identifies potential user groups. The report also includes a summary of the status of the current use of existing facilities as a benchmark. This is done by showing different cross sections through this multiple parameter space of activities. The intention is that the report should serve as guideline for making a long-term national strategy for the exploitation of large-scale facilities in order to help to optimise their impact on science, education and industry within Denmark, and to safeguard the prominent internationally leading role that Denmark has in this area. (LN)

  2. Hard X-ray in-line outline imaging for blood vessels: first generation synchrotron radiation without contrast agents in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Phase-contrast X-ray imaging which reduces radiation exposure, is a promising technique for observing the inner structures of biological soft tissues without the aid of contrast agents.The present study intends to depict blood vessels of rabbits and human livers with hard X-ray in-line out line imaging without contrast agents using synchrotron radiation. Methods: All samples were fixed with formalin and sliced into 6 mm sections. The imaging experiments were performed with Fuji-IX80 films on the 4W1A light beam of the first generation synchrotron radiation in Beijing, China. The device of the ex periment, which supplies a maximum light spot size of 20× 10 mm was similar to that of in-line holography. The photon energy was set at 8 KeV and high quality imagines were obtained by altering the distance between the sample and the film. Results: The trees of rabbit-liver blood vessels and the curved vessels of the cirrhotic human liver were revealed on the images, where vessels < 20 μm in diameter were differentiated. Conclusion: These results show that the blood vessels of liver samples can be revealed by using hard X-ray in-line outline imaging with the first generation synchrotron radiation without contrast agents.

  3. Application of the diffraction theory for calculation of the Fresnel lenses for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model is proposed which determines chromatic aberrations of the focal spot and also the smearing of the focus due to unevenness of the incident wave-front. On the base of mathematical model additional procedure for the BESSY ray-trace software RAY is developed/ Intensity distributions in the focuses of test zone plates calculated by RAY are compared with the results of the other software KRGF that deals with wave-fronts and phases and calculates a diffraction pattern using the Huygens-Fresnel wave propagation principle

  4. Observation of broadband self-amplified spontaneous coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths have been observed at several storage rings. A microbunching instability has been proposed as the source for the bursts. However,the microbunching mechanism has yet to be elucidated. We provide the first evidence that the bursts are due to a microbunching instability driven by the emission of synchrotron radiation in the bunch. Observations made at the Advanced Light Source are consistent with the values predicted by a model for the microbunching proposed by Heifets and Stupakov. These results demonstrate a new instability regime for high energy synchrotron radiation sources and will impact the design of future sources

  5. Stability of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the following topics: characteristics of synchrotron radiation sources; stability of the orbits; orbit control; nonlinear dynamic stability; and coherent stability and control. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Application of synchrotron radiation to submicron lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relevant features of modern X-ray sources suitable for submicron lithography with special emphasis on synchrotron with classical, normal and superconducting storage rings are compared. Capability of such sources for X-ray lithographic fabrication of 100 nm lines and 0.5 micron devices such as ULSI and multimegabit memory are discussed. Selecting the materials for X-ray mask substrate as well as the technique of patterning absorber material over it are extremely critical. Use of advanced techniques such as reactive ion etching, ion beam patterning and electron beam lithography for their fabrication is discussed. Characteristics of positive/negative X-ray resists such as sensitivity and resolution, critically governing their suitability in lithographic applications are compared. The technology of alignments recently adopted for X-ray lithography is presented. Submicron patterns and devices like CMOS, BPF and deep grooves featured through dedicated and commercial X-ray systems have been sampled. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Room-temperature macromolecular serial crystallography using synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Stellato

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for collecting data from many hundreds of thousands of microcrystals using X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser has recently been developed. Referred to as serial crystallography, diffraction patterns are recorded at a constant rate as a suspension of protein crystals flows across the path of an X-ray beam. Events that by chance contain single-crystal diffraction patterns are retained, then indexed and merged to form a three-dimensional set of reflection intensities for structure determination. This approach relies upon several innovations: an intense X-ray beam; a fast detector system; a means to rapidly flow a suspension of crystals across the X-ray beam; and the computational infrastructure to process the large volume of data. Originally conceived for radiation-damage-free measurements with ultrafast X-ray pulses, the same methods can be employed with synchrotron radiation. As in powder diffraction, the averaging of thousands of observations per Bragg peak may improve the ratio of signal to noise of low-dose exposures. Here, it is shown that this paradigm can be implemented for room-temperature data collection using synchrotron radiation and exposure times of less than 3 ms. Using lysozyme microcrystals as a model system, over 40 000 single-crystal diffraction patterns were obtained and merged to produce a structural model that could be refined to 2.1 Å resolution. The resulting electron density is in excellent agreement with that obtained using standard X-ray data collection techniques. With further improvements the method is well suited for even shorter exposures at future and upgraded synchrotron radiation facilities that may deliver beams with 1000 times higher brightness than they currently produce.

  8. Studies of free and deposited clusters using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clusters deposited onto substrates or into rare gas matrices are being studied at present synchrotron radiation sources using absorption or secondary emission type spectroscopies. Thus the electronic and geometric structure of these systems can be determined as a function of particle size. Using the next generation synchrotron radiation sources, it will be possible to extend these studies to free beams of these particles where the results are not perturbed by substrate or matrix effects

  9. A device for the application of uniaxial strain to single crystal samples for use in synchrotron radiation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, L; Bosak, A; Burkovsky, R G; Nisbet, G; Petrović, A P; Hoesch, M

    2015-10-01

    We present the design, construction, and testing of a straining device compatible with many different synchrotron radiation techniques, in a wide range of experimental environments (including low temperature, high field and ultra-high vacuum). The device has been tested by X-ray diffraction on single crystal samples of quasi-one-dimensional Cs2Mo6Se6 and K2Mo6Se6, in which microscopic strains up to a Δc/c = 0.12% ± 0.01% change in the c lattice parameters have been achieved. We have also used the device in an inelastic X-ray scattering experiment, to probe the strain-dependent speed of sound ν along the c axis. A reduction Δν/ν of up to -3.8% was obtained at a strain of Δc/c = 0.25% in K2Mo6Se6. PMID:26520968

  10. Synchrotron radiation of higher order soliton

    CERN Document Server

    Driben, Rodislav; Efimov, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate radiation mechanism exhibited by higher order soliton. In a course of its evolution higher order soliton emits polychromatic radiation resulting in appearance of multipeak frequency comb like spectral band. The shape and spectral position of this band can be effectively controlled by the relative strength of the third order dispersion. An analytical description is completely corroborated by numerical simulations. An analogy between this radiation and the radiation of moving charges is presented. For longer pulses the described effect persists also under the action of higher order perturbations such as Raman and self-steepening.

  11. Millimeter wave coherent synchrotron radiation in a compact storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Installation of a 2,856 MHz RF system into the XLS compact electron storage ring would allow the generation of millimeter wave coherent synchrotron radiation. Operating at 150 MeV, one could produce bunches containing on the order of 2 x 107 electrons with a bunch length σL0 = 0.3 mm, resulting in coherent emission at wavelengths above 0.8 mm. The characteristics of the source and the emitted radiation are discussed. In the case of 100 mrad horizontal collection angle, the average power radiated in the wavelength band 1 mm ≤ λ ≤ 2 mm is 0.3 mW for single bunch operation and 24 mW for 80 bunch operation. The peak power in a single pulse of a few picosecond duration is on the order of one watt. By reducing the momentum compaction, the bunch length could be reduced to σL0 = 0.15 mm, resulting in coherent synchrotron radiation down to 500 microm

  12. Shielding the cold region of the ISA magnets from synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the ISA superconducting ring is to be used for electron acceleration, one of the most severe problems is the enormous power (5.3 MW) given off by the electron beam. The refrigeration capacity available per ring is 13 kW, thus the loading of the refrigerator by synchrotron radiation should not be more than 1 to 2 kW, so that effectively the synchrotron radiation power must be reduced by a factor of 5 x 103 before it enters the cold part of the magnet. It is shown that shielding the cold region from the synchrotron radiation is not difficult

  13. A spectrometer for X-ray energy-dispersive diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes a white-beam X-ray energy dispersive diffractometer using the synchroton radiation from the DORIS ESR. The following features of the instrument are discussed: Horizontal or vertical scattering plane, collimators, sample environment, remote control of gonimeter, data acquisition, energy-sensitive detectors using small-area and large-area detector crystals, modes of operation, powder and single crystal diffraction. An example is given from a high-pressure study of YbH2 using a diamond anvil cell. (orig./HP)

  14. Report of the plan meeting on use of synchrotron radiation from the Tristan Main Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been widely known that activities of synchrotron radiation community in Japan have been grown rapidly in these ten years. Among the technological research and developments, insertion devices to produce new type of synchrotron radiation and optical components to suit the proper purposes of these devices are to be especially mentioned. In order to promote synchrotron radiation research, it is widely understood that intensive use of the Tristan Main Ring is quite essential, because of its extremely high brilliance unattainable for other existing or planned sources. Under these situations we have had participation of not only users who are anxious to use this special radiation but also accelerator physicists and high energy physicists. This report covers following subjects: a capability of the ring as a synchrotron radiation source, several related research topics, a way to realize the utilization of Sr, and perspectives of high energy physics using the Main Ring. (author)

  15. Industry's demand for the BESSY synchrotron radiation (SR): approaches towards interlinking basic scientific research activities and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany, industry's demand for synchrotron radiation (SR) is very limited, due to the current macroeconomic situation and the corporate strategy of potential SR users in industry. This is in contrast to the conditions in the USA (and Japan), where industrial enterprises more readily invest in and run their own long-term basic research projects for exploration of potential commercial applications according to their demands, with research goals pursued there and in Germany overlapping to a large extent. It cannot be expected that demand for SR from industry in Germany will ever come up to the level seen in the USA. In Germany, non-university research institutes are most likely to become an important group of potential users of SR. Substantially boosting the demand for SR from industry will need a change of macroeconomic framework conditions affecting the corporate strategy to the effect that industry will more strongly commit itself to and take up responsibility for application-oriented fundamental research and the corresponding technology transfer. This can be achieved by a policy providing both for institutional means and financial incentives. As to near-market, strategic technological developments, establishment of structures allowing direct cooperation of science and technology, for instance in the form of joint ventures, or underwriting agreements and corresponding supervisory boards, seem to be promising. As to basic-research-oriented promotion of research, a technology screening might lead to the selection of technology-relevant research goals, and corresponding financial support from a special fund. Such incentives for cooperative action by technology, science and the government will create novel types of research-industry interfaces in Germany between ''historical'' spheres of autonomy of research of industry and the scientific community. (orig.)

  16. Vavilov-Cherenkov and Synchrotron Radiation Foundations and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, G. N

    2005-01-01

    The theory of the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation observed by Cherenkov in 1934 was created by Tamm, Frank and Ginsburg who associated the observed blue light with the uniform charge motion of a charge at a velocity greater than the velocity of light in the medium. On the other hand, Vavilov, Cherenkov's teacher, attributed the observed blue light to the deceleration of electrons. This has given rise to the appearance of papers in which the radiation of a charge uniformly moving in a finite space interval was related to the Bremsstrahlung arising at the end points of the motion interval. This monograph is intended for students of the third year and higher, for postgraduates, for professional scientists (both experimentalists and theoreticians) dealing with Vavilov-Cherenkov and synchrotron radiation. An acquaintance with the three volumes of the Landau and Lifshitz course (Quantum Mechanics, Classical Field Theory and Macroscopic Electrodynamics) is sufficient for understanding the text.

  17. Second Order Harmonics Suppression With Glass Filters for Synchrotron UV Radiation Calibration Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Burattini, E; Gambicorti, L; Malvezzi, F; Marcelli, A; Monti, F; Pace, E

    2005-01-01

    This development is the latest result of the cooperation between the National Laboratories of Frascati and the Department of Astronomy and Space Science of the University of Florence to improve the capabilities of the existing DXR-2 beam line at the DAΦNE-LIGHT laboratories. This collaboration has assessed a new facility in order to characterize optics and sensors in a wide spectral range (ranging from VUV to IR). Previous measurements [1] have highlighted some limitations in the present setup, as higher signal levels due to the diffracted radiation of the grating in the second order have to be removed to allow an accurate detection. In this work a glass filter is used to remove such spurious signal present in the spectral region with λ > 360 nm. The characteristics of the filter and its application to the optical system used to measure the sensitivity of a diamond-based photoconductor have been discussed.

  18. Measurement of parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodke, A. D.; Husain, Riyasat; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Surendra; Puntambekar, T. A. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, 452013, Indore (India)

    2012-10-15

    The paper presents the measurement of optics parameters in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source, which include betatron tune, beta function, dispersion function, natural chromaticity, corrected chromaticity, central RF frequency, momentum compaction factor, and linear betatron coupling. Two methods were used for beta function measurement; a conventional quadrupole scan method and a method using the fitting of the orbit response matrix. A robust Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used for nonlinear least square fitting of the orbit response matrix. In this paper, detailed methods for the parameter measurements are described. The measured results are discussed and compared with the theoretical values obtained using accelerator simulation code Accelerator Toolbox in MATLAB.

  19. Calculations of synchrotron radiation emission in the transverse coherent limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present approximations for the synchrotron radiation emission for low emittance light sources, which provide a connection between user needs and the electron beam parameters. The results and calculations are a consequence of the phase coherence in the emission from the electrons. We derive the remarkable result that if the electron beam is energetic enough, the emitted flux is independent of the photon energy, electron beam energy, or bending radius in the transverse coherent limit. Similarly the brightness is identical for all machines at a given current.

  20. The use of combined synchrotron radiation micro FT-IR and XRD for the characterization of Romanesque wall paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high analytical sensitivity and high spatial resolution of synchrotron radiation-based techniques, in particular SR-XRD and SR-FT-IR, allows the identification of complex micrometric mixtures of compounds that constitute the different layers of ancient paintings. The reliability of the measurements even with an extremely small amount of sampled material is very high, and this is particularly important when analyzing art works. Furthermore, the micro size (10 x 10μm for FT-IR and 30 to 50 μm squared spot size for XRD) of the beam enables one to obtain detailed compositional profiles from the different chromatic and preparation layers. The sensitivity of the techniques is high enough for the determination of minor and trace compounds, such as reaction and weathering compounds. We report here the identification of pigments in the Romanesque wall paintings found in situ in the church of Saint Eulalia of Unha place in the Aran valley (central Pyrenees). During the first centuries of the second millennium numerous religious buildings were built in Western Europe in the Romanesque style. In particular, a great number of churches were built in the Pyrenees, most of which were decorated with wall paintings. Although only a few of these paintings have survived, they represent one of the most important collections of Romanesque art, both for their quantity and quality. A full identification of the pigments, binder, supports, and reaction and weathering compounds has been obtained. The results obtained, in particular aerinite as a pigment, indicate a clear connection between the paintings found in this Occitanian church and the Catalan Romanesque paintings from the south bound of the Pyrenees. (orig.)

  1. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m‑1 to 697.41 Fμ m‑1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m‑1 to 566.11 Fμ m‑1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  2. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m−1 to 697.41 Fμ m−1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m−1 to 566.11 Fμ m−1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis

  3. Fish samples as bioindicator of environmental quality: synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-TXRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study fish were used as bioindicators of environmental contamination. The species were collected in Piracicaba River, Sao Paulo state, Brazil and the toxic elements concentrations were determined in muscle tissue and viscus (liver, intestine and stomach) by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (SR-TXRF). Were determined the elements Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ba. The results were compared with values established by Brazilian Legislation for general food. The elements concentrations evidenced potential risk to human health and environmental quality alteration of the studied area. The measurements were realized at the 'Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron' (LNLS) located in Campinas, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. (author)

  4. Synchrotron radiation induced fluorescence spectroscopy of gas phase molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Ruiz, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    A new experimental set-up for gas phase fluorescence studies using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed to perform simultaneously total and dispersed fluorescence measurements. Neutral photodissociation of CO has been investigated after excitation with 19-26 eV photons. Fluorescence from 3p 3P, 3p 3S and 3p 1D excited states in carbon was recorded and interpreted by ab initio calculations. The population and dissociation of states belonging to the C and D Rydberg series in ...

  5. Microfabrication of high quality polytetrafluoroethylene films by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We deposited polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films both from the PTFE target by using synchrotron radiation (SR) beam and from PTFE emulsion by spin-coat process. The X-ray diffraction analyses showed a sharp peak due to (1 0 0) PTFE crystalline part, and only C-F2 bonding was found in Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer spectra. From electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis measurements, no impurities were found. The fabricated PTFE films were easily etched by SR beam on the limited area of the surface on a microscale through a suitably patterned mask

  6. Longitudinal bunch dynamics study with coherent synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinghurst, B. E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; May, T. E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    An electron bunch circulating in a storage ring constitutes a dynamical system with both longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom. Through a self-interaction with the wakefields created by the bunch, certain of these degrees may get excited, defining a set of eigenmodes analogous to a spectroscopic series. The present study focuses on the longitudinal modes of a single bunch. The excitation of a mode appears as an amplitude modulation at the mode frequency of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by the bunch. The modulations are superimposed on a much larger continuum from CSR emission in the continuous mode. A given eigenmode is classified by the integer m which is the ratio of the mode frequency to the synchrotron frequency. The present measurements extend up to m =8 and focus on the region near the instability thresholds. At threshold the modes are excited sequentially, resembling a staircase when the mode frequencies are plotted as a function of bunch length or synchrotron frequency. Adjacent modes are observed to coexist at the boundaries between the modes. An energy-independent correlation is observed between the threshold current for an instability and the corresponding zero-current bunch length. Measurements were made at five beam energies between 1.0 and 2.9 GeV at the Canadian Light Source. The CSR was measured in the time domain using an unbiased Schottky diode spanning 50-75 GHz.

  7. Optimization of a coherent synchrotron radiation source in the Tera-hertz range for high-resolution spectroscopy of molecules of astrophysical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourier Transform spectroscopy is the most used multiplex tool for high-resolution measurements in the infrared range. Its extension to the Tera-hertz domain is of great interest for spectroscopic studies of interstellar molecules. This application is however hampered by the lack of dedicated, broadband sources with a sufficient intensity and stability. In this work, Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) was used as a source for molecular spectroscopy at high resolution on the AILES infrared and Tera-hertz beamline of SOLEIL synchrotron. The beamline being optimized for far-infrared, we could characterize the properties of CSR and compare them to the incoherent synchrotron radiation. A double detection system allowed to correct the effect of the source-related instabilities, hence to significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Pure rotational spectra were measured using these developments. The case of the propynal molecule, for which a refined set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants was calculated, proves the complementarity between CSR and the classical microwave or infrared sources. (author)

  8. Variations in Jupiter's Radiation Belts and Synchrotron Radiation as a Result of the Impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy/9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M.; Thorne, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    Changes to Jupiter's synchrotron radiation following the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy/9 are reported. Also, the consequences are reported for three possible mechanisms that might have caused those changes.

  9. TXRF analysis of multielements in serum of patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of trace elements levels in physiological fluids is of considerable interest in clinical chemistry. Since it has been established these levels in human serum can be utilized as indicators for several pathological conditions, diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. In this work, trace elements were analyzed in serum of patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by total reflection X-ray fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF). Sickle cell Anemia is a blood disorder that affects hemoglobin, the protein found in red blood cells that help carry oxygen throughout the body. SCA occurs when a person inherits two abnormal genes (one from each parent) that cause their red blood cells to change shape. These irregular-shaped blood cells die prematurely, resulting in a chronic shortage of red blood cells. We studied forty-three patients (15 males and 28 females) aged 18 to 50 years, suffering SCA and Sixty healthy volunteers (41 males and 19 females) aged 18 to 60 years. All the serum samples had been collected of people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. The measurements were performed at the X-ray fluorescence beam line at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo using a polychromatic beam. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. (author)

  10. TXRF analysis of multielements in serum of patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: catarine@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: edgar@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). COPPE Technology Center. Nuclear Instrumentation Lab.; Carvalho, Silvia M.F., E-mail: silvia@hemorio.rj.gov.b [State Institute of Hematology Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti (HEMORIO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The determination of trace elements levels in physiological fluids is of considerable interest in clinical chemistry. Since it has been established these levels in human serum can be utilized as indicators for several pathological conditions, diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. In this work, trace elements were analyzed in serum of patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by total reflection X-ray fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF). Sickle cell Anemia is a blood disorder that affects hemoglobin, the protein found in red blood cells that help carry oxygen throughout the body. SCA occurs when a person inherits two abnormal genes (one from each parent) that cause their red blood cells to change shape. These irregular-shaped blood cells die prematurely, resulting in a chronic shortage of red blood cells. We studied forty-three patients (15 males and 28 females) aged 18 to 50 years, suffering SCA and Sixty healthy volunteers (41 males and 19 females) aged 18 to 60 years. All the serum samples had been collected of people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. The measurements were performed at the X-ray fluorescence beam line at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo using a polychromatic beam. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. (author)

  11. γ-H2AX as a marker for dose deposition in the brain of wistar rats after synchrotron microbeam radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Fernandez-Palomo

    Full Text Available Synchrotron radiation has shown high therapeutic potential in small animal models of malignant brain tumours. However, more studies are needed to understand the radiobiological effects caused by the delivery of high doses of spatially fractionated x-rays in tissue. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of the γ-H2AX antibody as a marker for dose deposition in the brain of rats after synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT.Normal and tumour-bearing Wistar rats were exposed to 35, 70 or 350 Gy of MRT to their right cerebral hemisphere. The brains were extracted either at 4 or 8 hours after irradiation and immediately placed in formalin. Sections of paraffin-embedded tissue were incubated with anti γ-H2AX primary antibody.While the presence of the C6 glioma does not seem to modulate the formation of γ-H2AX in normal tissue, the irradiation dose and the recovery versus time are the most important factors affecting the development of γ-H2AX foci. Our results also suggest that doses of 350 Gy can trigger the release of bystander signals that significantly amplify the DNA damage caused by radiation and that the γ-H2AX biomarker does not only represent DNA damage produced by radiation, but also damage caused by bystander effects.In conclusion, we suggest that the γ-H2AX foci should be used as biomarker for targeted and non-targeted DNA damage after synchrotron radiation rather than a tool to measure the actual physical doses.

  12. Exploring the source of life energy. A research of synchrotron radiation on ATP synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The award of a share of the 1997 Nobel Chemistry Prize was the crystal structure of mitochondrial F1-ATPase determined at 0.28 nm atomic resolution using data collected at the SRS, Daresbury, UK, and this was the first Nobel Prize for synchrotron radiation-based work. The coming of age of post-genomics was further enforced by synchrotron radiation with characteristics of high intensity, high collimation and continuous tunable wavelength

  13. Synchrotron radiation sources INDUS-1 and INDUS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synchrotron radiation sources, INDUS-1 and INDUS-2 are electron storage rings of 450 MeV and 2 GeV beam energies respectively. INDUS-1 is designed to produce VUV radiation whereas INDUS-2 will be mainly used to produce x-rays. INDUS-1 is presently undergoing commissioning whereas INDUS-2 is under construction. Both these rings have a common injector system comprising of a microtron and a synchrotron. Basic design features of these sources and their injector system are discussed in this paper. The radiation beamlines to be set up on these sources are also described. (author)

  14. Characterization of Medipix3 With Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Gimenez, E N; Marchal, J; Turecek, D; Ballabriga, R; Tartoni, N; Campbell, M; Llopart, X; Sawhney, K J S

    2011-01-01

    Medipix3 is the latest generation of photon counting readout chips of the Medipix family. With the same dimensions as Medipix2 (256 x 256 pixels of 55 mu m x 55 mu m pitch each), Medipix3 is however implemented in an 8-layer metallization 0.13 mu m CMOS technology which leads to an increase in the functionality associated with each pixel over Medipix2. One of the new operational modes implemented in the front-end architecture is the Charge Summing Mode (CSM). This mode consists of a charge reconstruction and hit allocation algorithm which eliminates event-by-event the low energy counts produced by charge-shared events between adjacent pixels. The present work focuses on the study of the CSM mode and compares it to the Single Pixel Mode (SPM) which is the conventional readout method for these kind of detectors and it is also implemented in Medipix3. Tests of a Medipix3 chip bump-bonded to a 300 mu m thick silicon photodiode sensor were performed at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron to evaluate the performan...

  15. Design of bunch compressing system with suppression of coherent synchrotron radiation for ATF upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Yichao [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fedurin, Mikhail [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    One of the operation modes for Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) upgrade is to provide high peak current, high quality electron beam for users. Such operation requires a bunch compressing system with a very large compression ratio. The CSR originating from the strong compressors generally could greatly degrade the quality of the electron beam. In this paper, we present our design for the entire bunch compressing system that will limit the effect of CSR on the e-beam’s quality. We discuss and detail the performance from the start to end simulation of such a compressor for ATF.

  16. Concepts of tunable magnets using permanent magnetic material for synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel tunable magnets using permanent magnetic materials (PMMs) are proposed for the magnetic lattice of the 3 GeV Sirius storage ring. Many essential qualitative aspects are discussed including the low and high field dipole designs using PMMs. Studies for quadrupoles and sextupoles were also performed, but as an alternative way, which depends on field requirements

  17. Thermal management for LLNL/UC/SSRL bending magnet beamline VIII at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All the important heat loads on the elements of Beamline VIII are cataloged. The principal elements are identified and their heat loads tabulated for various loading scenarios. The expected heat loads are those from normal operations including the anticipated performance improvements planned for the SPEAR ring and from abnormal operations due to positional perturbations of the electron beam

  18. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, T. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2007-07-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SR{sub {mu}}CT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SR{sub {mu}}CT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SR{sub {mu}}CT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  19. The profile of the electron beam in the PTB synchrotron, and its influence on radiometric measurements with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method is described to determine the beam profile in an electron synchrotron; the measured results are compared with calculated values. Moreover, the influence of synchrotron- and betatron-oscillations on synchrotron radiation measurements is discussed, and a method is given to correct this. (orig.)

  20. Characterizing THz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at Femtosecond Linear Accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xu-Ling; ZHANG Jian-Bing; LU YU; LUO Feng; LU Shan-Liang; YU Tie-Min; DAI Zhi-Min

    2009-01-01

    The generation and observation of coherent THz synchrotron radiation from femtosecond electron bunches in the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics femtosecond accelerator device is reported.We describe the experiment setup and present the first result of THz radiation properties such as power and spectrum.

  1. Moessbauer filtration of synchrotron radiation: advances and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short review of the conventional ways of Moessbauer filtration (obtaining highly monochromatized radiation limited only by the energy width of the Moessbauer line) is presented and some new proposals related to the Moessbauer filtration of synchrotron radiation (SR) are discussed

  2. The historical development of cryogenically cooled monochromators for third-generation synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period of the late-1980s, before the construction of multi-GeV third-generation storage rings with their intense insertion-device sources, the perceived number one problem for X-ray instrumentation was proper cooling of the first optical element in the beamline. This article, first given as an acceptance speech for the Compton Award ceremony at the Advanced Photon Source, presents a somewhat historical and anecdotal overview of how cryogenically cooled monochromator optics have been developed to provide a monochromator cooling solution adequate for today's power levels. A series of workshops and international collaborations were the key components for the progress and final success of this development

  3. Dipole magnet for 2.5 GeV synchrotron radiation source Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1.5T dipole magnet for Indus-2 has been designed. A half-length prototype is built and tested at various excitation levels. Test data is analyzed, higher order multipoles and deflection is estimated. Deflection is also calculated using finite element analysis and measured physically. Design is modified on the basis of test results

  4. Scaling Behavior of Circular Colliders Dominated by Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The quite low Higgs particle mass makes it natural for the next high energy facility to be a circular e+e- Higgs factory and, after that, a next-generation p,p collider in the same tunnel. Surveying the luminosity-limiting phenomena of synchrotron radiation power loss, beam-beam interaction limitations, and beamstrahlung, scaling laws are established that fix all parameters of the Higgs factory, as functions of assumed radius $r$, and RF power $P$. at least to a first approximation. Historically the accelerator formalisms of electron and hadron rings have been distinguished largely by the importance of synchrotron radiation for electrons, and its unimportance for protons. While electron beams equilibrate within seconds, proton beam distributions have survived largely intact for extended periods. For future hadron colliders, this distinction will no longer be valid. This will have a large impact on the design of the future FCC-pp proton collider whose parameters can be extrapolated using formulas previously ap...

  5. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe{sub 2} and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  6. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe[sub 2] and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  7. Synchrotron Radiation Micro-tomography:a non Destructive tool for the Characterization of Archaeological Wood

    OpenAIRE

    Dreossi, D.; S.Favretto; M. Fioravanti; Mancini, L; Rigon, L.; Sodini, N.; G.Tromba; Zanini, F.

    2009-01-01

    Archaeological wood, and waterlogged archaeological wood in particular, are almost always characterised by a modification in the original properties and structure of the wood. Degradation agents can be of different origins (Biological, Chemical, Physical) and they are able to produce a large variability in the degradation of individual pieces, requiring their characterization for a proper conservation. X-ray computed Micro-Tomography (X-ray μCT) is a powerful tool, which provides three-dimens...

  8. The electronic interface for control of the dedicated synchrotron radiation storage ring BESSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The commercially available electronic interface system, called DEV 12 and the developed BESSY-standard I/O-cards and hardware tools are presented. The DEV 12 system is a simple bit parallel byte-serial data multiplexing system, connectable in a tree or chain structure. Six different types of I/O-cards were developed. 3/4 of all equipments are interfaced only by a single card. The rest uses combinations of several cards. For reading back analog signals the voltage to frequency conversion is used. The computer and equipments are multiple optically insulated from each other. Computer controlled knobs were developed, becoming the most important hardware for machine adjustment. For units without digital remote control capability an interface module called 'General Purpose Interface GPI' was built to match any equipment to the standard I/O-cards. An intelligent 'GPI' is in construction to get rid of any specialized type of equipment and part of the so far used interface system. The general design philosophy, the hardware structure, and the features of the control system hardware is given

  9. A high brightness, X-band photoinjector for the production of coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear colliders, future electron acceleration concepts, and short pulse, ultrawideband millimeter-wave sources all require bright electron beams. Photoinjectors have demonstrated the ability to produce relativistic electron beams with low emittance and energy spread. The system described herein combines state-of-the-art capabilities in the laser and rf systems, advanced photocathode materials, and new concepts for synchronization. Phase jitter has been measured in detail, and schemes for alleviating this problem have undergone initial proof-of-principle testing. Direct mode locking of a multiple quantum well Al:GaAs solid-state laser oscillator by an rf signal sampled from within a high-power rf accelerator cavity was demonstrated for the first time. Characterization of the electron beam produced by the system is presented. The linear electron accelerator system is comprised of a 1.5 cell side-wall coupled standing wave accelerator structure, driven by a 20 MW Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Klystron operating at 8.548 GHz, a Ti:sapphire laser oscillator, and a chirped pulse Ti:sapphire laser amplifier. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Application of synchrotron radiation for measurement of iron red-ox speciation in atmospherically processed aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Majestic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ambient atmospheric particulate matter (PM samples were collected using a size-resolved impactor sampler from three urban sites. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of transformations of aerosol-bound iron as it is processed in the atmosphere. Thus, the aerosol samples were artificially aged to represent long-term transport (10 to 40 days or short-term transport (1 to 10 days and were measured for iron at several time points. At each time point, iron was measured in each size fraction using three different techniques; 1 inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS for total iron, 2 x-ray absorbance near edge structure (XANES spectroscopy for the measurement of total Fe(II and Fe(III, and 3 a wet-chemical method to measure soluble Fe(II and Fe(III. Prior to aging, the XANES spectroscopy results show that a majority (>60% for each size fraction of the total iron in the PM is in the form of Fe(III. Fe(III was shown to be a significant fraction of the soluble iron (sometimes > 50%, but the relative significance of Fe(III was found to vary depending on the site. Overall, the total soluble iron depended on the sampling site, but values ranged from less than 1% up to about 18% of the total iron. Over the course of the 40 day aging period, we found moderate changes in the relative Fe(II/Fe(III content. A slight increase was noted in the coarse (>2.5 μm fraction and a slight decrease in the 0.25 to 0.5 μm fraction. The soluble fraction generally showed (excepting one day a decrease of soluble Fe(II prior to 10 days of aging, followed by a relatively constant concentration. In the short-term transport condition, we found that the sub-micron fraction of soluble Fe(II spikes at 1 to 3 days of aging, then decreases to near the initial value at around 6 to 10 days. Very little change in soluble Fe(II was observed in the super-micron fraction. These results show that changes in the soluble iron fraction occur

  11. Application of synchrotron radiation for measurement of iron red-ox speciation in atmospherically processed aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Majestic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples were collected using a size-resolved impactor sampler from three urban sites. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of transformations of aerosol-bound iron as it is processed in the atmosphere. Thus, the aerosol samples were artificially aged to represent long-term transport (10 to 40 days or short-term transport (1 to 10 days and were measured for iron at several time points. At each time point, iron was measured in each size fraction using three different techniques; 1 inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS for total iron, 2 x-ray absorbance near edge structure (XANES spectroscopy for the measurement of total Fe(II and Fe(III, and 3 a wet-chemical method to measure soluble Fe(II and Fe(III. Prior to aging, the XANES spectroscopy results show that a majority (>60% for each size fraction of the total iron in the PM is in the form of Fe(III. Fe(III was shown to be a significant fraction of the soluble iron (sometimes >50%, but the relative significance of Fe(III was found to vary depending on the site. Overall, the total soluble iron depended on the sampling site, but values ranged from less than 1% up to about 20% of the total iron. Over the course of the 40 day aging period, we found moderate changes in the relative Fe(II/Fe(III content. A slight increase was noted in the coarse (>2.5 µm fraction and a slight decrease in the 0.25 to 0.5 µm fraction. The soluble fraction generally showed (excepting one day a decrease of soluble Fe(II prior to 10 days of aging, followed by a relatively constant concentration. In the short-term transport condition, we found that the sub-micron fraction of soluble Fe(II spikes at 1 to 3 days of aging, then decreases to near the initial value at around 6 to 10 days. Very little change in soluble Fe(II was observed in the super-micron fraction.

  12. An Evaluation of Dose Equivalence between Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy and Conventional Broadbeam Radiation Using Clonogenic and Cell Impedance Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Johari Ibahim; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Yuqing Yang; Marina Zaitseva; Andrew W Stevenson; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Premila Paiva

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) has shown the potential to deliver improved outcomes over conventional broadbeam (BB) radiation therapy. To implement synchrotron MRT clinically for cancer treatment, it is necessary to undertake dose equivalence studies to identify MRT doses that give similar outcomes to BB treatments. AIM: To develop an in vitro approach to determine biological dose equivalence between MRT and BB using two different cell-based assays. METHO...

  13. Construction of the undulator beamline equipped with a UHV-STM for observations of synchrotron-radiation-stimulated surface reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An undulator beamline equipped with a UHV-scanning tunneling electron microscopy (STM) system has been designed and constructed at the UVSOR facility to investigate synchrotron-radiation-stimulated reactions. Using this undulator beamline, we have observed irradiation effects on the hydrogen terminated-(H-) Si(1 1 1) surfaces in atomic scale. The small protrusions, which are assigned to the rest-atom with missing H, appeared on the monohydride surface after irradiation. The density of them monotonically increased with irradiation dose. This phenomenon has been observed almost independent on the Si 2p core electron excitation threshold, indicating the significant contribution of the valence electron excitations to the Si-H bond dissociations

  14. A New Lecture-Tutorial for Teaching about Molecular Excitations and Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Hornstein, Seth D.; Burns, Jack O.; Schlingman, Wayne M.; Chambers, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Light and spectroscopy are among the most important and frequently taught topics in introductory college-level general education astronomy courses (hereafter Astro 101). This is due to the fact that the vast majority of observational data studied by astronomers arrives at Earth in the form of light. While there are many processes by which matter can emit and absorb light, Astro 101 courses typically limit their instruction to the Bohr model of the atom and electron energy level transitions. In this paper, we report on the development of a new Lecture-Tutorial to help students learn about other processes that are responsible for the emission and absorption of light, namely molecular rotations, molecular vibrations, and the acceleration of charged particles by magnetic fields. Note that this paper primarily focuses on describing the variety of representations and reasoning tasks designed for this Lecture-Tutorial; while the end of this paper highlights some data that are suggestive of the Lecture-Tutorial's effectiveness, our more comprehensive analysis of its efficacy will be presented in a future publication.

  15. Fabrication of mold master for spiral microcoil utilizing x-ray lithography of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To produce three-dimensional and precise microstructures on a small curved surface, we developed a high-precision 3-dimensional X-ray lithography technique. We succeeded in the production of a master of a metallic mold used for mass producing a spiral microcoil with a diameter of 0.48 mm and a length of 1 mm using this technique. An exposure stage controllable by piezoelectric elements and stepping motors was developed. The adhesion between a resist material and a substrate material was enhanced. We investigated about the effect that X-ray diffraction rounds the edge of a pattern, and a process flow was produced. This product has polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spiral microstructures with a line width of 10 μm, a thickness of 10 μm, and a pitch of 20 μm. (author)

  16. Engineering at SLAC: Designing and constructing experimental devices for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djang, Austin [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-22

    Thanks to the versatility of the beam lines at SSRL, research there is varied and benefits multiple fields. Each experiment requires a particular set of experiment equipment, which in turns requires its own particular assembly. As such, new engineering challenges arise from each new experiment. My role as an engineering intern has been to help solve these challenges, by designing and assembling experimental devices. My first project was to design a heated sample holder, which will be used to investigate the effect of temperature on a sample's x-ray diffraction pattern. My second project was to help set up an imaging test, which involved designing a cooled grating holder and assembling multiple positioning stages. My third project was designing a 3D-printed pencil holder for the SSRL workstations.

  17. Method and apparatus for control of coherent synchrotron radiation effects during recirculation with bunch compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David R; Tennant, Christopher

    2015-11-10

    A modulated-bending recirculating system that avoids CSR-driven breakdown in emittance compensation by redistributing the bending along the beamline. The modulated-bending recirculating system includes a) larger angles of bending in initial FODO cells, thereby enhancing the impact of CSR early on in the beam line while the bunch is long, and 2) a decreased bending angle in the final FODO cells, reducing the effect of CSR while the bunch is short. The invention describes a method for controlling the effects of CSR during recirculation and bunch compression including a) correcting chromatic aberrations, b) correcting lattice and CSR-induced curvature in the longitudinal phase space by compensating T.sub.566, and c) using lattice perturbations to compensate obvious linear correlations x-dp/p and x'-dp/p.

  18. Method and apparatus for control of coherent synchrotron radiation effects during recirculation with bunch compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R; Tennant, Christopher

    2015-11-10

    A modulated-bending recirculating system that avoids CSR-driven breakdown in emittance compensation by redistributing the bending along the beamline. The modulated-bending recirculating system includes a) larger angles of bending in initial FODO cells, thereby enhancing the impact of CSR early on in the beam line while the bunch is long, and 2) a decreased bending angle in the final FODO cells, reducing the effect of CSR while the bunch is short. The invention describes a method for controlling the effects of CSR during recirculation and bunch compression including a) correcting chromatic aberrations, b) correcting lattice and CSR-induced curvature in the longitudinal phase space by compensating T.sub.566, and c) using lattice perturbations to compensate obvious linear correlations x-dp/p and x'-dp/p.

  19. A New Lecture-Tutorial for Teaching about Molecular Excitations and Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, Colin S; Hornstein, Seth D; Schlingman, Wayne M; Chambers, Timothy G; Burns, Jack O

    2015-01-01

    Light and spectroscopy are among the most important and frequently taught topics in introductory, college-level, general education astronomy courses. This is due to the fact that the vast majority of observational data studied by astronomers arrives at Earth in the form of light. While there are many processes by which matter can emit and absorb light, Astro 101 courses typically limit their instruction to the Bohr model of the atom and electron energy level transitions. In this paper, we report on the development of a new Lecture-Tutorial to help students learn about other processes that are responsible for the emission and absorption of light, namely molecular rotations, molecular vibrations, and the acceleration of charged particles by magnetic fields.

  20. A device for the application of uniaxial strain to single crystal samples for use in synchrotron radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gannon, L. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford Physics Department, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 ODE (United Kingdom); Bosak, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Burkovsky, R. G. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University, 29 Politekhnicheskaya, 195251, St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Nisbet, G.; Hoesch, M., E-mail: Moritz.Hoesch@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 ODE (United Kingdom); Petrović, A. P. [DPMC-MaNEP, Université de Genève, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, 1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    We present the design, construction, and testing of a straining device compatible with many different synchrotron radiation techniques, in a wide range of experimental environments (including low temperature, high field and ultra-high vacuum). The device has been tested by X-ray diffraction on single crystal samples of quasi-one-dimensional Cs{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Se{sub 6} and K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Se{sub 6}, in which microscopic strains up to a Δc/c = 0.12% ± 0.01% change in the c lattice parameters have been achieved. We have also used the device in an inelastic X-ray scattering experiment, to probe the strain-dependent speed of sound ν along the c axis. A reduction Δν/ν of up to −3.8% was obtained at a strain of Δc/c = 0.25% in K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Se{sub 6}.