WorldWideScience

Sample records for brayton cycle power systems

  1. Performance evaluation of space solar Brayton cycle power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Zheng-Gang

    1992-06-01

    Unlike gas turbine power systems which consume chemical or nuclear energy, the energy consumption and/or cycle efficiency should not be a suitable criterion for evaluating the performance of space solar Brayton cycle power. A new design goal, life cycle cost, can combine all the power system characteristics, such as mass, area, and station-keeping propellant, into a unified criterion. Effects of pressure ratio, recuperator effectiveness, and compressor inlet temperature on life cycle cost were examined. This method would aid in making design choices for a space power system.

  2. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at

  3. Power conversion systems based on Brayton cycles for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, J.I., E-mail: linares@upcomillas.es [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies. Comillas Pontifical University, Alberto Aguilera, 25-28015 Madrid (Spain); Herranz, L.E. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research. CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Moratilla, B.Y.; Serrano, I.P. [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies. Comillas Pontifical University, Alberto Aguilera, 25-28015 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    This paper investigates Brayton power cycles for fusion reactors. Two working fluids have been explored: helium in classical configurations and CO{sub 2} in recompression layouts (Feher cycle). Typical recuperator arrangements in both cycles have been strongly constrained by low temperature of some of the energy thermal sources from the reactor. This limitation has been overcome in two ways: with a combined architecture and with dual cycles. Combined architecture couples the Brayton cycle with a Rankine one capable of taking advantage of the thermal energy content of the working fluid after exiting the turbine stage (iso-butane and steam fitted best the conditions of the He and CO{sub 2} cycles, respectively). Dual cycles set a specific Rankine cycle to exploit the lowest quality thermal energy source, allowing usual recuperator arrangements in the Brayton cycle. The results of the analyses indicate that dual cycles could reach thermal efficiencies around 42.8% when using helium, whereas thermal performance might be even better (46.7%), if a combined CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O cycle was set.

  4. Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Bruce [Wilson Solarpower Corporation, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were:1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the system’s high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system. This Phase 2 followed Wilson’s Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOE’s targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilson’s Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOE’s instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components.

  5. Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Bruce

    2013-12-31

    The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were: 1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the system’s high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system This Phase 2 followed Wilson’s Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOE’s targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilson’s Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOE’s instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components. Success criteria DOE targets Wilson system LCOE DOE’s gas price $6.75/MBtu 9 cents/kWh 7.7 cents/kWh LCOE Current gas price $4.71/MBtu NA 6.9 cents/kWh Capacity factor 75% (6500hr) 75-100% Solar fraction 85% (5585hr) >5585hr Receiver cost $170/kWe $50/kWe Thermal storage cost $20/kWhth $13/kWhth Heliostat cost $120/m2 $89.8/m2

  6. Innovative open air brayton combined cycle systems for the next generation nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohuri, Bahman

    The purpose of this research was to model and analyze a nuclear heated multi-turbine power conversion system operating with atmospheric air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a molten salt, or liquid metal, to gas heat exchanger reaching a peak temperature of 660 0C. The effects of adding a recuperator or a bottoming steam cycle have been addressed. The calculated results are intended to identify paths for future work on the next generation nuclear power plant (GEN-IV). This document describes the proposed system in sufficient detail to communicate a good understanding of the overall system, its components, and intended uses. The architecture is described at the conceptual level, and does not replace a detailed design document. The main part of the study focused on a Brayton --- Rankine Combined Cycle system and a Recuperated Brayton Cycle since they offer the highest overall efficiencies. Open Air Brayton power cycles also require low cooling water flows relative to other power cycles. Although the Recuperated Brayton Cycle achieves an overall efficiency slightly less that the Brayton --- Rankine Combined Cycle, it is completely free of a circulating water system and can be used in a desert climate. Detailed results of modeling a combined cycle Brayton-Rankine power conversion system are presented. The Rankine bottoming cycle appears to offer a slight efficiency advantage over the recuperated Brayton cycle. Both offer very significant advantages over current generation Light Water Reactor steam cycles. The combined cycle was optimized as a unit and lower pressure Rankine systems seem to be more efficient. The combined cycle requires a lot less circulating water than current power plants. The open-air Brayton systems appear to be worth investigating, if the higher temperatures predicted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant do materialize.

  7. Research and Technology Activities Supporting Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The elements of Brayton technology development emphasize power conversion system risk mitigation. Risk mitigation is achieved by demonstrating system integration feasibility, subsystem/component life capability (particularly in the context of material creep) and overall spacecraft mass reduction. Closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion technology is viewed as relatively mature. At the 2-kWe power level, a CBC conversion system Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of six (6) was achieved during the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration (SD-GTD) in 1998. A TRL 5 was demonstrated for 10 kWe-class CBC components during the development of the Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) from 1968 to 1976. Components currently in terrestrial (open cycle) Brayton machines represent TRL 4 for similar uses in 100 kWe-class CBC space systems. Because of the baseline component and subsystem technology maturity, much of the Brayton technology task is focused on issues related to systems integration. A brief description of ongoing technology activities is given.

  8. Preheating of fluid in a supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system at cold startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert L.

    2016-07-12

    Various technologies pertaining to causing fluid in a supercritical Brayton cycle power generation system to flow in a desired direction at cold startup of the system are described herein. A sensor is positioned at an inlet of a turbine, wherein the sensor is configured to output sensed temperatures of fluid at the inlet of the turbine. If the sensed temperature surpasses a predefined threshold, at least one operating parameter of the power generation system is altered.

  9. Dynamic neutronic and stability analysis of a burst mode, single cavity gas core reactor Brayton cycle space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Edward T.; Kutikkad, Kiratadas

    The conceptual, burst-mode gaseous-core reactor (GCR) space nuclear power system presently subjected to reactor-dynamics and system stability studies operates on a closed Brayton cycle, via disk MHD generator for energy conversion. While the gaseous fuel density power coefficient of reactivity is found to be capable of rapidly stabilizing the GCR system, the power of this feedback renders standard external reactivity insertions inadequate for significant power-level changes during normal operation.

  10. A global optimization method synthesizing heat transfer and thermodynamics for the power generation system with Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong-Huan; Zhang, Xing

    2016-09-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide operated in a Brayton cycle offers a numerous of potential advantages for a power generation system, and a lot of thermodynamics analyses have been conducted to increase its efficiency. Because there are a lot of heat-absorbing and heat-lossing subprocesses in a practical thermodynamic cycle and they are implemented by heat exchangers, it will increase the gross efficiency of the whole power generation system to optimize the system combining thermodynamics and heat transfer theory. This paper analyzes the influence of the performance of heat exchangers on the actual efficiency of an ideal Brayton cycle with a simple configuration, and proposes a new method to optimize the power generation system, which aims at the minimum energy consumption. Although the method is operated only for the ideal working fluid in this paper, its merits compared to that only with thermodynamic analysis are fully shown.

  11. Status of Brayton cycle power conversion development at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee S.; Shaltens, Richard K.; Dolce, James L.; Cataldo, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is pursuing the development of Brayton cycle power conversion for various NASA initiatives. Brayton cycle power systems offer numerous advantages for space power generation including high efficiency, long life, high maturity, and broad salability. Candidate mission applications include surface rovers and bases, advanced propulsion vehicles, and earth orbiting satellites. A key advantage is the ability for Brayton converters to span the wide range of power demands of future missions from several kilowatts to multi-megawatts using either solar, isotope, or reactor heat sources. Brayton technology has been under development by NASA since the early 1960's resulting in engine prototypes in the 2 to 15 kW-class that have demonstrated conversion efficiency of almost 30% and cumulative operation in excess of 40,000 hours. Present efforts at GRC are focusing on a 2 kW testbed as a proving ground for future component advances and operational strategies, and a 25 kW engine design as a modular building block for 100 kW-class electric propulsion and Mars surface power applications. .

  12. Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.D. Rao; D.J. Francuz; J.D. Maclay; J. Brouwer; A. Verma; M. Li; G.S. Samuelsen

    2008-09-30

    The main objective is to identify and assess advanced improvements to the Brayton Cycle (such as but not limited to firing temperature, pressure ratio, combustion techniques, intercooling, fuel or combustion air augmentation, enhanced blade cooling schemes) that will lead to significant performance improvements in coal based power systems. This assessment is conducted in the context of conceptual design studies (systems studies) that advance state-of-art Brayton cycles and result in coal based efficiencies equivalent to 65% + on natural gas basis (LHV), or approximately an 8% reduction in heat rate of an IGCC plant utilizing the H class steam cooled gas turbine. H class gas turbines are commercially offered by General Electric and Mitsubishi for natural gas based combined cycle applications with 60% efficiency (LHV) and it is expected that such machine will be offered for syngas applications within the next 10 years. The studies are being sufficiently detailed so that third parties will be able to validate portions or all of the studies. The designs and system studies are based on plants for near zero emissions (including CO{sub 2}). Also included in this program is the performance evaluation of other advanced technologies such as advanced compression concepts and the fuel cell based combined cycle. The objective of the fuel cell based combined cycle task is to identify the desired performance characteristics and design basis for a gas turbine that will be integrated with an SOFC in Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) applications. The goal is the conceptualization of near zero emission (including CO{sub 2} capture) integrated gasification power plants producing electricity as the principle product. The capability of such plants to coproduce H{sub 2} is qualitatively addressed. Since a total systems solution is critical to establishing a plant configuration worthy of a comprehensive market interest, a baseline IGCC plant scheme is developed and used to study

  13. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) facility specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-31

    General requirements for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)/Ground Demonstration System (GDS) assembly and test facility are defined. The facility will include provisions for a complete test laboratory for GDS checkout, performance, and endurance testing, and a contamination-controlled area for assembly, fabrication, storage, and storage preparation of GDS components. Specifications, schedules, and drawings are included.

  14. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jae Eun; Kim, S. O.; Seong, S. H.; Eoh, J. H.; Lee, T. H.; Choi, S. K.; Han, J. W.; Bae, S. W

    2007-12-15

    This report contains the description of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to KALIMER-600 as an alternative energy conversion system. For system development, a computer code was developed to calculate heat balance of 100% power operation condition. Based on the computer code, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle energy conversion system was constructed for the KALIMER-600. Using the developed turbomachinery models, the off-design characteristics and the sensitivities of the S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery were investigated. For the development of PCHE models, a one-dimensional analysis computer code was developed to evaluate the performance of the PCHE. Possible control schemes for power control in the KALIMER-600 S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle were investigated by using the MARS code. Simple power reduction and recovery event was selected and analyzed for the transient calculation. For the evaluation of Na/CO{sub 2} boundary failure event, a computer was developed to simulate the complex thermodynamic behaviors coupled with the chemical reaction between liquid sodium and CO{sub 2} gas. The long term behavior of a Na/CO{sub 2} boundary failure event and its consequences which lead to a system pressure transient were evaluated.

  15. Verification of a 2 kWe Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System Mechanical Dynamics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwiczak, Damian R.; Le, Dzu K.; McNelis, Anne M.; Yu, Albert C.; Samorezov, Sergey; Hervol, Dave S.

    2005-01-01

    Vibration test data from an operating 2 kWe closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion system (PCS) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center was used for a comparison with a dynamic disturbance model of the same unit. This effort was performed to show that a dynamic disturbance model of a CBC PCS can be developed that can accurately predict the torque and vibration disturbance fields of such class of rotating machinery. The ability to accurately predict these disturbance fields is required before such hardware can be confidently integrated onto a spacecraft mission. Accurate predictions of CBC disturbance fields will be used for spacecraft control/structure interaction analyses and for understanding the vibration disturbances affecting the scientific instrumentation onboard. This paper discusses how test cell data measurements for the 2 kWe CBC PCS were obtained, the development of a dynamic disturbance model used to predict the transient torque and steady state vibration fields of the same unit, and a comparison of the two sets of data.

  16. Experimental Validation of a Closed Brayton Cycle System Transient Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul K.; Hervol, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) is a closed cycle system with an inert gas working fluid. It is located in Vacuum Facility 6 at NASA Glenn Research Center. Was used in previous solar dynamic technology efforts (SDGTD). Modified to its present configuration by replacing the solar receiver with an electrical resistance heater. The first closed-Brayton-cycle to be coupled with an ion propulsion system. Used to examine mechanical dynamic characteristics and responses. The focus of this work was the validation of a computer model of the BPCU. Model was built using the Closed Cycle System Simulation (CCSS) design and analysis tool. Test conditions were then duplicated in CCSS. Various steady-state points. Transients involving changes in shaft rotational speed and heat input. Testing to date has shown that the BPCU is able to generate meaningful, repeatable data that can be used for computer model validation. Results generated by CCSS demonstrated that the model sufficiently reproduced the thermal transients exhibited by the BPCU system. CCSS was also used to match BPCU steady-state operating points. Cycle temperatures were within 4.1% of the data (most were within 1%). Cycle pressures were all within 3.2%. Error in alternator power (as much as 13.5%) was attributed to uncertainties in the compressor and turbine maps and alternator and bearing loss models. The acquired understanding of the BPCU behavior gives useful insight for improvements to be made to the CCSS model as well as ideas for future testing and possible system modifications.

  17. Preliminary design of S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle for APR-1400 with power generation and desalination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong Jun; Lee, Won Woong; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon [KUSTAR, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-10-15

    This study was conducted to explore the capabilities of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle for a cogeneration system for APR-1400 application. Three concepts of the S-CO{sub 2} simple recuperated co-generation cycle were designed. A supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is recently receiving significant attention as a promising power conversion system in wide range of energy applications due to its high efficiency and compact footprint. The main reason why the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has these advantages is that the compressor operates near the critical point of CO{sub 2} (30.98 .deg. C, 7.38MPa) to reduce the compression work significantly compared to the other Brayton cycles. In this study, the concept of replacing the entire steam cycle of APR-1400 with the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is evaluated. The power generation purpose S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles are redesigned to generate power and provide heat to the desalination system at the same time. The performance of these newly suggested cycles are evaluated in this paper. The target was to deliver 147MW heat to the desalination process. The thermal efficiencies of the three concepts are not significantly different, but the 3{sup rd} concept is relatively simpler than other cycles because only an additional heat exchanger is required. Although the 2{sup nd} concept is relatively complicated in comparison to other concepts, the temperatures at the inlet and outlet of the DHX are higher than that of the others. As shown in the results, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles are not easy to outperform the steam cycle with very simple layout and general design points under APR-1400 operating condition. However, this study shows that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles can be designed as a co-generation cycle while producing the target desalination heat with a simple configuration. In addition, it was also found that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle can achieve higher cycle thermal efficiency than the steam power cycle under

  18. Neon turbo-Brayton cycle refrigerator for HTS power machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hirokazu; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, Shigeru; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We developed a prototype turbo-Brayton refrigerator whose working fluid is neon gas. The refrigerator is designed for a HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power transformer and its cooling power is more than 2 kW at 65 K. The refrigerator has a turboexpander and a turbo-compressor, which utilize magnetic bearings. These rotational machines have no rubbing parts and no oil-components. Those make a long maintenance interval of the refrigerator. The refrigerator is very compact because our newly developed turbo-compressor is volumetrically smaller than a displacement type compressor in same operating specification. Another feature of the refrigerator is a wide range operation capability for various heat-loads. Cooling power is controlled by the input-power of the turbo-compressor instead of the conventional method of using an electric heater. The rotational speed of the compressor motor is adjusted by an inverter. This system is expected to be more efficient. We show design details, specification and cooling test results of the new refrigerator in this paper.

  19. System design specification Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Flight System (FS), and Ground Demonstration System (GDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-14

    The system design specification for ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) is presented. The requirements for both a BIPS conceptual Flight System (FS) and a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) are defined.

  20. An Advanced Turbo-Brayton Converter for Radioisotope Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagarola, Mark V.; Izenson, Michael G.; Breedlove, Jeffrey J.; O'Connor, George M.; Ketchum, Andrew C.; Jetley, Richard L.; Simons, James K.

    2005-02-01

    Past work has shown that Brayton power converters are an attractive option for high power, long-duration space missions. More recently, Creare has shown that Brayton technology could be scaled with high efficiency and specific power to lower power levels suitable for radioisotope power conversion systems. Creare is currently leading the development of an advanced turbo-Brayton converter under NASA's Prometheus Program. The converter design is based on space-proven cryocooler technologies that have been shown to be safe; to provide long, maintenance-free lifetimes; and to have high reliability, negligible vibration emittance, and low EMI/EMC. The predicted performance of a converter at the beginning of life is greater than 20% (including electronic inefficiencies and overhead) with a converter specific power of greater than 8 We/kg for a test unit and greater than 15 We/kg for a flight unit. The degradation in performance over a 14-year mission lifetime is predicted to be negligible, and the primary life limiting factor is not expected to be an issue for greater than twice the mission duration. Work during the last year focused on the material and fabrication issues associated with a high temperature turbine and a lightweight recuperator, and the performance issues associated with the high-temperature insulation and power conversion electronics. The development of the converter is on schedule. Thermal vacuum testing to demonstrate a technology readiness level of 5 is currently planned for 2006.

  1. Closed Brayton Cycle power system with a high temperature pellet bed reactor heat source for NEP applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Harper, William B., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Capitalizing on past and future development of high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) technology, a low mass 15 MWe closed gas turbine cycle power system using a pellet bed reactor heating helium working fluid is proposed for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications. Although the design of this directly coupled system architecture, comprising the reactor/power system/space radiator subsystems, is presented in conceptual form, sufficient detail is included to permit an assessment of overall system performance and mass. Furthermore, an attempt is made to show how tailoring of the main subsystem design characteristics can be utilized to achieve synergistic system level advantages that can lead to improved reliability and enhanced system life while reducing the number of parasitic load driven peripheral subsystems.

  2. Preliminary design review: Brayton Isotope Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1977-03-01

    The design aspects covered include flight system design, design criteria/margins/reliability, GDS design, system analysis, materials, system assembly procedure, and government furnished equipment-BTPS. (TFD)

  3. Closed-Cycle Engine Program Used to Study Brayton Power Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul K.

    2005-01-01

    One form of power conversion under consideration in NASA Glenn Research Center's Thermal Energy Conversion Branch is the closed-Brayton-cycle engine. In the tens-of-kilowatts to multimegawatt class, the Brayton engine lends itself to potential space nuclear power applications such as electric propulsion or surface power. The Thermal Energy Conversion Branch has most recently concentrated its Brayton studies on electric propulsion for Prometheus. One piece of software used for evaluating such designs over a limited tradeoff space has been the Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP). The CCEP originated in the mid-1980s from a Fortran aircraft engine code known as the Navy/NASA Engine Program (NNEP). Components such as a solar collector, heat exchangers, ducting, a pumped-loop radiator, a nuclear heat source, and radial turbomachinery were added to NNEP, transforming it into a high-fidelity design and performance tool for closed-Brayton-cycle power conversion and heat rejection. CCEP was used in the 1990s in conjunction with the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration conducted at Glenn. Over the past year, updates were made to CCEP to adapt it for an electric propulsion application. The pumped-loop radiator coolant can now be n-heptane, water, or sodium-potassium (NaK); liquid-metal pump design tables were added to accommodate the NaK fluid. For the reactor and shield, a user can now elect to calculate a higher fidelity mass estimate. In addition, helium-xenon working-fluid properties were recalculated and updated.

  4. Preliminary design study of an alternate heat source assembly for a Brayton isotope power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a study of the preliminary design of an alternate heat source assembly (HSA) intended for use in the Brayton isotope power system (BIPS). The BIPS converts thermal energy emitted by a radioactive heat source into electrical energy by means of a closed Brayton cycle. A heat source heat exchanger configuration was selected and optimized. The design consists of a 10 turn helically wound Hastelloy X tube. Thermal analyses were performed for various operating conditions to ensure that post impact containment shell (PICS) temperatures remain within specified limits. These limits are essentially satisfied for all modes of operation except for the emergency cooling system for which the PICS temperatures are too high. Neon was found to be the best choice for a fill gas for auxiliary cooling system operation. Low cycle fatigue life, natural frequency, and dynamic loading requirements can be met with minor modifications to the existing HSA.

  5. Nuclear Air-Brayton Combined Cycle Power Conversion Design, Physical Performance Estimation and Economic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreades, Charalampos

    The combination of an increased demand for electricity for economic development in parallel with the widespread push for adoption of renewable energy sources and the trend toward liberalized markets has placed a tremendous amount of stress on generators, system operators, and consumers. Non-guaranteed cost recovery, intermittent capacity, and highly volatile market prices are all part of new electricity grids. In order to try and remediate some of these effects, this dissertation proposes and studies the design and performance, both physical and economic, of a novel power conversion system, the Nuclear Air-Brayton Combined Cycle (NACC). The NACC is a power conversion system that takes a conventional industrial frame type gas turbine, modifies it to accept external nuclear heat at 670°C, while also maintaining its ability to co-fire with natural gas to increase temperature and power output at a very quick ramp rate. The NACC addresses the above issues by allowing the generator to gain extra revenue through the provision of ancillary services in addition to energy payments, the grid operator to have a highly flexible source of capacity to back up intermittent renewable energy sources, and the consumer to possibly see less volatile electricity prices and a reduced probability of black/brown outs. This dissertation is split into six sections that delve into specific design and economic issues related to the NACC. The first section describes the basic design and modifications necessary to create a functional externally heated gas turbine, sets a baseline design based upon the GE 7FB, and estimates its physical performance under nominal conditions. The second section explores the off-nominal performance of the NACC and characterizes its startup and shutdown sequences, along with some of its safety measures. The third section deals with the power ramp rate estimation of the NACC, a key performance parameter in a renewable-heavy grid that needs flexible capacity. The

  6. Phase I: controls preliminary design report for Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-20

    Background analyses of three control systems capable of controlling the speed, output voltage, and start rate of Brayton Isotope Power Systems (BIPS) are presented. Conclusions of all functions considered are summarized. (TFD)

  7. Brayton-cycle heat exchanger technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killackey, J. J.; Coombs, M. G.; Graves, R. F.; Morse, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The following five tasks designed to advance this development of heat exchanger systems for close loop Brayton cycle power systems are presented: (1) heat transfer and pressure drop data for a finned tubular heat transfer matrix. The tubes are arranged in a triangular array with copper stainless steel laminate strips helically wound on the tubes to form a disk fin geometry; (2) the development of a modularized waste heat exchanger. Means to provide verified double containment are described; (3) the design, fabrication, and test of compact plate fin heat exchangers representative of full scale Brayton cycle recuperators; (4) the analysis and design of bellows suitable for operation at 1600 F and 200 psia for 1,000 cycles and 50,000 hours creep life; and (5) screening tests used to select a low cost braze alloy with the desirable attributes of a gold base alloy. A total of 22 different alloys were investigated; the final selection was Nicrobraz 30.

  8. Numerical Comparison of NASA's Dual Brayton Power Generation System Performance Using CO2 or N2 as the Working Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownens, Albert K.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Hervol, David S.

    2010-01-01

    A Dual Brayton Power Conversion System (DBPCS) has been tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center using Nitrogen (N2) as the working fluid. This system uses two closed Brayton cycle systems that share a common heat source and working fluid but are otherwise independent. This system has been modeled using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment. This paper presents the results of a numerical study that investigated system performance changes resulting when the working fluid is changed from gaseous (N2) to gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2).

  9. Thermodynamic Optimization of Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhim, Dong-Ryul; Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Hyun; Yeom, Choong-Sub [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has been studied for nuclear applications, mainly for one of the alternative power conversion systems of the sodium cooled fast reactor, since 1960's. Although the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has not been expected to show higher efficiency at lower turbine inlet temperature over the conventional steam Rankine cycle, the higher density of supercritical CO{sub 2} like a liquid in the supercritical region could reduce turbo-machinery sizes, and the potential problem of sodium-water reaction with the sodium cooled fast reactor might be solved with the use of CO{sub 2} instead of water. The supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle was proposed for the better thermodynamic efficiency than for the simple supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Thus this paper presents the efficiencies of the supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle along with several decision variables for the thermodynamic optimization of the supercritical CO{sub 2} recompression Brayton cycle. The analytic results in this study show that the system efficiency reaches its maximum value at a compressor outlet pressure of 200 bars and a recycle fraction of 30 %, and the lower minimum temperature approach at the two heat exchangers shows higher system efficiency as expected.

  10. A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  11. Transient analysis of an FHR coupled to a helium Brayton power cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Minghui [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Nuclear Engineering Program; Kim, In Hun [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Nuclear Engineering Program; Sun, Xiaodong [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Nuclear Engineering Program; Christensen, Richard [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Nuclear Engineering Program; Utgikar, Vivek [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) features a passive decay heat removal system and a high-efficiency Brayton cycle for electricity generation. It typically employs an intermediate loop, consisting of an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX), to couple the primary system with the power conversion unit (PCU). In this study, a preliminary dynamic system model is developed to simulate transient characteristics of a prototypic 20-MWth Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Test Reactor (FHTR). The model consists of a series of differential conservation equations that are numerically solved using the MATLAB platform. For the reactor, a point neutron kinetics model is adopted. For the IHX and SHX, a fluted tube heat exchanger and an offset strip-fin heat exchanger are selected, respectively. Detailed geometric parameters of each component in the FHTR are determined based on the FHTR nominal steady-state operating conditions. Three initiating events are simulated in this study, including a positive reactivity insertion, a step increase in the mass flow rate of the PCU helium flow, and a step increase in the PCU helium inlet temperature to the SHX. The simulation results show that the reactor has inherent safety features for those three simulated scenarios. It is observed that the increase in the temperatures of the fuel pebbles and primary coolant is mitigated by the decrease in the reactor power due to negative temperature feedbacks. The results also indicate that the intermediate loop with the two heat exchangers plays a significant role in the transient progression of the integral reactor system.

  12. Design and Off-Design Performance of 100 kWe-Class Brayton Power Conversion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul K.; Mason, Lee S.

    2005-02-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center in-house computer model Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP) was used to explore the design trade space and off-design performance characteristics of 100 kWe-class recuperated Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) power conversion systems. Input variables for a potential design point included the number of operating units (1, 2, 4), cycle peak pressure (0.5, 1, 2 MPa), and turbo-alternator shaft speed (30,45, 60 kRPM). The design point analysis assumed a fixed turbine inlet temperature (1150 K), compressor inlet temperature (400 K), helium-xenon working-fluid molecular weight (40 g/mol), compressor pressure ratio (2.0), recuperator effectiveness (0.95), and a Sodium-Potassium (NaK) pumped-loop radiator. The design point options were compared on the basis of thermal input power, radiator area, and mass. For a nominal design point with defined Brayton components and radiator area, off-design cases were examined by reducing turbine inlet temperature (as low as 900 K), reducing shaft speed (as low as 50% of nominal), and circulating a percentage (up to 20%) of the compressor exit flow back to the gas cooler. The off-design examination sought approaches to reduce thermal input power without freezing the radiator.

  13. Specification requirements summary for the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Ground Demonstration System (GDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, E.E.

    1976-02-10

    This document provides a summary of the required program specifications and procedures for the ERDA Phase I Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Program. Also included are document definitions, descriptions, and formats, and a listing of commonly used abbreviations. This document is intended to be used as a guide in document preparation and control.

  14. Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS). Phase I. First annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-10-27

    The objective of the BIPS program is to develop a closed gas turbine dynamic conversion system for space application. The baseline system is a 7-year life, 450 lb, 1300 W(e) unit using Brayton cycle hardware developed for the NASA LeRC and two 2400 W(t) Multi-Hundred Watt isotope heat sources developed for the ERDA. Phase I of the three-phase BIPS program is the conceptual design of the flight system, the design, development, and testing of a prototype Ground Demonstration System (GDS). The Mini-Brayton Rotating Unit (Mini-BRU), Mini-BRU Recuperator (MBR), and Heat Source Assembly (HSA) will be integrated into the ground demonstrator loop, and the system will be tested under simulated space conditions at the AiResearch Space Power Laboratory. Successful completion of the Phase I effort in mid 1978 is expected to lead to the Phase II and Phase III follow-on efforts. Phase II is a 24-month effort for the development and qualification of a flight system. Qualification will include testing with an isotope heat source. Phase III is a 12-month effort to fabricate flight-qualified hardware for delivery in April 1981.

  15. Simulation of CO2 Brayton Cycle for Engine Exhaust Heat Recovery under Various Operating Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒歌群; 张承宇; 田华; 高媛媛; 李团兵; 仇荣赓

    2015-01-01

    A bottoming cycle system based on CO2 Brayton cycle is proposed to recover the engine exhaust heat. Its performance is compared with the conventional air Brayton cycle under five typical engine conditions. The results show that CO2 Brayton cycle proves to be superior to the air Brayton cycle in terms of the system net output power, thermal efficiency and recovery efficiency. In most cases, the recovery efficiency of CO2 Brayton cycle can be higher than 9%and the system has a better performance at the engine’s high operating load. The thermal efficiency can be as large as 24.83%under 100%operating load, accordingly, the net output power of 14.86 kW is obtained.

  16. Brayton power conversion system parametric design modelling for nuclear electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashe, Thomas L.; Otting, William D.

    1993-11-01

    The parametrically based closed Brayton cycle (CBC) computer design model was developed for inclusion into the NASA LeRC overall Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) end-to-end systems model. The code is intended to provide greater depth to the NEP system modeling which is required to more accurately predict the impact of specific technology on system performance. The CBC model is parametrically based to allow for conducting detailed optimization studies and to provide for easy integration into an overall optimizer driver routine. The power conversion model includes the modeling of the turbines, alternators, compressors, ducting, and heat exchangers (hot-side heat exchanger and recuperator). The code predicts performance to significant detail. The system characteristics determined include estimates of mass, efficiency, and the characteristic dimensions of the major power conversion system components. These characteristics are parametrically modeled as a function of input parameters such as the aerodynamic configuration (axial or radial), turbine inlet temperature, cycle temperature ratio, power level, lifetime, materials, and redundancy.

  17. Brayton-cycle heat recovery-system characterization program. Subatmospheric-system test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgmeier, L.; Leung, S.

    1981-07-31

    The turbine tests and results for the Brayton cycle subatmospheric system (SAS) are summarized. A scaled model turbine was operated in the same environment as that which a full-scale SAS machine would experience from the hot effluent flue gas from a glass container furnace. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the effects of a simulated furnace flue gas stream on the turbine nozzles and blades. The following specific areas were evaluated: erosion of the turbine nozzles and blades from the dust in the flue gas, hot corrosion from alkali metal salts in the dust and acid vapor (sulfur trioxide and hydrogen chloride) in the flue gas, and fouling and flow blockage due to deposition and/or condensation from the flue gas constituents.

  18. Exergy analysis for combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zelong; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui [College of Naval Architecture and Power, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the study of exergy analysis of combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles. The analytical formulae of exergy loss and exergy efficiency are derived. The largest exergy loss location is determined. By taking the maximum exergy efficiency as the objective, the choice of bottom cycle pressure ratio is optimized by detailed numerical examples, and the corresponding optimal exergy efficiency is obtained. The influences of various parameters on the exergy efficiency and other performances are analyzed by numerical calculations.

  19. Thermodynamic optimisation of supercritical CO2 Brayton power cycles coupled to Direct Steam Generation Line-Focusing solar fields

    OpenAIRE

    Coco Enriquez, Luis; Muñoz Antón, Javier; Martínez-Val Peñalosa, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a new generation line-focusing solar plants coupled to a s-CO2 Brayton power cycles are studied. These innovative CSP will increase the plant energy efficiency, and subsequently optimizing the SF effective aperture area and SF investment cost for a fixed power output. Two SF configurations were assessed: the Configuration 1 with a condenser between the SF and the Balance Of Plant (BOP), for Turbine Inlet Temperatures (TIT) up to 400oC, and the Configuration 2, for higher TIT up ...

  20. Brayton isotope power system, phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-28

    The Phase I program resulted in the development and ground demonstration of a dynamic power conversion system. The two key contractual objectives of 25% conversion efficiency and 1000 h of endurance testing were successfully met. As a result of the Phase I effort, the BIPS is a viable candidate for further development into a flight system capable of sustained operation in space. It represents the only known dynamic space power system to demonstrate the performance and endurance coupled with the simplicity necessary for reliable operation. This final report follows thirty-five monthly reports. For expediency, it makes liberal use of referenced documents which have been submitted to DOE during the course of the program.

  1. The design and fabrication of a reverse Brayton cycle cryocooler system for the high temperature superconductivity cable cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hong; Kwon, Yong Ha; Kim, Young Soo

    2005-01-01

    A high temperature superconductivity cable must be cooled below the nitrogen liquefaction temperature to apply the cable to power generation and transmission systems under superconducting state. To maintain the superconducting state, a reliable cryocooler system is also required. The design and fabrication of a cryocooler system have been performed with a reverse Brayton cycle using neon gas as a refrigerant. The system consists of a compressor, a recuperator, a cold-box, and control valves. The design of the system is made to have 1 kW cooling capacity. The heat loss through multilayer insulators is calculated. Conduction heat loss is about 7 W through valves and access ports and radiation heat loss is about 18 W on the surface of a cryocooler. The design factors are discussed in detail.

  2. Sensitivity study on nitrogen Brayton cycle coupled with a small ultra-long cycle fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Seok Bin; Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main characteristics of UCFR are constant neutron flux and power density. They move their positions every moment at constant speed along with axial position of fuel rod for 60 years. Simultaneously with the development of the reactors, a new power conversion system has been considered. To solve existing issues of vigorous sodium-water reaction in SFR with steam power cycle, many researchers suggested a closed Brayton cycle as an alternative technique for SFR power conversion system. Many inactive gases are selected as a working fluid in Brayton power cycle, mainly supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}). However, S-CO{sub 2} still has potential for reaction with sodium. CO{sub 2}-sodium reaction produces solid product, which has possibility to have an auto ignition reaction around 600 .deg. C. Thus, instead of S-CO{sub 2}, CEA in France has developed nitrogen power cycle for ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration). In addition to inactive characteristic of nitrogen with sodium, its thermal and physical similarity with air enables to easily adopt to existing air Brayton cycle technology. In this study, for an optimized power conversion system for UCFR, a nitrogen Brayton cycle was analyzed in thermodynamic aspect. Based on subchannel analysis data of UCFR-100, a parametric study for thermal performance of nitrogen Brayton cycle was achieved. The system maximum pressure significantly affects to the overall efficiency of cycle, while other parameters show little effects. Little differences of the overall efficiencies for all cases between three stages (BOC, MOC, EOC) indicate that the power cycle of UCFR-100 maintains its performance during the operation.

  3. Exergy analysis for combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelong Zhang, Lingen Chen, Fengrui Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of exergy analysis of combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles. The analytical formulae of exergy loss and exergy efficiency are derived. The largest exergy loss location is determined. By taking the maximum exergy efficiency as the objective, the choice of bottom cycle pressure ratio is optimized by detailed numerical examples, and the corresponding optimal exergy efficiency is obtained. The influences of various parameters on the exergy efficiency and other performances are analyzed by numerical calculations.

  4. Modeling and sizing of the heat exchangers of a new supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle for energy conversion for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, I.P.; Cantizano, A.; Linares, J.I., E-mail: linares@upcomillas.es; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •We propose a procedure to model the heat exchangers of a S-CO2 Brayton power cycle. •Discretization in sub-heat exchangers is performed due to complex behavior of CO{sub 2}. •Different correlations have been tested, verifying them with CFD when necessary. •Obtained sizes are agree with usual values of printed circuit heat exchangers. -- Abstract: TECNO{sub F}US is a research program financed by the Spanish Government to develop technologies related to a dual-coolant (He/Pb–Li) breeding blanket design concept including the auxiliary systems for a future power reactor (DEMO). One of the main issues of this program is the optimization of heat recovery from the reactor and its conversion into electrical power. This paper is focused on the methodology employed for the design and sizing of all the heat exchangers of the supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton power cycle (S-CO2) proposed by the authors. Due to the large pressure difference between the fluids, and also to their compactness, Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHE) are suggested in literature for these type of cycles. Because of the complex behavior of CO{sub 2}, their design is performed by a numerical discretization into sub-heat exchangers, thus a higher precision is reached when the thermal properties of the fluids vary along the heat exchanger. Different empirical correlations for the pressure drop and the Nusselt number have been coupled and assessed. The design of the precooler (PC) and the low temperature recuperator (LTR) is also verified by simulations using CFD because of the near-critical behavior of CO{sub 2}. The size of all of the heat exchangers of the cycle have been assessed.

  5. Back Work Ratio of Brayton Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaver de la Fuente M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analizes the existing relation between temperatures, back work ratio and net work of Brayton cycle, a cycle that describes gas turbine engines performance. The application of computational soft ware helps to show the influence of back work ratio or coupling ratio, compressor and turbine in let temperatures in an ideal thermodynamical cycle. The results lead to deduce that the maximum value reached in back work ratio will depend on the ranges of maximum and minimal temperatures of Brayton cycle.

  6. Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Nichols, Kenneth; Brown, Nicholas

    2005-02-01

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of ˜1000 K.

  7. Advanced Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sienicki, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, Anton [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nellis, Gregory [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Klein, Sanford [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-21

    Fluids operating in the supercritical state have promising characteristics for future high efficiency power cycles. In order to develop power cycles using supercritical fluids, it is necessary to understand the flow characteristics of fluids under both supercritical and two-phase conditions. In this study, a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methodology was developed for supercritical fluids flowing through complex geometries. A real fluid property module was implemented to provide properties for different supercritical fluids. However, in each simulation case, there is only one species of fluid. As a result, the fluid property module provides properties for either supercritical CO2 (S-CO2) or supercritical water (SCW). The Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) was employed to model the two-phase flow. HEM assumes two phases have same velocity, pressure, and temperature, making it only applicable for the dilute dispersed two-phase flow situation. Three example geometries, including orifices, labyrinth seals, and valves, were used to validate this methodology with experimental data. For the first geometry, S-CO2 and SCW flowing through orifices were simulated and compared with experimental data. The maximum difference between the mass flow rate predictions and experimental measurements is less than 5%. This is a significant improvement as previous works can only guarantee 10% error. In this research, several efforts were made to help this improvement. First, an accurate real fluid module was used to provide properties. Second, the upstream condition was determined by pressure and density, which determines supercritical states more precise than using pressure and temperature. For the second geometry, the flow through labyrinth seals was studied. After a successful validation, parametric studies were performed to study geometric effects on the leakage rate. Based on these parametric studies, an optimum design strategy for the see

  8. Selection of a closed Brayton cycle gas turbine for an intermediate-duty solar-electric power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, G. L.; Plummer, D. F.

    1980-03-01

    Subsystem and system analyses were performed to select the preferred working gas, performance characteristics and size of a closed cycle gas turbine for an intermediate-duty solar-electric power plant. Capital costs for all major subsystems were evaluated, but the principal selection criterion was the projected cost of electricity produced by the plant. Detailed analyses of the power conversion loop were conducted for both air and helium systems. Since the plant was intended for use on an intermediate-duty cycle, thermal storage was required. The coupling of the storage and power conversion loops in combination with the daily operating cycle influenced plant performance and energy costs in addition to the selection of the power conversion cycle.

  9. Proposal for an advanced heat source assembly for the Isotope Brayton Power System. Volume 1. Technical program and statement of work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    The technical program plan for evaluating the performance and safety of a radioisotope-fueled Brayton power system for space vehicles is presented with schedules for evaluating heat source design and safety, for specifying power system requirements, and for the development and operation of a ground demonstration system. (LCL)

  10. Thermodynamic Modeling for Open Combined Regenerative Brayton and Inverse Brayton Cycles with Regeneration before the Inverse Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingen Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamic model of an open combined regenerative Brayton and inverse Brayton cycles with regeneration before the inverse cycle is established in this paper by using thermodynamic optimization theory. The flow processes of the working fluid with the pressure drops and the size constraint of the real power plant are modeled. There are 13 flow resistances encountered by the working fluid stream for the cycle model. Four of these, the friction through the blades and vanes of the compressors and the turbines, are related to the isentropic efficiencies. The remaining nine flow resistances are always present because of the changes in flow cross-section at the compressor inlet of the top cycle, regenerator inlet and outlet, combustion chamber inlet and outlet, turbine outlet of the top cycle, turbine outlet of the bottom cycle, heat exchanger inlet, and compressor inlet of the bottom cycle. These resistances associated with the flow through various cross-sectional areas are derived as functions of the compressor inlet relative pressure drop of the top cycle, and control the air flow rate, the net power output and the thermal efficiency. The analytical formulae about the power output, efficiency and other coefficients are derived with 13 pressure drop losses. It is found that the combined cycle with regenerator can reach higher thermal efficiency but smaller power output than those of the base combined cycle at small compressor inlet relative pressure drop of the top cycle.

  11. Operation and analysis of a supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven Alan; Radel, Ross F.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2010-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for use with solar, nuclear or fossil heat sources. The focus of this work has been on the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle (S-CO2) which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources, and is also very compact, with the potential for lower capital costs. The first step in the development of these advanced cycles was the construction of a small scale Brayton cycle loop, funded by the Laboratory Directed Research & Development program, to study the key issue of compression near the critical point of CO{sub 2}. This document outlines the design of the small scale loop, describes the major components, presents models of system performance, including losses, leakage, windage, compressor performance, and flow map predictions, and finally describes the experimental results that have been generated.

  12. Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles For High Efficiency Zero Emission Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. D. Rao; J. Francuz; A. Verma; G. S. Samuelsen

    2006-10-30

    The ultimate goal of this program is to identify the power block cycle conditions and/or configurations which could increase the overall thermal efficiency of the Baseline IGCC by about 8% on a relative basis (i.e., 8% on a heat rate basis). This document presents the cycle conditions and/or the configurations for evaluation in an initial screening analysis. These cycle conditions and/or configurations for investigation in the screening analysis are identified by literature searches and brain storming sessions. The screening analysis in turn narrows down the number of promising cases for detailed analysis.

  13. Calculation principles of humid air in a reversed Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, J. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Energy Technology

    1997-12-31

    The article presents a calculation method for reversed Brayton cycle that uses humid air as working medium. The reversed Brayton cycle can be employed as an air dryer, a heat pump or a refrigerating machine. In this research the use of humid air as a working fluid has an environmental advantage, as well. In this method especially the expansion process in the turbine is important because of the condensation of the water vapour in the humid air. This physical phenomena can have significant effects on the level of performance of the application. The expansion process differs physically from the compression process, when the water vapour in the humid air begins to condensate. In the thermodynamic equilibrium of the flow, the water vapour pressure in humid air cannot exceed the pressure of saturated water vapour in corresponding temperature. Expansion calculation during operation around the saturation zone is based on a quasistatic expansion, in which the system after the turbine is in thermodynamical equilibrium. The state parameters are at every moment defined by the equation of state, and there is no supercooling in the vapour. Following simplifications are used in the calculations: The system is assumed to be adiabatic. This means that there is no heat transfer to the surroundings. This is a common practice, when the temperature differences are moderate as here; The power of the cooling is omitted. The cooling construction is very dependent on the machine and the distribution of the losses; The flow is assumed to be one-dimensional, steady-state and homogenous. The water vapour condensing in the turbine can cause errors, but the errors are mainly included in the efficiency calculation. (author) 11 refs.

  14. Parametric Investigation and Thermoeconomic Optimization of a Combined Cycle for Recovering the Waste Heat from Nuclear Closed Brayton Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihuang Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined cycle that combines AWM cycle with a nuclear closed Brayton cycle is proposed to recover the waste heat rejected from the precooler of a nuclear closed Brayton cycle in this paper. The detailed thermodynamic and economic analyses are carried out for the combined cycle. The effects of several important parameters, such as the absorber pressure, the turbine inlet pressure, the turbine inlet temperature, the ammonia mass fraction, and the ambient temperature, are investigated. The combined cycle performance is also optimized based on a multiobjective function. Compared with the closed Brayton cycle, the optimized power output and overall efficiency of the combined cycle are higher by 2.41% and 2.43%, respectively. The optimized LEC of the combined cycle is 0.73% lower than that of the closed Brayton cycle.

  15. Comparison between s-CO2 and other supercritical working Fluids (s-Ethane, s-SF6, s-Xe, s-CH4, s-N2) in Line-Focusing Solar Power Plants with supercritical Brayton power cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Coco Enríquez, Luis; Muñoz Antón, Javier; Martínez-Val Peñalosa, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Thermosolar power plants with linear solar collectors and Rankine or Brayton power cycles are maturing as a competitive solution for reducing CO2 emissions in power plants as an alternative to traditional fossil and nuclear fuels. In this context, nowadays a great effort is being invested in supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton (s-CO2) power cycles for optimizing the line-focusing solar plants performance and reducing the cost of renewable energy. However, there are other working fluids with ...

  16. Method for controlling start-up and steady state performance of a closed split flow recompression brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasch, James Jay

    2017-02-07

    A method of resolving a balanced condition that generates control parameters for start-up and steady state operating points and various component and cycle performances for a closed split flow recompression cycle system. The method provides for improved control of a Brayton cycle thermal to electrical power conversion system. The method may also be used for system design, operational simulation and/or parameter prediction.

  17. Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles For High Efficiency Zero Emission Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. D. Rao; J. Francuz; H. Liao; A. Verma; G. S. Samuelsen

    2006-11-01

    Table 1 shows that the systems efficiency, coal (HHV) to power, is 35%. Table 2 summarizes the auxiliary power consumption within the plant. Thermoflex was used to simulate the power block and Aspen Plus the balance of plant. The overall block flow diagram is presented in Figure A1.3-1 and the key unit process flow diagrams are shown in subsequent figures. Stream data are given in Table A1.3-1. Equipment function specifications are provided in Tables A1.3-2 through 17. The overall plant scheme consists of a cryogenic air separation unit supplying 95% purity O{sub 2} to GE type high pressure (HP) total quench gasifiers. The raw gas after scrubbing is treated in a sour shift unit to react the CO with H{sub 2}O to form H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The gas is further treated to remove Hg in a sulfided activated carbon bed. The syngas is desulfurized and decarbonized in a Selexol acid gas removal unit and the decarbonized syngas after humidification and preheat is fired in GE 7H type steam cooled gas turbines. Intermediate pressure (IP) N{sub 2} from the ASU is also supplied to the combustors of the gas turbines as additional diluent for NOx control. A portion of the air required by the ASU is extracted from the gas turbines. The plant consists of the following major process units: (1) Air Separation Unit (ASU); (2) Gasification Unit; (3) CO Shift/Low Temperature Gas Cooling (LTGC) Unit; (4) Acid Gas Removal Unit (AGR) Unit; (5) Fuel Gas Humidification Unit; (6) Carbon Dioxide Compression/Dehydration Unit; (7) Claus Sulfur Recovery/Tail Gas Treating Unit (SRU/TGTU); and (8) Power Block.

  18. Rankline-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L [Livermore, CA

    2012-03-13

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  19. Rankine-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-12-29

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  20. Use of Multiple Reheat Helium Brayton Cycles to Eliminate the Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop for Advanced Loop Type SFRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Samuel E. Bays

    2009-05-01

    The sodium intermediate heat transfer loop is used in existing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) plant design as a necessary safety measure to separate the radioactive primary loop sodium from the water of the steam Rankine power cycle. However, the intermediate heat transfer loop significantly increases the SFR plant cost and decreases the plant reliability due to the relatively high possibility of sodium leakage. A previous study shows that helium Brayton cycles with multiple reheat and intercooling for SFRs with reactor outlet temperature in the range of 510°C to 650°C can achieve thermal efficiencies comparable to or higher than steam cycles or recently proposed supercritical CO2 cycles. Use of inert helium as the power conversion working fluid provides major advantages over steam or CO2 by removing the requirement for safety systems to prevent and mitigate the sodium-water or sodium-CO2 reactions. A helium Brayton cycle power conversion system therefore makes the elimination of the intermediate heat transfer loop possible. This paper presents a pre-conceptual design of multiple reheat helium Brayton cycle for an advanced loop type SFR. This design widely refers the new horizontal shaft distributed PBMR helium power conversion design features. For a loop type SFR with reactor outlet temperature 550°C, the design achieves 42.4% thermal efficiency with favorable power density comparing with high temperature gas cooled reactors.

  1. Back work ratio of Brayton cycle; La relacion de trabajo de retroceso de un ciclo Brayton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaver de la Fuente, M. [Universidad Maritima del Caribe (Venezuela)]. E-mail: mmf_umc@hotmail.com

    2010-07-15

    This paper analyzes the existing relation between temperatures, back work ratio and net work of Brayton cycle, a cycle that describes gas turbine engines performance. The application of computational software helps to show the influence of back work ratio or coupling ratio, compressor and turbine inlet temperatures in an ideal thermodynamical cycle. The results lead to deduce that the maximum value reached in back work ratio will depend on the ranges of maximum and minimal temperatures of Brayton cycle. [Spanish] En este articulo se estudia la relacion que existe entre las temperaturas, la relacion de trabajo de retroceso y el trabajo neto en el ciclo Brayton, que es el ciclo ideal que describe el comportamiento de los motores de turbina de gas. La aplicacion de programas computarizados ayuda a mostrar la influencia de la relacion de trabajo de retroceso o relacion de acoplamiento, la temperatura de entrada al compresor y la temperatura de entrada a la turbina en este ciclo termodinamico ideal. Los resultados obtenidos permiten deducir que el valor maximo que alcanza la relacion de trabajo de retroceso dependera de los limites de temperatura maxima y minima impuestos en el ciclo Brayton.

  2. Dry Air Cooler Modeling for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lv, Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Modeling for commercially available and cost effective dry air coolers such as those manufactured by Harsco Industries has been implemented in the Argonne National Laboratory Plant Dynamics Code for system level dynamic analysis of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycles. The modeling can now be utilized to optimize and simulate sCO2 Brayton cycles with dry air cooling whereby heat is rejected directly to the atmospheric heat sink without the need for cooling towers that require makeup water for evaporative losses. It has sometimes been stated that a benefit of the sCO2 Brayton cycle is that it enables dry air cooling implying that the Rankine steam cycle does not. A preliminary and simple examination of a Rankine superheated steam cycle and an air-cooled condenser indicates that dry air cooling can be utilized with both cycles provided that the cycle conditions are selected appropriately

  3. Concept Design for a High Temperature Helium Brayton Cycle with Interstage Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pickard, Paul S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The primary metric for the viability of these next generation nuclear power plants will be the cost of generated electricity. One important component in achieving these objectives is the development of power conversion technologies that maximize the electrical power output of these advanced reactors for a given thermal power. More efficient power conversion systems can directly reduce the cost of nuclear generated electricity and therefore advanced power conversion cycle research is an important area of investigation for the Generation IV Program. Brayton cycles using inert or other gas working fluids, have the potential to take advantage of the higher outlet temperature range of Generation IV systems and allow substantial increases in nuclear power conversion efficiency, and potentially reductions in power conversion system capital costs compared to the steam Rankine cycle used in current light water reactors. For the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Helium Brayton cycles which can operate in the 900 to 950 C range have been the focus of power conversion research. Previous Generation IV studies examined several options for He Brayton cycles that could increase efficiency with acceptable capital cost implications. At these high outlet temperatures, Interstage Heating and Cooling (IHC) was shown to provide significant efficiency improvement (a few to 12%) but required increased system complexity and therefore had potential for increased costs. These scoping studies identified the potential for increased efficiency, but a more detailed analysis of the turbomachinery and heat exchanger sizes and costs was needed to determine whether this approach could be cost effective. The purpose of this study is to examine the turbomachinery and heat exchanger implications of interstage heating and cooling configurations. In general, this analysis illustrates that these engineering considerations introduce new constraints to the design of IHC systems that may require

  4. Performance Optimization of a Solar-Driven Multi-Step Irreversible Brayton Cycle Based on a Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Mohammad Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An applicable approach for a multi-step regenerative irreversible Brayton cycle on the basis of thermodynamics and optimization of thermal efficiency and normalized output power is presented in this work. In the present study, thermodynamic analysis and a NSGA II algorithm are coupled to determine the optimum values of thermal efficiency and normalized power output for a Brayton cycle system. Moreover, three well-known decision-making methods are employed to indicate definite answers from the outputs gained from the aforementioned approach. Finally, with the aim of error analysis, the values of the average and maximum error of the results are also calculated.

  5. Thermoeconomic Analysis and Optimization of a New Combined Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Recompression Brayton/Kalina Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohammad S. Mahmoudi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new combined supercritical CO2 recompression Brayton/Kalina cycle (SCRB/KC is proposed. In the proposed system, waste heat from a supercritical CO2 recompression Brayton cycle (SCRBC is recovered by a Kalina cycle (KC to generate additional electrical power. The performances of the two cycles are simulated and compared using mass, energy and exergy balances of the overall systems and their components. Using the SPECO (Specific Exergy Costing approach and employing selected cost balance equations for the components of each system, the total product unit costs of the cycles are obtained. Parametric studies are performed to investigate the effects on the SCRB/KC and SCRBC thermodynamic and thermoeconomic performances of key decision parameters. In addition, considering the exergy efficiency and total product unit cost as criteria, optimization is performed for the SCRBC and SCRB/KC using Engineering Equation Solver software. The results indicate that the maximum exergy efficiency of the SCRB/KC is higher than that of the SCRBC by up to 10%, and that the minimum total product unit cost of the SCRB/KC is lower than that of the SCRBC by up to 4.9%.

  6. Exergy analyses of an endoreversible closed regenerative Brayton cycle CCHP plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang, Lingen Chen, Yanlin Ge, Fengrui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An endoreversible closed regenerative Brayton cycle CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power plant coupled to constant-temperature heat reservoirs is presented using finite time thermodynamics (FTT. The CCHP plant includes an endoreversible closed regenerative Brayton cycle, an endoreversible four-heat-reservoir absorption refrigerator and a heat recovery device of thermal consumer. The heat-resistance losses in the hot-, cold-, thermal consumer-, generator-, condenser-, evaporator- and absorber-side heat exchangers and regenerator are considered. The performance of the CCHP plant is studied from the exergetic perspective, and the analytical formulae about exergy output rate and exergy efficiency are derived. Through numerical calculations, the pressure ratio of regenerative Brayton cycle is optimized, the effects of heat conductance of regenerator and ratio of heat demanded by the thermal consumer to power output on dimensionless exergy output rate and exergy efficiency are analyzed.

  7. Scaling considerations for a multi-megawatt class supercritical CO2 brayton cycle and commercialization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Conboy, Thomas M.; Pasch, James Jay; Wright, Steven A; Rochau, Gary E; Fuller, Robert Lynn

    2013-11-01

    Small-scale supercritical CO2 demonstration loops are successful at identifying the important technical issues that one must face in order to scale up to larger power levels. The Sandia National Laboratories supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle test loops are identifying technical needs to scale the technology to commercial power levels such as 10 MWe. The small size of the Sandia 1 MWth loop has demonstration of the split flow loop efficiency and effectiveness of the Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHXs) leading to the design of a fully recuperated, split flow, supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle demonstration system. However, there were many problems that were encountered, such as high rotational speeds in the units. Additionally, the turbomachinery in the test loops need to identify issues concerning the bearings, seals, thermal boundaries, and motor controller problems in order to be proved a reliable power source in the 300 kWe range. Although these issues were anticipated in smaller demonstration units, commercially scaled hardware would eliminate these problems caused by high rotational speeds at small scale. The economic viability and development of the future scalable 10 MWe solely depends on the interest of DOE and private industry. The Intellectual Property collected by Sandia proves that the ~10 MWe supercritical CO2 power conversion loop to be very beneficial when coupled to a 20 MWth heat source (either solar, geothermal, fossil, or nuclear). This paper will identify a commercialization plan, as well as, a roadmap from the simple 1 MWth supercritical CO2 development loop to a power producing 10 MWe supercritical CO2 Brayton loop.

  8. On the reversed Brayton cycle with high speed machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, J.

    1996-12-31

    This work was carried out in the laboratory of Fluid Dynamics, at Lappeenranta University of Technology during the years 1991-1996. The research was a part of larger high speed technology development research. First, there was the idea of making high speed machinery applications with the Brayton cycle. There was a clear need to deepen the knowledge of the cycle itself and to make a new approach in the field of the research. Also, the removal of water from the humid air seemed very interesting. The goal of this work was to study methods of designing high speed machinery for the reversed Brayton cycle, from theoretical principles to practical applications. The reversed Brayton cycle can be employed as an air dryer, a heat pump or a refrigerating machine. In this research the use of humid air as a working fluid has an environmental advantage, as well. A new calculation method for the Brayton cycle is developed. In this method especially the expansion process in the turbine is important because of the condensation of the water vapour in the humid air. This physical phenomena can have significant effects on the level of performance of the application. Also, the influence of calculating the process with actual, achievable process equipment efficiencies is essential for the development of future machinery. The above theoretical calculations are confirmed with two different laboratory prototypes. (53 refs.)

  9. Application of exergetic sustainability index to a nano-scale irreversible Brayton cycle operating with ideal Bose and Fermi gasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Açıkkalp, Emin, E-mail: eacikkalp@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Bilecik S.E. University, Bilecik (Turkey); Caner, Necmettin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • An irreversible Brayton cycle operating quantum gasses is considered. • Exergetic sustainability index is derived for nano-scale cycles. • Nano-scale effects are considered. • Calculation are conducted for irreversible cycles. • Numerical results are presented and discussed. - Abstract: In this study, a nano-scale irreversible Brayton cycle operating with quantum gasses including Bose and Fermi gasses is researched. Developments in the nano-technology cause searching the nano-scale machines including thermal systems to be unavoidable. Thermodynamic analysis of a nano-scale irreversible Brayton cycle operating with Bose and Fermi gasses was performed (especially using exergetic sustainability index). In addition, thermodynamic analysis involving classical evaluation parameters such as work output, exergy output, entropy generation, energy and exergy efficiencies were conducted. Results are submitted numerically and finally some useful recommendations were conducted. Some important results are: entropy generation and exergetic sustainability index are affected mostly for Bose gas and power output and exergy output are affected mostly for the Fermi gas by x. At the high temperature conditions, work output and entropy generation have high values comparing with other degeneracy conditions.

  10. Tensile and Creep Property Characterization of Potential Brayton Cycle Impeller and Duct Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper represents a status report documenting the work on creep of superalloys performed under Project Prometheus. Cast superalloys have potential applications in space as impellers within closed-loop Brayton cycle nuclear power generation systems. Likewise wrought superalloys are good candidates for ducts and heat exchangers transporting the inert working gas in a Brayton-based power plant. Two cast superalloys, Mar-M247LC and IN792, and a NASA GRC powder metallurgy superalloy, LSHR, are being screened to compare their respective capabilities for impeller applications. Several wrought superalloys including Hastelloy X, (Haynes International, Inc., Kokomo, IN), Inconel 617, Inconel 740, Nimonic 263, and Incoloy MA956 (Special Metals Corporation, Huntington, WV) are also being screened to compare their capabilities for duct applications. These proposed applications would require sufficient strength and creep resistance for long term service at temperatures up to 1200 K, with service times to 100,000 h or more. Conventional tensile and creep tests were performed at temperatures up to 1200 K on specimens extracted from the materials. Initial microstructure evaluations were also undertaken.

  11. Creep Property Characterization of Potential Brayton Cycle Impeller and Duct Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, john; Garg, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Cast superalloys have potential applications in space as impellers within closed-loop Brayton cycle nuclear power generation systems. Likewise wrought superalloys are good candidates for ducts and heat exchangers transporting the inert working gas in a Brayton-based power plant. Two cast superalloys, Mar-M247LC and IN792, and a NASA GRC powder metallurgy superalloy, LSHR, have been screened to compare their respective capabilities for impeller applications. Mar-M247LC has been selected for additional long term evaluations. Initial tests in helium indicate this inert environment may debit long term creep resistance of this alloy. Several wrought superalloys including Hastelloy(Registered TradeMark) X, Inconel(Registered TradeMark) 617, Inconel(Registered TradeMark) 740, Nimonic(Registered TradeMark) 263, Incoloy(Registered TradeMark) MA956, and Haynes 230 are also being screened to compare their capabilities for duct applications. Haynes 230 has been selected for additional long term evaluations. Initial tests in helium are just underway for this alloy. These proposed applications would require sufficient strength and creep resistance for long term service at temperatures up to 1200 K, with service times to 100,000 h or more. Therefore, long term microstructural stability is also being screened.

  12. Optimal analysis on the performance of an irreversible harmonic quantum Brayton refrigeration cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bihong; Chen, Jincan

    2003-11-01

    An irreversible model of a quantum refrigeration cycle working with many noninteracting harmonic oscillators is established. The refrigeration cycle consists of two adiabatic and two constant-frequency processes. The general performance characteristics of the cycle are investigated, based on the quantum master equation and the semigroup approach. The expressions for several important performance parameters such as the coefficient of performance, cooling rate, power input, and rate of entropy production are derived. By using numerical solutions, the cooling rate of the refrigeration cycle subject to finite cycle duration is optimized. The maximum cooling rate and the corresponding parameters are calculated numerically. The optimal region of the coefficient of performance and the optimal ranges of temperatures of the working substance and times spent on the two constant-frequency processes are determined. Moreover, the optimal performance of the cycle in the high-temperature limit is compared with that of a classical Brayton refrigerator working with an ideal gas. The results obtained here show that in the high-temperature limit a harmonic quantum Brayton cycle may be equivalent to a classical Brayton cycle.

  13. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a partial energy conversion system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  14. Evaluation of Active Working Fluids for Brayton Cycles in Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, J. C.; Courville, G. E.; Scott, J. H.

    2004-02-01

    The main parameter of interest for space thermal power conversion to electricity is specific power, defined as the total electric power output per unit of system mass, rather than the cycle thermal efficiency. For a closed Brayton cycle, performance with two active working fluids, nitrogen tetroxide and aluminum chloride, is compared to that with an inert mixture of helium and xenon having a molecular mass of 40. A chemically active working fluid is defined here as a chemical compound that has a relatively high molecular weight at temperatures appropriate for the compressor inlet and dissociates to a lighter molecular weight fluid at typical turbine inlet temperatures. The active working fluids may have the advantage of a higher net turbomachinery work output and an advantageous enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient in the heat exchangers. The fundamental theory of the active working fluid concept is presented to demonstrate these potential advantages. Scoping calculations of the heat exchanger mass for a selected spacecraft application of 36.4 kW of electrical power output show that the nitrogen tetroxide active working fluid has an advantageous 7% to 30% lower mass-to-power ratio than that for the inert noble gas mixture, depending on the allowable turbine inlet temperature. The calculations for the aluminum chloride system suggest only a slight improvement in performance relative to the inert noble gas mixture.

  15. Coupling a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle to a Helium-Cooled Reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, Bobby [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pasch, James Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kruizenga, Alan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Walker, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the thermodynamics of a supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) recompression closed Brayton cycle (RCBC) coupled to a Helium-cooled nuclear reactor. The baseline reactor design for the study is the AREVA High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Using the AREVA HTGR nominal operating parameters, an initial thermodynamic study was performed using Sandia's deterministic RCBC analysis program. Utilizing the output of the RCBC thermodynamic analysis, preliminary values of reactor power and of Helium flow rate through the reactor were calculated in Sandia's HelCO2 code. Some research regarding materials requirements was then conducted to determine aspects of corrosion related to both Helium and to sCO2 , as well as some mechanical considerations for pressures and temperatures that will be seen by the piping and other components. This analysis resulted in a list of materials-related research items that need to be conducted in the future. A short assessment of dry heat rejection advantages of sCO2> Brayton cycles was also included. This assessment lists some items that should be investigated in the future to better understand how sCO2 Brayton cycles and nuclear can maximally contribute to optimizing the water efficiency of carbon free power generation

  16. Brayton cycle for internal combustion engine exhaust gas waste heat recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Galindo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An average passenger car engine effectively uses about one-third of the fuel combustion energy, while the two-thirds are wasted through exhaust gases and engine cooling. It is of great interest to automotive industry to recover some of this wasted energy, thus increasing the engine efficiency and lowering fuel consumption and contamination. Waste heat recovery for internal combustion engine exhaust gases using Brayton cycle machine was investigated. The principle problems of application of such a system in a passenger car were considered: compressor and expander machine selection, machine size for packaging under the hood, efficiency of the cycle, and improvement of engine efficiency. Important parameters of machines design have been determined and analyzed. An average 2-L turbocharged gasoline engine’s New European Driving Cycle points were taken as inlet points for waste heat recovery system. It is theoretically estimated that the recuperated power of 1515 W can be achieved along with 5.7% improvement in engine efficiency, at the point where engine power is 26550 W.

  17. A Closed Brayton Power Conversion Unit Concept for Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Claude Russell; Fowler, Bruce; Matthews, John

    2003-01-01

    In space, whether in a stable satellite orbit around a planetary body or traveling as a deep space exploration craft, power is just as important as the propulsion. The need for power is especially important for in-space vehicles that use Electric Propulsion. Using nuclear power with electric propulsion has the potential to provide increased payload fractions and reduced mission times to the outer planets. One of the critical engineering and design aspects of nuclear electric propulsion at required mission optimized power levels is the mechanism that is used to convert the thermal energy of the reactor to electrical power. The use of closed Brayton cycles has been studied over the past 30 or years and shown to be the optimum approach for power requirements that range from ten to hundreds of kilowatts of power. It also has been found to be scalable to higher power levels. The Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engine power conversion unit (PCU) is the most flexible for a wide range of power conversion needs and uses state-of-the-art, demonstrated engineering approaches. It also is in use with many commercial power plants today. The long life requirements and need for uninterrupted operation for nuclear electric propulsion demands high reliability from a CBC engine. A CBC engine design for use with a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system has been defined based on Pratt & Whitney's data from designing long-life turbo-machines such as the Space Shuttle turbopumps and military gas turbines and the use of proven integrated control/health management systems (EHMS). An integrated CBC and EHMS design that is focused on using low-risk and proven technologies will over come many of the life-related design issues. This paper will discuss the use of a CBC engine as the power conversion unit coupled to a gas-cooled nuclear reactor and the design trends relative to its use for powering electric thrusters in the 25 kWe to 100kWe power level.

  18. Counter flow induced draft cooling tower option for supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pidaparti, Sandeep R., E-mail: sandeep.pidaparti@gmail.com [Georgia Institute of Technology, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Moisseytsev, Anton; Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ranjan, Devesh, E-mail: devesh.ranjan@me.gatech.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A code was developed to investigate the various aspects of using cooling tower for S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycles. • Cooling tower option to reject heat is quantitatively compared to the direct water cooling and dry air cooling options. • Optimum water conditions resulting in minimal plant capital cost per unit power consumption are calculated. - Abstract: A simplified qualitative analysis was performed to investigate the possibility of using counter flow induced draft cooling tower option to reject heat from the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for advanced fast reactor (AFR)-100 and advanced burner reactor (ABR)-1000 plants. A code was developed to estimate the tower dimensions, power and water consumption, and to perform economic analysis. The code developed was verified against a vendor provided quotation and is used to understand the effect of ambient air and water conditions on the design of cooling tower. The calculations indicated that there exists optimum water conditions for given ambient air conditions which will result in minimum power consumption, thereby increasing the cycle efficiency. A cost-based optimization technique is used to estimate the optimum water conditions which will improve the overall plant economics. A comparison of different cooling options for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle indicated that the cooling tower option is a much more practical and economical option compared to the dry air cooling or direct water cooling options.

  19. Identified corrosion and erosion mechanisms in SCO2 Brayton Cycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Kruizenga, Alan Michael

    2014-06-01

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO2) is an efficient and flexible working fluid for power production. Research to interface S-CO2 systems with nuclear, thermal solar, and fossil energy sources is currently underway. To proceed, we must address concerns regarding compatibility of materials, at high temperature, and compatibility between significantly different heat transfer fluids. Dry, pure S-CO2 is thought to be relatively inert [1], while the addition of ppm levels of water and oxygen result in formation of a protective chromia layer and iron oxide [2]. Thin oxides are favorable as diffusion barriers, and for their minimal impact on heat transfer. While S-CO2 is typically understood to be the secondary fluid, many varieties of primary fluids exist for nuclear applications. Molten salts, for use in the Molten Salt Reactor concept, are given as an example to contrast the materials requirements of primary and secondary fluids. Thin chromia layers are soluble in molten salt systems (nitrate, chloride, and fluoride based salts) [3-8], making materials selection for heat exchangers a precarious balancing act between high temperature oxidation (S-CO2) and metal dissolution (salt side of heat exchanger). Because concerns have been raised regarding component lifetimes, S-CO2 work has begun to characterize starting materials and to establish a baseline by analysis of 1) as-received stainless steel piping, and 2) piping exposed to S-CO2 under typical operating conditions with Sandia National Laboratories Brayton systems. A second issue discovered by SNL involves substantial erosion in the turbine blade and inlet nozzle. It is believed that this is caused by small particulates that originate from different materials around the loop that are entrained by the S-CO2 to the nozzle, where they impact the inlet nozzle vanes, causing erosion. We believe that, in some way, this is linked to the purity of the S-CO2, the corrosion contaminants, and the metal particulates that

  20. An Advanced Light Weight Recuperator for Space Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) space power system is one of the most efficient energy conversion technologies for nuclear and solar electric propulsion. The recuperator...

  1. Development of a Novel Brayton-Cycle Cryocooler and Key Component Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieczkoski, S. J.; Mohling, R. A.

    2004-06-01

    Brayton-cycle cryocoolers are being developed to provide efficient cooling in the 6 K to 70 K temperature range. The cryocoolers are being developed for use in space and in terrestrial applications where combinations of long lifetime, high efficiency, compactness, low mass, low vibration, flexible interfacing, load variability, and reliability are essential. The key enabling technologies for these systems are a mesoscale expander and an advanced oil-free scroll compressor. Both these components are nearing completion of their prototype development phase. The emphasis on the component and system development has been on invoking fabrication processes and techniques that can be evolved to further reduction in scale tending toward cryocooler miniaturization.

  2. Conceptual design study of a 5 kilowatt solar dynamic Brayton power system using a dome Fresnel lens solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneill, Mark J.; Mcdanal, A. J.; Spears, Don H.

    1989-01-01

    The primary project objective was to generate a conceptual design for a nominal 5 kW solar dynamic space power system, which uses a unique, patented, transmittance-optimized, dome-shaped, point-focus Fresnel lens as the optical concentrator. Compared to reflective concentrators, the dome lens allows 200 times larger slope errors for the same image displacement. Additionally, the dome lens allows the energy receiver, the power conversion unit (PCU), and the heat rejection radiator to be independently optimized in configuration and orientation, since none of these elements causes any aperture blockage. Based on optical and thermal trade studies, a 6.6 m diameter lens with a focal length of 7.2 m was selected. This lens should provide 87 percent net optical efficienty at 800X geometric concentration ratio. The large lens is comprised of 24 gores, which compactly stow together during launch, and automatically deploy on orbit. The total mass of the microglass lens panels, the graphite/epoxy support structure, and miscellaneous hardware is about 1.2 kg per square meter of aperture. The key problem for the dome lens approach relates to the selection of a space-durable lens material. For the first time, all-glass Fresnel lens samples were successfully made by a sol-gel casting process.

  3. A comparison between molten carbonate fuel cells based hybrid systems using air and supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycles with state of the art technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, D.; Muñoz de Escalona, J. M.; Chacartegui, R.; Muñoz, A.; Sánchez, T.

    A proposal for high efficiency hybrid systems based on molten carbonate fuel cells is presented in this paper. This proposal is based on adopting a closed cycle bottoming gas turbine using supercritical carbon dioxide as working fluid as opposed to open cycle hot air turbines typically used in this type of power generators. First, both bottoming cycles are compared for the same operating conditions, showing that their performances do not differ as much as initially expected, even if the initial objective of reducing compression work is accomplished satisfactorily. In view of these results, a profound review of research and industrial literature is carried out in order to determine realistic specifications for the principal components of the bottoming systems. From this analysis, it is concluded that an appropriate set of specifications must be developed for each bottoming cycle as the performances of compressor, turbine and recuperator differ significantly from one working fluid to another. Thus, when the operating conditions are updated, the performances of the resulting systems show a remarkable advantage of carbon dioxide based systems over conventional air units. Actually, the proposed hybrid system shows its capability to achieve 60% net efficiency, what represents a 10% increase with respect to the reference system.

  4. Modeling the small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Willem G.; Meyer, Josua P.

    2016-05-01

    The small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle (STBC) makes use of a sun-tracking dish reflector, solar receiver, recuperator and micro-turbine to generate power in the range of 1-20 kW. The modeling of such a system, using a turbocharger as micro-turbine, is required so that optimisation and further development of an experimental setup can be done. As a validation, an analytical model of the small-scale STBC in Matlab, where the net power output is determined from an exergy analysis, is compared with Flownex, an integrated systems CFD code. A 4.8 m diameter parabolic dish with open-cavity tubular receiver and plate-type counterflow recuperator is considered, based on previous work. A dish optical error of 10 mrad, a tracking error of 1° and a receiver aperture area of 0.25 m × 0.25 m are considered. Since the recuperator operates at a very high average temperature, the recuperator is modeled using an updated ɛ-NTU method which takes heat loss to the environment into consideration. Compressor and turbine maps from standard off-the-shelf Garrett turbochargers are used. The results show that for the calculation of the steady-state temperatures and pressures, there is good comparison between the Matlab and Flownex results (within 8%) except for the recuperator outlet temperature, which is due to the use of different ɛ-NTU methods. With the use of Matlab and Flownex, it is shown that the small-scale open STBC with an existing off-the-shelf turbocharger could generate a positive net power output with solar-to-mechanical efficiency of up to 12%, with much room for improvement.

  5. Exergetic efficiency optimization for an irreversible heat pump working on reversed Brayton cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuehong Bi; Lingen Chen; Fengrui Sun

    2010-03-01

    This paper deals with the performance analysis and optimization for irreversible heat pumps working on reversed Brayton cycle with constant-temperature heat reservoirs by taking exergetic efficiency as the optimization objective combining exergy concept with finite-time thermodynamics (FTT). Exergetic efficiency is defined as the ratio of rate of exergy output to rate of exergy input of the system. The irreversibilities considered in the system include heat resistance losses in the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and non-isentropic losses in the compression and expansion processes. The analytical formulas of the heating load, coefficient of performance (COP) and exergetic efficiency for the heat pumps are derived. The results are compared with those obtained for the traditional heating load and coefficient of performance objectives. The influences of the pressure ratio of the compressor, the allocation of heat exchanger inventory, the temperature ratio of two reservoirs, the effectiveness of the hot- and cold-side heat exchangers and regenerator, the efficiencies of the compressor and expander, the ratio of hot-side heat reservoir temperature to ambient temperature, the total heat exchanger inventory, and the heat capacity rate of the working fluid on the exergetic efficiency of the heat pumps are analysed by numerical calculations. The results show that the exergetic efficiency optimization is an important and effective criterion for the evaluation of an irreversible heat pump working on reversed Brayton cycle.

  6. Use of RELAP5-3D for Dynamic Analysis of a Closed-Loop Brayton Cycle Coupled To a Nuclear Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Larry D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes results of a dynamic system model for a pair of closed Brayton-cycle (CBC) loops running in parallel that are connected to a nuclear gas reactor. The model assumes direct coupling between the reactor and the Brayton-cycle loops. The RELAP5-3D (version 2.4.1) computer program was used to perform the analysis. Few reactors have ever been coupled to closed Brayton-cycle systems. As such their behavior under dynamically varying loads, startup and shut down conditions, and requirements for safe and autonomous operation are largely unknown. The model described in this paper represents the reactor, turbine, compressor, recuperator, heat rejection system and alternator. The initial results of the model indicate stable operation of the reactor-driven Brayton-cycle system. However, for analysts with mostly pressurized water reactor experience, the Brayton cycle loops coupled to a gas-cooled reactor also indicate some counter-intuitive behavior for the complete coupled system. This model has provided crucial information in evaluating the reactor design and would have been further developed for use in developing procedures for safe start up, shut down, safe-standby, and other autonomous operating modes had the plant development cycle been completed.

  7. Second-law analysis and optimization of reverse brayton cycles of different configurations for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, James Ryder; Razani, Arsalan

    2012-06-01

    Second-law of thermodynamics (2nd law) and exergy analyses and optimization offour Reverse Brayton Refrigeration (RBR) cryogenic cycle configurations: Conventional 1-stage compression cycle; Conventional 2-stage compression cycle; 1-stage compressionModified cycle with intermediate cooling of the recuperator using an auxiliary cooler; andan Integrated 2-stage expansion RBR cycle are performed. The conventional RBR cyclesare analyzed for low and high pressure ratio applications using multistage compressorswith intercooling. Analytical solutions for the conventional cycles are developed includingthermal and fluid flow irreversibilities of the recuperators and all heat exchangers inaddition to the compression and expansion processes. Analytical solutions are used to findthe thermodynamic bounds for the performance of the cycles. Exergy irreversibilitydiagrams of the cycles are developed and the effects of important system parameters onRBR cycle performance are investigated. 2nd law/exergy analyses, and optimization of thecycles with intermediate cooling of the recuperator, considering the cooling temperatureand the recuperator effectiveness and pressure drop, are included. The effect of the 2ndlaw/exergy efficiency of the auxiliary cooler on the total system efficiencies is presented.

  8. Exergy Analysis and Second Law Efficiency of a Regenerative Brayton Cycle with Isothermal Heat Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser M. Jubeh

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The effect of two heat additions, rather than one, in a gas turbine engine is analyzed from the second law of thermodynamics point of view. A regenerative Brayton cycle model is used for this study, and compared with other models of Brayton cycle. All fluid friction losses in the compressor and turbine are quantified by an isentropic efficiency term. The effect of pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, ambient temperature, altitude, and altitude with variable ambient temperature on irreversibility "exergy destroyed" and second law efficiency was investigated and compared for all models. The results are given graphically with the appropriate discussion and conclusion.

  9. Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature

  10. Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

  11. Analysis of Superimposed Elementary Thermodynamic Cycles: from the Brayton-Joule to Advanced Mixed (Auto-Combined Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Manente

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The need for efficiency improvement in energy conversion systems leads to a stricter functional integration among system components. This results in structures of increasing complexity, the high performance of which are often difficult to be understood easily. To make the comprehension of these structures easier, a new approach is followed in this paper, consisting in their representation as partial or total superimposition of elementary thermodynamic cycles. Although system performance cannot, in general, be evaluated as the sum of the performance of the separate thermodynamic cycles, this kind of representation and analysis can be of great help in understanding directions of development followed in the literature for the construction of advanced energy systems, and could suggest new potential directions of work. The evolution from the simple Brayton-Joule cycle to the so called “mixed” cycles, in which heat at the turbine discharge is exploited using internal heat sinks only without using a separate bottoming section, is used to demonstrate the potentiality of the approach. Mixed cycles are named here "auto-combined cycles” to highlight the combination of different (gas and steam cycles within the same system components.

    • This paper is an updated version of a paper published in the ECOS'08 proceedings. 

  12. Malone-Brayton Cycle Engine/Heat Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A machine, such as a heat pump , and having an all liquid heat exchange fluid, operates over a more nearly ideal thermodynamic cycle by adjustment of...difference in axial lengths of rotary pumps of the gear or vane type to achieve the adjustment of volumetric capacity. Adjustment of the heat pump system

  13. Potential Improvements of Supercritical CO2 Brayton Cycle by Modifying Critical Point of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo Seok; Lee, Jeong Ik; Jeong, Yong Hoon; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is one of strong candidates for a next generation nuclear reactor. However, the conventional design of a SFR concept with an indirect Rankine cycle is subjected to a sodium water reaction, which can deteriorate the safety of a SFR. To prevent any hazards from sodium-water reaction, a SFR with the Brayton cycle using Helium or Supercritical Carbon dioxide (S-CO2) as working fluids can be an alternative approach to improve the current SFR design. As in a helium cycle, there has been an investigation to modify thermo-physical properties to increase the efficiency of the cycle and reduce the size of turbomachineries. Particularly, He-Xe or He-N2 binary mixture were successful to decrease the stages of turbomachines due to the increment of molecular weight of gas mixture than that of pure helium. Similar to the case of helium, CO2 has a potential to modify its thermo-physical properties by mixing with other gases. For instance, it was reported that critical point of CO2 can be shifted by mixing with different gases. Since, the efficiency of a S-CO2 cycle is limited to the critical point of CO2, the shift in critical point implies that there is a possibility of improving the cycle efficiency than the current design. This paper presents the results of a preliminary analysis to identify the effects of CO2 critical point modification on the Brayton cycle performance.

  14. A preliminary study of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Ohnishi, M.; Yamamoto, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Key issues on a D-T Tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket concept using CFAB (Compact Fusion Advanced Brayton) cycle are presented. Although the previously proposed and studied compact fusion advanced Rankine cycle using mercury liquid metal has shown, in general, excellent performance characteristics in extracting energy and electricity with high efficiency by the {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} nonequilibrium MHD disk generator, and in enhancing safety potential, there was a fear about uses of hazardous mercury as primary coolant as well as its limited natural resources. To overcome these disadvantages while retaining the advantage features of a ultra-high temperature coolant inherent in the synchrotron energy-enhanced D-T tokamak reactor, a compact fusion advanced Brayton cycle using helium was reexamined which was once considered relatively not superior in the CFAR study, at the expense of high, but acceptable circulation power, lower heat transfer characteristics, and probably of a little bit reduced safety.

  15. Development of the ANL plant dynamics code and control strategies for the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle and code validation with data from the Sandia small-scale supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle test loop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-11-07

    Significant progress has been made in the ongoing development of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code (PDC), the ongoing investigation and development of control strategies, and the analysis of system transient behavior for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycles. Several code modifications have been introduced during FY2011 to extend the range of applicability of the PDC and to improve its calculational stability and speed. A new and innovative approach was developed to couple the Plant Dynamics Code for S-CO{sub 2} cycle calculations with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor Code System calculations for the transient system level behavior on the reactor side of a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) or Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The new code system allows use of the full capabilities of both codes such that whole-plant transients can now be simulated without additional user interaction. Several other code modifications, including the introduction of compressor surge control, a new approach for determining the solution time step for efficient computational speed, an updated treatment of S-CO{sub 2} cycle flow mergers and splits, a modified enthalpy equation to improve the treatment of negative flow, and a revised solution of the reactor heat exchanger (RHX) equations coupling the S-CO{sub 2} cycle to the reactor, were introduced to the PDC in FY2011. All of these modifications have improved the code computational stability and computational speed, while not significantly affecting the results of transient calculations. The improved PDC was used to continue the investigation of S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and transient behavior. The coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code capability was used to study the dynamic characteristics of a S-CO{sub 2} cycle coupled to a SFR plant. Cycle control was investigated in terms of the ability of the cycle to respond to a linear reduction in the electrical grid demand from 100% to 0% at a rate of 5

  16. Solar dynamic power system definition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Wayne E.; Friefeld, Jerry M.

    1988-01-01

    The solar dynamic power system design and analysis study compared Brayton, alkali-metal Rankine, and free-piston Stirling cycles with silicon planar and GaAs concentrator photovoltaic power systems for application to missions beyond the Phase 2 Space Station level of technology for all power systems. Conceptual designs for Brayton and Stirling power systems were developed for 35 kWe and 7 kWe power levels. All power systems were designed for 7-year end-of-life conditions in low Earth orbit. LiF was selected for thermal energy storage for the solar dynamic systems. Results indicate that the Stirling cycle systems have the highest performance (lowest weight and area) followed by the Brayton cycle, with photovoltaic systems considerably lower in performance. For example, based on the performance assumptions used, the planar silicon power system weight was 55 to 75 percent higher than for the Stirling system. A technology program was developed to address areas wherein significant performance improvements could be realized relative to the current state-of-the-art as represented by Space Station. In addition, a preliminary evaluation of hardenability potential found that solar dynamic systems can be hardened beyond the hardness inherent in the conceptual designs of this study.

  17. EXPLOIT STUDY OF NUCLEAR COMBINE CYCLE SYSTEM WITH TOPPING BRAYTON CYCLE%顶置燃气轮机核能联合循环系统开拓研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林汝谋; 高林; 段立强

    2001-01-01

    本文探索研究核电站更新改造新技术。基于系统综合和能的梯级利用的思路,设计构筑压水堆核电站与燃气轮机相结合的核能联合循环系统流程超结构,通过对其综合优化,提出两种可供选用的顶置燃气轮机核能联合循环总体技术方案,还结合实例进行模拟分析,揭示了它们的热力学特性,从而提出核电站联合循环技术更新改造(NRCC-Repowering)的新途径与新方案及其设计分析方法。%Nuclear combine cycle systems with topping Braytoncycle for existing nuclear power stations have been exploited inthis paper. Based on the principle of energy cascadesutilization and system synthesis, the system flow superstructureof the combine cycle has been schemed out and have been syntheticallyoptimized, then two kind of system schemes havebeen put forward. At the same time, by setting up mathematicalmodel with four independent variables for this system, we have pointedout the relationship between system performanceand independent variables. These promising results obtained herewill be valuable for NRCC-Repowering of existing nuclear power stations.

  18. Intercooled Turbo-Brayton Power Converter for Spaceflight Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA space missions require advanced systems to convert thermal energy into electric power. These systems must be reliable, efficient, and lightweight. In...

  19. Turbo-Brayton Power Converter for Spaceflight Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA space missions require advanced systems to convert thermal energy into electric power. These systems must be reliable, efficient, and lightweight. In...

  20. INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Sandvig; Gary Walling; Robert C. Brown; Ryan Pletka; Desmond Radlein; Warren Johnson

    2003-03-01

    Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW{sub e}; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system.

  1. Comparison between reverse Brayton and Kapitza based LNG boil-off gas reliquefaction system using exergy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochunni, Sarun Kumar; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2017-02-01

    LNG boil-off gas (BOG) reliquefaction systems in LNG carrier ships uses refrigeration devices which are based on reverse Brayton, Claude, Kapitza (modified Claude) or Cascade cycles. Some of these refrigeration devices use nitrogen as the refrigerants and hence nitrogen storage vessels or nitrogen generators needs to be installed in LNG carrier ships which consume space and add weight to the carrier. In the present work, a new configuration based on Kapitza liquefaction cycle which uses BOG itself as working fluid is proposed and has been compared with Reverse Brayton Cycle (RBC) on sizes of heat exchangers and compressor operating parameters. Exergy analysis is done after simulating at steady state with Aspen Hysys 8.6® and the comparison between RBC and Kapitza may help designers to choose reliquefaction system with appropriate process parameters and sizes of equipment. With comparable exergetic efficiency as that of an RBC, a Kaptiza system needs only BOG compressor without any need of nitrogen gas.

  2. Preliminary Modelling Results for an Otto Cycle/Stirling Cycle Hybrid-engine-based Power Generation System

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, Barry; McGovern, Jim; Feidt, Michel; Petrescu, Stoian

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data and results for a system mathematical model for a proposed Otto Cycle / Stirling Cycle hybrid-engine-based power generation system. The system is a combined cycle system with the Stirling cycle machine operating as a bottoming cycle on the Otto cycle exhaust. The application considered is that of a stationary power generation scenario wherein the Stirling cycle engine operates as a waste heat recovery device on the exhaust stream of the Otto cycle engine. ...

  3. Thermodynamic Analysis of Beam down Solar Gas Turbine Power Plant equipped with Concentrating Receiver System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azharuddin; Santarelli, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of a closed cycle, solar powered Brayton gas turbine power plant with Concentrating Receiver system has been studied. A Brayton cycle is simpler than a Rankine cycle and has an advantage where the water is scarce. With the normal Brayton cycle a Concentrating Receiver System has been analysed which has a dependence on field density and optical system. This study presents a method of optimization of design parameter, such as the receiver working temperature and the heliostats density. This method aims at maximizing the overall efficiency of the three major subsystem that constitute the entire plant, namely, the heliostat field and the tower, the receiver and the power block. The results of the optimization process are shown and analysed.

  4. Combined Reverse-Brayton Joule Thompson Hydrogen Liquefaction Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimko, Martin A. [Gas Equipment Engineering Corporation, Milford, CT (United States); Dunn, Paul M. [Gas Equipment Engineering Corporation, Milford, CT (United States)

    2011-12-31

    The following is a compilation of Annual Progress Reports submitted to the DOE’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office by Gas Equipment Engineering Corp. for contract DE-FG36-05GO15021. The reports cover the project activities from August 2005 through June 2010. The purpose of this project is to produce a pilot-scale liquefaction plant that demonstrates GEECO’s ability to meet or exceed the efficiency targets set by the DOE. This plant will be used as a model to commercialize this technology for use in the distribution infrastructure of hydrogen fuel. It could also be applied to markets distributing hydrogen for industrial gas applications. Extensive modeling of plant performance will be used in the early part of the project to identify the liquefaction cycle architecture that optimizes the twin goals of increased efficiency and reduced cost. The major challenge of the project is to optimize/balance the performance (efficiency) of the plant against the cost of the plant so that the fully amortized cost of liquefying hydrogen meets the aggressive goals set by DOE. This project will design and build a small-scale pilot plant (several hundred kg/day) that will be both a hardware demonstration and a model for scaling to larger plant sizes (>50,000 kg/day). Though an effort will be made to use commercial or near-commercial components, key components that will need development for either a pilot- or full-scale plant will be identified. Prior to starting pilot plant fabrication, these components will be demonstrated at the appropriate scale to demonstrate sufficient performance for use in the pilot plant and the potential to achieve the performance used in modeling the full-scale plant.

  5. Investigation of CO{sub 2} Recovery System Design in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Seok; Jung, Hwa-Young; Ahn, Yoonhan; Cho, Seong Kuk; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    These are mainly possible because the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle has lower compressing work than other Brayton cycles due to its high density and low compressibility near the critical point. These attributes make easier to achieve higher turbine inlet temperature. Furthermore, the coolant chemistry control and component cooling systems are relatively simple for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle unlike the steam Rankine cycle, and therefore the total plant footprint can be greatly reduced further. However, certain amount of leakage flow is inevitable in the rotating turbo-machinery since the S-CO{sub 2} power cycle is a highly pressurized system. A computational model of critical flow in turbo-machinery seal is essential to predict the leakage flow and calculate the required total mass of working fluid in S-CO{sub 2} power system. Before designing a computational model of critical flow in turbo-machinery seal, this paper will identify what the issues are in predicting leakage flow and how these issues can be successfully addressed. Also, suitability of this solution in a large scale S-CO{sub 2} power cycle will be discussed, because this solution is for the small scale. S-CO{sub 2} power cycle has gained interest especially for the SFR application as an alternative to the conventional steam Rankine cycle, since S-CO{sub 2} power cycle can provide better performance and enhance safety. This paper discussed what the problem in leakage flow is and how to deal with this problem at present. High cavity pressure causing instability of gas foil bearing and large windage losses can be reduced by booster pump used to scavenge the gas in the rotor cavity. Also, labyrinth seals can be another good solution to decrease the rotor cavity pressure. Additionally, difference between large and small scale S-CO{sub 2} power cycle in turbo-machinery leakage is addressed. It is shown that optimization of CO{sub 2} recovery system design is more important to large scale S-CO{sub 2} power cycle. For

  6. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  7. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  8. An open reversed Brayton cycle with regeneration using moist air for deep freeze cooled by circulating water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Shaobo [Guangdong Ocean University, College of Engineering, East Jiefang Rd. No. 40, Xiashan, Zhanjiang, Guangdong 524006 (China); Northwestern Polytechnical University, School of Aeroengine and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Zhang, Hefei [Northwestern Polytechnical University, School of Aeroengine and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents an open reversed Brayton cycle with regeneration using moist air for deep freeze cooled by circulating water, and proves its feasibility through performance simulation. Pinch technology is used to analyze the cooling of the wet air after compressor and the water used for cooling wet air after compressor. Its refrigeration depends mainly on the sensible heat of air and the latent heat of water vapor, its performance is more efficient than a conventional air-cycle, and the utilization of turbo-machinery makes it possible. The adoption of this cycle will make deep freeze easily and reduce initial cost because very low temperature, about -55 C, air is obtained. The sensitivity analysis of coefficient of performance to the efficiency of compressor and the efficiency of compressor, and the results of the cycle are also given. The simulation results show that the COP of this system depends on the temperature before turbine, the efficiency of compressor and the efficiency of compressor, and varies with the wet bulb temperature of the outdoor air. Humid air is a perfect working fluid for deep freeze with no cost to the user. (author)

  9. Off-design performance prediction of Radial Compressor of Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for KAIST Micro Modular Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seongkuk; Lee, Jekyoung; Kim, Seong Gu; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    KAIST research team suggested a new concept of SMR, which utilizes S-CO{sub 2} as the operating fluid and coolant. It was named as KAIST MMR(Micro Modular Reactor). Compared with existing SMR concepts, this reactor has advantages of achieving smaller volume of power conversion unit (PCU) containing the core and PCU in one vessel for the complete modularization passive air-cooling system more flexible installation in the inland area. In previous study, performance of turbomachinery in PCU was considered only on-design. But, off-design performances of each component can affect not only PCU but also the core because this reactor adopts the direct S-CO{sub 2} loop in GFR. Nuclear system is applied by relatively conservative criteria of safety. Thus, off-design performances of each component should be considered in order to be more realistic reactor. The suggested turbomachinery size of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is relatively smaller than those of helium Brayton cycle and steam Rankine cycle. Performance analysis of compressor is conducted by KAIST-TMD in case of on-design and off-design. Compressor efficiency in on-design conditions is obtained 84.51 %. But compressor performance in off-design conditions decreases certainly. This means that more heat than existing prediction is rejected by air-cooling system. KAIST-TMD will be verified with more experiment data for providing the results of more accurate analysis. Also, this code will be modified to couple with safety analysis codes and S-CO{sub 2} cycle analysis codes in the future. Furthermore, authors will consider aerodynamic performance analysis and various losses for more realization.

  10. Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles: Design Considerations for Concentrating Solar Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neises, Ty; Turchi, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A comparison of three supercritical CO2 Brayton cycles: the simple cycle, recompression cycle and partial-cooling cycle indicates the partial-cooling cycle is favored for use in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. Although it displays slightly lower cycle efficiency versus the recompression cycle, the partial-cooling cycle is estimated to have lower total recuperator size, as well as a lower maximum s-CO2 temperature in the high-temperature recuperator. Both of these effects reduce recuperator cost. Furthermore, the partial-cooling cycle provides a larger temperature differential across the turbine, which translates into a smaller, more cost-effective thermal energy storage system. The temperature drop across the turbine (and by extension, across a thermal storage system) for the partial-cooling cycle is estimated to be 23% to 35% larger compared to the recompression cycle of equal recuperator conductance between 5 and 15 MW/K. This reduces the size and cost of the thermal storage system. Simulations by NREL and Abengoa Solar indicate the partial-cooling cycle results in a lower LCOE compared with the recompression cycle, despite the former's slightly lower cycle efficiency. Advantages of the recompression cycle include higher thermal efficiency and potential for a smaller precooler. The overall impact favors the use of a partial-cooling cycle for CSP compared to the more commonly analyzed recompression cycle.

  11. Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

    1997-12-01

    The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

  12. A Mass Computation Model for Lightweight Brayton Cycle Regenerator Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a theoretical analysis of convective heat transfer across large internal surface areas, this paper discusses the design implications for generating lightweight gas-gas heat exchanger designs by packaging such areas into compact three-dimensional shapes. Allowances are made for hot and cold inlet and outlet headers for assembly of completed regenerator (or recuperator) heat exchanger units into closed cycle gas turbine flow ducting. Surface area and resulting volume and mass requirements are computed for a range of heat exchanger effectiveness values and internal heat transfer coefficients. Benefit cost curves show the effect of increasing heat exchanger effectiveness on Brayton cycle thermodynamic efficiency on the plus side, while also illustrating the cost in heat exchanger required surface area, volume, and mass requirements as effectiveness is increased. The equations derived for counterflow and crossflow configurations show that as effectiveness values approach unity, or 100 percent, the required surface area, and hence heat exchanger volume and mass tend toward infinity, since the implication is that heat is transferred at a zero temperature difference. To verify the dimensional accuracy of the regenerator mass computational procedure, calculation of a regenerator specific mass, that is, heat exchanger weight per unit working fluid mass flow, is performed in both English and SI units. Identical numerical values for the specific mass parameter, whether expressed in lb/(lb/sec) or kg/ (kg/sec), show the dimensional consistency of overall results.

  13. Comparative evaluation of three alternative power cycles for waste heat recovery from the exhaust of adiabatic diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, M.M.

    1985-07-01

    Three alternative power cycles were compared in application as an exhaust-gas heat-recovery system for use with advanced ''adiabatic'' diesel engines. The power cycle alternatives considered were steam Rankine, organic Rankine with RC-1 as the working fluid, and variations of an air Brayton cycle. The comparison was made in terms of fuel economy and economic payback potential for heavy-duty trucks operating in line-haul service. The results indicate that, in terms of engine rated specific fuel consumption, a diesel/alternative-power-cycle engine offers a significant improvement over the turbocompound diesel used as the baseline for comparison. The maximum improvement resulted from the use of a Rankine cycle heat-recovery system in series with turbocompounding. The air Brayton cycle alternatives studied, which included both simple-cycle and compression-intercooled configurations, were less effective and provided about half the fuel consumption improvement of the Rankine cycle alternatives under the same conditions. Capital and maintenance cost estimates were also developed for each of the heat-recovery power cycle systems. These costs were integrated with the fuel savings to identify the time required for net annual savings to pay back the initial capital investment. The sensitivity of capital payback time to arbitrary increases in fuel price, not accompanied by corresponding hardware cost inflation, was also examined. The results indicate that a fuel price increase is required for the alternative power cycles to pay back capital within an acceptable time period.

  14. Comparative evaluation of three alternative power cycles for waste heat recovery from the exhaust of adiabatic diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Three alternative power cycles were compared in application as an exhaust-gas heat-recovery system for use with advanced adiabatic diesel engines. The power cycle alternatives considered were steam Rankine, organic Rankine with RC-1 as the working fluid, and variations of an air Brayton cycle. The comparison was made in terms of fuel economy and economic payback potential for heavy-duty trucks operating in line-haul service. The results indicate that, in terms of engine rated specific fuel consumption, a diesel/alternative-power-cycle engine offers a significant improvement over the turbocompound diesel used as the baseline for comparison. The maximum imporvement resulted from the use of a Rankine cycle heat-recovery system in series with turbocompounding. The air Brayton cycle alternatives studied, which included both simple-cycle and compression-intercooled configurations, were less effective and provided about half the fuel consumption improvement of the Rankine cycle alternatives under the same conditions. Capital and maintenance cost estimates were also developed for each of the heat-recovery power cycle systems. These costs were integrated with the fuel savings to identify the time required for net annual savings to pay back the initial capital investment. The sensitivity of capital payback time to arbitrary increases in fuel price, not accompanied by corresponding hardware cost inflation, was also examined. The results indicate that a fuel price increase is required for the alternative power cycles to pay back capital within an acceptable time period.

  15. Brayton-Moser Equations and New Passivity Properties for Nonlinear Electro-Mechanical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeltsema, Dimitri; Clemente-Gallardo, Jesus; Ortega, Romeo; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Klaassens, J. Ben

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative framework for a practically relevant class of nonlinear electro-mechanical systems. The formalism is based on a generalization of Brayton and Moser’s mixed-potential function. Instead of focusing on the usual energy-balance, the models are constructed using the pow

  16. Waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines by exhaust-driven Brayton cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, H.E.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an evaluation of Brayton Bottoming Systems (BBS) as waste heat recovery devices for future adiabatic diesel engines in heavy duty trucks. Parametric studies were performed to evaluate the influence of external and internal design parameters on BBS performance. Conceptual design and trade-off studies were undertaken to estimate the optimum configuration, size, and cost of major hardware components. The potential annual fuel savings of long-haul trucks equipped with BBS were estimated. The addition of a BBS to a turbocharged, nonaftercooled adiabatic engine would improve fuel economy by as much as 12%. In comparison with an aftercooled, turbocompound engine, the BBS-equipped turbocharged engine would offer a 4.4% fuel economy advantage. It is also shown that, if installed in tandem with an aftercooled turbocompound engine, the BBS could effect a 7.2% fuel economy improvement. The cost of a mass-produced 38 Bhp BBS is estimated at about $6460 or $170/Bhp. Technical and economic barriers that would hinder the commercial introduction of bottoming systems were identified.

  17. A Comparison of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Configurations with an Emphasis on CSP Applications (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neises, T.; Turchi, C.

    2013-09-01

    Recent research suggests that an emerging power cycle technology using supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) operated in a closed-loop Brayton cycle offers the potential of equivalent or higher cycle efficiency versus supercritical or superheated steam cycles at temperatures relevant for CSP applications. Preliminary design-point modeling suggests that s-CO2 cycle configurations can be devised that have similar overall efficiency but different temperature and/or pressure characteristics. This paper employs a more detailed heat exchanger model than previous work to compare the recompression and partial cooling cycles, two cycles with high design-point efficiencies, and illustrates the potential advantages of the latter. Integration of the cycles into CSP systems is studied, with a focus on sensible heat thermal storage and direct s-CO2 receivers. Results show the partial cooling cycle may offer a larger temperature difference across the primary heat exchanger, thereby potentially reducing heat exchanger cost and improving CSP receiver efficiency.

  18. Development of 0.5-5 W, 10K Reverse Brayton Cycle Cryocoolers - Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doty, F. D.; Boman, A.; Arnold, S.; Spitzmesser, J. B.; Jones, D.; McCree, D.; Hacker, L. J.

    2001-10-15

    Miniature cryocoolers for the 8-30 K range are needed to provide 0.5-5 w of cooling to high sensitivity detectors (for long-wave-length IR, magnetism, mm-wave, X-ray, dark matter, and possibly y-ray detection) while maintaining low mass, ultra-low vibration, and good efficiency. This project presents a new approach to eliminating the problems normally encountered in efforts to build low-vibration, fieldable, miniature cryocoolers. Using the reverse Brayton Cycle (RBC), the approach applies and expands on existing spinner technology previously used only in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes.

  19. Multi Megawatt Power System Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, Glen Reed; Harvego, Edwin Allan; Schnitzler, Bruce Gordon; Seifert, Gary Dean; Sharpe, John Phillip; Verrill, Donald Alan; Watts, Kenneth Donald; Parks, Benjamin Travis

    2001-11-01

    Missions to the outer planets or to near-by planets requiring short times and/or increased payload carrying capability will benefit from nuclear power. A concept study was undertaken to evaluate options for a multi-megawatt power source for nuclear electric propulsion. The nominal electric power requirement was set at 15 MWe with an assumed mission profile of 120 days at full power, 60 days in hot standby, and another 120 days of full power, repeated several times for 7 years of service. Of the numerous options considered, two that appeared to have the greatest promise were a gas-cooled reactor based on the NERVA Derivative design, operating a closed cycle Brayton power conversion system; and a molten lithium-cooled reactor based on SP-100 technology, driving a boiling potassium Rankine power conversion system. This study examined the relative merits of these two systems, seeking to optimize the specific mass. Conclusions were that either concept appeared capable of approaching the specific mass goal of 3-5 kg/kWe estimated to be needed for this class of mission, though neither could be realized without substantial development in reactor fuels technology, thermal radiator mass efficiency, and power conversion and distribution electronics and systems capable of operating at high temperatures. Though the gas-Brayton systems showed an apparent advantage in specific mass, differences in the degree of conservatism inherent in the models used suggests expectations for the two approaches may be similar. Brayton systems eliminate the need to deal with two-phase flows in the microgravity environment of space.

  20. Comparison Between helium cycle and Supercritical CO{sub 2} Cycle for MMR and AMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong Jun; Lee, Jeong Ik; Ahn, Yoon Han; Lee, Je Kyoung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started the development of Mobile Multi-Purpose Reactor (MMR), which is a 10MWth gas-cooled reactor. MMR is aiming for maximizing mobility, high performance, durability and safety. This is in order to use the MMR for many purposes such as ship propulsion, train engine and so on. MMR generally uses helium Brayton cycle as a power conversion system since it can obtain very simple system arrangement with direct cycle. However, some researchers have proposed that the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle can be more efficient energy converting cycle for the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) and the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) system as well. Thus, this paper is to compare helium Brayton cycle to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in terms of the efficiency while varying turbine inlet temperature (T. I. T). A cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycle which had been proposed by Argonne National laboratory (ANL) was used as the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle configuration. This cycle is to overcome the mismatch of temperature drop between reactor coolant and CO{sub 2} through the reactor heat exchanger (RHX). Our research team reviewed the ANL research by using the in-house codes developed by the Korea Advanced institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) research team. The calculation error between the in-house code and previous result was -0.36%.

  1. Multi-megawatt power system trade study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Glen R.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Parks, Benjamin T.

    2002-01-01

    A concept study was undertaken to evaluate potential multi-megawatt power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. The nominal electric power requirement was set at 15 MWe with an assumed mission profile of 120 days at full power, 60 days in hot standby, and another 120 days of full power, repeated several times for 7 years of service. Two configurations examined were (1) a gas-cooled reactor based on the NERVA Derivative design, operating a closed cycle Brayton power conversion system; and (2) a molten metal-cooled reactor based on SP-100 technology, driving a boiling potassium Rankine power conversion system. This study considered the relative merits of these two systems, seeking to optimize the specific mass. Conclusions were that either concept appeared capable of reaching the specific mass goal of 3-5 kg/kWe estimated to be needed for this class of mission, though neither could be realized without substantial development in reactor fuels technology, thermal radiator mass and volume efficiency, and power conversion and distribution electronics and systems capable of operating at high temperatures. The gas-Brayton system showed a specific mass advantage (3.17 vs 6.43 kg/kWe for the baseline cases) under the set of assumptions used and eliminated the need to deal with two-phase working fluid flows in the microgravity environment of space. .

  2. Combined cycle power unit with a binary system based on waste geothermal brine at Mutnovsk geothermal power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.; Nikol'skii, A. I.; Semenov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    The Russian geothermal power systems developed in the last few decades outperform their counterparts around the world in many respects. However, all Russian geothermal power stations employ steam as the geothermal fluid and discard the accompanying geothermal brine. In reality, the power of the existing Russian geothermal power stations may be increased without drilling more wells, if the waste brine is employed in combined cycle systems with steam and binary turbine units. For the example of the 50 MW Mutnovsk geothermal power plant, the optimal combined cycle power unit based on the waste geothermal brine is considered. It is of great interest to determine how the thermodynamic parameters of the secondary steam in the expansion unit and the pressure in the condenser affect the performance of the equipment in the combined cycle power unit at Mutnovsk geothermal power plant. For the utilization of the waste geothermal brine at Mutnovsk geothermal power plant, the optimal air temperature in the condensers of the combined cycle power unit is +5°C. The use of secondary steam obtained by flashing of the geothermal brine at Mutnovsk geothermal power plant 1 at a pressure of 0.2 MPa permits the generation of up to 8 MW of electric power in steam turbines and additional power of 5 MW in the turbines of the binary cycle.

  3. Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-11

    A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the

  4. Detailed analysis of the effect of the turbine and compressor isentropic efficiency on the thermal and exergy efficiency of a Brayton cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živić Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy and exergy analysis of a Brayton cycle with an ideal gas is given. The irreversibility of the adiabatic processes in turbine and compressor is taken into account through their isentropic efficiencies. The net work per cycle, the thermal efficiency and the two exergy efficiencies are expressed as functions of the four dimensionless variables: the isentropic efficiencies of turbine and compressor, the pressure ratio, and the temperature ratio. It is shown that the maximal values of the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiency are achieved when the isentropic efficiencies and temperature ratio are as high as possible, while the different values of pressure ratio that maximize the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiencies exist. These pressure ratios increase with the increase of the temperature ratio and the isentropic efficiency of compressor and turbine. The increase of the turbine isentropic efficiency has a greater impact on the increase of the net work per cycle and the thermal efficiency of a Brayton cycle than the same increase of compressor isentropic efficiency. Finally, two goal functions are proposed for thermodynamic optimization of a Brayton cycle for given values of the temperature ratio and the compressor and turbine isentropic efficiencies. The first maximizes the sum of the net work per cycle and thermal efficiency while the second the net work per cycle and exergy efficiency. In both cases the optimal pressure ratio is closer to the pressure ratio that maximizes the net work per cycle.

  5. Control system options and strategies for supercritical CO2 cycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Kulesza, K. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Oregon State Univ.

    2009-06-18

    The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising alternative to Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle energy converters for use with Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs), as well as other advanced reactor concepts. The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle offers higher plant efficiencies than Rankine or recuperated gas Brayton cycles operating at the same liquid metal reactor core outlet temperatures as well as reduced costs or size of key components especially the turbomachinery. A new Plant Dynamics Computer Code has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for simulation of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous load following liquid metal-cooled fast reactor. The Plant Dynamics code has been applied to investigate the effectiveness of a control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for the STAR-LM 181 MWe (400 MWt) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor. The strategy, which involves a combination of control mechanisms, is found to be effective for controlling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle over the complete operating range from 0 to 100 % load for a representative set of transient load changes. While the system dynamic analysis of control strategy performance for STARLM is carried out for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter incorporating an axial flow turbine and compressors, investigations of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle have identified benefits from the use of centrifugal compressors which offer a wider operating range, greater stability near the critical point, and potentially further cost reductions due to fewer stages than axial flow compressors. Models have been developed at Argonne for the conceptual design and performance analysis of centrifugal compressors for use in the SCO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle. Steady state calculations demonstrate the wider operating range of centrifugal compressors versus axial compressors installed in a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle as

  6. Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2007-03-08

    STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal

  7. Battery powered portable vapor compression cycle system with PCM condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNardo, Nicholas M.

    Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, encompasses manufacturing processes that construct a geometry by depositing or solidifying material only where it is needed in the absence of a mold. The ability to manufacture complex geometries on demand directly from a digital file, as well as the decreasing equipment costs due to increased competition in the market, have resulted in the AM industry experiencing rapid growth in the past decade. Many companies have emerged with novel technologies well suited to improve products and/or save costs in various industries. Until recently, the applications of polymer additive manufacturing have been mainly limited to prototyping. This can be attributed to multiple factors, namely the high cost of the machines and materials, long print times, and anisotropy of printed parts. In addition, the low unit cost and cycle time of competing processes such as injection molding further skew the economics in favor of other processes. The addition of fiber-reinforcement into polymers used in additive manufacturing processes significantly increases the strength of parts, and also allows larger parts to be manufactured. In 2014, large-scale additive manufacturing of fiber-reinforced polymers was pioneered, and has generated significant attention from both academia and industry. Commercial machines that incorporate high throughput extruders on gantry systems are now available. New applications that require high temperature polymers with low coefficients of thermal expansion and high stiffness are being targeted, for example tooling used in the manufacturing of composite components. The state of the art of this new paradigm in additive manufacturing as well as the target applications will be discussed in detail. Many new challenges arise as AM scales and reinforced polymers are incorporated. One of the most notable challenges is the presence of large temperature gradients induced in parts during the manufacturing process, which lead to residual

  8. Performance Optimization of a Solar-driven Irreversible Intercooled Regenerated Brayton Cycle%不可逆中冷回热太阳能布雷顿循环系统的优化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许益霖; 黄跃武

    2011-01-01

    建立了由太阳能集热器模型和不可逆中冷回热布雷顿循环模型组成的恒温热源条件下太阳能布雷顿循环系统,以系统总效率为目标函数,考虑了高低温侧换热器、回热器和中冷器的热阻损失以及压缩机和涡轮机的不可逆损失,借助数值计算对太阳能集热器的工作温度进行了优化,并分析了主要特征参数对总效率的影响.结果表明:太阳能布雷顿循环系统中存在一个最佳的太阳能集热器工作温度和相应的最大总效率及最大总输出功率;在此基础上,通过优化中间压比可使循环系统的总效率和相应的总输出功率达到双重最大值;系统总效率随着回热器传热有效度和光学效率的增加而提高;系统运行时存在一个最佳的总压比.%An irreversible solar-driven heat engine system with constant-temperature heat-reservoirs has been built up, which consists of the model of a solar collector and an intercooled regenerated Brayton cycle. Taking the overall efficiency as the objective function, and considering both the heat resistance in high/low temperature-side heat exchanger, regenerative heater and intercooler, and the irreversible loss in compressor and turbine, the operating temperature of solar collector has been optimized with the help of numerical simulation, while influence of the main parameters on its overall efficiency analyzed. Results show that for the solar-driven Brayton cycle, there exists an optimum collector operating temperature, a corresponding maximum overall efficiency and a maximum total output power; on this basis, both the overall efficiency and the total output power may reach their maximum value by optimizing the intermediate pressure ratio; the overall efficiency increases with the rise of thermal and optical efficiency of regenerative heater; there exists an optimum total pressure ratio for the system.

  9. 10-75-kWe-reactor-powered organic Rankine-cycle electric power systems (ORCEPS) study. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-30

    This 10-75 kW(e) Reactor-ORCEPS study was concerned with the evaluation of several organic Rankine cycle energy conversion systems which utilized a /sup 235/U-ZrH reactor as a heat source. A liquid metal (NaK) loop employing a thermoelectric converter-powered EM pump was used to transfer the reactor energy to the organic working fluid. At moderate peak cycle temperatures (750/sup 0/F), power conversion unit cycle efficiencies of up to 25% and overall efficiencies of 20% can be obtained. The required operating life of seven years should be readily achievable. The CP-25 (toluene) working fluid cycle was found to provide the highest performance levels at the lowest system weights. Specific weights varies from 100 to 50 lb/kW(e) over the power level range 10 to 75 kW(e). (DLC)

  10. New concepts for organic Rankine cycle power systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casati, E.I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Energy provision is one of the major challenges for the Human Society, and it is increasingly clear that the current production/consumption model is not sustainable. The envisaged energy system is smarter, more decentralised and integrated. Energy conversion systems based on the organic Rankine ther

  11. Thermal energy storage for a space solar dynamic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faget, N. M.; Fraser, W. M., Jr.; Simon, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, NASA has employed solar photovoltaic devices for long-duration missions. Thus, the Skylab system has operated with a silicon photovoltaic array and a nickel-cadmium electrochemical system energy storage system. Difficulties regarding the employment of such a system for the larger power requirements of the Space Station are related to a low orbit system efficiency and the large weight of the battery. For this reason the employment of a solar dynamic power system (SDPS) has been considered. The primary components of an SDPS include a concentrating mirror, a heat receiver, a thermal energy storage (TES) system, a thermodynamic heat engine, an alternator, and a heat rejection system. The heat-engine types under consideration are a Brayton cycle engine, an organic Rankine cycle engine, and a free-piston/linear-alternator Stirling cycle engine. Attention is given to a system description, TES integration concepts, and a TES technology assessment.

  12. A modular gas-cooled cermet reactor system for planetary base power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahshan, Salim N.; Borkowski, Jeffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    Fission nuclear power is foreseen as the source for electricity in planetary colonization and exploration. A six module gas-cooled, cermet-fueled reactor is proposed that can meet the design objectives. The highly enriched core is compact and can operate at high temperature for a long life. The helium coolant powers six modular Brayton cycles that compare favorably with the SP-100-based Brayton cycle.

  13. Gasification/combined-cycle power generation: environmental assessment of alternative systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    This report provides a basis for the comparative assessment of the potential performance capability, technological development, and economic and environmental impact associated with the operation of integrated low-Btu coal-gasification/combined-cycle power systems. Characterization of the integrated power system in terms of fuel processing, power production, and auxiliary systems is followed up with comparisons of alternative integrated-plant-design/fuel combinations with reference to the conventional coal-fired power plant, taking into account both economic and environmental factors. The report includes an assessment of the effects of recent regulatory changes on the prospects for integrated power systems and establishes a timetable for the probable commercial development of such systems by the utilities.

  14. Megawatt solar power systems for lunar surface operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brian; Alhadeff, Sam; Beard, Shawn; Carlile, David; Cook, David; Douglas, Craig; Garcia, Don; Gillespie, David; Golingo, Raymond; Gonzalez, Drew

    1990-06-01

    Lunar surface operations require habitation, transportation, life support, scientific, and manufacturing systems, all of which require some form of power. As an alternative to nuclear power, the development of a modular one megawatt solar power system is studied, examining both photovoltaic and dynamic cycle conversion methods, along with energy storage, heat rejection, and power backup subsystems. For photovoltaic power conversion, two systems are examined. First, a substantial increase in photovoltaic conversion efficiency is realized with the use of new GaAs/GaSb tandem photovoltaic cells, offering an impressive overall array efficiency of 23.5 percent. Since these new cells are still in the experimental phase of development, a currently available GaAs cell providing 18 percent efficiency is examined as an alternate to the experimental cells. Both Brayton and Stirling cycles, powered by linear parabolic solar concentrators, are examined for dynamic cycle power conversion. The Brayton cycle is studied in depth since it is already well developed and can provide high power levels fairly efficiently in a compact, low mass system. The dynamic conversion system requires large scale waste heat rejection capability. To provide this heat rejection, a comparison is made between a heat pipe/radiative fin system using advanced composites, and a potentially less massive liquid droplet radiator system. To supply power through the lunar night, both a low temperature alkaline fuel cell system and an experimental high temperature monolithic solid-oxide fuel cell system are considered. The reactants for the fuel cells are stored cryogenically in order to avoid the high tankage mass required by conventional gaseous storage. In addition, it is proposed that the propellant tanks from a spent, prototype lunar excursion vehicle be used for this purpose, therefore resulting in a significant overall reduction in effective storage system mass.

  15. Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

    2007-04-25

    Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump

  16. Universal Expression of Efficiency at Maximum Power: A Quantum-Mechanical Brayton Engine Working with a Single Particle Confined in a Power-Law Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhuo-Lin; Li, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Yi-Ming; He, Ji-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2015-12-01

    We propose a quantum-mechanical Brayton engine model that works between two superposed states, employing a single particle confined in an arbitrary power-law trap as the working substance. Applying the superposition principle, we obtain the explicit expressions of the power and efficiency, and find that the efficiency at maximum power is bounded from above by the function: η+ = θ/(θ + 1), with θ being a potential-dependent exponent. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11505091, 11265010, and 11365015, and the Jiangxi Provincial Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. 20132BAB212009

  17. Experimental Study of a Low-Temperature Power Generation System in an Organic Rankine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Yongchao; Zhang, Yufeng; Deng, Na

    2015-01-01

    as the engine of the power generator. The style of the preheater was a shell and tube heat exchanger, which could provide a long path for the working fluid. A flooded heat exchanger with a high heat transfer coefficient was taken as the evaporator. R134a was used as working fluid for the Rankine cycle......This paper presents a new power generation system under the principle of organic Rankine cycle which can generate power with a low-temperature heat source. A prototype was built to investigate the proposed system. In the prototype, an air screw compressor was converted into an expander and used...... in the system. This study compared and analyzed the experimental performance of the prototype at different heat source temperatures. The results show that the preheater and flooded evaporator was used for sensible heating and latent heating of the working fluid, respectively, as expected. When the temperature...

  18. Combined cycle solar central receiver hybrid power system study. Final technical report. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-11-01

    This study develops the conceptual design for a commercial-scale (nominal 100 MWe) central receiver solar/fossil fuel hybrid power system with combined cycle energy conversion. A near-term, metallic heat pipe receiver and an advanced ceramic tube receiver hybrid system are defined through parametric and market potential analyses. Comparative evaluations of the cost of power generation, the fuel displacement potential, and the technological readiness of these two systems indicate that the near-term hybrid system has better potential for commercialization by 1990. Based on the assessment of the conceptual design, major cost and performance improvements are projected for the near-term system. Constraints preventing wide-spread use were not identified. Energy storage is not required for this system and analyses show no economic advantages with energy storage provisions. It is concluded that the solar hybrid system is a cost effective alternative to conventional gas turbines and combined cycle generating plants, and has potential for intermediate-load market penetration at 15% annual fuel escalation rate. Due to their flexibility, simple solar/nonsolar interfacing, and short startup cycles, these hybrid plants have significant operating advantages. Utility company comments suggest that hybrid power systems will precede stand-alone solar plants.

  19. A thermodynamics comparison of subcritical and transcritical organic Rankine cycle system for power generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱家玲; 薄华宇; 李太禄; 胡开永; 刘克涛

    2015-01-01

    A comparison on subcritical and transcritical organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system with a heat source of 110 °C geothermal water was presented. The net power output, thermal and exergy efficiencies and the products of the heat transfer coefficient (U) and the total heat exchange area (A) (UA values) were calculated for parametric optimization. Nine candidate working fluids were investigated and compared. Under the given conditions, transcritical systems have higher net power outputs than subcritical ones. The highest net power output of transcritical systems is 18.63 kW obtained by R218, and that of subcritical systems is 13.57 kW obtained by R600a. Moreover, with the increase of evaporating pressure, the thermal and exergy efficiencies of transcritical systems increase at first and then decrease, but the efficiencies of subcritical ones increase. As a result, the efficiencies of transcritical systems cannot always outperform those of the subcritical ones. However, the subcritical systems have lower minimum UA values and lower expansion ratios than the transcritical ones at the maximum net power output. In addition, the transcritical cycles have higher expansion ratios than the subcritical ones at their maximum net power output.

  20. Key Factors Influencing the Decision on the Number of Brayton Units for the Prometheus Space Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, John; Belanger, Sean; Burdge, Wayne; Clementoni, Eric; Jensen, Krista; Proctor, N. Beth; Zemo-Fulkerson, Annie

    2007-01-01

    The Naval Reactors (NR) Program and its DOE Laboratories, KAPL and Bettis, were assigned responsibility to develop space reactor systems for the Prometheus Program. After investigating all of the potential reactor and energy conversion options, KAPL and Bettis selected a direct gas Brayton system as the reference approach for the nuclear electric propulsion missions, including the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). In order to determine the optimal plant architecture for the direct gas system, KAPL and Bettis investigated systems with one or two active Brayton units and up to two spare units. No final decision was made on the optimal system configuration for the NEP gas-Brayton system prior to closeout of the project. The two most promising options appear to be a single system without spares and a three Brayton system with two operating units, each producing half of the required load, with a single spare unit. The studies show that a single Brayton system, without spares, offers the lowest mass system, with potential for lower operating temperature, and a minimum of system and operational complexity. The lower required mass and increased system efficiency inherent in the single Brayton system may be exploited to satisfy other design objectives such as reduced reactor and radiator operating temperatures. While Brayton system lifetimes applicable to a JIMO or other nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) mission have not been demonstrated, there is no fundamental limit on the lifetime of the Brayton hardware. Use of additional Brayton units with installed spares will allow for continued operation in the event of a failure of an individual Brayton unit. However, preliminary system reliability evaluations do not point to any substantial reliability benefit provided by carrying spare Brayton units. If a spare unit is used, operating two of the units at full power with an unpowered spare proved more efficient than operating all three units at a reduced power and temperature

  1. The universal power and efficiency characteristics for irreversible reciprocating heat engine cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Qin Xiao Yong; Sun Feng Rui; Wu Chih

    2003-01-01

    The performance of irreversible reciprocating heat engine cycles with heat transfer loss and friction-like term loss is analysed using finite-time thermodynamics. The universal relations between the power output and the compression ratio, between the thermal efficiency and the compression ratio, and the optimal relation between power output and the efficiency of the cycles are derived. Moreover, analysis and optimization of the model were carried out in order to investigate the effect of cycle processes on the performance of the cycle using numerical examples. The results obtained herein include the performance characteristics of irreversible reciprocating Diesel, Otto, Atkinson and Brayton cycles.

  2. A Score Function for Optimizing the Cycle-Life of Battery-Powered Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wognsen, Erik Ramsgaard; Haverkort, Boudewijn; Jongerden, Marijn;

    2015-01-01

    An ever increasing share of embedded systems is powered by rechargeable batteries. These batteries deteriorate with the number of charge/discharge cycles they are subjected to, the so-called cycle life. In this paper, we propose the wear score function to compare and evaluate the relative impact...... checking and reinforcement learning to synthesize near-optimal scheduling strategies subject to possible hard timing-constaints. We use this to study the trade-off between optimal short-term dynamic payload selection and the operational life of the satellite....

  3. EASETECH Energy: Life Cycle Assessment of current and future Danish power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turconi, Roberto; Damgaard, Anders; Bisinella, Valentina

    A new life cycle assessment (LCA) model software has been developed by DTU Environment, to facilitate detailed LCA of energy technologies. The model, EASETECH Energy, is dedicated to the specific technologies needed to assess energy production and energy systems and provides an unprecedented...... flexibility with respect to LCA modeling of these technologies. To illustrate the functionality of the model, preliminary results from a LCA of the Danish power system in 2010 as well as two future scenarios for 2030 are presented. In addition to providing a general overview of the environmental profile...... of a renewable based power system, specific focus is placed on the typical challenges encountered when performing an LCA of a power system. Further, the key characteristics of EASETECH Energy that can expedite the set-up of multiple scenarios and enhance transparency in the modelling are explained....

  4. Working fluids of a low-temperature geothermally-powered Rankine cycle for combined power and heat generation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A novel combined power and heat generation system was investigated in this study. This system consists of a low-temperature geothermally-powered organic Rankine cycle (ORC) subsystem, an intermediate heat exchanger and a commercial R134a-based heat pump subsystem. The advantages of the novel combined power and heat generation system are free of using additional cooling water circling system for the power generation subsystem as well as maximizing the use of thermal energy in the low-temperature geothermal source. The main purpose is to identify suitable working fluids (wet, isentropic and dry flu-ids) which may yield high PPR (the ratio of power produced by the power generation subsystem to power consumed by the heat pump subsystem) value and QQR (the ratio of heat supplied to the user to heat produced by the geothermal source) value. Parameters under investigation were evaporating temperature, PPR value and QQR value. Results indicate that there exits an optimum evaporating temperature to maximize the PPR value and minimize the QQR value at the same time for individual fluid. And dry fluids show higher PPR values but lower QQR values. NH3 and R152a outstand among wet fluids. R134a out-stands among isentropic fluids. R236ea, R245ca, R245fa, R600 and R600a outstand among dry fluids. R236ea shows the highest PPR value among the recommended fluids.

  5. Passive residual energy utilization system in thermal cycles on water-cooled power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placco, Guilherme M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F., E-mail: placco@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV/DCTA) Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Santos, Rubens S. dos, E-mail: rsantos@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN -RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work presents a concept of a residual energy utilization in nuclear plants thermal cycles. After taking notice of the causes of the Fukushima nuclear plant accident, an idea arose to adapt a passive thermal circuit as part of the ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). One of the research topics of IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), as part of the heat conversion of a space nuclear power system is a passive multi fluid turbine. One of the main characteristics of this device is its passive capability of staying inert and be brought to power at moments notice. During the first experiments and testing of this passive device, it became clear that any small amount of gas flow would generate power. Given that in the first stages of the Fukushima accident and even during the whole event there was plenty availability of steam flow that would be the proper condition to make the proposed system to work. This system starts in case of failure of the ECCS, including loss of site power, loss of diesel generators and loss of the battery power. This system does not requires electricity to run and will work with bleed steam. It will generate enough power to supply the plant safety system avoiding overheating of the reactor core produced by the decay heat. This passive system uses a modified Tesla type turbine. With the tests conducted until now, it is possible to ensure that the operation of this new turbine in a thermal cycle is very satisfactory and it performs as expected. (author)

  6. Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design.

  7. Technology for Bayton-cycle powerplants using solar and nuclear energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Brayton cycle gas turbines have the potential to use either solar heat or nuclear reactors for generating from tens of kilowatts to tens of megawatts of power in space, all this from a single technology for the power generating system. Their development for solar energy dynamic power generation for the space station could be the first step in an evolution of such powerplants for a very wide range of applications. At the low power level of only 10 kWe, a power generating system has already demonstrated overall efficiency of 0.29 and operated 38 000 hr. Tests of improved components show that these components would raise that efficiency to 0.32, a value twice that demonstrated by any alternate concept. Because of this high efficiency, solar Brayton cycle power generators offer the potential to increase power per unit of solar collector area to levels exceeding four times that from photovoltaic powerplants using present technology for silicon solar cells. The technologies for solar mirrors and heat receivers are reviewed and assessed. This Brayton technology for solar powerplants is equally suitable for use with the nuclear reactors. The available long time creep data on the tantalum alloy ASTAR-811C show that such Brayton cycles can evolve to cycle peak temperatures of 1500 K (2240 F). And this same technology can be extended to generate 10 to 100 MW in space by exploiting existing technology for terrestrial gas turbines in the fields of both aircraft propulsion and stationary power generation.

  8. Analysis of R&D Strategy for Advanced Combined Cycle Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Keigo; Hayashi, Ayami; Kosugi, Takanobu; Tomoda, Toshimasa

    This article analyzes and evaluates the R&D strategy for advanced power generation technologies, such as natural gas combined cycles, IGCCs (Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycles), and large-scale fuel cell power generation systems with a mixed-integer programming model. The R&D processes are explicitly formulated in the model through GERT (Graphical Evaluation and Review Technique), and the data on each required time of R&D was collected through questionnaire surveys among the experts. The obtained cost-effective strategy incorporates the optimum investment allocation among the developments of various elemental technologies, and at the same time, it incorporates the least-cost expansion planning of power systems in Japan including other power generation technologies such as conventional coal, oil, and gas fired, and hydro and wind power. The simulation results show the selection of the cost-effective technology developments and the importance of the concentrated investments in them. For example, IGCC, which has a relatively high thermal efficiency, and LNG-CCs of the assumed two efficiencies are the cost-effective investment targets in the no-CO2-regulation case.

  9. On the thermal efficiency of power cycles in finite time thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Farhang; Morad, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Ashkan

    2016-09-01

    The Carnot, Diesel, Otto, and Brayton power cycles are reconsidered endoreversibly in finite time thermodynamics (FTT). In particular, the thermal efficiency of these standard power cycles is compared to the well-known results in classical thermodynamics. The present analysis based on FTT modelling shows that a reduction in both the maximum and minimum temperatures of the cycle causes the thermal efficiency to increase. This is antithetical to the existing trend in the classical references. Under the assumption of endoreversibility, the relation between the efficiencies is also changed to {η }{{Carnot}}\\gt {η }{{Brayton}}\\gt {η }{{Diesel}}\\gt {η }{{Otto}}, which is again very different from the corresponding classical results. The present results benefit a better understanding of the important role of irreversibility on heat engines in classical thermodynamics.

  10. Regulation Law of Turbine and Generator in Organic Rankine Cycle Power Generation Experimental System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘利生; 王怀信; 史维秀

    2014-01-01

    In the performance experiment of organic Rankine cycle power generation experimental system, the load-resistance-regulation method is one of the most important regulation methods. However, the regulation law has not been clear enough to guide the experiment, which is unfavorable to the experimental research on organic Rankine cy-cle. In this paper the regulation law of turbine and generator by the load-resistance-regulation method is studied theo-retically and experimentally. The results show that when the thermal cycle parameters keep constant, the turbine speed increases with the increase of load resistance and there is a maximum value of transmission-generator efficiency with the variation of the turbine speed; when the turbine speed and generator speed keep constant, the transmission-generator efficiency decreases and gradually tends to zero with the increase of load resistance.

  11. Design of organic Rankine cycle power systems accounting for expander performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Seta, Angelo; Andreasen, Jesper Graa; Pierobon, Leonardo;

    2015-01-01

    Organic Rankine cycle power systems have recently emerged as promising solutions for waste heat recovery in low- and medium-size power plants. Their performance and economic feasibility strongly depend on the expander. Its design process and efficiency estimation are particularly challenging due......-loaded stages in supersonic flow regimes. This paper proposes a design method where the conventional cycle analysis is combined with calculations of the maximum expander performance using a validated mean-line design tool. The high computational cost of the turbine optimization is tackled building a model which...... efficiency of an offshore platform. The analysis of the results obtained using a constant turbine efficiency and the method proposed in this paper indicates a maximum reduction of the expander performance of 10% points for pressure ratios between 10 and 35. This work also demonstrates that this approach can...

  12. Design and optimization of a single stage centrifugal compressor for a solar dish-Brayton system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongsheng; Wang, Kai; Tong, Zhiting; Lin, Feng; Nie, Chaoqun; Engeda, Abraham

    2013-10-01

    According to the requirements of a solar dish-Brayton system, a centrifugal compressor stage with a minimum total pressure ratio of 5, an adiabatic efficiency above 75% and a surge margin more than 12% needs to be designed. A single stage, which consists of impeller, radial vaned diffuser, 90° crossover and two rows of axial stators, was chosen to satisfy this system. To achieve the stage performance, an impeller with a 6:1 total pressure ratio and an adiabatic efficiency of 90% was designed and its preliminary geometry came from an in-house one-dimensional program. Radial vaned diffuser was applied downstream of the impeller. Two rows of axial stators after 90° crossover were added to guide the flow into axial direction. Since jet-wake flow, shockwave and boundary layer separation coexisted in the impeller-diffuser region, optimization on the radius ratio of radial diffuser vane inlet to impeller exit, diffuser vane inlet blade angle and number of diffuser vanes was carried out at design point. Finally, an optimized centrifugal compressor stage fulfilled the high expectations and presented proper performance. Numerical simulation showed that at design point the stage adiabatic efficiency was 79.93% and the total pressure ratio was 5.6. The surge margin was 15%. The performance map including 80%, 90% and 100% design speed was also presented.

  13. Reverse Brayton Cycle with Bladeless Turbo Compressor for Automotive Environmental Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda-Rizo, Juan (Inventor); Ganapathi, Gani B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An automotive cabin cooling system uses a bladeless turbocompressor driven by automobile engine exhaust to compress incoming ambient air. The compressed air is directed to an intercooler where it is cooled and then to another bladeless turbine used as an expander where the air cools as it expands and is directed to the cabin interior. Excess energy may be captured by an alternator couple to the expander turbine. The system employs no chemical refrigerant and may be further modified to include another intercooler on the output of the expander turbine to isolate the cooled cabin environment.

  14. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A program is proposed for the ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a radioisotope nuclear heated dynamic power system for use on space missions beginning in the 1980's. This type of electrical power system is based upon and combines two aerospace technologies currently under intense development; namely, the MHW isotope heat source and the closed Brayton cycle gas turbine. This power system represents the next generation of reliable, efficient economic electrical power equipment for space, and will be capable of providing 0.5 to 2.0 kW of electric power to a wide variety of spacecraft for earth orbital and interplanetary missions. The immediate design will be based upon the requirements for the Air Force SURVSATCOM mission. The proposal is presented in three volumes plus an Executive Summary. This volume describes the tasks in the technical program.

  15. Waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines by exhaust-driven Brayton cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of Bryton Bottoming Systems (BBS) as waste heat recovery devices for future adiabatic diesel engines in heavy duty trucks is presented. Parametric studies were performed to evaluate the influence of external and internal design parameters on BBS performance. Conceptual design and trade-off studies were undertaken to estimate the optimum configuration, size, and cost of major hardware components. The potential annual fuel savings of long-haul trucks equipped with BBS were estimated. The addition of a BBS to a turbocharged, nonaftercooled adiabatic engine would improve fuel economy by as much as 12%. In comparison with an aftercooled, turbocompound engine, the BBS-equipped turbocharged engine would offer a 4.4% fuel economy advantage. If installed in tandem with an aftercooled turbocompound engine, the BBS could effect a 7.2% fuel economy improvement. The cost of a mass-produced 38 Bhp BBS is estimated at about $6460 or 170/Bhp. Technical and economic barriers that hinder the commercial introduction of bottoming systems were identified. Related studies in the area of waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines and NASA-CR-168255 (Steam Rankine) and CR-168256 (Organic Rankine).

  16. Thermodynamic design of 10 kW Brayton cryocooler for HTS cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, C. W.; Yang, H. S.; Sohn, Song Ho; Lim, Ji Hyun; Oh, S. R.; Hwang, Si Dole

    2012-06-01

    Thermodynamic design of Brayton cryocooler is presented as part of an ongoing governmental project in Korea, aiming at 1 km HTS power cable in the transmission grid. The refrigeration requirement is 10 kW for continuously sub-cooling liquid nitrogen from 72 K to 65 K. An ideal Brayton cycle for this application is first investigated to examine the fundamental features. Then a practical cycle for a Brayton cryocooler is designed, taking into account the performance of compressor, expander, and heat exchangers. Commercial software (Aspen HYSYS) is used for simulating the refrigeration cycle with real fluid properties of refrigerant. Helium is selected as a refrigerant, as it is superior to neon in thermodynamic efficiency. The operating pressure and flow rate of refrigerant are decided with a constraint to avoid the freezing of liquid nitrogen

  17. Exergetic Analysis of a Novel Solar Cooling System for Combined Cycle Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Calise

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a detailed exergetic analysis of a novel high-temperature Solar Assisted Combined Cycle (SACC power plant. The system includes a solar field consisting of innovative high-temperature flat plate evacuated solar thermal collectors, a double stage LiBr-H2O absorption chiller, pumps, heat exchangers, storage tanks, mixers, diverters, controllers and a simple single-pressure Combined Cycle (CC power plant. Here, a high temperature solar cooling system is coupled with a conventional combined cycle, in order to pre-cool gas turbine inlet air in order to enhance system efficiency and electrical capacity. In this paper, the system is analyzed from an exergetic point of view, on the basis of an energy-economic model presented in a recent work, where the obtained main results show that SACC exhibits a higher electrical production and efficiency with respect to the conventional CC. The system performance is evaluated by a dynamic simulation, where detailed simulation models are implemented for all the components included in the system. In addition, for all the components and for the system as whole, energy and exergy balances are implemented in order to calculate the magnitude of the irreversibilities within the system. In fact, exergy analysis is used in order to assess: exergy destructions and exergetic efficiencies. Such parameters are used in order to evaluate the magnitude of the irreversibilities in the system and to identify the sources of such irreversibilities. Exergetic efficiencies and exergy destructions are dynamically calculated for the 1-year operation of the system. Similarly, exergetic results are also integrated on weekly and yearly bases in order to evaluate the corresponding irreversibilities. The results showed that the components of the Joule cycle (combustor, turbine and compressor are the major sources of irreversibilities. System overall exergetic efficiency was around 48%. Average weekly solar collector

  18. Network Theory Integrated Life Cycle Assessment for an Electric Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heetae Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we allocate Greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of electricity transmission to the consumers. As an allocation basis, we introduce energy distance. Energy distance takes the transmission load on the electricity energy system into account in addition to the amount of electricity consumption. As a case study, we estimate regional GHG emissions of electricity transmission loss in Chile. Life cycle assessment (LCA is used to estimate the total GHG emissions of the Chilean electric power system. The regional GHG emission of transmission loss is calculated from the total GHG emissions. We construct the network model of Chilean electric power grid as an undirected network with 466 nodes and 543 edges holding the topology of the power grid based on the statistical record. We analyze the total annual GHG emissions of the Chilean electricity energy system as 23.07 Mt CO2-eq. and 1.61 Mt CO2-eq. for the transmission loss, respectively. The total energy distance for the electricity transmission accounts for 12,842.10 TWh km based on network analysis. We argue that when the GHG emission of electricity transmission loss is estimated, the electricity transmission load should be separately considered. We propose network theory as a useful complement to LCA analysis for the complex allocation. Energy distance is especially useful on a very large-scale electric power grid such as an intercontinental transmission network.

  19. Comparison of advanced thermal and electrical storage for parabolic dish solar thermal power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T.; Birur, G. C.; Schredder, J. M.; Bowyer, J. M.; Awaya, H. I.

    1982-01-01

    Parabolic dish solar concentrator cluster concepts are explored, with attention given to thermal storage systems coupled to Stirling and Brayton cycle power conversion devices. Sensible heat storage involving molten salt (NaOH), liquid sodium, and solid cordierite bricks are considered for 1500 F thermal storage systems. Latent heat storage with NaF-MgF2 phase change materials are explored in terms of passive, active, and direct contact designs. Comparisons are made of the effectiveness of thermal storage relative to redox, Na-S, Zn-Cl, and Zn-Br battery storage systems. Molten lead trickling down through a phase change eutectic, the NaF-MgF2, formed the direct contact system. Heat transport in all systems is effected through Inconel pipes. Using a cost goal of 120-150 mills/kWh as the controlling parameter, sensible heat systems with molten salts transport with either Stirling or Brayton engines, or latent heat systems with Stirling engines, and latent heat-Brayton engine with direct contact were favored in the analyses. Battery storage systems, however, offered the most flexibility of applications.

  20. Manned mars mission enhancements using Pratt & Whitney escort combined propulsion and power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Russell; Feller, Gerald J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the cost implications to manned Mars missions when a nuclear thermal combined propulsion and power unit is used for main propulsion and mission power. The paper uses a series of mission opportunities during the NASA DRM focus period and looks at how a NTR (Nuclear Thermal Rocket) can be used to increase the Mars mission payload delivery capability and mission flexibility across the entire mission spectrum. In propulsive mode, a nuclear reactor is used to heat hot hydrogen, which is expanded through a converging/diverging nozzle to generate thrust. Heat pickup in the nozzle and the radial beryllium reflectors is used to drive the turbomachinery in the ESCORT expander cycle. In electrical mode, the reactor is used to heat a mixture of helium and xenon to drive a closed-loop Brayton cycle in order to generate electrical energy. A Mars transportation system integrated performance methodology was developed to assess the sensitivity to weight, thrust and impulse to the Mars conjunction class mission requirements. Propellant tanks, propulsion system mass, shielding, and Brayton cycle power conversion unit requirements were included in this evaluation. This paper examines how the design characteristics of the ESCORT derivative propulsion and power system affect the mission payload capability and the earth launch vehicle design requirements. The same reactor design is also used for Mars surface power reactor, delivered as payload by the ESCORT derivative powered Mars transfer stage. Trade curves of mission mass and payload are presented.

  1. Alternative analysis to increase the power in combined-cycle power plants; Analisis de alternativas para el incremento de potencia en plantas termoelectricas de Ciclo Combinado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco Cruz, Hector; Arriola Medellin, Alejandro M. [Gerencia de Procesos Termicos, Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: hpacheco@iie.org.mx; aarriola@iie.org.mx

    2010-11-15

    The electricity industry traditionally had two thermodynamic cycles for power generation: conventional steam turbine (Rankine cycle) used to supply a base load during the day, and gas turbines (Brayton cycle), for its speed response, normally used to cover peak loads. However, to provide variable peak loads, the gas turbine, as a volumetric machine is affected by the change in air density by changing the combustion temperature. This paper shows the scheme of integration of both systems, that it's known as combined cycle and the different options that would have these power plants, to maintain or increase their power in variable ambient conditions. It analyzes different options, such as: 1. Supplementary fire in the stove. 2. Air cooling intake in the gas turbine (evaporation system or mechanical system). 3. Steam injection in the combustion chamber. [Spanish] La industria electrica tradicionalmente a contado con dos ciclos termodinamicos para generacion electrica: las turbinas convencionales de vapor (ciclo de Rankine) se utilizan para suministrar una carga base durante el dia, y las turbinas de gas (ciclo de Brayton), por su rapidez de respuesta, se utilizan normalmente para cubrir las cargas pico. Sin embargo, para suministrar las cargas variables pico, la turbina a gas, por ser una maquina volumetrica, se ve afectada por el cambio de la densidad del aire de combustion al cambiar la temperatura ambiente. En este trabajo se muestra el esquema de integracion de ambos sistemas, en lo que se conoce como ciclo combinado y las diferentes opciones que tendrian estas plantas de generacion electrica para mantener o incrementar su potencia en condiciones ambiente variable. Para ello se analizan diferentes opciones, tales como: 1.- Combustion suplementaria en el recuperador de calor. 2.- Enfriamiento del aire de admision a la turbina de gas (mediante un sistema de evaporacion o mediante un sistema mecanico). 3.- Inyeccion de vapor a la camara de combustion. Palabras

  2. Comparative evaluation of biomass power generation systems in China using hybrid life cycle inventory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huacai; Yin, Xiuli; Wu, Chuangzhi

    2014-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth in using agricultural residues as an energy source to generate electricity in China. Biomass power generation (BPG) systems may vary significantly in technology, scale, and feedstock and consequently in their performances. A comparative evaluation of five typical BPG systems has been conducted in this study through a hybrid life cycle inventory (LCI) approach. Results show that requirements of fossil energy savings, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions, as well as emission reductions of SO2 and NOx, can be best met by the BPG systems. The cofiring systems were found to behave better than the biomass-only fired system and the biomass gasification systems in terms of energy savings and GHG emission reductions. Comparing with results of conventional process-base LCI, an important aspect to note is the significant contribution of infrastructure, equipment, and maintenance of the plant, which require the input of various types of materials, fuels, services, and the consequent GHG emissions. The results demonstrate characteristics and differences of BPG systems and help identify critical opportunities for biomass power development in China.

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Biomass Power Generation Systems in China Using Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huacai Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a rapid growth in using agricultural residues as an energy source to generate electricity in China. Biomass power generation (BPG systems may vary significantly in technology, scale, and feedstock and consequently in their performances. A comparative evaluation of five typical BPG systems has been conducted in this study through a hybrid life cycle inventory (LCI approach. Results show that requirements of fossil energy savings, and greenhouse gas (GHG emission reductions, as well as emission reductions of SO2 and NOx, can be best met by the BPG systems. The cofiring systems were found to behave better than the biomass-only fired system and the biomass gasification systems in terms of energy savings and GHG emission reductions. Comparing with results of conventional process-base LCI, an important aspect to note is the significant contribution of infrastructure, equipment, and maintenance of the plant, which require the input of various types of materials, fuels, services, and the consequent GHG emissions. The results demonstrate characteristics and differences of BPG systems and help identify critical opportunities for biomass power development in China.

  4. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fic Adam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle, which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle. The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  5. Stand-alone flat-plate photovoltaic power systems: System sizing and life-cycle costing methodology for Federal agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, C. S.; Volkmer, K.; Cochrane, E. H.; Lawson, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    A simple methodology to estimate photovoltaic system size and life-cycle costs in stand-alone applications is presented. It is designed to assist engineers at Government agencies in determining the feasibility of using small stand-alone photovoltaic systems to supply ac or dc power to the load. Photovoltaic system design considerations are presented as well as the equations for sizing the flat-plate array and the battery storage to meet the required load. Cost effectiveness of a candidate photovoltaic system is based on comparison with the life-cycle cost of alternative systems. Examples of alternative systems addressed are batteries, diesel generators, the utility grid, and other renewable energy systems.

  6. Multi-Megawatt Power System Trade Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, Glen Reed; Schnitzler, Bruce Gordon; Parks, Benjamin Travis

    2001-11-01

    As part of a larger task, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was tasked to perform a trade study comparing liquid-metal cooled reactors having Rankine power conversion systems with gas-cooled reactors having Brayton power conversion systems. This report summarizes the approach, the methodology, and the results of that trade study. Findings suggest that either approach has the possibility to approach the target specific mass of 3-5 kg/kWe for the power system, though it appears either will require improvements to achieve that. Higher reactor temperatures have the most potential for reducing the specific mass of gas-cooled reactors but do not necessarily have a similar effect for liquid-cooled Rankine systems. Fuels development will be the key to higher reactor operating temperatures. Higher temperature turbines will be important for Brayton systems. Both replacing lithium coolant in the primary circuit with gallium and replacing potassium with sodium in the power loop for liquid systems increase system specific mass. Changing the feed pump turbine to an electric motor in Rankine systems has little effect. Key technologies in reducing specific mass are high reactor and radiator operating temperatures, low radiator areal density, and low turbine/generator system masses. Turbine/generator mass tends to dominate overall power system mass for Rankine systems. Radiator mass was dominant for Brayton systems.

  7. HTR-Based Power Plants’ Performance Analysis Applied on Conventional Combined Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carbia Carril

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In high temperature reactors including gas cooled fast reactors and gas turbine modular helium reactors (GT-MHR specifically designed to operate as power plant heat sources, efficiency enhancement at effective cost under safe conditions can be achieved. Mentioned improvements concern the implementation of two cycle structures: (a, a stand alone Brayton operating with helium and a stand alone Rankine cycle (RC with regeneration, operating with carbon dioxide at ultrasupercritical pressure as working fluid (WF, where condensation is carried out at quasicritical conditions, and (b, a combined cycle (CC, in which the topping closed Brayton cycle (CBC operates with helium as WF, while the bottoming RC is operated with one of the following WFs: carbon dioxide, xenon, ethane, ammonia, or water. In both cases, an intermediate heat exchanger (IHE is proposed to provide thermal energy to the closed Brayton or to the Rankine cycles. The results of the case study show that the thermal efficiency, through the use of a CC, is slightly improved (from 45.79% for BC and from 50.17% for RC to 53.63 for the proposed CC with He-H2O operating under safety standards.

  8. Analysis of the solar powered/fuel assisted Rankine cycle cooling system. Phase 1: Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lior, N.; Koai, K.; Yeh, H.

    1985-04-01

    The subject of this analysis is a solar cooling system which consists of a conventional open-compressor chiller, driven by a novel hybrid steam Rankine cycle. Steam is generated by the use of solar energy collected at about 100C, and it is then superheated to about 600C in a fossil-fuel fired superheater. The steam drives a novel counter-rotating turbine, some of the heat from it is regenerated, and it is then condensed. Thermal storage is implemented as an integral part of the cycle, by means of hot-water which is flashed to steam when needed for driving the turbine. For the solar energy input, both evacuated and double-glazed flat-plate collectors were considered. A comprehensive computer program was developed to analyze the operation and performance of the entire power/cooling system. Each component was described by a separate subroutine to compute its performance from basic principles, and special attention was given to the parasitic losses, including pumps, fans and pressure drops in the piping and heat exchangers, and to describe the off-design performance of the components. The thermophysical properties of the fluids used are also described in separate subroutines. Transient simulation of the entire system was performed on an hourly basis over a cooling season in two representative climatic regions (Washington, DC, and Phoenix, AZ) for a number of system configurations.

  9. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

    1979-09-01

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected.

  10. Stand-alone flat-plate photovoltaic power systems: system sizing and life-cycle costing methodology for federal agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borden, C.S.; Volkmer, K.; Cochrane, E.H.; Lawson, A.C.

    1984-05-01

    A simple methodology to estimate photovoltaic system size and life-cycle costs in stand-along applications is presented in this document. It is designed to assist engineers at government agencies in determining the feasibility of using small stand-alone photovoltaic systems to supply ac or dc power to the load. Photovoltaic system design considerations are presented as well as the equations for sizing the flat-plate array and the battery storage to meet the required load. Cost effectiveness of a candidate photovoltaic system is based on comparison with the life-cycle cost of alternative systems. Examples of alternative systems addressed herein are batteries, diesel generators, the utility grid, and other renewable energy systems. A companion document, Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Power Systems Handbook for Federal Agencies (Reference 10), is recommended for discussion of issues for evaluating the viability of potential photovoltaic applications; descriptions of present photovoltaic system applications; synthesis of lessons learned from photovoltaic system design, installation, and operation; and identification of procurement strategies for federal agencies.

  11. Super- and Transcritical Fluid Expansions for Next-Generation Energy Conversion Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harinck, J.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation of thermodynamic power cycles offers great potential as the conceptual basis for sustainable energy converters. Examples are the supercritical and superheated Organic Rankine cycle, the transcritical condensation cycle, the supercritical Brayton cycle, the Organic Stirling cycle

  12. Method and systems for power control of internal combustion engines using individual cycle cut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorenko, Y.; Korzhov, M.; Filippov, A.; Atamanenko, N.

    1996-09-01

    A new method of controlling power has been developed for improving efficiency and emissions performance of internal combustion engines at partial load. The method involves cutting-off some of the work cycles, as the load decreases, to obtain required power. Theoretical and experimental material is presented to illustrate the underlying principle, the implementation means and the results for the 4- and 8-cylinder piston engine and a twin rotor Wankel engine applications.

  13. Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

    1980-11-01

    Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

  14. Performance analysis of a combined cycle gas turbine power plant by using various inlet air cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahim, Murad A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Gazi University (Turkey)], e-mail: mrahim@gazi.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, the use of gas turbines in combined cycle power plants has increased. Turbine inlet air cooling appears to be the best solution for maximizing both production and efficiency, particularly in a hot climate. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of different air cooling systems on the gas turbine's performance and carbon dioxide emissions. Computer simulations were carried out, using the THERMOFLEX program, on fogging, evaporative cooling, adsorption cooling, and electrical chiller cooling systems as well as on a base case without cooling system. Results showed that inlet air cooling systems are effective in increasing the efficiency of gas turbine power plants. In addition it was found that absorption chillers are the best system for increasing power generation but that economic and source analyses should be conducted before installing a cooling system. This paper demonstrated that inlet air cooling systems have the ability to increase net power generation of gas turbine power plants.

  15. 78 FR 47012 - Developing Software Life Cycle Processes Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ..., ``IEEE Standard for Developing a Software Project Life Cycle Process,'' issued 2006, with the... guidance in IEEE Std. 1074- 2006, ``IEEE Standard for Developing a Software Project Life Cycle Process... to systems and related quality assurance processes, and the requirements also extend to the...

  16. Applied studies in advanced boiler technology for Rankine cycle power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, F.W.; Negreanu, M.J.

    1978-02-01

    A study is presented on a new rotational boiler design which has improved passive dynamic response and two-phase flow stability characteristics. A survey of small boiler manufacturers in the United States indicated that currently available designs are based on steady-state operating requirements rather than for dynamic performance. Recent work by EPA and ERDA which addressed boiler designs for mobile automotive Rankine cycle power systems showed that boilers of a monotube or multipass tube configuration design could be developed which were physically compact, but still were subject to the two-phase flow instability problem when coupled within an operating power system. The objectives of this work were to evaluate alternative boiler configurations which would improve boiler dynamic response and also have good two-phase liquid-vapor interface flow stability. The major physical design limitation of any boiler is the small external hot gas heat transfer coefficient. Such a low coefficient requires considerable design enhancements to increase the rate of energy transfer to the circulation system fluid. The rotational boiler is a physical design configuration which addresses this problem. The results of an analytic study using several mathematical model formulations showed that a rotational boiler could have a passive response time constant which was approximately one-half the magnitude for an equivalent single pass monotube boiler. An experimental prototype rotational boiler was designed, manufactured and tested, with the experimental results confirming that the experimental passive response time constants were comparable to the estimates from the analytic models. The experimental boiler operating in two-phase flow was found to be stable and responsive to external inputs. A rotational boiler configuration is a good alternative design configuration for small compact vapor generator designs based on fast transient passive response and two-phase flow stability.

  17. Optical cycle power meter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A bicycle power meter for measuring power generated when riding a bicycle, the power meter comprising a position-sensitive radiation detector (409) attachable to a component of a crank set (404) of bicycle, and a radiation source (408) attachable to the component of the crank set and configured t...

  18. Emissions from cycling of thermal power plants in electricity systems with high penetration of wind power: Life cycle assessment for Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turconi, Roberto; O'Dwyer, C.; Flynn, D.

    2014-01-01

    The increase of renewable sources in the power sector is an important step towards more sustainable electricity production. However, introducing high shares of variable renewables, such as wind and solar, cause dispatchable power plants to vary their output to fulfill the remaining electrical...... significantly affect the average power plant efficiency, with all units seeing an average yearly efficiency noticeably less than optimal. In particular, load following units, on average, saw an 11% reduction. Given that production technologies are typically modeled assuming steady-state operation at full load......, as part of LCA of electricity generation, the efficiency reduction would result in large underestimation of emissions, e.g. up to 65% for an oil power plant. Overall, cycling emissions accounted for less than 7% of lifecycle CO2, NOx and SO2 emissions in the five scenarios considered: while...

  19. A Burst Mode, Ultrahigh Temperature UF4 Vapor Core Reactor Rankine Cycle Space Power System Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, E. T.; Kahook, S. D.; Diaz, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    Static and dynamic neutronic analyses have been performed on an innovative burst mode (100's of MW output for a few thousand seconds) Ulvahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor (UTVR) space nuclear power system. The NVTR employs multiple, neutronically-coupled fissioning cores and operates on a direct, closed Rankine cycle using a disk Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generater for energy conversion. The UTVR includes two types of fissioning core regions: (1) the central Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core (UTVC) which contains a vapor mixture of highly enriched UF4 fuel and a metal fluoride working fluid and (2) the UF4 boiler column cores located in the BeO moderator/reflector region. The gaseous nature of the fuel the fact that the fuel is circulating, the multiple coupled fissioning cores, and the use of a two phase fissioning fuel lead to unique static and dynamic neutronic characteristics. Static neutronic analysis was conducted using two-dimensional S sub n, transport theory calculations and three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport theory calculations. Circulating-fuel, coupled-core point reactor kinetics equations were used for analyzing the dynamic behavior of the UTVR. In addition to including reactivity feedback phenomena associated with the individual fissioning cores, the effects of core-to-core neutronic and mass flow coupling between the UTVC and the surrounding boiler cores were also included in the dynamic model The dynamic analysis of the UTVR reveals the existence of some very effectlve inherent reactivity feedback effects that are capable of quickly stabilizing this system, within a few seconds, even when large positive reactivity insertions are imposed. If the UTVC vapor fuel density feedback is suppressed, the UTVR is still inherently stable because of the boiler core liquid-fuel volume feedback; in contrast, suppression of the vapor fuel density feedback in 'conventional" gas core cavity reactors causes them to become inherently unstable. Due to the

  20. A stochastic process model for life cycle cost analysis of nuclear power plant systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Weide, J.A.M.; Pandey, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a general stochastic model to analyze the life cycle cost of an engineering system that is affected by minor but repairable failures interrupting the operation and a major failure that would require the replacement or renewal of the failed system. It is commonly observed that the

  1. Life cycle assessment of primary control provision by battery storage systems and fossil power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Koj, Jan Christian; Stenzel, Peter; Schreiber, Andrea; Hennings, Wilfried; Zapp, Petra; Wrede, Gunnar; Hahndorf, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Increasing renewable energy generation influences the reliability of electric power grids. Thus, there is a demand for new technical units providing ancillary grid services. Intermittent renewable energy sources can be balanced by energy storage devices, especially battery storage systems. By battery systems grid efficiency and reliability as well as power quality can be increased. A further characteristic of battery systems is the ability to respond rapidly and precisely to frequency deviati...

  2. 53 W average power few-cycle fiber laser system generating soft x rays up to the water window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Klenke, Arno; Demmler, Stefan; Hoffmann, Armin; Gotschall, Thomas; Eidam, Tino; Krebs, Manuel; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    We report on a few-cycle laser system delivering sub-8-fs pulses with 353 μJ pulse energy and 25 GW of peak power at up to 150 kHz repetition rate. The corresponding average output power is as high as 53 W, which represents the highest average power obtained from any few-cycle laser architecture so far. The combination of both high average and high peak power provides unique opportunities for applications. We demonstrate high harmonic generation up to the water window and record-high photon flux in the soft x-ray spectral region. This tabletop source of high-photon flux soft x rays will, for example, enable coherent diffractive imaging with sub-10-nm resolution in the near future.

  3. Consideration of sub-cooled LN2 circulation system for HTS power machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shigeru; Hirai, Hirokazu; Nara, N.; Nagasaka, T.; Hirokawa, M.; Okamoto, H.; Hayashi, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We consider a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (LN) circulation system for HTS power equipment. The planned circulation system consists of a sub-cool heat exchanger (subcooler) and a circulation pump. The sub-cooler will be connected to a neon turbo- Brayton cycle refrigerator with a cooling power of 2 kW at 65 K. Sub-cooled LN will be delivered into the sub-cooler by the pump and cooled within it. Sub-cooled LN is adequate fluid for cooling HTS power equipment, because its dielectric strength is high and it supports a large critical current. However, a possibility of LN solidification in the sub-cooler is a considerable issue. The refrigerator will produce cold neon gas of about 60 K, which is lower than the nitrogen freezing temperature of 63 K. Therefore, we designed two-stage heat exchangers which are based on a plate-fin type and a tube-intube type. Process simulations of those heat exchangers indicate that sub-cooled LN is not frozen in either sub-cooler. The plate-fin type sub-cooler is consequently adopted for its reliability and compactness. Furthermore, we found that a cooling system with a Brayton refrigerator has the same total cooling efficiency as a cooling system with a Stirling refrigerator.

  4. Evaluation of technical feasibility of closed-cycle non-equilibrium MHD power generation with direct coal firing. Final report, Task 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-01

    Program accomplishments in a continuing effort to demonstrate the feasibility of direct coal fired, closed cycle, magnetohydrodynamic power generation are detailed. These accomplishments relate to all system aspects of a CCMHD power generation system including coal combustion, heat transfer to the MHD working fluid, MHD power generation, heat and cesium seed recovery and overall systems analysis. Direct coal firing of the combined cycle has been under laboratory development in the form of a high slag rejection, regeneratively air cooled cyclone coal combustor concept, originated within this program. A hot bottom ceramic regenerative heat exchanger system was assembled and test fired with coal for the purposes of evaluating the catalytic effect of alumina on NO/sub x/ emission reduction and operability of the refractory dome support system. Design, procurement, fabrication and partial installation of a heat and seed recovery flow apparatus was accomplished and was based on a stream tube model of the full scale system using full scale temperatures, tube sizes, rates of temperature change and tube geometry. Systems analysis capability was substantially upgraded by the incorporation of a revised systems code, with emphasis on ease of operator interaction as well as separability of component subroutines. The updated code was used in the development of a new plant configuration, the Feedwater Cooled (FCB) Brayton Cycle, which is superior to the CCMHD/Steam cycle both in performance and cost. (WHK)

  5. Combined Turbine and Cycle Optimization for Organic Rankine Cycle Power Systems—Part B: Application on a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo La Seta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic Rankine cycle (ORC power systems have recently emerged as promising solutions for waste heat recovery in low- and medium-size power plants. Their performance and economic feasibility strongly depend on the expander. The design process and efficiency estimation are particularly challenging due to the peculiar physical properties of the working fluid and the gas-dynamic phenomena occurring in the machine. Unlike steam Rankine and Brayton engines, organic Rankine cycle expanders combine small enthalpy drops with large expansion ratios. These features yield turbine designs with few highly-loaded stages in supersonic flow regimes. Part A of this two-part paper has presented the implementation and validation of the simulation tool TURAX, which provides the optimal preliminary design of single-stage axial-flow turbines. The authors have also presented a sensitivity analysis on the decision variables affecting the turbine design. Part B of this two-part paper presents the first application of a design method where the thermodynamic cycle optimization is combined with calculations of the maximum expander performance using the mean-line design tool described in part A. The high computational cost of the turbine optimization is tackled by building a model which gives the optimal preliminary design of an axial-flow turbine as a function of the cycle conditions. This allows for estimating the optimal expander performance for each operating condition of interest. The test case is the preliminary design of an organic Rankine cycle turbogenerator to increase the overall energy efficiency of an offshore platform. For an increase in expander pressure ratio from 10 to 35, the results indicate up to 10% point reduction in expander performance. This corresponds to a relative reduction in net power output of 8.3% compared to the case when the turbine efficiency is assumed to be 80%. This work also demonstrates that this approach can support the plant designer

  6. The Influence of the Heat Source Temperature on the Multivane Expander Output Power in an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kolasiński

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC power systems are nowadays an option for local and domestic cogeneration of heat and electric power. Very interesting are micropower systems for heat recovery from low potential (40–90 °C waste and renewable heat sources. Designing an ORC system dedicated to heat recovery from such a source is very difficult. Most important problems are connected with the selection of a suitable expander. Volumetric machines, such as scroll and screw expanders, are adopted as turbine alternative in small-power ORC systems. However, these machines are complicated and expensive. Vane expanders on the other hand are simple and cheap. This paper presents a theoretical and experimental analysis of the operation of a micro-ORC rotary vane expander under variable heat source temperature conditions. The main objective of this research was therefore a comprehensive analysis of relation between the vane expander output power and the heat source temperature. A series of experiments was performed using the micropower ORC test-stand. Results of these experiments are presented here, together with a mathematical description of multivane expanders. The analysis presented in this paper indicates that the output power of multivane expanders depend on the heat source temperature, and that multivane expanders are cheap alternatives to other expanders proposed for micropower ORC systems.

  7. Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-04-09

    Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

  8. Passive load follow analysis of the STAR-LM and STAR-H2 systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseytsev, Anton

    A steady-state model for the calculation of temperature and pressure distributions, and heat and work balance for the STAR-LM and the STAR-H2 systems was developed. The STAR-LM system is designed for electricity production and consists of the lead cooled reactor on natural circulation and the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle. The STAR-H2 system uses the same reactor which is coupled to the hydrogen production plant, the Brayton cycle, and the water desalination plant. The Brayton cycle produces electricity for the on-site needs. Realistic modules for each system component were developed. The model also performs design calculations for the turbine and compressors for the CO2 Brayton cycle. The model was used to optimize the performance of the entire system as well as every system component. The size of each component was calculated. For the 400 MWt reactor power the STAR-LM produces 174.4 MWe (44% efficiency) and the STAR-H2 system produces 7450 kg H2/hr. The steady state model was used to conduct quasi-static passive load follow analysis. The control strategy was developed for each system; no control action on the reactor is required. As a main safety criterion, the peak cladding temperature is used. It was demonstrated that this temperature remains below the safety limit during both normal operation and load follow.

  9. Nuclear-Powered GPS Spacecraft Design Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, Bernard

    1977-05-01

    This is the final report of a study to investigate the potential benefits of a nuclear (radioisotope) - powered satellite for advanced phases of the Global Positioning System (GPS) program. The critical parameters were: power to user; mean mission duration; orbital predictability; thermal control of on-board frequency standards; and vulnerability. The reference design approach is described, and input data are given for two power systems that are under development: an organic Rankine system and a Brayton cycle system. Reference design details are provided and structural design and analysis are discussed, as well as thermal design and analysis. A higher altitude version is also considered.

  10. A high-efficiency power cycle in which hydrogen is compressed by absorption in metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J R; Salzano, F J; Yu, W S; Milau, J S

    1976-07-23

    A high-efficiency power cycle is proposed in which molecular hydrogen gas is used as a working fluid in a regenerative closed Brayton cycle. The hydrogen gas is compressed by an absorption-desorption cycle on metal hydride (FeTiH(x)) beds. Low-temperature solar or geothermal heat (temperature about 100 degrees C) is used for the compression process, and high-temperature fossil fuel or nuclear heat (temperature about 700 degrees C) supplies the expansion work in the turbine. Typically, about 90 percent of the high-temperature heat input is converted to electricity, while about 3 kilowatts of low-temperature heat is required per kilowatt of electrical output.

  11. NASA solar dynamic ground test demonstration (GTD) program and its application to space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, William B.; Shaltens, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems are readily adaptable to any heat source contemplated for space application. The inert gas working fluid can be used directly in gas-cooled reactors and coupled to a variety of heat sources (reactor, isotope or solar) by a heat exchanger. This point is demonstrated by the incorporation in the NASA 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Space Power Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) Program of the turboalternator-compressor and recuperator from the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) program. This paper will review the goals and status of the SD GTD Program, initiated in April 1992. The performance of the BIPS isotope-heated system will be compared to the solar-heated GTD system incorporating the BIPS components and the applicability of the GTD test bed to dynamics space nuclear power R&D will be discussed.

  12. Mini-Brayton economic RTG study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of a radioisotope heated Mini-Brayton power system to the 1973 USAF/AEC requirements established for the SURVSATCOM Mission. The principal requiremenets of the power system, are: 400 We power level; maximum weight 205 lbs.; $1.2 to 2.0 million per unit cost; and 5y mission duration. A radioisotope heat source that meets the ACE Nuclear Safety Criteria is presented. The major aspects of the Reference Design MB-ERTG are summarized. The Reference Design, utilizes a flexible Brayton rotating unit (BRU), a /sup 244/Cm heat source with ceramic clad fuel cylinders and an aluminum radiator. The flexible BRU has a variable power output capability, from 400 We to 3000 We, and is an important factor in the formulation of a cost effective development plan. The system weight is 186 lb and unit cost, including the /sup 244/Cm fuel, acceptance testing and delivery is $748,000. The total development cost for the 5-yr program is estimated at $16.4M with an additional $6.5M required for /sup 244/Cm heat source development support, /sup 244/Cm fuel, heat source fabrication and capital equipment expenditures. (LCL)

  13. Goethermal power plant with Kalina cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renz, M.; Filipovic, A. [M+W Zander Facility Engineering GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). Marketing-Communications

    2005-04-01

    Several factors are creating an increased market for small power plant technology. These include the need for distributed/decentralised power systems, the need to generate more electricity by non-combustion renewable processes, the need for sustainable power for economic growth in developing countries and the deregulation and privatization of the electrical generation sector. Basically there are 2 alternate principles to improve the efficiency of the Rankine steam cycle for low temperature applications: Replacing water by a one-component fluid with lower boiling points, e.g. different organic substances like n-pentane, isobutene, perfluoropen-tane. (Organic Rankine Cycle, ORC). Replacing water by a binary working fluid like ammonia-water as proposed by Kalina. Kalina and ORC power cycles are primarily used for lower temperature heat sources, such as goethermal or waste-heat recovery. The primary advantage of this technology is the operation at low temperature which is given at renewable heat sources and waste heat. Further the power cycles are simple and generally can be operated remotely, without licensed operators, allowing for increased use of self-diagnostics. M+W Zander is working closely with partners to establish an alternative technology for geothermal applications. (orig.)

  14. Exergoeconomic performance optimization of an endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton combined heat and power plant coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Lingen; Sun, Fengrui [College of Naval Architecture and Power, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2012-07-01

    An endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton combined heat and power (CHP) plant model coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs is established. The exergoeconomic performance of the CHP plant is investigated using finite time thermodynamics. The analytical formulae about dimensionless profit rate and exergy efficiency of the CHP plant with the heat resistance losses in the hot-, cold- and consumer-side heat exchangers, the intercooler and the regenerator are deduced. By taking the maximum profit rate as the objective, the heat conductance allocation among the five heat exchangers and the choice of intercooling pressure ratio are optimized by numerical examples, the characteristic of the optimal dimensionless profit rate versus corresponding exergy efficiency is investigated. When the optimization is performed further with respect to the total pressure ratio, a double-maximum profit rate is obtained. The effects of the design parameters on the double-maximum dimensionless profit rate and corresponding exergy efficiency, optimal total pressure ratio and optimal intercooling pressure ratio are analyzed in detail, and it is found that there exist an optimal consumer-side temperature and an optimal thermal capacitance rate matching between the working fluid and the heat reservoir, respectively, corresponding to a thrice-maximum dimensionless profit rate.

  15. Exergoeconomic performance optimization of an endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton combined heat and power plant coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang, Lingen Chen, Fengrui Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton combined heat and power (CHP plant model coupled to variable-temperature heat reservoirs is established. The exergoeconomic performance of the CHP plant is investigated using finite time thermodynamics. The analytical formulae about dimensionless profit rate and exergy efficiency of the CHP plant with the heat resistance losses in the hot-, cold- and consumer-side heat exchangers, the intercooler and the regenerator are deduced. By taking the maximum profit rate as the objective, the heat conductance allocation among the five heat exchangers and the choice of intercooling pressure ratio are optimized by numerical examples, the characteristic of the optimal dimensionless profit rate versus corresponding exergy efficiency is investigated. When the optimization is performed further with respect to the total pressure ratio, a double-maximum profit rate is obtained. The effects of the design parameters on the double-maximum dimensionless profit rate and corresponding exergy efficiency, optimal total pressure ratio and optimal intercooling pressure ratio are analyzed in detail, and it is found that there exist an optimal consumer-side temperature and an optimal thermal capacitance rate matching between the working fluid and the heat reservoir, respectively, corresponding to a thrice-maximum dimensionless profit rate.

  16. Characteristics Evaluation of a CO2-Caputuring Power Generation System with Reheat Cycle Utilizing Regenerative Oxygen-Combustion Steam-Superheater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Pyong Sik

    A new CO2-capturing power generation system is proposed that can be easily realized by applying conventional technologies. In the proposed system, the temperature of middle-pressure steam in a thermal power plant is raised by utilizing oxygen-combusting regenerative steam-superheater. The generated CO2 by combusting fuel in the superheater can be easily separated and captured from the exhaust gas at condenser outlet, and is liquefied. The superheated steam is used to drive a steam turbine power generation system. By adopting a high efficient combined cycle power generation system as an example, it has been shown that the proposed system can increase power output by 10.8%, decrease the CO2 emission amount of the total integrated system by 18.6% with power generation efficiency drop of 2.36% compared with the original power plant without CO2-capture, when superheated steam temperature is 750°C

  17. Maximisation of Combined Cycle Power Plant Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Kotowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents concepts for increasing the efficiency of a modern combined cycle power plant. Improvement of gas turbine performance indicators as well as recovering heat from the air cooling the gas turbine’s flow system enable reaching gross electrical efficiencies of around 65%. Analyses for a wide range of compressor pressure ratios were performed. Operating characteristics were developed for the analysed combined cycle plant, for different types of open air cooling arrangements of the gas turbine’s expander: convective, transpiration and film.

  18. Power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-03-18

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  19. Exergy analysis of micro-organic Rankine power cycles for a small scale solar driven reverse osmosis desalination system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchanche, B.F.; Lambrinos, Gr.; Frangoudakis, A.; Papadakis, G. [Department of Natural Resources and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos Street, 11855 Athens (Greece)

    2010-04-15

    Exergy analysis of micro-organic Rankine heat engines is performed to identify the most suitable engine for driving a small scale reverse osmosis desalination system. Three modified engines derived from simple Rankine engine using regeneration (incorporation of regenerator or feedliquid heaters) are analyzed through a novel approach, called exergy-topological method based on the combination of exergy flow graphs, exergy loss graphs, and thermoeconomic graphs. For the investigations, three working fluids are considered: R134a, R245fa and R600. The incorporated devices produce different results with different fluids. Exergy destruction throughout the systems operating with R134a was quantified and illustrated using exergy diagrams. The sites with greater exergy destruction include turbine, evaporator and feedliquid heaters. The most critical components include evaporator, turbine and mixing units. A regenerative heat exchanger has positive effects only when the engine operates with dry fluids; feedliquid heaters improve the degree of thermodynamic perfection of the system but lead to loss in exergetic efficiency. Although, different modifications produce better energy conversion and less exergy destroyed, the improvements are not significant enough and subsequent modifications of the simple Rankine engine cannot be considered as economically profitable for heat source temperature below 100 C. As illustration, a regenerator increases the system's energy efficiency by 7%, the degree of thermodynamic perfection by 3.5% while the exergetic efficiency is unchanged in comparison with the simple Rankine cycle, with R600 as working fluid. The impacts of heat source temperature and pinch point temperature difference on engine's performance are also examined. Finally, results demonstrate that energy analysis combined with the mathematical graph theory is a powerful tool in performance assessments of Rankine based power systems and permits meaningful comparison of

  20. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  1. 逆布雷顿空气制冷机动态降温特性数值研究%Numerical study on dynamic cooling performance of reverse Brayton cycle air cryocooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵祥雄; 孙皖; 刘炅辉; 侯予

    2013-01-01

    建立了逆布雷顿空气制冷机系统时间相关数学模型,对系统动态降温过程进行了数值分析.详细阐述了系统主要部件板翅式换热器及透平膨胀机动态回热及降温数学模型.以该模型为基础,分析了逆布雷顿空气制冷系统不同入口压力、温度、流量及不同换热面积和膨胀机效率下的动态温降特性曲线,讨论了部分参数对系统动态降温性能的影响.结果表明:对于确定的入口流量,提高系统入口压力可以加快系统降温速度和最大温降;此外,系统设计时采用较大的回热换热器面积和提高膨胀机效率也是实现更大温降的有效手段.%In order to study the dynamic cooling process performance of a reverse Brayton cycle air cryocooler, a system time-dependent numerical model was set up and described, including the dynamic thermal performance model of a plate-fin heat exchanger and a turbo expander. The dynamic cooling process of the air cryocooler was discussed under different system inlet parameters, including pressure, temperature, volume flowrate, different heat exchange area and different turbo expander efficiency. The theoretical results shown that the higher the system inlet pressure the faster the system temperature decreases in case of low system inlet temperature and small system inlet flowrate, the increase of heat exchange area and turbo expander thermal efficiency can promote the system cooling performance.

  2. Metal corrosion in a supercritical carbon dioxide - liquid sodium power cycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Conboy, Thomas M.

    2012-02-01

    A liquid sodium cooled fast reactor coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton power cycle is a promising combination for the next generation nuclear power production process. For optimum efficiency, a microchannel heat exchanger, constructed by diffusion bonding, can be used for heat transfer from the liquid sodium reactor coolant to the supercritical carbon dioxide. In this work, we have reviewed the literature on corrosion of metals in liquid sodium and carbon dioxide. The main conclusions are (1) pure, dry CO{sub 2} is virtually inert but can be highly corrosive in the presence of even ppm concentrations of water, (2) carburization and decarburization are very significant mechanism for corrosion in liquid sodium especially at high temperature and the mechanism is not well understood, and (3) very little information could be located on corrosion of diffusion bonded metals. Significantly more research is needed in all of these areas.

  3. Test facility of thermal storage equipment for space power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Mochida, Y.; Ohtomo, F.; Shimizu, K.; Tanaka, K.; Abe, Y.; Nomura, O.; Kamimoto, M.

    A thermal storage equipment test facility has been built in connection with developing solar dynamic power systems (SDPSs). The test facility consists of a recuperative closed Brayton cycle system (CBC), with a mixture of helium and xenon with a molecular weight of 39.9 serving as the working fluid. CBC has been shown to be the most attractive power generation system among several types of SDPSs because of its ability to meet the required high power demand and its thermal efficiency, about 30 percent. The authors present a description of this test facility and give results of the preliminary test and the first-stage test with heat storage equipment.

  4. Power Systems integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Power systems integration in large flexible space structures is discussed with emphasis upon body control. A solar array is discussed as a typical example of spacecraft configuration problems. Information on how electric batteries dominate life-cycle costs is presented in chart form. Information is given on liquid metal droplet generators and collectors, hot spot analysis, power dissipation in solar arrays, solar array protection optimization, and electromagnetic compatibility for a power system platform.

  5. Optimization of a Brayton cryocooler for ZBO liquid hydrogen storage in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserranno, D.; Zagarola, M.; Li, X.; Mustafi, S.

    2014-11-01

    NASA is evaluating and developing technology for long-term storage of cryogenic propellant in space. A key technology is a cryogenic refrigerator which intercepts heat loads to the storage tank, resulting in a reduced- or zero-boil-off condition. Turbo-Brayton cryocoolers are particularly well suited for cryogen storage applications because the technology scales well to high capacities and low temperatures. In addition, the continuous-flow nature of the cycle allows direct cooling of the cryogen storage tank without mass and power penalties associated with a cryogenic heat transport system. To quantify the benefits and mature the cryocooler technology, Creare Inc. performed a design study and technology demonstration effort for NASA on a 20 W, 20 K cryocooler for liquid hydrogen storage. During the design study, we optimized these key components: three centrifugal compressors, a modular high-capacity plate-fin recuperator, and a single-stage turboalternator. The optimization of the compressors and turboalternator were supported by component testing. The optimized cryocooler has an overall flight mass of 88 kg and a specific power of 61 W/W. The coefficient of performance of the cryocooler is 23% of the Carnot cycle. This is significantly better performance than any 20 K space cryocooler existing or under development.

  6. Analyzing the possibility of constructing the air heating system for an integrated solid fuel gasification combined-cycle power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikula, V. A.; Ryzhkov, A. F.; Val'tsev, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Combined-cycle power plants operating on solid fuel have presently been implemented only in demonstration projects. One of possible ways for improving such plants consists in making a shift to hybrid process circuits of integrated gasification combined-cycle plants with external firing of solid fuel. A high-temperature air heater serving to heat compressed air is a key element of the hybrid process circuit. The article describes application of a high-temperature recuperative metal air heater in the process circuit of an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant (IGCC). The available experience with high-temperature air heating is considered, and possible air heater layout arrangements are analyzed along with domestically produced heat-resistant grades of steel suitable for manufacturing such air heater. An alternative (with respect to the traditional one) design is proposed, according to which solid fuel is fired in a noncooled furnace extension, followed by mixing the combustion products with recirculation gases, after which the mixture is fed to a convective air heater. The use of this design makes it possible to achieve considerably smaller capital outlays and operating costs. The data obtained from thermal and aerodynamic calculations of the high-temperature air heater with a thermal capacity of 258 MW for heating air to a temperature of up to 800°C for being used in the hybrid process circuit of a combined-cycle power plant are presented.

  7. ESCORT: A Pratt & Whitney nuclear thermal propulsion and power system for manned mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Gerald J.; Joyner, Russell

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the conceptual design of an upgrade to the Pratt & Whitney ESCORT nuclear thermal rocket engine. The ESCORT is a bimodal engine capable of supporting a wide range of vehicle propulsive and electrical power requirements. The ESCORT engine is powered by a fast-spectrum beryllium-reflected CERMET-fueled nuclear reactor. In propulsive mode, the reactor is used to heat hot hydrogen to approximately 2700 K which is expanded through a converging/diverging nozzle to generate thrust. Heat pickup in the nozzle and the radial beryllium reflectors is used to drive the turbomachinery in the ESCORT expander cycle. In electrical mode, the reactor is used to heat a mixture of helium and xenon to drive a closed-loop Brayton cycle in order to generate electrical energy. This closed loop system has the additional function of a decay heat removal system after the propulsive mode operation is discontinued. The original ESCORT design was capable of delivering 4448.2 N (1000 lbf) of thrust at a vacuum impulse level of approximately 900 s. Design Reference Mission requirements (DRM) from NASA Johnson Space Center and NASA Lewis Research Center studies in 1997 and 1998 have detailed upgraded requirements for potential manned Mars missions. The current NASA DRM requires a nuclear thermal propulsion system capable of delivering total mission requirements of 200170 N (45000 lbf) thrust and 50 kWe of spacecraft electrical power. This is met assuming three engines capable of each delivering 66723 N (15000 lbf) of vacuum thrust and 25 kWe of electrical power. The individual engine requirements were developed assuming three out of three engine reliability for propulsion and two out of three engine reliability for spacecraft electrical power. The approximate target vacuum impulse is 925 s. The Pratt & Whitney ESCORT concept was upgraded to meet these requirements. The hexagonal prismatic fuel elements were modified to address the uprated power requirements

  8. Exercise efficiency of low power output cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, M; Peterman, J E; Kram, R; Byrnes, W C

    2013-12-01

    Exercise efficiency at low power outputs, energetically comparable to daily living activities, can be influenced by homeostatic perturbations (e.g., weight gain/loss). However, an appropriate efficiency calculation for low power outputs used in these studies has not been determined. Fifteen active subjects (seven females, eight males) performed 14, 5-min cycling trials: two types of seated rest (cranks vertical and horizontal), passive (motor-driven) cycling, no-chain cycling, no-load cycling, cycling at low (10, 20, 30, 40 W), and moderate (50, 60, 80, 100, 120 W) power outputs. Mean delta efficiency was 57% for low power outputs compared to 41.3% for moderate power outputs. Means for gross (3.6%) and net (5.7%) efficiencies were low at the lowest power output. At low power outputs, delta and work efficiency values exceeded theoretical values. In conclusion, at low power outputs, none of the common exercise efficiency calculations gave values comparable to theoretical muscle efficiency. However, gross efficiency and the slope and intercept of the metabolic power vs mechanical power output regression provide insights that are still valuable when studying homeostatic perturbations.

  9. System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annen, K.D.

    1981-08-01

    The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

  10. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 6: Closed-cycle gas turbine systems. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, D. J.; Fentress, W. K.; Stahl, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Both recuperated and bottomed closed cycle gas turbine systems in electric power plants were studied. All systems used a pressurizing gas turbine coupled with a pressurized furnace to heat the helium for the closed cycle gas turbine. Steam and organic vapors are used as Rankine bottoming fluids. Although plant efficiencies of over 40% are calculated for some plants, the resultant cost of electricity was found to be 8.75 mills/MJ (31.5 mills/kWh). These plants do not appear practical for coal or oil fired plants.

  11. Release and sorption of alkali metals in coal fired combined cycle power systems; Freisetzung und Einbindung von Alkalimetallverbindungen in kohlebefeuerten Kombikraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Coal fired combined cycle power systems will be a sufficient way to increase the efficiency of coal combustion. However, combined cycle power systems require a reliable hot gas cleanup. Especially alkali metals, such as sodium and potassium, can lead to hot corrosion of the gas turbine blading if they condensate as sulphates. The actual work deals with the release and sorption of alkali metals in coal fired combined cycle power systems. The influence of coal composition, temperature and pressure on the release of alkali species in coal combustion was investigated and the relevant release mechanisms identified. Alumosilicate sorbents have been found that reduce the alkali concentration in the hot flue gas of the Circulating Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion 2{sup nd} Generation (CPFBC 2{sup nd} Gen.) at 750 C to values sufficient for use in a gas turbine. Accordingly, alumosilicate sorbents working at 1400 C have been found for the Pressurized Pulverized Coal Combustion (PPCC). The sorption mechanisms have been identified. Thermodynamic calculations were performed to upscale the results of the laboratory experiments to conditions prevailing in power systems. According to these calculations, there is no risk of hot corrosion in both processes. Furthermore, thermodynamic calculations were performed to investigate the behaviour of alkali metals in an IGCC with integrated hot gas cleanup and H{sub 2} membrane for CO{sub 2} sequestration. (orig.)

  12. Buffer thermal energy storage for a solar Brayton engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been completed on the application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine. To aid in the study, a computer program was written for complete transient/stead-state Brayton cycle performance. The results indicated that thermal storage can afford a significant decrease in the number of engine shutdowns as compared to operating without thermal storage. However, the number of shutdowns does not continuously decrease as the storage material weight increases. In fact, there appears to be an optimum weight for minimizing the number of shutdowns.

  13. Integration of A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell into A 10 MW Gas Turbine Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denver F. Cheddie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Power generation using gas turbine power plants operating on the Brayton cycle suffers from low efficiencies. In this work, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC is proposed for integration into a 10 MW gas turbine power plant, operating at 30% efficiency. The SOFC system utilizes four heat exchangers for heat recovery from both the turbine outlet and the fuel cell outlet to ensure a sufficiently high SOFC temperature. The power output of the hybrid plant is 37 MW at 66.2% efficiency. A thermo-economic model predicts a payback period of less than four years, based on future projected SOFC cost estimates.

  14. Development of a 77K Reverse-Brayton Cryocooler with Multiple Coldheads Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RTI will design and optimize an 80 W, 77K cryocooler based on the reverse turbo Brayton cycle (RTBC) with four identical coldheads for distributed cooling. Based on...

  15. Closed power cycles thermodynamic fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Invernizzi, Costante Mario

    2013-01-01

    With the growing attention to the exploitation of renewable energies and heat recovery from industrial processes, the traditional steam and gas cycles are showing themselves often inadequate. The inadequacy is due to the great assortment of the required sizes power and of the large kind of heat sources. Closed Power Cycles: Thermodynamic Fundamentals and Applications offers an organized discussion about the strong interaction between working fluids, the thermodynamic behavior of the cycle using them and the technological design aspects of the machines. A precise treatment of thermal engines op

  16. Space nuclear power systems 1989; Proceedings of the 6th Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, Jan. 8-12, 1989. Vols. 1 & 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S. (Editor); Hoover, Mark D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present conference discusses such space nuclear power (SNP) issues as current design trends for SDI applications, ultrahigh heat-flux systems with curved surface subcooled nucleate boiling, design and manufacturing alternatives for low cost production of SNPs, a lightweight radioisotope heater for the Galileo mission, compatible materials for uranium fluoride-based gas core SNPs, Johnson noise thermometry for SNPs, and uranium nitride/rhenium compatibility studies for the SP-100 SNP. Also discussed are system issues in antimatter energy conversion, the thermal design of a heat source for a Brayton cycle radioisotope power system, structural and thermal analyses of an isotope heat source, a novel plant protection strategy for transient reactors, and beryllium toxicity.

  17. Low-Concentration Solar-Power Systems based on Organic Rankine Cycles for Distributed-Scale Applications:Overview and Further Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos N. Markides

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the emergence and development of low- to medium-grade thermal-energy conversion systems for distributed power generation based on thermodynamic vapour-phase heat-engine cycles undergone by organic working-fluids, namely organic Rankine cycles (ORCs. ORC power systems are, to some extent, a relatively established and mature technology that is well-suited to converting low-/medium-grade heat (at temperatures up to ~ 300 – 400 °C to useful work, at an output power scale from a few kW to 10s of MW. Thermal efficiencies in excess of 25% are achievable at higher temperatures and larger scales, and efforts are currently in progress to improve the overall economic viability, and thus uptake, of ORC power systems by focusing on advanced architectures, working-fluid selection, heat exchangers and expansion machines. Solar-power systems based on ORC technology have a significant potential to be used for distributed power generation, by converting thermal energy from simple and low-cost non-concentrated or low-concentration collectors to mechanical, hydraulic or electrical energy. Current fields of use include mainly geothermal and biomass/biogas, as well as the recovery and conversion of waste heat, leading to improved energy efficiency, primary energy (i.e. fuel use and emission minimization, yet the technology is highly transferable to solar power generation as an affordable alternative to small- to medium-scale photovoltaic (PV systems. Solar-ORC systems offer naturally the advantages of providing a simultaneous thermal-energy output for hot water provision and/or space heating, and the particularly interesting possibility of relatively straightforward on-site (thermal energy storage. Key performance characteristics are presented, and important heat transfer effects that act to limit performance are identified as noteworthy directions of future research for the further development of this technology.

  18. Method for the thermo-hydraulic analysis of the test facility for the PBMR reserve shutdown system / Petrus Gerhardus van der Merwe

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a revolutionary small, compact and safe nuclear power plant. It operates on a direct closed Brayton cycle. One of the unique features of this concept is its load following capability enabled by extracting or injecting of the working fluid (in the PBMR's case Helium) from or to the system during operation. The Reserve Shutdown System (RSS) is one of the essential subsystems of the PBMR. The RSS is used as a maintenance and secondary shutd...

  19. An Advanced Light Weight Recuperator for Space Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology holds great promise for power and propulsion demands of NASA current and future deep space explorations. Closed Brayton...

  20. Efficient cycles for carbon capture CLC power plants based on thermally balanced redox reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike

    2015-10-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The rotary reactor differs from most alternative chemical looping combustion (CLC) reactor designs because it maintains near-thermal equilibrium between the two stages of the redox process by thermally coupling channels undergoing oxidation and reduction. An earlier study showed that this thermal coupling between the oxidation and reduction reactors increases the efficiency by up to 2% points when implemented in a regenerative Brayton cycle. The present study extends this analysis to alternative CLC cycles with the objective of identifying optimal configurations and design tradeoffs. Results show that the increased efficiency from reactor thermal coupling applies only to cycles that are capable of exploiting the increased availability in the reduction reactor exhaust. Thus, in addition to the regenerative cycle, the combined CLC cycle and the combined-regenerative CLC cycle are suitable for integration with the rotary reactor. Parametric studies are used to compare the sensitivity of the different cycle efficiencies to parameters like pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, carrier-gas fraction and purge steam generation. One of the key conclusions from this analysis is that while the optimal efficiency for regenerative CLC cycle was the highest of the three (56% at 3. bars, 1200. °C), the combined-regenerative cycle offers a trade-off that combines a reasonably high efficiency (about 54% at 12. bars, 1200. °C) with much lower gas volumetric flow rate and consequently, smaller reactor size. Unlike the other two cycles, the optimal compressor pressure ratio for the regenerative cycle is weakly dependent on the design turbine inlet temperature. For the regenerative and combined regenerative cycles, steam production in the regenerator below 2× fuel flow rate improves exhaust recovery and consequently, the overall system efficiency. Also, given that the fuel side regenerator flow is unbalanced, it is more efficient to generate steam from the

  1. Combined Turbine and Cycle Optimization for Organic Rankine Cycle Power Systems—Part A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meroni, Andrea; La Seta, Angelo; Andreasen, Jesper Graa;

    2016-01-01

    Axial-flow turbines represent a well-established technology for a wide variety of power generation systems. Compactness, flexibility, reliability and high efficiency have been key factors for the extensive use of axial turbines in conventional power plants and, in the last decades, in organic...... Rankine cycle power systems. In this two-part paper, an overall cycle model and a model of an axial turbine were combined in order to provide a comprehensive preliminary design of the organic Rankine cycle unit, taking into account both cycle and turbine optimal designs. Part A presents the preliminary...... turbine design model, the details of the validation and a sensitivity analysis on the main parameters, in order to minimize the number of decision variables in the subsequent turbine design optimization. Part B analyzes the application of the combined turbine and cycle designs on a selected case study...

  2. Energy systems. Tome 3: advanced cycles, low environmental impact innovative systems; Systeme energetiques, TOME 3: cycles avances, systemes innovants a faible impact environnemental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gicquel, R

    2009-07-01

    This third tome about energy systems completes the two previous ones by showing up advanced thermodynamical cycles, in particular having a low environmental impact, and by dealing with two other questions linked with the study of systems with a changing regime operation: - the time management of energy, with the use of thermal and pneumatic storage systems and time simulation (schedule for instance) of systems (solar energy type in particular); - the technological dimensioning and non-nominal regime operation studies. Because this last topic is particularly complex, new functionalities have been implemented mainly by using the external classes mechanism, which allows the user to freely personalize his models. This tome is illustrated with about 50 examples of cycles modelled with Thermoptim software. Content: foreword; 1 - generic external classes; 2 - advanced gas turbine cycles; 3 - evaporation-concentration, mechanical steam compression, desalination, hot gas drying; 4 - cryogenic cycles; 5 - electrochemical converters; 6 - global warming, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration; 7 - future nuclear reactors (coupled to Hirn and Brayton cycles); 8 - thermodynamic solar cycles; 10 - pneumatic and thermal storage; 11 - calculation of thermodynamic solar facilities; 12 - problem of technological dimensioning and non-nominal regime; 13 - exchangers modeling and parameterizing for the dimensioning and the non-nominal regime; 14 - modeling and parameterizing of volumetric compressors; 15 - modeling and parameterizing of turbo-compressors and turbines; 16 - identification methodology of component parameters; 17 - case studies. (J.S.)

  3. Plate-fin Heat-exchangers for a 10 kW Brayton Cryocooler and a 1 km HTS Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Gwak, Kyung Hyun; Jung, Seyong; Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si-Dole

    Plate-fin heat exchangers (PFHX) are designed and fabricated for a cryogenic cooling system, serving for a 10 kW Brayton cryocooler and a 1 km HTS transmission cable under development in Korea. To achieve compactness and thermal efficiency at the same time, a recuperative HX for Brayton cycle and a sub-cooling HX of liquid nitrogen for HTS cable are designed as integrated parts. A key design feature is focused on the coldest part of sub-cooling HX, where the streams of liquid nitrogen and refrigerant (helium gas) are arranged as two-pass cross-flow so that the risk of freeze-out of liquid nitrogen can be reduced. Details of hardware PFHX design are presented and discussed towards its immediate application to the HTS cable system.

  4. Environmental implications of United States coal exports: a comparative life cycle assessment of future power system scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnengel, Barrett; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia; Bergerson, Joule

    2014-08-19

    Stricter emissions requirements on coal-fired power plants together with low natural gas prices have contributed to a recent decline in the use of coal for electricity generation in the United States. Faced with a shrinking domestic market, many coal companies are taking advantage of a growing coal export market. As a result, U.S. coal exports hit an all-time high in 2012, fueled largely by demand in Asia. This paper presents a comparative life cycle assessment of two scenarios: a baseline scenario in which coal continues to be burned domestically for power generation, and an export scenario in which coal is exported to Asia. For the coal export scenario we focus on the Morrow Pacific export project being planned in Oregon by Ambre Energy that would ship 8.8 million tons of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal annually to Asian markets via rail, river barge, and ocean vessel. Air emissions (SOx, NOx, PM10 and CO2e) results assuming that the exported coal is burned for electricity generation in South Korea are compared to those of a business as usual case in which Oregon and Washington's coal plants, Boardman and Centralia, are retrofitted to comply with EPA emissions standards and continue their coal consumption. Findings show that although the environmental impacts of shipping PRB coal to Asia are significant, the combination of superior energy efficiency among newer South Korean coal-fired power plants and lower emissions from U.S. replacement of coal with natural gas could lead to a greenhouse gas reduction of 21% in the case that imported PRB coal replaces other coal sources in this Asian country. If instead PRB coal were to replace natural gas or nuclear generation in South Korea, greenhouse gas emissions per unit of electricity generated would increase. Results are similar for other air emissions such as SOx, NOx and PM. This study provides a framework for comparing energy export scenarios and highlights the importance of complete life cycle assessment in

  5. The power profile predicts road cycling MMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quod, M J; Martin, D T; Martin, J C; Laursen, P B

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory tests of fitness variables have previously been shown to be valid predictors of cycling time-trial performance. However, due to the influence of drafting, tactics and the variability of power output in mass-start road races, comparisons between laboratory tests and competition performance are limited. The purpose of this study was to compare the power produced in the laboratory Power Profile (PP) test and Maximum Mean Power (MMP) analysis of competition data. Ten male cyclists (mean+/-SD: 20.8+/-1.5 y, 67.3+/-5.5 kg, V O (2 max) 72.7+/-5.1 mL x kg (-1) x min (-1)) completed a PP test within 14 days of competing in a series of road races. No differences were found between PP results and MMP analysis of competition data for durations of 60-600 s, total work or estimates of critical power and the fixed amount of work that can be completed above critical power (W'). Self-selected cadence was 15+/-7 rpm higher in the lab. These results indicate that the PP test is an ecologically valid assessment of power producing capacity over cycling specific durations. In combination with MMP analysis, this may be a useful tool for quantifying elements of cycling specific performance in competitive cyclists.

  6. Stockholm Power Tech. Power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The proceedings from this symposium is presented in six volumes: Invited speakers` sessions; Power systems; Power electronics; High-voltage technology; Electrical machines and drives; and Information and control systems. This report covers the power systems volume. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 141 of the 145 papers in this volume

  7. Power and Efficiency Analysis of a Solar Central Receiver Combined Cycle Plant with a Small Particle Heat Exchanger Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgen, Matthew Miguel

    Two significant goals in solar plant operation are lower cost and higher efficiencies. To achieve those goals, a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) system, which uses the hot gas turbine exhaust to produce superheated steam for a bottoming Rankine cycle by way of a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), is investigated in this work. Building off of a previous gas turbine model created at the Combustion and Solar Energy Laboratory at SDSU, here are added the HRSG and steam turbine model, which had to handle significant change in the mass flow and temperature of air exiting the gas turbine due to varying solar input. A wide range of cases were run to explore options for maximizing both power and efficiency from the proposed CSP CCGT plant. Variable guide vanes (VGVs) were found in the earlier model to be an effective tool in providing operational flexibility to address the variable nature of solar input. Combined cycle efficiencies in the range of 50% were found to result from this plant configuration. However, a combustor inlet temperature (CIT) limit leads to two distinct Modes of operation, with a sharp drop in both plant efficiency and power occurring when the air flow through the receiver exceeded the CIT limit. This drawback can be partially addressed through strategic use of the VGVs. Since system response is fully established for the relevant range of solar input and variable guide vane angles, the System Advisor Model (SAM) from NREL can be used to find what the actual expected solar input would be over the course of the day, and plan accordingly. While the SAM software is not yet equipped to model a Brayton cycle cavity receiver, appropriate approximations were made in order to produce a suitable heliostat field to fit this system. Since the SPHER uses carbon nano-particles as the solar absorbers, questions of particle longevity and how the particles might affect the flame behavior in the combustor were addressed using the chemical kinetics software Chemkin

  8. Combined Turbine and Cycle Optimization for Organic Rankine Cycle Power Systems—Part B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Seta, Angelo; Meroni, Andrea; Andreasen, Jesper Graa;

    2016-01-01

    due to the peculiar physical properties of the working fluid and the gas-dynamic phenomena occurring in the machine. Unlike steam Rankine and Brayton engines, organic Rankine cycle expanders combine small enthalpy drops with large expansion ratios. These features yield turbine designs with few highly......-loaded stages in supersonic flow regimes. Part A of this two-part paper has presented the implementation and validation of the simulation tool TURAX, which provides the optimal preliminary design of single-stage axial-flow turbines. The authors have also presented a sensitivity analysis on the decision...... variables affecting the turbine design. Part B of this two-part paper presents the first application of a design method where the thermodynamic cycle optimization is combined with calculations of the maximum expander performance using the mean-line design tool described in part A. The high computational...

  9. Gasification combined cycle power generation - process alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkela, E.; Korhonen, M.

    1988-01-01

    Interest in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants has recently increased also in Finland. The IGCC systems offer the potential of superior efficiency and environmental performance over conventional pulverized coal or peat fired boilers. Potential applications are both large-scale electricity production from coal and medium-scale combined heat and electricity production. In the latter case, the gasification process should also be applicable to peat and wood. Several IGCC processes have been developed in USA and in Europe. These processes differ from each other in many respects. Nearest to commercialization are processes, which employ oxygen gasification and cold gas cleanup. The Cool Water plant, which was brought into operation in 1984 in USA, has demonstrated the feasibility of an IGCC system using Texaco entrained-bed gasifier. Several pressurized fluidized-bed and fixed-bed gasification processes have also reached a pilot or demonstration stage with a wide variety of coals from lignite to hard coal. Pressurized fluidized-bed gasification of peat (Rheinbraun-HTW-process) will also be demonstrated at the peat ammonia plant of Kemira Oy, which will be commissioned in 1988 in Oulu, Finland. Oxygen gasification and cold gas cleanup are, however, economically viable only in large-scale applications. Technology is being developed to simplify the IGCC system, in order to reduce its capital costs and increase its efficiency. Air gasification combined with ho gas cleanup seems to have a great potential of improving the competitiveness of the IGCC system.

  10. Wind power in power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The second edition of the highly acclaimed Wind Power in Power Systems has been thoroughly revised and expanded to reflect the latest challenges associated with increasing wind power penetration levels. Since its first release, practical experiences with high wind power penetration levels have significantly increased. This book presents an overview of the lessons learned in integrating wind power into power systems and provides an outlook of the relevant issues and solutions to allow even higher wind power penetration levels. This includes the development of standard wind turbine sim

  11. Energy efficiency analysis and impact evaluation of the application of thermoelectric power cycle to today's CHP systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min; Lund, Henrik; Rosendahl, Lasse;

    2010-01-01

    High efficiency thermoelectric generators (TEG) can recover waste heat from both industrial and private sectors. Thus, the development and deployment of TEG may represent one of the main drives for technological change and fuel substitution. This paper will present an analysis of system efficiency...... configurations for combustion systems. The feasible deployment of TEG in various CHP plants will be examined in terms of heat source temperature range, influences on CHP power specification and thermal environment, as well as potential benefits. The overall conversion efficiency improvements and economic...

  12. Design and Implementation of A PV Powered Tri-Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Das

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Solar PV technology is one of the first among the various renewable energy technologies that have been adopted and accepted universally in order to meet the basic needs of generation of electricity. The objective of this paper is to propose a tri-cycle that utilises the application of stand-alone photovoltaic (PV system. A preliminary design and construction of a solar tri-cycle has been performed by evaluating and estimating the required panel size, battery capacity and motor power. Calculation in this paper exhibit that the solar power alone will be sufficient to operate a tri-cycle from one place to another.

  13. Fuel Cycle Comparison for Distributed Power Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgowainy, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wang, M. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2008-11-15

    This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microturbines and internal combustion engines.

  14. Assessment of the thorium fuel cycle in power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Homan, F.J.; Allen, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate the role of thorium fuel cycles in power reactors. Three thermal reactor systems were considered: Light Water Reactors (LWRs); High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs); and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) of the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor (CANDU) type; most of the effort was on these systems. A summary comparing thorium and uranium fuel cycles in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs) was also compiled.

  15. Thermodynamic Analysis of Combined Cycle Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K.Tiwari,

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC can replace the heat recovery steam generator and the steam turbine of the conventionalcombined cycle plant. The exhaust energy of the topping gas turbine of existing combine cycle is sent to gas-air heat exchange, which heats the air in the secondary gas turbine cycle. In 1980’s the ABC was proposed as an alternative for the conventional steam bottoming cycle. In spite of the cost of reducing hardware installations it could achieve a thermal efficiency of 80%. The complete thermodynamic analysis of the system has been performed by using specially designed programme, enabling the variation of main independent variables. The result shows the gain in net work output as well as efficiency of combined cycle is 35% to 68%.

  16. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turboalternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  17. Environmental control implications of generating electric power from coal. Appendix C. Gasification/combined-cycle power generation: comparison of alternative systems. 1977 technology status report. [246 references w. abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    The technical, economic, and environmental aspects of low-Btu gasification/combined-cycle power-generation (LBG/CCPG) plants are assessed, using available published data. Six base-case plants, based on three different gasifiers and two different coals, are investigated. A representative combined power cycle is selected for analysis, and material and energy balances for the six systems are developed. Emissions of various air pollutants, including sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, and discharge rates of aqueous effluents are also calculated. The costs of electricity produced are derived for the six systems, using estimated plant-investment and operating costs. These costs and the emissions of various pollutants are compared with those for a conventional 500-MWe coal-based power plant using flue-gas cleaning and in compliance with the federal New Source Performance Standards. Finally, the commercialization potential of coal-based combined-cycle plants, based on the technical feasibility of building a first plant in the 1985 period and on economic viability, is evaluated. This evaluation is based on the current status of research and development programs for various components of the combined-cycle plant, such as gas turbines and fuel-gas-cleaning systems, and on the status of the demonstration plant.

  18. Preliminary studies on the heat exchanger option for S-CO{sub 2} power conversion cycle coupled to water cooled SMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Y.; Lee, J. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. I. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa Univ. of Science, Technology and Research (KUSTAR), P.O.Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2012-07-01

    For more than a half century, the steam Rankine cycle had been the major power conversion cycle for a nuclear power plant. However, as the interest on the next generation reactors grows, a variety of alternative power conversion systems have been studied. Among them, the S-CO{sub 2} cycle (Supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle) is considered as a promising candidate due to several benefits such as 1) Relatively high thermal efficiency at relatively low turbine inlet temperature, 2) High efficiency with simple lay-out 3) Compactness of turbo-machineries. 4) Compactness of total cycle combined with PCHE (Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger). According to the conventional classification of heat exchangers (HE), there are three kind of HE, 1) Tubular HEs, 2) Plate-type HEs, 3) Extended surface HEs. So far, the researcher has mostly assumed PCHE type HE for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle due to its compactness with reasonably low pressure drop. However, PCHE is currently one of the most expensive components in the cycle, which can have a negative effect on the economics of the cycle. Therefore, an alternative for the HE should be seriously investigated. By comparing the operating condition (pressure and temperature) there are three kind of HE in the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, 1) IHX (Intermediate Heat exchanger) 2) Recuperator and 3) Pre-cooler. In each heat exchanger, hot side and cold side coolants are different, i.e. reactor coolant to S-CO{sub 2} (IHX), S-CO{sub 2} to S-CO{sub 2}(Recuperator), S-CO{sub 2} to water (Pre-cooler). By considering all the attributes mentioned above, all existing types of heat exchangers are compared to find a possible alternative to PCHE. The comparing factors are 1) Size(volume), 2) Cost. Plate fin type HEs are considered to be the most competitive heat exchanger regarding the size and the cost after some improvements on the design limit are made. (authors)

  19. Development of an Anti-Vibration Controller for Magnetic Bearing Cooling Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines a program to develop a vibration-free reverse-Brayton cycle cooling system using specially-tuned magnetic bearings. Such a system is critical...

  20. Thermodynamic cycles of nuclear power plants; Les cycles thermodynamiques des centrales nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normand, T.; Andreani, J.; Tejedor, V.

    2010-07-01

    Above all a nuclear power plant is a thermal system whose efficiency relies on the thermodynamic cycle that turns the heat produced by the fission of uranium nuclei into electricity. The thermodynamic yield is an essential parameter to dimension a power plant. This book is dedicated to the presentation of the thermodynamic cycles that have been chosen in the different types of French PWR: CP0, P4, N4 and EPR. These cycles are classical steam cycles that have been used and optimized for 40 years, but they are physically limited and do not respond to the expectations of future generations of reactors. The last part deals with the thermodynamic cycles that might be involved in the fourth generation of nuclear reactors: cycles with super-critical steam, direct cycles for high temperature gas, indirect gas cycles, and cycles with super-critical CO{sub 2}. The first part of the book gives an account of the situation of nuclear power in France. (A.C.)

  1. Computational tool for simulation of power and refrigeration cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba Tuta, E.; Reyes Orozco, M.

    2016-07-01

    Small improvement in thermal efficiency of power cycles brings huge cost savings in the production of electricity, for that reason have a tool for simulation of power cycles allows modeling the optimal changes for a best performance. There is also a big boom in research Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), which aims to get electricity at low power through cogeneration, in which the working fluid is usually a refrigerant. A tool to design the elements of an ORC cycle and the selection of the working fluid would be helpful, because sources of heat from cogeneration are very different and in each case would be a custom design. In this work the development of a multiplatform software for the simulation of power cycles and refrigeration, which was implemented in the C ++ language and includes a graphical interface which was developed using multiplatform environment Qt and runs on operating systems Windows and Linux. The tool allows the design of custom power cycles, selection the type of fluid (thermodynamic properties are calculated through CoolProp library), calculate the plant efficiency, identify the fractions of flow in each branch and finally generates a report very educational in pdf format via the LaTeX tool.

  2. Gas--steam turbine combined cycle power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1978-10-01

    The purpose of this technology evaluation is to provide performance and cost characteristics of the combined gas and steam turbine, cycle system applied to an Integrated Community Energy System (ICES). To date, most of the applications of combined cycles have been for electric power generation only. The basic gas--steam turbine combined cycle consists of: (1) a gas turbine-generator set, (2) a waste-heat recovery boiler in the gas turbine exhaust stream designed to produce steam, and (3) a steam turbine acting as a bottoming cycle. Because modification of the standard steam portion of the combined cycle would be necessary to recover waste heat at a useful temperature (> 212/sup 0/F), some sacrifice in the potential conversion efficiency is necessary at this temperature. The total energy efficiency ((electric power + recovered waste heat) divided by input fuel energy) varies from about 65 to 73% at full load to 34 to 49% at 20% rated electric power output. Two major factors that must be considered when installing a gas--steam turbine combines cycle are: the realiability of the gas turbine portion of the cycle, and the availability of liquid and gas fuels or the feasibility of hooking up with a coal gasification/liquefaction process.

  3. Can cycle power predict sprint running performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ingen Schenau, G J; Jacobs, R; de Koning, J J

    1991-01-01

    A major criticism of present models of the energetics and mechanics of sprint running concerns the application of estimates of parameters which seem to be adapted from measurements of running during actual competitions. This study presents a model which does not perpetuate this solecism. Using data obtained during supra-maximal cycle ergometer tests of highly trained athletes, the kinetics of the anaerobic and aerobic pathways were modelled. Internal power wasted in the acceleration and deceleration of body limbs and the power necessary to overcome air friction was calculated from data in the literature. Assuming a mechanical efficiency as found during submaximal cycling, a power equation was constructed which also included the power necessary to accelerate the body at the start of movement. The differential equation thus obtained was solved through simulation. The model appeared to predict realistic times at 100 m (10.47 s), 200 m (19.63 s) and 400 m (42.99 s) distances. By comparison with other methods it is argued that power equations of locomotion should include the concept of mechanical efficiency.

  4. Design of a gigawatt space solar power satellite using optical concentrator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessanti, B.; Komerath, N.; Shah, S.

    A 1-gigawatt space solar power satellite using a large array of individually pointable optical elements is identified as the key mass element of a large scale space solar power architecture using the Space Power Grid concept. The proposed satellite design enables a significant increase in specific power. Placed in sun-synchronous dynamic orbits near 2000km altitude, these satellites can maintain the constant solar view requirement of GEO-based architectures, while greatly reducing the beaming distance required, decreasing the required antenna size and in turn the overall system mass. The satellite uses an array of individually pointable optical elements (which we call a Mirasol Concentrator Array) to concentrate solar energy to an intensified feed target that feeds into the main heater of the spacecraft, similar conceptually to heliostat arrays. The spacecraft then utilizes Brayton cycle conversion to take advantage of non-linear power level scaling in order to generate high specific power values. Using phase array antennas, the power is then beamed at a millimeter wave frequency of 220GHz down to Earth. The design of the Mirasol concentrator system will be described and a detailed mass estimation of the system is developed. The technical challenges of pointing the elements and maintaining constant solar view is investigated. An end-to-end efficiency analysis is performed. Subsystem designs for the spacecraft are outlined. A detailed mass budget is refined to reflect reductions in uncertainty of the spacecraft mass, particularly in the Mirasol system. One of the key mass drivers of the spacecraft is the active thermal control system. The design of a lightweight thermal control system utilizing graphene sheets is also detailed.

  5. Pre-design and life cycle cost analysis of a hybrid power system for rural and remote communities in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Sayed Shah Danish

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In view of the present situation of the Afghanistan electricity sector, the photovoltaic and diesel generator stand-alone hybrid power system is increasingly attractive for application in rural and remote communities. Thousands of rural communities in Afghanistan depend solely on traditional kerosene for illumination and rarely have access to electricity sources such as DC battery for radio and other small appliances. This study is conducted to offer real-life solution to this problem. The hybrid system is investigated to meet the domestic load demand that is estimated based on the communities’ electricity consumption culture. At first, customary pre-design is pursued. Afterwards, the break-even point and net present value algorithms are applied for economic analysis. That makes this study differ from the previous academic literature. The concepts developed in this study are targeted for a cost-effective hybrid system, which is appropriate for rural and remote residents’ lifestyle change and improvement. Based on the academic research methods, overall analysis procedures can fit as an analogy, especially for developing countries.

  6. A numerical investigation of a thermodielectric power generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, Akiva A.

    consists of four processes; the first process is a charging process, during which an electric field is applied to a thermodielectric material, causing it to acquire electrical charge on its surface (this process is analogous to the isentropic compression process of a Brayton cycle). The second process is a heating process in which the temperature of the dielectric material is increased via heat transfer from an external source. During this process, the thermodielectric material is forced to eject a portion of its surface charge because its charge storing capability decreases as the temperature increases; the ejected charge is intended for capture by external circuitry connected to the thermodielectric material, where it can be routed to an electrochemical storage device or an electromechanical device requiring high voltage direct current. The third process is a discharging process, during which the applied electric field is reduced to its initial strength (analogous to the isentropic expansion process of a Brayton cycle). The final process is a cooling process in which the temperature of the dielectric material is decreased via heat transfer from an external source, returning it to its initial temperature. Previously, predicting the performance of a thermodielectric power generator was hindered by a poor understanding of the material's thermodynamic properties and the effect unsteady heat transfer losses have on system performance. In order to improve predictive capabilities in this study, a thermodielectric equation of state was developed that relates the strength of the applied electric field, the amount of surface charge stored by the thermodielectric material, and its temperature. This state equation was then used to derive expressions for the material's thermodynamic states (internal energy, entropy), which were subsequently used to determine the optimum material properties for power generation. Next, a numerical simulation code was developed to determine the heat

  7. Benefits of solar/fossil hybrid gas turbine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    The potential benefits of solar/fossil hybrid gas turbine power systems were assessed. Both retrofit and new systems were considered from the aspects of cost of electricity, fuel conservation, operational mode, technology requirements, and fuels flexibility. Hybrid retrofit (repowering) of existing combustion (simple Brayton cycle) turbines can provide near-term fuel savings and solar experience, while new and advanced recuperated or combined cycle systems may be an attractive fuel saving and economically competitive vehicle to transition from today's gas and oil-fired powerplants to other more abundant fuels.

  8. Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, JR.G.L.

    2006-03-08

    Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

  9. High Efficiency Nuclear Power Plants Using Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rarick, Richard A.; Rangarajan, Rajmohan

    2009-01-01

    An overall system analysis approach is used to propose potential conceptual designs of advanced terrestrial nuclear power plants based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) experience and utilizing Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) thermal-to-electric energy conversion technology. In particular conceptual designs for an advanced 1 GWe power plant with turbine reheat and compressor intercooling at a 950 K turbine inlet temperature (TIT), as well as near term 100 MWe demonstration plants with TITs of 950 and 1200 K are presented. Power plant performance data were obtained for TITs ranging from 650 to 1300 K by use of a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems code which considered the interaction between major sub-systems, including the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR), heat source and heat sink heat exchangers, turbo-generator machinery, and an electric power generation and transmission system. Optional off-shore submarine installation of the power plant is a major consideration.

  10. An isothermal model of a hybrid Stirling/reverse-Brayton cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, G. F.; Maddocks, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a model of a cryogenic refrigerator that integrates a reverse-Brayton lower temperature stage with a 2-piston Stirling upper temperature stage using a rectification system of check valves and buffer volumes. The numerical model extends the isothermal Schmidt analysis of the Stirling cycle by deriving the additional dimensionless governing equations that characterize the recuperative system. Numerical errors are quantified and the results are verified against analytical solutions in the appropriate limits. The model is used to explore the effect of the rectification system's characteristics on the overall cycle's behavior. Finally, the model is used to optimize the hybrid system's design by varying the swept volume ratio and phase angle in order to maximize the refrigeration per unit of heat transfer in the recuperator and regenerator.

  11. Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume III. Analysis of concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laity, W.W.; Aase, D.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Drost, M.K.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

    1980-09-01

    A comparative analysis of solar thermal conversion concepts that are potentially suitable for development as small electric power systems (1 to 10 MWe) is given. Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces; (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting suraces; and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and the latter of the two also was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. This volume describes the systems analyses performed on all the alternative configurations of the seven generic collector concepts and the results obtained. The SOLSTEP computer code used to determine each configuration's system cost and performance is briefly described. The collector and receiver performance calculations used are also presented. The capital investment and related costs that were obtained from the systems studies are presented, and the levelized energy costs are given as a function of capacity factor obtained from the systems studies. Included also are the values of the other attributes used in the concepts' final ranking. The comments, conclusions, and recommendations developed by the PNL study team during the concept characterization and systems analysis tasks of the study are presented. (WHK)

  12. Low duty-cycle pulsed power actuation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merryman, Stephen A.; Owens, W. Todd

    1995-01-01

    Electrical actuator systems are being pursued as alternatives to hydraulic systems to reduce maintenance time, weight, and costs while increasing reliability. Additionally, safety and environmental hazards associated with the hydraulic fluids can be eliminated. For most actuation systems, the actuation process is typically pulsed with high peak power requirements but with relatively modest average power levels. For example, the peak power requirements for the shuttle solid rocket booster actuators are approximately 40 kW for one or two seconds, but the average power over the 130 second burn time is on the order of 7 kW. The power-time requirements for electrical actuators are characteristic of pulsed power technologies where the source can be sized for the average power levels while providing the capability to achieve the peak requirements. Among the options for the power source are battery systems, capacitor systems or battery-capacitor hybrid systems. Battery technologies are energy dense but deficient in power density; capacitor technologies are power dense but limited by energy density. The battery-capacitor hybrid system uses the battery to supply the average power and the capacitor to meet the peak demands. In this research effort, Chemical Double Layer (CDL) capacitor technology is being applied in the design and development of power sources for electrical actuators. CDL capacitors have many properties that make them well-suited for actuator applications. They have the highest demonstrated energy density for capacitive storage (about a factor of 5-10 less than NiCd batteries), have power densities 50 times greater than NiCd batteries, are capable of 500,000 charge-discharge cycles, can be charged at extremely high rates, and have non-explosive failure modes. Thus, CDL capacitors exhibit a combination of desirable battery and capacitor characteristics. Specifically, electrode technology patented by Auburn University is being used in the development of CDL

  13. The use of low power dual mode nuclear thermal rocket engines to support space exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of dual mode concepts is presented, focusing on advantages and problems associated with both low and high temperature dual mode conversion systems. It is concluded that dual mode nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) systems using high temperature Brayton cycle conversion technology offer a high payoff enhancement of conventional NTR, with a comparatively minor increase of technological challenge. It is recommended that NTR engines be designed so that dual mode conversion systems can be attached to them in a modular way, thus enabling the production of electric power on all missions where it is needed.

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of Electricity Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turconi, Roberto

    a systematic framework for the life cycle assessment (LCA) of electricity systems, which aimed at providing: •Scientifically sound recommendations for decision-making processes, leading to more sustainable energy systems; •Accurate and transparent LCA data for electricity supply, thereby increasing...... on aggregated modelling. The results showed that an increase in wind power causes greater emissions from other power plants in the electricity system (which need to ‘cycle’ – adjust their production – more frequently); however, considering the entire electricity system, increasing wind power penetration reduces...... the overall emissions. Electricity storage limits the amount of cycling but environmental benefits are related to the base load fleet in the system, i.e. having coal as base load causes an increase in emissions. Electricity imports and exports are likely to increase with the expansion of wind power...

  15. Simulation and parametric optimisation of thermal power plant cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravindra Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to analyse parametric studies and optimum steam extraction pressures of three different (subcritical, supercritical and ultra-supercritical coal fired power plant cycles at a particular main steam temperature of 600 °C by keeping the reheat temperature at 537 °C and condenser pressure at 0.09 bar as constant. In order to maximize the heat rate gain possible with supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions, eight stages of feed water heater arrangement with single reheater is considered. The system is optimized in such a way that the percentage exergetic losses are reduced for the increase of the exergetic efficiency and higher fuel utilization. The plant cycles are simulated and optimized by using Cycle Tempo 5.0 simulation software tool. From the simulation study, it is observed that the thermal efficiency of the three different power plant cycles obtained as 41.40, 42.48 and 43.03%, respectively. The specific coal consumption for three different power plant cycles are 0.56, 0.55 and 0.54 Tonnes/MWh. The improvement in feed water temperatures at the inlet of steam generator of respective cycles are 291, 305 and 316 °C.

  16. Power management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2007-10-02

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  17. Thermo-economic modeling of an indirectly coupled solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheddie, Denver F. [Center for Energy Studies, University of Trinidad and Tobago, Point Lisas Campus, Esperanza Road, Brechin Castle, Couva (Trinidad and Tobago); Tobago; Murray, Renique [Natural Gas Institute of the Americas, University of Trinidad and Tobago, Point Lisas Campus, Esperanza Road, Brechin Castle, Couva (Trinidad and Tobago); Tobago

    2010-12-15

    Power generation using gas turbine (GT) power plants operating on the Brayton cycle suffers from low efficiencies, resulting in poor fuel to power conversion. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is proposed for integration into a 10 MW gas turbine power plant, operating at 30% efficiency, in order to improve system efficiencies and economics. The SOFC system is indirectly coupled to the gas turbine power plant, paying careful attention to minimize the disruption to the GT operation. A thermo-economic model is developed for the hybrid power plant, and predicts an optimized power output of 20.6 MW at 49.9% efficiency. The model also predicts a break-even per-unit energy cost of USD 4.65 cents kWh{sup -1} for the hybrid system based on futuristic mass generation SOFC costs. This shows that SOFCs may be indirectly integrated into existing GT power systems to improve their thermodynamic and economic performance. (author)

  18. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture - Part A: Methodology and reference cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-08-01

    Driven by the search for the highest theoretical efficiency, in the latest years several studies investigated the integration of high temperature fuel cells in natural gas fired power plants, where fuel cells are integrated with simple or modified Brayton cycles and/or with additional bottoming cycles, and CO2 can be separated via chemical or physical separation, oxy-combustion and cryogenic methods. Focusing on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) and following a comprehensive review and analysis of possible plant configurations, this work investigates their theoretical potential efficiency and proposes two ultra-high efficiency plant configurations based on advanced intermediate-temperature SOFCs integrated with a steam turbine or gas turbine cycle. The SOFC works at atmospheric or pressurized conditions and the resulting power plant exceeds 78% LHV efficiency without CO2 capture (as discussed in part A of the work) and 70% LHV efficiency with substantial CO2 capture (part B). The power plants are simulated at the 100 MW scale with a complete set of realistic assumptions about fuel cell (FC) performance, plant components and auxiliaries, presenting detailed energy and material balances together with a second law analysis.

  19. Reactive power influence on the thermal cycling of multi-MW wind power inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the reactive power influence on the thermal cycling of power devices in grid-connected inverter for 10 MW wind turbines is investigated. Restrained by the grid codes, the allowable reactive power ranges in relation to amplitude and phase angle of the load current for a single...... converter system are first presented at different wind speeds. Furthermore, the interaction between paralleled converter systems in a wind park is also considered and analyzed. By controlling the reactive power circulated among paralleled converters, a new concept is then proposed to stabilize the thermal...... fluctuation of the power devices during wind gusts. It is concluded that the reactive power may change the thermal distribution of power devices. By properly controlling the reactive power, it is possible to achieve a more stable junction temperature in the power devices during the fluctuation of wind speed...

  20. Test results on parabolic dish concentrators for solar thermal power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents results of development testing of various solar thermal parabolic dish concentrators. The concentrators were mostly designed for the production of electric power using dish-mounted Rankine, Brayton or Stirling cycle engines, intended to be produced at low cost. Measured performance for various dishes included optical efficiencies ranging from 0.32 to 0.86 at a geometric concentration ratio of 500, and from about 0.09 to 0.85 at a geometric concentration ratio of 3000. Some malfunctions were observed. The tests should provide operating information of value in developing concentrators with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  1. Optimization of CCGT power plant and performance analysis using MATLAB/Simulink with actual operational data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Naimul; Rai, Jitendra Nath; Arora, Bharat Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    In the Modern scenario, the naturally available resources for power generation are being depleted at an alarming rate; firstly due to wastage of power at consumer end, secondly due to inefficiency of various power system components. A Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) integrates two cycles- Brayton cycle (Gas Turbine) and Rankine cycle (Steam Turbine) with the objective of increasing overall plant efficiency. This is accomplished by utilising the exhaust of Gas Turbine through a waste-heat recovery boiler to run a Steam Turbine. The efficiency of a gas turbine which ranges from 28% to 33% can hence be raised to about 60% by recovering some of the low grade thermal energy from the exhaust gas for steam turbine process. This paper is a study for the modelling of CCGT and comparing it with actual operational data. The performance model for CCGT plant was developed in MATLAB/Simulink.

  2. Development of cooling system for 66/6.9kV-20MVA REBCO superconducting transformers with Ne turbo-Brayton refrigerator and subcooled liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakuma, M.; Adachi, K.; Yun, K.; Yoshida, K.; Sato, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Umeno, T.; Konno, M.; Hayashi, H.; Eguchi, T.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We developed a turbo-Brayton refrigerator with Ne gas as a working fluid for a 3 ϕ- 66/6.9kV-2MVA superconducting transformer with coated conductors which was bath-cooled with subcooled LN2. The two-stage compressor and expansion turbine had non-contact magnetic bearings for a long maintenance interval. In the future, we intend to directly install a heat exchanger into the Glass-Fiber-Reinforced-Plastics cryostat of a transformer and make a heat exchange between the working fluid gas and subcooled LN2. In this paper we investigate the behaviour of subcooled LN2 in a test cryostat, in which heater coils were arranged side by side with a flat plate finned-tube heat exchanger. Here a He turbo-Brayton refrigerator was used as a substitute for a Ne turbo-Brayton one. The pressure at the surface of LN2 in the cryostat was one atmosphere. Just under the LN2 surface, a stationary layer of LN2 was created over the depth of 20 cm and temperature dropped from 77 K to 65 K with depth while, in the lower level than that, a natural convection flow of LN2 was formed and temperature was almost uniform over 1 m depth. The boundary plane between the stationary layer and the natural convection region was visible.

  3. Thermo-economic modeling of a solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine power plant with semi-direct coupling and anode recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheddie, Denver F. [Center for Energy Studies, University of Trinidad and Tobago, Point Lisas Campus, Esperanza Road, Brechin Castle, Couva (Trinidad and Tobago); Tobago; Murray, Renique [Natural Gas Institute of the Americas, University of Trinidad and Tobago, Point Lisas Campus, Esperanza Road, Brechin Castle, Couva (Trinidad and Tobago); Tobago

    2010-10-15

    Power generation using gas turbine (GT) power plants operating on the Brayton cycle suffers from low efficiencies, resulting in poor fuel to power conversion. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is proposed for integration into a 10 MW gas turbine power plant, operating at 30% efficiency in order to improve system efficiencies and economics. The SOFC system is semi-directly coupled to the gas turbine power plant, with careful attention paid to minimize the disruption to the GT operation. A thermo-economic model is developed for the hybrid power plant, and predicts an optimized power output of 21.6 MW at 49.2% efficiency. The model also predicts a breakeven per-unit energy cost of USD 4.70 cents /kWh for the hybrid system based on futuristic mass generation SOFC costs. Results show that SOFCs can be semi-directly integrated into existing GT power systems to improve their thermodynamic and economic performance. (author)

  4. The use of absorption refrigeration systems in combined cycle power plants; Empleo de sistemas de refrigeracion por absorcion en plantas de ciclo combinado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Paredes, H.; Ambriz, J.J.; Vargas, M.; Godinez, M.; Gomez, F.; Valdez, L.; Pantoja, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    1995-12-31

    Day after day the electric power generation tends to be done in the most efficient way in order to diminish the generation costs and the rate of environmental pollution per KWh generated. This paper discusses the application of absorption refrigeration systems for the cooling of the air entering the compressor of a gas turbine in a combined cycle, in order to increase the mass air flow and with it the turbine output. The flows with remanent energy content that are not used in a combined cycle can be used for the operation of the absorption refrigeration system. This way, the required thermal energy for the cooling system is free. With this system it is possible to raise the gas turbine generation output from 5% to 25%. [Espanol] La generacion electrica dia con dia pretende realizarse de la manera mas eficiente posible con el objeto de disminuir los costos de generacion y la tasa de contaminacion ambiental por Kwh generado. En el presente trabajo se introduce la aplicacion de sistemas de refrigeracion por absorcion para el enfriamiento del aire de entrada al compresor de la turbina de gas de un ciclo combinado, con el objeto de aumentar el flujo masico del aire y con ello la potencia de salida de la turbina. Las corrientes con contenido remanente de energia termica que no se usan en una planta de ciclo combinado pueden servir para operar el sistema de refrigeracion por absorcion. De esta manera, la energia termica requerida para el sistema de enfriamiento es gratuita. Con este sistema es posible incrementar la potencia de generacion de la turbina de gas de 5 a 25%.

  5. Buffer thermal energy storage for an air Brayton solar engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    The application of latent-heat buffer thermal energy storage to a point-focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine was studied. To demonstrate the effect of buffer thermal energy storage on engine operation, a computer program was written which models the recuperator, receiver, and thermal storage device as finite-element thermal masses. Actual operating or predicted performance data are used for all components, including the rotating equipment. Based on insolation input and a specified control scheme, the program predicts the Brayton engine operation, including flows, temperatures, and pressures for the various components, along with the engine output power. An economic parametric study indicates that the economic viability of buffer thermal energy storage is largely a function of the achievable engine life.

  6. Flight experiment of thermal energy storage. [for spacecraft power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, David

    1989-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) enables a solar dynamic system to deliver constant electric power through periods of sun and shade. Brayton and Stirling power systems under current considerations for missions in the near future require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1300+ K range. TES materials that meet these requirements fall into the fluoride family of salts. Salts shrink as they solidify, a change reaching 30 percent for some salts. Hot spots can develop in the TES container or the container can become distorted if the melting salt cannot expand elsewhere. Analysis of the transient, two-phase phenomenon is being incorporated into a three-dimensional computer code. The objective of the flight program is to verify the predictions of the code, particularly of the void location and its effect on containment temperature. The four experimental packages comprising the program will be the first tests of melting and freezing conducted under microgravity.

  7. Solar powered Stirling cycle electrical generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.

    1991-01-01

    Under NASA's Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI), the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing the technology needed for free-piston Stirling engines as a candidate power source for space systems in the late 1990's and into the next century. Space power requirements include high efficiency, very long life, high reliability, and low vibration. Furthermore, system weight and operating temperature are important. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for a highly reliable engine with long life because it has only a few moving parts, non-contacting gas bearings, and can be hermetically sealed. These attributes of the free-piston Stirling engine also make it a viable candidate for terrestrial applications. In cooperation with the Department of Energy, system designs are currently being completed that feature the free-piston Stirling engine for terrestrial applications. Industry teams were assembled and are currently completing designs for two Advanced Stirling Conversion Systems utilizing technology being developed under the NASA CSTI Program. These systems, when coupled with a parabolic mirror to collect the solar energy, are capable of producing about 25 kW of electricity to a utility grid. Industry has identified a niche market for dish Stirling systems for worldwide remote power application. They believe that these niche markets may play a major role in the introduction of Stirling products into the commercial market.

  8. Test and evaluation of a solar-powered laboratory turbocompressor system for building heating and cooling. Final technical report. [Rankine cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biancardi, F.R.; Meader, M.D. Melikian, G.; Landerman, A.M.; Hall, J.B.

    1977-03-01

    Extensive testing of an available laboratory Rankine-cycle turbocompressor cooling system was conducted over a range of temperatures consistent with present-day flat-plate and advanced medium-concentration solar collectors and at air- and water-cooled condenser temperature levels. Over 700 hours of testing demonstrated the high performance potential of such systems over a wide range of operational conditions and has provided design guidelines and preliminary specifications for future systems. Minor modifications were made to the laboratory system. These modifications included: (1) demonstration of three tons of cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of about 160 F, (2) efficient operation (i.e., COP of approximately 0.45) at turbine inlet temperatures of 240 F at air-cooled condenser temperatures, and (3) a COP in excess of 0.5 and more than five tons of cooling at system turbine inlet temperature levels of 200 F with water-cooled condenser temperatures. Generally, the test data correlated very well with detailed analytical design and off-design performance projections over the range of operating conditions. These data correlations indicate that the achieved performance levels were limited by mismatching of the existing turbomachinery elements. Data and experience obtained in this program substantiate the judgment that incorporating well-matched turbomachinery, based on existing technology, would result in the achievement of the full potential of a turbocompressor system for both air- and water-cooled operation. Prototype turbocompressor systems can be designed and developed which demonstrate high performance, (i.e., a COP approaching 1.0 and 0.75 for water and air-cooled operation, respectively), versatile operational features, permitting use of different collectors with a range of temperature capability, and potential for significant energy savings when used as solar-powered heating and cooling systems.

  9. Design considerations of a power supply system for fast cycling superconducting accelerator magnets of 2 Tesla b-field generated by a conductor of 100 kA current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Steve; Piekarz, Henryk; Pfeffer, Howie; Claypool, Brad; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Recently proposed fast cycling accelerators for proton drivers (SF-SPS, CERN and SF-MR, SF-BOOSTER, FNAL) neutrino sources require development of new magnet technology. In support of this magnet development a power supply system will need to be developed that can support the high current and high rate of power swing required by the fast cycling (1 sec rise and fall in the SF-MR, 5Hz in Booster). This paper will outline a design concept for a +/- 2000 V and 100,000 A fast ramping power supply system. This power supply design is in support of a 6.44 km magnet system at 0.020 H and 330 m 5 Hz, 0.00534 H superconducting loads. The design description will include the layout and plan for extending the present FNAL Main Injector style ramping power supply to the higher currents needed for this operation. This will also include the design for a harmonic filter and power factor corrector that will be needed to control the large power swings caused by the fast cycle time. A conceptual design for the current regulation system and control will also be outlined. The power circuit design will include the bridge, filter and transformer plan based on existing designs.

  10. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Supercritical Mercury Power Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, A.S. Jr.

    1969-04-15

    An heat engine is considered which employs supercritical mercury as the working fluid and a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator for thermal to electrical energy conversion. The main thrust of the paper is power cycle thermodynamics, where constraints are imposed by utilizing a MHD generator operating between supercritical, electrically conducting states of the working fluid; and, pump work is accomplished with liquid mercury. The temperature range is approximately 300 to 2200 K and system pressure is > 1,500 atm. Equilibrium and transport properties are carefully considered since these are known to vary radically in the vicinity of the critical point, which is found near the supercritical states of interest. A maximum gross plant efficiency is 20% with a regenerator effectiveness of 90% and greater, a cycle pressure ratio of two, and with highly efficient pump and generator. Certain specified cycle irreversibilities and others such as heat losses and heat exchanger pressure drops, which are not accounted for explicitly, reduce the gross plant efficiency to a few per cent. Experimental efforts aimed at practical application of the power cycle are discouraged by the marginal thermodynamic performance predicted by this study, unless such applications are insensitive to gross cycle efficiency.

  11. Technical comparison between Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Pablo Andres Silva; Venturini, Osvaldo Jose; Lora, Electo Eduardo Silva [Federal University of Itajuba - UNIFEI, MG (Brazil). Excellence Group in Thermal Power and Distributed Generation - NEST], e-mails: osvaldo@unifei.edu.br, electo@unifei.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    Among the emerging clean coal technologies for power generation, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) systems are receiving considerable attention as a potentially attractive option to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The main reason is because these systems has high efficiency and low emissions in comparison with traditional power generation plants. Currently in IGCC and NGCC systems at demonstration stage is been considered to implement CCS technology. CO{sub 2} emissions can be avoided in a gasification-based power plant because by transferring almost all carbon compounds to CO{sub 2} through the water gas shift (WGS) reaction, then removing the CO{sub 2} before it is diluted in the combustion stage. The aim of this study is to compare the technical performance of an IGCC system that uses Brazilian coal and petroleum coke as fuel with a NGCC system, with the same fixed output power of 450 MW. The first section of this paper presents the plant configurations of IGCC systems. The following section presents an analysis of NGCC technology. (author)

  12. Phase change energy storage for solar dynamic power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, F. P.; Taylor, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a transient computer simulation that was developed to study phase change energy storage techniques for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic (SD) power systems. Such SD systems may be used in future growth SSF configurations. Two solar dynamic options are considered in this paper: Brayton and Rankine. Model elements consist of a single node receiver and concentrator, and takes into account overall heat engine efficiency and power distribution characteristics. The simulation not only computes the energy stored in the receiver phase change material (PCM), but also the amount of the PCM required for various combinations of load demands and power system mission constraints. For a solar dynamic power system in low earth orbit, the amount of stored PCM energy is calculated by balancing the solar energy input and the energy consumed by the loads corrected by an overall system efficiency. The model assumes an average 75 kW SD power system load profile which is connected to user loads via dedicated power distribution channels. The model then calculates the stored energy in the receiver and subsequently estimates the quantity of PCM necessary to meet peaking and contingency requirements. The model can also be used to conduct trade studies on the performance of SD power systems using different storage materials.

  13. Limit cycles in quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Patrick

    2015-04-27

    In this thesis we investigate Limit Cycles in Quantum Systems. Limit cycles are a renormalization group (RG) topology. When degrees of freedom are integrated out, the coupling constants flow periodically in a closed curve. The presence of limit cycles is restricted by the necessary condition of discrete scale invariance. A signature of discrete scale invariance and limit cycles is log-periodic behavior. The first part of this thesis is concerned with the study of limit cycles with the similarity renormalization group (SRG). Limit cycles are mainly investigated within conventional renormalization group frameworks, where degrees of freedom, which are larger than a given cutoff, are integrated out. In contrast, in the SRG potentials are unitarily transformed and thereby obtain a band-diagonal structure. The width of the band structure can be regarded as an effective cutoff. We investigate the appearance of limit cycles in the SRG evolution. Our aim is to extract signatures as well as the scaling factor of the limit cycle. We consider the 1/R{sup 2}-potential in a two-body system and a three-body system with large scattering lengths. Both systems display a limit cycle. Besides the frequently used kinetic energy generator we apply the exponential and the inverse generator. In the second part of this thesis, Limit Cycles at Finite Density, we examine the pole structure of the scattering amplitude for distinguishable fermions at zero temperature in the medium. Unequal masses and a filled Fermi sphere for each fermion species are considered. We focus on negative scattering lengths and the unitary limit. The properties of the three-body spectrum in the medium and implications for the phase structure of ultracold Fermi gases are discussed.

  14. Effects of thermal cycling on aluminum metallization of power diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Mads; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup; Kristensen, Peter Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of aluminum metallization on top of power electronic chips is a well-known wear out phenomenon under power cycling conditions. However, the origins of reconstruction are still under discussion. In the current study, a method for carrying out passive thermal cycling of power diodes ...

  15. Optimizing design of converters using power cycling lifetime models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Ørndrup; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    Converter power cycling lifetime depends heavily on converter operation point. A lifetime model of a single power module switched mode power supply with wide input voltage range is shown. A lifetime model is created using a power loss model, a thermal model and a model for power cycling capability...... with a given mission profile. A method to improve the expected lifetime of the converter is presented, taking into account switching frequency, input voltage and transformer turns ratio....

  16. Pebble Bed Reactor Power Systems for Lunar Outposts: Long Operation Life and End-of Life Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Schriener, Timothy M.

    2010-09-01

    The Pellet Bed Reactor(PeBR) and power system for supporting future lunar outposts offer many desirable design, operation and safety features and address post operation storage of spent nuclear fuel. In addition to its long, full power operation life of 66 year, the PeBR is launched without fuel and loaded after placement below grade on the lunar surface with spherical fuel pellets, designed to fully contain fission products. The fuel pellets(~1.0 cm dia.) are launched separately in subcritical canisters. The post-operation PeBR is stored below grade for > 300 year to allow the radioactivity in the spent fuel to decay to a sufficiently low level. The PeBR power system, designed for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and energy conversion, nominally generates ~100 kWe at a thermal efficiency of ~ 21%. In addition to the sectored reactor core, it uses three Closed Brayton Cycle loops with centrifugal flow turbo-machines for energy conversion and He-Xe(40 g/mol) binary gas mixture working fluid and reactor coolant.

  17. Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

    2010-08-31

    The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

  18. Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power Systems (MCNSPS) conceptual design and evaluation report. Volume 1: Objectives, summary results and introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetch, J. R.

    1988-09-01

    The objective was to determine which reactor, conversion, and radiator technologies would best fulfill future Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power System Requirements. Specifically, the requirement was 10 megawatts for 5 years of full power operation and 10 years systems life on orbit. A variety of liquid metal and gas cooled reactors, static and dynamic conversion systems, and passive and dynamic radiators were considered. Four concepts were selected for more detailed study. The concepts are: a gas cooled reactor with closed cycle Brayton turbine-alternator conversion with heat pipe and pumped tube-fin heat rejection; a lithium cooled reactor with a free piston Stirling engine-linear alternator and a pumped tube-fin radiator; a lithium cooled reactor with potassium Rankine turbine-alternator and heat pipe radiator; and a lithium cooled incore thermionic static conversion reactor with a heat pipe radiator. The systems recommended for further development to meet a 10 megawatt long life requirement are the lithium cooled reactor with the K-Rankine conversion and heat pipe radiator, and the lithium cooled incore thermionic reactor with heat pipe radiator.

  19. Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power Systems (MCNSPS) conceptual design and evaluation report. Volume 4: Concepts selection, conceptual designs, recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetch, J. R.

    1988-09-01

    A study was conducted by NASA Lewis Research Center for the Triagency SP-100 program office. The objective was to determine which reactor, conversion and radiator technologies would best fulfill future Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power System Requirements. The requirement was 10 megawatts for 5 years of full power operation and 10 years system life on orbit. A variety of liquid metal and gas cooled reactors, static and dynamic conversion systems, and passive and dynamic radiators were considered. Four concepts were selected for more detailed study: (1) a gas cooled reactor with closed cycle Brayton turbine-alternator conversion with heatpipe and pumped tube fin rejection, (2) a Lithium cooled reactor with a free piston Stirling engine-linear alternator and a pumped tube-fin radiator,(3) a Lithium cooled reactor with a Potassium Rankine turbine-alternator and heat pipe radiator, and (4) a Lithium cooled incore thermionic static conversion reactor with a heat pipe radiator. The systems recommended for further development to meet a 10 megawatt long life requirement are the Lithium cooled reactor with the K-Rankine conversion and heat pipe radiator, and the Lithium cooled incore thermionic reactor with heat pipe radiator.

  20. Electric power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Weedy, B M; Jenkins, N; Ekanayake, J B; Strbac, G

    2012-01-01

    The definitive textbook for Power Systems students, providing a grounding in essential power system theory while also focusing on practical power engineering applications. Electric Power Systems has been an essential book in power systems engineering for over thirty years. Bringing the content firmly up-to-date whilst still retaining the flavour of Weedy's extremely popular original, this Fifth Edition has been revised by experts Nick Jenkins, Janaka Ekanayake and Goran Strbac. This wide-ranging text still covers all of the fundamental power systems subjects but is now e

  1. Fiscal 1995 survey of promotion of the geothermal development. Report on a usage feasibility test of a small scale geothermal binary cycle power generation system; 1995 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Chusho chinetsu binary hatsuden system jissho shiken hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    In this survey, studies for popularization and practical utilization of small and medium size geothermal binary cycle power systems which assesses low and medium temperature geothermal resources were conducted, and studies for development of the system to be introduced for practical use and for promotion of the popularization were made. A study was carried out of preconditions and various conditions of a demonstrative test plant (100kW class, 500kW class) in view of the initial cost of the actual plant, and an analysis was made of the power generation cost. Acceptability of the demonstrative test plant (100kW class) was examined to analyze problems on the introduction. A thermodynamic analysis was made of the output of geothermal binary cycle power generation. Analysis/evaluation of the results of the 100kW demonstrative test plant were carried out in view of the operation results of the plant of the same kind, and checks/reviews were conducted of performance and reliability of the system, equipment simplification, etc. Inspection of the system was made in the stage of design/manufacture of the 500kW demonstrative test plant. Concerning the spread/expansion of the system, studied were multiple stage geothermal utilization and PR promotion method. 14 refs., 62 figs., 55 tabs.

  2. Laser-powered MHD generators for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1986-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion systems of the pulsed laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave, plasma MHD, and liquid-metal MHD (LMMHD) types are assessed for their potential as space-based laser-to-electrical power converters. These systems offer several advantages as energy converters relative to the present chemical, nuclear, and solar devices, including high conversion efficiency, simple design, high-temperature operation, high power density, and high reliability. Of these systems, the Brayton cycle liquid-metal MHD system appears to be the most attractive. The LMMHD technology base is well established for terrestrial applications, particularly with regard to the generator, mixer, and other system components. However, further research is required to extend this technology base to space applications and to establish the technology required to couple the laser energy into the system most efficiently. Continued research on each of the three system types is recommended.

  3. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.

  4. Radioisotope Power System Pool Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusick, Jeffrey J.; Bolotin, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for NASA deep space science missions have historically used static thermoelectric-based designs because they are highly reliable, and their radioisotope heat sources can be passively cooled throughout the mission life cycle. Recently, a significant effort to develop a dynamic RPS, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), was conducted by NASA and the Department of Energy, because Stirling based designs offer energy conversion efficiencies four times higher than heritage thermoelectric designs; and the efficiency would proportionately reduce the amount of radioisotope fuel needed for the same power output. However, the long term reliability of a Stirling based design is a concern compared to thermoelectric designs, because for certain Stirling system architectures the radioisotope heat sources must be actively cooled via the dynamic operation of Stirling converters throughout the mission life cycle. To address this reliability concern, a new dynamic Stirling cycle RPS architecture is proposed called the RPS Pool Concept.

  5. Power system relaying

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, Stanley H; Niemira, James K

    2013-01-01

    The previous three editions of Power System Relaying offer comprehensive and accessible coverage of the theory and fundamentals of relaying and have been widely adopted on university and industry courses worldwide. With the third edition, the authors have added new and detailed descriptions of power system phenomena such as stability, system-wide protection concepts and discussion of historic outages. Power System Relaying, 4th Edition continues its role as an outstanding textbook on power system protection for senior and graduate students in the field of electric power engineering and a refer

  6. Design and Modelling of Small Scale Low Temperature Power Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wronski, Jorrit

    impact on the work output of the expander.The final part of this report deals with the performance of plate heat exchangers. Several plate heat exchanger correlations were reviewed focussing on their applicability to ORC systems. A framework for dynamic heat exchanger modelling was developed......he work presented in this report contributes to the state of the art within design and modelling of small scale low temperature power cycles. The study is divided into three main parts: (i) fluid property evaluation, (ii) expansion device investigations and (iii) heat exchanger performance...... times and below 10−7 away from the phase boundaries.Regarding expansion devices for small scale organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems,this work focussed on reciprocating machines. A prototype of a reciprocating expander with a swept volume of 736 cm3 was tested and modelled. he model was written in object...

  7. Shipboard electrical power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Mukund R

    2011-01-01

    Shipboard Electrical Power Systems addresses new developments in this growing field. Focused on the trend toward electrification to power commercial shipping, naval, and passenger vessels, this book helps new or experienced engineers master cutting-edge methods for power system design, control, protection, and economic use of power. Provides Basic Transferable Skills for Managing Electrical Power on Ships or on LandThis groundbreaking book is the first volume of its kind to illustrate optimization of all aspects of shipboard electrical power systems. Applying author Mukund Patel's rare combina

  8. Electrofishing power requirements in relation to duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L.E.; Dolan, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Under controlled laboratory conditions we measured the electrical peak power required to immobilize (i.e., narcotize or tetanize) fish of various species and sizes with duty cycles (i.e., percentage of time a field is energized) ranging from 1.5% to 100%. Electrofishing effectiveness was closely associated with duty cycle. Duty cycles of 10-50% required the least peak power to immobilize fish; peak power requirements increased gradually above 50% duty cycle and sharply below 10%. Small duty cycles can increase field strength by making possible higher instantaneous peak voltages that allow the threshold power needed to immobilize fish to radiate farther away from the electrodes. Therefore, operating within the 10-50% range of duty cycles would allow a larger radius of immobilization action than operating with higher duty cycles. This 10-50% range of duty cycles also coincided with some of the highest margins of difference between the electrical power required to narcotize and that required to tetanize fish. This observation is worthy of note because proper use of duty cycle could help reduce the mortality associated with tetany documented by some authors. Although electrofishing with intermediate duty cycles can potentially increase effectiveness of electrofishing, our results suggest that immobilization response is not fully accounted for by duty cycle because of a potential interaction between pulse frequency and duration that requires further investigation.

  9. Examination of the effect of system pressure ratio and heat recuperation on the efficiency of a coal based gas turbine fuel cell hybrid power generation system with CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanOsdol, J.G.; Gemmen, R.S.; Liese, E.A

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines two coal-based hybrid configurations that employ separated anode and cathode streams for the capture and compression of CO2. One configuration uses a standard Brayton cycle, and the other adds heat recuperation ahead of the fuel cell. Results show that peak efficiencies near 55% are possible, regardless of cycle configuration, including the cost in terms of energy production of CO2 capture and compression. The power that is required to capture and compress the CO2 is shown to be approximately 15% of the total plant power.

  10. COMBINED CYCLE GAS TURBINE FOR THERMAL POWER STATIONS: EXPERIENCE IN DESIGNING AND OPERATION, PROSPECTS IN APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Karnitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has reviewed main world tendencies in power consumption and power system structure. Main schemes of combined cycle gas turbines have been considered in the paper. The paper contains an operational analysis of CCGT blocks that are operating within the Belarusian energy system. The analysis results have been given in tables showing main operational indices of power blocks

  11. On q-power cycles in cubic graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensmail, Julien

    2016-01-01

    In the context of a conjecture of Erdos and Gyárfás, we consider, for any q ≥ 2, the existence of q-power cycles (i.e. with length a power of q) in cubic graphs. We exhibit constructions showing that, for every q ≥ 3, there exist arbitrarily large cubic graphs with no q-power cycles. Concerning...... the remaining case q = 2 (which corresponds to the conjecture of Erdos and Gyárfás), we show that there exist arbitrarily large cubic graphs whose only 2-power cycles have length 4 only, or 8 only....

  12. On q-power cycles in cubic graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensmail, Julien

    2017-01-01

    In the context of a conjecture of Erdos and Gyárfás, we consider, for any q ≥ 2, the existence of q-power cycles (i.e. with length a power of q) in cubic graphs. We exhibit constructions showing that, for every q ≥ 3, there exist arbitrarily large cubic graphs with no q-power cycles. Concerning...... the remaining case q = 2 (which corresponds to the conjecture of Erdos and Gyárfás), we show that there exist arbitrarily large cubic graphs whose only 2-power cycles have length 4 only, or 8 only....

  13. Wireless power transfer system

    OpenAIRE

    Arai, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of recent wireless power transfer systems. The issue of wireless power transfer is to achieve a highly efficient system with small positioning errors of the facilities setting. Several theories have been presented to obtain precise system design. This paper presents a summary of design theory for short range power transfer systems and detailed formulations based on a circuit model and an array of infinitesimal dipoles. In addition to these theories, this paper in...

  14. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates. Volume IX is divided into three sections: Chapter 1, Reactor Systems; Chapter 2, Fuel-Cycle Systems; and the Appendixes. Chapter 1 contains the characterizations of the following 12 reactor types: light-water reactor; heavy-water reactor; water-cooled breeder reactor; high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; gas-cooled fast reactor; liquid-metal fast breeder reactor; spectral-shift-controlled reactor; accelerator-driven reactor; molten-salt reactor; gaseous-core reactor; tokamak fusion-fisson hybrid reactor; and fast mixed-spectrum reactor. Chapter 2 contains similar information developed for fuel-cycle facilities in the following categories: mining and milling; conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication; spent fuel reprocessing; waste handling and disposal; and transportation of nuclear materials.

  15. Overview of waste heat utilization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy truck diesel engine rejects a significant fraction of its fuel energy in the form of waste heat. Historically, the Department of Energy has supported technology efforts for utilization of the diesel exhaust heat. Specifically, the Turbocompound and the Organic Rankine Cycle System (ORCS) have demonstrated that meaningful improvements in highway fuel economy can be realized through waste heat utilization. For heat recovery from the high temperature exhaust of future adiabatic diesel engines, the DOE/NASA are investigating a variety of alternatives based on the Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling power cycles. Initial screening results indicate that systems of this type offer a fuel savings advantage over the turbocompound system. Capital and maintenance cost projections, however, indicate that the alternative power cycles are not competitive on an economic payback basis. Plans call for continued analysis in an attempt to identify a cost effective configuration with adequate fuel savings potential.

  16. Numerical evaluation of the Kalina cycle for concentrating solar power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modi, Anish

    Concentrating solar power plants use a number of reflecting mirrors to focus and convert the incident solar energy to heat, and a power cycle to convert this heat into electricity. One of the key challenges currently faced by the solar industry is the high cost of electricity production....... These costs may be driven down by developing more cost-effective plant components and improving the system designs. This thesis focuses on the power cycle aspect of the concentrating solar power plants by studying the use a Kalina cycle with ammonia-water mixtures as the cycle working fluid. The potential...... of using a Kalina cycle is evaluated with a thermoeconomic optimization with a turbine inlet temperature of 500 C for a central receiver solar power plant with direct vapour generation, and 370 C for a parabolic trough solar power plant with Therminol VP-1 as the solar field heat transfer fluid. No thermal...

  17. Integrated propulsion and power modeling for bimodal nuclear thermal rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Joshua

    Bimodal nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) engines have been shown to reduce the weight of space vehicles to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by utilizing a common reactor for propulsion and power generation. These savings lead to reduced launch vehicle costs and/or increased mission safety and capability. Experimental work of the Rover/NERVA program demonstrated the feasibility of NTR systems for trajectories to Mars. Numerous recent studies have demonstrated the economic and performance benefits of BNTR operation. Relatively little, however, is known about the reactor-level operation of a BNTR engine. The objective of this dissertation is to develop a numerical BNTR engine model in order to study the feasibility and component-level impact of utilizing a NERVA-derived reactor as a heat source for both propulsion and power. The primary contribution is to provide the first-of-its-kind model and analysis of a NERVA-derived BNTR engine. Numerical component models have been modified and created for the NERVA reactor fuel elements and tie tubes, including 1-D coolant thermodynamics and radial thermal conduction with heat generation. A BNTR engine system model has been created in order to design and analyze an engine employing an expander-cycle nuclear rocket and Brayton cycle power generator using the same reactor. Design point results show that a 316 MWt reactor produces a thrust and specific impulse of 66.6 kN and 917 s, respectively. The same reactor can be run at 73.8 kWt to produce the necessary 16.7 kW electric power with a Brayton cycle generator. This demonstrates the feasibility of BNTR operation with a NERVA-derived reactor but also indicates that the reactor control system must be able to operate with precision across a wide power range, and that the transient analysis of reactor decay heat merits future investigation. Results also identify a significant reactor pressure-drop limitation during propulsion and power-generation operation that is caused by poor tie tube

  18. DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-05-01

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

  19. Preliminary Study of the Supercritical CO{sub 2} Hybrid Cycle for the HTGR Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong Jun; Ahn, Yoonhan; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This study was conducted to explore the potential of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle for the HTGR application. The S-CO{sub 2} cycle is being considered as a PCS due to its high thermal efficiency, simplicity, compactness and so on. Generally, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is characterized as a highly recuperated cycle which means that to achieve high thermal efficiency, the cycle requires a highly effective recuperator. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) showed that direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompressing Brayton cycle to the HTGR or the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is difficult to achieve high thermal efficiency due to the mismatch of the temperature difference between the temperature drop of helium as the primary reactor coolant and the temperature rise of CO{sub 2} as the PCS coolant through an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX). Therefore, our research team suggests a novel S-CO{sub 2} cycle configuration, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton and Rankine hybrid cycle, to solve this limitation. This S-CO{sub 2} hybrid concept is utilizing the waste heat of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle as heat input to the S-CO{sub 2} Rankine cycle. Dividing the thermal capacity of the heat source in to the Brayton cycle part and Rankine cycle part of the S-CO{sub 2} hybrid cycle appropriately, the temperature difference at the IHX could be reduced, therefore the net system performance and operating range can be improved. In this study, the ANL research is reviewed by the in-house cycle analysis codes developed by the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) research team. And the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton and Rankine hybrid cycle is studied as a PCS for the VHTR condition which was utilized by ANL research team; it was assumed that the core outlet temperature to be 850 .deg. C and the core inlet temperature of 400 .deg. C.

  20. Stochastic power system operation

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines how to economically and reliably operate a power system with high levels of renewable generation which are stochastic in nature. It outlines the challenges for system operators, and suggests tools and methods for meeting this challenge, which is one of the most fundamental since large scale power networks were instituted. The Ireland power system, due to its nature and level of renewable generation, is considered as an example in this paper.

  1. Advanced Turbomachinery Components for Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Michael [Gas Technology Inst., Woodland Hills, CA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Six indirectly heated supercritical CO2 (SCO2 ) Brayton cycles with turbine inlet conditions of 1300°F and 4000 psia with varying plant capacities from 10MWe to 550MWe were analyzed. 550 MWe plant capacity directly heated SCO2 Brayton cycles with turbine inlet conditions of 2500°F and 4000 psia were also analyzed. Turbomachinery configurations and conceptual designs for both indirectly and directly heated cycles were developed. Optimum turbomachinery and generator configurations were selected and the resulting analysis provides validation that the turbomachinery conceptual designs meet efficiency performance targets. Previously identified technology gaps were updated based on these conceptual designs. Material compatibility testing was conducted for materials typically used in turbomachinery housings, turbine disks and blades. Testing was completed for samples in unstressed and stressed conditions. All samples exposed to SCO2 showed some oxidation, the extent of which varied considerably between the alloys tested. Examination of cross sections of the stressed samples found no evidence of cracking due to SCO2 exposure.

  2. Rankine cycle system and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-09-09

    A Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system uses a receiver with a maximum liquid working fluid level lower than the minimum liquid working fluid level of a sub-cooler of the waste heat recovery system. The receiver may have a position that is physically lower than the sub-cooler's position. A valve controls transfer of fluid between several of the components in the waste heat recovery system, especially from the receiver to the sub-cooler. The system may also have an associated control module.

  3. Optimization in power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Geraldo R.M. da [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses, partially, the advantages and the disadvantages of the optimal power flow. It shows some of the difficulties of implementation and proposes solutions. An analysis is made comparing the power flow, BIGPOWER/CESP, and the optimal power flow, FPO/SEL, developed by the author, when applied to the CEPEL-ELETRONORTE and CESP systems. (author) 8 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Modelling and Improvement of Thermal Cycling in Power Electronics for Motor Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernica, Ionut; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the dynamical change of the thermal stress in the power devices is one of the major factors that have influences on the overall efficiency and reliability of power electronics. The main objective of this paper consists of identifying the main parameters that affect the thermal...... cycling of power devices in a motor drive application and modelling their impact on the thermal stress. The motor drive system together with the thermal cycling in the power semiconductors have been modelled, and after investigating the dynamic behavior of the system, adverse temperature swings...... thermal response of the power devices is validated through experimental results....

  5. Modelling and Improvement of Thermal Cycling in Power Electronics for Motor Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernica, Ionut; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    cycling of power devices in a motor drive application and modelling their impact on the thermal stress. The motor drive system together with the thermal cycling in the power semiconductors have been modelled, and after investigating the dynamic behavior of the system, adverse temperature swings......It is well known that the dynamical change of the thermal stress in the power devices is one of the major factors that have influences on the overall efficiency and reliability of power electronics. The main objective of this paper consists of identifying the main parameters that affect the thermal...... thermal response of the power devices is validated through experimental results....

  6. Nuclear fusion systems analysis research. FY 1975 annual report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weatherwax, R.K. (ed.)

    1975-12-31

    This report summarizes research conducted during FY 1975 on the parametric systems analysis of fusion central power stations. As described in the report the methodology being pursued provides for a phased analysis starting with simple ''nominal'' parameters and associated computer codes and progressing to more complex functional models and then to physically based mathematical models for the systems of major significance in future power station viability. The nominal parameter analysis for preliminary screening only derives from consideration of extant reactor point designs and defines a nominal 5000 MWt reactor with either a 900 or 1250 K peak blanket coolant temperature. Functionalized performance and cost models are described for helium Brayton cycle, steam Rankine cycle and binary cycle electric power generation systems.

  7. Space Nuclear Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Fission power and propulsion systems can enable exciting space exploration missions. These include bases on the moon and Mars; and the exploration, development, and utilization of the solar system. In the near-term, fission surface power systems could provide abundant, constant, cost-effective power anywhere on the surface of the Moon or Mars, independent of available sunlight. Affordable access to Mars, the asteroid belt, or other destinations could be provided by nuclear thermal rockets. In the further term, high performance fission power supplies could enable both extremely high power levels on planetary surfaces and fission electric propulsion vehicles for rapid, efficient cargo and crew transfer. Advanced fission propulsion systems could eventually allow routine access to the entire solar system. Fission systems could also enable the utilization of resources within the solar system.

  8. Power system state estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Mukhtar

    2012-01-01

    State estimation is one of the most important functions in power system operation and control. This area is concerned with the overall monitoring, control, and contingency evaluation of power systems. It is mainly aimed at providing a reliable estimate of system voltages. State estimator information flows to control centers, where critical decisions are made concerning power system design and operations. This valuable resource provides thorough coverage of this area, helping professionals overcome challenges involving system quality, reliability, security, stability, and economy.Engineers are

  9. Thermionic reactors for space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griaznov, Georgii M.; Zhabotinskii, Evgenii E.; Serbin, Victor I.; Zrodnikov, Anatolii V.; Pupko, Victor Ia.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Usov, V. A.; Nikolaev, Iu. V.

    Compact thermionic nuclear reactor systems with satisfactory mass performance are competitive with space nuclear power systems based on the organic Rankine and closed Brayton cycles. The mass characteristics of the thermionic space nuclear power system are better than that of the solar power system for power levels beyond about 10 kWe. Longlife thermionic fuel element requirements, including their optimal dimensions, and common requirements for the in-core thermionic reactor design are formulated. Thermal and fast in-core thermionic reactors are considered and the ranges of their sensible use are discussed. Some design features of the fast in-core thermionic reactors cores (power range to 1 MWe) including a choice of coolants are discussed. Mass and dimensional performance for thermionic nuclear power reactor system are assessed. It is concluded that thermionic space nuclear power systems are promising power supplies for spacecrafts and that a single basic type of thermionic fuel element may be used for power requirements ranging to several hundred kWe.

  10. Air bottoming cycle, an alternative to combined cycles. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaikko, J. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2002-02-01

    In this work, the idea of Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) has been studied. The objectives for the work have been to establish an understanding of the concept for power and heat generation as well as to find - if possible - feasible concepts for future use in the Swedish energy system. Combined cycle in power generation is an established technology. In the conventional combined cycle, a gas turbine works as a topping cycle together with the steam (Rankine) bottoming cycle. In the ABC the steam bottoming cycle is replaced with a gas turbine (Brayton) bottoming cycle having air as a working fluid. The two gas turbines are thermally connected over a gas-to-gas heat exchanger. This concept promises savings in weight and cost, as well as operating benefits, compared to the Rankine bottoming technology. The ABC has been modelled using a heat balance program, and a parametric study for the concept optimisation as well as for off-design analysis has been performed. Performance of the ABC has been compared to other, established technologies. A preliminary economic evaluation has been made. As a result of the study, it is clarified that the Rankine bottoming cycle with steam remains superior to the ABC as regards electrical efficiency in the medium and large power scale. For small-scale applications (<10 MW{sub e}) where the thermodynamic advantage of the Rankine cycle is not dominating any longer and its economy is burdened by the heavy investment structure, the ABC becomes the better alternative for energy utilisation. A preliminary economic evaluation shows that (at energy prices autumn 2000) the ABC is at the same level as the comparable small-scale cogeneration installations. Due to high power-to-heat ratio however, higher electricity prices will favour the ABC. One interesting feature of the ABC is that about 50% of the dissipated low-value heat from the cycle is carried by clean (sterile) air at the temperature around 200 deg C. This air can be utilised for space heating or

  11. Air bottoming cycle, an alternative to combined cycles. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaikko, J. [Royal Inst. of Techn., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2001-10-01

    In this work, the idea of Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) has been studied. The objectives for the work have been to establish an understanding of the concept for power and heat generation as well as to find - if possible - feasible concepts for future use in the Swedish energy system. Combined cycle in power generation is an established technology. In the conventional combined cycle, a gas turbine works as a topping cycle together with the steam (Rankine) bottoming cycle. In the ABC the steam bottoming cycle is replaced with a gas turbine (Brayton) bottoming cycle having air as a working fluid. The two gas turbines are thermally connected over a gas-to-gas heat exchanger. This concept promises savings in weight and cost, as well as operating benefits, compared to the Rankine bottoming technology. The ABC has been modelled using a heat balance program, and a parametric study for the concept optimisation as well as for off-design analysis has been performed. Performance of the ABC has been compared to other, established technologies. A preliminary economic evaluation has been made. As a result of the study, it is clarified that the Rankine bottoming cycle with steam remains superior to the ABC as regards electrical efficiency in the medium and large power scale. For small-scale applications (<10 MW{sub e}) where the thermodynamic advantage of the Rankine cycle is not dominating any longer and its economy is burdened by the heavy investment structure, the ABC becomes the better alternative for energy utilisation. A preliminary economic evaluation shows that (at energy prices autumn 2000) the ABC is at the same level as the comparable small-scale cogeneration installations. Due to high power-to-heat ratio however, higher electricity prices will favour the ABC. One interesting feature of the ABC is that about 50% of the dissipated low-value heat from the cycle is carried by clean (sterile) air at the temperature around 200 deg C. This air can be utilised for space heating or

  12. HEAT RECOVERY FROM A NATURAL GAS POWERED INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE BY CO2 TRANSCRITICAL POWER CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Farzaneh-Gord

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides details of energy accounting of a natural gas powered internal combustion engine and achievable work of a utilized CO2 power cycle. Based on experimental performance analysis of a new designed IKCO (Iran Khodro Company 1.7 litre natural gas powered engine, full energy accounting of the engine were carried out on various engine speeds and loads. Further, various CO2 transcritical power cycle configurations have been appointed to take advantages of exhaust and coolant water heat lost. Based on thermodynamic analysis, the amount of recoverable work obtainable by CO2 transcritical power cycles have been calculated on various engine conditions. The results show that as much as 18 kW power could be generated by the power cycle. This would be considerable amount of power especially if compared with the engine brake power.

  13. Power Management for Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel

    of wind energy in the power production and increases the potential market size for wind power generators and other renewable energy sources. Thus, we aim at promoting the use of environmentally sustainable power production technologies while creating new business opportunities for both power consumers...... of temperature dependent efficiencies in the refrigeration cycle. -Nonlinear economic MPC with uncertain predictions and the implementation of very simple predictors that use entirely historical data of, e.g., electricity prices and outdoor temperatures. Economic MPC for wind turbines, including -Optimal steady...... of 30 %, compared to a standard thermostat-based supermarket refrigeration system and show how our methods exhibit sophisticated demand response to real-time variations in electricity prices. Violations of the temperature ranges can be kept at a very low frequency of occurence inspite of the presence...

  14. Automatic system of tests for control equipment in combined cycle power stations; Sistema automatico de pruebas para equipos de control en centrales de ciclo combinado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez M, Miguel A; Flores L, Zenon; Delgadillo V, Miguel A; Gutierrez A, Ruben [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    This article deals on the Automatic System of Tests, denominated PROBADOR, used by the Gerencia de Control e Instrumentation (GCI) of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE)for the accomplishment of dynamic tests in laboratory, to the systems of acquisition and control developed with the electronic line SAC-IIE that are installed in the Thermoelectric Power station of Combined Cycle (CTCC) of Dos Bocas, Veracruz and Gomez Palacio, Durango, Mexico. Also the architecture, the functions that are carried out in the equipment of the System of Acquisition and control (SAC) and in the personal computer (PC) that conforms it are described, as well as the methodology used for the development of the tests. The PC constitutes Interface Man-Machine (IMM) and in the SAC equipment the simulation of the processes is made (by means of the execution of algebraic-differential equations) in the compressor, combustion chamber, gas turbine, heat recuperators, steam turbines and condenser equipment that integrate a CTCC. The equations that are used are based in the thermodynamics, flow dynamics and heat transfer; they become attached to the real process with a margin of error that is estimated in 10%. Finally, the tendencies of the PROBADOR and the technical and economic advantages are described that it has provided for the improvement in the performance of the control systems, before different situations, with no need to have the real process. [Spanish] Este articulo versa sobre el Sistema Automatico de Pruebas, denominado PROBADOR, utilizado por la Gerencia de Control e Instrumentacion (GCI) del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas para la realizacion de pruebas dinamicas en laboratorio, a los sistemas de adquisicion y control desarrollado con la linea electronica SAC-IIE que estan instalados en las Centrales Termoelectricas de Ciclo Combinado (CTCC) de Dos Bocas, Veracruz y Gomez Palacio, Durango, Mexico. Tambien se describen la arquitectura, las funciones que se llevan

  15. 不可逆闭式布雷顿热电联产装置火用经济性能优化%Exergy Economic Performance Optimization of an Irreversible Closed Type Brayton Heating-and-power Cogenration Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶桂生; 陈林根; 孙丰瑞

    2009-01-01

    By adopting a finite time thermodynamic method,studied was the exergy economic performance of an irreversible closed type Brayton cogeneration plant under the condition of a constant temperature heat source and derived were its profit margin and exergy coefficient analytic expression.By employing a numerical calculation method,with the profit margin serving as a target,optimized were the distribution of heat conductivity and the choice of pressure ratio.The authors have studied the optimum profit margin and corresponding exergy efficiency characteristics and analyzed the influence of various design parameters of the cogeneration system on its optimized performance.The research results show that for a given total heat conductivity,there exist only one optimum heat conductivity distribution ratio and pressure ratio among heat exchangers at high temperature,low temperature and end-user side,which results in an maximal value of the non-dimensional profit margin of the plant.In the meantime,there is an optimum end-user temperature.%应用有限时间热力学方法,研究了恒温热源条件下不可逆闭式布雷顿联产装置的火用经济性能,导出了利润率及火用效率解析式.利用数值计算方法,以利润率为目标,对热导率分配和压比的选取进行了优化.研究了最优利润率及相应火用效率特性,并分析了各种联产设计参数对联产优化性能的影响.结果表明,对于给定的总热导率,在高温、低温和用户侧换热器之间,存在唯一的最佳热导率分配比和唯一的最佳压比,使得装置的无因次利润率取得最大值;同时存在最佳用户温度.

  16. Study of practical cycles for geothermal power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskesen, J.H.

    1977-04-01

    A comparison is made of the performance and cost of geothermal power cycles designed specifically, utilizing existing technology, to exploit the high temperature, high salinity resource at Niland and the moderate temperature, moderately saline resource at East Mesa in California's Imperial Valley. Only two kinds of cycles are considered in the analysis. Both employ a dual flash arrangement and the liberated steam is either utilized directly in a condensing steam turbine or used to heat a secondary working fluid in a closed Rankine (binary) cycle. The performance of several organic fluids was investigated for the closed cycle and the most promising were selected for detailed analysis with the given resource conditions. Results show for the temperature range investigated that if the noncondensible gas content in the brine is low, a dual flash condensing steam turbine cycle is potentially better in terms of resource utilization than a dual flash binary cycle. (The reverse is shown to be true when the brine is utilized directly for heat exchange.) It is also shown that despite the higher resource temperature, the performance of the dual flash binary cycle at Niland is degraded appreciably by the high salinity and its output per unit of brine flow is almost 20 percent lower than that of the steam turbine cycle at East Mesa. Turbine designs were formulated and costs established for power plants having a nominal generating capacity of 50 MW. Three cycles were analyzed in detail. At East Mesa a steam turbine and a binary cycle were compared. At Niland only the binary cycle was analyzed since the high CO/sub 2/ content in the brine precludes the use of a steam turbine there. In each case only the power island equipment was considered and well costs and the cost of flash separators, steam scrubbers and piping to the power plant boundary were excluded from the estimate.

  17. Power Electronics System Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Milosavljevic, Ivana

    1999-01-01

    This work investigates communication issues in high-frequency power converters. A novel control communication network (Power Electronics System Network or PES Net) is proposed for modular, medium and high-power, converters. The network protocol, hardware and software are designed and implemented. The PES Net runs at 125 Mb/s over plastic optical fiber allowing converter switching frequencies in excess of 100 kHz. Communication control is implemented in a fie...

  18. Turbomachinery for small solar power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bammert, K.; Heikal, H.; Mobarak, A.

    1981-01-01

    Conversion of solar energy into mechanical or electrical energy in small solar power plants (10 bis 500 kW) requires new design criteria, especially with regard to turbomachinery. The cycles suitable for solar power production are affected by many variables such as kinds of working fluid, range of power and maximum cycle temperature determined by the type of collector. Also, the size of the plant will influence the selection of the various components of the plant, especially that of the turbomachinery. A study of a suitable thermodynamic cycle and working fluid is done for different ranges of power and temperature. The working fluids considered are steam, toluene, and refrigerant 113 for the Rankine cycle systems and air for gas turbine systems. For Rankine cycles, turbine selection is a problem in the small power range. This is mainly due to the fact, that for high efficiency the enthalpy drop should be as high as possible, and the mass flow rate of the working fluid through the turbine becomes very small. This, in turn, requires high rotational speed, multistaging and partial admission, especially if water is the working fluid. Toluene offers better design criteria for the turbine in the same temperature and power range (50-200 kW). For the very small range (10 kW) refrigerant 113 or similar should be used, otherwise severe design problems with the turbine will occur. In this power range, photovoltaics may also be considered. For high concentration systems with Brayton cycles (800-1000/sup 0/C) only open-cycle gas turbine plants should be used.

  19. On Brayton and Moser's missing stability theorem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeltsema, D.; Scherpen, J. M. A.

    2005-01-01

    In the early 1960s, Brayton and Moser proved three theorems concerning the stability of nonlinear electrical circuits. The applicability of each theorem depends on three different conditions on the type of admissible nonlinearities in circuit. Roughly speaking, this means that the theorems apply to

  20. Junction temperature estimation for an advanced active power cycling test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Jørgensen, S.

    2015-01-01

    estimation method using on-state VCE for an advanced active power cycling test is proposed. The concept of the advanced power cycling test is explained first. Afterwards the junction temperature estimation method using on-state VCE and current is presented. Further, the method to improve the accuracy......On-state collector-emitter voltage (VCE) is a good indicator to determine the wear-out condition of power device modules. Further, it is a one of the Temperature Sensitive Electrical Parameters (TSEPs) and thus can be used for junction temperature estimation. In this paper, the junction temperature...

  1. Investigation of heat exchangers for energy conversion systems of megawatt-class space power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmov, D. N.; Mamontov, Yu. N.; Skorohodov, A. S.; Smolyarov, V. A.; Filatov, N. I.

    2016-01-01

    The specifics of operation (high temperatures in excess of 1000 K and large pressure drops of several megapascals between "hot" and "cold" coolant paths) of heat exchangers in the closed circuit of a gasturbine power converter operating in accordance with the Brayton cycle with internal heat recovery are analyzed in the context of construction of space propulsion systems. The design of a heat-exchange matrix made from doubly convex stamped plates with a specific surface relief is proposed. This design offers the opportunity to construct heat exchangers with the required parameters (strength, rigidity, weight, and dimensions) for the given operating conditions. The diagram of the working area of a test bench is presented, and the experimental techniques are outlined. The results of experimental studies of heat exchange and flow regimes in the models of heat exchangers with matrices containing 50 and 300 plates for two pairs of coolants (gas-gas and gas-liquid) are detailed. A criterion equation for the Nusselt number in the range of Reynolds numbers from 200 to 20 000 is proposed. The coefficients of hydraulic resistance for each coolant path are determined as functions of the Reynolds number. It is noted that the pressure in the water path in the "gas-liquid" series of experiments remained almost constant. This suggests that no well-developed processes of vaporization occurred within this heat-exchange matrix design even when the temperature drop between gas and water was as large as tens or hundreds of degrees. The obtained results allow one to design flight heat exchangers for various space power plants.

  2. Carnot cycle at finite power: attainability of maximal efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Hovhannisyan, Karen V; Melkikh, Alexey V; Gevorkian, Sasun G

    2013-08-01

    We want to understand whether and to what extent the maximal (Carnot) efficiency for heat engines can be reached at a finite power. To this end we generalize the Carnot cycle so that it is not restricted to slow processes. We show that for realistic (i.e., not purposefully designed) engine-bath interactions, the work-optimal engine performing the generalized cycle close to the maximal efficiency has a long cycle time and hence vanishing power. This aspect is shown to relate to the theory of computational complexity. A physical manifestation of the same effect is Levinthal's paradox in the protein folding problem. The resolution of this paradox for realistic proteins allows to construct engines that can extract at a finite power 40% of the maximally possible work reaching 90% of the maximal efficiency. For purposefully designed engine-bath interactions, the Carnot efficiency is achievable at a large power.

  3. Environmental Emissions From Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Martin, Robert L.

    1989-04-01

    This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide. (DJE 2005)

  4. Results of studies on application of CCMHD to advanced fossil fuel power plant cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foote, J.P.; Wu, Y.C.L.S.; Lineberry, J.T.

    1998-07-01

    A study was conducted to assess the potential for application of a Closed Cycle MHD disk generator (CCMHD) in advanced fossil fuel power generation systems. Cycle analyses were conducted for a variety of candidate power cycles, including simple cycle CCMHD (MHD); a cycle combining CCMHD and gas turbines (MHD/GT); and a triple combined cycle including CCMHD, gas turbines, and steam turbines (MHD/GT/ST). The above cycles were previously considered in cycle studies reported by Japanese researchers. Also considered was a CCMHD cycle incorporating thermochemical heat recovery through reforming of the fuel stream (MHD/REF), which is the first consideration of this approach. A gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle (GT/ST) was also analyzed for baseline comparison. The only fuel considered in the study was CH4. Component heat and pressure losses were neglected, and the potential for NOx emission due to high combustion temperatures was not considered. Likewise, engineering limitations for cycle components, particularly the high temperature argon heater, were not considered. This approach was adopted to simplify the analysis for preliminary screening of candidate cycles. Cycle calculations were performed using in-house code. Ideal gas thermodynamic properties were calculated using the NASA SP- 273 data base, and thermodynamic properties for steam were calculated using the computerized ASME Steam Tables. High temperature equilibrium compositions for combustion gas were calculated using tabulated values of the equilibrium constants for the important reactions.

  5. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification program. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A proposal for the demonstration, development and production of the Isotope Brayton Flight System for space vehicles is presented with details on the technical requirements for designing and testing a ground demonstration system and on the program organization and personnel. (LCL)

  6. Microgravity fluid management requirements of advanced solar dynamic power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migra, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    The advanced solar dynamic system (ASDS) program is aimed at developing the technology for highly efficient, lightweight space power systems. The approach is to evaluate Stirling, Brayton and liquid metal Rankine power conversion systems (PCS) over the temperature range of 1025 to 1400K, identify the critical technologies and develop these technologies. Microgravity fluid management technology is required in several areas of this program, namely, thermal energy storage (TES), heat pipe applications and liquid metal, two phase flow Rankine systems. Utilization of the heat of fusion of phase change materials offers potential for smaller, lighter TES systems. The candidate TES materials exhibit large volume change with the phase change. The heat pipe is an energy dense heat transfer device. A high temperature application may transfer heat from the solar receiver to the PCS working fluid and/or TES. A low temperature application may transfer waste heat from the PCS to the radiator. The liquid metal Rankine PCS requires management of the boiling/condensing process typical of two phase flow systems.

  7. Multiple Limit Cycles in an Immune System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-cheng Huang; Le-min Zhu; Minaya Villasana

    2008-01-01

    The nonlinear oscillatory phenomenon has been observed in the system of immune response, which corresponds to the limit cycles in the mathematical models. We prove that the system simulating an immune response studied by Huang has at least three limit cycles in the system. The conditions for the multiple limit cycles are useful in analyzing the nonlinear oscillation in immune response.

  8. Power, muscular work, and external forces in cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, G; Welbergen, E; Clijsen, L; Clarijs, J; Cabri, J; Antonis, J

    1994-01-01

    Cycling performance is affected by the interaction of a number of variables, including environment, mechanical, and human factors. Engineers have focused on the development of more efficient bicycles. Kinesiologists have examined cycling performance from a human perspective. This paper summarizes only certain aspects of human ergonomics of cycling, especially those which are important for the recent current research in our departments. Power is a key to performance of physical work. During locomotion an imaginary flow of energy takes place from the metabolism to the environment, with some efficiency. The 'useful' mechanical muscle power output might be used to perform movements and to do work against the environment. The external power is defined as the sum of joint powers, each calculated as the product of the joint (net) moment and angular velocity. This definition of external power is closely related to the mean external power as applied to exercise physiology: the sum of joint powers reflects all mechanical power which in principle can be used to fulfil a certain task. In this paper, the flow of energy for cycling is traced quantitatively as far as possible. Studies on the total lower limb can give insight into the contribution of individual muscles to external power. The muscle velocity (positive or negative) is obtained from the positions and orientations of body segments and a bar linkage model of the lower limb. The muscle activity can be measured by electromyography. In this way, positive and negative work regions in individual muscles are identified. Synergy between active agonistic/antagonistic muscle groups occurs in order to deliver external power. Maximum power is influenced by body position, geometry of the bicycle and pedalling rate. This has to be interpreted in terms of the length-tension and force-velocity-power relationships of the involved muscles. Flat road and uphill cycling at different saddle-tube angles is simulated on an ergometer. The

  9. Power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorin, Eva

    2000-05-01

    It is of great interest to improve the efficiency of power generating processes, i.e. to convert more of the energy in the heat source to power. This is favorable from an environmental point of view and can also be an economic advantage. To use an ammonia-water mixture instead of water as working fluid is a possible way to improve the efficiency of steam turbine processes. This thesis includes studies of power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid utilizing different kinds of heat sources for power and heat generation. The thermophysical properties of the mixture are also studied. They play an important role in the calculations of the process performance and for the design of its components, such as heat exchangers. The studies concern thermodynamic simulations of processes in applications suitable for Swedish conditions. Available correlations for the thermophysical properties are compared and their influence on simulations and heat exchanger area predictions is investigated. Measurements of ammonia-water mixture viscosities using a vibrating wire viscometer are also described. The studies performed show that power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as the working fluid are well suited for utilization of waste heat from industry and from gas engines. The ammonia-water power cycles can give up to 32 % more power in the industrial waste heat application and up to 54 % more power in the gas engine bottoming cycle application compared to a conventional Rankine steam cycle. However, ammonia-water power cycles in small direct-fired biomass-fueled cogeneration plants do not show better performance than a conventional Rankine steam cycle. When different correlations for the thermodynamic properties are used in simulations of a simple ammonia-water power cycle the difference in efficiency is not larger than 4 %, corresponding to about 1.3 percentage points. The differences in saturation properties between the correlations are, however, considerable at high

  10. Life cycle assessment analysis of supercritical coal power units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziębik, Andrzej; Hoinka, Krzysztof; Liszka, Marcin

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) analysis concerning the selected options of supercritical coal power units. The investigation covers a pulverized power unit without a CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) installation, a pulverized unit with a "post-combustion" installation (MEA type) and a pulverized power unit working in the "oxy-combustion" mode. For each variant the net electric power amounts to 600 MW. The energy component of the LCA analysis has been determined. It describes the depletion of non-renewable natural resources. The energy component is determined by the coefficient of cumulative energy consumption in the life cycle. For the calculation of the ecological component of the LCA analysis the cumulative CO2 emission has been applied. At present it is the basic emission factor for the LCA analysis of power plants. The work also presents the sensitivity analysis of calculated energy and ecological factors.

  11. Wind power in modern power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, wind power is experiencing a rapid growth, and large-scale wind turbines/wind farms have been developed and connected to power systems. However, the traditional power system generation units are centralized located synchronous generators with different characteristics compared...... with wind turbines. This paper presents an overview of the issues about integrating large-scale wind power plants into modern power systems. Firstly, grid codes are introduced. Then, the main technical problems and challenges are presented. Finally, some possible technical solutions are discussed....

  12. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  13. SUNIST Microwave Power System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Songlin; Yang Xuanzong; Feng Chunhua; Wang Long; Rao Jun; Feng Kecheng

    2005-01-01

    Experiments on the start-up and formation of spherical tokamak plasmas by electron cyclotron heating alone without ohmic heating and electrode discharge assisted electron cyclotron wave current start-up will be carried out on the SUNIST (Sino United Spherical Tokamak) device.The 2.45 GHz/100 kW/30 ms microwave power system and 1000 V/50 A power supply for electrode discharge are ready for experiments with non-inductive current drive.

  14. Estimation of crank angle for cycling with a powered prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, B E; Shultz, A; Ledoux, E; Goldfarb, M

    2014-01-01

    In order for a prosthesis to restore power generation during cycling, it must supply torque in a manner that is coordinated with the motion of the bicycle crank. This paper outlines an algorithm for the real time estimation of the angular position of a bicycle crankshaft using only measurements internal to an intelligent knee and ankle prosthesis. The algorithm assumes that the rider/prosthesis/bicycle system can be modeled as a four-bar mechanism. Assuming that a prosthesis can generate two independent angular measurements of the mechanism (in this case the knee angle and the absolute orientation of the shank), Freudenstein's equation can be used to synthesize the mechanism continuously. A recursive least-squares algorithm is implemented to estimate the Freudenstein coefficients, and the resulting link lengths are used to reformulate the equation in terms of input-output relationships mapping both measured angles to the crank angle. Using two independent measurements allows the algorithm to uniquely determine the crank angle from multi-valued functions. In order to validate the algorithm, a bicycle was mounted on a trainer and configured with the prosthesis using an artificial hip joint attached to the seat post. Motion capture was used to monitor the mechanism for forward and backward pedaling and the results are compared to the output of the presented algorithm. Once the parameters have converged, the algorithm is shown to predict the crank angle within 15° of the externally measured value throughout the entire crank cycle during forward rotation.

  15. ISCC Kuraymat Integrated Solar Combined Cycle Power Plant in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brakmann, G.

    2006-07-01

    The New and Renewable Energy Authority (NREA) of Egypt intends to implement an Integrated Solar Combined Cycle Power Plant, ISCC Kuraymat, to be located about 95 km south of Cairo, on the eastern side of the river Nile, at a northern latitude of 29{sup o} 16' and an eastern longitude of 31{sup o} 15'. The complete ISCC Project shall be implemented in three (3) contract lots: One (1) Contract Lot for Solar Island as EPC cum OandM contract for engineering, procurement, construction, testing, commissioning and five (5) years operation and maintenance; (Two contracts will be used for this Lot (Solar Island), one for EPC and one for the OandM part of the Lot.) The Solar Island shall consist of a parabolic trough solar field capable to generate about 110 MW (thermal) of solar heat at a temperature of 393{sup o}C, the related IandC and control room and the heat transfer fluid (HTF) system up to the HTF inlet and outlet flanges of the Solar Heat Exchanger(s). The Contractor for Solar Island shall guarantee the supply of solar heat to the Solar Heat Exchanger(s) as a function of normal direct solar irradiation (DNI) and of solar position. One (1) Contract for Combined Cycle Island as EPC contract for engineering, procurement, construction, testing and commissioning and extended two (2) year warranty period. The Combined Cycle Island shall consist of one (1) or two (2) gas turbine(s) with ISO rating of about 80 MWe (total), one (1) or two (2) heat recovery steam generator(s) (HRSG), one (1) steam turbine of about 70 MWe, solar heat exchanger(s) capable to absorb about 110 MW (thermal) of solar heat plus all associated balance of plant equipment. The Contractor(s) for Combined Cycle Island shall guarantee the supply of electricity and the heat rate as a function of ambient temperature and as a function of solar heat supply from the Solar Island. One (1) Contract for Combined Cycle Island as OandM contract for five (5) year operation and maintenance. (Author)

  16. Analyze and Improve Lifetime in 3L-NPC Inverter from Power Cycle and Thermal Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Quan; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Qunjing

    2014-01-01

    Three-level Neutral-point-clamped (3L-NPC) topology is becoming a realistic alternative to the conventional one in high-voltage and high-power application. Studies show that the power cycling mean time to failure (MTTF) of the semiconductor bond wire in 3L-NPC inverter system may be very short un...

  17. Theoretical Study on CO2 Transcritical Cycle Combined Ejector Cycle Refrigeration System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢苇; 马一太; 李敏霞; 查世彤

    2003-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons(CFCs) or hydrochlorofluorocarbons(HCFCs) are as main refrigerants used in traditional refrigeration systems driven by electricity from burning fossil fuels, which is regarded as one of the major reasons for ozone depletion (man-made refrigerants emission) and global warming (CO2 emission). So people pay more and more attention to natural refrigerants and energy saving technologies. An innovative system combining CO2 transcritical cycle with ejector cycle is proposed in this paper. The CO2 compression sub-cycle is powered by electricity with the characteristics of relatively high temperature in the gas cooler (defined as an intercooler by the proposed system). In order to recover the waste heat, an ejector sub-cycle operating with the natural refrigerants (NH3, H2O) is employed. The two sub-cycles are connected by an intercooler. This combined cycle joins the advantages of the two cycles together and eliminates the disadvantages. The influences of the evaporation temperature in CO2 compression sub-cycle, the evaporation temperature in the ejector sub-cycle, the temperature in the intercooler and the condensation temperature in the proposed system performance are discussed theoretically in this study. In addition, some unique features of the system are presented.

  18. Applicability of the minimum entropy generation method for optimizing thermodynamic cycles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Xue-Tao; Liang Xin-Gang

    2013-01-01

    Entropy generation is often used as a figure of merit in thermodynamic cycle optimizations.In this paper,it is shown that the applicability of the minimum entropy generation method to optimizing output power is conditional.The minimum entropy generation rate and the minimum entropy generation number do not correspond to the maximum output power when the total heat into the system of interest is not prescribed.For the cycles whose working medium is heated or cooled by streams with prescribed inlet temperatures and prescribed heat capacity flow rates,it is theoretically proved that both the minimum entropy generation rate and the minimum entropy generation number correspond to the maximum output power when the virtual entropy generation induced by dumping the used streams into the environment is considered.However,the minimum principle of entropy generation is not tenable in the case that the virtual entropy generation is not included,because the total heat into the system of interest is not fixed.An irreversible Carnot cycle and an irreversible Brayton cycle are analysed.The minimum entropy generation rate and the minimum entropy generation number do not correspond to the maximum output power if the heat into the system of interest is not prescribed.

  19. Simplified procedure for the estimation of Rankine power cycle efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwardhan, V.R.; Devotta, S.; Patwardhan, V.S. (National Chemical Lab., Poona (India))

    1989-01-01

    A simplified procedure for estimating the Rankine power cycle efficiency eta{sub R} is presented. This procedure does not need any detailed thermodynamic data but requires only the liquid specific heat and the latent heat of vaporization at boiler temperature. This procedure is tested for its application to eight potential Rankine power cycle working fluids for which exact eta{sub R} values have been reported based on detailed thermodynamic data. A fairly wide range of condensing and boiling temperatures is covered. The results indicate that the present procedure can predict eta{sub R} values within +- 1%. (author).

  20. Novel design methods and control strategies for oil and gas offshore power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo

    .The optimal technology is determined by programming a multi-objective optimization procedure, capable of optimizing the design of Rankine and Brayton engines. The objective functions are the daily carbon dioxide emissions, the weight of the componentsand the economic revenue. The optimization routine...... of the investment. The organic Rankine cycle technology hasthe largest potential to decrease the carbon dioxide emissions (10 - 15 %). On the other hand, the steam Rankine engine is more competitive from an economic perspective.The air Bryton cycles give the lightest modules (10 - 60 t). Therefore, this technology...... the requirements of oshoreelectric grids. Specifically, the use of low-weight units is discouraged. It entails frequency fluctuations outside the specified tolerance (i.e. 4 %) and instabilities in the process variables. Additionally, the proposed simulation tool can detect the system designs which expose...

  1. Comparison of Gas-Turbine Cycles for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Robert E.; Slone, Henry O.

    1960-01-01

    On the basis of the radiator area required for rejecting cycle waste heat, Rankine vapor cycles are far superior to the basic Brayton gas cycle for space turbogenerating powerplants. The present analysis considers modifications of the basic Brayton cycle and compares the modified cycles to the basic cycle with radiator area as the criterion of merit. The results indicate that reductions in radiator area attainable by modifying the basic Brayton cycle are small, and thus the competitive position of gasturbine cycles relative to Rankine vapor cycles is unchanged.

  2. Design, fabrication, and performance of foil journal bearing for the brayton rotating unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, L.; Branger, M.

    1973-01-01

    Foil bearings were designed and manufactured to replace pivoted-shoe journal bearings in an existing Brayton Cycle turbo-alternator-compressor. The design of this unconventional rotor support was accomplished within the constraints and space limitations imposed by the present machine, and the substitution of foil bearings was effected without changes or modification other machine components. A housing and a test rig were constructed to incorporate the new foil-bearing support into a unified assemble with an air-driven rotor and the gimbal-mounted thrust bearing, seals, and shrouds of an actual Brayton Rotating Unit. The foil bearing required no external pressure source, and stable self-acting rotation was achieved at all speeds up to 43,200 rpm. Excellent wipe-wear characteristics of the foil bearing permitted well over 1000 start-stop cycles with no deterioriation of performance in the entire speed range.

  3. Estimates of power requirements for a manned Mars rover powered by a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Nicholas J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Cataldo, Robert; Bloomfield, Harvey

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the power requirement for a Manned Mars Rover vehicle. Auxiliary power needs are fulfilled using a hybrid solar photovoltaic/regenerative fuel cell system, while the primary power needs are met using an SP-100 type reactor. The primary electric power needs, which include 30-kWe net user power, depend on the reactor thermal power and the efficiency of the power conversion system. Results show that an SP-100 type reactor coupled to a Free Piston Stirling Engine (FPSE) yields the lowest total vehicle mass and lowest specific mass for the power system. The second lowest mass was for a SP-100 reactor coupled to a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) using He/Xe as the working fluid. The specific mass of the nuclear reactor power systrem, including a man-rated radiation shield, ranged from 150-kg/kWe to 190-kg/kWe and the total mass of the Rover vehicle varied depend upon the cruising speed.

  4. Reactive power influence on the thermal cycling of multi-MW wind power inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the reactive power influence on the thermal cycling of power devices in grid-connected inverter for 10 MW wind turbines is investigated. Restrained by the grid codes, the allowable reactive power ranges in relation to amplitude and phase angle of the load current for a single...

  5. Fuel Cycle System Analysis Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Dirk Gombert; Edward A. Hoffman; Gretchen E. Matthern; Kent A. Williams

    2009-06-01

    This Handbook aims to improve understanding and communication regarding nuclear fuel cycle options. It is intended to assist DOE, Campaign Managers, and other presenters prepare presentations and reports. When looking for information, check here. The Handbook generally includes few details of how calculations were performed, which can be found by consulting references provided to the reader. The Handbook emphasizes results in the form of graphics and diagrams, with only enough text to explain the graphic, to ensure that the messages associated with the graphic is clear, and to explain key assumptions and methods that cause the graphed results. Some of the material is new and is not found in previous reports, for example: (1) Section 3 has system-level mass flow diagrams for 0-tier (once-through), 1-tier (UOX to CR=0.50 fast reactor), and 2-tier (UOX to MOX-Pu to CR=0.50 fast reactor) scenarios - at both static and dynamic equilibrium. (2) To help inform fast reactor transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio and uranium supply behavior, section 5 provides the sustainable fast reactor growth rate as a function of TRU conversion ratio. (3) To help clarify the difference in recycling Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, and all-TRU, section 5 provides mass fraction, gamma, and neutron emission for those four cases for MOX, heterogeneous LWR IMF (assemblies mixing IMF and UOX pins), and a CR=0.50 fast reactor. There are data for the first 10 LWR recycle passes and equilibrium. (4) Section 6 provides information on the cycle length, planned and unplanned outages, and TRU enrichment as a function of fast reactor TRU conversion ratio, as well as the dilution of TRU feedstock by uranium in making fast reactor fuel. (The recovered uranium is considered to be more pure than recovered TRU.) The latter parameter impacts the required TRU impurity limits specified by the Fuels Campaign. (5) Section 7 provides flows for an 800-tonne UOX separation plant. (6) To complement 'tornado' economic

  6. Advanced Accelerated Power Cycling Test for Reliability Investigation of Power Device Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Jørgensen, Søren; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    of tested power IGBT module. The various realistic electrical operating conditions close to real three-phase converter applications can be achieved by the simple control method. Further, by the proposed concept of applying the temperature stress, it is possible to apply various magnitudes of temperature......This paper presents an apparatus and methodology for an advanced accelerated power cycling test of insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules. In this test, the accelerated power cycling test can be performed under more realistic electrical operating conditions with online wear-out monitoring...... power cycling test setup is given. Then, an improved in situ junction temperature estimation method using on-state collector–emitter voltage VCE ON and load current is proposed. In addition, a procedure of advanced accelerated power cycling test and test results with 600 V, 30 A transfer molded IGBT...

  7. Effective Parameters on Performance of Multipressure Combined Cycle Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Thamir K. Ibrahim; Rahman, M M

    2014-01-01

    A parametric analysis is performed for numerous configurations of a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power plant, including single-pressure, double-pressure, triple-pressure, triple-pressure with reheat, and supplementary triple-pressure with reheat. The compression ratio of the gas turbine and the steam pressure of the steam turbine are taken as design parameters. The thermodynamic model was developed based on an existing MARAFIQ CCGT power plant and performance model code developed using t...

  8. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  9. Power output during women's World Cup road cycle racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Tammie R; Martin, David T; McDonald, Warren; Victor, James; Plummer, John; Withers, Robert T

    2005-12-01

    Little information exists on the power output demands of competitive women's road cycle racing. The purpose of our investigation was to document the power output generated by elite female road cyclists who achieved success in FLAT and HILLY World Cup races. Power output data were collected from 27 top-20 World Cup finishes (19 FLAT and 8 HILLY) achieved by 15 nationally ranked cyclists (mean +/- SD; age: 24.1+/-4.0 years; body mass: 57.9+/-3.6 kg; height: 168.7+/-5.6 cm; VO2max 63.6+/-2.4 mL kg(-1) min(-1); peak power during graded exercise test (GXT(peak power)): 310+/-25 W). The GXT determined GXT(peak power), VO2peak lactate threshold (LT) and anaerobic threshold (AT). Bicycles were fitted with SRM powermeters, which recorded power (W), cadence (rpm), distance (km) and speed (km h(-1)). Racing data were analysed to establish time in power output and metabolic threshold bands and maximal mean power (MMP) over different durations. When compared to HILLY, FLAT were raced at a similar cadence (75+/-8 vs. 75+/-4 rpm, P=0.93) but higher speed (37.6+/-2.6 vs. 33.9+/-2.7 km h(-1), P=0.008) and power output (192+/-21 vs. 169+/-17 W, P=0.04; 3.3+/-0.3 vs. 3.0+/-0.4 W kg(-1), P=0.04). During FLAT races, riders spent significantly more time above 500 W, while greater race time was spent between 100 and 300 W (LT-AT) for HILLY races, with higher MMPs for 180-300 s. Racing terrain influenced the power output profiles of our internationally competitive female road cyclists. These data are the first to define the unique power output requirements associated with placing well in both flat and hilly women's World Cup cycling events.

  10. Wind power plant system services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basit, Abdul; Altin, Müfit

    Traditionally, conventional power plants have the task to support the power system, by supplying power balancing services. These services are required by the power system operators in order to secure a safe and reliable operation of the power system. However, as in the future the wind power...... is going more and more to replace conventional power plants, the sources of conventional reserve available to the system will be reduced and fewer conventional plants will be available on-line to share the regulation burden. The reliable operation of highly wind power integrated power system might......, in a modern power system with large scale integration wind power. This study presents the investigation of the real-time balance control in a modern Danish power system, where WPPs can actively contribute to active power balance control. New solutions for the automatic generation control (AGC) dealing...

  11. Pratt & Whitney ESCORT derivative for mars surface power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Gerald J.; Joyner, Russell

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the applicability of a common reactor system design from the Pratt & Whitney ESCORT nuclear thermal rocket engine concept to support current NASA mars surface-based power requirements. The ESCORT is a bimodal engine capable of supporting a wide range of propulsive thermal and vehicle electrical power requirements. The ESCORT engine is powered by a fast-spectrum beryllium-reflected CERMET-fueled nuclear reactor. In addition to an expander cycle propulsive mode, the ESCORT is capable of operating in an electrical power mode. In this mode, the reactor is used to heat a mixture of helium and xenon to drive a closed-loop Brayton cycle in order to generate electrical energy. Recent Design Reference Mission requirements (DRM) from NASA Johnson Space Center and NASA Lewis Research Center studies in 1997 and 1998 have detailed upgraded requirements for potential mars transfer missions. The current NASA DRM requires a nuclear thermal propulsion system capable of delivering total mission requirements of 200170 N (45000 lbf) thrust and 50 kWe of spacecraft electrical power. Additionally, these requirements detailed a surface power system capable of providing approximately 160 kW of electrical energy over an approximate 10 year period within a given weight and volume envelope. Current NASA studies use a SP-100 reactor (0.8 MT) and a NERVA derivative (1.6 MT) as baseline systems. A mobile power cart of approximate dimensions 1.7 m×4.5 m×4.4 m has been conceptualized to transport the reactor power system on the Mars Surface. The 63.25 cm diameter and 80.25 cm height of the ESCORT and its 1.3 MT of weight fit well within the current weight and volume target range of the NASA DRM requirements. The modifications required to the ESCORT reactor system to support this upgraded electrical power requirements along with operation in the Martian atmospheric conditions are addressed in this paper. Sufficient excess reactivity and burnup capability

  12. Reliability of power output during eccentric sprint cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brughelli, Matt; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of power outputs during maximal intensity eccentric cycling over short durations (i.e., eccentric sprint cycling) on a "motor-driven" isokinetic ergometer. Fourteen physically active male subjects performed isokinetic eccentric cycling sprints at 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 revolutions per minute (rpm) on 4 separate occasions (T1-T4). Each sprint lasted for 6 seconds, and absolute measures of mean power (MP) and peak power (PP) per revolution were recorded. Significant increases in MP and PP were observed between T1 and subsequent trials, but no significant differences were identified between T2, T3, and T4. The coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated to reflect within-subject and between-session reliability of MP and PP at each cadence. The CV improved to below 10% for cadences of 60, 80, 100, and 120 rpm between T3 and T4, and the majority of ICC values improved to above 0.90. The remaining ICC values remained in the moderate range between T3 and T4 (i.e., 0.82-0.89). Coefficient of variation and ICC values for the 40 rpm cadence remained at unacceptable levels throughout the 4 trials and thus should be avoided in future investigations. The results of this study indicate that reliable power outputs may be obtained after 2 familiarization sessions during eccentric sprint cycling at cadences ranging from 60 to 120 rpm.

  13. Advanced Turbine System Program: Phase 2 cycle selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latcovich, J.A. Jr. [ABB Power Generation, Inc., Midlothian, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objectives of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 2 Program were to define a commercially attractive ATS cycle and to develop the necessary technologies required to meet the ATS Program goals with this cycle. This program is part of an eight-year Department of Energy, Fossil Energy sponsored ATS Program to make a significant improvement in natural gas-fired power generation plant efficiency while providing an environmentally superior and cost-effective system.

  14. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume III. Resources and fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Volume III explores resources and fuel cycle facilities. Chapters are devoted to: estimates of US uranium resources and supply; comparison of US uranium demands with US production capability forecasts; estimates of foreign uranium resources and supply; comparison of foreign uranium demands with foreign production capability forecasts; and world supply and demand for other resources and fuel cycle services. An appendix gives uranium, fissile material, and separative work requirements for selected reactors and fuel cycles.

  15. Evaluation of High-Temperature Tensile Property of Diffusion Bond of Austenitic Alloys for S-CO{sub 2} Cycle Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Sah, Injin; Jang, Chanheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To improve the inherent safety of the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is being considered as an alternative power conversion system to steam the Rankine cycle. In the S-CO{sub 2} system, a PCHE (printed circuit heat exchanger) is being considered. In this type of heat exchangers, diffusion bonding is used for joining the thin plates. In this study, the diffusion bonding characteristics of various austenitic alloys were evaluated. The tensile properties were measured at temperatures starting from the room temperature up to 650℃. For the 316H and 347H types of stainless steel, the tensile ductility was well maintained up to 550℃. However, the Incoloy 800HT showed lower strength and ductility at all temperatures. The microstructure near the bond line was examined to understand the reason for the loss of ductility at high temperatures.

  16. Chronic eccentric cycling improves quadriceps muscle structure and maximum cycling power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, C H; McDermott, W J; Elmer, S J; Martin, J C

    2014-06-01

    An interesting finding from eccentric exercise training interventions is the presence of muscle hypertrophy without changes in maximum concentric strength and/or power. The lack of improvements in concentric strength and/or power could be due to long lasting suppressive effects on muscle force production following eccentric training. Thus, improvements in concentric strength and/or power might not be detected until muscle tissue has recovered (e. g., several weeks post-training). We evaluated alterations in muscular structure (rectus-femoris, RF, and vastus lateralis, VL, thickness and pennation angles) and maximum concentric cycling power (Pmax) 1-week following 8-weeks of eccentric cycling training (2×/week; 5-10.5 min; 20-55% of Pmax). Pmax was assessed again at 8-weeks post-training. At 1 week post-training, RF and VL thickness increased by 24±4% and 13±2%, respectively, and RF and VL pennation angles increased by 31±4% and 13±1%, respectively (all Peccentric cycling can be a time-effective intervention for improving muscular structure and function in the lower body of healthy individuals. The larger Pmax increase detected at 8-weeks post-training implies that sufficient recovery might be necessary to fully detect changes in muscular power after eccentric cycling training.

  17. Generalized conventional and intelligent supervisory control system for combined cycle generation power plants; Sistema de control supervisorio generalizado convencional e inteligente para centrales de generacion de ciclo combinado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Morales, Miguel Angel

    2004-12-15

    The Mexican Electricity Utility (Comision Federal de Electricidad - CFE) growing program in Power Generation for the 2004 - 2008 period is based on Combined Cycle Power Plants (CCPP). In accordance with [CFE, 2000], the expected power generation capacity developed during such period will rise by the amount of 12876 MW, 10655 MW belonging to CCPP (82.75 %). With such important program for the increasing of Power Generation in Mexico, researches have to receive new technologies for CCPP, some of them not completely tested and immature, with the compromise to make then more efficient and reliable. Under such idea and looking to increase the automation level for CCPP with better control algorithms, the Supervisory Generalized Control (SGC) for CCPP was developed in this thesis, based on PID strategies and intelligent (fuzzy) control strategies. With the SGC is possible to get the best performance for the whole CCPP through the automatic starting, synchronizing and loading of the generating units (two gas turbines and one steam turbine) with a minimum participation of operators. To get the increased efficiency, the SGC generates the reference paths for both gas turbines (GT) first, and the steam turbine (ST). The SGC accelerates each unit with a minimum effort and vibrations getting the synchronizing speed in a minimum time and wasted energy. Then the SGC synchronize each unit taking minimum load quickly and loading up to the highest electric power value. All these can be done in an automated operation. The SGC employs two critical-process variable- control strategies, based on blade path temperature average (BPT Average) for Gas Turbines (GT) and the throttle steam pressure for the Steam Turbine (ST). The control algorithms designed take both units, the GT and the ST, picking up load to the highest process value avoiding the alarms activation and shutdown. This is possible only with such an automated control strategy. Test performed showed that with the SGC

  18. Modeling and experimental results for condensing supercritical CO2 power cycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Radel, Ross F.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2011-01-01

    This Sandia supported research project evaluated the potential improvement that 'condensing' supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) power cycles can have on the efficiency of Light Water Reactors (LWR). The analytical portion of research project identified that a S-CO{sub 2} 'condensing' re-compression power cycle with multiple stages of reheat can increase LWR power conversion efficiency from 33-34% to 37-39%. The experimental portion of the project used Sandia's S-CO{sub 2} research loop to show that the as designed radial compressor could 'pump' liquid CO{sub 2} and that the gas-cooler's could 'condense' CO{sub 2} even though both of these S-CO{sub 2} components were designed to operate on vapor phase S-CO{sub 2} near the critical point. There is potentially very high value to this research as it opens the possibility of increasing LWR power cycle efficiency, above the 33-34% range, while lowering the capital cost of the power plant because of the small size of the S-CO{sub 2} power system. In addition it provides a way to incrementally build advanced LWRs that are optimally designed to couple to S-CO{sub 2} power conversion systems to increase the power cycle efficiency to near 40%.

  19. The electric power engineering handbook power systems

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Power Systems, Third Edition (part of the five-volume set, The Electric Power Engineering Handbook) covers all aspects of power system protection, dynamics, stability, operation, and control. Under the editorial guidance of L.L. Grigsby, a respected and accomplished authority in power engineering, and section editors Andrew Hanson, Pritindra Chowdhuri, Gerry Sheble, and Mark Nelms, this carefully crafted reference includes substantial new and revised contributions from worldwide leaders in the field. This content provides convenient access to overviews and detailed information on a diverse arr

  20. Status of a Power Processor for the Prometheus-1 Electric Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Hill, Gerald M.; Aulisio, Michael; Gerber, Scott; Griebeler, Elmer; Hewitt, Frank; Scina, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    NASA is developing technologies for nuclear electric propulsion for proposed deep space missions in support of the Exploration initiative under Project Prometheus. Electrical power produced by the combination of a fission-based power source and a Brayton power conversion and distribution system is used by a high specific impulse ion propulsion system to propel the spaceship. The ion propulsion system include the thruster, power processor and propellant feed system. A power processor technology development effort was initiated under Project Prometheus to develop high performance and lightweight power-processing technologies suitable for the application. This effort faces multiple challenges including developing radiation hardened power modules and converters with very high power capability and efficiency to minimize the impact on the power conversion and distribution system as well as the heat rejection system. This paper documents the design and test results of the first version of the beam supply, the design of a second version of the beam supply and the design and test results of the ancillary supplies.

  1. Wireless power transfer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2016-02-23

    A system includes a first stage of an inductive power transfer system with an LCL load resonant converter with a switching section, an LCL tuning circuit, and a primary receiver pad. The IPT system includes a second stage with a secondary receiver pad, a secondary resonant circuit, a secondary rectification circuit, and a secondary decoupling converter. The secondary receiver pad connects to the secondary resonant circuit. The secondary resonant circuit connects to the secondary rectification circuit. The secondary rectification circuit connects to the secondary decoupling converter. The second stage connects to a load. The load includes an energy storage element. The second stage and load are located on a vehicle and the first stage is located at a fixed location. The primary receiver pad wirelessly transfers power to the secondary receiver pad across a gap when the vehicle positions the secondary receiver pad with respect to the primary receiver pad.

  2. 永磁同步风电系统网侧单周期控制研究%Study on One-Cycle Control of Grid-Side Inverter for PMSG Wind Power System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何雄峰; 吉同舟; 李先允; 张迈

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes a principle of one-cycle control, and proposes a one-cycle control for fully rated converter of permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG)wind power system on grid-side. With the output current as integral reference and grid voltage as the comparative reference,the output current is always tracking the output voltage. It aims to automatically adjust power factor and can effectively inhibit DC bus voltage fluctuation from impacting output voltage,and to improve low voltage ride-through(LVRT) capability of PMSG wind power system. The model and its control strategy are created in PSCAD/EMTDC. The simulation results show the correctness and validity of one-cycle control strategy.%对单周期控制进行了理论分析,进而提出了基于单周期控制的直驱永磁同步风力发电系统全功率换流器网侧控制策略.该方法采用输出电压作为参考量,输出电流作为积分量,实现输出电流跟踪输出电压,以达到自适应功率因数校正的目的,且能有效抑制直流母线电压波动给输出电压带来的影响,提高了永磁同步风电系统的低电压运行能力.就其控制策略在PSCAD/EMTDC中创建了仿真模型,仿真结果表明了单周期控制策略的正确性和有效性.

  3. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  4. Distribution of power output when establishing a breakaway in cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbiss, Chris R; Menaspà, Paolo; Villerius, Vincent; Martin, David T

    2013-07-01

    A number of laboratory-based performance tests have been designed to mimic the dynamic and stochastic nature of road cycling. However, the distribution of power output and thus physical demands of high-intensity surges performed to establish a breakaway during actual competitive road cycling are unclear. Review of data from professional road-cycling events has indicated that numerous short-duration (5-15 s), high-intensity (~9.5-14 W/kg) surges are typically observed in the 5-10 min before athletes' establishing a breakaway (ie, riding away from a group of cyclists). After this initial high-intensity effort, power output declined but remained high (~450-500 W) for a further 30 s to 5 min, depending on race dynamics (ie, the response of the chase group). Due to the significant influence competitors have on pacing strategies, it is difficult for laboratory-based performance tests to precisely replicate this aspect of mass-start competitive road cycling. Further research examining the distribution of power output during competitive road racing is needed to refine laboratory-based simulated stochastic performance trials and better understand the factors important to the success of a breakaway.

  5. Balancing modern Power System with large scale of wind power

    OpenAIRE

    Basit, Abdul; Altin, Müfit; Hansen, Anca Daniela; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar

    2014-01-01

    Power system operators must ensure robust, secure and reliable power system operation even with a large scale integration of wind power. Electricity generated from the intermittent wind in large propor-tion may impact on the control of power system balance and thus deviations in the power system frequency in small or islanded power systems or tie line power flows in interconnected power systems. Therefore, the large scale integration of wind power into the power system strongly concerns the s...

  6. Technical Feasibility Study of Thermal Energy Storage Integration into the Conventional Power Plant Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek D. Wojcik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current load balance in the grid is managed mainly through peaking fossil-fuelled power plants that respond passively to the load changes. Intermittency, which comes from renewable energy sources, imposes additional requirements for even more flexible and faster responses from conventional power plants. A major challenge is to keep conventional generation running closest to the design condition with higher load factors and to avoid switching off periods if possible. Thermal energy storage (TES integration into the power plant process cycle is considered as a possible solution for this issue. In this article, a technical feasibility study of TES integration into a 375-MW subcritical oil-fired conventional power plant is presented. Retrofitting is considered in order to avoid major changes in the power plant process cycle. The concept is tested based on the complete power plant model implemented in the ProTRAX software environment. Steam and water parameters are assessed for different TES integration scenarios as a function of the plant load level. The best candidate points for heat extraction in the TES charging and discharging processes are evaluated. The results demonstrate that the integration of TES with power plant cycle is feasible and provide a provisional guidance for the design of the TES system that will result in the minimal influence on the power plant cycle.

  7. ON COMPLEXITY OF POWER SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jin; CHENG Daizhan; HONG Yiguang; SUN Yuanzhang

    2003-01-01

    The power system is a classical example of complex systems. In this paper it is shown that the power industry in China is facing a tremendous challenge. The complexity in power systems is investigated as follows. First, the cascade failure in power systems is analyzed, and compared with sand-pile model. Next, we show that the agent-based modelling is a proper way for power network. Mathematically, the geometric dynamics and differential inclusion are useful tools for the stability analysis of large scale power systems. As for power market, the game theory and generalized control system model are proposed. For a complex power system, an evolutive model may be more accurate in description and analysis. Finally, certain newly developed numerical methods in the power system computation are introduced. Overall, we are convinced that the theorem of complexity, combined with modern control theory, may be the right way to answer the challenges faced by the power industry in China.

  8. Open cycle cooling systems using solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzarin, R.; Sovrano, M.

    Open cycle cooling systems are particularly suitable for utilizing solar energy. In all these systems the adsorption and absorption phenomena are very important, hence they are described separately. The cycles used are essentially two: the Baum-Kakabaev cycle using liquid absorbers and the dehumidification/humidification cycle where also adsorbent substances can be utilized. Solar energy is used in the regeneration process of dehumidifying substances. Reactivation modes can be various: suitability of one mode or the other can depend on the climate of the site where the system is installed.

  9. Cycle slipping in phase synchronization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Lin

    2007-02-01

    Cycle slipping is a characteristically nonlinear phenomenon in phase synchronization systems, which is highly dependent of the initial state of the system. Slipping a cycle means that the phase error is increased to such an extent that the generator to be synchronized slips one complete cycle with respect to the input phase. In this Letter, a linear matrix inequality (LMI) based approach is proposed and the estimation of the number of cycles which slips a solution of the system is obtained by solving a quasi-convex optimization problem of LMI. Applications to phase locked loops demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach.

  10. Comparison of Prime Movers Suitable for USMC Expeditionary Power Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiss, T.J.

    2000-04-18

    This report documents the results of the ORNL investigation into prime movers that would be desirable for the construction of a power system suitable for the United States Marine Corps (USMC) expeditionary forces under Operational Maneuvers From The Sea (OMFTS) doctrine. Discrete power levels of {approx}1, 5, 15, and 30 kW are considered. The only requirement is that the prime mover consumes diesel fuel. A brief description is given for the prime movers to describe their basic scientific foundations and relative advantages and disadvantages. A list of key attributes developed by ORNL has been weighted by the USMC to indicate the level of importance. A total of 14 different prime movers were scored by ORNL personnel in four size ranges (1,5, 15, & 30 kW) for their relative strength in each attribute area. The resulting weighted analysis was used to indicate which prime movers are likely to be suitable for USMC needs. No single engine or prime mover emerged as the clear-cut favorite but several engines scored as well or better than the diesel engine. At the higher load levels (15 & 30 kW), the results indicate that the open Brayton (gas turbine) is a relatively mature technology and likely a suitable choice to meet USMC needs. At the lower power levels, the situation is more difficult and the market alone is not likely to provide an optimum solution in the time frame desired (2010). Several prime movers should be considered for future developments and may be satisfactory; specifically, the Atkinson cycle, the open Brayton cycle (gas turbine), the 2-stroke diesel. The rotary diesel and the solid oxide fuel cell should be backup candidates. Of all these prime movers, the Atkinson cycle may well be the most suitable for this application but is an immature technology. Additional demonstrations of this engine will be conducted at ORNL. If this analysis is positive, then the performance of a generator set using this engine, the open Brayton and the 2-stroke diesel should

  11. Small Stirling dynamic isotope power system for robotic space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, D. J.

    1992-08-01

    The design of a multihundred-watt Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS), based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) and small (multihundred-watt) free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE), is being pursued as a potential lower cost alternative to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's). The design is targeted at the power needs of future unmanned deep space and planetary surface exploration missions ranging from scientific probes to Space Exploration Initiative precursor missions. Power level for these missions is less than a kilowatt. The incentive for any dynamic system is that it can save fuel and reduce costs and radiological hazard. Unlike DIPS based on turbomachinery conversion (e.g. Brayton), this small Stirling DIPS can be advantageously scaled to multihundred-watt unit size while preserving size and mass competitiveness with RTG's. Stirling conversion extends the competitive range for dynamic systems down to a few hundred watts--a power level not previously considered for dynamic systems. The challenge for Stirling conversion will be to demonstrate reliability and life similar to RTG experience. Since the competitive potential of FPSE as an isotope converter was first identified, work has focused on feasibility of directly integrating GPHS with the Stirling heater head. Thermal modeling of various radiatively coupled heat source/heater head geometries has been performed using data furnished by the developers of FPSE and GPHS. The analysis indicates that, for the 1050 K heater head configurations considered, GPHS fuel clad temperatures remain within acceptable operating limits. Based on these results, preliminary characterizations of multihundred-watt units have been established.

  12. Thermodynamic Cycles using Carbon Dioxide as Working Fluid : CO2 transcritical power cycle study

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chen

    2011-01-01

    The interest in utilizing the energy in low‐grade heat sources and waste heat is increasing. There is an abundance of such heat sources, but their utilization today is insufficient, mainly due to the limitations of the conventional power cycles in such applications, such as low efficiency, bulky size or moisture at the expansion outlet (e.g. problems for turbine blades). Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been widely investigated for use as a working fluid in refrigeration cycles, because it has no ozo...

  13. Monitoring of the thermoeconomic performance in an actual combined cycle power plant bottoming cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cafaro, S.; Napoli, L.; Traverso, A.; Massardo, A.F. [DIMSET (TPG), University of Genoa, Via Montallegro 1, 16145 Genoa (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    This paper presents a research project carried out by TPG (Thermochemical Power Group) of University of Genoa to develop innovative monitoring and diagnostics procedures and software tools for software-aided maintenance and customer support. This work is concerned with preliminary outcomes regarding the thermoeconomic monitoring of the bottoming cycle of a combined cycle power plant, using real historical data. The software is able to calculate functional exergy flows (y), their related costs (c) (using the plant functional diagram); after that non dimensional parameters for the characteristic exergonomic indexes ({delta}c, {delta}c*, {delta}k*) are determined. Through a plant optimization (not described here) the reference conditions of the plant at each operating condition can be determined. Then, non dimensional indexes related to each thermoeconomic parameter are defined, in order to depict a ''cost degradation'', and thus a significant rise in the production cost of the main products of the bottoming cycle (steam and power). The methodology developed has been successfully applied to historical logged data of an existing 400 MW power plant, showing the capabilities in estimating the ''cost degradation'' of the elements of the BC over the plant life, and trends in the thermoeconomic indexes. (author)

  14. Wind Powered Sprinkler System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Jung Huang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to limited energy resources, excessive emission of CO2, global warming, increase of mean temperature, serious impacts have resulted on our living environment, and thus, energy saving and carbon reduction have become urgent issues. Planting grass, flowers and trees can absorb and reduce CO2, thus meeting the requirements for energy saving and carbon reduction in environmental protection. At present, most of lawns or gardens in Taiwan are maintained by manual or traditional semiautomatic watering device. Whether the lawn needs to be watered and the amount of water to be sprinkled depends on subjective decision. When the lawn is watered without examining the moisture content of the soil beforehand, it causes waste of time, labor, water and cost. The intelligent wind powered watering system developed by this study used an electromechanical integrated design system to control the humidity probe, and used the electricity generated by natural wind power and pumping device to control the sprinkling action. This system sprinkles water by sensing the soil moisture content, and stops sprinkling automatically when the soil moisture content is enough, thus achieving the purposes of cost and energy saving.

  15. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-07-01

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

  16. 3G POWER GRID SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Saiyad Tausif Ali *; Gaurav Pawar; Pragati Rathi; Mandar Pathak

    2016-01-01

    3G Power grid system is dual side stream of electricity and automated construct information and distributed advanced energy delivery network. In this 3G Power grid system avoided the thermal and hydro sources of energy. By using the solar power and wind power energy will generate electricity according with the condition of nature. 3G Power grid system provides the facility of generating as well as marketing of electricity not only for the producers but also for consumers. By using megabytes o...

  17. The US business cycle: power law scaling for interacting units with complex internal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Paul

    2002-11-01

    In the social sciences, there is increasing evidence of the existence of power law distributions. The distribution of recessions in capitalist economies has recently been shown to follow such a distribution. The preferred explanation for this is self-organised criticality. Gene Stanley and colleagues propose an alternative, namely that power law scaling can arise from the interplay between random multiplicative growth and the complex structure of the units composing the system. This paper offers a parsimonious model of the US business cycle based on similar principles. The business cycle, along with long-term growth, is one of the two features which distinguishes capitalism from all previously existing societies. Yet, economics lacks a satisfactory theory of the cycle. The source of cycles is posited in economic theory to be a series of random shocks which are external to the system. In this model, the cycle is an internal feature of the system, arising from the level of industrial concentration of the agents and the interactions between them. The model-in contrast to existing economic theories of the cycle-accounts for the key features of output growth in the US business cycle in the 20th century.

  18. 基于生命周期的电力物资管理系统研究与实现%Power Supplies Management System Research and Implementation Based On Life Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐楠楠

    2011-01-01

    电力企业的生产就是围绕设备的运行、维护、检修、试验等工作展开。本文首先,采用生命周期管理理论,将它应用到电力公司物资管理过程具有重要意义。然后,做出物资全生命周期管理系统的需求分析,并且根据需求分析建立设备全生命周期管理系统。然后,根据全生命周期管理理论和方法,把电力物资信息管理分成五个阶段进行管理。并采用基子.NET框架,基于B/S架枸的实现方案对系统总体结构进行设计。最后,基于Microsoft Visual Studio 2005平台、SQL Server 2005数据库,对整个系统进行了具体实现。%Electricity production is around the equipment,operation,maintenance,repair, testing and other work to start.In this paper, the use of life-cycle management theory, it would be applied to the power company materials management process is important.Then,to make material life cycle management system needs analysis and requirements analysis based on the establishment of equipment life cycle management system.Then,according to the full life cycle management theory and methods,the power supplies is divided into five stages of information management to manage.And based on.NET framework,based on B/S structure of the system to achieve the overall structure of the program design.Finally, based on Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 plafform, SQLServer2005 database,a concrete realization of the entire system.

  19. Optimizing power plant cycling operations while reducing generating plant damage and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefton, S.A.; Besuner, P.H.; Grimsrud, P. [Aptech Engineering Services, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Bissel, A. [Electric Supply Board, Dublin (Ireland)

    1998-12-31

    This presentation describes a method for analyzing, quantifying, and minimizing the total cost of fossil, combined cycle, and pumped hydro power plant cycling operation. The method has been developed, refined, and applied during engineering studies at some 160 units in the United States and 8 units at the Irish Electric Supply Board (ESB) generating system. The basic premise of these studies was that utilities are underestimating the cost of cycling operation. The studies showed that the cost of cycling conventional boiler/turbine fossil power plants can range from between $2,500 and $500,000 per start-stop cycle. It was found that utilities typically estimate these costs by factors of 3 to 30 below actual costs and, thus, often significantly underestimate their true cycling costs. Knowledge of the actual, or total, cost of cycling will reduce power production costs by enabling utilities to more accurately dispatch their units to manage unit life expectancies, maintenance strategies and reliability. Utility management responses to these costs are presented and utility cost savings have been demonstrated. (orig.) 7 refs.

  20. Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K. [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

  1. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2004-04-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC15 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Power Generation, Inc. (SPG) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC15 began on April 19, 2004, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier startup burner. The Transport Gasifier was shutdown on April 29, 2004, accumulating 200 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. About 91 hours of the test run occurred during oxygen-blown operations. Another 6 hours of the test run was in enriched-air mode. The remainder of the test run, approximately 103 hours, took place during air-blown operations. The highest operating temperature in the gasifier mixing zone mostly varied from 1,800 to 1,850 F. The gasifier exit pressure ran between 200 and 230 psig during air-blown operations and between 110 and 150 psig in oxygen-enhanced air operations.

  2. Raft River binary-cycle geothermal pilot power plant final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliem, C.J.; Walrath, L.F.

    1983-04-01

    The design and performance of a 5-MW(e) binary-cycle pilot power plant that used a moderate-temperature hydrothermal resource, with isobutane as a working fluid, are examined. Operating problems experienced and solutions found are discussed and recommendations are made for improvements to future power plant designs. The plant and individual systems are analyzed for design specification versus actual performance figures.

  3. Power DRAC for rapid LMFBR deployment and consequent CO{sub 2} mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenewerk, W.E. [California Nuclear Engineer NU 2272, Los Angeles CA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A metallic-sodium LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor) can control fuel temperature after a full power SCRAM using natural convection. A 3 percent nominal DRAC (Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling) does this without moving parts. DRAC is promoted from tertiary to primary decay heat removal, resulting in what is referred to as a Power DRAC. Power DRAC operates continuously before and after SCRAM, rejecting 3 per cent pile power. Power DRAC operability is validated by having it reject 75 MWt from a 2500 MWt pile at all times. IHX (Intermediate Heat Exchanger) is not required to be operable for primary, secondary, or tertiary core over-temperature protection. Original DRAC concept (venturi DRAC) was a 1 per cent nominal tertiary decay heat removal system. Tertiary DRAC patent has expired. Power DRAC rejects 75 MWt through its own secondary sodium heat transfer loop to power a 25 MWe air Brayton cycle. Power DRAC eliminates requiring steam plant operability for decay heat removal. Intermediate sodium heat transfer system and steam plant can be optimized for maximum thermal efficiency. 2.5 GWt pile makes 1.0 GWe net power. Power DRAC maintains pile inlet and outlet temperatures while going from power to post-SCRAM conditions. Steam pressure is maintained post-SCRAM to mitigate SCRAM thermal transient. Not requiring steam plant operability for decay heat removal eases licensing and allows early LMFBR deployment. Each GWe atomic power delays CO{sub 2} doubling one week. (author)

  4. Experimental investigation of an ammonia-based combined power and cooling cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Gunnar Olavi

    A novel ammonia-water thermodynamic cycle, capable of producing both power and refrigeration, was proposed by D. Yogi Goswami. The binary mixture exhibits variable boiling temperatures during the boiling process, which leads to a good thermal match between the heating fluid and working fluid for efficient heat source utilization. The cycle can be driven by low temperature sources such as solar, geothermal, and waste heat from a conventional power cycle, reducing the reliance on high temperature sources such as fossil fuels. A theoretical simulation of the cycle at heat source temperatures obtainable from low and mid temperature solar collectors showed that the ideal cycle could produce power and refrigeration at a maximum exergy efficiency, defined as the ratio of the net work and refrigeration output to the change in availability of the heat source, of over 60%. The exergy efficiency is a useful measure of the cycle's performance as it compares the effectiveness of different cycles in harnessing the same source. An experimental system was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of the cycle and to compare the experimental results with the theoretical simulations. In this first phase of experimentation, the turbine expansion was simulated with a throttling valve and a heat exchanger. Results showed that the vapor generation and absorption condensation processes work experimentally. The potential for combined turbine work and refrigeration output was evidenced in operating the system. Analysis of losses led to modifications in the system design, which were implemented to yield improvements in heat exchange, vapor generation, pump performance and overall stability. The research that has been conducted verifies the potential of the power and cooling cycle as an alternative to using conventional fossil fuel technologies. The research that continues is to further demonstrate the concept and direct it towards industry. On the large scale, the cycle can be used for

  5. Performance analysis of OTEC power cycle with a liquid-vapor ejector using R32/R152a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-In; Son, Chang-Hyo; Seol, Sung-hoon; Kim, Hyeon-Uk; Ha, Soo-Jung; Jung, Suk-Ho; Kim, Hyeon-Ju; Lee, Ho-Saeng

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the condensation and evaporation capacity, turbine work, efficiency, and main component size of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power system with a liquid-vapor ejector are presented to offer the basic design data for the operating parameters of the system. The analysis procedure was performed with a simulation program called Aspentech HYSYS. The working fluid used in this system is the R32/R152a mixture. The operating parameters considered in this study include the vapor quality at the reheat outlet, the pressure ratio of the ejector, the inlet pressure of turbine 2, entrainment ratio of the liquid-vapor ejector etc. The main results are summarized as follows. The efficiency of the OTEC power cycle is closely related to the entrainment ratio of the liquid-vapor ejector. Also, the increase rate of the efficiency of proposed OTEC power cycle using the liquid-vapor ejector is 16 % higher than that of basic OTEC power cycle. Furthermore, regarding the reduction ratios of the system size that affects the initial cost, the reduction ratios of the evaporator size and the condenser size are about 13 and 14 % higher than those of basic OTEC power cycle, respectively. And, the pump power and the mass flow rate of the required refrigerant are 8 and 4 %, respectively. Therefore, the proposed OTEC power cycle is more advantageous than basic OTEC power cycle because of the compactness and high-efficiency of the system.

  6. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  7. Construction of life cycle assessment software system platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ya-ping; ZUO Yu-hui

    2007-01-01

    There has not been life cycle assessment (LCA) software applicable to China's products. To faciliate the develop-ment of LCA software system in China, we built an object-oriented LCA software system plantform based on LCA international standards ISO 14040 to ISO 14043 and the commonness of diverse products. The system includes six modules: disassembly module, data collection module, arithmetic module, drawing module, database module and control module. It evaluates all economic and environmental impacts during the whole life cycle of a product. The integrated life cycle inventory database system allows dynamic expansion, which makes the effort required for data collection reduce with the increase of the system's application. With the improvement of human environmental-awareness, the demand of environment-friendly products is increasing, and ecological design of products has become a critical part in products development. Consummation of the LCA software system will provide a powerful tool for designing and developing Chinese ecological products.

  8. Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-12-08

    The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

  9. TECHNOECONOMIC APPRAISAL OF INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED-CYCLE POWER GENERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report is a technoeconomic appraisal of the integrated (coal) gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system. lthough not yet a proven commercial technology, IGCC is a future competitive technology to current pulverized-coal boilers equipped with SO2 and NOx controls, because of i...

  10. Thermionic power system power processing and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Thermionic power systems are being considered for space-based miltary applications because of their survivability and high efficiency. Under the direction of the Air Force, conceptual designs were generated for two thermionic power systems to determine preliminary system performance data and direct future component development. This paper discusses the power processing and control (PP&C) subsystem that conditions the thermionic converter power and controls the operation of the reactor and thermionic converter subsystems. The baseline PP&C design and design options are discussed, mass and performance data are provided, and technology needs are identified. The impact on PP&C subsystem mass and efficiency of alternate power levels and boom lengths is also presented. The baseline PP&C subsystem is lightweight and reliable, and it uses proven design concepts to minimize development and testing time. However, the radiation dosages specified in the program research and development announcement (PRDA) are 10 to 100 times the capabilities of present semiconductor devices. While these levels are aggressive, they are considered to be achievable by 1995 if the Air Force and other government agencies continue to actively develop radiation resistant electronics devices for military applications.

  11. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2016-05-10

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  12. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-08-12

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  13. Energetic sub-2-cycle laser with 216  W average power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädrich, Steffen; Kienel, Marco; Müller, Michael; Klenke, Arno; Rothhardt, Jan; Klas, Robert; Gottschall, Thomas; Eidam, Tino; Drozdy, András; Jójárt, Péter; Várallyay, Zoltán; Cormier, Eric; Osvay, Károly; Tünnermann, Andreas; Limpert, Jens

    2016-09-15

    Few-cycle lasers are essential for many research areas such as attosecond physics that promise to address fundamental questions in science and technology. Therefore, further advancements are connected to significant progress in the underlying laser technology. Here, two-stage nonlinear compression of a 660 W femtosecond fiber laser system is utilized to achieve unprecedented average power levels of energetic ultrashort or even few-cycle laser pulses. In a first compression step, 408 W, 320 μJ, 30 fs pulses are achieved, which can be further compressed to 216 W, 170 μJ, 6.3 fs pulses in a second compression stage. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average power few-cycle laser system presented so far. It is expected to significantly advance the fields of high harmonic generation and attosecond science.

  14. Decision Model for Life Cycle Assessment of Power Transformer during Load Violation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Bhandari

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Utility have normally planned the power transformer based on its designed load demand for the long term. Due to unexpected penetration, the actual load profile does not always follow the designed load and load violation will occur at some points during the life cycle of the power transformer for which the utility is inevitably required to make strategic decision. In the past, the decisions were mainly focused on the technical condition of the assetwithout any consideration to investment budget limitation. In this paper, an alternative methodology comprising of knowledge based model, financial model and decision criteria is proposed to make an optimal decision during load violation. A generic power system similar to Nepal Electricity Authority’s context was utilized as a case study. The result depicts that this model can effectively assess the life cycle of power transformer balancing both the financialand technical constraints.

  15. Overview of Air Liquide refrigeration systems between 1.8 K and 200 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondrand, C.; Durand, F.; Delcayre, F.; Crispel, S. [AL-AT, 2 rue de Clémencières, 38360 Sassenage (France); Baguer, G. M. Gistau [CRYOGUY, 44, chemin de la Buisse, 38330 Biviers (France)

    2014-01-29

    Cryogenic refrigeration systems are necessary for numerous applications. Gas purification and distillation require temperatures between 15 K and 200 K depending on the application, space simulation chambers down to 15 K, superconductivity between 1.8 K and up to 75 K (magnets, cavities or HTS devices like cables, FCL, SMES, etc), Cold Neutron Sources between 15 and 20 K, etc. Air Liquide Advanced Technologies is designing and manufacturing refrigerators since 60 years to satisfy those needs. The step by step developments achieved have led to machines with higher efficiency and reliability. In 1965, reciprocating compressors and Joule Thomson expansion valves were used. In 1969, centripetal expanders began to be used. In 1980, oil lubricated screw compressors took the place of reciprocating compressors and a standard range of Claude cycle refrigerators was developed: the HELIAL series. 1980 was also the time for cryogenic centrifugal compressor development. In 2011, driven by the need for lower operational cost (high efficiency and low maintenance), cycle oil free centrifugal compressors on magnetic bearings were introduced instead of screw compressors. The power extracted by centripetal expanders was recovered. Based on this technology, a range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators has been designed for temperatures between 40 K and 150 K. On-going development will enable widening the range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators to cryogenic temperatures down to 15 K.. Cryogenic centrifugal circulators have been developed in order to answer to an increasing demand of 4 K refrigerators able to distribute cold power.

  16. Overview of Air Liquide refrigeration systems between 1.8 K and 200 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondrand, C.; Durand, F.; Delcayre, F.; Crispel, S.; Baguer, G. M. Gistau

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic refrigeration systems are necessary for numerous applications. Gas purification and distillation require temperatures between 15 K and 200 K depending on the application, space simulation chambers down to 15 K, superconductivity between 1.8 K and up to 75 K (magnets, cavities or HTS devices like cables, FCL, SMES, etc), Cold Neutron Sources between 15 and 20 K, etc. Air Liquide Advanced Technologies is designing and manufacturing refrigerators since 60 years to satisfy those needs. The step by step developments achieved have led to machines with higher efficiency and reliability. In 1965, reciprocating compressors and Joule Thomson expansion valves were used. In 1969, centripetal expanders began to be used. In 1980, oil lubricated screw compressors took the place of reciprocating compressors and a standard range of Claude cycle refrigerators was developed: the HELIAL series. 1980 was also the time for cryogenic centrifugal compressor development. In 2011, driven by the need for lower operational cost (high efficiency and low maintenance), cycle oil free centrifugal compressors on magnetic bearings were introduced instead of screw compressors. The power extracted by centripetal expanders was recovered. Based on this technology, a range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators has been designed for temperatures between 40 K and 150 K. On-going development will enable widening the range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators to cryogenic temperatures down to 15 K.. Cryogenic centrifugal circulators have been developed in order to answer to an increasing demand of 4 K refrigerators able to distribute cold power.

  17. Research on Low Power Marine Current Power Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkai Peng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a simple topological structure and power control method for a small scale stand alone marine current system, in which a diode rectifier, DC/DC boost converter for the maximum power control, battery as a storage element and a single phase inverter to link with load. The study establishes the steady-state mathematical model of marine current power generation system and derives the formula between the maximum power point and dc battery voltage. Then use the measurements of DC voltage and DC current to obtain Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT by controlling the duty cycle of the boost converter switch in order to simplify the system structure and the control strategies. In this case, the hill climbing searching algorithm is employed to get maximum power point and the double closed loops control strategy is used to improve the dynamic and static performance of single phase inverter. The simulation model is developed in MATLAB/Simulink. And the control method is executed in dSPACE1104 real-time platform. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed control strategies.

  18. Balancing modern Power System with large scale of wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basit, Abdul; Altin, Müfit; Hansen, Anca Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Power system operators must ensure robust, secure and reliable power system operation even with a large scale integration of wind power. Electricity generated from the intermittent wind in large propor-tion may impact on the control of power system balance and thus deviations in the power system...... to be analysed with improved analytical tools and techniques. This paper proposes techniques for the active power balance control in future power systems with the large scale wind power integration, where power balancing model provides the hour-ahead dispatch plan with reduced planning horizon and the real time...... frequency in small or islanded power systems or tie line power flows in interconnected power systems. Therefore, the large scale integration of wind power into the power system strongly concerns the secure and stable grid operation. To ensure the stable power system operation, the evolving power system has...

  19. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandias concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  20. Power Generation Systems Using Continuous Blowdown Waste Heat From Drum Boilers Driving an Organic Rankine Cycle%利用汽包锅炉连续排污余热的有机朗肯循环发电系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘强; 段远源; 万绪财

    2013-01-01

    A power generation system which used the continuous blowdown waste heat to drive an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) was developed to improve the energy efficiency. The blowdown waste heat was recovered by organic fluid, and then generates power by expansion through a turbine. The analysis model of thermal performance for the system was established. The performance of seven ORC working fluids including R227ea, RC318, R236ea, R245fa, R245ca, R123 and R113 were optimized using the GRG algorithm, and the maximum power output was obtained. The results show that the optimum turbine inlet temperature increases as the critical temperature of the working fluid decreases for the o2 cycle which has saturated vapor entering the turbine. However, the superheating in the o3 cycle reduces the waste heat utilization ratio. Supercritical ORC improves the match of temperature profiles between the heat source and the working fluid, which helps to increase the system power output. But the high operation pressure and heat transfer deterioration due to the large specific heat near the critical point must be considered in the system design. The thermal performance and the power output of R236ea are better than the six other fluids.%提出了一种利用汽包锅炉排污系统余热的有机朗肯循环发电系统,有机工质回收扩容器疏水的热量,并通过气轮机发电。建立了系统的热力性能分析模型,并对 R227ea、RC318、R236ea、R245fa、R245ca、R123和R113等7种工质的热力性能进行了优化。结果表明,临界温度高的工质,其 o2循环的最佳主气温度(蒸发温度)反而低;亚临界循环采用干流体时,过热不利于余热的利用;超临界循环可以改善热源与工质间的温度匹配,有利于增大系统输出功,但是其运行压力高、大比热区的传热恶化等问题是实际运行和设计需要考虑的因素;R236ea的热力性能优于其余6种工质。

  1. Industrial applications study. Volume III. Technology data base evaluation of waste recovery systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Harry L.; Hamel, Bernard B.; Karamchetty, Som; Steigelmann, William H.; Gajanana, Birur C.; Agarwal, Anil P.; Klock, Lawrence W.; Henderson, James M.; Calobrisi, Gary; Hedman, Bruce A.; Koluch, Michael; Biancardi, Frank; Bass, Robert; Landerman, Abraham; Peters, George; Limaye, Dilip; Price, Jeffrey; Farr, Janet

    1977-01-01

    An analytical study was undertaken to estimate the present and potential technical and economic characteristics of a wide range of components and complete systems capable of converting industrial and commercial waste heat into mechanical or electrical power and/or building and process heating and cooling. The component and system technologies evaluated include: Rankine-, Stirling-, and Brayton-cycle power systems; reciprocating-, rotary-, and turbo-expanders; heat exchangers and heat pumps; thermally driven cooling and dehumidification systems; and integrated systems capable of providing multiple outputs. Extensive analyses were conducted of Rankine-cycle systems using steam, halogenated hydrocarbons, and other organic compounds as working fluids. Performance characteristics, recoverable output power, and installed costs were estimated and are presented herein for Rankine-cycle systems utilizing selected working fluids over a range of waste heat source temperatures between approximately 200 and 1000/sup 0/F. Data describing the performance capabilities, technology and installed costs of heat exchangers, expanders and thermally driven absorption, vapor compression, steam-jet cooling and refrigeration systems are presented herein together with limited performance and cost estimates for Stirling-cycle power recovery systems. The component and system data were used to provide a preliminary assessment of the recoverable energy and associated system costs when integrated with generalized waste heat sources identified by Drexel University from their two-digit SIC industrial energy survey.

  2. 单周控制的锂动力电池化成能量回馈系统研究%Research on Formation Energy Feedback System of Lithium Power Battery Based on Single-cycle Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王术; 郗晓田; 游林儒

    2011-01-01

    针对目前锂动力电池化成过程中存在大量的能源浪费问题,提出了一种采用反馈+前馈双闭环单周控制算法的全数字大容量锂动力电池化成能量回馈控制系统.该系统采用一种新型专用数字信号控制器TMS320F28035作为整个系统的控制单元,实现锂动力电池化成能量的高效回馈,回馈效率达到89.4%.且对电网的谐波污染小.%On account of the current lithium power battery's problem of great amount of energy waste existing in the process of formation, a all-digital formation energy feedback control system of large capacity lithium power battery is proposed by double-loop single-cycle control algorithm which uses feedback plus feed-forward. Employing a new typo of spocial digital signal controller TMS320F28035, the system is successful in achieving the goal of efficient feedback of lithium battery's formation energy,the feedback efficiency is 89.45%, and the harmonic pollution to the grid is small.

  3. A cycle ergometer test of maximal aerobic power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, W S; Toft, R J

    1982-01-01

    An indirect test of maximal aerobic power (IMAP) was evaluated in 31 healthy male subjects by comparing it with a direct treadmill measurement of maximal aerobic power (VO2 max), with the prediction of VO2 max from heart rate during submaximal exercise on a cycle ergometer using Astrand's nomogram, with the British Army's Basic Fitness Test (BFT, a 2.4 km run performed in boots and trousers), and with a test of maximum anaerobic power. For the IMAP test, subjects pedalled on a cycle ergometer at 75 revs X min-1. The workload was 37.5 watts for the first minute, and was increased by 37.5 watts every minute until the subject could not continue. Time to exhaustion was recorded. Predicted VO2 max and times for BFT and IMAP correlated significantly (p less than 0.001) with the direct VO2 max: r = 0.70, r = 0.67 and r = 0.79 respectively. The correlation between direct VO2 max and the maximum anaerobic power test was significant (p less than 0.05) but lower, r = 0.44. Although lactate levels after direct VO2 max determination were significantly higher than those after the IMAP test, maximum heart rates were not significantly different. Submaximal VO2 values measured during the IMAP test yielded a regression equation relating VO2 and pedalling time. When individual values for direct and predicted VO2 max and times for BFT and IMAP were compared with equivalent standards, the percentages of subjects able to exceed the standard were 100, 65, 87, and 87 respectively. These data demonstrate that the IMAP test provides a valid estimate of VO2 max and indicate that it may be a practical test for establishing that an individual meets a minimum standard.

  4. NB Power Transmission system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, J. [NB Power Transmission, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The NB Power Transmission System operates 6700 km of transmission lines having voltages of 69 kV, 138 kV, 230 kV, and 345 kV. The history of lightning protection on this transmission system was presented. Lightning protection with shield wires has been applied selectively on the 69 kV and 138 kV lines and has been applied to all lines in the 230 kV and 345 kV range. Beginning in 2000, line arresters were installed on selected 69 kV and 138 kV lines. It was noted that although overhead shield wires are commonly installed to capture lightning strikes and shield the conductors, problems can occur if the electrical flashover of insulators result in a line to ground fault. Good grounding is needed to ensure that lightning enters the ground from the tower. The new approach is to install line arresters on structures without overhead shield wires. Line arresters are surge arresters applied in parallel with the insulator string. This new line arrester technology was tested by installing nearly 1200 arresters in the Saint John area. This paper described the reasons for choosing line arresters over shield wires and presented the methods of installation. The problems and failure rates of the installed line arresters were presented along with solutions, including solutions to protect lines against lightning in areas with heavy icing. Recommendations for future research into the use, application and development of line arresters were also presented. tabs., figs.

  5. Thawing of foods in a microwave oven: I. Effect of power levels and power cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamchong, M; Datta, A K

    1999-01-01

    Microwave thawing is faster than other methods, but it can produce significant non-uniformity of heating. The objective of this study was to perform comprehensive experimentation and heat transfer modeling to relate the time to thaw and the non-uniformity of thawing to power cycling, power level and the surface heat transfer coefficient. The governing energy equation was formulated with an exponential decay of the microwave flux from the surface. Surface microwave flux was obtained from the measured temperature rise using inverse heat transfer analysis. Gradual phase change was formulated as an apparent specific heat, and was obtained for the experimental material tylose from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The temperatures were measured immediately following heating with a fast response thermocouple. Dielectric properties were measured above freezing. Results show that the microwave flux at the surface and its decay are affected by the changes in the power level. Power cycling has an almost identical effect as continuous power at the reduced level of the average cycled power. As power level increases, the surface flux increases by the same fraction. At higher power levels, however, the outside thaws relatively faster. A "shield" develops due to a much reduced microwave penetration depth at the surface. This thawing time at higher power levels is reduced considerably. Temperature increases initially are non-uniform since the surface is heated at a faster rate than the interior. In keeping with the assumption that once the temperature reaches 100 degrees C, all energy absorbed goes into evaporation, and subsequent temperature is maintained at 100 degrees C. Thus, eventually, non-uniformity starts to decrease.

  6. Ramgen Power Systems for Military Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    approach will potentially play a critical role in the advancement of future Integrated Gasification Com- bined Cycle ( IGCC ) power plants that will...The CO2 compression Topic Area #4 of the DOE Solicitation DE-PS26- 05NT42380 had defined a general set of requirements for IGCC systems with mass...whatever capacity increment is appropriate to optimize the IGCC plant. The final specifications of the system will be defined in Phases I and II as

  7. Numerical System Solver Developed for the National Cycle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the National Cycle Program (NCP), a powerful new numerical solver has been developed to support the simulation of aeropropulsion systems. This software uses a hierarchical object-oriented design. It can provide steady-state and time-dependent solutions to nonlinear and even discontinuous problems typically encountered when aircraft and spacecraft propulsion systems are simulated. It also can handle constrained solutions, in which one or more factors may limit the behavior of the engine system. Timedependent simulation capabilities include adaptive time-stepping and synchronization with digital control elements. The NCP solver is playing an important role in making the NCP a flexible, powerful, and reliable simulation package.

  8. FLIR systems submicro rotary stirling cycle IDCA for imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri, Bin-Nun

    2011-06-01

    The advantages of the common Rotary Stirling cycle coolers over the Split Stirling Linear are the overall size, light weight, low cooler input power and high efficiency. The main disadvantage has always been self induced vibration. Self induced vibration is a major consideration in the design of stabilized IR imaging systems/(GIMBALS) due to the effect it has on image quality i.e. Jitter. The "irregular shape" of the Rotary cooling engine attached to the payload and optics is also a problem in terms of the limits it has on optical system size. To address these issues, FLIR Systems Inc in Boston MA, developed a new rotary Stirling cycle cooling engine known as the FLIR Submicro Cooler. The Submicro is now in production and has been applied in a few products especially in FLIR"S smallest GIMBAL which measures 7.0 inch in spherical diameter. In this paper we discuss the improvements made in terms of IDCA implementation in stabilized imaging systems.

  9. Reciprocating Joule-cycle engine for domestic CHP systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, R.W.; Roskilly, A.P.; Nanda, S.K. [University of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Marine Science and Technology

    2005-02-01

    The reciprocating Joule-cycle engine operates on a recuperated gas-turbine cycle and is intended to provide high thermal efficiency in small sizes (1-10 kW). It is designed to achieve a higher efficiency than a comparable gas-turbine by using a reciprocating compressor and expander to provide very high compression and expansion efficiencies. Possible power plants for small combined heat-and-power systems currently include Stirling engines, internal-combustion engines, gas-turbines and fuel cells. The reciprocating Joule-cycle engine appears to have considerable advantages compared with other prime movers in terms of efficiency, emissions and multi-fuel capability. The present study estimates the performance of such an engine and is the first stage in a larger project that will in due course produce a demonstration engine. (author)

  10. Power Conversion with a Stirling Cycle for Venus Surface Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellott, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The light-filtering characteristic of the dense, mostly-CO2 atmosphere of Venus, combined with the high atmospheric cloud cover, relegates the surface mission use of photovoltaic power systems and beckons for the independence and reliability of a nuclear-powered energy source. A multi-faceted Venus mission study was completed at NASA GRC in December of 2003 that resulted in the preliminary design of a helium- charged, kinematic Stirling converter, which is powered by nuclear, General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. The kinematic, Stirling power converter is configured to drive an electronics and sensor cooler in addition to a generator for electrical power. This paper briefly describes the design process and also describes and summarizes key features of the Stirling power converter preliminary design concept. With an estimated total efficiency of 23.4%, the power converter drives the electronics and sensor cooler, and also produces 100 watts of electricity. The converter rejects waste heat at a hot sink temperature of 500 C.

  11. The nuclear power cycle; Le cycle de l'energie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Fifty years after the first nuclear reactor come on-line, nuclear power is fourth among the world's primary energy sources, after oil, coal and gas. In 2002, there were 441 reactors in operation worldwide. The United States led the world with 104 reactors and an installed capacity of 100,000 MWe, or more than one fourth of global capacity. Electricity from nuclear energy represents 78% of the production in France, 57% in Belgium, 46% in Sweden, 40% in Switzerland, 39% in South Korea, 34% in Japan, 30% in Germany, 30% in Finland, 26% in Spain, 22% in Great Britain, 20% in the United States and 16% in Russia. Worldwide, 32 reactors are under construction, including 21 in Asia. This information document presents the Areva activities in the nuclear power cycle: the nuclear fuel, the nuclear reactors, the spent fuel reprocessing and recycling and nuclear cleanup and dismantling. (A.L.B.)

  12. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-05-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT3 of the Halliburton KBR transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT3. GCT3 was planned as a 250-hour test run to commission the loop seal and continue the characterization of the limits of operational parameter variations using a blend of several Powder River Basin coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: (1) Loop Seal Commissioning--Evaluate the operational stability of the loop seal with sand and limestone as a bed material at different solids circulation rates and establish a maximum solids circulation rate through the loop seal with the inert bed. (2) Loop Seal Operations--Evaluate the loop seal operational stability during coal feed operations and establish maximum solids circulation rate. Secondary objectives included the continuation of reactor characterization, including: (1) Operational Stability--Characterize the reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal feed, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. (2) Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. (3) Effects of Reactor Conditions on Syngas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam

  13. Prospective Analysis of Life-Cycle Indicators through Endogenous Integration into a National Power Generation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego García-Gusano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing importance of sustainability aspects in national energy plans, this article deals with the prospective analysis of life-cycle indicators of the power generation sector through the case study of Spain. A technology-rich, optimisation-based model for power generation in Spain is developed and provided with endogenous life-cycle indicators (climate change, resources, and human health to assess their evolution to 2050. Prospective performance indicators are analysed under two energy scenarios: a business-as-usual one, and an alternative scenario favouring the role of carbon dioxide capture in the electricity production mix by 2050. Life-cycle impacts are found to decrease substantially when existing fossil technologies disappear in the mix (especially coal thermal power plants. In the long term, the relatively high presence of natural gas arises as the main source of impact. When the installation of new fossil options without CO2 capture is forbidden by 2030, both renewable technologies and—to a lesser extent—fossil technologies with CO2 capture are found to increase their contribution to electricity production. The endogenous integration of life-cycle indicators into energy models proves to boost the usefulness of both life cycle assessment and energy systems modelling in order to support decision- and policy-making.

  14. 云扰动下太阳能驱动有机朗肯循环发电系统的动态特性%Dynamic Performance of Solar Driven Organic Rankine Cycle Power System Under Cloud Disturbance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵力; 赵玮奇; 邓帅

    2016-01-01

    Based on the demonstration project of 200,kW focused organic Rankine cycle(ORC)power system driven by solar parabolic trough collector(PTC),a dynamic model was built with Simulink. In terms of the meteorological data of Tianjin City,an analysis was conducted on the dynamic performance of developed solar-ORC system under typical design working conditions and under unconventional working conditions mainly caused by cloud shadow. The results show that power/thermal capacity values of main components have the same variation trend with solar radiation and the average system efficiency is 12.68% under conventional working conditions. Under unconventional working conditions,a linear correlation exists between the variation of heat source temperature and the deteriorative time of system performance,the linear dependence coefficient being about 4.04. In addition,the impact of various heat source temperatures on the power generation of turbine is 1.67 and 2.08 times higher than thermal capacities of evapo-rator and condenser,respectively. The power output of turbine shows a high sensitivity to the variation of heat source temperature.%基于200,kW级聚焦型槽式太阳能集热驱动的有机朗肯循环发电系统示范工程,通过Simulink软件建立了系统的动态模型,采用天津地区的气象数据作为输入,分别分析了典型日系统常规工况和太阳受云遮挡造成直射辐射迅速衰减的非常规工况下系统的动态特性.结果表明:常规工况中系统热、电功率与太阳直射辐射两者变化趋势相同,系统平均效率为 12.68%;非常规工作状况中系统热源温度变化与达到恶劣工况的时间线性相关,相关系数为4.04;汽轮机发电功率受热源温度突变量影响分别是蒸发器和冷凝器的1.67倍和2.08倍,汽轮机输出对热源温度变化呈现高敏感性.

  15. Air Conditioning System using Rankine Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Shigemi; Yamaguchi, Hiroichi; Hattori, Hitoshi; Futamura, Motonori

    Natural gas is used as the energy source to cope with the recent situation of increasing demand for electricity especially in summer. In this paper, the performance of a Rankine cycle air conditioning system driven by natural gas was studied. The following results were obtained : (1) Basic equations of performance, refrigerant mass flow rate and expander volume were developed by using the values of heating efficiency, regeneration efficiency, expander efficiency and compressor efficiency. (2) R134a refrigerant has been considered to be suitable for the Rankine cycle air conditioning system, compared with other refrigerants. (3)A Rankine cycle cooling system using R134a refrigerant as a single working fluid was developed. System COP of 0.47 was attained at typical operating condition.

  16. Power system protection 3 application

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The worldwide growth in demand for electricity has forced the pace of developments in electrical power system design to meet consumer needs for reliable, secure and cheap supplies. Power system protection, as a technology essential to high quality supply, is widely recognised as a specialism of growing and often critical importance, in which power system needs and technological progress have combined to result in rapid developments in policy and practice in recent years. In the United Kingdom, the need for appropriate training in power system protection was recognised in the early 1960s with t

  17. Comparison of advanced engines for parabolic dish solar thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T.; Bowyer, J. M.; Gajanana, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    A paraboloidal dish solar thermal power plant produces electrical energy by a two-step conversion process. The collector subsystem is composed of a two-axis tracking paraboloidal concentrator and a cavity receiver. The concentrator focuses intercepted sunlight (direct, normal insolation) into a cavity receiver whose aperture encircles the focal point of the concentrator. At the internal wall of the receiver the electromagnetic radiation is converted to thermal energy. A heat engine/generator assembly then converts the thermal energy captured by the receiver to electricity. Developmental activity has been concentrated on small power modules which employ 11- to 12-meter diameter dishes to generate nominal power levels of approximately 20 kWe. A comparison of advanced heat engines for the dish power module is presented in terms of the performance potential of each engine with its requirements for advanced technology development. Three advanced engine possibilities are the Brayton (gas turbine), Brayton/Rankine combined cycle, and Stirling engines.

  18. Power quality load management for large spacecraft electrical power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollar, Louis F.

    1988-01-01

    In December, 1986, a Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) proposal was granted to study power system control techniques in large space electrical power systems. Presented are the accomplishments in the area of power system control by power quality load management. In addition, information concerning the distortion problems in a 20 kHz ac power system is presented.

  19. Numerical analyses and experiment investigations of an annular micro gas turbine power system using fuels with low heating values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; ChunHsiang; LEE; ChengChia; HSIAO; JenHao; CHEN; ChiunHsun

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of using fuels with low heating values on the performance of an annular micro gas turbine(MGT)experimentally and numerically.The MGT used in this study is MW-54, whose original fuel is liquid(Jet A1).Its fuel supply system is re-designed to use biogas fuel with low heating value(LHV).The purpose is to reduce the size of a biogas distributed power supply system and to enhance its popularization.This study assesses the practicability of using fuels with LHVs by using various mixing ratios of methane(CH4)and carbon dioxide(CO2).Prior to experiments,the corresponding simulations,aided by the commercial code CFD-ACE+,were carried out to investigate the cooling effect in a perforated combustion chamber and combustion behavior in an annular MGT when LHV gas was used.The main purposes are to confirm that there are no hot spots occurring in the liners and the exhaust temperatures of combustor are lower than 700°C when MGT is operated under different conditions.In experiments,fuel pressure and mass flow rate,turbine rotational speed,generator power output,and temperature distribution were measured to analyze MGT performance.Experimental results indicate that the presented MGT system operates successfully under each tested condition when the minimum heating value of the simulated fuel is approximately 50%of pure methane.The power output is around 170 W at 85000 r/min as 90%CH4 with 10%CO2 is used and 70 W at 60000 r/min as 70%CH4 with 30%CO2 is used.When a critical limit of 60%CH4 is used,the power output is extremely low. Furthermore,the best theoretical Brayton cycle efficiency for such MGT is calculated as 23%according to the experimental data while LHV fuel is used.Finally,the numerical results and experiment results reveal that MGT performance can be improved further and the possible solutions for performance im- provement are suggested for the future studies.

  20. Numerical analyses and experiment investigations of an annular micro gas turbine power system using fuels with low heating values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG ChunHsiang; LEE ChengChia; HSIAO JenHao; CHEN ChiunHsun

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of using fuels with low heating values on the performance of an annular micro gas turbine(MGT)experimentally and numerically.The MGT used in this study is MW-54,whose original fuel is liquid(Jet al).Its fuel supply system is re-designed to use biogas fuel with low heating value(LHV).The purpose is to reduce the size of a biogas distributed power supply system and to enhance its popularization.This study assesses the practicability of using fuels with LHVs by using various mixing ratios of methane(CH_4)and carbon dioxide(CO_2).Prior to experiments,the corresponding simulations,aided by the commercial code CFD-ACE+,were carried out to investigate the cooling effect in a perforated combustion chamber and combustion behavior in an annular MGT when LHV gas was used.The main purposes are to confirm that there are no hot spots occurring in the liners and the exhaust temperatures of combustor are lower than 700℃ when MGT is operated under different conditions,in experiments,fuel pressure and mass flow rate,turbine rotational speed,generator power output,and temperature distribution were measured to analyze MGT performance.Experimental results indicate that the presented MGT system operates successfully under each tested condition when the minimum heating value of the simulated fuel is approximately 50%of pure methane.The power output is around 170 W at 85000 r/min as 90%CH_4 with 10%CO_2 is used and 70 W at 60000 r/min as 70%CH_4 with 30%CO_2 is used.When a critical limit of 60%CH_4 is used,the power output is extremely low.Furthermore,the best theoretical Brayton cycle efficiency for such MGT is calculated as 23%according to the experimental data while LHV fuel is used.Finally,the numerical results and experiment results reveal that MGT performance can be improved further and the possible solutions for performance improvement are suggested for the future studies.

  1. Microfabricated rankine cycle steam turbine for power generation and methods of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frechette, Luc (Inventor); Muller, Norbert (Inventor); Lee, Changgu (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, an integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip has been provided. The integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip of the present invention comprises a miniature electric power generation system fabricated using silicon microfabrication technology and lithographic patterning. The present invention converts heat to electricity by implementing a thermodynamic power cycle on a chip. The steam turbine power plant on-a-chip generally comprises a turbine, a pump, an electric generator, an evaporator, and a condenser. The turbine is formed by a rotatable, disk-shaped rotor having a plurality of rotor blades disposed thereon and a plurality of stator blades. The plurality of stator blades are interdigitated with the plurality of rotor blades to form the turbine. The generator is driven by the turbine and converts mechanical energy into electrical energy.

  2. Implementing Life Cycle Assessment in systems development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhander, Gurbakhash Singh; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; McAloone, Timothy Charles

    2003-01-01

    derived from products and system, and calculate resource consumptions. However, the complexity of LCA poses restrictions to its use in current product and system development given the need for a reduction in product development cycle time which is needed to meet the increasing competitive pressures....... The paper reviews the current environmental evaluation practices with respect to product life cycles. As a number of deficiencies in LCA are identified, strategies are presented to provide a solution to many of the deficiencies. The result of the paper is a definition of the requirements for performance...... measurement techniques and a performance measurement environment necessary to support life cycle evaluation throughout the evaluation of early stages of a product system....

  3. A Study of Solar Thermal Propulsion System Enhancement via Thermal Storage and Thermal-electric Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    Brayton cycle and free piston Stirling cycle). These systems have been thoroughly reviewed elsewhere and will only be briefly discussed here. 24-27...thermal-to-electric conversion systems consists of a hot cathode which thermionically emits electrons over a potential energy barrier to a cooler anode to... Stirling cycle is an efficient and simple system that is typically lightweight and doesn’t require lubricants or high-pressure seals. Sunpower is

  4. Exergy analysis of an integrated solar combined cycle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghernejad, A.; Yaghoubi, M. [Engineering School, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran)

    2010-10-15

    Exergetic analysis has become an integral part of thermodynamic assessment of any power generation system. Energy and exergy studies for power plants optimum design and for combined chemical industries received much attention recently. An Integrated Solar Combined Cycle System (ISCCS) is proposed as a means of integrating a parabolic trough solar thermal plant with modern combined cycle power plants. In this study attempt will be made to analyze the Integrated Solar Combined Cycle in Yazd, Iran using design plant data. Energy and exergy analysis for the solar field and combined cycle is carried out to assess the plant performance and pinpoint sites of primary exergy destruction. Exergy destruction throughout the plant is quantified and illustrated using an exergy flow diagram, and compared to the energy flow diagram. The causes of exergy destruction in the plant include: losses in combustor, collector, heat exchangers, and pump and turbines which accounts for 29.62, 8.69, 9.11 and 8% of the total exergy input to the plant, respectively. Exergetic efficiencies of the major plant components are determined in an attempt to assess their individual performances. (author)

  5. Contraction-specific differences in maximal muscle power during stretch-shortening cycle movements in elderly males and females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caserotti, Paolo; Aagaard, Per; Simonsen, Erik Bruun;

    2001-01-01

    Aging, muscle power, stretch-shortening cycle, eccentric muscle actions, concentric contractions......Aging, muscle power, stretch-shortening cycle, eccentric muscle actions, concentric contractions...

  6. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  7. Impact of advanced wind power ancillary services on power system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca Daniela; Altin, Müfit

    The objective of this report is to illustrate and analyse, by means of simulation test cases, the impact of wind power advanced ancillary services, like inertial response (IR), power oscillation damping (POD) and synchronising power (SP) on the power system. Generic models for wind turbine, wind...... power plant and power system are used in the investigation....

  8. Power systems engineering and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Knight, U G

    1972-01-01

    Power Systems Engineering and Mathematics investigates the application of mathematical aids, particularly the techniques of resource planning, to some of the technical-economic problems of power systems engineering. Topics covered include the process of engineering design and the use of computers in system design and operation; power system planning and operation; time scales and computation in system operation; and load prediction and generation capacity. This volume is comprised of 13 chapters and begins by outlining the stages in the synthesis of designs (or operating states) for engineerin

  9. Handbook of power systems I

    CERN Document Server

    Pardalos, P M; Pereira, Mario V; Iliadis, Niko A

    2010-01-01

    Energy is one of the world's most challenging problems, and power systems are an important aspect of energy-related issues. The Handbook of Power Systems contains state-of-the-art contributions on power systems modeling. In particular, it covers topics like operation planning, expansion planning, transmission and distribution modelling, computing technologies in energy systems, energy auctions, risk management, market regulation, stochastic programming in energy, and forecasting in energy. The book is separated into nine sections, which cover the most important areas of energy systems. The con

  10. Robust power system frequency control

    CERN Document Server

    Bevrani, Hassan

    2008-01-01

    Emphasizes the physical and engineering aspects of the power system frequency control design problem while providing a conceptual understanding of frequency regulation and application of robust control techniques. This book summarizes the author's research outcomes, contributions and experiences with power system frequency regulation.

  11. Geometrization of spin systems using cycle expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Mainieri, R

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that a spin system with long range interactions can be converted into a chaotic dynamical system that is differentiable and low-dimensional. The thermodynamic limit of the spin system is then equivalent to studying the long term behavior of the dynamical system. Cycle expansions of chaotic systems (expansion of the Fredholm determinant) are then used to study the thermodynamic limit. By considering the smooth dynamical system, it is possible to converge to the thermodynamic limit faster than with transfer matrices.

  12. Parametric study and optimization of a transcritical power cycle using a low temperature source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cayer, Emmanuel; Galanis, Nicolas [Universite de Sherbrooke, Genie mecanique, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); Nesreddine, Hakim [LTE-Hydro-Quebec, 600 av. de la Montagne, Shawinigan, QC (Canada)

    2010-04-15

    A parametric study and optimization is performed on a transcritical power cycle using six performance indicators: thermal efficiency, specific net output, exergetic efficiency, total UA and surface of the heat exchangers as well as the relative cost of the system. The independent parameters are the maximum temperature and pressure of the cycle as well as the net power output. Results show that it is impossible to simultaneously optimise all six performance indicators, i.e. that the values of the independent parameters are not the same for all the optimizations. The design value for these parameters is therefore a matter of choice, or compromise, among the combinations optimising the performance indicators. For a limited low temperature heat source the parametric studies reveal the existence of a maximum value for the net power output of the system and of another net power output minimising the cost per kW. A comparison of optimised results for three working fluids (CO{sub 2}, ethane, R125) shows that the better fluid depends on the optimised indicator and clearly indicates that a simple first law analysis is not sufficient for the selection of a working fluid. In summary, this paper demonstrates the need to achieve a multi-point optimization and comparison in order to study adequately a transcritical power system. (author)

  13. A Co-Powered Biomass and Concentrated Solar Power Rankine Cycle Concept for Small Size Combined Heat and Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Tortora

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the matching of an advanced small scale Combined Heat and Power (CHP Rankine cycle plant with end-user thermal and electric load. The power plant consists of a concentrated solar power field co-powered by a biomass furnace to produce steam in a Rankine cycle, with a CHP configuration. A hotel was selected as the end user due to its high thermal to electric consumption ratio. The power plant design and its operation were modelled and investigated by adopting transient simulations with an hourly distribution. The study of the load matching of the proposed renewable power technology and the final user has been carried out by comparing two different load tracking scenarios, i.e., the thermal and the electric demands. As a result, the power output follows fairly well the given load curves, supplying, on a selected winter day, about 50 GJ/d of thermal energy and the 6 GJ/d of electric energy, with reduced energy dumps when matching the load.

  14. Membranes for H2 generation from nuclear powered thermochemical cycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Ambrosini, Andrea; Garino, Terry J.; Gelbard, Fred; Leung, Kevin; Navrotsky, Alexandra (University of California, Davis, CA); Iyer, Ratnasabapathy G. (University of California, Davis, CA); Axness, Marlene

    2006-11-01

    In an effort to produce hydrogen without the unwanted greenhouse gas byproducts, high-temperature thermochemical cycles driven by heat from solar energy or next-generation nuclear power plants are being explored. The process being developed is the thermochemical production of Hydrogen. The Sulfur-Iodide (SI) cycle was deemed to be one of the most promising cycles to explore. The first step of the SI cycle involves the decomposition of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} into O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O at temperatures around 850 C. In-situ removal of O{sub 2} from this reaction pushes the equilibrium towards dissociation, thus increasing the overall efficiency of the decomposition reaction. A membrane is required for this oxygen separation step that is capable of withstanding the high temperatures and corrosive conditions inherent in this process. Mixed ionic-electronic perovskites and perovskite-related structures are potential materials for oxygen separation membranes owing to their robustness, ability to form dense ceramics, capacity to stabilize oxygen nonstoichiometry, and mixed ionic/electronic conductivity. Two oxide families with promising results were studied: the double-substituted perovskite A{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}B{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (A=La, Y; B=Cr-Ni), in particular the family La{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCM), and doped La{sub 2}Ni{sub 1-x}M{sub x}O{sub 4} (M = Cu, Zn). Materials and membranes were synthesized by solid state methods and characterized by X-ray and neutron diffraction, SEM, thermal analyses, calorimetry and conductivity. Furthermore, we were able to leverage our program with a DOE/NE sponsored H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition reactor study (at Sandia), in which our membranes were tested in the actual H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition step.

  15. Cycle Trades for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C.; Guidos, M.; Greene, W.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been used as a reliable source for utility power in the United States for decades. Even in the 1940's, long before the United States had a viable space program, the theoretical benefits of nuclear power as applied to space travel were being explored. These benefits include long-life operation and high performance, particularly in the form of vehicle power density, enabling longer-lasting space missions. The configurations for nuclear rocket systems and chemical rocket systems are similar except that a nuclear rocket utilizes a fission reactor as its heat source. This thermal energy can be utilized directly to heat propellants that are then accelerated through a nozzle to generate thrust or it can be used as part of an electricity generation system. The former approach is Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) and the latter is Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), which is then used to power thruster technologies such as ion thrusters. This paper will explore a number of indirect-NTP engine cycle configurations using assumed performance constraints and requirements, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each cycle configuration, and present preliminary performance and size results. This paper is intended to lay the groundwork for future efforts in the development of a practical NTP system or a combined NTP/NEP hybrid system.

  16. Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressured Oxy-combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron; Davis, John

    2014-03-31

    The team of Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI) and Thar Energy LLC (Thar) applied technology engineering and economic analysis to evaluate two advanced oxy-combustion power cycles, the Cryogenic Pressurized Oxy-combustion Cycle (CPOC), and the Supercritical Oxy-combustion Cycle. This assessment evaluated the performance and economic cost of the two proposed cycles with carbon capture, and included a technology gap analysis of the proposed technologies to determine the technology readiness level of the cycle and the cycle components. The results of the engineering and economic analysis and the technology gap analysis were used to identify the next steps along the technology development roadmap for the selected cycle. The project objectives, as outlined in the FOA, were 90% CO{sub 2} removal at no more than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE) as compared to a Supercritical Pulverized Coal Plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The supercritical oxy-combustion power cycle with 99% carbon capture achieves a COE of $121/MWe. This revised COE represents a 21% reduction in cost as compared to supercritical steam with 90% carbon capture ($137/MWe). However, this represents a 49% increase in the COE over supercritical steam without carbon capture ($80.95/MWe), exceeding the 35% target. The supercritical oxy-combustion cycle with 99% carbon capture achieved a 37.9% HHV plant efficiency (39.3% LHV plant efficiency), when coupling a supercritical oxy-combustion thermal loop to an indirect supercritical CO{sub 2} (sCO{sub 2}) power block. In this configuration, the power block achieved 48% thermal efficiency for turbine inlet conditions of 650°C and 290 atm. Power block efficiencies near 60% are feasible with higher turbine inlet temperatures, however a design tradeoff to limit firing temperature to 650°C was made in order to use austenitic stainless steels for the high temperature pressure vessels and piping and to minimize the need for advanced turbomachinery features

  17. Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the

  18. Exergy Analysis of Gas Turbine – Fuel cell based combined Cycle Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Sreeramulu,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase in demand for electrical energy leads to the newer power generation systems. Though it is not new, fuel cell technology is one of the promising systems for cleaner and competitive alternate power generation system. When the fuel cells are integrated with the Gas Turbines, the total thermal efficiency of the combined cycle is obtained greater than 60%. In this paper, thermodynamic analysis of SOFC-GT combined system (2.898MW has been carried out, exergy efficiency and exergy destruction of each component are calculated.The effect of compression ratio (rp, turbine inlet temperature (TIT and ambient temperature of air, on the performance of the system has been analyzed. Outcome of the system modeling reveals that SOFC andcombustion chamber are the main sources of exergy destruction. At the optimum compression ratio 9, the total thermal efficiency and exergy efficiency are found to be 63.3% and 60.85% respectively.

  19. The limits of the possible: models of power supply and demand in cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, T; Norton, K; Craig, N; Olive, S; Lowe, E

    1995-06-01

    This paper outlines a general strategy for mathematical modeling of cycling performance. This strategy involves formulating one expression describing the power available for external work from physiological sources. The variables used in this expression include maximal aerobic power (VO2max), fractional utilisation of VO2max, mechanical efficiency, maximal accumulated oxygen deficit, and the time constants relating to the expression of aerobic and anaerobic capacities. A second expression describing the power demand of cycling is then constructed. The variables used in this expression include the mass, projected frontal area and drag characteristics of the system, the coefficient of rolling resistance, environmental variables such as temperature, barometric pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and direction and the slope of the course. The two expressions are equated and solved using an iterative procedure. Two series of trials were used to assess the predictive accuracy of the model, one using track endurance performances and the other a 26 km road time-trial. The correlations between actual and predicted times have been excellent (0.92-0.95, p cycling performance. A range of options designed to improve cycling performance is described.

  20. Power system protection 2 systems and methods

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The worldwide growth in demand for electricity has forced the pace of developments in electrical power system design to meet consumer needs for reliable, secure and cheap supplies. Power system protection, as a technology essential to high quality supply, is widely recognised as a specialism of growing and often critical importance, in which power system needs and technological progress have combined to result in rapid developments in policy and practice in recent years. In the United Kingdom, the need for appropriate training in power system protection was recognised in the early 1960s with t

  1. Effect of isokinetic cycling versus weight training on maximal power output and endurance performance in cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koninckx, Erwin; Van Leemputte, Marc; Hespel, Peter

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a weight training program for the leg extensors with isokinetic cycling training (80 rpm) on maximal power output and endurance performance. Both strength training interventions were incorporated twice a week in a similar endurance training program of 12 weeks. Eighteen trained male cyclists (VO(2peak) 60 +/- 1 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) were grouped into the weight training (WT n = 9) or the isokinetic training group (IT n = 9) matched for training background and sprint power (P (max)), assessed from five maximal sprints (5 s) on an isokinetic bicycle ergometer at cadences between 40 and 120 rpm. Crank torque was measured (1 kHz) to determine the torque distribution during pedaling. Endurance performance was evaluated by measuring power, heart rate and lactate during a graded exercise test to exhaustion and a 30-min performance test. All tests were performed on subjects' individual race bicycle. Knee extension torque was evaluated isometrically at 115 degrees knee angle and dynamically at 200 degrees s(-1) using an isokinetic dynamometer. P (max) at 40 rpm increased in both the groups (~15%; P < 0.05). At 120 rpm, no improvement of P (max) was found in the IT training group, which was possibly related to an observed change in crank torque at high cadences (P < 0.05). Both groups improved their power output in the 30-min performance test (P < 0.05). Isometric knee extension torque increased only in WT (P < 0.05). In conclusion, at low cadences, P (max) improved in both training groups. However, in the IT training group, a disturbed pedaling technique compromises an improvement of P (max) at high cadences.

  2. Techno-economic projections for advanced small solar thermal electric power plants to years 1990-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T.; Manvi, R.; Roschke, E. J.; El-Gabalawi, N.; Herrera, G.; Kuo, T. J.; Chen, K. H.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced technologies applicable to solar thermal electric power systems in the 1990-200 time-frame are delineated for power applications that fulfill a wide spectrum of small power needs with primary emphasis on power ratings less than 10MWe. Projections of power system characteristics (energy and capital costs as a function of capacity factor) are made based on development of identified promising technologies and are used as the basis for comparing technology development options and combinations of these options to determine developmental directions offering potential for significant improvements. Stirling engines, Brayton/Rankine combined cycles and storage/transport concepts encompassing liquid metals, and reversible-reaction chemical systems are considered for two-axis tracking systems such as the central receiver or power tower concept and distributed parabolic dish receivers which can provide efficient low-cost solar energy collection while achieving high temperatures for efficient energy conversion. Pursuit of advanced technology across a broad front can result in post-1985 solar thermal systems having the potential of approaching the goal of competitiveness with conventional power systems.

  3. -150℃逆布雷顿空气制冷机动态温降特性研究%Study on the Dynamic Cooling Performance of a-150 ℃ Reverse Brayton Cycle Air Cryocooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡君伟; 孙皖; 李斌; 李涛; 侯予

    2013-01-01

    A turboexpander having a working wheel with a diameter of 24mm and a plate-fin heat exchanger were applied in a retrofitted -150 ℃ air cryocooler system. A vacuum cryogenic trap (absolute pressure < 10-3 Pa) was used for insulation. The dynamic cooling performance of the whole system was studied under the conditions of different brake wheel configurations. A numerical model in respect of the dynamic cooling performance of the - 150 ℃ air cryocooler system was established. The results show that the brake wheel size significantly affects the cooling performance of the cryocooler, and the lowest system temperature is under -150 ℃. Additionally, the numerical results agree well with the experimental data.%为了研究空气制冷机的动态温降特性,对采用工作轮直径为24 mm的小型透平膨胀机和板翅式换热器的逆布雷顿循环空气制冷机实验台进行了改进.采用高真空绝热冷箱对制冷机进行绝热,可使绝对压力低于10-3 Pa,得到的设计制冷温度为-150℃.对不同进口参数和采用不同直径风机轮的制冷机工况进行了实验研究,获得了透平膨胀机的实际温降曲线;以实验系统为基础建立了数学模型,得到了相应的理论温降曲线.研究结果表明:风机轮尺寸对空气制冷机动态温降过程的影响较大,实验的最低温度低于-150℃;所建理论模型能够较好地预测实际系统温降的过程.

  4. Grid-connected distributed solar power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, R.; Chernoff, H.; Schweizer, T.

    This paper discusses some important, though often ignored, technical and economic issues of distributed solar power systems: protection of the utility system and nonsolar customers requires suitable interfaced equipment. Purchase criteria must mirror reality; most analyses use life-cycle costing with low discount rates - most buyers use short payback periods. Distributing, installing, and marketing small, distributed solar systems is more costly than most analyses estimate. Results show that certain local conditions and uncommon purchase considerations can combine to make small, distributed solar power attractive, but lower interconnect costs (per kW), lower marketing and product distribution costs, and more favorable purchase criteria make large, centralized solar energy more attractive. Specifically, the value of dispersed solar systems to investors and utilities can be higher than $2000/kw. However, typical residential owners place a value of well under $1000 on the installed system.

  5. Detonation Jet Engine. Part 1--Thermodynamic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the most relevant works on jet engine design that utilize thermodynamic cycle of detonative combustion. The efficiency advantages of thermodynamic detonative combustion cycle over Humphrey combustion cycle at constant volume and Brayton combustion cycle at constant pressure were demonstrated. An ideal Ficket-Jacobs detonation cycle, and…

  6. Experimental and CFD Analysis of Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger for Supercritical CO{sub 2} Power Cycle Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Seungjoon; Kim, Hyeon Tae; Kim, Seong Gu; Lee, Jekyoung; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) power cycle has been suggested as an alternative for the SFR power generation system. First of all, relatively mild sodium-CO{sub 2} interaction can reduce the accident probability. Also the S-CO{sub 2} power conversion cycle can achieve high efficiency with SFR core thermal condition. Moreover, the S-CO{sub 2} power cycle can reduce cycle footprint due to high density of the working fluid. Recently, various compact heat exchangers have been studied for developing an optimal heat exchanger. In this paper, the printed circuit heat exchanger was selected for S-CO{sub 2} power cycle applications and was closely investigated experimentally and analytically. Recently, design and performance prediction of PCHE received attention due to its importance in high pressure power systems such as S-CO{sub 2} cycle. To evaluate a PCHE performance with CO{sub 2} to water, KAIST research team designed and tested a lab-scale PCHE. From the experimental data and CFD analysis, pressure drop and heat transfer correlations are obtained. For the CFD analysis, Ansys-CFX commercial code was utilized with RGP table implementation. In near future, the turbulence model sensitivity study will be followed.

  7. Test bench for thermal cycling of 10 kV silicon carbide power modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Simon Dyhr; Jørgensen, Asger Bjørn; Maarbjerg, Anders Eggert;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a test bench for lifetime investigation of 10 kV silicon carbide power modules. The test bench subjects high voltage switching operation to the modules while power cycling. Thus both a thermal and electrical operating point is emulated. The power cycling setup features offline...

  8. High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for Use Ina a Supercritical CO2 Recompression Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Shaun D. [Brayton Energy, LLC, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Kesseli, James [Brayton Energy, LLC, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Nash, James [Brayton Energy, LLC, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Farias, Jason [Brayton Energy, LLC, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Kesseli, Devon [Brayton Energy, LLC, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Caruso, William [Brayton Energy, LLC, Portsmouth, NH (United States)

    2016-04-06

    This project has performed solar receiver designs for two supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) power cycles. The first half of the program focused on a nominally 2 MWe power cycle, with a receiver designed for test at the Sandia Solar Thermal Test Facility. This led to an economical cavity-type receiver. The second half of the program focused on a 10 MWe power cycle, incorporating a surround open receiver. Rigorous component life and performance testing was performed in support of both receiver designs. The receiver performance objectives are set to conform to the US DOE goals of 6¢/kWh by 2020 . Key findings for both cavity-type and direct open receiver are highlighted below: A tube-based absorber design is impractical at specified temperatures, pressures and heat fluxes for the application; a plate-fin architecture however has been shown to meet performance and life targets; the $148/kWth cost of the design is significantly less than the SunShot cost target with a margin of 30%; the proposed receiver design is scalable, and may be applied to both modular cavity-type installations as well as large utility-scale open receiver installations; the design may be integrated with thermal storage systems, allowing for continuous high-efficiency electrical production during off-sun hours; costs associated with a direct sCO2 receiver for a sCO2 Brayton power cycle are comparable to those of a typical molten salt receiver; lifetimes in excess of the 90,000 hour goal are achievable with an optimal cell geometry; the thermal performance of the Brayton receiver is significantly higher than the industry standard, and enables at least a 30% efficiency improvement over the performance of the baseline steam-Rankine boiler/cycle system; brayton’s patent-pending quartz tube window provides a greater than five-percent efficiency benefit to the receiver by reducing both convection and radiation losses.

  9. Space power systems technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulman, George A.

    1994-01-01

    Reported here is a series of studies which examine several potential catalysts and electrodes for some fuel cell systems, some materials for space applications, and mathematical modeling and performance predictions for some solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers. The fuel cell systems have a potential for terrestrial applications in addition to solar energy conversion in space applications. Catalysts and electrodes for phosphoric acid fuel cell systems and for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell and electrolyzer systems were examined.

  10. Exergoeconomic performance optimization of an endoreversible intercooled regenerated Brayton cogeneration plant. Part 1: Thermodynamic model and parameter analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingen Chen, Bo Yang, Fengrui Sun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamic model of an endoreversible intercooled regenerative Brayton heat and power cogeneration plant coupled to constant-temperature heat reservoirs is established by using finite time thermodynamics in Part 1 of this paper. The heat resistance losses in the hot-, cold- and consumer-side heat exchangers, the intercooler and the regenerator are taken into account. The finite time exergoeconomic performance of the cogeneration plant is investigated. The analytical formulae about dimensionless profit rate and exergetic efficiency are derived. The numerical examples show that there exists an optimal value of intercooling pressure ratio which leads to an optimal value of dimensionless profit rate for the fixed total pressure ratio. There also exists an optimal total pressure ratio which leads to a maximum profit rate for the variable total pressure ratio. The effects of intercooling, regeneration and the ratio of the hot-side heat reservoir temperature to environment temperature on dimensionless profit rate and the corresponding exergetic efficiency are analyzed. At last, it is found that there exists an optimal consumer-side temperature which leads to a double-maximum dimensionless profit rate. The profit rate of the model cycle is optimized by optimal allocation of the heat conductance of the heat exchangers in Part 2 of this paper.

  11. Power Aware Distributed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    algorithm from the Army Research Laboratory for power aware analysis. In addition to the algorithm in MATLAB (and ported to C by MIT), the...tool for software energy pro ling”, in Proc. IEEE/ACM DAC, June, 2001. [37] J. L. W. V. Jensen, “Sur les fonctions convexes et les ingalits entre les... fonctions convexes et les ingalits entre les valeurs moyennes”, Acta Math., vol. 30, pp. 175–193, 1906. [37] PARSEC parallel simulation language (http://pcl.cs.ucla.edu/projects/parsec) 19 225

  12. 77 FR 2521 - Integrated System Power Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... Southwestern Power Administration Integrated System Power Rates AGENCY: Southwestern Power Administration, DOE... System pursuant to the Integrated System Rate Schedules which supersede the existing rate schedules... Integrated System pursuant to the following Integrated System Rate Schedules: Rate Schedule P-11,...

  13. Combined Cycle for Power Generation and Refrigeration Using Low Temperature Heat Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Chauhan; P. Anil Kishan; Sateesh Gedupudi

    2014-01-01

    A combined refrigeration and power cycle, which uses ammonia-water as the working fluid, is proposed by combining Rankine and vapour absorption cycles with an advantage of varying refrigeration capacity to power output ratio. The study investigates the usage of low temperature heat sources for the cycle operation. Results of parametric analysis are presented, which show the scope for optimization. Results of thermodynamic optimization of the cycle for second law efficiency performed using gen...

  14. Staging Rankine Cycles Using Ammonia for OTEC Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharathan, D.

    2011-03-01

    Recent focus on renewable power production has renewed interest in looking into ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Early studies in OTEC applicability indicate that the island of Hawaii offers a potential market for a nominal 40-MWe system. a 40-MWe system represents a large leap in the current state of OTEC technology. Lockheed Martin Inc. is currently pursuing a more realistic goal of developing a 10-MWe system under U.S. Navy funding (Lockheed 2009). It is essential that the potential risks associated with the first-of-its-kind plant should be minimized for the project's success. Every means for reducing costs must also be pursued without increasing risks. With this in mind, the potential for increasing return on the investment is assessed both in terms of effective use of the seawater resource and of reducing equipment costs.

  15. Development of a Thin Film Primary Surface Heat Exchanger for Advanced Power Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Tim [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Beck, Griffin [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Bennett, Jeffrey [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Hoopes, Kevin [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Miller, Larry [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-29

    This project objective is to develop a high-temperature design upgrade for an existing primary surface heat exchanger so that the redesigned hardware is capable of operation in CO2 at temperatures up to 1,510°F (821°C) and pressure differentials up to 130 psi (9 bar). The heat exchanger is proposed for use as a recuperator in an advanced low-pressure oxy-fuel Brayton cycle that is predicted to achieve over 50% thermodynamic efficiency, although the heat exchanger could also be used in other high-temperature, low-differential pressure cycles. This report describes the progress to date, which includes continuing work performed to select and test new candidate materials for the recuperator redesign, final mechanical and thermal performance analysis results of various redesign concepts, and the preliminary design of a test loop for the redesigned recuperator including a budgetary estimate for detailed test loop design, procurement, and test operation. A materials search was performed in order to investigate high-temperature properties of many candidate materials, including high-temperature strength and nickel content. These properties were used to rank the candidate materials, resulting in a reduced list of nine materials for corrosion testing. Multiple test rigs were considered and analyzed for short-term corrosion testing and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) was selected as the most cost-effective option for evaluating corrosion resistance of the candidate materials. In addition, tantalum, niobium, and chromium coatings were identified as potential options for increased corrosion resistance. The test results show that many materials exhibit relatively low weight gain rates, and that niobium and tantalum coatings may improve corrosion resistance for many materials, while chromium coatings appear to oxidize and debond quickly. Metallurgical analysis of alloys was also performed, showing evidence of intergranular attack in 282 that may cause long

  16. Protection of industrial power systems

    CERN Document Server

    DAVIES, T

    2006-01-01

    The protection which is installed on an industrial power system is likely to be subjected to more difficult conditions than the protection on any other kind of power system. Starting with the many simple devices which are employed and covering the whole area of industrial power system protection, this book aims to help achieve a thorough understanding of the protection necessary.Vital aspects such as the modern cartridge fuse, types of relays, and the role of the current transformer are covered and the widely used inverse definite-minimum time overcurrent relay, the theory of the M

  17. Optimization of power system operation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    This book applies the latest applications of new technologies topower system operation and analysis, including new and importantareas that are not covered in the previous edition. Optimization of Power System Operation covers both traditional andmodern technologies, including power flow analysis, steady-statesecurity region analysis, security constrained economic dispatch,multi-area system economic dispatch, unit commitment, optimal powerflow, smart grid operation, optimal load shed, optimalreconfiguration of distribution network, power system uncertaintyanalysis, power system sensitivity analysis, analytic hierarchicalprocess, neural network, fuzzy theory, genetic algorithm,evolutionary programming, and particle swarm optimization, amongothers. New topics such as the wheeling model, multi-areawheeling, the total transfer capability computation in multipleareas, are also addressed. The new edition of this book continues to provide engineers andac demics with a complete picture of the optimization of techn...

  18. High Power Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) for Cargo and Propellant Transfer Missions in Cislunar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck, Robert D.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) in transporting cargo and propellant from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to the first Earth-Moon Lagrange point (EML1) is examined. The baseline NEP vehicle utilizes a fission reactor system with Brayton power conversion for electric power generation to power multiple liquid hydrogen magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters. Vehicle characteristics and performance levels are based on technology availability in a fifteen to twenty year timeframe. Results of numerical trajectory analyses are also provided.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of molecular design problem for the development of novel working fluids for power cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    identify the target properties of the CAMD problem for working fluids. In this study the CAMD problem for the development of novel working fluids for organic Rankine cycles (ORC) is formulated mathematically. It integrates both a system model for the ORC and property models including the Peng...... will be applied in a case study of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) with a low-temperature heat source. The heat source is a hot water stream from waste heat of a chemical site. Giving this pre-exquisite the method allows to identify the most favorable working fluid along with the corresponding optimal process...... conditions in order to get the highest possible power output. The study presents a new approach for the identification of target properties of CAMD problems based on sensitivity analysis and shows its application for the development of novel working fluids of organic Rankine cycles for low temperature heat...

  20. Advanced fusion MHD power conversion using the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Logan, B.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA); Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1988-10-01

    The CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept for a tokamak reactor involves the use of a high-temperature Rankine cycle in combination with microwave superheaters and nonequilibrium MHD disk generators to obtain a compact, low-capital-cost power conversion system which fits almost entirely within the reactor vault. The significant savings in the balance-of-plant costs are expected to result in much lower costs of electricity than previous concepts. This paper describes the unique features of the CFAR cycle and a high- temperature blanket designed to take advantage of it as well as the predicted performance of the MHD disk generators using mercury seeded with cesium. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Wind farm - A power source in future power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2009-01-01

    wind turbines and wind farms, and then introduces the wind power development and wind farms. An optimization platform for designing electrical systems of offshore wind farms is briefed. The major issues related to the grid connection requirements and the operation of wind turbines/farms in power......The paper describes modern wind power systems, introduces the issues of large penetration of wind power into power systems, and discusses the possible methods of making wind turbines/farms act as a power source, like conventional power plants in power systems. Firstly, the paper describes modern...... systems are illustrated....

  2. Evaluating the impacts of climate change on diurnal wind power cycles using multiple regional climate models

    KAUST Repository

    Goddard, Scott D.

    2015-05-01

    Electrical utility system operators must plan resources so that electricity supply matches demand throughout the day. As the proportion of wind-generated electricity in the US grows, changes in daily wind patterns have the potential either to disrupt the utility or increase the value of wind to the system over time. Wind power projects are designed to last many years, so at this timescale, climate change may become an influential factor on wind patterns. We examine the potential effects of climate change on the average diurnal power production cycles at 12 locations in North America by analyzing averaged and individual output from nine high-resolution regional climate models comprising historical (1971–1999) and future (2041–2069) periods. A semi-parametric mixed model is fit using cubic B-splines, and model diagnostics are checked. Then, a likelihood ratio test is applied to test for differences between the time periods in the seasonal daily averaged cycles, and agreement among the individual regional climate models is assessed. We investigate the significant changes by combining boxplots with a differencing approach and identify broad categories of changes in the amplitude, shape, and position of the average daily cycles. We then discuss the potential impact of these changes on wind power production.

  3. DESIGN OF COMBINED CYCLE GENERATION SYSTEM WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL AND STEAM TURBINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lijun; Yuan Junqi; Cao Guangyi

    2003-01-01

    For environment protection and high efficiency, development of new concept power plant has been required in China. The fuel cell is expected to be used in a power plant as a centralized power station or distributed power plant. It is a chemical power generation device that converts the energy of a chemical reaction directly into electrical energy and not limited by Carnot cycle efficiency. The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plant has several attractive features I.e. High efficiency and lower emission of Nox and Sox. A combined cycle generation system with MCFC and steam turbine is designed. Its net electrical efficiency LHV is about 55%.

  4. Basic data for integrated assessment of nuclear fuel cycle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Tamaki, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ito, Chihiro; Saegusa, Toshiari [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    In our country, where natural energy resources such as oil and coal are scarce, it is vital to establish a nuclear fuel cycle to reprocess spent fuel and reuse valuable nuclear fuel in electric power generation reactors. However spent fuel is now being accumulated too much so that, for the time being, it is necessary to establish a system for tentatively storing spent fuel. In this report, in order to deal with these issues, evaluation methods, which were developed, prepared and discussed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), are rendered together with sample results of their application. Also reported is some important information on the data and methods for the safety assessment of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, which have been surveyed by JAERI and CRIEPI. (author)

  5. Reliability of Power Electronic Converter Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -link capacitance in power electronic converter systems; wind turbine systems; smart control strategies for improved reliability of power electronics system; lifetime modelling; power module lifetime test and state monitoring; tools for performance and reliability analysis of power electronics systems; fault......-tolerant adjustable speed drive systems; mission profile oriented reliability design in wind turbine and photovoltaic systems; reliability of power conversion systems in photovoltaic applications; power supplies for computers; and high-power converters. Reliability of Power Electronic Converter Systems is essential...... reading for researchers, professionals and students working with power electronics and their applications, particularly those specializing in the development and application of power electronic converters and systems....

  6. Water Powered Bioassay System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    capillary micropump 27 Figure 30: Slow dripping/separation of a droplet from a capillary 4.1.5 Micro Osmotic Pumping Nano Droplet...stored and delivered fluidic pressure and, with a combination of pumps and valves, formed the basic micro fluidic processing unit. The addition of...System, Microvalve, Micro -Accumulator, Micro Dialysis Needle, Bioassay System, Water Activated, Micro Osmotic Pump 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY

  7. Life-Cycle Evaluation of Domestic Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Shigeru; Hihara, Eiji

    Among the growing number of environmental issues, the global warming due to the increasing emission of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide CO2, is the most serious one. In order to reduce CO2 emissions in energy use, it is necessary to reduce primary energy consumption, and to replace energy sources with alternatives that emit less CO2.One option of such ideas is to replace fossil gas for water heating with electricity generated by nuclear power, hydraulic power, and other methods with low CO2 emission. It is also important to use energy efficiently and to reduce waste heat. Co-generation system is one of the applications to be able to use waste heat from a generator as much as possible. The CO2 heat pump water heaters, the polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and the micro gas turbines have high potential for domestic energy systems. In the present study, the life-cycle cost, the life-cycle consumption of primary energy and the life-cycle emission of CO2 of these domestic energy systems are compare. The result shows that the CO2 heat pump water heaters have an ability to reduce CO2 emission by 10%, and the co-generation systems also have another ability to reduce primary energy consumption by 20%.

  8. Organic Rankine-cycle turbine power plant utilizing low temperature heat sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizza, V.

    1980-03-01

    Utilizing and converting of existing low temperature and waste heat sources by the use of a high efficiency bottoming cycle is attractive and should be possible for many locations. This paper presents a theoretical study on possible combination of an organic Rankine-cycle turbine power plate with the heat pump supplied by waste energy sources. Energy requirements and system performances are analyzed using realistic design operating condition for a middle town. Some conversion systems employing working fluids other than water are being studied for the purpose of proposed application. Thermodynamic efficiencies, with respect to available resource, have been calculated by varying some system operating parameters at various reference temperature. With reference to proposed application equations and graphs are presented which interrelate the turbine operational parameters for some possible working fluids with computation results.

  9. Conceptual System Design of a Supercritical CO2 cooled Micro Modular Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Gu; Oh, Bongseong; Baik, Seung Joon; Yu, Hwanyeal; Kim, Yonghee; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The S-CO2 Brayton cycle has many advantages for SMR's power conversion system. The S-CO2 cycle can achieve small component size and simple cycle layout as shown in Fig. 1. Therefore, a concept of one module containing the S-CO2 cooled fast reactor core and power conversion system is realizable. Thanks to the compact heat exchanger technology such as Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE), the supercritical fluid with mediocre heat transfer performance can be utilized to a thermal cycle. This concept of fully modularized reactor is named as KAIST Micro Modular Reactor (MMR). It can achieve large economic by production in series, and transported in the land way or sea way. Based on the design results and dimensions of the reactor core and cycle components, the authors propose a conceptual layout of KAIST MMR. Based on this concept of reactor core, power conversion system, and decay heat removal system, the seasonal operation and transient analysis will be performed in the further works.

  10. Gemini helium closed cycle cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Manuel; Galvez, Ramon; Rogers, Rolando; Solis, Hernan; Tapia, Eduardo; Maltes, Diego; Collins, Paul; White, John; Cavedoni, Chas; Yamasaki, Chris; Sheehan, Michael P.; Walls, Brian

    2008-07-01

    The Gemini Observatory presents the Helium Closed Cycle Cooling System that provides cooling capacity at cryogenic temperatures for instruments and detectors. It is implemented by running three independent helium closed cycle cooling circuits with several banks of compressors in parallel to continuously supply high purity helium gas to cryocoolers located about 100-120 meters apart. This poster describes how the system has been implemented, the required helium pressures and gas flow to reach cryogenic temperature, the performance it has achieved, the helium compressors and cryocoolers in use and the level of vibration the cryocoolers produce in the telescope environment. The poster also describes the new technology for cryocoolers that Gemini is considering in the development of new instruments.

  11. Life cycle management. Condition monitoring of wind power plants; Life-cycle-management. Zustandsueberwachung von Windenergieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, R. [cmc GmbH, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on maintenance strategies and condition monitoring in the field of wind energy. Beside the components in the drive train of wind turbines under consideration, the condition monitoring of the hardware systems and their software is explained. A brief overview of the field of machinery diagnosis and an explanation of the transmission of the measured data follow. Additional sensors such as sensors for the rotor blade monitoring, oil particles counter or oil quality sensors are described. In the field of diagnostic certainty, special follow-up studies such as video endoscopy, analysis of oil or grease, filter testing and material testing are discussed. The information from these thematic fields is used in the life-cycle management database for operationally relevant evaluations and considerations of economy of condition monitoring systems.

  12. Power Systems Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    California Institute of Technology

    2007-03-31

    In the 17 quarters of the project, we have accomplished the following milestones - first, construction of the three multiwavelength laser scattering machines for different light scattering study purposes; second, build up of simulation software package for simulation of field and laboratory particulates matters data; third, carried out field online test on exhaust from combustion engines with our laser scatter system. This report gives a summary of the results and achievements during the project's 16 quarters period. During the 16 quarters of this project, we constructed three multiwavelength scattering instruments for PM2.5 particulates. We build up a simulation software package that could automate the simulation of light scattering for different combinations of particulate matters. At the field test site with our partner, Alturdyne, Inc., we collected light scattering data for a small gas turbine engine. We also included the experimental data feedback function to the simulation software to match simulation with real field data. The PM scattering instruments developed in this project involve the development of some core hardware technologies, including fast gated CCD system, accurately triggered Passively Q-Switched diode pumped lasers, and multiwavelength beam combination system. To calibrate the scattering results for liquid samples, we also developed the calibration system which includes liquid PM generator and size sorting instrument, i.e. MOUDI. In this report, we give the concise summary report on each of these subsystems development results.

  13. High power lasers & systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chatwin, Chris; Young, Rupert; Birch, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Some laser history;\\ud Airborne Laser Testbed & Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL);\\ud Laser modes and beam propagation;\\ud Fibre lasers and applications;\\ud US Navy Laser system – NRL 33kW fibre laser;\\ud Lockheed Martin 30kW fibre laser;\\ud Conclusions

  14. Scale Resistant Heat Exchanger for Low Temperature Geothermal Binary Cycle Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Lance G. [Energent Corporation, Santa Ana, CA (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Phase 1 of the investigation of improvements to low temperature geothermal power systems was completed. The improvements considered were reduction of scaling in heat exchangers and a hermetic turbine generator (eliminating seals, seal system, gearbox, and lube oil system). A scaling test system with several experiments was designed and operated at Coso geothermal resource with brine having a high scaling potential. Several methods were investigated at the brine temperature of 235 ºF. One method, circulation of abradable balls through the brine passages, was found to substantially reduce scale deposits. The test heat exchanger was operated with brine outlet temperatures as low as 125 ºF, which enables increased heat input available to power conversion systems. For advanced low temperature cycles, such as the Variable Phase Cycle (VPC) or Kalina Cycle, the lower brine temperature will result in a 20-30% increase in power production from low temperature resources. A preliminary design of an abradable ball system (ABS) was done for the heat exchanger of the 1 megawatt VPC system at Coso resource. The ABS will be installed and demonstrated in Phase 2 of this project, increasing the power production above that possible with the present 175 ºF brine outlet limit. A hermetic turbine generator (TGH) was designed and manufacturing drawings produced. This unit will use the working fluid (R134a) to lubricate the bearings and cool the generator. The 200 kW turbine directly drives the generator, eliminating a gearbox and lube oil system. Elimination of external seals eliminates the potential of leakage of the refrigerant or hydrocarbon working fluids, resulting in environmental improvement. A similar design has been demonstrated by Energent in an ORC waste heat recovery system. The existing VPC power plant at Coso was modified to enable the “piggyback” demonstration of the TGH. The existing heat exchanger, pumps, and condenser will be operated to provide the required

  15. Harmonics in transmission power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiechowski, Wojciech Tomasz

    in transmission power systems" was formulated. In this project, the entire 400 kV and 150 kV western transmission network of Energinet.dk is modelled using the simulation software DIgSILENT PowerFactory. A fundamental frequency load-flow model is used as a basis that is to be extended. The model is sought......, provided that background harmonic distortion, and the network configuration, are not changing during the measurement. It is shown that switching of a shunt linear power system component can result in variation of the harmonic levels that can be measured and used to verify the harmonic model of the network......, in order to determine which power system component, when switched, results in the largest change in harmonic levels, some initial harmonic simulations, using the created harmonic model of Energinet.dk transmission network, are performed. The criterion is that the measuring equipment shall not be installed...

  16. Power Quality in DC Power Distribution Systems and Microgrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Whaite

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This review paper discusses power quality considerations for direct current (DC electric power distribution systems, particularly DC microgrids. First, four selected sample DC architectures are discussed to provide motivation for the consideration of power quality in DC systems. Second, a brief overview of power quality challenges in conventional alternating current (AC distribution systems is given to establish the field of power quality. Finally, a survey of literature addressing power quality issues in DC systems is presented, and necessary power quality considerations in DC distribution system design and operation are discussed.

  17. Electric power system applications of optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Momoh, James A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Structure of a Generic Electric Power System  Power System Models  Power System Control Power System Security Assessment  Power System Optimization as a Function of Time  Review of Optimization Techniques Applicable to Power Systems Electric Power System Models  Complex Power Concepts Three-Phase Systems Per Unit Representation  Synchronous Machine Modeling Reactive Capability Limits Prime Movers and Governing Systems  Automatic Gain Control Transmission Subsystems  Y-Bus Incorporating the Transformer Effect  Load Models  Available Transfer Capability  Illustrative Examples  Power

  18. LUCIDPIPE™ POWER SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Team, Purdue ECT

    2016-01-01

    In most gravity fed water transmission pipelines, it is desired to reduce excess pressure head to prevent undue strain on a pipeline and lower the incidence of leaks. Normally this is done with pressure reducing valves that essentially burn off this excess pressure as heat. The LucidPipe™ system converts it to low cost electricity thereby removing unwanted pressure and generating energy at the same time - energy that can be put used behind the grid or put back on the grid. The LucidPipe™ syst...

  19. Chain modeling for life cycle systems engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, J.J. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shapiro, V. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Spatial Automation Lab.

    1997-12-01

    Throughout Sandia`s history, products have been represented by drawings. Solid modeling systems have recently replaced drawings as the preferred means for representing product geometry. These systems are used for product visualization, engineering analysis and manufacturing planning. Unfortunately, solid modeling technology is inadequate for life cycle systems engineering, which requires maintenance of technical history, efficient management of geometric and non-geometric data, and explicit representation of engineering and manufacturing characteristics. Such information is not part of the mathematical foundation of solid modeling. The current state-of-the-art in life cycle engineering is comprised of painstakingly created special purpose tools, which often are incompatible. New research on {open_quotes}chain modeling{close_quotes} provides a method of chaining the functionality of a part to the geometric representation. Chain modeling extends classical solid modeling to include physical, manufacturing, and procedural information required for life cycle engineering. In addition, chain modeling promises to provide the missing theoretical basis for Sandia`s parent/child product realization paradigm. In chain modeling, artifacts and systems are characterized in terms of their combinatorial properties: cell complexes, chains, and their operators. This approach is firmly rooted in algebraic topology and is a natural extension of current technology. The potential benefits of this approach include explicit hierarchical and combinatorial representation of physics, geometry, functionality, test, and legacy data in a common computational framework that supports a rational decision process and partial design automation. Chain modeling will have a significant impact on design preservation, system identification, parameterization, system reliability, and design simplification.

  20. Advanced power cycling test for power module with on-line on-state VCE measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Ui-min; Trintis, Ionut; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    module. The proposed concept can perform various stress conditions which is valid in a real mission profile and it is using a real power converter application with small loss. The concept of the proposed test setup is first presented. Then, the on-line on-state collector-emitter voltage VCE measurement......Recent research has made an effort to improve the reliability of power electronic systems to comply with more stringent constraints on cost, safety, predicted lifetime and availability in many applications. For this, studies about failure mechanisms of power electronic components and lifetime...

  1. Sub-atmospheric disk generators for coal-fired MHD/steam combined cycle power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerle, H.K.; Fang, Y.; Simpson, S.W.; Marty, S.M. (Sydney Univ. (Australia). School of Electrical Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    A coal fired MHD disk generator in a combined cycle MHD/steam power generation system with a diffuser operating at sub-atmospheric pressure is proposed. The effects of pressure on the performance of a radial outflow MHD disk generator and other system components are analysed. Using a previous study as a reference case, preliminary calculations show that, in such a sub-atmospheric system, improved power station efficiency can be achieved. In addition, operation at reduced values of magnetic field strength would be feasible. Calculations have also been carried out for a 30 MW{sub th} experimental disk generator operating at reduced pressure with a magnetic field strength of 2 T. Flow conditions at sub-atmospheric pressure would provide an improved simulation of a full-scale generator operating at normal pressures. (author).

  2. Hydro power flexibility for power systems with variable renewable energy sources: an IEA Task 25 collaboration: Hydro power flexibility for power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huertas-Hernando, Daniel [Department of Energy Systems, SINTEF, Trondheim Norway; Farahmand, Hossein [Department of Electric Power Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim Norway; Holttinen, Hannele [Department of Energy Systems, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo Finland; Kiviluoma, Juha [Department of Energy Systems, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo Finland; Rinne, Erkka [Department of Energy Systems, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo Finland; Söder, Lennart [Department of Electrical Engineering, KTH University, Stockholm Sweden; Milligan, Michael [Transmission and Grid Integration Group, National Renewable Energy Laboratory' s National Wind Technology Center, Golden CO USA; Ibanez, Eduardo [Transmission and Grid Integration Group, National Renewable Energy Laboratory' s National Wind Technology Center, Golden CO USA; Martínez, Sergio Martín [Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics, Automation and Communications, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Albacete Spain; Gomez-Lazaro, Emilio [Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics, Automation and Communications, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Albacete Spain; Estanqueiro, Ana [National Laboratory of Energy and Geology - LNEG, Lisbon Portugal; Rodrigues, Luis [National Laboratory of Energy and Geology - LNEG, Lisbon Portugal; Carr, Luis [Research Association for Energy Economics (FfE GmbH), Munich Germany; van Roon, Serafin [Research Association for Energy Economics (FfE GmbH), Munich Germany; Orths, Antje Gesa [Energinet.dk, Fredericia Denmark; Eriksen, Peter Børre [Energinet.dk, Fredericia Denmark; Forcione, Alain [Hydro Quebec, Montréal Canada; Menemenlis, Nickie [Hydro Quebec, Montréal Canada

    2016-06-20

    Hydro power is one of the most flexible sources of electricity production. Power systems with considerable amounts of flexible hydro power potentially offer easier integration of variable generation, e.g., wind and solar. However, there exist operational constraints to ensure mid-/long-term security of supply while keeping river flows and reservoirs levels within permitted limits. In order to properly assess the effective available hydro power flexibility and its value for storage, a detailed assessment of hydro power is essential. Due to the inherent uncertainty of the weather-dependent hydrological cycle, regulation constraints on the hydro system, and uncertainty of internal load as well as variable generation (wind and solar), this assessment is complex. Hence, it requires proper modeling of all the underlying interactions between hydro power and the power system, with a large share of other variable renewables. A summary of existing experience of wind integration in hydro-dominated power systems clearly points to strict simulation methodologies. Recommendations include requirements for techno-economic models to correctly assess strategies for hydro power and pumped storage dispatch. These models are based not only on seasonal water inflow variations but also on variable generation, and all these are in time horizons from very short term up to multiple years, depending on the studied system. Another important recommendation is to include a geographically detailed description of hydro power systems, rivers' flows, and reservoirs as well as grid topology and congestion.

  3. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Cycle Technology for Auxiliary Aerospace Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.; Freeh, Joshua E.; Larosiliere, Louis M.

    2005-01-01

    A notional 440 kW auxiliary power unit has been developed for 300 passenger commercial transport aircraft in 2015AD. A hybrid engine using solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and a gas turbine bottoming cycle has been considered. Steady-state performance analysis during cruise operation has been presented. Trades between performance efficiency and system mass were conducted with system specific energy as the discriminator. Fuel cell performance was examined with an area specific resistance. The ratio of fuel cell versus turbine power was explored through variable fuel utilization. Area specific resistance, fuel utilization, and mission length had interacting effects upon system specific energy. During cruise operation, the simple cycle fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid was not able to outperform current turbine-driven generators for system specific energy, despite a significant improvement in system efficiency. This was due in part to the increased mass of the hybrid engine, and the increased water flow required for on-board fuel reformation. Two planar, anode-supported cell design concepts were considered. Designs that seek to minimize the metallic interconnect layer mass were seen to have a large effect upon the system mass estimates.

  4. Annual Cycle Energy System concept and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyers, J. C.; Hise, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    The Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), under development at ERDA's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, promises to provide space heating, air conditioning, and water heating at a significantly lower expenditure of energy than conventional space conditioning and water heating systems. The ACES embodies heat pumping, thermal storage and, where climate dictates, solar assistance. The concept is described, along with variations in design that permit flexibility to maximize energy conservation or to provide load management capabilities. Installations that exist or are under construction are described and variations that are incorporated to meet specific objectives are discussed.

  5. Radiation and Thermal Cycling Effects on EPC1001 Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Lauenstein, Jean M.; Casey, Megan C.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Information pertaining to performance of electronic parts and systems under hostile environments is very scarce, especially for new devices. Such data is very critical so that proper design is implemented in order to ensure mission success and to mitigate risks associated with exposure of on-board systems to the operational environment. In this work, newly-developed enhancement-mode field effect transistors (FET) based on gallium nitride (GaN) technology were exposed to various particles of ionizing radiation and to long-term thermal cycling over a wide temperature range. Data obtained on control (un-irradiated) and irradiated samples of these power transistors are presented and the results are discussed.

  6. System-wide emissions implications of increased wind power penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Lauren; Valenzuela, Viviana; Botterud, Audun; Zhou, Zhi; Conzelmann, Guenter

    2012-04-03

    This paper discusses the environmental effects of incorporating wind energy into the el