WorldWideScience

Sample records for bravo fallout radiation

  1. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1988 through December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to disseminate information concerning the medical status of 253 Marshallese exposed to fallout radiation in 1954. This report discusses the medical care provided and the medical findings for the years 1988-1991. Details of the BRAVO thermonuclear accident that caused the exposure have been published, and a 1955 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association describing the acute medical effects in the exposed population remains a definitive and relevant description of events. Participation in the Marshall Islands Medical Program by the exposed Marshallese is voluntary. In the spring and fall of each year, medical surveillance is provided to exposed and unexposed cohorts. Examinations performed include: a cancer-related examination as defined by the American Society, an annual thyroid examination and thyroid function testing, serum prolactin testing looking for pituitary tumors, annual blood counts to include platelets, and evaluation for paraneoplastic evidence of neoplasms. This report details the medical program, medical findings, and thyroid surgery findings. Deaths (4 exposed and 10 nonexposed) that occurred during the reporting period are discussed. There is a mild but relatively consistent depression of neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet concentrations in the blood of the exposed population. This depression appears to be of no clinical significance. Thyroid hypofunction, either clinical or biochemical, has been documented as a consequence of radiation exposure in 14 exposed individuals. Previously, one other exposed person was diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma. During this reporting period, a thyroid nodule was identified in an individual who was in utero during the exposure. Upon pathologic review, the nodule was diagnosed as occult papillary carcinoma

  2. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1988 through December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.E.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.; Adams, W.H.

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to disseminate information concerning the medical status of 253 Marshallese exposed to fallout radiation in 1954. This report discusses the medical care provided and the medical findings for the years 1988-1991. Details of the BRAVO thermonuclear accident that caused the exposure have been published, and a 1955 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association describing the acute medical effects in the exposed population remains a definitive and relevant description of events. Participation in the Marshall Islands Medical Program by the exposed Marshallese is voluntary. In the spring and fall of each year, medical surveillance is provided to exposed and unexposed cohorts. Examinations performed include: a cancer-related examination as defined by the American Society, an annual thyroid examination and thyroid function testing, serum prolactin testing looking for pituitary tumors, annual blood counts to include platelets, and evaluation for paraneoplastic evidence of neoplasms. This report details the medical program, medical findings, and thyroid surgery findings. Deaths (4 exposed and 10 nonexposed) that occurred during the reporting period are discussed. There is a mild but relatively consistent depression of neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet concentrations in the blood of the exposed population. This depression appears to be of no clinical significance. Thyroid hypofunction, either clinical or biochemical, has been documented as a consequence of radiation exposure in 14 exposed individuals. Previously, one other exposed person was diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma. During this reporting period, a thyroid nodule was identified in an individual who was in utero during the exposure. Upon pathologic review, the nodule was diagnosed as occult papillary carcinoma.

  3. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation, January 1983-December 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, W.H.; Engle, J.R.; Harper, J.A.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    March 1, 1984, was the 30th anniversary of the Bravo thermonuclear test that resulted in the accidental exposure of the populations of Rongelap and Utirik atolls to radioactive fallout. The chronicling of the medical events resulting from that exposure is continued in this report, which covers the period from January 1983 through December 1984. An updated listing of all relevant publications from the Medical Department Brookhaven National Laboratory, is presented in the Reference Section. Thirty years of observation continue to show no detectable increase in mortality in the exposed population as a result of that exposure. The survival curves of the high-exposure Rongelap group, the low-exposure Utirik population, and an unexposed group of Rongelap people matched by age and sex to the exposed Rongelap group in 1957 continue to be similar. 89 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation, January 1983-December 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March 1, 1984, was the 30th anniversary of the Bravo thermonuclear test that resulted in the accidental exposure of the populations of Rongelap and Utirik atolls to radioactive fallout. The chronicling of the medical events resulting from that exposure is continued in this report, which covers the period from January 1983 through December 1984. An updated listing of all relevant publications from the Medical Department Brookhaven National Laboratory, is presented in the Reference Section. Thirty years of observation continue to show no detectable increase in mortality in the exposed population as a result of that exposure. The survival curves of the high-exposure Rongelap group, the low-exposure Utirik population, and an unexposed group of Rongelap people matched by age and sex to the exposed Rongelap group in 1957 continue to be similar. 89 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  5. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1980-December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Rittmaster, R.S.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report updates, for 1980 through 1982, the results of continuing medical surveillance of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in March 1954. The originally exposed Marshallese population comprised 64 persons on Rongelap Atoll who each received, on the average, an estimated 190 rads of absorbed external gamma radiation, 18 on Ailingnae Atoll who received 110 rads, and 159 on Utirik who received 11 rads. There were, in addition, 3 persons in utero on Rongelap, 1 person in utero on Ailingnae, and 8 persons in utero on Utirik who are considered exposed. The recipients of primary medical care include exposed and comparison populations as well as a rather large number of additional beneficiaries who are seen on a humanitarian basis of practical need and resource availability. In recent years, about 1400 people have been seen annually. This report, however, deals with four clearly defined groups: the remaining individuals who were exposed to radioactive fallout on Rongelap, Ailingnae, and Utirik in 1954 (including those in utero), and a comparison population of individuals from Rongelap who were unexposed. The number of persons now in each exposure category are 51, 12, 116, and 137, respectively. 100 references, 4 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

  6. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1980-December 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report updates, for 1980 through 1982, the results of continuing medical surveillance of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in March 1954. The originally exposed Marshallese population comprised 64 persons on Rongelap Atoll who each received, on the average, an estimated 190 rads of absorbed external gamma radiation, 18 on Ailingnae Atoll who received 110 rads, and 159 on Utirik who received 11 rads. There were, in addition, 3 persons in utero on Rongelap, 1 person in utero on Ailingnae, and 8 persons in utero on Utirik who are considered exposed. The recipients of primary medical care include exposed and comparison populations as well as a rather large number of additional beneficiaries who are seen on a humanitarian basis of practical need and resource availability. In recent years, about 1400 people have been seen annually. This report, however, deals with four clearly defined groups: the remaining individuals who were exposed to radioactive fallout on Rongelap, Ailingnae, and Utirik in 1954 (including those in utero), and a comparison population of individuals from Rongelap who were unexposed. The number of persons now in each exposure category are 51, 12, 116, and 137, respectively. 100 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  7. Five year report on the medical follow up of Marshallese receiving special medical care related to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation (January 1992--1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaswani, A.N.; Howard, J.E.

    1999-06-01

    This is the 17th and final report of the Marshall Islands Medical Program as carried out by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The purpose of these publications has been to provide information on the medical status of 253 Marshallese exposed to radiation fallout in 1954. The medical program fulfills a commitment to disclose unique medical information relevant to public health. Details of the Bravo thermonuclear accident that caused the exposure have been published. A 1955 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which described the acute medical effects on the population that required special medical care, remains a definitive and relevant description of events. Marshallese participation in this Congressionally mandated program is voluntary. Throughout the 44 years of the program, each participating individual`s relevant medical findings, laboratory data, disease morbidity, and mortality have been published in the BNL reports in a manner preserving patient confidentiality. In each report, there has been an attempt to interpret these findings and to infer the role of radiation exposure in their development. An equally important aspect of the reports has been the presentation of data that allows for analyses of the medical consequences of the Marshallese exposure.

  8. Five year report on the medical follow up of Marshallese receiving special medical care related to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation (January 1992 -1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the 17th and final report of the Marshall Islands Medical Program as carried out by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The purpose of these publications has been to provide information on the medical status of 253 Marshallese exposed to radiation fallout in 1954. The medical program fulfills a commitment to disclose unique medical information relevant to public health. Details of the Bravo thermonuclear accident that caused the exposure have been published. A 1955 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which described the acute medical effects on the population that required special medical care, remains a definitive and relevant description of events. Marshallese participation in this Congressionally mandated program is voluntary. Throughout the 44 years of the program, each participating individual's relevant medical findings, laboratory data, disease morbidity, and mortality have been published in the BNL reports in a manner preserving patient confidentiality. In each report, there has been an attempt to interpret these findings and to infer the role of radiation exposure in their development. An equally important aspect of the reports has been the presentation of data that allows for analyses of the medical consequences of the Marshallese exposure

  9. URINARY EXCRETION OF RADIONUCLIDES FROM MARSHALLESE EXPOSED TO FALLOUT FROM THE 1954 BRAVO NUCLEAR TEST

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Payne S.; Simon, Steven L.; Ibrahim, Shawki A.

    2010-01-01

    Soon after the Bravo nuclear test at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands on 1 March 1954, urine samples were collected for analysis of excreted radioactivity from native residents exposed to radioactive fallout on two atolls as well as from U.S. military personnel on a third atoll. The earliest acquired samples, obtained by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), were assayed for various radionuclides and provided the first known measurements of 131I in urine following exposure to fallo...

  10. Urinary excretion of radionuclides from Marshallese exposed to fallout from the 1954 Bravo nuclear test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Payne S; Simon, Steven L; Ibrahim, Shawki A

    2010-08-01

    Soon after the Bravo nuclear test at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands on 1 March 1954, urine samples were collected for analysis of excreted radioactivity from native residents exposed to radioactive fallout on two atolls as well as from U.S. military personnel on a third atoll. The earliest acquired samples, obtained by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), were assayed for various radionuclides and provided the first known measurements of (131)I in urine following exposure to fallout from a nuclear test. Over the course of 1954, many additional samples were collected by the LASL, as well as by the Atomic Energy Commission New York Operations Office's Health and Safety Laboratory and the Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory. Collectively, the groups sampled included Marshallese exposed on Rongelap and Ailinginae Atolls, American military weather observers temporarily resident on Rongerik Atoll, and sailors from the Japanese fishing vessel, the Lucky Dragon. While the bioassay measurement data and individual urine volumes have been crucial to various attempts to assess intakes of radioactivity and the related internal radiation doses among the Marshallese, those data have never been published in any peer-reviewed journal, but have been restricted to agency memoranda, laboratory reports, and summaries in some publications and book chapters. Reconstructions of internal doses to Marshallese in 1954 and in later years have depended on these data and, hence, they have considerable historical importance as well as importance to ongoing health risk projections for Marshallese. This paper presents much of the original data on urine volumes and radioactivity from the various assays of urine for radionuclides, and compares estimates of (131)I intakes made in 1954, 1985, 1987, and 2008. PMID:20622553

  11. An estimate by two methods of thyroid absorbed doses due to BRAVO fallout in several northern Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of the thyroid absorbed doses due to fallout originating from the 1 March 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test on Bikini Atoll have been made for several inhabited locations in the Northern Marshall Islands. Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae Atolls were also inhabited on 1 March 1954, where retrospective thyroid absorbed doses have previously been reconstructed. Current estimates are based primarily on external exposure data, which were recorded shortly after each nuclear test in the Castle Series, and secondarily on soil concentrations of 137Cs in samples collected in 1978 and 1988, along with aerial monitoring done in 1978. External exposures and 137Cs Soil concentrations were representative of the atmospheric transport and deposition patterns of the entire Castle Series tests and show that the BRAVO test was the major contributor to fallout exposure during the Castle series and other test series which were carried out in the Marshall Islands. These data have been used as surrogates for fission product radioiodines and telluriums in order to estimate the range of thyroid absorbed doses that may have occurred throughout the Marshall Islands. Dosimetry based on these two sets of estimates agreed within a factor of 4 at the locations where BRAVO was the dominant contributor to the total exposure and deposition. Both methods indicate that thyroid absorbed doses in the range of 1 Gy (100 rad) may have been incurred in some of the northern locations, whereas the doses at southern locations did not significantly exceed levels comparable to those from worldwide fallout. The results of these estimates indicate that a systematic medical survey for thyroid disease should be conducted, and that a more definitive dose reconstruction should be made for all the populated atolls and islands in the Northern Marshall Islands beyond Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae, which were significantly contaminated by BRAVO fallout. 30 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs

  12. An estimate by two methods of thyroid absorbed doses due to BRAVO fallout in several Northern Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, S V; Greenhouse, N A; Hull, A P

    1997-10-01

    Estimates of the thyroid absorbed doses due to fallout originating from the 1 March 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test on Bikini Atoll have been made for several inhabited locations in the Northern Marshall Islands. Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae Atolls were also inhabited on 1 March 1954, where retrospective thyroid absorbed doses have previously been reconstructed. The current estimates are based primarily on external exposure data, which were recorded shortly after each nuclear test in the Castle Series, and secondarily on soil concentrations of 137Cs in samples collected in 1978 and 1988, along with aerial monitoring done in 1978. The external exposures and 137Cs soil concentrations were representative of the atmospheric transport and deposition patterns of the entire Castle Series tests and show that the BRAVO test was the major contributor to fallout exposure during the Castle series and other test series which were carried out in the Marshall Islands. These data have been used as surrogates for fission product radioiodines and telluriums in order to estimate the range of thyroid absorbed doses that may have occurred throughout the Marshall Islands. Dosimetry based on these two sets of estimates agreed within a factor of 4 at the locations where BRAVO was the dominant contributor to the total exposure and deposition. Both methods indicate that thyroid absorbed doses in the range of 1 Gy (100 rad) may have been incurred in some of the northern locations, whereas the doses at southern locations did not significantly exceed levels comparable to those from worldwide fallout. The results of these estimates indicate that a systematic medical survey for thyroid disease should be conducted, and that a more definitive dose reconstruction should be made for all the populated atolls and islands in the Northern Marshall Islands beyond Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae, which were significantly contaminated by BRAVO fallout. PMID:9314227

  13. Historical events associated with fallout from Bravo Shot-Operation castle and 25 y of medical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The events prior to Bravo Shot-Operation Castle that led to a decision not to evacuate the Marshallese prior to testing the thermonuclear bombs are presented as are the actions taken after the fallout incident in evacuating the exposed Marshallese and the military personnel. The initial medical effects (findings during first 6 wk after exposure) are briefly described and are followed by description of long term effects, namely, induction of one case or fatal acute myeloid leukemia and a large number of thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) in addition to hypothyroidism in adults and children and two cases of cretinism. The hypothyroidism and cretinism responded well to administration of oral thyroxine. During the first 25 y, there was also much unrest and political agitation initiated by exposed and unexposed Marshallese who were very unhappy as a result of relocation and inability to return to their homelands and feeling that all illness and deaths were due to the mysterious radiation, which they understandably did not understand. The difficulties in part were ameliorated by financial aid from the U.S. Congress. In view of one of us (EPC), no one agency or person in the U.S. Government was willing to take the responsibility for care of the Marshallese and its financing. The exposed and non-exposed Marshallese had their lifestyle changed, some of their homelands made uninhabitable for several years and could aptly be called open-quotes nuclear nomads,close quotes an expression coined by others. 14 refs., 3 tabs

  14. Historical events associated with fallout from Bravo Shot--Operation Castle and 25 Y of medical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronkite, E P; Conard, R A; Bond, V P

    1997-07-01

    The events prior to Bravo Shot-Operation Castle that led to a decision not to evacuate the Marshallese prior to testing the thermonuclear bombs are presented as are the actions taken after the fallout incident in evacuating the exposed Marshallese and the military personnel. The initial medical effects (findings during first 6 wk after exposure) are briefly described and are followed by description of long term effects, namely, induction of one case of fatal acute myeloid leukemia and a large number of thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) in addition to hypothyroidism in adults and children and two cases of cretinism. The hypothyroidism and cretinism responded well to administration of oral thyroxine. During the first 25 y, there was also much unrest and political agitation initiated by exposed and unexposed Marshallese who were very unhappy as a result of relocation and inability to return to their homelands and feeling that all illness and deaths were due to the mysterious radiation, which they understandably did not understand. The difficulties in part were ameliorated by financial aid from the U.S. Congress. In view of one of us (EPC), no one agency or person in the U.S. Government was willing to take the responsibility for care of the Marshallese and its financing. The exposed and nonexposed Marshallese had their lifestyle changed, some of their homelands made uninhabitable for several years and could aptly be called "nuclear nomads," an expression coined by others. PMID:9199227

  15. Ionizing radiation, cancer induction and radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred years of observations of ionizing radiation have led to a number of major discoveries, including [1] ionizing radiation induces gene mutations in animals at a rate linearly proportional to dose, [2] certain cancers are induced by relatively high doses at a rate that is linearly proportional to the dose, [3] exposure of the fetus to very low doses of x-rays has been associated with an increased risk of cancer developing during childhood, and [4] many cancers result from somatic mutations in genes that control the normal growth and differentiation of cells. Cancers induced by ionizing radiation are likely therefore to result from somatic mutations, as first predicted by H. J. Muller in 1927. Large scale man-made releases of radioactive fallout have occurred and pose a cancer hazard. A special case is the risk of thyroid cancer to infants who ingest the radioiodines in such fallout. Ongoing epidemiological studies of persons exposed to fallout from the Chernobyl accident in 1986 may eventually help to quantify risks associated with very low radiation doses and low dose rates. Governments and societies will need to be better prepared to cope with any future releases of radioactive fallout. (author)

  16. Pituitary tumors following fallout radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two pituitary tumors were diagnosed in a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in 1954. Endocrinologic findings in the exposed population, are reported and the possible relation of the tumors to radiation exposure and thyroid disease is discussed

  17. Effects of fallout radiation on crop production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vulnerability of selected food crops to radioactive fallout as affected by radiation dose, dose rate, kind of radiation, plant species, developmental stage, and postirradiation interval was studied. Data are presented on barley, wheat, soybeans, corn, potatoes, alfalfa, and rice. Results showed that morphological development influenced radiosensitivity of the plants in terms of seed or grain yield, and high radiation dose rates were more damaging to plants than low dose rates. Beta radiation was equivalent to γ radiation for specific indices of damage. Annual plants showed sublethal damage at maturity but damage in perennials sometimes did not appear for several years. (U.S.)

  18. FALLOUT RADIATION: EFFECTS ON THE SKIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R. A.; Cronkite, E. P.; Bond, V. P.

    1963-02-06

    Until recently it has been generally assumed that injury to the skin from ionizing radiation was not a serious hazard associated with the detonation of nuclear dcvices. However, in 1954 the importance of this hazard became apparent when widespread lesions of the skin developed in a large group of people accidentally exposed to fallout radiation in the Marshall Islands following the experimental detonation of a large nuclear device. The accident in the Marshall Islands affords an example of large numbers of lesions of the skin in human beings from the fallout. Studies have been documented and will be referred to frequently in this chapter. The possibility of such accidents must be considered seriously in view of the increasingly widespread use of radioisotopes.

  19. Childhood leukaemia, fallout and radiation doses near Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible explanations of the recently reported increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia around Dounreay are examined in the light of the changes in national leukaemia incidence that occurred during the period of exposure to fallout from international atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. It is concluded that the increase cannot be due to underestimation of the risk of leukaemia per unit dose of radiation, nor to an underestimate of the relative biological efficiency of high as compared with low LET radiation. Possible explanations of the increase include an underestimate of the red bone marrow doses due to the Dounreay discharges relative to those from fallout, a misconception of the site of origin of childhood leukaemia, epidemics of infectious disease and exposure to some other unidentified environmental agent. (author)

  20. Fallout, radiation doses near Dounreay, and childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possible explanations for the recently reported increased incidence of childhood leukaemia around Dounreay were examined in the light of changes in the national incidence of leukaemia that occurred during the period of exposure to fallout from international testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. It was concluded that the increase could not be accounted for by underestimate of the risk of leukaemia per unit dose of radiation at low doses and low dose rates, nor by underestimate of the relative biological efficiency of high compared with low linear energy transfer radiation. One possible explanation was underestimation of doses to the red bone marrow due to the discharges at Dounreay relative to dose from fallout, though investigation of ways in which this might have occurred did not suggest anything definite. Other explanations included a misconception of the site of origin of childhood leukaemia, outbreaks of an infectious disease and exposure to other, unidentified environmental agents. These findings weigh against the hypothesis that the recent increase in childhood leukaemia near Dounreay might be accounted for by radioactive discharges from nuclear plants, unless the doses to the stem cells from which childhood leukaemia originates have been grossly underestimated. (author)

  1. Relevance of Fukushima Nuclear Accident to India: Nuclear Radiation Risk and Interventions to Mitigate Adverse Fallout

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav Kapil, Varshney Neha, Aslesh OP, Karmakar MG, Pandav Chandrakant S

    2012-01-01

    The environmental radiation release from Fukushima nuclear power following tsunami in Japan has once again highlighted the omnipotent risk of radiation injury in the today’s world. India is at a real risk from radiation fallout both due to nuclear power plant accidents and nuclear warfare threat. The risk from nuclear radiation accident in India is further increased by the region being endemic for iodine deficiency as adverse effects following nuclear radiation fallout l...

  2. Relevance of Fukushima Nuclear Accident to India: Nuclear Radiation Risk and Interventions to Mitigate Adverse Fallout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Kapil, Varshney Neha, Aslesh OP, Karmakar MG, Pandav Chandrakant S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The environmental radiation release from Fukushima nuclear power following tsunami in Japan has once again highlighted the omnipotent risk of radiation injury in the today’s world. India is at a real risk from radiation fallout both due to nuclear power plant accidents and nuclear warfare threat. The risk from nuclear radiation accident in India is further increased by the region being endemic for iodine deficiency as adverse effects following nuclear radiation fallout like thyroid cancer is significantly higher in iodine deficient populations .There is need to institute disaster preparedness measures to mitigate the damage in case of a nuclear accident. Interventions to control adverse fallout of nuclear radiation include evacuation, sheltering and food controls as well as iodine prophylaxis

  3. Radiation doses in Sweden as a result of the Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation doses from the Chernobyl fallout originate mainly from two sources: External irradiation (ground radiation) and internal irradiation from radioactive materials accumulated in the human body via food. In addition there are an inhalation dose and a radiation dose from the radioactive cloud. The level of doses from the various sources is presented

  4. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities

  5. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R.A.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  6. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  7. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-12-31

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  8. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities

  9. Thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the risk of thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to radioiodines in nuclear fallout from the 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test. We screened 7266 Marshall Islanders for thyroid nodules; the islanders were from 14 atolls, including several southern atolls, which were the source of the best available unexposed comparison group. Using a retrospective cohort design, we determined the prevalence of thyroid nodularity in a subgroup of 2273 persons who were alive in 1954 and who therefore were potentially exposed to fallout from the BRAVO test. For those 12 atolls previously thought to be unexposed to fallout, the prevalence of thyroid nodules ranged from 0.9% to 10.6%. Using the distance of each atoll from the test site as a proxy for the radiation dose to the thyroid gland, a weighted linear regression showed an inverse linear relationship between distance and the age-adjusted prevalence of thyroid nodules. Distance was the strongest single predictor in logistic regression analysis. A new absolute risk estimate was calculated to be 1100 excess cases/Gy/y/1 X 10(6) persons (11.0 excess cases/rad/y/1 million persons), 33% higher than previous estimates. We conclude that an excess of thyroid nodules was not limited only to the two northern atolls but extended throughout the northern atolls; this suggests a linear dose-response relationship

  10. The health after effects on children exposed to Chernobyl radiation fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the long-term health consequences that are now being detected in Ukrainian adolescents who, as children, were exposed to Chornobyl radiation fallout fifteen years ago. The information presented will emphasize the importance of ensuring that nuclear power plants are built and operated with all the safeguards needed to prevent a recurrence of the Chornobyl disaster

  11. Radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential radiation doses from several scenarios involving nuclear attack on an unsheltered United States population are calculated for local, intermediate time scale and long-term fallout. Dose estimates are made for both a normal atmosphere and an atmosphere perturbed by smoke produced by massive fires. A separate section discusses the additional doses from nuclear fuel facilities, were they to be targeted in an attack. Finally, in an appendix the direct effects of fallout on humans are considered. These include effects of sheltering and biological repair of damage from chronic doses. 21 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs

  12. Doses to the Norwegian population from naturally occuring radiation and from the Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The doses to the Norwegian population from naturally occuring radiation are extensively reviewed. The annual population weighted average dose equivalent to the Norwegian population from 222Rn and its daughters is estimated to be between 3.5 and 4.5 mSv. The average concentration of 220Rn daughters in Norwegian dwellings is most probably between 1.0 and 1.5 Bq m-3. The corresponding effective dose equivalent for 220Rn and its daughters is estimated to be between 0.4 and 0.6 mSv. The total annual collective dose equivalent from naturally occuring radiation in Norway is found to be between 21000 and 27000 man Sv. The doses to the Norwegian population from the Chernobyl fallout are briefly discussed. Based on the results of a ''food basket'' project and supplementary data from about 30000 measurements on food samples the first year after the reactor accident, the total annual effective dose equivalent from foodstuffs to an average Norwegian consumer during this first year is estimated to be 0.15 +-0.002 m Sv at the 95% confidence level. The per caput effective dose equivalent from external fallout gamma radiation in the first year after the Chernobyl accident, is approximately 82 μSv in Norway

  13. Thyroid nodule prevalence and radiation dose from fallout near the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid nodule prevalence was use as a biomarker for radiation-related thyroid cancer risk associated with dose from internal and external radiation sources in fallout from the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS) in Kazakhstan. Ultrasound scans were done on the thyroid glands of 1990 current residents of 7 villages near the STS, all members of a defined study cohort established in the 1960s, and all juveniles at some time during 1949-1962. Questionnaire-guided interviews focused on residential history and childhood consumption of milk and milk products. A refined dose reconstruction algorithm, developed jointly by experts from Russia and the US, was applied to the resulting data to calculate individual estimates of thyroid dose from external and internal sources of fallout-related radiation. Individual radiation dose estimates ranged from zero to 20 Gy for total dose (0-1.7 Gy and 0-20 Gy for dose from external and internal sources, respectively). The ratio of internal to external dose generally increased with increasing distance, reflecting a shift towards smaller particle sizes at greater distances and more effective transfer of small particles through the foodchain. Dose-response analysis was focused on variation of nodule prevalence by sex, age at screening, measured thyroid volume, and reconstructed thyroid dose from external (mainly gamma-ray) and internal (mainly 131I) radiation sources. Nodule prevalence was markedly higher among women and increased significantly with increasing age at screening and with thyroid volume. Highly significant dose responses were observed for nodule prevalence as a function of total thyroid dose and, in a separate analysis, of doses from internal and external sources as distinct independent variables; dose response was linear for total dose 131I cf. x ray with respect to thyroid cancer as an endpoint, based on theoretical, experimental, and epidemiological data

  14. Delayed damage from fallout and activated radiation of A-bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with an alternative approach to assess the risk of delayed damage from fallout and activated radiation of the A-bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the total doses absorbed were determined separately for the '0-9 rad T65D' and 'NIC' (Not In City) groups of individuals. The risk of organ damage from loosely ionising radiation in the low dose range was calculated on the basis of quantitative observations for mammary carcinomas and leukemia. Account was further taken of predictions about the dose-response relationship, including theories supporting the likelihood of linear and quadratic curves for the two organ lesions under investigation. The incidence of these diseases as indicated by the overall cancer index for Japan was taken as a control value. (ECB)

  15. Secret fallout. Low-level radiation from Hiroshima to Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author, Professor of radiation physics at the University of Pittsburgh, presents evidence for the cumulative effects of low-level radiation on health. In the early 1960s, when nuclear testing created fallout radioactivity, Dr. Sternglass states that he discovered a related increase in fetal deaths, infant mortality, and certain kinds of cancer. Nuclear power plants became the topic of his studies in 1970, and he gathered data that he interprets to show that nuclear emissions have resulted in increased genetic defects, mental retardation, and death among newborns, as well as death due to lung disease in all age groups. Dr. Sternglass made headlines in 1979 by a study in which he links the decline in Scholastic Aptitude Test scores that has puzzled educators to past atomic testing. Most recently, he has looked at the evidence of the aftereffects of the Three-Mile Island incident

  16. Secret fallout. Low-level radiation from Hiroshima to Three Mile Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternglass, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The author, Professor of radiation physics at the University of Pittsburgh, presents evidence for the cumulative effects of low-level radiation on health. In the early 1960s, when nuclear testing created fallout radioactivity, Dr. Sternglass states that he discovered a related increase in fetal deaths, infant mortality, and certain kinds of cancer. Nuclear power plants became the topic of his studies in 1970, and he gathered data that he interprets to show that nuclear emissions have resulted in increased genetic defects, mental retardation, and death among newborns, as well as death due to lung disease in all age groups. Dr. Sternglass made headlines in 1979 by a study in which he links the decline in Scholastic Aptitude Test scores that has puzzled educators to past atomic testing. Most recently, he has looked at the evidence of the aftereffects of the Three-Mile Island incident.

  17. Analysis of the radiation fallout tests at ETBS, France (Fall 1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments were carried out at the Etablissement Technique de Bourges (ETBS), France to measure protection factors for the Russian T72M tank during exposure to gamma radiation emanating from the ground. The purpose of these measurements was to determine the reduction in the dose rate to the tank occupants when the vehicle traverses terrain that has been contaminated as the result of fallout from a nuclear weapon or when the ground has been contaminated by the distribution of radioactive material by terrorists. This report summarizes results of calculations that replicate the measurements. Comparisons of measured and calculated protection factors are reported for a series of nested iron cylinders and the T72M tank. The cylinder measurements were performed to compare protection factors measured at Bourges with those obtained previously at the US Army Aberdeen Test Center

  18. Blast overpressure and fallout radiation dose models for casualty assessment and other purposes. Rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of blast overpressures and fallout radiation doses at points on a sufficiently fine grid, for any part or for the whole of the UK, and for any postulated attack, is an essential element in the systematic assessment of casualties, the estimation of numbers of homeless, and the evaluation of life-saving measures generally. Models are described which provide the required blast and dose values and which are intended to supersede existing models which were introduced in 1971. The factors which affect blast and, more particularly, dose values are discussed, and the way in which various factors are modelled is described. The models are incorporated into separate computer programs which are described, the outputs of which are stored on magnetic tape for subsequent use as required. (author)

  19. Environmental gamma radiation and fallout measurements in Finland, 1986-87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from a survey of environmental gamma radiation levels in Finland after the Chernobyl accident 1986 are presented. The measurements were made in 1986-87 by means of sensitive Geiger-counters and a gamma-spectrometer placed in cars. The results show the level of external radiation caused by the cesium fallout on the first of October 1987. The fallout pattern of 137Cs as well as of 95Zr and 103Ru are also presented. In the center of Southern Finland there are wide areas with exposure levels exceeding 0.03 μSv h-1, areas exceeding 0.10 μSv h-1 being very rare. The surface area weighted mean dose rate for the 461 municipalities in Finland was 0.027 μSv h-1 (range 0-0.19 μSv h-1). The population weighted mean dose rate was 0.037 μSv h-1. The corresponding estimated surface activity of 137Cs was 10.7 kBq m-2. The passage of the Chernobyl plume over Finland in 1986 led to various fallout patterns for different radionuclides. The deposition of the non-volatile nuclides, 95Zr and 141Ce, is closely related to the passage of the hot particle dust formed at the initial explosion in the reactor at 01.23 LT on 26 April. This cloud passed over Finland between the morning and the night of 27 April. The deposition of volatile fission products such as 131I, 132Te, 134Cs and 137Cs in Finland was caused by releases from the burning reactor after the initial explosion. The radioactive plume spread over Southern and Central Finland between Sunday 27 April and Tuesday 29 April. On 30 April and finally on 1 May a could northerly airstream spread into the whole of Finland purifying the atmosphere. The volatile nuclides were mainly deposited by intermittent rain on 28-30 April. The deposition pattern of 103Ru is a combination of the fallou patterns due to the initial explosion and the reactor burn, as well as the wet deposition occurring on 10-12 May caused by the releases from the burning reactor in early May

  20. Radiation doses and cancer risks in the Marshall Islands associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests: summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    for internal doses to the thyroid gland, external exposure was generally the major contributor to organ doses, particularly for red bone marrow and stomach wall. Internal doses to the stomach wall and red bone marrow were similar in magnitude, about 1 mGy to 7 mGy for permanent residents of the southern and mid-latitude atolls. However, adult residents of Utrik and Rongelap Island, which are part of the northern atolls, received much higher internal doses because of intakes of short-lived radionuclides leading to doses from 20 mGy to more than 500 mGy to red bone marrow and stomach wall. In general, internal doses to the colon wall were four to ten times greater than those to the red bone marrow and internal doses to the thyroid gland were 20 to 30 times greater than to the red bone marrow. Adult internal thyroid doses for the Utrik community and for the Rongelap Island community were about 760 mGy and 7,600 mGy, respectively. The highest doses were to the thyroid glands of young children exposed on Rongelap at the time of the Castle Bravo test of 1 March 1954 and were about three times higher than for adults. Internal doses from chronic intakes, related to residual activities of long-lived radionuclides in the environment, were, in general, low in comparison with acute exposure resulting from the intakes of radionuclides immediately or soon after the deposition of fallout. The annual doses and the population sizes at each atoll in each year were used to develop estimates of cancer risks for the permanent residents of all atolls that were inhabited during the testing period as well as for the Marshallese population groups that were relocated prior to the testing or after it had begun. About 170 excess cancers (radiation-related cases) are projected to occur among more than 25,000 Marshallese, half of whom were born before 1948. All but about 65 of those cancers are estimated to have already been expressed. The 170 excess cancers are in comparison to about 10

  1. Radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of the fireball following a nuclear or thermonuclear explosion, and its ascent and cooling are described. Local and global fallout are discussed, and the differing behaviour of fallout from the troposphere and stratosphere explained. The monthly and accumulated fallout of sr90 and its distribution in the Northern and Southern hemispheres is used as an illustration. The accumulation of fallout and its distribution and concentration by food chains is also discussed, using Sr 90, Cs 137 and I 131 as examples. (JIW)

  2. External Radiation in Dolon Village Due to Local Fallout from the First USSR Atomic Bomb Test in 1949

    OpenAIRE

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; FUKUTANI, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Sakaguchi, Aya; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2006-01-01

    Dolon village, located about 60 km from the border of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, is known to be heavily contaminated by local fallout from the first USSR atomic bomb test in 1949. External radiation in Dolon was evaluated based on recent 137Cs data in soil and calculation of temporal change in the fission product composition. After fitting a log-normal distribution to the soil data, a 137Cs deposition of 32 kBq m-2, which corresponds to the 90th-percentile of the distribution, was t...

  3. Dose conversion factors of radiation doses at normal operation discharges. A. Dispersion in air and fallout on the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed in order to develop and supplement existing models for calculating radiation doses from discharges of radionuclides under normal operating conditions at the Swedish NPPs at Barsebaeck, Forsmark, Oskarshamn and Ringhals, and at the nuclear plants at Studsvik and the Westinghouse Atom fuel plant. Methods for modeling the dispersion i the atmosphere and the fallout on the ground are described in this report. A gaussian plume-model is used, and the effects of different parameters on the results are illustrated. Long term mean values for environmental contamination are calculated for an average year by using 5-year statistics for each location

  4. Immunological effects of low dose radiation. Absent or minor effects of Chernobyl fallout in Norway?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitan, J.B.; Bergan, T.D.; Strand, P. [Statens Straalevern, Oesteraas (Norway); Melbye, O.J. [Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    1998-01-01

    In this pilot study of those Norwegian individuals most heavily exposed to the Chernobyl Fallout, immunological parameters generally stayed within normal limits. However, some parameter, apparently within the assumed normal range did, in fact correlate to the estimated individual dose as assessed by wholebody counting of radiocaesium content. The small possible effects revealed in this study may represent real biological effects, but do not necessarily represent a health detriment. 43 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Immunological effects of low dose radiation. Absent or minor effects of Chernobyl fallout in Norway?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this pilot study of those Norwegian individuals most heavily exposed to the Chernobyl Fallout, immunological parameters generally stayed within normal limits. However, some parameter, apparently within the assumed normal range did, in fact correlate to the estimated individual dose as assessed by wholebody counting of radiocaesium content. The small possible effects revealed in this study may represent real biological effects, but do not necessarily represent a health detriment. 43 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Somatic effects in man due to chronic radiation exposure: Health effects from fallout and radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detailed review containts a short introduction and the following chapters: 1. Background of nuclear technology with special emphasis on the production and toxicity of nuclear fuels; 2. The nuclear power industry (mainly dealing with the growth of the industry and the Chernobyl accident); 3. The use of nuclear weapons and their effects; 4. Health studies of populations around the Rocky Flats nuclear plant, the Windscale nuclear plant and the Savannah River nuclear installation; 5. Health studies of populations exposed to radioactive clouds and plumes, residing in a contaminated environment and ingesting food and water containing fallout radionuclides. (MG)

  7. Measurements of the Chernobyl accident fallout in Israel and the assessment of the radiation doses to the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel is located approximately 2000 km southeast of Chernobyl. The fallout from the accident in Chernobyl reactor no. 4 on April 26, 1986 arrived in Israel on the night of May 2nd. Following the accident, studies of the radiological effects were initiated by many countries some of them many thousands of kilometers away. These studies can be characterized by three periods: a) First months following the accident - Measurements were taken to assess the immediate impact and to propose countermeasures that would reduce doses incurred by the population. b) First years following the accidents - Measurements were taken to validate that radioecological effects are well below any regulatory limits, from both the fallout radioactivity in the country and import of food coming from other affected areas. c) The last years (e.g. 1990-1995) - Measurements were taken within the regular program of environmental radioactivity surveillance. In this paper we have compiled the results of the studies in Israel which have followed the three phases mentioned above. Assessment of the accumulated potential radiation doses to the population in Israel was made based on the results of those measurements covered in the three phases, considering the various possible pathways

  8. Radiation doses in Sweden as a result of the Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose to people living in Sweden originates mainly from external radiation from the ground and from internal radiation from radioactive materials accumulated in the body via foodstuff. In addition there are an inhalation dose and a dose from the radioactive cloud. The collective dose in nSv for the 1st year and for 50 years is evaluated. (orig./HP)

  9. The effect on lymphocyte chromosomes of additional radiation burden due to fallout in Salzburg (Austria) from the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation has been carried out to determine whether chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes reflect the elevated environmental dose of low-LET ionising radiation, mainly due to radiocesium from Chernobyl fallout, to the population living in Salzburg city. Sixteen volunteers were sampled 1 year after the Chernobyl accident. Two of these persons were also sampled before the accident, and then in 1988 and 1990. The radioactive environment of Salzburg city and the radiation burden of its inhabitants have been frequently determined before and after the accident. The Cs-137 content of the volunteers was measured by whole-body counting. The additional external plus internal radiation doses in the year 1987 to the tested individuals ranged between 15 and 68% of the former normal environmental burden. The aberration frequencies showed a sharp increase of about a factor 6 from the pre-Chernobyl dose rate (0.9. mGy/year) to the post-Chernobyl dose rate (about 2 mGy/year total) but then decreased again with higher additional dose. In the two persons analysed before and up to 4 years after the accident the aberration yield showed a significant increase from 1984/85 to 1987, a decrease in 1988 and a further decrease in 1990. If these last 2 values are plotted against additional dose they fit the curve of the pooled 1987 values. The dose-effect curves revealed the same tendency as we found in various previous investigations and support the assumption that repair enzymes could be triggered by a certain amount of damage to the DNA

  10. RADIATION DOSES AND CANCER RISKS IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT FROM BIKINI AND ENEWETAK NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTS: SUMMARY

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E.; Beck, Harold L.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946–1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. Fro...

  11. Survey of thyroid diseases among inhabitants exposed to fallout radiation from the nuclear power station explosion at Chernobyl, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term medical surveys at Hiroshima, Nagasaki and the Marshal Islands have revealed that the frequency of thyroid diseases increases year by year after nuclear explosions. Although about 5 years have passed since the nuclear power station explosion at Chernobyl in 1986, there have been no detailed reports of thyroid surveys. We had an opportunity to examine the inhabits of Chechelsk, Byelorussia who were exposed to high levels of fallout radiation after the accident. The survey was carried out only by palpation of the anterior neck. Three-hundred and six unselected individuals were examined, ranging in age from 9 months to 68 years, 64% being under 20 years. Goiter was found in 92 of the 306 (30.1%) with the highest incidence in individuals aged between 10 and 20 years. Most of these cases were diffuse goiter. As Chechelsk is located far inland from the sea, endemic goiter is a possibility. This study will be continued to clarify the etiology of the goiter and to detect thyroid diseases with the aim of starting treatment earlier. (author)

  12. Natural background radiation and 137Cs inventories in southern Nevada. Preliminary report on fallout, December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation measurements and soil sampling were performed at 28 sites in southern Nevada as part of an extensive radiological survey to determine residual levels of fission products and transuranic nuclides in Utah and Nevada as a result of nuclear weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during 1951 to 1958. The natural background exposure rate was found to vary by about a factor of two. The 137Cs inventories tended to be lower than expected indicating the effects of wind erosion. Cobalt-60 and 241Am were detected at several sites which were reported to be hotspots in post-shot radiological surveys

  13. Changes in the levels of radioactive fall-out and the resulting radiation doses to man in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period covered by the Council's 1956 report, that is, up to the spring of 1956, the radioactive debris falling in the United Kingdom had arisen from a large number of small nuclear explosions, chiefly in Nevada, and from a few large nuclear explosions mainly in the Pacific, especially in March, 1954. It was recognized that the doses of radiation to persons from the deposition of debris arising from the smaller nuclear explosions would be far outweighed by those from the larger explosions. The material reaching the U.K. from the latter at that time was found to have an apparent age (determined from the ratio of strontium 89 to strontium 90 which ranged from 7 to 14 months. In these circumstances the dose contributed by the isotopes of relatively short life (say, two months or less) was much less important than the dose from the long-lived isotopes such as caesium 137 and strontium 90. From the autumn of 1956 the pattern of testing changed. A high proportion of the explosions carried out were of megaton size and took place in higher latitudes in the northern hemisphere. As a result the short-lived isotopes became relatively more important and, with the heavy testing of nuclear devices in the Arctic in October, 1958, the contribution of radioactive fall-out to the background dose-rate in air in the open rose in the spring of 1959 so that, for a period of a month or two, it amounted to some 30 per cent of the natural background. This rise in dose-rate can be attributed to two main causes, namely, the increase in the rate of testing and the shorter time during which the fission products from the tests in the autumn in northern latitudes, particularly in the Arctic, have remained airborne

  14. The Ghost of the Bomb : the Bravo Medical Program, scientific uncertainty, and the legacy of U.S. Cold War science, 1954-2005

    OpenAIRE

    Harkewicz, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    After more than 50 years, controversy persists over the effects of radioactive fallout from the 1954 "Bravo" hydrogen bomb test. Although most scholars agree that the exposure was a tragic accident, popular accounts continue to portray the Marshallese as human guinea pigs, victims of scientific imperialism and Cold War atomic politics. Analyzing the historical records of pertinent activist groups as well as government documents of the long-term medical program that was created in response to ...

  15. Pre-dose TL characteristics of quartz inclusions removed from bricks exposed to fallout radiation from atmospheric testing at the Nevada test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pre-dose thermoluminescence (TL) technique is currently the most sensitive method of radiation dosimetry for direct measurement of absorbed dose to environmental materials. The technique was recently used with other TL methods in a multinational collaborative effort to measure radiation doses of less than 1 Gy in bricks and tiles from Hiroshima and Nagasaki (Maruyama et al., 1987; Haskell et al., 1987). We report here the application of the technique to the measurement of cumulative doses to bricks exposed to radiation from fallout from atmospheric testing at the Nevada Test Site during the 1950s and 1960s. Those doses, which include the components from natural background radiation, averaged less than 0.20 Gy. We describe the pre-dose characteristics of the quartz inclusions studied. (author)

  16. New Trends in Fallout Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The objective of the national fallout shelter program is to provide shelter space for all Americans by--(1) locating, marking, and stocking suitable public shelter areas in existing buildings, and (2) having new structures designed and built to maximize protection. This nation's architects and engineers are now knowledgeable in radiation shielding…

  17. Chromosome aberrations in Japanese fishermen exposed to fallout radiation 420-1200 km distant from the nuclear explosion test site at Bikini Atoll: report 60 years after the incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Ohtaki, Megu; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2016-08-01

    During the period from March to May, 1954, the USA conducted six nuclear weapon tests at the "Bravo" detonation sites at the Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, Marshall Islands. At that time, the crew of tuna fishing boats and cargo ships that were operating approximately 150-1200 km away from the test sites were exposed to radioactive fallout. The crew of the fishing boats and those on cargo ships except the "5th Fukuryu-maru" did not undergo any health examinations at the time of the incident. In the present study, chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes were examined in detail by the G-banding method in 17 crew members from 8 fishing boats and 2 from one cargo ship, 60 years after the tests. None of the subjects examined had suffered from cancer. The percentages of both stable-type aberrations such as translocation, inversion and deletion, and unstable-type aberrations such as dicentric and centric ring in the study group were significantly higher (1.4- and 2.3-fold, respectively) than those in nine age-matched controls. In the exposed and control groups, the percentages of stable-type aberrations were 3.35 % and 2.45 %, respectively, and the numbers of dicentric and centric ring chromosomes per 100 cells were 0.35 and 0.15, respectively. Small clones were observed in three members of the exposed group. These results suggest that the crews were exposed to slightly higher levels of fallout than had hitherto been assumed. PMID:27017218

  18. Sergio Bravo y tendencias del montaje Film EditingTendencies in Sergio Bravo's Filmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Corro Pemjean

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available El texto ahonda, en términos, críticos tanto en la singular doctrina sobre el montaje cinematográfico propuesta por Gilles Deleuze en sus textos sobre cine, como en el sentido y forma que adopta el montaje en la filmografía del documentalista chileno Sergio Bravo Ramos. Las escuelas de montaje, que distingue el filósofo y que, como escuelas cinematográficas nacionales son asimiladas a conciencias estético-políticas, se identifican en los documentales de Bravo y permiten distinguir, a través de sus aplicaciones, una oscilación de la retórica del cineasta, entre la ampliación del inventario de objetos culturales y sociales del cine documental chileno y la experimentación plástica a partir de ellos mismos.This article examines critical concepts related to Gilles Deleuze's singular doctrine about film editing, as well as the particular form and meaning of editing techniques developed by Chilean documentary maker Sergio Bravo Ramos throughout his filmography. The quality of film editing schools, acknowledged by Deleuze as political aesthetic consciousness, can be recognized in Bravo's documentaries, and by means of its applications, it is possible to distinguish an oscillation of his rhetoric from the widening of the cultural and social objects inventory in Chilean documentary cinema to artistic experimentation developed from them.

  19. ACUTE AND CHRONIC INTAKES OF FALLOUT RADIONUCLIDES BY MARSHALLESE FROM NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTING AT BIKINI AND ENEWETAK AND RELATED INTERNAL RADIATION DOSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L.; Weinstock, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  20. Survey of thyroid diseases among inhabitants exposed to fallout radiation from the nuclear power station explosion at Chernobyl, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the prevalence of diffuse goiter and thyroid nodules in children aged 10-15 years living at Chechelsk city, Byelorussia, which is one of the high radioactive fallout areas after the Chernobyl accident. Seven hundred thirteen children (330 males and 383 females) were enrolled in the study. The goiter staging was defined according to the WHO classification. Those who showed apparent goiter from Grade I to III were additionally examined by ultrasonography. The prevalence of palpable goiter was 41.5% in males and 56.9% in females. The incidence in females was significantly higher than that in males (p<0.01). In the ultrasonography survey, 9 (3 males and 6 females) of 196 children revealed one or several small nodules in diffuse goiter, which were less than 1 cm in size and appeared as irregular hypoechoic lesions. These school children with nodular lesions require further medical examination for defined diagnosis and proper treatment. Future investigation regarding both the endemic goiter of this district and goiter prevalence in non-affected neighboring areas is crucial for evaluating the effects of radioactive fallout correctly. (author)

  1. The relationship of thyroid cancer with radiation exposure from nuclear weapon testing in the Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US nuclear weapons testing program in the Pacific conducted between 1946 and 1958 resulted in radiation exposure in the Marshall Islands. The potentially widespread radiation exposure from radioiodines of fallout has raised concerns about the risk of thyroid cancer in the Marshallese population. The most serious exposures and its health hazards resulted from the hydrogen-thermonuclear bomb test, the Castle BRAVO, on March 1, 1954. Between 1993 and 1997, we screened 3,709 Marshallese for thyroid disease who were born before the BRAVO test. It was 60% of the entire population at risk and who were still alive at the time of our examinations. We diagnosed 30 thyroid cancers and found 27 other study participants who had been operated for thyroid cancer before our screening in this group. Fifty-seven Marshallese born before 1954 (1.5%) had thyroid cancer or had been operated for thyroid cancer. Nearly all (92%) of these cancers were papillary carcinoma. We derived estimates of individual thyroid dose proxy from the BRAVO test in 1954 on the basis of published age-specific doses estimated on Utirik atoll and 137Cs deposition levels on the atolls where the participants came from. There was suggestive evidence that the prevalence of thyroid cancer increased with category of estimated dose to the thyroid. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the US Army fallout prediction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Army fallout prediction method was evaluated against an advanced fallout prediction model--SIMFIC (Simplified Fallout Interpretive Code). The danger zone areas of the US Army method were found to be significantly greater (up to a factor of 8) than the areas of corresponding radiation hazard as predicted by SIMFIC. Nonetheless, because the US Army's method predicts danger zone lengths that are commonly shorter than the corresponding hot line distances of SIMFIC, the US Army's method is not reliably conservative

  3. Gamma-ray activity of the fallout dust produced by the super-hydrogen bomb test explosion on March 1, 1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The super-hydrogen bomb test explosion, called Bravo was executed on Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954. Fallout dust collected on a Japanese fishing boat 31 years ago was analyzed using a HPGe detector. The existence of sup(241)Am, sup(155)Eu, sup(137)Cs and sup(60)Co could be proved by means of gamma spectrometry. Morphological features of the fine debris of fallout and absolute activities of the radionuclides are reported. Radioactivity results of the 'Bikini Ash' determined soon after the explosion and after 31 years are compared. (V.N.)

  4. Radioecology of fallout cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The title subject is discussed mainly on findings of radiocesium (rCs) from 3 aspects of the radionuclide fallout and its spread thereafter, the primary and secondary contamination of the food chain leading to man, and the concept of decontamination by isolation of radionuclides. Japanese ecosystem has undergone the wide and complicated contamination with global fallouts mainly by nuclear tests in the atmosphere (1950-1970), Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents (1986 and 2011, respectively). rCs in the fallouts, having the long half time, is heterogeneously spread in the forest, farmland, rivers and lakes, seaweeds, animals, soils and water. In Fukushima, rCs contamination is conceivably over its transiently elevated early phase from fallout, sea/river water and land soil to plant including vegetables and fruit trees and animals like fishes, livestock and wild ones. Ecological half life of rCs derived from Chernobyl fallout in England is reportedly 1-4 years during the first five years, and thereafter, 6-30 years due to its environmental circulation within the ecosystem. For ambient dose of rCs, water and soil can be a shield of its gamma ray in the ecosystem. It is essential to understand the dynamics of rCs in the ecosystem for environmental restoration from the contamination in order to maintain the safe and reassured human life through dietary/active living. The present method of decontamination in the ecosystem essentially stands on the transfer of radionuclides, but should do on their isolation, of which approach must be searched for. (T.T.)

  5. A fall-out shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strong structure of precast concrete for use as, for example, a fallout shelter, strong-room or electricity sub-station is described. The major portion is generally tubular in construction and rectangular in cross-section. The tube may be formed in one piece or with two directed channel elements. Pairs of U legs abut either along the sides or along the top and bottom. End slabs close the compartment. An entrance shaft is formed by an upstanding channel element with upper and lower end slabs; alternatively the entrance shaft may be horizontal. Doors or hatches are provided. The whole structure may be buried. This invention provides a structure capable of withstanding considerable overpressure and of offering good resistance to radiation and is cheap and simple to manufacture. (U.K.)

  6. Part I. Radioactivity in fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily and monthly variations were studied of radioactive fallout. Daily fallout was sampled in Bratislava and at Jaslovske Bohunice while monthly fallout was sampled in Bratislava, Jaslovske Bohunice, Trnava, Piestany. The study covered the years 1961 to 1964. Since 1964 samples were only taken in Bratislava. As against Jaslovske Bohunice, samples taken in Bratislava showed high pollution levels. It was found that maximum fallout occurred after the first resumption of nuclear tests, ie., in 1963. The values of 20.89 nCi/m2 for 90Sr and 28.24 nCi/m2 for 137Cs were found. A drop in the amount of fallout was observed after 1964. Radioactivity increased again following nuclear tests. The overall cumulative values of fallout deposit in Bratislava were found to be 51.99 nCi/m2 for 90Sr and 73.10 nCi/m2 for 137Cs. (J.P.)

  7. BRAVO for many-server QED systems with finite buffers

    OpenAIRE

    Daley, DJ; Leeuwaarden, van, JSH Johan; Nazarathy, Y Yoni

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the occurrence of the feature called BRAVO (balancing reduces asymptotic variance of output) for the departure process of a finite-buffer Markovian many-server system in the QED (quality and efficiency-driven) heavy-traffic regime. The results are based on evaluating the limit of an equation for the asymptotic variance of death counts in finite birth-death processes.

  8. The real hazards of nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses an article by Carl Sagan entitled ''On minimizing the consequences of nuclear war'' [Nature 317 485 Oct 1985], in the light of the authors' own work on global fallout. Consequences of local fallout, human impact of local fallout, and global fallout calculations using computer models, are all described. (U.K.)

  9. Environmental practices of the tourist companies in Valle de Bravo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article analyzes the environmental practices of the social actors related to the tourist companies of the municipality of Valle de Bravo, Mexico State. The environmental practices were considered from the socioeconomic point of view, including not only the natural resources management, but also the social and economic environment. Considering the previous, using a methodological proposal based on the theory of complex systems, the effects on the above mentioned environments of this tourist destination were analyzed, allowing to holistically visualizing the situation that prevails towards the environmental caring performed by all the social actors of the locality. The results show a great weakness in the implementation of the above mentioned practices, due to the fact that nowadays these practices are imposed by the municipal government and are not an initiative of the actors of the tourist companies. For this reason, the conditions of environmental deterioration in Valle de Bravo are increasing. Based on the results, some recommendations are proposed for the implementation and improvement of environmental practices that contribute to the conservation and care of the environment.

  10. Reconstruction of the composition of the Chernobyl radionuclide fallout and external radiation absorbed doses to the population in areas of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of reconstruction of the radionuclide composition of the Chernobyl fallout in the territories of Russia is presented. Reconstruction has been carried out by means of statistical analysis of the gamma spectrometry data on 2867 soil samples collected in the territories of Ukraine, Byelarus and Russia from 1986 to 1988. To verify the data, aggregated estimates of the fuel composition of the 4th block at the moment of the accident (available from the literature) have been used, as well as the estimates of activity released to the atmosphere. As a result, correlation and regression dependences have been obtained between the activities of the radionuclides most contributing to the dose (137Cs, 134Cs, 131I, 140Ba, 140La, 95Zr, 95Nb, 103Ru, 106Ru, 141Ce, 144Ce, 125Sb). Statistically significant regression relations between different pairs of radionuclides (including analysis of the 'noise' contribution to the data) depending on the distance between the point of sample collection and the power station are presented for the 'north-east track' - the northern part of the 30 km zone and southern part of the Gomel 'district (Byelarus) and the Briansk, Kaluga, Tula and Orel districts (Russia). A methodology is also described for reconstructing space-time characteristics of the contamination of the territories by major dose-forming radionuclides released from the Chernobyl NPP 4th unit. (Author)

  11. After Chernobyl--how US physicians respond to radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26, 1986, a reactor unit at the Soviet Union's Chernobyl Power Station exploded, and substantial amounts of radioactive material were released. Fallout from this incident was deposited in the United States and elsewhere. Radioactive fallout is a major concern for obstetricians and pediatricians; their patients are the most vulnerable to the adverse effects of radiation. This study addresses the question: What are these physicians' perceptions and beliefs about fallout and its effects on their patients? A questionnaire was developed to measure these perceptions and beliefs. This instrument was mailed in November 1986 to all obstetricians and pediatricians listed in the telephone directory for western Massachusetts. A factor analysis of the physicians' responses yielded five factors: concern for patients, management of risk, effect of fallout, physicians' role in prevention, and guidance on advising patients. The physicians' responses to patients' inquiries were categorized as giving information, reassurance, and prescription. The authors recommend that the study be replicated with a more representative sample, that professional medical groups provide reliable information to members, and that physicians ask their professional organizations to address the issue of physician participation in the national planning process relevant to their concerns about radioactive fallout

  12. Results of calculations of external gamma-radiation exposure rates from fallout and the related radionuclide compositions. Operations Nougat through Bowline, 1962-1968

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and ground deposition of related radionuclides resulting from Events that deposited detectable radioactivity outside the Nevada Test Site complex

  13. Cartas de un general porfirista: Correspondencia familiar de Ignacio Bravo, 1889-1918 Letters from a Porfirian General: Family Correspondence of Ignacio Bravo, 1889-1918

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Ramos Díaz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available La correspondencia familiar de Ignacio Bravo muestra facetas poco conocidas de los primeros años de vida del territorio de Quintana Roo, de algunos episodios de la revolución mexicana y del exilio del presidente Victoriano Huerta en Texas. Pero, sobre todo, las cartas personales del general Bravo delinean el itinerario de una familia de militares en los años finales del siglo XIX y primeros del siglo XX, en el México de Porfirio Díaz. El presente artículo da la noticia del hallazgo de cientos de piezas de correspondencia personal de Bravo y al mismo tiempo realiza una antología de la información que ayuda a comprender, con nuevos datos, sucesos recurrentes en la historiografía regional del sureste mexicano, como la pacificación de los mayas, la creación del territorio federal de Quintana Roo en la frontera México-Belice y el entorno selvático y hostil para los pioneros que se establecieron en esa alejada región.Ignacio Bravo's family correspondence reveals little-known aspects of the early years of Quintana Roo, certain episodes of the Mexican Revolution and President Victoriano Huerta's exile in Texas. Above all, General Bravo's personal letters trace the lives of a family of military men in the late 19th and early 20th century in the Mexico of Porfirio Díaz. The article reveals the discovery of hundreds of pieces of Bravo's personal correspondence and provides an anthology of the information that uses new data to explain recurrent events in the regional historiography of the Mexican southeast, such as the pacification of the Maya, the creation of the federal territory of Quintana Roo on the Mexico-Belize border and the hostile, jungle environment for the pioneers who settled in this far-off region.

  14. Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from fallout and the related radionuclide compositions. Operation Buster-Jangle, 1951

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and ground deposition of related radionuclides resulting from Events that deposited detectable radioactivity outside the Nevada Test Site complex

  15. Nuclear fall-out shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An underground nuclear fall-out shelter has a plastics shell which, apart from service and access openings, is waterproof and provided, if desired, with a concrete roof. The shelter has an access opening, an air system, lighting, water storage, sanitation and sewage facilities. (author)

  16. Fallout over Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friends of the Earth Ltd set up a mobile radiation monitoring unit between October and November 1988 which surveyed grass, silage, vegetables, meat in areas in Cumbria, North Wales, the Isle of Man and Scotland affected by the restrictions on the slaughter and movement of sheep following the accident at Chernobyl in 1986. This report contains the results of 357 sample analyses for CS 134 and Cs 137 examined during the survey and discusses discrepancies with official data. (U.K.)

  17. Topographic Effects on Ambient Dose Equivalent Rates from Radiocesium Fallout

    CERN Document Server

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    Land topography can affect air radiation dose rates by locating radiation sources closer to, or further, from detector locations when compared to perfectly flat terrain. Hills and slopes can also shield against the propagation of gamma rays. To understand the possible magnitude of topographic effects on air dose rates, this study presents calculations for ambient dose equivalent rates at a range of heights above the ground for varying land topographies. The geometries considered were angled ground at the intersection of two planar surfaces, which is a model for slopes neighboring flat land, and a simple conical geometry, representing settings from hilltops to valley bottoms. In each case the radiation source was radioactive cesium fallout, and the slope angle was varied systematically to determine the effect of topography on the air dose rate. Under the assumption of homogeneous fallout across the land surface, and for these geometries and detector locations, the dose rates at high altitudes are more strongly...

  18. Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of two hypothetical 1-MT nuclear bursts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from two hypothetical 1-Mt nuclear bursts. Calculations are made of the debris from two types of bombs: one containing 235U as a fissionable material (designated oralloy), the other containing 238U (designated tuballoy). 4 references

  19. Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of two hypothetical 1-MT nuclear bursts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, H.

    1984-12-01

    This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from two hypothetical 1-Mt nuclear bursts. Calculations are made of the debris from two types of bombs: one containing /sup 235/U as a fissionable material (designated oralloy), the other containing /sup 238/U (designated tuballoy). 4 references.

  20. Shuttle user analysis (study 2.2). Volume 3: Business risk and value of operations in space (BRAVO). Part 2: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the BRAVO User's Manual is to describe the BRAVO methodology in terms of step-by-step procedures. The BRAVO methodology then becomes a tool which a team of analysts can utilize to perform cost effectiveness analyses on potential future space applications with a relatively general set of input information and a relatively small expenditure of resources. An overview of the BRAVO procedure is given by describing the complete procedure in a general form.

  1. Chapter 4: Measurements of total beta-activity in the fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to provide information on fresh fission products in fallout reaching Australia from nuclear tests being conducted by France in Polynesia, measurements were made of total beta activity in daily fallout deposition of 25 Australian sampling stations covering a three month period from 25 July to 23 October 1973. The methods employed to measure the radioactivity of the samples are described and the data on total beta-activity, and the calculated external gamma radiation doses from fresh fallout are presented. (R.L.)

  2. Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of selected US Pacific events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from selected US Pacific events. Results of the calculations of relative external gamma radiation exposure rate and related radionuclide ground deposition are given in six appendices. The output of the calculation has 30 decay times: 10 from 1 to 21 h, 10 from 1 to 300 d, and 10 from 1 to 50 y. For each of these times and for zero time, there are values of the external gamma radiation exposure rate normalized to 1 mR/h, 1 m above the surface, 12 h after the event; the associated values of μCi/m2 for each radionuclide; and the total μCi/m2. Surface roughness effects are simulated by using Beck's values of (mR/h)/μCi/m2) for a relaxation length of 0.16 g/cm2. Fractionation effects, simulated by the removal of a fraction of the refractory nuclides from the calculation, were found for unfractionated debris and for debris with 0.5 and 0.1 of the refractory elements present. Each Appendix contains three sets of 11 pages of calculated results relating to one event in Table 1. Each set of 11 pages is marked page 2 through page 12. Page 2 of each set gives the external gamma-ray exposure rates and associated values of total microcuries per square meter at 30 decay intervals and at zero time. The value for each activation product at zero time is the result of a measurement. The measurements were performed on debris samples taken by aircraft approximately 1 to 4 h after detonation. When no measurement exists, the value appears as zero. Fission products were calculated from the fissioning nuclides and neutron energy spectra. Calculated values for each radionuclide at various decay intervals are given

  3. Fukushima fallout at Milano, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Alexandra; Manenti, Simone; Gini, Luigi; Groppi, Flavia

    2012-12-01

    The radionuclides (131)I, (137)Cs and (134)Cs were observed in the Milano region (45°) of Italy early after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan. Increased atmospheric radioactivity was observed on an air filter taken on 30 March 2011, while the maximum activity of 467 μBq m(-3) for (131)I was recorded at April 3-4, 2011. The first evidence of Fukushima fallout was confirmed with (131)I and (137)Cs measured in precipitation at two sampling sites at Milano on 28 March, 2011, with the concentrations of (131)I and (137)Cs in the rainwater equal to 0.89 Bq L(-1) and 0.12 Bq L(-1), respectively. A sample of dry deposition that was collected 9 days after the first rainfall event of 27-28 March, 2011 showed that the dry deposition was more effective in the case of (137)Cs than it was for (131)I, probably because iodine was mainly in gaseous form whereas caesium was rapidly bound to aerosols and thus highly subject to dry deposition. The relatively high observed values of (137)Cs in grass, soil and fresh goat and cow milk samples were probably from Chernobyl fallout and global fallout from past nuclear tests rather than from the Fukushima accident. Finally, a dose assessment for the region of investigation showed clearly that the detected activities in all environmental samples were very far below levels of concern. PMID:22300481

  4. New regulations for radiation protection for work involving radioactive fallout emitted by the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi APP accident: application expansion to recovery and reconstruction work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Shojiro

    2014-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Atomic Power Plant that accompanied the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 released a large amount of radioactive material. To rehabilitate the contaminated areas, the government of Japan decided to carry out decontamination work. In April 2012, the Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters (NERH) started dividing the restricted areas into three sub-areas based on the ambient dose rate. In accordance with the rearrangement of the restricted area, NERH decided to allow resumption of business activities, including manufacturing and farming, as well as operation of hospitals, welfare facilities, and shops and related subordinate tasks, such as maintenance, repair, and transportation. As a result, the government needed regulations for radiation protection for workers engaged in those activities. The issues that arose in the deliberation of the regulations were distilled into two points: 1) whether radiation protection systems established for a planned exposure situation should apply to construction and agricultural work activities in an existing exposure situation, and 2) how to simplify the regulation in accordance with the nature of the work activities. Further research and development concerning the following issues are warranted: a) the relationship between the radioactive concentrations of materials handled and the risk of internal exposure, and b) the relationship between the radioactive concentration of the soil and the surface contamination level. PMID:24593039

  5. Radioactive fall-out in Norway after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the fall-out from the atmosphere during the fifties and sixties, a system of local control of radioactive contamination of food was built up. (LORACON - LOcal RAdioactivity COntrol). The different Meat and Food Inspection Services were equipped with Geiger Mueller instruments. The system was in operation until late seventies. From 1977 there was no testing and calibration of the instruments. The development towards a reduction of the state of readiness was accelerated when the Norwegian Parliament decided that Norway should not establish any nuclear power plants (1979). Only the universities and special institutions as the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene and the Institute for Energy Technique were still able to analyse on radioactive isotopes. The confusion about how much radioactive fall-out from the Chernobyl reactor accident Norway received lasted for some weeks in Norway. Partially, this was due to the lack of instruments, but also many experts rejected the idea that an accident so far away might cause these amounts of fall-out consisted of Iodine and Cesium. The fall-out followed a very irregular pattern both nationally and locally with the mountain areas in Middle Norway most affected

  6. Influence of radioactive fallout on water supply and sewerage in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report reviews the practices and organization of water supply and sewerage in Finland and is related to their response to radioactive fallout situations. The contribution of drinking water to the internal radiation dose caused by radioactive fallout has earlier been small in Finland. However, in a wide-scale fallout situation, the decreasing of collective dose received from water may be justified, if the dose can be reduced at a reasonable cost, for instance by a temporary change of the raw water source. Efficient exchange of information between radiation protection and water supply experts is important for successful dose reduction measures. In Finland waterworks deliver tap water to 4.2 million people. Half of the water is ground water, and generally very well protected against fallout radioactivity. The other half is treated surface water. (6 figs., 5 tabs.)

  7. PROJECTED LIFETIME CANCER RISKS FROM EXPOSURE TO REGIONAL RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS

    OpenAIRE

    Land, Charles E.; Bouville, Andre; Apostoaei, Iulian; Simon, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive fallout from nuclear test detonations during 1946–1958 at Bikini and Enewetak atolls in the Marshall Islands (MI) exposed populations living elsewhere in the archipelago. A comprehensive analysis, presented in seven companion papers, has produced estimates of tissue-specific radiation absorbed dose to MI residents at all historically inhabited atolls from internal (ingested) and external radioactive components of fallout, by calendar year, and by age of the population at time of e...

  8. Erosional losses of fallout plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium from fallout after atmospheric explosion of nuclear weapons in the 1950's and 1960s is being redistributed over the landscape by soil erosion and carried on sediment by streams to oceans. Erosion rates computed with the Universal Soil Loss Equation for more than 200,000 sample points on nonfederal land across the US were used to estimate plutonium removal rates by soil erosion. On the average, only about 4% of the eroded sediment reaches the outlet of a major river. The remaining sediment is deposited en route, and because deposition is a selective process, the sediment is enriched in fine particles having the highest concentration of plutonium because of the element's strong association with clay and silt-sized sediment. Estimated enrichment ratios, sediment delivery ratios, and erosion rates were used to estimate annual delivery of fallout plutonium. These estimates ranged from 0.002% of the initial fallout plutonium inventory for the Savannah River basin to 0.01% for the Columbia River basin, to 0.02% for the Hudson and Rio Grande River basins, to 0.08% for the Mississippi River basin. If the deposition of plutonium had been uniformly 1 mCi/km2, the estimated plutonium activity on suspended sediment would range from about 7 fCi/g of sediment of the Savannah River basin, to 9 fCi/g for the Mississippi River basin, to 12 fCi/g for the Hudson River basin, to 14 fCi/g for the Columbia and Rio Grande River basins. 45 references, 2 figures, 17 tables

  9. Fallout forecasting: 1945-1962

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delayed hazards of fallout from the detonations of nuclear devices in the atmosphere have always been the concern of those involved in the Test Program. Even before the Trinity Shot (TR-2) of July 16, 1945, many very competent, intelligent scientists and others from all fields of expertise tried their hand at the prediction problems. This resume and collection of parts from reports, memoranda, references, etc., endeavor to chronologically outline prediction methods used operationally in the field during Test Operations of nuclear devices fired into the atmosphere

  10. Fallout forecasting: 1945-1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.R. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The delayed hazards of fallout from the detonations of nuclear devices in the atmosphere have always been the concern of those involved in the Test Program. Even before the Trinity Shot (TR-2) of July 16, 1945, many very competent, intelligent scientists and others from all fields of expertise tried their hand at the prediction problems. This resume and collection of parts from reports, memoranda, references, etc., endeavor to chronologically outline prediction methods used operationally in the field during Test Operations of nuclear devices fired into the atmosphere.

  11. Radioactive fallout in food and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part 1 of this review is designed to provide an up-dated background to the subject in relation to FAO's interests and responsibilities in scientifically accurate but non-technical language. Part 2 is concerned more specifically with the problems of radioactive fallout over pasture and cultivated soils. Moreover, it is mainly concerned with problems of international significance under peacetime conditions and which are likely only to arise as a result of a major nuclear reactor accident, or, possibly, some unintended nuclear explosion. However, relatively local problems of soil contamination could arise as a result of other kinds of accident. In the report the natural occurrence of radionuclides, and radiation exposure as a fact of life in the human environment, are indicated. Exposure to ionizing radiation from natural and man-made sources are compared. The behaviour and significance of radionuclides in ecosystems are briefly illustrated. Land-based nuclear powr stations and nuclear-powered ships and submarines are identified as the major potential accident hazards to agriculture or fisheries under peacetime conditions. 216 refs, figs and tabs

  12. Thermoluminescence studies of NTS-related fallout exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible health effects from fallout radiation resulting from atmospheric testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the 1950's and 60's was refocused in 1979 by the report of apparent increases in childhood leukemias in regions downwind of the NTS. A program is discussed which established a dosimetry technique for the measurement of low doses of radiation in common building bricks. A considerable amount of technique development has been in progress throughout the course of the pilot study. Since its development, considerable progress has been made on increasing the accuracy and reliability of the technique

  13. Instructional Design of Entrepreneurship Courses: Interview Research of Wyoming BRAVO! Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Belinda J.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the opportunity recognition process of Wyoming BRAVO! Entrepreneur (WBE) Award winners or nominees, in order to better inform the learner analysis and organizational strategy components of instructional design, specifically with respect to entrepreneurship courses. This study may be of significance to post…

  14. BRAVO [test facility] puts PWR safety and relief valves to the test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new valve blowdown test facility is completing commissioning at the Marchwood Engineering Laboratories of Britain's Central Electricity Generating Board. BRAVO, as the facility is known, will prove the performance of the safety and relief valves to be used in Sizewell B, Britain's first PWR. (author)

  15. Space shuttle/payload interface analysis. Volume 4: Business Risk and Value of Operations in Space (BRAVO). Part 3: Workbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A collection of blank worksheets for use on each BRAVO problem to be analyzed is supplied, for the purposes of recording the inputs for the BRAVO analysis, working out the definition of mission equipment, recording inputs to the satellite synthesis computer program, estimating satellite earth station costs, costing terrestrial systems, and cost effectiveness calculations. The group of analysts working BRAVO will normally use a set of worksheets on each problem, however, the workbook pages are of sufficiently good quality that the user can duplicate them, if more worksheet blanks are required than supplied. For Vol. 1, see N74-12493; for Vol. 2, see N74-14530.

  16. Public health impact of fallout from British nuclear weapons tests in Australia, 1952-1957

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period 1952-1957, Britain conducted 12 full-scale nuclear weapons tests in Australia in five series, viz. Hurricane(1952), Totem(1953), Mosaic(1956), Buffalo(1956) and Antler(1957). Radioactive fallout from the tests reached many parts of Australia. This report reviews the pathways by which the radionuclides in the fallout could have irradiated the population. The methodology is presented for estimating the radiation doses and values are derived from the available data. The possible effect that the radiation exposure had on public health is assessed. Estimation of the radiation doses is approached in two parts: (a) the contributions from the Mosaic, Buffalo and Antler series which were monitored, and (b) the contributions from the Hurricane and Totem series for which there are few fallout data. In part (a), the activities of the radionuclides making up the measured fallout are established by calculation. Standard models are then used to derive the radiation doses for the population centres - from external radiation, from ingestion of radionuclides in food and from inhalation of radionuclides in air. A simple treatment is adopted to estimate radiation doses from drinking contaminated water. For Part (b), the data assembled in (a) provide the basis for developing statistical models for predicting radiation doses from weapon yields and trajectories of the radioactive clouds. The models are then applied to give the radiation doses to population centres following the tests in Hurricane and Totem, using their yields and trajectories. 71 refs., 20 tabs., 8 figs

  17. Comparison of esophageal placement of Bravo capsule system under direct endoscopic guidance with conventional placement method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijaz A Sofi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Aijaz A Sofi, Charles Filipiak, Thomas Sodeman, Usman Ahmad, Ali Nawras, Isam DaboulDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio, USABackground: Conventional placement of a wireless esophageal pH monitoring device in the esophagus requires initial endoscopy to determine the distance to the gastroesophageal junction. Blind placement of the capsule by the Bravo delivery system is followed by repeat endoscopy to confirm placement. Alternatively, the capsule can be placed under direct vision during endoscopy. Currently there are no published data comparing the efficiency of one method over the other. The objective of this study was to compare the method of Bravo wireless pH deviceplacement under direct visualization with the conventional method.Methods: A retrospective study involving 58 patients (29 patients with indirect and 29 patients with direct visualization who had Bravo capsule placement. The physician endoscopy procedure notes, nurse’s notes, postprocedure notes, recovery notes, and pH monitoring results were reviewed. The safety of the procedures, length of the procedures, and patient tolerability were evaluated.Results: None of the 58 patients had early detachment of the device and had no immediate procedure-related complications. The overall incidence of complications in both the groups was similar. No failures due to the technique were noted in either group. Average amount of time taken for the procedure was similar in both groups.Conclusion: The technique of placing a Bravo pH device under direct visualization is as safe and effective as the conventional method. In addition, there is an added advantage of avoiding a second endoscopic intubation in the direct visualization technique.Keywords: Bravo capsule, technique, esophageal pH monitoring

  18. Atmospheric fallout of sodium combustion aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five sodium combustion product release tests were conducted in the open atmosphere at INEL, Idaho. About 100 kg of sodium was burned in 5 min at 30 m elevation in two of the tests. Fallout distribution and combustion product species determinations were made. The principal fallout occurred near the release point and decreased exponentially as the plume moved downwind. The tests indicated that little fallout of combustion product aerosols occurred beyond a few hundred meters from the source under the given meteorological conditions. 2 refs

  19. Nuclear radiation in warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; digest of nuclear weaponry (characteristics of nuclear weapons; effects of nuclear weapons other than ionizing radiation (fire-ball, fall-out, thermal radiation, blast wave, electromagnetic pulse); the nuclear arms race; war scenarios; biological effects of radiations on man (radiation doses; natural sources of radiation; acute effects of radiation; long-term somatic effects; genetic effects; factors affecting the biological response to radiation; internal exposure; synergistic effects; protection against radiation effects); radiations from nuclear explosions (initial radiation; fall-out; effects of fall-out on animal and plant life; contamination of water and food supplies by fall-out); radiation casualties in a nuclear war; effectiveness of civil defence; other warlike uses of radiation (attacks on civilian nuclear power installations; radiological warfare; terrorist activities); conclusion. (orig./HP)

  20. Radioactive fallout and neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejat Akar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Possible link between radioactivity and the occurrence of neural tube defects is a long lasting debate since the Chernobyl nuclear fallout in 1986. A recent report on the incidence of neural defects in the west coast of USA, following Fukushima disaster, brought another evidence for effect of radioactive fallout on the occurrence of NTD’s. Here a literature review was performed focusing on this special subject.

  1. Arctic cushion plants as fallout 'monitors'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internal distribution of fallout 137Cs was determined for arctic cushion plants Dryas integrifolia, Silene acaulis and the bryophytes Rhacomitrium lanuginosum and Polytrichum juniperinum collected at various latitudes in Canadian Arctic. The results indicate that these plants have functioned as biological monitors of radioactive fallout and it is suggested that analysis of the internal distribution of 137Cs could serve as a model for other airborne contaminants. (author)

  2. Space shuttle/payload interface analysis. (Study 2.4) Volume 4: Business Risk and Value of Operations in Space (BRAVO). Part 2: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The BRAVO User's Manual is presented which describes the BRAVO methodology in terms of step-by-step procedures, so that it may be used as a tool for a team of analysts performing cost effectiveness analyses on potential future space applications. BRAVO requires a relatively general set of input information and a relatively small expenditure of resources. For Vol. 1, see N74-12493; for Vol. 2, see N74-14530.

  3. Constraints on the magnitude and rate of CO2 dissolution at Bravo Dome natural gas field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathaye, Kiran J; Hesse, Marc A; Cassidy, Martin; Stockli, Daniel F

    2014-10-28

    The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) captured at large point sources into deep saline aquifers can significantly reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Dissolution of the injected CO2 into the formation brine is a trapping mechanism that helps to ensure the long-term security of geological CO2 storage. We use thermochronology to estimate the timing of CO2 emplacement at Bravo Dome, a large natural CO2 field at a depth of 700 m in New Mexico. Together with estimates of the total mass loss from the field we present, to our knowledge, the first constraints on the magnitude, mechanisms, and rates of CO2 dissolution on millennial timescales. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology records heating of the Bravo Dome reservoir due to the emplacement of hot volcanic gases 1.2-1.5 Ma. The CO2 accumulation is therefore significantly older than previous estimates of 10 ka, which demonstrates that safe long-term geological CO2 storage is possible. Integrating geophysical and geochemical data, we estimate that 1.3 Gt CO2 are currently stored at Bravo Dome, but that only 22% of the emplaced CO2 has dissolved into the brine over 1.2 My. Roughly 40% of the dissolution occurred during the emplacement. The CO2 dissolved after emplacement exceeds the amount expected from diffusion and provides field evidence for convective dissolution with a rate of 0.1 g/(m(2)y). The similarity between Bravo Dome and major US saline aquifers suggests that significant amounts of CO2 are likely to dissolve during injection at US storage sites, but that convective dissolution is unlikely to trap all injected CO2 on the 10-ky timescale typically considered for storage projects. PMID:25313084

  4. The calculation of fallout protection factors using the VCS adjoint Monte Carlo methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vehicle Code System (VCS) was designed to compute initial radiation protection factors from distal sources for the shielding object such that radiation environments on a coupling boundary surface could be specified by a two-dimensional discrete ordinate (R,Z) calculation with the DOT code at a single range interval. The VCS procedure does not allow fixed sources of radiation internal to the coupling surface. This constraint on VCS is important for the analysis of fallout radiation protection factors. A new code, in a VCS framework, computes radiation protection factors from nuclear fallout for complex three-dimensional structures. Fallout radiation protection factor computations present at least two significant differences from the normal application of VCS to initial radiation: (1) there are radiation sources (on ground and roofs) local to the detector which cannot normally be excluded from the interior of a boundary surface and (2) the distal radiation environment is well-characterized by a one-dimensional discrete ordinates computation in plane geometry with the ANISN code. Thus, major features of this new code procedure include the addition of logic to score particles at potential source surfaces (e.g., roof and ground surfaces) within the Monte Carlo geometry, the addition of logic in the coupling procedure to treat these scores, and the addition of a capability to couple the ANISN plane geometry free-field fluxes instead of the two-dimensional DOT free-field fluxes

  5. External doses from radioactive fallout. Dosimetry and levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehni, T.

    1995-12-31

    The design, manufacture and calibration of a TL-based dosemeter for measurement of low level external photon radiation are presented. The dosemeter is based on CaF{sub 2} with 2 mm brass filter for energy compensation. It is able to resolve a 8% dose increase relative to natural background radiation. With this dosemeter external dose measurements were made in 6 villages in a heavily contaminated region in Russia (Chernobyl fallout), in order to assess external doses to the population. The results were analyzed in the light of additional existing information on radioactive deposition, social habits, decontamination measures and other influencing technical and physical factors. The observed dose values were lower than theoretical estimates of external doses based on published values for external dose levels relative to the level of contamination. 84 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. External doses from radioactive fallout. Dosimetry and levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design, manufacture and calibration of a TL-based dosemeter for measurement of low level external photon radiation are presented. The dosemeter is based on CaF2 with 2 mm brass filter for energy compensation. It is able to resolve a 8% dose increase relative to natural background radiation. With this dosemeter external dose measurements were made in 6 villages in a heavily contaminated region in Russia (Chernobyl fallout), in order to assess external doses to the population. The results were analyzed in the light of additional existing information on radioactive deposition, social habits, decontamination measures and other influencing technical and physical factors. The observed dose values were lower than theoretical estimates of external doses based on published values for external dose levels relative to the level of contamination. 84 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Behavior and food consumption pattern of the population exposed in 1949–1962 to fallout from Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Schonfeld, Sara; Akimzhanov, Kuat; Aldyngurov, Daulet; Land, Charles E.; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Potischman, Nancy; Schwerin, Michael J.; Semenova, Yulia; Tokaeva, Alma; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Bouville, André; Steven L Simon

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between radiation exposure from nuclear weapons testing fallout and thyroid disease in a group of 2,994 subjects has been the subject of study by the U.S. National Cancer Institute. In that study, radiation doses to the thyroid were estimated for residents of villages in Kazakhstan possibly exposed to deposition of radioactive fallout from nuclear testing conducted by the Soviet Union at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site in Kazakhstan between 1949 and 1962. The study subjec...

  8. Some perspectives on action levels in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximum permissible radiation levels for planned activities must be distinguished from action levels as applied to protect people and animals after nuclear accidents. The essential thing with action levels is the optimal balance between the danger of the radiation and the harm involved in the counter measures themselves. Among other things these counter measures are dependent on the magnitude of the fallout, i.e. on the apprehended doses to man and animals

  9. [The making of the sexual and erotic body in the West German youth magazine BRAVO, 1960s-70s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerteig, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the very successful popular youth magazine BRAVO as a central element of the West German youth culture. The focus is on BRAVO's contribution to the shaping of the sexual and erotic knowledge of the young in West Germany since the mid-1960s. Using a definition of popular culture that is inspired by the cultural studies and by an understanding of gender as a construct, the paper scrutinizes discourses on homosexuality, impotency and frigidity, moral debates on premarital sexual intercourse and changes of sexual behaviour of the young at the end of the 1960s, as well as discourses on the erotic body in the 1970s. By mediating authoritative knowledge about sex BRAVO contributed to stabilizing the heterosexual matrix in West Germany's youth culture. PMID:18019224

  10. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 210 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 208 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Fallout from Chernobyl [Letters to the editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six brief letters discuss the possible health effects of fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident including an increase in thyroid cancer in children in Belarus, chromosomal abnormalities in workers from Latvia who cleared up the Chernobyl accident site, an increased trisomy 21 in Berlin but a lack of increased childhood leukaemia incidence in Greece. (UK)

  13. Fallout from Chernobyl [Letters to the editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E.D. (Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Abelin, T.; Egger, M. (Bern Univ. (Switzerland)) (and others)

    1994-11-12

    Six brief letters discuss the possible health effects of fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident including an increase in thyroid cancer in children in Belarus, chromosomal abnormalities in workers from Latvia who cleared up the Chernobyl accident site, an increased trisomy 21 in Berlin but a lack of increased childhood leukaemia incidence in Greece. (UK).

  14. Fallout in Sweden from Chernobyl Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fallout from Chernobyl as recorded by the Swedish network of 25 fixed gamma monitoring stations during the three days 27th, 28th and 29th of April 1986. The measurements are made 2.5 metres above the ground. (author)

  15. Temporary/portable nuclear fallout shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and invention of a temporary/portable fallout shelter has been described in context of schematic and representative embodiments. Tent structures are described which include disposable, exterior, semi-transparent plastic and/or fabric shield membranes covering a tent composed of stretched, tightly woven, rip-resistant fabric panels supported by tensile rods/wands. 16 figs

  16. Radioecological sensitivity. Danish fallout data revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danish fallout data covering four decades are interpreted in terms of radioecological sensitivity. The radioecological sensitivity is the time-integrated radionuclide concentration in an environmental sample from a unit ground deposition (e.g. Bq y kg-1 per Gq m-2). The fallout data comprise observed levels of the radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr in precipitation, grass, milk, beef and diet. The data are analysed with different types of radioecological models: traditional UNSCEAR models and more recent dynamic models. The traditional models provide empirical relationships between the annual fallout from precipitation and the annual average levels in grass, milk, beef and diet. The relationships may be derived from spreadsheet calculations. ECOSYS and FARMLAND represent more recent radioecological models, which are available as software for personal computers. These models are more mechanistic and require information on a range of topics, e.g. mode of deposition, nuclide dependent and nuclide independent parameters. The more recent models do not reproduce the fallout data better than the traditional models. But the general features of the more recent models make them suited for prediction of radiological consequences of routine and accidental releases in areas where limited radioecological data are available. The work is part of the NKS/BOK-2.1 project on Important Nordic Food Chains aiming at characterising radioecological sensitivity and variability across the Nordic countries. (au)

  17. Scientists study 'cold war' fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the epidemiological studies being carried out to determine radiation doses to the public from intentional and accidental releases of radioactive compounds during the Cold War. These studies at present are focused on Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Fernald, with studies beginning at Rocky Flats and Savannah

  18. Childhood leukaemia in Great Britain and fallout from nuclear weapons testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible effects of radiation from fallout on childhood leukaemia mortality from 1950 to 1987 and registrations from 1963 to 1987 were assessed using a division of Great Britain into regions with higher rainfall and a consequently higher fallout radiation dose in the 1960s and regions with lower rainfall and a lower radiation dose. Childhood leukaemia mortality rates declined and registration rates increased throughout the period. For ages 0-14 years, the differences between rates in wet regions and dry regions were small and appeared unrelated to periods of low, medium and high radiation exposure based on dose equivalent to the red bone marrow after birth. For the 0-4 years age group the highest ratios of leukaemia death rates and registration rates in the wet compared with the dry part of Great Britain occurred in the period of highest radiation exposure after birth. The death rate ratio was significantly raised in the period of high exposure compared with the surrounding medium exposure periods, but the difference in registration rate ratios between the high exposure period and the medium exposure period following was not statistically significant. The results might be explained by survival and registration changes, or chance in the case of registrations, but do not exclude the possibility that low doses of radiation from fallout were responsible for an increased risk of leukaemia in young children in Great Britain. (author)

  19. Chernobyl fallout in a Swedish spruce forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the distribution of Chernobyl fallout in a Swedish forest was carried out and showed more than 95% of the 137Cs in the system to be of Chernobyl origin. The data show that approximately 87% of total fallout is found in soils, 6% in the bryophyte layer and 7% in standing biomass of trees. The mean deposition of 137Cs in the system (including soils, bryophytes, understorey vegetation, fungi, trees, moose and roe deer) was 54 kBq m-2. Fungi, understorey vegetation and ruminant populations collectively contained approximately 1% of total radiocaesium in the system. However, actual concentrations in these sample types were higher than in any other category, mostly exceeding the limit of 1500 Bq kg-1 for consumption of wild produce in Sweden. These categories represent the principal foodstuffs responsible for radiation transfer to man from the system and though negligible in total biomass there is potential for significant dose transfer to individuals who are regular consumers of wild forest produce

  20. A Crítica ao Cinema Brasileiro Atual: a retórica das revistas Veja e Bravo!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOMES, Regina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a rhetorical-comparative study of film reviews about Brazilian movies, published in magazines Veja and Bravo!, between the years 1997 and 2004. Although different institutions, the magazines used similar argumentative resources to convince the reader with aesthetic judgments predominantly positive of recent Brazilian cinema. However, Bravo! presented persuasive rhetoric more stronger that Veja magazine. The dialogue between rhetoric and journalistic criticism demarcated the discussion relating to the methods of interpretation and meaning construction in film reviews.

  1. Evaluation of fallout strontium-90 accumulation in bone and cancer mortality risk in Japanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical model was developed for evaluating a fallout 90Sr accumulation in Japanese bone through its dietary intake, and was validated by comparing the estimates of 90Sr concentration in bone with the observed. The mortality risk by the radiation-induced leukemia and bone cancer was evaluated based on the NUREG/CR-4214 model. The main results obtained in this study under the limited assumptions are as follows: (1) The mathematical model was developed to relate 90Sr concentration in an environment with the mortality risk due to the radiation-induced leukemia and bone cancer through dietary intake of fallout 90Sr. (2) The leukemia mortality risk due to the fallout 90Sr is about one order larger than the bone cancer mortality risk, and is evaluated to be larger than 10-6 for Japanese who were born before early 1970's. (3) The leukemia mortality risk due to the fallout 90Sr is about 10% level in 1992 of the leukemia mortality risk expected by the benzene in ambient air. (author)

  2. Ordenamiento territorial, turismo y ambiente en Valle de Bravo, México

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy Sierra López; Lilia Zizumbo Villarreal; Tonatiuh Romero Contreras; Neptalí Monterroso Salvatierra

    2011-01-01

    Detrás de ese paisaje idílico de agua, bosques y arquitectura, que la mercadotecnia ofrece y que la tradición evoca, se desarrollaron fuertes conflictos de intereses, necesidades sociales insatisfechas, así como la depredación ambiental constante. En Valle de Bravo pueden observarse paisajes con diferentes visiones y lógicas socioeconómicas, como resultado de un conjunto de políticas de carácter territorial formuladas por el Estado y por la iniciativa privada, con el objetivo de fomentar la a...

  3. Anestesia del toro bravo. Estudio clínico, cardiorrespiratorio y neurológico

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Rascón, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    El toro bravo, tanto por su temperamento como por ser una raza extensiva en semilibertad se asemeja más a los bovinos de vida libre como el búfalo o el bisonte que a los bovinos domésticos. Estos animales, en ocasiones, requieren asistencia veterinaria para la realización de procedimientos medico-quirúrgicos, diagnósticos o de manejo que necesitan de la anestesia como herramienta imprescindible para su realización. La inmovilización de estos animales resulta esencial para minim...

  4. Evaluation of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Using the Bravo Capsule pH System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawenko, Rona Marie A; Lee, Yeong Yeh

    2016-01-31

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disease predominantly seen in the West but there is a rising trend in Asia. Ambulatory 24-hour catheter-based pH monitoring has been the de facto gold standard test for GERD that correlates symptoms with acid reflux episodes. However, drawbacks such as patients' discomfort, and catheter displacement render the test as cumbersome and error-prone. The Bravo pH wireless system is designed to be user-friendly and has an added advantage of prolonged pH monitoring. The system is comparable to the catheter-based pH monitoring system in terms of diagnostic yield and symptom-reflux association. Indications include evaluation of patients with refractory GERD symptoms and prior to anti-reflux surgery. Bravo utilizes a wireless pH-sensing capsule with a complete prepackaged system, and a data processing software. The capsule may be positioned indirectly using endoscopic or manometric landmarks or under direct endoscopic guidance. Optimal threshold cut-off values are yet to be standardized but based on available studies, for the Asian population, it may be recommended for total % time pH Cost is a limitation but capsule placement is relatively safe although technical failures may be seen in small percentage of cases. PMID:26717929

  5. Carborne fallout mapping - STUK/HUT team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the summer 1995 altogether 8,625 spectrometric and 3,108 dose-rate measurements were performed in Padasjoki Auttoinen village using carborne measuring devices. As a result 137Cs fallout and dose-rate maps were produced. The highest measured values in the test area II were 160 kBq m-2 for fallout and 0.22 μSv h-1 for dose-rate. One hot spot was found beside the test area (dose rate 0.31 μSv h-1). On the cultivated areas the measured count rates in 137Cs-window are three to four times lower than in the forest areas in average, indicating an altered depth profile of caesium. (au)

  6. Carborne fallout mapping - STUK/HUT team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honkamaa, T.; Tiilikainen, H. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Aarnio, P.; Nikkinen, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    During the summer 1995 altogether 8,625 spectrometric and 3,108 dose-rate measurements were performed in Padasjoki Auttoinen village using carborne measuring devices. As a result {sup 137}Cs fallout and dose-rate maps were produced. The highest measured values in the test area II were 160 kBq m{sup -2} for fallout and 0.22 {mu}Sv h{sup -1} for dose-rate. One hot spot was found beside the test area (dose rate 0.31 {mu}Sv h{sup -1}). On the cultivated areas the measured count rates in {sup 137}Cs-window are three to four times lower than in the forest areas in average, indicating an altered depth profile of caesium. (au).

  7. Modeling Fallout of Anthropogenic I-129

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englund, Edvard; Aldahan, Als; Possnert, Göran; Haltia-Hovi, Eeva; Hou, Xiaolin; Renberg, Ingmar; Saarinen, Timo

    2008-01-01

    Despite the relatively well-recognized emission rates of the anthropogenic 1291, there is little knowledge about the temporal fallout patterns and magnitude of fluxes since the start of the atomic era at the early 1940s. We here present measurements of annual 1291 concentrations in sediment...... atmosphere is derived for pertinent sea areas (English Channel, Irish Sea, and North Sea), which is estimated at 0.04 to 0.21 y(-1)....

  8. Space shuttle/payload interface analysis. Volume 4: Business Risk and Value of Operations in Space (BRAVO). Part 1: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Background information is provided which emphasizes the philosophy behind analytical techniques used in the business risk and value of operations in space (BRAVO) study. The focus of the summary is on the general approach, operation of the procedures, and the status of the study. For Vol. 1, see N74-12493; for Vol. 2, see N74-14530.

  9. José Julián Bravo (1874-1927), a hitherto unknown conchologist from Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mogollón Avila, V.; Breure, A.S.H.

    2009-01-01

    The recent finding of a private shell collection from Peru, dating from the early 20th century, sheds some new light on the history of Neotropical malacology. The collection of J.J. Bravo is partly reconstructed and some data is given on his life and conchological activities. It shows that, in the e

  10. Radioactive fallout in Norway in 1964

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholastic achievement of Norwegian children born in 1965 has been analysed in relation to date of birth and school address, in order to examine a possible effect of radioactive fallout during their fetal period. The Western regions of the country had an order of magnitude higher fallout contamination than the Eastern region. There was in the Western region a pronounced seasonal variation in e.g. 137Cs content of milk. The results indicate a deficiency in scholastic achievement in the West cohort corresponding to the coincidence of the most sensitive fetal period (8-15 weeks post conception) with the 1964 late summer increase in 137Cs content of milk. The dose from fallout is several orders of magnitude too low to explain the observed deficiency quantitatively in consonance with the Hiroshima-Nagasaki findings. It is suggested that the explaination may be found be way of a repair induction lag hypothesis, related to the microdosimetric conditions at background dose rate level. (author)

  11. Ingestion intake of fallout Pu in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingestion intakes of fallout Pu throughout Japan in the 1959-1962 and 1978-1980 periods were measured by analyzing composite samples of each foodstuff or duplicate composite food samples consumed by five persons for a period of 1 d. Cumulative ingestion intake in Tokyo for the period from 1954-1980 was estimated by regression analysis. The cumulative ingestion intake, calculated by simple regression analysis between the natural log of the intake and that of annual fallout deposition of Pu, was estimated to be 450 pCi. Calculated by a multiple regression analysis, including the natural log of annual fallout deposition rates for a previous year as an additional independent variable, it was estimated to be 600 pCi. Considering in combination an ingestion intake, the value of which is calculated by the multiple regression analysis; an absorption ratio from the gastrointestinal tract of 0.001 (a recently reported value for low-level soluble Pu independent of chemical form); and the metabolic model in ICRP Publication 30, it is possible to estimate that the contribution of ingestion intake to liver and bone burden would be approximately 30%

  12. Application of the ORIGEN Fallout Analysis Tool and the DELFIC Fallout Planning Tool to National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project was to provide a robust fallout analysis and planning tool for the National Technical Nuclear Forensics interagency ground sample collection team. Their application called for a fast-running, portable mission-planning tool for use in response to emerging improvised nuclear device (IND) post-detonation situations. The project met those goals by research and development of models to predict the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of fallout debris. ORNL has developed new graphical user interfaces for two existing codes, the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code and the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). ORIGEN is a validated, radionuclide production and decay code that has been implemented into the Fallout Analysis Tool to predict the fallout source term nuclide inventory after the detonation of an IND. DELFIC is a validated, physics-based, research reference fallout prediction software package. It has been implemented into the Fallout Planning Tool and is used to predict the fractionated isotope concentrations in fallout, particle sizes, fractionation ratios, dose rate, and integrated dose over the planned collection routes - information vital to ensure quality samples for nuclear forensic analysis while predicting dose to the sample collectors. DELFIC contains a particle activity module, which models the radiochemical fractionation of the elements in a cooling fireball as they condense into and onto particles to predict the fractionated activity size distribution for a given scenario. This provides the most detailed physics-based characterization of the fallout source term phenomenology available in an operational fallout model.

  13. Application of the ORIGEN Fallout Analysis Tool and the DELFIC Fallout Planning Tool to National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Lefebvre, Jordan P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide a robust fallout analysis and planning tool for the National Technical Nuclear Forensics interagency ground sample collection team. Their application called for a fast-running, portable mission-planning tool for use in response to emerging improvised nuclear device (IND) post-detonation situations. The project met those goals by research and development of models to predict the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of fallout debris. ORNL has developed new graphical user interfaces for two existing codes, the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code and the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). ORIGEN is a validated, radionuclide production and decay code that has been implemented into the Fallout Analysis Tool to predict the fallout source term nuclide inventory after the detonation of an IND. DELFIC is a validated, physics-based, research reference fallout prediction software package. It has been implemented into the Fallout Planning Tool and is used to predict the fractionated isotope concentrations in fallout, particle sizes, fractionation ratios, dose rate, and integrated dose over the planned collection routes - information vital to ensure quality samples for nuclear forensic analysis while predicting dose to the sample collectors. DELFIC contains a particle activity module, which models the radiochemical fractionation of the elements in a cooling fireball as they condense into and onto particles to predict the fractionated activity size distribution for a given scenario. This provides the most detailed physics-based characterization of the fallout source term phenomenology available in an operational fallout model.

  14. Thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function in subjects exposed to Chernobyl fallout during childhood: evidence for a transient radiation-induced elevation of serum thyroid antibodies without an increase in thyroid autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agate, Laura; Mariotti, Stefano; Elisei, Rossella;

    2008-01-01

    An increase in the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies (ATAs) was reported 6-8 yr after the Chernobyl accident in radiation-exposed children and adolescents.......An increase in the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies (ATAs) was reported 6-8 yr after the Chernobyl accident in radiation-exposed children and adolescents....

  15. HASL measurements of fallout following the September 26, 1976 Chinese nuclear test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported from measurements of radioactivity in the fallout from the nuclear test conducted by the Peoples Republic of China on September 26th, 1976. These measurements were carried on through Monday, October 18th. Results of these measurements made in New York and New Jersey, including external radiation exposure, air concentrations, deposition and the concentration of radioiodine in milk, are reported. An estimate of the thyroid dose from milk consumption is also included

  16. INDICADORES FECALES Y PATÓGENOS EN AGUA DESCARGADA AL RÍO BRAVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelina Olivas-Enriquez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Existen pocos estudios disponibles con base en microorganismos enteropatógenos que confirmen el impacto del Río Bravo en la frontera norte sobre la salud pública, aunque algunos datos revelan descargas diarias de millones de litros de aguas residuales, la mayoría sin el más mínimo tratamiento. Las partes bajas del río reciben las aguas negras de áreas urbanas, drenaje agrícola y descargas de la industria, lo que sugiere su alta y peligrosa contaminación con patógenos intestinales. El objetivo fue determinar la calidad microbiológica del agua del Río Bravo, proveniente de drenes y canales que desembocan en ambos lados de la frontera Juárez- El Paso (región denominada Paso del Norte mediante la detección de organismos indicadores de contaminación fecal, los que permiten inferir la presencia de patógenos intestinales. Se identificaron y cuantificaron los indicadores fecales Cryptosporidium y Giardia por técnicas de separación inmunomagnética e inmunofluorescencia; otros indicadores fueron las bacterias coliformes totales y Escherichia coli, usando la técnica de filtración por membrana. Los resultados mostraron que el 100% de las muestras presentaron los dos parásitos y por lo menos alguno de los indicadores bacterianos, aunque en números fluctuantes, atribuido al tipo de descargas. Con base en que estos indicadores deben ser cero en el agua para beber y utilizando referencias para cuerpos de agua, se pudo deducir la calidad microbiológica, no siendo segura en el 100% de las muestras ni para actividades recreativas ni aptas para riego agrícola. Se observó un número mayor de parásitos y bacterias en las muestras del lado mexicano; asimismo, en ambas fronteras se encontró un número mayor del parásito Giardia que de Cryptosporidium. Actualmente la presencia indiscutible de enteropatógenos en el agua del Río Bravo constituye un riesgo para la salud pública, principalmente para los agricultores que la manejan y en el

  17. The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearny, C.H.

    2001-11-20

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of {+-}25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The heart of this report is the step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM. NOTE: ''The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter'', was published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory report in1979. Some of the materials originally suggested for suspending the leaves of the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM) are no longer available. Because of changes in the manufacturing process, other materials (e.g., sewing thread, unwaxed dental floss) may not have the insulating capability to work properly. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has not tested any of the suggestions provided in the preface of the report, but they have been used by other groups. When using these

  18. Thyroid Nodules as a Late Effect of Exposure to Fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple nodules of the thyroid gland have developed in a Marshallese population 10 to 14 years after accidental exposure to radioactive fallout The exposure occurred in 1954 when an unpredicted shift in winds caused deposition of fallout on several Marshall Islands east of Bikini Sixty four people received 175 rads of gamma radiation which proved to be sub lethal but resulted in early nausea and vomiting and significant depression of blood elements Exposure of the skin resulted m beta bums and epilation and there was significant internal absorption of fission isotopes from contaminated food and water The most serious internal exposure was from radioiodines (131I 132I 133I 135I) It was estimated that in addition to the gamma radiation the adult thyroid gland received 160 rads from radioiodines and the young children because of their considerably smaller glands an estimated 700 1400 rads Recovery of blood elements to nearly normal and healing of skin lesions with regrowth of hair was complete by one year These findings have been fully documented The most important late radiation effect has been the development of thyroid abnormalities Since 1963 a total of 20 cases have thus far been detected 17 in children exposed at less than 10 years of age (90% of that group) and 3 in adults Thyroid surgery on 11 children and 3 adults revealed that all had benign adenomatous nodules except for a mixed papillary and follicular carcinoma in a 40 year-old woman The benign nodules were similar to those associated with iodine deficiency but such deficiency was not apparent m the Marshallese who live largely on seafood However most pathologists could not distinguish definite radiation effects in the nodules Growth and development retardation in some of the exposed children is now clearly related to thyroid deficiency Two boys with the greatest growth retardation developed pronounced hypothyroidism with atrophy of their thyroid glands Treatment of the exposed group with thyroid hormone

  19. The relationship of thyroid cancer in the people of the Marshall Islands to potential exposure to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US atomic weapons testing programme in the Pacific conducted between 1946 and 1958 resulted in radioactive contamination of a number of atolls in the Marshall Islands to various degrees. The largest weapon named BRAVO was tested in 1954 and resulted in high exposures to residents living on three atolls immediately downwind of the test site. Between 1993 and 1997, as part of the Nationwide Radiological Study of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, we examined 4767 Marshallese for all forms of thyroid disease, benign and malignant. Those examined had residences at the time of the test on all inhabited atolls of the nation and were born before the end of the nuclear testing period and thus potentially exposed to radioiodines from bomb test fallout. This group includes more than 60% of the alive population at risk. We diagnosed 38 thyroid cancers and found 23 other study participants who had been operated for thyroid cancer before. These findings indicate that 1 in 100 Marshallese had thyroid cancer or had been diagnosed with thyroid cancer before the investigation. Thyroid cancer rates varied little throughout the country, which suggests that thyroid cancer is endemic to the Marshallese population. However, the highest prevalence (1.8%) was found among women who were alive at the time of the BRAVO test. We derived crude estimates of thyroid dose for each study participant, using age-specific dose estimates on Utirik as estimated by Lessard et al. and adjusting those for location on the basis of contemporary measurements of Cs-137 at their island of residence in 1954. Prevalence of thyroid cancer generally increased with estimated dose to the thyroid, but the trend was not statistically significant. In view of these data, more precise individual thyroid dose reconstruction becomes an essential task for future work. (author)

  20. Projected lifetime cancer risks from exposure to regional radioactive fallout in the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Charles E; Bouville, André; Apostoaei, Iulian; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Radioactive fallout from nuclear test detonations during 1946-1958 at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands (MI) exposed populations living elsewhere in the MI archipelago. A comprehensive analysis, presented in seven companion papers, has produced estimates of tissue-specific radiation absorbed dose to MI residents at all historically inhabited atolls from internal (ingested) and external irradiation resulting from exposure to radioactive fallout, by calendar year, and by age of the population at time of exposure. The present report deals, for the first time, with the implications of these doses for cancer risk among exposed members of the MI population. Radiation doses differed by geographic location and year of birth, and radiation-related cancer risk depends upon age at exposure and age at observation for risk. Using dose-response models based on committee reports published by the National Research Council and the National Institutes of Health, we project that, during the lifetimes of members of the MI population potentially exposed to ionizing radiation from weapons test fallout deposited during the testing period (1948-1958) and from residual radioactive sources during the subsequent 12 y (1959-1970), perhaps 1.6% (with 90% uncertainty range 0.4% to 3.4%) of all cancers might be attributable to fallout-related radiation exposures. By sub-population, the projected proportion of cancers attributable to radiation from fallout from all nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands is 55% (28% to 69%) among 82 persons exposed in 1954 on Rongelap and Ailinginae, 10% (2.4% to 22%) for 157 persons exposed on Utrik, and 2.2% (0.5% to 4.8%) and 0.8% (0.2% to 1.8%), respectively, for the much larger populations exposed in mid-latitude locations including Kwajalein and in southern locations including Majuro. By cancer type, point estimates of attributable risk varied, by location, between 12% and 95% for thyroid cancer, between 2% and 78% for leukemia, and

  1. Potencial de comportamento do fogo em manchas de pinhal bravo remanescentes de incêndio

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, João Henrique Cruz Loureiro da

    2016-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado em Engenharia Florestal As manchas de pinhal bravo (Pinus pinaster) remanescentes de incêndios florestais são ecologicamente importantes e poderão dar orientações úteis no âmbito da mitigação do risco de incêndio, já que as suas características estruturais e de acumulação de combustível poderão ser extrapoladas para povoamentos de produção ou faixas de gestão de combustível e adotadas como recomendações de silvicultura preventiva. Neste trabalho estudaram-se 50 m...

  2. Ordenamiento territorial, turismo y ambiente en Valle de Bravo, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Sierra López

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Detrás de ese paisaje idílico de agua, bosques y arquitectura, que la mercadotecnia ofrece y que la tradición evoca, se desarrollaron fuertes conflictos de intereses, necesidades sociales insatisfechas, así como la depredación ambiental constante. En Valle de Bravo pueden observarse paisajes con diferentes visiones y lógicas socioeconómicas, como resultado de un conjunto de políticas de carácter territorial formuladas por el Estado y por la iniciativa privada, con el objetivo de fomentar la actividad turística como eje del desarrollo capitalista. El paisaje creado en algunas zonas ofrece una imagen de prosperidad y confort, mientras que en otras es posible observar la segregación socioterritorial que esta actividad ha generado y que excluye a la mayoría de sus habitantes de los beneficios que el turismo puede traer.

  3. Chernobyl fallout in southern and central Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the levels and distributions of radionuclides released in the Chernobyl accident, we sampled surface peat from 62 sites in Southern and Central Finland and measured 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs, 132Te, 140Ba, 103Ru, 90Sr, 141Ce, and 95Zr. The distribution of fallout activities was highly uneven, depending on movement of the contaminated air mass and rainfall distribution during the critical days. The highest values observed were 420 kBq m-2 of 131I and 70 kBq m-2 of 137Cs. The nuclide ratios showed wide and partly unexpected variations. The high-boiling-point, or nonvolatile, elements Ce and Zr were spread mostly on a 200-km-wide zone extending across Finland from southwest to northeast. The more volatile elements, I, Ce, and Te, showed quite a different, more widespread, fallout distribution, while an intermediate behavior was observed for Ba, Ru, and possibly Sr. These results can be explained by assuming that pulverized nuclear fuel material released in the reactor explosion on 26 April reached Finland via Poland and the Baltic Sea and traversed the country along the above-mentioned narrow zone, while volatile material, evaporated in the reactor fire from 26 April to 5 May, arrived in several waves and was consequently more widely and evenly spread. From their elemental melting and boiling points, Ru and Mo would appear to belong to the nonvolatile group and Sr to the volatile. Yet, their actual behaviors were opposite; Ru in particular was found in the nonvolatile as well as the volatile fallout, possibly because Ru activities were present in the fuel partly in the metallic state and partly as volatile oxides

  4. Evaluation of 7Be fallout spatial variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cosmogenic radionuclide beryllium-7 (Be) is produced in the atmosphere by cosmic particle reactions and is being used as a tracer for soil erosion and climatic processes research. After the production, 7Be bonds to aerosol particles in the atmosphere and is deposited on the soil surface with other radionuclide species by rainfall. Because of the high adsorption on soil particles and its short half-life of 53.2 days, this radionuclide follows of the erosion process and can be used as a tracer to evaluate the sediment transport that occurs during a single rain event or short period of rain events. A key assumption for the erosion evaluation through this radiotracer is the uniformity of the spatial distribution of the 7Be fallout. The 7Be method was elaborated recently and due to its few applications, some assumptions related to the method were not yet properly investigated yet, and the hypothesis of 7Be fallout uniformity needs to be evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 7Be fallout spatial distribution through the rain water 7Be activity analysis of the first five millimeters of single rain events. The rain water was sampled using twelve collectors distributed on an experimental area of about 300 m2 , located in the campus of Sao Paulo University, Piracicaba. The 7Be activities were measured using a 53% efficiency gamma-ray spectrometer from the Radioisotope laboratory of CENA. The 7Be activities in rain water varied from 0.26 to 1.81 Sq.L-1, with the highest values in summer and lowest in spring. In each one of the 5 single events, the spatial variability of 7Se activity in rain water was high, showing the high randomness of the fallout spatial distribution. A simulation using the 7Be spatial variability values obtained here and 7Se average reference inventories taken from the literature was performed determining the lowest detectable erosion rate estimated by 7Be model. The importance of taking a representative number of samples to determine the

  5. Prácticas ambientales de las empresas turísticas en valle de Bravo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Peñaloza1 Nadia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo analiza las prácticas ambientales de los actores sociales que se relacionan con las empresas turísticas del municipio de Valle de Bravo, Estado de México. Cabe mencionar que dichas prácticas se consideraron desde el punto de vista socio- económico, es decir, no sólo como se asumen en cuanto al manejo de los recursos naturales, sino también desde su entorno social y económico. Por ello, a partir de la propuesta metodológica de la teoría de sistemas complejos, se analizan los efectos producidos en los entornos de este destino turístico, lo que permite visualizar deuna manera holística la situación que prevalece para al cuidado del ambiente con la participación de todos los actores sociales de la localidad. Los resultados encontrados muestran una gran debilidaden la implementación de dichas prácticas, ya que éstas, actualmente, son impuestas por el gobierno municipal y no se asumen como una iniciativa de los propios actores que participan en las empresas turísticas. Por esta razón, las condiciones de deterioro ambiental en Valle de Bravo son cada vez mayores. A partir de los resultados generados por este estudio, se formulan recomendaciones de implementación y mejoramiento de las prácticas ambientales que contribuyen a la conservación y al cuidado del ambiente.

  6. Report of the expert committee on the review of data on atmospheric fallout arising from British nuclear tests in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terms of reference of the committee were to review the published scientific literature and other relevant scientific data on the short and long-term effects of fallout arising from British nuclear tests in Australia; to comment on the adequacy of the data available and the collection methodology; to assess the fallout levels arising from each of the tests, the immediate and subsequent hazards from the fallout to the Australian population and individual Australians, including Australian personnel involved and aborigines in South Australia, and the adequacy of the criteria for safe firing of each of the tests. A comparison is made of radiation protection standards adopted during the nuclear test period with current standards. The recommendations include the setting up of a public inquiry to determine how the conduct and consequences of the British nuclear tests affected the health and well-being of Australians

  7. Estimation of beta-ray skin dose from exposure to fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta-ray skin dose due to the fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb is potentially related to the epilation in the black rain area. The absorbed dose to the skin from beta-rays emitted by fission fallout has been estimated for an initial 137Cs deposition of 1 kBq m-2 on the ground at 0.5 h after the explosion. The estimated skin dose takes into account both external exposure from fission fallout radionuclides uniformly distributed in 1 mm of soil on the surface of the ground and from a 26 μm thickness of contaminated soil on the skin, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. The cumulative skin dose for 1 month after the explosion is taken as the representative value. The estimated skin dose for an initial 137Cs deposition of 1 kBq m-2 was determined to be about 500 mSv. (authors)

  8. The isotopic signature of fallout plutonium in the North Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium analyses of a dated coral record from the French Frigate Shoals in the central North Pacific indicate that there are two major sources of Pu in this basin: close-in (tropospheric) fallout from nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands in the 1950s and global (stratospheric) fallout which peaked in 1962. Furthermore, the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio of fallout from the Pacific Proving Grounds is characteristically higher (0.24) than that of global fallout Pu (0.18-0.19). Seawater and sediment samples from the North Pacific exhibit a wide range of 240Pu/239Pu values (0.19-0.34), with a trend towards higher ratios in the subsurface waters and sediment. Deep water 240Pu/239Pu ratios are higher in the vicinity of the Marshall Islands relative to stations further from this close-in fallout source. These preliminary data suggest that fallout Pu from the Pacific Proving Grounds is more rapidly removed from the surface waters than is global fallout Pu. Plutonium geochemistry appears to be related to the physical/chemical form of Pu-bearing particles generated by different fallout sources. (author)

  9. Development of a United States-Mexico Emissions Inventory for the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Hampden; Knipping, Eladio M; Vukovich, Jeffrey M

    2005-05-01

    The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study was commissioned to investigate the sources of haze at Big Bend National Park in southwest Texas. The modeling domain of the BRAVO Study includes most of the continental United States and Mexico. The BRAVO emissions inventory was constructed from the 1999 National Emission Inventory for the United States, modified to include finer-resolution data for Texas and 13 U.S. states in close proximity. The first regional-scale Mexican emissions inventory designed for air-quality modeling applications was developed for 10 northern Mexican states, the Tula Industrial Park in the state of Hidalgo, and the Popocatépetl volcano in the state of Puebla. Emissions data were compiled from numerous sources, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission (now Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), the Eastern Research Group, the Minerals Management Service, the Instituto Nacional de Ecología, and the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografía y Informática. The inventory includes emissions for CO, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, particulate matter (PM) gridded emissions fields for use with the Regional Modeling System for Aerosols and Deposition (REMSAD) and the Community Multiscale Air Quality model modified with the Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution (CMAQ-MADRID). The compilation of the inventory, supporting model input data, and issues encountered during the development of the inventory are documented. A comparison of the BRAVO emissions inventory for Mexico with other emerging Mexican emission inventories illustrates their uncertainty. PMID:15991676

  10. Knowledge about useful entomofauna in the county of La Purísima Palmar de Bravo, Puebla State, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    D. H. Zetina; Maria del S. Cuevas Correa; Javier García-Figueroa; José M. Pino; Julieta Ramos-Elorduy; Eraldo M. Costa Neto

    2007-01-01

    Eighteen species of edible insects belonging to 15 families of six orders of Insecta were recorded in the county of La Purísima Palmar de Bravo in Puebla State, Mexico. They had the following taxonomic distribution among the different families: Lygaeidae, Pentatomidae, Membracidae, Cercopidae, Psocidae, Melolonthidae, Curculionidae, Cossidae, Megathymidae, Pyralidae, Geometridae and Apidae, all with a single recorded species; the families Acrididae, Formicidae and Vespidae with two species in...

  11. Trends in childhood leukaemia in the Nordic countries in relation to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    OpenAIRE

    Darby, S. C.; Olsen, J. H.; Doll, R.; Thakrar, B.; Brown, P. D.; Storm, H H; Barlow, L.; Langmark, F.; Teppo, L; H. Tulinius

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To obtain further information about the risks of childhood leukaemia after exposure to ionising radiation at low doses and low dose rates before or after birth or to the father's testes shortly before conception. DESIGN--Observational study of trends in incidence of childhood leukaemia in relation to estimated radiation exposures due to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing during the 1950s and 1960s. SETTING--Nordic countries. SUBJECTS--Children aged under 15 years. MAI...

  12. Measurements of atmospheric fallout in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose of studying the radioactive fallout present in Argentina from atmospheric nuclear explosions tests that have been conducted recently, an environmental monitoring program, outside the influence of nuclear facilities of Argentina, was undertaken during 1996 and 1997. The levels of Cs-137 and Sr-90 were analysed in samples of air, deposited material (rainwater), milk, an average meal of a standard man and food. During this period, a total of 630 radiochemical analysis were performed on 325 samples of the different matrices described. The concentration levels of the radionuclides analysed in the different environmental matrices are presented and are compared with the values obtained in the environmental monitoring program done during the period 1960-1981. (author)

  13. Nuclear fallout in the Irish terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the transport mechanisms of pollutants from weapons detonation sites and reactor installations are reviewed. Secondary contamination processes such as sea-to-land transfer are also examined and a comprehensive literature survey of research relating to fission and neutron activation products such as 90Sr, 134Cs, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Pu and 241Am in the Global terrestrial environment is detailed. The deposition patterns of a wide range of fallout radionuclides throughout the terrestrial environment of Ireland have been examined in detail for the first time. Particular attention has been paid to the impact of (a) atmospheric nuclear weapons testing mainly carried out in the 1950s and 1960s and (b) the Chernobyl accident which occurred in April 1986. To this end a number of separate soil sampling programmes were carried out with the specific objectives of determining: (i) the geographical and vertical distribution of nuclear fallout in the Irish terrestrial environment, (ii) the contribution of Chernobyl deposition to the integrated total of selected nuclides, (iii) correlations, if any, with a number of environmental parameters, (iv) the possible existence of a radionuclide sea-to-land transfer effect along the north-east coast of Ireland and (v) the degree of spatial variability of radiometric measurements in a relatively localised and arbitrarily chosen area. The principal radionuclides studied included 134Cs, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am and 90Sr, and required the application of a range of high sensitivity radiochemical and radiometric techniques. (author)

  14. Impact of the Chernobyl fallout in the alpine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Austria the alpine regions received the highest fallout contamination, showing a very inhomogeneous spatial distribution of the surface deposition. About half of the national territory is within alpine regions, which are very different in times of underlying bedrock and soil characteristic. Since this is the controlling factor for the radionuclide uptake of the vegetation, it is crucial for the long-term effects of radioactive fallout. Different studies have been carried out in the Province of Salzburg (area: 7154 km2) over the past ten years, addressing a broad spectrum of issues, such as: measurement of the spatial distribution of the fallout, research in monitoring techniques comparison of theoretical calculations with actual in vivo-measurements of nuclide uptake by man for different population groups, and the investigation of biological effects. When considering the radioecological effects of the Chernobyl fallout a distinction has to be made between the short-term effects immediately following the fallout and the long-term effects. While the short term effects are controlled by the physical characteristics of the fallout, similar for the whole region, the long-term effects are more determined by the radioecological properties of the environments affected which are much more variable than the fallout-characteristics

  15. Mapping of caesium fallout from the Chernobyl accident in the Jotunheimen area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranwal, Vikas C.; Ofstad, Frode; Roenning, Jan S.; Watson, Robin J.

    2011-07-01

    As a consequence of the Chernobyl accident, several areas in Norway received radioactive fallout. One of these areas is the eastern part of Jotunheimen in central Norway. Immediately after the accident in 1986, the Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) performed airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy in central Norway. At that time, it was not possible to calculate reliable radionuclide concentrations, and the data were presented as total counts per second. Several man-made radionuclides were present in the initial fallout, but due to short half-lives, most of these have now disintegrated into stable isotopes. 137Cs, with a half-life of 11.000 days ({approx} 30 years) is still present in the environment in significant quantities, leading to high radioactivity levels in meat from reindeer and sheep. To obtain a detailed map of the caesium fallout concentration in Jotunheimen, an airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) survey was carried out, focussing on reindeer grazing areas. This project was a cooperation between Reindeer Husbandry Administration, Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Geological Survey of Norway. (auth)

  16. KFM: a homemade yet accurate and dependable fallout meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of +-25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM are presented. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM

  17. Composition of pectic polysaccharides in a Portuguese apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv Bravo de Esmolfe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana S. Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Malus domestica Borkh. cv Bravo de Esmolfe is a typical Portuguese apple cultivar classified as Protected Designation and Origin (PDO. It is a traditional product produced under strict conditions and labelled with a specific law protected designation. This cultivar presents quite good sweetness and flavor. The monosaccharide composition of the pectic polysaccharides from this traditional apple is herein reported for the first time. Based on the molar ratios obtained from the sugar composition, the presumable pectin structure could be inferred. The cell-wall polysaccharides present in the alcohol-insoluble residue (AIR of unpeeled BE apple were sequentially fractionated. In addition, pectic material was also extracted by citric acid treatment prior to heat extraction at acidic pH. The water soluble pectin, imidazole soluble pectin and sodium carbonate soluble pectin account for 44, 16 and 40 % of the AIR, respectively. The pectic polysaccharides extracted in the presence of citric acid had lower galacturonic acid content and higher neutral sugars content. The homogalacturonan (HG and less-substituted rhamnogalacturonan (RG domains are extracted first. Pectin treated with citric acid has been shown to contain more substituted polymers, especially RG-I. In addition, the relatively higher Xylose/Galacturonic acid ratio found in the citric acid extract demonstrates that the xylogalacturonan (XG domain presumably is present in the pectic material of the unpeeled BE apple.

  18. Infiltration in unsaturated layered fluvial deposits at Rio Bravo : photo essay and data summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, James Robert; Glass, Robert John, Jr.

    2007-08-01

    An infiltration and dye transport experiment was conducted to visualize flow and transport processes in a heterogeneous, layered, sandy-gravelly fluvial deposit adjacent to Rio Bravo Boulevard in Albuquerque, NM. Water containing red dye followed by blue-green dye was ponded in a small horizontal zone ({approx}0.5 m x 0.5 m) above a vertical outcrop ({approx}4 m x 2.5 m). The red dye lagged behind the wetting front due to slight adsorption thus allowing both the wetting front and dye fronts to be observed in time at the outcrop face. After infiltration, vertical slices were excavated to the midpoint of the infiltrometer exposing the wetting front and dye distribution in a quasi three-dimensional manner. At small-scale, wetting front advancement was influenced by the multitude of local capillary barriers within the deposit. However at the scale of the experiment, the wetting front appeared smooth with significant lateral spreading {approx} twice that in the vertical, indicating a strong anisotropy due to the pronounced horizontal layering. The dye fronts exhibited appreciably more irregularity than the wetting front, as well as the influence of preferential flow features (a fracture) that moved the dye directly to the front, bypassing the fresh water between.

  19. Trees as Filters of Radioactive Fallout from the Chernobyl Accident

    CERN Document Server

    Brownridge, James D

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a copy of an unpublished study of the filtering effect of red maple trees (acer rubrum) on fission product fallout near Binghamton, NY, USA following the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The conclusions of this work may offer some insight into what is happening in the forests exposed to fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident. This posting is in memory of Noel K. Yeh.

  20. Chernobyl fallout in small mammals captured in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out aimed at studying the contamination of small mammals (orders Rodentia and Insectivora) following the Chernobyl fallout. The animals were captured in three differently contaminated areas and, for control, in an area with negligible fallout. The results obtained show that the activity in the captured animals varied and depended on surface deposition. The differences between the species are investigated and the influence of feeding habits on the contamination levels are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Development of the town data base: Estimates of exposure rates and times of fallout arrival near the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project, the time of fallout arrival and the H+12 exposure rate were estimated for populated locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah that were affected by fallout from one or more nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of exposure rate were derived from measured values recorded before and after each test by fallout monitors in the field. The estimate for a given location was obtained by retrieving from a data base all measurements made in the vicinity, decay-correcting them to H+12, and calculating an average. Estimates were also derived from maps produced after most events that show isopleths of exposure rate and time of fallout arrival. Both sets of isopleths on these maps were digitized, and kriging was used to interpolate values at the nodes of a 10-km grid covering the pattern. The values at any location within the grid were then estimated from the values at the surrounding grid nodes. Estimates of dispersion (standard deviation) were also calculated. The Town Data Base contains the estimates for all combinations of location and nuclear event for which the estimated mean H+12 exposure rate was greater than three times background. A listing of the data base is included as an appendix. The information was used by other project task groups to estimate the radiation dose that off-site populations and individuals may have received as a result of exposure to fallout from Nevada nuclear tests

  2. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site Fallout: Internal dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a avery few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. 131I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (<3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided

  3. Fallout Concentration Various Environmental Samples in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The testing of nuclear weapons have been carried out by the advanced countries, such as United States, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, France, China, India and Pakistan, since about 1945 until 1998. Nuclear weapons tests were conducted at various locations, on and above the earth's surface or underground or on and under the ocean's surface. Nuclear explosions caused the radionuclides of fission product, such as 131l, 89Sr, 90Sr, 134Cs, 137Cs, and 239Pu released to the atmospheric layer. In the atmospheric layer, the long-lived radionuclides, i.e, 90Sr dan 137Cs will be distributed into the environment as the fallout radionuclides, and deposited in the various environmental samples (soil, water, and biota). In general, at several locations in Indonesia the 90Sr and 137Cs in the various environmental samples still can be detected. The data of measurement results of 90Sr and 137Cs concentrations were generally lower than that from some countries in the northern hemisphere. (author)

  4. Radioactive fallout in air and rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of atmospheric dust and rainwater have been collected from the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Results are presented of analyses of these samples for various fission products and certain other radionuclides. The average concentrations of long-lived fission products in air and rain in the United Kingdom in 1977 were about double those in 1976 and about 2% of the maximum which was reached in 1963-64. A similar rise occurred between 1973 and 1974. Despite such fluctuations the general trend is of slowly decreasing concentrations. Plutonium concentrations in air at Chilton are discussed for the years 1954-1977 and generally follow the pattern of long-lived fission products. Barium-140 and iodine-131 indicative of a recent atmospheric test were detected in air and rain in the United Kingdom after the low yield Chinese explosion of 17 September 1977. Iodine-131 ceased to be detectable by mid-October and barium-140 by December 1977. In the southern hemisphere the mean concentration of caesium-137 in air in 1977 was about two-thirds that in 1976. An estimate is made of the worldwide deposit of caesium-137 and strontium-90 which, in 1976, was the lowest since measurements were started in 1955. The gamma and beta-ray dose rates from fallout at Chilton are estimated from the observed deposition. Measurements of short-lived fission products in air and rain are given in an Appendix. (author)

  5. Estimates of fallout in the continental U.S. from Nevada weapons testing based on gummed-film monitoring data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During periods of weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) between 1951 and 1958, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) monitored daily fallout at about 100 sites in the U.S. using gummed-film collectors. These gummed-film data represent the only comprehensive set of actual measurements of fallout during this period for areas outside the immediate vicinity of the NTS. The measured beta activities originally reported by EML have been reviewed and reevaluated. This reevaluation corrected a number of errors in the original data set and allowed fairly accurate estimates to be made of specific radionuclide depositions from individual NTS shots. Estimates of the geographical and temporal variations in cumulative 137Cs and 131I depositions from all NTS shots through 1957 are presented, as well as estimates of the relative impact of particular shots and test series. The revised gummed-film estimates of total NTS fallout depositions are compared with estimates based on contemporary and historical soil sample analyses. These reevaluated gummed-film fallout deposition estimates are being extensively utilized in a number of ongoing programs to reconstruct the radiation exposure of the U.S. population from Nevada weapons testing

  6. Toxoplasma antibodies and retinochoroiditis in the Marshall Islands and their association with exposure to radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly universal serologic evidence of Toxoplasma gondii infection was found to have occurred by adulthood in 517 Marshallese tested in 1981-1982. The prevalence and incidence of retinal lesions compatible with toxoplasmosis were 3.9% and 273 cases/year/100,000 seropositive persons, respectively, thus indicating a significant public health problem. Seronegativity was significantly more common in a subgroup of Marshallese that had received 110-190 rads of total-body gamma radiation as a consequence of accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. Despite this finding there was no evidence of an increase in clinically significant lesions in exposed persons

  7. Early detection of radioactive fall-out by gamma-spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, K.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive fallout should be detected as early as possible. A new and efficient method for detection of low-level irradiation from manmade radioactivity is developed. Radiation abnormalities are detectable down to air kerma rate, of 0.5 to 1.0 nGy h(-1) for Cs-137 and even lower for I-131...... For multi-gamma energy radioactivity the detection level is 2.6-3.5 nGy h(-1). A standard NaI detector and a 512-channel analyser are used together with noise adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD). Statistical noise is removed and the measured spectra are reproduced using spectral components...

  8. Long-Term Consequences of Radioactive Fallout From Conflicts Involving Nuclear Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, S. L.; Bouville, A.

    2006-12-01

    This presentation will summarize past exposures of the public to radioactive fallout from nuclear testing and extrapolate to the possible fallout-related consequences from detonation of multiple warheads that might accompany international conflicts. Long-term consequences could be of three distinct types: (1) the abandonment of living areas that might be heavily contaminated; (2) the necessity to curtail use of particular agricultural products and foods, and (3) life-shortening due to increased rates of cancer and possibly some non-cancer diseases among the exposed populations. While the actual health and economic impact on the surviving public after such conflicts could vary tremendously depending on the number and sizes of explosions (fission yields), height of detonations, and the public's proximity to explosion sites, it is clear that multiple detonations would disperse radioactive products over large geographic areas. Our understanding of radioactive fallout is based on studies carried out for more than five decades on weapons testing fallout that originated from sites worldwide including Nevada, the Soviet Union, four locations in the Pacific, and elsewhere. Those studies have led to an understanding of the composition of radioactive fallout, of its radioactive qualities, and of its capacity to contaminate ground and agricultural products, as well as dwellings and workplaces located from a few km to tens of thousands of km from the explosion site. Though the most severe individual health consequences from exposure to fallout would most likely develop relatively close to the detonation sites (within a few hundred km), wide geographic distribution of fallout, well beyond the borders of the nations involved in the conflict, would affect much larger populations and would likely cause elevated cancer rates and cancer-related deaths among them for many decades following. While acute radiation symptoms (and even death) can result from very high short-term exposures

  9. Gamma-ray thermoluminescence measurements: a record of fallout deposition in Hiroshima?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D

    2012-05-01

    In certain Hiroshima neighborhoods, radiation measurements using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) exceed what can be explained by the initial gamma-ray doses and uncertainties from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). This problem was not previously recognized as being isolated to certain parts of that city. The ratio between TLD measurements and DS02 dose calculations for gamma rays appear to grow larger than unity up to more than three with increasing ground range, but closer examination shows the excess TLD dose (0.1, 0.2, or possibly up to 0.8 Gray) is correlated with certain neighborhoods and could be due to radioactive fallout. At Nagasaki, the TLD measurements do not show this same excess, probably because there were no TLD measurements taken more than 800 m downwind (eastward) from the Nagasaki hypocenter, so that any small excess TLD dose was masked by larger initial gamma-ray doses of 25-80 Gray in the few downwind samples. The DS02 Report had noted many measurements lower than the DS02 calculation for several Nagasaki TLD samples, independent of ground range. This was explained as being the result of previously unaccounted urban shielding which was observed from Nagasaki pre-bomb aerial photos. However, the Hiroshima excess TLD dose issue was not resolved. If the excess TLD doses at Hiroshima are an indication of fallout, it may be possible to use additional TLD studies to make better estimates of the locations and radiation doses to survivors from the fallout after the bombings at both cities. PMID:22421931

  10. a Review of Late Holocene Fluvial Systems in the Karst Maya Lowlands with Focus on the Rio Bravo, Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, T.; Luzzadder-Beach, S.; Krause, S.; Doyle, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Maya Lowlands is mostly an internally draining karst region with about 400 m of regional relief. Fluvial and fluviokarst systems drain the edges of this landscape either from low limestone uplands or igneous and metamorphic complexes. Thus far most fluvial research has focused around archaeology projects, and here we review the extant research conducted across the region and new research on the transboundary Rio Bravo watershed of Belize and Guatemala. The Rio Bravo drains a largely old growth tropical forest today, but was partly deforested around ancient Maya cities and farms from 3,000 to 1000 BP. Several studies estimate that 30 to 40 percent of forest survived through the Maya period. Work here has focused on soils and sediment movement along slope catenas, in floodplain sites, and on contributions from groundwater with high dissolved loads of sulfate and calcium. We review radiocarbon dates and present new dates and soil stratigraphy from these sequences to date slope and floodplain movement, and we estimate ancient land use from carbon isotopic and pollen evidence. Aggradation in this watershed occurred by flooding, gypsum precipitation, upland erosion, and ancient Maya canal building and filling for wetland farming. Soil erosion and aggradation started at least by 3,000 BP and continued through the ancient Maya period, though reduced locally by soil conservation, post urban construction, and source reduction, especially in Maya Classic period from 1700 to 1000 BP.

  11. Socialisation et dépendance. Théories de l’impérialisme chez Luciano Ferrari Bravo et Giovanni Arrighi

    OpenAIRE

    Melegari, Diego

    2016-01-01

    L’article compare les positions de Luciano Ferrari Bravo et Giovanni Arrighi à la fin des années 1970, notamment en ce qui concerne la théorie de l’impérialisme et la relation théorie-politique.

  12. Fallout Radioactivity in Some Egyptian Lakes Bottom Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the Egyptian environmental radioactivity monitoring program, the fallout radioactivity levels in Qarun, Bardawill and Ed ku lakes bottom sediments have been measured. The specific activities of 137Cs were measured using gamma ray spectrometer based on Hyper pure germanium detector. The specific activities of plutonium isotopes(238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Pu) were measured using alpha spectrometry based on surface battier detectors and liquid scintillation spectrometry after radiochemical separation. The activity ratios 239+240Pu/137Cs, 239+240Pu/241Pu, and 238Pu/ 239+240Pu were calculated. The results seemed to confirm that fallout radioactivity is mainly due to nuclear weapons testing fallout

  13. Water Management for Competing Uses: Environmental Flows in the Transboundary Rio Grande/Rio Bravo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Solis, S.; McKinney, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction Due to high water demand, the scarcity of water, and the complexity of water allocation, environmental flows have not been considered as an integral part of the water management in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo transboundary basin. The Big Bend reach is located between the cities of Presidio/Ojinaga to Amistad international reservoir, along the main stream (Fig. 1). Important environmental habitats such as the Big Bend National and State Park in the U.S., the Maderas del Carmen, Cañon de Santa Elena and Ocampo natural reserved areas in Mexico are ecologically threatened because of the lack of environmental water management policies. Several efforts have been undertaken by scientists, government agencies and NGOs to determine the environmental flows for this reach and water management policies that can provide these flows. Objective The objective of this research is to describe a water management policy that can conciliate environmental and human water uses in the Big Bend region. In other words, define a policy that can provide environmental flows without harming water supply for stakeholders or increasing flood risk, within legal and physical constraints of the system. Methodology First, the system was characterized identifying water users, hydraulic infrastructure, and water allocation according to state, federal and international regulations. Second, a hydrograph for environmental flows was proposed that mimics the hydrologic characteristics of the prior dam alteration. Third, a water planning model was constructed to evaluate alternative policies. Fourth, the water management is proposed to provide environmental restoration flows from Luis L. Leon reservoir. This policy considers mechanisms that reduce flooding and drought risks, while meting national and international water regulations. Results Three types of natural flow regimes are considered: (1) median flows aimed to provide the base flow in the region, (2) high flows to provide transversal

  14. Cooperation on Climate Services in the Binational Rio Grande/Bravo Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfin, G. M.; Shafer, M. A.; Brown, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Rio Grande/Bravo River Basin (RGB) of the United States and México is exposed to tornadoes, severe storms, hurricanes, winter storms, wildfire, and drought. The combination of these weather and climate-related hazards has resulted in impacts, such as wildfire, crop loss, water supply reduction, and flooding, with exceedingly high economic costs ($13 billion in 2011). In order to contribute to increased binational information flow and knowledge exchange in the region, we have developed a prototype quarterly bilingual RGB Climate Outlook, in PDF, supplemented by Twitter messages and Facebook posts. The goal of the project is to improve coordination between institutions in the U.S. and Mexico, increase awareness about climate variations, their impacts and costs to society, and build capacity for enhanced hazard preparedness. The RGB Outlook features a synthesis of climate products, impact data and analysis, is expressed in user-friendly language, and relies substantially on visual communication in contrast to text. The RGB Outlook is co-produced with colleagues in the U.S. and Mexico, in conjunction with the North American Climate Services Partnership (NACSP) and NOAA's regional climate services program. NACSP is a tri-national initiative to develop and deliver drought-based climate services in order to assist water resource managers, agricultural interests, and other constituents as they prepare for future drought events and build capacity to respond to other climate extremes. The RGB Climate Outlook builds on lessons learned from the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) Southwest Climate Outlook (PDF, html), La Niña Drought Tracker (PDF, html), the Southern Climate Impacts Policy Program (SCIPP) Managing Drought in the Southern Plains webinar series, the Border Climate Summary (PDF), and Transborder Climate newsletter (PDF) and webinar series. The latter two have been the only regularly occurring bilingual climate information products in the U

  15. Transfer of fallout tritium from environment to human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large quntity of tritium will be used as a fuel of nuclear fusion in the future. It is, therefore, considered important to elucidate tritium behavior present in the environment and the process of tritium transfer from the environment to the human body. Fallout tritium is an applicable material in searching for the long term behavior of tritium in the environment. This paper focuses on the American, Italian, Japanese literature concerning fallout tritium in food and in the human body. The specific activity ratio of bound to free tritium poses an important problem. The mechanism of biological concentration must await further studies. (N.K.) 63 refs

  16. A survey of radioactive fallout data in Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable attention has been directed by the scientific community to assessing the levels and fate of radionuclides in Arctic ecosystems. The following text and tables present available data and discussion of radionuclide fallout in Alaska. A literature search of 23 on-line databases (Table 1) using Alaska, Strontium (Sr), Cesium (Cs), Plutonium (Pu) and Radionuclide as constraint terms responded with 177 possible citations. After eliminating duplicate citations, 31 articles were available: 17 were relevant to the subject matter; the remainder addressed geologic issues. All of the cited literature addressed 137Cs, 90Sr and 239,240Pu as a result of radionuclide fallout from nuclear testing or accidental release

  17. Radioactive fallout over South Africa during 1974-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUCOR is routinely monitoring air and rainwater for radioactive fallout from atmospheric sources. Air humidity is continuously collected and analysed for tritium. Milk samples are obtained from a number of places throughout the country. These samples are analysed to detect timeously any build-up of radionuclides in soil and plants. Only a few atmosperic nuclear tests have been conducted (by China) since the previous report period of 1965 to 1973. The fallout from these sources over South Africa is extremely small and it is mainly cosmogenic radioactivity, viz 3H and 7Be, that is detected

  18. Interception and retention of Chernobyl fallout by forage grasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of perennial forage crops from experimental plots set up for field performance were utilized to assess fallout retention in the six weeks following the Chernobyl reactor accident. In the study, plant density and the concentration of Cs-137, Ru-106, and Sb-125 were determined in the four cultivars from 8th May to 17th June, 1986. The obtained results indicate that in the event of a nuclear reactor failure for a short deposition time of fallout particles on pasture during normal plant growth the activity of Cs, Ru, and Sb would decrease by 50% about 10 days following the end of radionuclide deposition. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  19. How the fallout from Chernobyl was detected and measured in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial observations of the Chernobyl fallout in Sweden and Norway are described. Characterization and mapping of the fallout are given. Improving of reactor accident consequence modelling is treated

  20. Sediment core record of global fallout and Bikini close-in fallout Pu in Sagami Bay, Western Northwest Pacific margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2004-07-01

    The total 239-240Pu activity and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio in the sediments in Sagami Bay of the western Northwest Pacific margin were investigated using ICP-MS with a shield torch system. 239+240Pu inventories in the examined sediment cores were found to be much higher than those predicted from atmospheric global fallout (42 MBq/km2) at the same latitude. In addition, elevated 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios ranging from 0.22 to 0.28 were observed in the sediment samples. On the basis of the vertical profiles of 239+240Pu and characterized 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in a sediment core collected in the center of Sagami Bay, we identified two distinct sources of fallout Pu in the bay: the global stratospheric fallout with characteristic 240Pu/239Pu ratio of 0.18 and the transported close-in fallout derived from Bikini and Enewetak surface nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s. We propose that the Pu transportation was mainly due to oceanic processes (for example, through the North Equatorial Current and the Kuroshio Current). Using a two fallout end-member model, we find that the contribution of Bikini close-in fallout Pu ranged from 44 to 59% in Sagami Bay sediments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that Pu contamination, which originated from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s, has extended westwards as far as the Japanese coast. PMID:15296298

  1. Behaviour of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides deposited on peat and urban surfaces in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the thesis the impact of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on Finland was studied in three aspects: (1) the areal distribution of Chernobyl fallout in Finland was determined by measuring peat samples, (2) the behaviour of fallout radionuclides was investigated in the combustion of peat in power plants, and (3) the removal rates of fallout radionuclides on urban surfaces were resolved

  2. Radioactive fallout in the southern hemisphere from nuclear weapons tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallout in the southern hemisphere, and its origins in the national programs of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in both hemispheres, are reviewed. Of the 390 nuclear tests conducted in the atmosphere to date, 53 were carried out in the southern hemisphere and it is the second phase of these, between 1966 and 1974, that is seen to have been responsible for the main fallout of short-lived fission products in the southern hemisphere. In contrast to this, the programs of atmospheric nuclear testing in the northern hemisphere up to 1962 are shown to have been the main source of long-lived fission products in fallout in the southern hemisphere. The course followed by this contamination through the environment of the southern hemisphere is traced for the national programs of nuclear testing after 1962 taken separately (France, China) and for the earlier national programs taken together (U.S.S.R., U.S.A. and U.K.). The impact on populations in the southern hemisphere of fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests to date is assessed

  3. Predicted erosion and sediment delivery of fallout plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erosion estimates calculated with the Universal Soil Loss Equation as a part of USDA's 1977 National Resources Inventory were used to estimate delivery of fallout plutonium in several major river basins. Erosion will slowly remove the plutonium, but deposition will leave about 90 percent of the plutonium on the landscape for very long times

  4. Local fall-out and the animal food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local consequences of fresh fall-out, especially in the case of atmospheric nuclear explosions, are reviewed from the point of view of the internal contamination of the consumer of foodstuffs of animal origin. The edibility of foodstuffs derived from animals having grazed in the presence of fall-out is evaluated both from the wholesome and radio-toxicological points of view. The contamination level of these foodstuffs is calculated as a function of the ground fall-out, and of agronomical and ecological parameters for each radio-nuclide of the animal food chain. The internal exposure of the human consumer is calculated from this level as a function of the diet and of various parameters especially temporal. The equivalent dose to each critical organ, including the digestive tract is deduced from the burdens of each organ. From this a nutritional hygiene in the areas affected by fall-out is obtained, in relationship to the action levels fixed by the responsible authorities in exceptional circumstances. Criteria for these action levels are given as function of the food rations. (authors)

  5. Dynamic Monitoring of Cleanroom Fallout Using an Air Particle Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Radford

    2011-01-01

    The particle fallout limitations and periodic allocations for the James Webb Space Telescope are very stringent. Standard prediction methods are complicated by non-linearity and monitoring methods that are insufficiently responsive. A method for dynamically predicting the particle fallout in a cleanroom using air particle counter data was determined by numerical correlation. This method provides a simple linear correlation to both time and air quality, which can be monitored in real time. The summation of effects provides the program better understanding of the cleanliness and assists in the planning of future activities. Definition of fallout rates within a cleanroom during assembly and integration of contamination-sensitive hardware, such as the James Webb Space Telescope, is essential for budgeting purposes. Balancing the activity levels for assembly and test with the particle accumulation rate is paramount. The current approach to predicting particle fallout in a cleanroom assumes a constant air quality based on the rated class of a cleanroom, with adjustments for projected work or exposure times. Actual cleanroom class can also depend on the number of personnel present and the type of activities. A linear correlation of air quality and normalized particle fallout was determined numerically. An air particle counter (standard cleanroom equipment) can be used to monitor the air quality on a real-time basis and determine the "class" of the cleanroom (per FED-STD-209 or ISO-14644). The correlation function provides an area coverage coefficient per class-hour of exposure. The prediction of particle accumulations provides scheduling inputs for activity levels and cleanroom class requirements.

  6. Knowledge about useful entomofauna in the county of La Purísima Palmar de Bravo, Puebla State, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Zetina

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen species of edible insects belonging to 15 families of six orders of Insecta were recorded in the county of La Purísima Palmar de Bravo in Puebla State, Mexico. They had the following taxonomic distribution among the different families: Lygaeidae, Pentatomidae, Membracidae, Cercopidae, Psocidae, Melolonthidae, Curculionidae, Cossidae, Megathymidae, Pyralidae, Geometridae and Apidae, all with a single recorded species; the families Acrididae, Formicidae and Vespidae with two species in each family. The latter were the most abundant families, and Hymenoptera was the most salient order with five species. Three species were reported as new registers of edible insects for Mexico and also for the world. The nutritive value of insects in terms of macro and micronutrients is discussed.

  7. Monitorização do coelho-bravo na Reserva Natural da Serra da Malcata : 1998-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Paula, Anabela Salvado

    2007-01-01

    O Coelho-bravo, Oryctolagus cuniculus, é uma espécie chave nos ecossistemas mediterrâneos ibéricos, desempenhando uma multiplicidade de papéis na dinâmica dos mesmos, dos quais de destaca o facto de ser principal “espécie presa” de um largo espectro de predadores, como por exemplo o Lince-ibérico e a Águia-imperial, e ser uma das principais espécies cinegéticas em Portugal. Na Reserva Natural da Serra da Malcata – RNSM, as suas populações têm sofrido um acentuado declínio, r...

  8. La ficción narrativa de la frontera: El río Bravo en tres novelas mexicanas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pardo Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El territorio a ambos lados del río Bravo es un espacio de confluencia y memoria compartida, pero al mismo tiempo de divergencias en el modo de entender el mundo, y por tanto, de escribirlo. El espacio cultural, además de las lenguas y su uso, no se encuentran restringidos por los límites políticos o económicos. Este trabajo pretende aproximarse a esta relación, a esta compleja concepción del río como ruptura y paso obligado, el modo de vivirlo o ignorarlo, y las relaciones de diálogo posible o imposible entre los sujetos culturales que desarrollan la escritura en una geografía escindida.

  9. Thermoluminescence measurements of gamma-ray doses attributable to fallout from the Nevada test site using building bricks as natural dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 1950's, the U.S. Government conducted an intensive atmospheric nuclear testing program in Nevada. Fallout from these atmospheric tests was measured throughout the U.S. with some of the heaviest concentrations to populated areas falling east of the test site in Washington County, UT. External exposures from 6.5 x 10-4 C kg-1 to 26 x 10-4 C kg-1 (2.5-5.0 R) were reported for this region. This study provides an independent measurement of fallout radiation doses to selected communities in Utah using a thermoluminescence technique originally developed for the dating of ancient pottery. The application of the predose thermoluminescence technique to fallout dosimetry is described. A mean dose of 38 ± 15 mGy (4.4 ± 1.7 R), attributed to fallout radiation, was measured in quartz grains extracted from the outer centimeter of bricks removed from six communities in Washington and Kane Counties in Utah. 48 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Thermoluminescence measurements of gamma-ray doses attributable to fallout from the Nevada test site using building bricks as natural dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, E H; Bailiff, I K; Kenner, G H; Kaipa, P L; Wrenn, M E

    1994-04-01

    During the 1950's, the U.S. Government conducted an intensive atmospheric nuclear testing program in Nevada. Fallout from these atmospheric tests was measured throughout the U.S. with some of the heaviest concentrations to populated areas falling east of the test site in Washington County, UT. External exposures from 6.5 x 10(-4) C kg-1 to 26 x 10(-4) C kg-1 (2.5-5.0 R) were reported for this region. This study provides an independent measurement of fallout radiation doses to selected communities in Utah using a thermoluminescence technique originally developed for the dating of ancient pottery. The application of the predose thermoluminescence technique to fallout dosimetry is described. A mean dose of 38 +/- 15 mGy (4.4 +/- 1.7 R), attributed to fallout radiation, was measured in quartz grains extracted from the outer centimeter of bricks removed from six communities in Washington and Kane Counties in Utah. PMID:8138403

  11. Noble gases preserve history of retentive continental crust in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Smye, Andrew J.; Jordan, Jacob S.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-06-01

    Budgets of 4He and 40Ar provide constraints on the chemical evolution of the solid Earth and atmosphere. Although continental crust accounts for the majority of 4He and 40Ar degassed from the Earth, degassing mechanisms are subject to scholarly debate. Here we provide a constraint on crustal degassing by comparing the noble gases accumulated in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir, New Mexico USA, with the radiogenic production in the underlying crust. A detailed geological model of the reservoir is used to provide absolute abundances and geostatistical uncertainty of 4He, 40Ar, 21Ne, 20Ne, 36Ar, and 84Kr. The present-day production rate of crustal radiogenic 4He and 40Ar, henceforth referred to as 4He* and 40Ar*, is estimated using the basement composition, surface and mantle heat flow, and seismic estimates of crustal density. After subtracting mantle and atmospheric contributions, the reservoir contains less than 0.02% of the radiogenic production in the underlying crust. This shows unequivocally that radiogenic noble gases are effectively retained in cratonic continental crust over millennial timescales. This also requires that approximately 1.5 Gt of mantle derived CO2 migrated through the crust without mobilizing the crustally accumulated gases. This observation suggests transport along a localized fracture network. Therefore, the retention of noble gases in stable crystalline continental crust allows shallow accumulations of radiogenic gases to record tectonic history. At Bravo Dome, the crustal 4He*/40Ar* ratio is one fifth of the expected crustal production ratio, recording the preferential release of 4He during the Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny, 300 Ma.

  12. Basic material for working out recommendations to farmers in case of a nuclear energy accident. After an alert, but before the deposition of radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce the vulnerability and the consequences of a nuclear accident in agriculture, certain measures can be taken already before a fallout has occurred. The risk scenario is that a radioactive release has taken place and that radioactive clouds can be expected to reach agricultural areas in Sweden, but as yet there has been no fallout. Countermeasures can be taken before fallout. The meteorological conditions are of vital importance for the development. The objective of this report is to suggest proper measures which can be taken before a fallout has occurred in order to reduce the radiation dose to people and animals. If this succeeds it could mean considerable savings for both society and the individual farmers. The threat is of different importance depending on the season of expected fallout. The measures and the recommendations are divided into general and specific. The specific measures deals with six occasions of crop development. In an acute threat situation the best recommendation would be to prepare a quick harvest of fodder for the animals or a quick crop harvest. The aim for grass crops is to avoid contamination of the first grass cut and to decrease the contamination level in the next. For cereal and oil crops the aim is to harvest as large an area as possible before fallout. Lack of time, personnel and local machine capacity are constraints to a general achievement of the goals, but the countermeasures, if employed in as large a scale as possible, can nevertheless be of large importance. Care must be taken by advisors in order to motivate the farmers to follow the recommendations

  13. The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, G D

    2009-02-13

    In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is

  14. Children become the first victims of fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balter, M.

    1996-04-19

    Pediatric endocrinologist Larisa Astakhova described a dramatic increase in thyroid cancer among the children of Belarus, with half the new cases, starting to appear in 1990, concentrated in Gomel north of Chernobyl. Gomel received heavy doses of radiation, including large amounts of Iodine-131 and other radioactive iodine isotopes, which the body selectively takes up into the thyroid gland. Since this was only 4 years, not the expected 6-8 year after the Chernobyl accident, the scientific public was at first skeptic, but became convinced. The tragic epidemic, the most pronounced health effect of the accident so far, has sparked intense collaborations between Western and Eastern radiation scientists. This article describes the research and implications of these studies.

  15. Estimation of beta-ray skin dose from exposure to fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2012-03-01

    Beta-ray skin dose due to the fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb is potentially related to the epilation in the black rain area. The absorbed dose to the skin from beta-rays emitted by fission fallout has been estimated for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² on the ground at 0.5 h after the explosion. The estimated skin dose takes into account both external exposure from fission fallout radionuclides uniformly distributed in 1 mm of soil on the surface of the ground and from a 26 μm thickness of contaminated soil on the skin, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. The cumulative skin dose for 1 month after the explosion is taken as the representative value. The estimated skin dose for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² was determined to be about 500 mSv. PMID:22042969

  16. A survey of radioactive fallout data in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePhillips, M.P.

    1995-10-23

    Considerable attention has been directed by the scientific community to assessing the levels and fate of radionuclides in Arctic ecosystems. The following text and tables present available data and discussion of radionuclide fallout in Alaska. A literature search of 23 on-line databases (Table 1) using Alaska, Strontium (Sr), Cesium (Cs), Plutonium (Pu) and Radionuclide as constraint terms responded with 177 possible citations. After eliminating duplicate citations, 31 articles were available: 17 were relevant to the subject matter; the remainder addressed geologic issues. All of the cited literature addressed {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239,240}Pu as a result of radionuclide fallout from nuclear testing or accidental release.

  17. Association of nuclear fallout with leukemia in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world population has been exposed to low levels of fission products from nuclear testing. Has this had any health effects? Six different epidemiological associations are demonstrated between leukemia and nuclear fallout in the general population. The strongest association is with acute and myeloid types of leukemia among children. They peaked at approximately 5.5 yr (among 5-9 yr olds) after the peaks in fallout. The entire United States population exhibited an increasing leukemia rate during and for several years after the open air nuclear testing and fell sharply thereafter. Regional differences in leukemia rates correspond to a composite exposure index that used 90Sr concentrations in food, cow's milk, and human bone. The calculated leukemia risk per rad for children was similar to that calculated for Japanese A-bomb children survivors

  18. Worldwide fallout of plutonium from nuclear weapons tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of 238Pu and /sup 239,240/Pu fallout from nuclear weapons tests and the SNAP-9A navigational satellite burnup are presented for the years through 1980. Data abstracted from the literature were taken from the stratosphere, atmosphere, and from deposition and surface soil. Over 7300 data entries are included in the 23 tables. The tables are sorted by medium (stratosphere, atmosphere, and deposition near the surface and soil, nuclide, hemisphere, and longitude going from west to east, and are arranged in chronological order. Latitudes are also provided. Fallout levels in SI units (becquerels), calculated from the original readings, and the references from which the original data were taken are given in the report. The appendix is a map showing the various sites from which data were obtained

  19. Observations of the Chernobyl fallout in Tvaeren bay, baltic proper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident was detected in Tvaeren bay, Baltic sea proper. A second peak of Cs-137 in the water occurring one year after the fallout event indicated a supply of water from the highly contaminated Bothnian sea area. Bladder wrack (Fucus vesiculosus) and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) responded quickly to the variations in CS-137 content of the water. Bladder wrack seems to be a ten times more sensitive bioindicator for radioactive CS than the blue mussel. An apparent half-time of 29 and 21 days was observed for bladder wrack and blue mussel, respectively, at a mean temperature of 12 degree C and 7 per thousand S. A long-term increase in Cs-137 content was observed in bottom sediment and benthic infauna. (au)

  20. Radioactive fallout nuclides in a peat-bog ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Province of Salzburg belongs to the regions with the highest contamination from the Chernobyl-fallout outside the former USSR. The peat-bog investigated in this study is situated in Koppl, east of Salzburg. A peat-bog is a special example of an ecosystem, which is generally not disturbed by human activities because it is under strict nature-conservation and whose soil structure is not affected by animal activities from moles and earthworms. Peat-bogs are characterized by acidic soils which are high in organic material and low in clay mineral content. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that especially in peat-bogs and especially in the Koppl-peat-bog very high amounts of radioactive fallout nuclides from the Chernobyl accident and from the bomb-testings could be found

  1. An aerial radiological survey of the Trinity Fallout Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aerial gamma survey was conducted during May and June of 1992 to define the Trinity fallout field, which lies primarily in the White Sands Missile Range in the state of New Mexico. The field was mapped almost entirely from the gamma ray emissions of cesium-137 (137Cs), a fission product. The field, as measured, extends from Trinity ground zero, over the Oscura Mountains, across the Chupadera Mesa, and thence past Cedarvale, New Mexico, a distance of more than 100 kilometers. An estimate of 137Cs activity inventory is 100 Ci in an area covering 1,400 square kilometers. Another isotope, europium-152, is significant at ground zero. A 137Cs concentration contour plot overlaid on a U.S. Geological Survey map indicates the location and intensity of the fallout field. A contour map of terrestrial exposure rate is presented in a similar fashion

  2. Committee's report on ruthenium fall-out incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations of the fall-out incident of November 11 and 12, 1959, by responsible parties (Health Physics Division and Operations Division personnel) established beyond reasonable doubt that the incident had its origin in the expulsion of particles, heavily contaminated with ruthenium, which had been detached from the walls of the electric fan housing and ducts in the off-gas system associated with the brick stack. All available evidence indicates that the particles were loosened during maintenance work on the exhaust damper and the bearings of the electric fan and were carried up the stack in two bursts as particulate fall-out when this fan was put back into service. Radiographic and chemical analysis showed the activity to be almost entirely ruthenium (Ru106) and its daughter rhodium (Rh106) with very little, if any, strontium being present. This report summarizes the findings and sets forth the conclusions and recommendations of the Committee asked to investigate the incident

  3. Comparison of Results between the Miniature FASat-Bravo Ozone Mapping Detector (OMAD) and NASA’s Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Fernez-Saldivar, Juan; Underwood, Craig

    2008-01-01

    The Ozone Layer Monitoring Experiment (OLME) on board the FASat-Bravo microsatellite launched in July 1992 observed backscattered UV to retrieve atmospheric ozone using two instruments: the Ozone Ultraviolet Backscatter Imager (OUBI) and the Ozone Mapping Detector (OMAD). Initial results from this experiment have shown good qualitative agreement with data from NASA’s TOMS instrument [1]. More recent studies of OMAD data have found quantitative agreement in their radiances and even indicated d...

  4. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Lelieveld, J.; KUNKEL, D.; M. G. Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of ma...

  5. The development of radioactive glass surrogates for fallout debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of glass that emulates fallout is desired by the nuclear forensics community for training and measurement exercises. The composition of nuclear fallout is complex, with widely varying isotopic compositions (Fahey et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(47):20207-20212, 2010; Bellucci et al., Anal Chem 85:7588-7593, 2013; Wallace et al., J Radioanal Nucl Chem, 2013; Belloni et al., J Environ Radioact 102:852-862, 2011; Freiling, Science 139:1058-1059, 1963; Science 133:1991-1999, 1961; Bunney and Sam Government Report: Naval Ordinance Laboratory, White Oak, 1971). As the gaseous cloud traverses from hotter to cooler regions of the atmosphere, the processes of condensation and nucleation entrain environmental materials, vaporized nuclear materials and fission products. The elemental and isotopic composition of the fission products is altered due to chemical fractionation (i.e. the fission product composition that would be expected from fission of the original nuclear material is altered by differences in condensation rates of the elements); the fallout may be enriched or depleted in volatile or refractory fission products. This paper describes preliminary work to synthesize, irradiate and fractionate the fission product content of irradiated particulate glass using a thermal distillation 2 h after irradiation. The glass was synthesized using a solution-based polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate. (Izrael, Radioactive fallout after nuclear explosions and accidents, 2002) Uranium was incorporated into the glass particulate at trace concentrations during polymerization. The particulate was subjected to a short thermal neutron irradiation then heated to 1,273 K approximately 2 h after the end of irradiation. Fission products of 133,134,135I, 132,134Te, 135Xe, 138Cs and 91,92Sr were observed to be distilled from the particulate. The results of these preliminary studies are discussed. (author)

  6. Fallout 137Cs in soils from North Western Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallout levels of 137Cs in surface soil from North Western Libya have been measured using gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations of 137Cs in soil ranged from 975 to 1720 mBq x kg-1. The areal activity concentrations ranged from 1300 to 2250 mBq x m-2, and were highly correlated with annual precipitation. The effective dose from external exposure to 137Cs is found to be 3 nSv x y-1. (author)

  7. The influence of the post-Chernobyl fallout on birth defects and abortion rates in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, M C; Berghold, A; Schoell, W; Hofer, P; Schaffer, M

    1992-10-01

    Researchers analyzed data on 66,743 births which occurred between 1985-1989 in the Styria region in southern Austria to determine whether radioactive fallout from the meltdown of the nuclear reaction at Chernobyl in the Ukraine, USSR in may 1986 affected the birth defect and abortion rates in this area of Austria. There were 1695 birth defect cases. Of the birth defects which occurred during embryogenesis, most occurred 14-49 days postconception (group 2; n=630). The researchers did not note a short-term effect of the fallout in group 2 or the other groups (relative risk= 0.75, 0.73 for group 1, and 0.93 for group 2). Baseline birth defect rates (per 1000 births) for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 2.5, 8.5, and 1,8 respectively. The only sizable increase occurred in group 2 at years 2 and 3 (10.6 and 10.3, respectively). More reported minor congenital defect cases accounted for this increase due to the newly established data base in the Department of Pediatric Cardiology at the University of Graz. Thus the increase was an artifact and not a true increase. Abortion rates varied from 10% to 14% and did not increase significantly after Chernobyl. Counseling frequency at abortion clinics fluctuated greatly (117-205) both before and after Chernobyl and the changes were not significant. These results indicated that the low dosage of radiation did not have a detectable biologic effect in terms of birth defects and abortions. The researchers addressed the difficulties with measuring teratologic potential of low dose radiation. They also highlighted the need for accurate categorizing of birth defects, adequate baseline data, and very reliable registries. Future research on possible environmental disasters which affect Austria can use these data as baseline data. PMID:1415387

  8. Development of a method to estimate thyroid dose from fallout radioiodine in a cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cohort of 4831 persons aged 11-18 y in 1965 was identified among students in the schools of Washington County, UT; Lincoln County, NV; and Graham County, AZ. These children who had potentially been exposed to radioiodine from atomic weapons test fallout from the Nevada Test Site during 1951-1962 were selected for participation in a study of thyroid disease. The entire cohort was first examined during 1965-1968 for thyroid abnormalities. A total of 3,085 of these people were again reexamined during 1985-1986 to determine any subsequent occurrence of thyroid disease. In order to determine the relationship of the radiation dose to the thyroid with incidence of thyroid disease, we have developed a suite of models to calculate estimates of the internal dose received by the thyroid from fallout radioiodines. For completeness, the exposure to the thyroid from external radiation is also estimated. Dose estimates are made specific to each individual in the study using individual residential histories, the locality-specific exposure rate and radionuclide deposition, descriptions of dairy management for identified milk producers, and the subjects' sources of foods and intake rates of milk and leafy vegetables determined by interview. Other data such as the relationship of radioiodine deposition to measured exposure rate, environmental transfer parameters, and age-dependent factors for the conversion of radioiodine intake to thyroid dose were taken from work of other investigators. Dairy management information, milk distribution practices, the milk source for each study subject, as well as age-specific intake rates of milk and leafy vegetables, were determined by interview

  9. Uranium fallout from nuclear-powered satellites and volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical measurements were carried out uranium isotopes in a total of 77 rain and snow samples collected at Fayetteville (360N, 940W), Arkansas, during the period between April 1983 and July 1985. The presence of excess 235U was detected in many of the rain samples and it was attributed to the fallout from the nuclear reactor on board the Soviet satellite Cosmos-1402, which fell over the South Atlantic Ocean on 7 February 1983 (Bakhtiar, 1985). Meanwhile, marked increases in the concentrations of naturally-occurring uranium and thorium isotopes were observed in rain samples collected during 1983 and these increases were attributed to the fallout from the 1982 eruption of El Chichon volcano in Mexico. At the beginning of 1984, the 235U/238U ratio in rain water was rapidly decreasing and it appeared as if the effects of both the 1982 eruption of El Chichon and the 1983 fall of the nuclear-powered satellite Cosmos-1402 on the concentration of uranium isotopes in rain water would dissipate and the levels of uranium in rain would soon return to normal during the early part of 1985. Sharp increases in the 234U/238U ratios in rain were observed during the months of May and June 1085. These results most likely indicate the effects of delayed fallouts from the two events-the 1982 eruption of El Chichon and the 1983 fall of cosmos-1402

  10. Web-Enabled Optoelectronic Particle-Fallout Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineberger, Lewis P.

    2008-01-01

    A Web-enabled optoelectronic particle- fallout monitor has been developed as a prototype of future such instruments that (l) would be installed in multiple locations for which assurance of cleanliness is required and (2) could be interrogated and controlled in nearly real time by multiple remote users. Like prior particle-fallout monitors, this instrument provides a measure of particles that accumulate on a surface as an indication of the quantity of airborne particulate contaminants. The design of this instrument reflects requirements to: Reduce the cost and complexity of its optoelectronic sensory subsystem relative to those of prior optoelectronic particle fallout monitors while maintaining or improving capabilities; Use existing network and office computers for distributed display and control; Derive electric power for the instrument from a computer network, a wall outlet, or a battery; Provide for Web-based retrieval and analysis of measurement data and of a file containing such ancillary data as a log of command attempts at remote units; and Use the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) for maximum performance and minimal network overhead.

  11. Distribution of fallout cesium-137 in the Chesapeake Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique was developed for simple analysis of 137Cs concentrations in water, sediments, and biota in the fractional picocurie per liter range. These measurements are important, since fallout 137Cs will be present in estuarine environments for a generation. The concentration of 137Cs in water is important to studies of distribution coefficients, or concentration factors between water and sediment or organisms. Fallout 137Cs is also a natural tracer, making possible experiments on a span of space and time that is impossible with intentionally added tracers. Thus, one can determine an approximate residence time for a body of brackish water with a few 137Cs concentration measurements, given the average depth and typical fallout deposition rate. This estimate is good enough for first estimates as to the capacity of the body of water for various pollutants. Measurements at several sites, and at all seasonal conditions, can be used to solve the mass and concentration balance equations that more rigorously describe the hydrography of the estuary. (U.S.)

  12. Protective effect of building against nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to adopt appropriate countermeasures to protect the public in case of a wide-spread contamination after a severe reactor accident, a profound knowledge of the dose to be expected and of the dose reduction to be expected if a specific countermeasure is adopted is required. Since external radiation contributes a major fraction of up to 80 % to the total dose, the interest is focused on the reduction of external dose by staying indoors. For this purpose measurements of the dose reduction by external radiation were performed in 40 residential rooms in Vienna which were chosen according to their fraction of the Viennese building structure. They were performed by measurement of the reduction of the gamma-flux in the interior of buildings compared to the gamma-flux outside. Measurements were carried out by a HPGe-detector which was positioned 1 m above ground. The observed dose reduction factors amounted to 0.013 on the average (protection factor 78.7 ± 49.7), with the protection factors of the investigated building types ranging from 6.5 (single house in garden) to 122.9 (edicifices of the turn of the century). The observed protection factors do not include the dose reduction by dense arrangement of buildings in urban areas which has to be considered separately. The dose reduction due to different radionuclide mixtures after severe reactor accidents was also investigated. Factors similar to that observed for Cs-137 were found. The maximum deviations amounted only 12 % and therefore may be neglected in the consideration of protective measures. Additional measurements were performed with the same detector shielded by lead on all sides to determine the contribution of the interior contamination. A contribution of between < 10 % to 50 % to the external dose in the interior of buildings was observed. Measures to reduce the inner contamination in rooms (closing of windows and doors, cleaning upon entering the building interior) in case of an event are therefore

  13. Estimate of whole body doses for Lynette Tew and Becky Farnsworth from Nevada Test Site local fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynette Tew and Becky Farnsworth are decendents whose relatives are litigants in Timothy vs US. The litigants allege that the decendents were harmed by radiation doses received as a result of local fallout from the testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site. We have calculated a best estimate of the whole body dose received by each decendent from external exposure and the ingestion of radionuclides with food. In each case the dose via ingestion is trivial compared to the external dose. For Lynette Tew the dose estimate is 0.28 rads. For Becky Farnsworth it is 0.0035 rads. 23 references, 4 tables

  14. Trends in childhood leukaemia in the Nordic countries in relation to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed to obtain further information about the risks of childhood leukaemia after exposure to ionising radiation at low doses and low dose rates before or after birth or to the father's testes shortly before conception. Trends were studied in the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the Nordic countries in relation to estimated radiation exposures due to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing during the 1950s and 1960s. During the high fallout period the average estimated dose equivalent to the fetal red bone marrow was around 140 μSv and the average annual testicular dose 140 μSv. There was little evidence of increased incidence of leukaemia among children born in these years. Doses to the red bone marrow of a child after birth were higher, and during the high exposure period children would have been subjected to an additional dose equivalent of around 1500 μSv, similar to doses received by children in several parts of central and eastern Europe owing to the Chernobyl accident and about 50% greater than the annual dose equivalent to the red bone marrow of a child from natural radiation. Leukaemia incidence and red marrow dose was not related overall, but rates of leukaemia in the high exposure period were slightly higher than in the surrounding medium exposure period. (Author)

  15. Information by the German Federal Government. Environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report on environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure of the German Federal Government for 2009 includes the following chapters: (1) natural radiation exposure; (2) civilization based radiation exposure (nuclear power plants, nuclear installations, radioactive waste repositories, other radiation sources, Chernobyl accident caused fall-out); (3) occupational radiation exposure; (4) medical radiation exposure; (5) non-ionizing radiation.

  16. Cesium-137 radioisotope, a fallout component in the study of soil erosion and sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary study on the possibility of using Cesium-137, a component of the fallout, to estimate soil erosion and sedimentation was carried out in a small watershed in Piracicaba, Sao Paulo. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (Germanium detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer) was used to detect Cs-137. The fallout standards of the profiles fallout and results of soil losses and gains for the transects are discussed based on these measurements. (author)

  17. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  18. History of plutonium composition of fallout in the northeastern U.S. from contemporary measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analyses of lake sediments from the northeastern US provide depositional histories of 137Cs and 239+240Pu from both global fallout and fallout from the Nevada Test Site detonations in the 1950's. These results provide an independent verification and extension of the temporal trend of the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio of global fallout to earlier times. This data supports the findings of other studies of fallout in the atmospheric and marine environment. (author) 26 refs.; 8 figs.; 9 refs

  19. When the dust settles: stable xenon isotope constraints on the formation of nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear weapons represent one of the most immediate threats of mass destruction. In the event that a procured or developed nuclear weapon is detonated in a populated metropolitan area, timely and accurate nuclear forensic analysis and fallout modeling would be needed to support attribution efforts and hazard assessments. Here we demonstrate that fissiogenic xenon isotopes retained in radioactive fallout generated by a nuclear explosion provide unique constraints on (1) the timescale of fallout formation, (2) chemical fractionation that occurs when fission products and nuclear fuel are incorporated into fallout, and (3) the speciation of fission products in the fireball. Our data suggest that, in near surface nuclear tests, the presence of a significant quantity of metal in a device assembly, combined with a short time allowed for mixing with the ambient atmosphere (seconds), may prevent complete oxidation of fission products prior to their incorporation into fallout. Xenon isotopes thus provide a window into the chemical composition of the fireball in the seconds that follow a nuclear explosion, thereby improving our understanding of the physical and thermo-chemical conditions under which fallout forms. - Highlights: • Radioactive fallout generated by nuclear explosions contains fissiogenic xenon isotopes. • Xe isotopes provide constraints on timescales of fallout formation and the speciation of fission products in the fireball. • Our data indicate that macroscopic fallout forms rapidly (<3 s). • Chemical fractionation trends suggest that fission products may not have been fully oxidized prior to incorporation

  20. Fallout radionuclides and natural radioactivity in tissues of deers from different regions in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of fallout radionuclides in bone and liver samples of deers from different regions in Austria have been investigated. The results indicate that these concentrations are correlated with the altitude and the mean annual rainfall of the region, where the animals lived. About 20 years after the Test Ban Treaty comes into force, 90-Sr and 137-Cs contaminations still can be shown in such tissue samples. In bone 0,5 - 20 pCi 90-Sr and generally less than 0,2 pCi 137-Cs have been found per g fresh weight. Related to the calcium and potassium content of this tissue, maximal values of 95 pCi 90-Sr/g Ca and 730 pCi 137-Cs/g K have been reached. Additionally small amounts of 144-Ce, 60-Co and 54-Mn have been seen, which obviously resulted from the Chinese weapon tests during the last years. In liver samples 90-Sr is below our detection level (i. e. smaller than 0,2 pCi 90-Sr/sample), 137-Cs in the range of 0,1 - 1,7 pCi/g fresh weight. Related to the potassium content of the liver, a maximal value of 190 pCi 137-Cs/g K is observed. Comparing a period of 10 years 137-Cs contaminations remained nearly the same. Also the amount of natural radioactivities like 40-K, 226-Ra, 228-Ac and 212-Pb have been determined in these samples. The results show that the radiation dose to the animals delivered from incorporated natural radioactivities is about one order of magnitude higher than those which has to be expected from fallout contaminations. (Author)

  1. Genetic consequences of radioactive contamination by the Chernobyl fallout to agricultural crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic consequences of radioactive contamination by the fallout to agricultural crops after the accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986 have been studied. In the first, acute, period of this accident, when the absorbed dose was primarily due to external β- and γ-irradiation, the radiation injury of agricultural crops, according to the basic cytogenetic tests resembled the effect produced by acute γ-irradiation at comparable doses. The yield of cytogenetic damage in leaf meristem of plants grown in the 10-km zone of the ChNPP in 1987-1989 (the period of chronic, lower level radiation exposure) was shown to be enhanced and dependent on the level of radioactive contamination. The rate of decline with time in cytogenetic damage induced by chronic exposure lagged considerably behind that of the radiation exposure. Analysis of genetic variability in three sequentia generations of rye and wheat revealed increased cytogenetic damage in plants exposed to chronic irradiation during the 2nd and 3rd years

  2. Summary of thyroid findings in Marshallese 22 years after exposure to radioactive fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R A

    1976-01-01

    Inhabitants of several atolls in the Marshall Islands were accidently exposed to fallout radiation following a detonation of a high yield thermonuclear device during experiments at Bikini in the Pacific Proving Grounds in March 1954. The most serious acute effects of the exposure were due to penetrating gamma radiation. Contamination of the skin in the Rongelap group resulted in widespread beta burns and epilation. These lesions healed and hair regrew normally within several months. Radiochemical urine analyses revealed that measurable amounts of radionuclides, including /sup 131/I, were absorbed internally from ingestion of contaminated food and water and from inhalation. No acute effects due to this internal exposure were seen. Late thyroid effects from radioiodine absorption are described. Follow-up examinations have revealed, except for one fatal case of leukemia and extensive thyroid lesions, only a few findings that might be related to radiation exposure. A group of more than 200 Rongelap people who were relatives of exposed people, but had been away from the island at the time of the accident, moved back with the exposed people to their home island in 1957 and have served as an ideal comparison population for the studies. Results of medical examinations carried out on these populations for the past 22 years are reviewed.

  3. Summary of thyroid findings in Marshallese 22 years after exposure to radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhabitants of several atolls in the Marshall Islands were accidently exposed to fallout radiation following a detonation of a high yield thermonuclear device during experiments at Bikini in the Pacific Proving Grounds in March 1954. The most serious acute effects of the exposure were due to penetrating gamma radiation. Contamination of the skin in the Rongelap group resulted in widespread beta burns and epilation. These lesions healed and hair regrew normally within several months. Radiochemical urine analyses revealed that measurable amounts of radionuclides, including 131I, were absorbed internally from ingestion of contaminated food and water and from inhalation. No acute effects due to this internal exposure were seen. Late thyroid effects from radioiodine absorption are described. Follow-up examinations have revealed, except for one fatal case of leukemia and extensive thyroid lesions, only a few findings that might be related to radiation exposure. A group of more than 200 Rongelap people who were relatives of exposed people, but had been away from the island at the time of the accident, moved back with the exposed people to their home island in 1957 and have served as an ideal comparison population for the studies. Results of medical examinations carried out on these populations for the past 22 years are reviewed

  4. Artificial tritium fall-out at the South Pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow samples were taken from a 5-m-deep pit located near the South Pole station in January 1975, and continuous deuterium, tritium and beta activity profiles have been obtained from them. These three measurements and the stratigraphic level observation allow a precise chronology of the pit from 1950 to 1975 to be deduced, providing a continuous record of artificial tritium fall-out in the southern hemisphere. This has been extended to 1978 using samples from a second pit taken in 1978. Taking advantage of the unusual 1957-58 stable isotope content in the snow, it has been demonstrated that an important part of the isotopic signal in the precipitation is retained in the snow in spite of the low accumulation rate (8.2g/cm2). The first artificial tritium, from the 1952 Ivy experiments, was detected during 1954. A two years delay between explosions and fall-out is well established, and enables the tritium fall-out to be related to the main nuclear tests from 1952 up to 1960. This delay appears longer for the large 1961-62 devices. For the French southern hemisphere experiments, it is about one year. A sharp tritium decrease is observed after a high 1973 peak, providing a new tritium reference level for future glaciological studies in Antarctica. The beta and tritium peaks occur during the Antarctic summer and the Antarctic winter respectively, showing different injection mechanisms. This winter input and the high tritium values registered at the South Pole indicate a preferential tritium transfer over the polar region. Two mechanisms, stratospheric-tropospheric exchange and direct stratospheric cloud precipitation, could account for this injection. (author)

  5. Field study of fallout radiocaesium in upland soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of Chernobyl fallout radiocaesium in undisturbed soils of the mountain areas of Friuli-Venezia Giulia region (NE Italy) has been monitored by two sampling surveys carried out in 1987 and 1988. Surface activities and depth profiles are presented and discussed with regard to different natural ecosystems. A simple residence time model is applied to describe downwards migration of radiocaesium. Residence half-time in the top 3-cm layer averages about 5 years both for fields and forests and decreases in underlying layers. It is suggested to use this parameter to investigate the influence of soil and site characteristics on radiocaesium migration. (author)

  6. Cesium fallout in Norway after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of country-wide measurements of 137Cs and 134 Cs in soil samples in Norway after the Chernobyl accident are reported. The results clearly demonstrates that municipalities in the central part of southern Norway, Troendelag and the southern part of Nordland, have been rather heavily contaminated. The total fallout of 137Cs and 134Cs from the Chernobyl accident in Norway is estimated to 2300 TBq and 1200 TBq, respectively. This is approximately 6% of the cesium activity released from the reactor

  7. Radioactive fallout in Norway from the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl accident had considerable consequences for Norway. Except for the areas in the former USSR, around Chernobyl some areas in Norway received fallout which gave the highest contamination levels. The natural and semi natural ecosystems will produce food products with high activity levels of radiocesium for several decennium. Cost-effective countermeasures were implemented, and they reduced the doses considerable, especially for critical groups. Doses received over the next 50 years will probably cause cancer in 500 persons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Caesium fallout as a tracer of erosion-sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to set up a methodology of use of radioactive caesium fallout, to measure erosion and sedimentation in a sub-catchment and to establish the effects of geomorphological parameters, land uses and soil nature, on the losses caesium by physical process. The result obtained by this new and elegant approach, on a watershed of 4114 ha., studied before by classical and conventional techniques, gives a good evaluation of erosion, but also sedimentation rate, and permit to stand up, a model and sampling strategy, to extend the method to large catchment. 1 tab., 2 refs. (author)

  9. Evaluation of {sup 7}Be fallout spatial variability; Avaliacao da variabilidade espacial do fallout do {sup 7}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Victor Meriguetti

    2011-07-01

    The cosmogenic radionuclide beryllium-7 (Be) is produced in the atmosphere by cosmic particle reactions and is being used as a tracer for soil erosion and climatic processes research. After the production, {sup 7}Be bonds to aerosol particles in the atmosphere and is deposited on the soil surface with other radionuclide species by rainfall. Because of the high adsorption on soil particles and its short half-life of 53.2 days, this radionuclide follows of the erosion process and can be used as a tracer to evaluate the sediment transport that occurs during a single rain event or short period of rain events. A key assumption for the erosion evaluation through this radiotracer is the uniformity of the spatial distribution of the {sup 7}Be fallout. The {sup 7}Be method was elaborated recently and due to its few applications, some assumptions related to the method were not yet properly investigated yet, and the hypothesis of {sup 7}Be fallout uniformity needs to be evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the {sup 7}Be fallout spatial distribution through the rain water {sup 7}Be activity analysis of the first five millimeters of single rain events. The rain water was sampled using twelve collectors distributed on an experimental area of about 300 m2 , located in the campus of Sao Paulo University, Piracicaba. The {sup 7}Be activities were measured using a 53% efficiency gamma-ray spectrometer from the Radioisotope laboratory of CENA. The {sup 7}Be activities in rain water varied from 0.26 to 1.81 Sq.L{sup -}1, with the highest values in summer and lowest in spring. In each one of the 5 single events, the spatial variability of {sup 7}Se activity in rain water was high, showing the high randomness of the fallout spatial distribution. A simulation using the {sup 7}Be spatial variability values obtained here and {sup 7}Se average reference inventories taken from the literature was performed determining the lowest detectable erosion rate estimated by {sup 7}Be model

  10. Freshwater and Alpine ecosystem response to Chernobyl fallout in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental and agricultural research programmes were initiated in Norway in June 1986 following the Chernobyl accident. The main fallout in Norway occurred on 28 and 29 April and had an extremely patchy distribution between 60 and 66 deg. C N. In Lake Hoeysjoeen in the county of North Troendelag, high radioactivity was found in the sediment and in all levels of the food chains from vegetation to fish, including phytoplankton, zooplankton, bottom animals, brown trout and Arctic char. Food chains for both wild and domestic animals are studied in the Alpine areas of central Norway. High seasonal variation has been found in the radiocaesium load of reindeer. Such a variation is a result of the high radioactivity (up to more than 100 kBq/kg dry weight) in lichens, the only winter food for reindeer. Also there are indications of increased calf mortality and chromosomal aberrations in the blood cells of the reindeer in nutrient poor areas with heavy fallout. In mountain pastures where sheep and goats graze, a sharp increase in meat and goat milk radiocaesium occurred during the late pasture season in 1988. This was caused by the large number of mushrooms with high levels of radioactivity. Present research in Norway will have to be continued in order to develop further national and international co-operation among scientists and institutions with whom biologists had little or no contact previously. (author). 11 refs, 3 figs

  11. Individual human odor fallout as detected by trained canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyplelová, Petra; Vokálek, Václav; Pinc, Ludvík; Pacáková, Zuzana; Bartoš, Luděk; Santariová, Milena; Čapková, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that if odor fallout (the release of a human's odor onto an untouched object) in human subjects exists, then holding a hand above an absorbent will produce a detectable scent which will be subsequently matched in a detection test by trained canines. Scents were collected from seven males to sterile cotton absorbent squares. The left hand was used to get the control scent and the right hand served as the target scent. Each experimental subject was sitting; his left hand was laid down on a cotton square for 3 min. The right hand was held 5 cm above another cotton square for 3 min. The scent identification was done by two specially trained police German shepherds. These canines had routinely performed scent identification line-ups as part of criminal investigation procedures. Both canines performed 14 line-ups and correctly matched the collected scents of all test subjects. The results suggest the existence of human odor fallout, whereby a human scent trace is left by humans even if they do not touch an object. PMID:24378296

  12. Organic association of the fallout radionuclides in the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate organic association of fallout cesium, strontium and plutonium in the soil, soil samples influenced by fallout from nuclear weapon testings were treated with alkali (0.1 M-sodium hydroxide solution) to extract organic acids. After extraction, the resultant three fractions (sedimentary residue, humic and fulvic acid fractions) were subjected to the γ-ray spectrometric analysis for 137Cs, and radiochemical analysis for 90Sr and 239,240Pu. Alkali extraction experiments showed that a lot of 239,240Pu was extracted to organic acids from the soil samples, whereas most of 137Cs and 90Sr remained in residual fraction. Less than 10% of the total 137Cs and 90Sr was found in the organic fraction. The concentrations of 137Cs and 90Sr associated with humic fractions were higher than those with the corresponding fulvic fractions. It was found that more than 40% of the total 239,240Pu was associated with the organic fraction of soils. In contrast with 137Cs and 90Sr, 239,240Pu associated with fulvic fractions was much higher than in humic fractions

  13. Relações de produtividade, área folhear e alternância na macieira bravo de esmolfe: Yield efficiency, leaf area and alternate bearing indices of apple cv. bravo de esmolfe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Santos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A macieira Bravo de Esmolfe é a mais conhecida e valorizada das variedades regionais, mas o conhecimento técnico disponível é escasso e torna-se necessário aprofundá-lo, em especial no que se refere às formas de gestão e controlo de uma das suas características mais negativas, a forte tendência para alternar as produções. Assim, pretendeu-se identificar algumas relações de produtividade que não desencadeiem alternância, quando cultivada no porta-enxerto ananicante EMLA9, que tem sido considerado entre os melhores actualmente disponíveis para o seu cultivo em regime intensivo. Para o efeito foram seleccionadas 30 macieiras de 8 anos, de estatura semelhante, e que apresentaram diferentes níveis de produtividade no ano de 2004. Em Novembro de 2004 foram recolhidas as folhas e medida a sua área, e contabilizadas as respectivas inflorescências em Abril de 2005, o que forneceu uma perspectiva da produção para essa campanha. Tendo em conta tais valores, e recorrendo ao seu historial produtivo, foram calculados alguns parâmetros que permitiram a análise do comportamento e regularidade de produção das macieiras seleccionadas. Os resultados obtidos nesta primeira abordagem sugerem que intervalos de produtividade da ordem de 8 a 11 g de maçã por folha durante a campanha, a que correspondem 20 a 30 maçãs por cm de diâmetro do tronco, bem como valores entre 10 e 15 folhas por maçã produzida, evitam a alternância de produção, desde que sejam feitas mondas atempadas, conseguindo-se assim bom equilíbrio produção/vegetação.The Bravo de Esmolfe apple tree is the most reputed and valued regional variety, but the available technical knowledge about it does not suffice. It must be deepened, especially on what concerns tools for management and control of one of this cultivar’s most negative characteristics, the strong tendency to alternate bearing. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify some yield relations that

  14. Future radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the units used in radiation protection. The radiation hazards incurred by human populations can be divided into early and late somatic radiation effects and genetic radiation effects. Examples and motivations of risk analysis estimates are given. For genetic radiation effects, the siginificance dose and the doubling dose are defined. The minimum permissible dose for different human populations are compared with the doses received from natural radioactivity with medical applications. The risk caused by nuclear reactors and fall-out and its consequences are given for the year 1972 and estimated for the year 2000

  15. PREDICTIONS OF DISPERSION AND DEPOSITION OF FALLOUT FROM NUCLEAR TESTING USING THE NOAA-HYSPLIT METEOROLOGICAL MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Brian E.; Beck, Harold L.; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    The NOAA Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) was evaluated as a research tool to simulate the dispersion and deposition of radioactive fallout from nuclear tests. Model-based estimates of fallout can be valuable for use in the reconstruction of past exposures from nuclear testing, particularly, where little historical fallout monitoring data is available. The ability to make reliable predictions about fallout deposition could also have significant importanc...

  16. Processing of analogues of plume fallout in cold regions of Enceladus by energetic electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Bergantini, A; Nair, B G; Mason, N J; Fraser, H J

    2014-01-01

    Enceladus, a small icy moon of Saturn, is one of the most remarkable bodies in the solar system. This moon is a geologically active object, and despite the lower temperatures on most of its surface, the geothermally heated south polar region presents geysers that spouts a plume made of water (approximately ninety percent), carbon dioxide, methane, ammonia, and methanol, among other molecules. Most of the upward-moving particles do not have the velocity to escape from the gravitational influence of the moon and fall back to the surface. The molecules in the ice are continuously exposed to ionizing radiation, such as UV and X-rays photons, cosmic rays, and electrons. Over time, the ionizing radiation promotes molecular bond rupture, destroying and also forming molecules, radicals, and fragments. We analyse the processing of an ice mixture analogue to the Enceladus fallout ice in cold resurfaced areas (north pole) by 1 keV electrons. The main goal is to search for complex species that have not yet been detected ...

  17. EPA assessment of fallout in the United States from atmospheric nuclear testing on September 26 and November 17, 1976 by the People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests by the People's Republic of China on September 26 and November 17, 1976, the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) network was fully activated and frequent samples of air particulates, precipitation, and pasteurized milk were collected for several weeks after each event. Population doses for the United States were calculated using the levels of radioactivity measured in these samples. Based on the calculated doses, health effects to the population of the United States were estimated. This report is a summary of EPA's assessment regarding the radiation doses and potential health effects which may be attributed to radioactive fallout from these nuclear weapons tests

  18. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated

  19. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Hae Youn; Park, Hong Sook

    2001-03-01

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated.

  20. Cancer of the thyroid and 131I fallout in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1953 to 1962 Norway received relatively high levels of radioactive fallout. On the basis of extensive measurements in air, precipitation, food and humans, the dose to the thyroid due to 131I has been calculated. Cancer registration in Norway is practically completely efficient because of obligatory notification of the Cancer Registry by physicians, pathology laboratories, and the Central Bureau of Statistics of all cases or death certificates concerning cancer. Analysis of the Cancer Registry data from 1953 to 1980 concerning birth cohorts 1936 to 1961 indicates an overall increasing trend in thyroid cancer morbidity, most pronounced in female cohorts born 1930-50. The highest, most abrupt irregularities reveal a coincidence of high numbers with high 131I content in milk consumed during the years of prepuberty and puberty. Possible interpretations are discussed. (author)

  1. Transport of fallout radiocesium and plutonium in forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At five sites in a spruce stand and in a pine stand the vertical activity distributions were determined for sup239+240 Pu and sup137 Cs from the global fallout of weapon testing in the sixties as well as separately for Chernobyl-derived radiocesium. To evaluate the migration rates of these radionuclides in the various soil horinzons, a compartmental model was employed. The migration rates were smallest at the top of the mineral horizon, but increased again with increasing depth. In contrast, the mobility of Chernobyl-derived sup137 Cs is presently in all soil layers significantly higher, but decreases with time. The fixation of radiocesium by the clay particles of the soil is, therefore, a rather slow process

  2. Using fallout plutonium as a probe for erosion assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, W T; Fifield, L K; Tims, S G; Fujioka, T; Mueller, N

    2011-10-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the potential of using fallout plutonium (Pu), which originated from atmospheric nuclear-weapons tests, as a tool to investigate recent erosional processes within the lower Cotter water-supply catchment in the Australian Capital Territory. This catchment, which was predominantly pine plantation, was severely affected by a major bush fire in 2003. Accelerator mass spectrometry has been used to measure Pu in soil samples collected from a number of sites across the catchment. The results indicate that less than 1cm of surface soil had been lost since the early 1960s over much of the catchment. Areas of more erodible soil have, however, lost 2-4cm of topsoil, and a loss of ∼6cm of soil was identified at one particular site. PMID:20638160

  3. Accumulation of plutonium from fallout in southern Finns and Lapps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The body burden of 239,240Pu and 238Pu from fallout in southern Finns and Lapps was determined by ion exchange and alpha-spectrometry through analyses of autopsy tissue samples. Comparing the body burden against the inhalation and ingestion intake of plutonium of these population groups the fractional absorption factor for plutonium from the human gastrointestinal tract and lungs was estinated. In addition, the determined tissue values were compared with those computed with the aid of the ICRP lung model and plutonium content of surface air in the Helsinki area. The 239,240Pu concentrations per wet weight of tissue descended in the order liver>lymph nodes>bone>lung>testes>muscle. A dependence of plutonium content of tissues on the amount of air inhaled by the person during the fallout period and, thus, on the age of the person, was shown. The skeletal distribution of plutonium in man was roughly similar to that reported for animals. The ratio of 239,240Pu content in vertebrae to that in ribs was 1.4, on the average, and the rib/femur ratio 1.0. The average body burden of 239,240Pu in adult southern Finn and Lapp males was estimated to be 1.2 pCi (44.4 mBq), of which about 51 per cent was located in liver and 40 per cent in skeleton. The estimates for the ingestion and inhalation intake of 239,240Pu during the period 1945-78 were 36 and 18 pCi (1.3, 0.67 Bq) and 540 and 13 pCi (19.9, 0.48 Bq) for southern Finn and Lapp males, respectively. The estimated fractional absorption factor of plutonium in humn GI-tract was of the order (6-9)x10-4 and in lungs (7.5-8.5)x10-2. (author)

  4. Assessment of spatial distribution of fallout radionuclides through geostatistics concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabit, L; Bernard, C

    2007-01-01

    After introducing geostatistics concept and its utility in environmental science and especially in Fallout Radionuclide (FRN) spatialisation, a case study for cesium-137 ((137)Cs) redistribution at the field scale using geostatistics is presented. On a Canadian agricultural field, geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test three different techniques of interpolation [Ordinary Kriging (OK), Inverse Distance Weighting power one (IDW1) and two (IDW2)] to create a (137)Cs map and to establish a radioisotope budget. Following the optimization of variographic parameters, an experimental semivariogram was developed to determine the spatial dependence of (137)Cs. It was adjusted to a spherical isotropic model with a range of 30 m and a very small nugget effect. This (137)Cs semivariogram showed a good autocorrelation (R(2)=0.91) and was well structured ('nugget-to-sill' ratio of 4%). It also revealed that the sampling strategy was adequate to reveal the spatial correlation of (137)Cs. The spatial redistribution of (137)Cs was estimated by Ordinary Kriging and IDW to produce contour maps. A radioisotope budget was established for the 2.16 ha agricultural field under investigation. It was estimated that around 2 x 10(7)Bq of (137)Cs were missing (around 30% of the total initial fallout) and were exported by physical processes (runoff and erosion processes) from the area under investigation. The cross-validation analysis showed that in the case of spatially structured data, OK is a better interpolation method than IDW1 or IDW2 for the assessment of potential radioactive contamination and/or pollution. PMID:17673340

  5. Assessment of spatial distribution of fallout radionuclides through geostatistics concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After introducing geostatistics concept and its utility in environmental science and especially in Fallout Radionuclide (FRN) spatialisation, a case study for cesium-137 (137Cs) redistribution at the field scale using geostatistics is presented. On a Canadian agricultural field, geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test three different techniques of interpolation [Ordinary Kriging (OK), Inverse Distance Weighting power one (IDW1) and two (IDW2)] to create a 137Cs map and to establish a radioisotope budget. Following the optimization of variographic parameters, an experimental semivariogram was developed to determine the spatial dependence of 137Cs. It was adjusted to a spherical isotropic model with a range of 30 m and a very small nugget effect. This 137Cs semivariogram showed a good autocorrelation (R2 = 0.91) and was well structured ('nugget-to-sill' ratio of 4%). It also revealed that the sampling strategy was adequate to reveal the spatial correlation of 137Cs. The spatial redistribution of 137Cs was estimated by Ordinary Kriging and IDW to produce contour maps. A radioisotope budget was established for the 2.16 ha agricultural field under investigation. It was estimated that around 2 x 107 Bq of 137Cs were missing (around 30% of the total initial fallout) and were exported by physical processes (runoff and erosion processes) from the area under investigation. The cross-validation analysis showed that in the case of spatially structured data, OK is a better interpolation method than IDW1 or IDW2 for the assessment of potential radioactive contamination and/or pollution

  6. Predicted erosion and sediment delivery of fallout plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium (Pu) from fallout after atmospheric explosion of nuclear weapons in the 1950s and 1960s is being redistributed over the landscape by soil erosion and carried on sediment by streams to oceans. Erosion rates computed with the Universal Soil Loss Equation for about 200,000 sample points on nonfederal land across the US were used to estimate Pu removal rates by soil erosion by water, Pu delivery in several major rivers, and concentration of Pu on the transported sediment. Estimates of average annual Pu delivery on sediment ranged from 0.002% of the initial fallout Pu inventory for the Savannah River basin to 0.08% for the Mississippi River basin. If the deposition of Pu had been uniformly 37 Bq/m2, the estimated Pu activity on suspended sediment ranged from about 0.26 Bq/kg of sediment for the Savannah River basin to 0.52 Bq/kg for the Columbia and Rio Grande river basins. After 1000 yr, about 9 to 48% of the initial Pu inventory will remain in US soils that are eroding. Much of the Pu on eroded sediment will travel only a short distance from its origin before its host sediment particles are deposited and permanently located, at least for a few hundred years. As much as 90% of the initially deposited Pu will remain, redistributed over the landscape by erosion and deposition. Although the delivery rate of Pu by rivers will not decrease greatly in the next 100 yr, a significant decrease will likely occur by 1000 yr

  7. Quantifying Holocene and Anthropocene erosion rates with cosmogenic and fallout nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-lived cosmogenic nuclides, such as in-situ produced 14C in quartz, and fallout nuclides, such as 137Cs and 239,240Pu, are particularly suited to determine Holocene and/or anthropogenic rates of soil erosion. While fallout 137Cs has been widely used to study erosion processes, the methodology and application of the in-situ produced 14C and 239,240Pu are still somewhat experimental. In the case of in-situ 14C it are experimental/methodological obstacles that stand in the way of wider application, in the case of fallout plutonium it is down to neglect. This experimental/neglected status is a pity, since in situ 14C has the potential to allow resolving Holocene from longer-term Earth-surface process rates, whereas fallout Pu can be used to overcome difficulties in 137Cs methodology arising from the Chernobyl fallout (particularly in Europe) and the relative short half-life of radionuclides of Cs. The presentation will (i) introduce the intrinsic methodological benefits of in-situ produced radiocarbon and fallout plutonium, (ii) report on developmental work at CologneAMS to establish routine use of these nuclides and (iii) present a showcase application for fallout plutonium. (author)

  8. Redistribution of fallout radionuclides in Enewetak Atoll lagoon sediments by callianassid bioturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands contain a large selection of fallout radionuclides as a result of 43 nuclear weapon tests conducted there between 1948 and 1958. The authors report elevated fallout radionuclide concentrations buried more deeply in the lagoon sediments and evidence of burrowing into the sediment by several species of callianassid ghost shrimp (Crustacea: Thalassinidea) which has displaced highly radioactive sediment. The burrowing activities of callianassids, which are ubiquitous on the lagoon floor, facilitate radionuclide redistribution and complicate the fallout radionuclide inventory of the lagoon. (author)

  9. Variations of caesium isotope concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat, South Vietnam, 1986-91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monthly records of 137Cs and 134Cs concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat for the period 1986-91 are presented and discussed. The concentration variations exhibit distinct maxima during December-January, when dry fallout dominated. These peaks are explained by the intrusion of more radioactive cold air masses from temperature northern latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. High dry fallout velocities (about 10 cm/s) determined from these data clearly demonstrate one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front, vertical air motion is descending. (Author)

  10. Variations of Caesium Isotope Concentrations in Air and Fallout at Dalat, South Vietnam, 1986-91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monthly records of 137Cs and 134Cs concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat for the period 1986-91 are presented and discussed. The concentration variations exhibit distinct maxima during December-January, when dry fallout dominates. These peaks are explained by the intrusion of more radioactive cold air masses from temperate northern latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. High dry fallout velocities (about 10 cm/s) determined from these data clearly demonstrate one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front, vertical air motion is descending. (author)

  11. Variations of caesium isotope concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat, South Vietnam, 1986-91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham Zuy Hien; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Truong Y; Vuong Thu Bac; Nguyen Trong Ngo (Dalat Nuclear Research Inst. (Viet Nam))

    1994-01-01

    Monthly records of [sup 137]Cs and [sup 134]Cs concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat for the period 1986-91 are presented and discussed. The concentration variations exhibit distinct maxima during December-January, when dry fallout dominated. These peaks are explained by the intrusion of more radioactive cold air masses from temperature northern latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. High dry fallout velocities (about 10 cm/s) determined from these data clearly demonstrate one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front, vertical air motion is descending. (Author).

  12. Variations of caesium isotope concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat, South Vietnam, 1986-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monthly records of Cs-137 and Cs-134 concentrations in air and fallout at Dalat for the period 1986-1991 are presented and discussed. The concentration variations exhibit distinct maxima during December-January, when dry fallout dominated. These peaks are explained by the intrusion of more radioactive cold air masses from temperate northern latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. High dry fallout velocities (about 10 cm/s) determined from this data clearly demonstrate one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front, vertical air motion is descending

  13. Study of the fallout of artificial iron-55. Application to the evaluation of the fallout of natural iron of stratospheric origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this work is to study the iron-55 fallout to establish the world balance of this radioelement. The utilisation of this tracer enables the calculation of the input of natural iron of stratospheric origin to the Earth and the input through the atmosphere of natural iron to the oceans. We have shown that: iron-55 is essentially produced in nuclear explosions according to the 56Fe(n,2n)55Fe reaction; the iron-55 fallout obeys a 'stratospheric pattern' with a decay period between 9 and 11 months; by surface unit and at the same latitude, this fallout is 3.5 times more important on the Eastern part of the Northern Atlantic than over France. By comparison with the strontium-90 fallout, we established the world balance of the iron-55 fallout in the 1962-1965 period. This balance amounts to approximately 50 mega-curies for the iron-55 introduced into the atmosphere; 25.3 mega-curies of which fall down on the Earth during this period. We estimated at 6 x 106 tons per year the input of natural iron of stratospheric origin to the Earth and at 1.2 x 107 tons per year the input through the atmosphere of natural iron to the oceans. This latter figure represents 13 to 38 per cent of the amount of iron incorporated annually in the pelagic sediments. (author)

  14. Transfer of some Chernobyl fallout nuclides in the animal-product food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important tasks after the Chernobyl accident was the tracing of radionuclides into the food chain because of the acute interest in view of radiation protection considerations and of the fundamental significance to extend the knowledge on consequences of an accidental release. In this context five experiments have been performed during the last two years to investigate the transfer of radiocesium from grass into milk and meat of dairy cows. The first experiment, which was started immediately after the accident, involved 10 stable-kept cows fed with the freshly contaminated grass. Cs-transfer from grass into milk was found to be considerably lower than expected. After the starting phase of one week the mean transfer factor milk/grass for Cs-134 and Cs-137 leveled at 3.2.10-3 d/kg during the second week. This interesting result gave rise to four additional experiments, to study the Cs-transfer during the following feeding periods applying grass of fallout and root-uptake contamination

  15. Selected natural and fallout radionuclides in plant foods around the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity concentrations of certain radionuclides were quantified in some plant foods cultivated around Kudankulam, where a mega-nuclear power plant is being established. The activity concentrations were found more in the ‘pulses’ group and were the lowest in ‘other vegetable’ category. The annual effective dose was computed based on the activity concentration of radionuclides and it was found to be higher due to the consumption of cereals and pulses. Other vegetables, cereals, pulses and nuts recorded high transfer factors for the radionuclide 228Ra. Fruits, leafy vegetables, tubers and roots, and palm embryo registered high transfer factors for 226Ra. Group-wise activity concentration, radiation dose to the public and soil-plant-to-transfer factor are discussed in detail. Highlights: ► Fallout radionuclides (90Sr and 137Cs) were below the limit of detection. ► 228Ra activities were higher than 226Ra activity concentrations. ► ‘Pulses’ group (leguminous grains) was the highest accumulator of radium nuclides. ► 228Ra transfer factor was higher in few groups while 226Ra was higher in others.

  16. Dynamic performances of the fallout radionuclides in the environment and related health risk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The framework was developed for evaluating the cancer induction mortality risk due to the prolonged exposure to the fallout Sr-90 in the environment, which was released by the atmospheric nuclear detonation tests, through dietary intake by considering the effect of foods and feeds import to Japan. The risk evaluation framework presented was composed of three sub-models: the model foe evaluation of the global circulation of Sr-90, the model for evaluation of Sr-90 concentration in foods and dietary intake, and the model for the cancer induction mortality risk. The mortality risk by the radiation-induced leukemia was evaluated based on the NUREG/CR-4214 model. The model was applied on the reference Japanese for past half century to evaluate the historical variation of the health risks. The new framework is presented and discussed on their feasibility to apply on the health risk evaluation due to the low-level and prolonged exposure to radionuclides in the environment. The possibility to use some kind of bio-markers are discussed to evaluate the potential health risk in advance before the risk will be actually detected. (author)

  17. Radioactive fallout in the South Pacific: a history Part 2: radioactivity measurements in the Pacific islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises results of the environmental radioactivity monitoring programme maintained in the Pacific islands by the National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) since 1961. Monitoring was commenced during the nuclear weapons tests at Christmas Island, then extended to a greater number of sites during the French atmospheric tests at Mururoa during 1966-1974 and maintained at that level until 1985 when the network was scaled down to its pres the monitoring of the French tests as the largest local source of short-lived fallout. These pacific monitoring operations during the period of 1960 to 1990 are reviewed which brings together and summarises the extensive compilation of data comprising 70 NRL report published during the period. An attempt is also made to correct the original data for decay between sampling and analysis. The average effective dose commitment for the South Pacific island population due to the entire history of atmospheric weapons tests is estimated to be 1.1 milli sievert.(author). 17 refs., 23 figs., tabs., ills

  18. Transfer of 137Cs to milk and meat in Hungary from Chernobyl fallout with comparisons of worldwide fallout in the 1960s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transfer coefficients for 137Cs from the Chernobyl accident were determined for milk (Fm) and meat (Ff) of cows and sheep in Hungary. Fm and Ff for both cows and sheep fed forage harvested within 1 mo of the accident were lower than results reported for worldwide fallout from weapons tests. Forage harvested 60 d or later after the accident produced an Fm similar to results from feeding soluble 134Cs. The results are interpreted to indicate three distinct categories of Fm about 2.0 X 10(-3), 4.0 X 10(-3) and 1.4 X 10(-2) d L-1, respectively, for Chernobyl fallout, worldwide fallout and soluble Cs isotopes or 137Cs contained in plants from soil uptake

  19. On temporal variation of Ceasium isotopes activities in airborne and fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monthly variations of Cs-137 and Cs-134 activities in airborne and fallout collected in Dalat from 1986 to 1991 are presented. The variations exhibit distinct maxima in December-January, when dry fallout was predominant. The observed peaks are explained by the intrusion of cold air masses with higher radioactivity from temperate latitudes during the development of large-scale anticyclones frequently observed in the most active winter monsoon period. Very high dry fallout velocity (about 10 cm/s) determined from the airborne and fallout activities clearly demonstrates one of the most relevant characteristics of cold air masses: behind the cold front vertical air motion is descending.(Authors) (1 Fig. 2 Tables)

  20. Determination of Volatility and Element Fractionation in Glassy Fallout Debris by SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Todd L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tenner, Travis Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bonamici, Chloe Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kinman, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pollington, Anthony Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Steiner, Robert Ernest [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-10

    The purpose of this report is to characterize glassy fallout debris using the Trinity Test and then characterize the U-isotopes of U3O8 reference materials that contain weaponized debris.

  1. Valores energéticos e composição bromatológica dos fenos de jureminha, feijão bravo e maniçoba para aves Energy values and chemical composition of jureminha, bravo beans and maniçoba hays for poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Guilherme Perazzo Costa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento foi conduzido para determinação dos valores de energia metabolizável aparente (EMA e energia metabolizável aparente corrigida pelo balanço de nitrogênio (EMAn e da composição química dos fenos de feijão-bravo (FFB, jureminha (FJ e maniçoba (FM para uso na alimentação de aves. Duzentos e oitenta pintos com 17 dias de idade foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em sete tratamentos, em esquema fatorial 3 x 2 + 1 (três tipos de feno x dois níveis de substituição da dieta-referência + dieta-referência, com quatro repetições de dez aves. Os níveis de EMA e EMAn dos fenos de jureminha, feijão-bravo e maniçoba foram 3.205 e 2.911, 2.990 e 2.648, 2.728 e 2.419, determinados com 15% de substituição da dieta-referência pelo alimento e 2.678 e 2.371, 2.875 e 2.523, 2.277 e 1.956 com substituição de 30%, respectivamente, e evidenciaram influência do nível de substituição da dieta-referência sobre os valores de EMA e EMAn das dietas. Os valores de EMA e EMAn, para aves, dos fenos de jureminha e feijão-bravo são superiores aos do feno de maniçoba.An experiment was carried out to determine the apparent metabolizable energy (AME, apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn and chemical composition of bravo bean hay (HBB, jureminha hay (HJ and maniçoba hay (HM for use in birds feeding. Two hundred and eighty, 17 days old broiler chicks were distributed according to a completely randomized design, into seven treatments organized in a factorial arrangement 3 x 2 + 1 (three hay types x two levels of substitution of the reference diet + reference diet, with four repetitions of 10 birds each. The contents of AME and AMEn of jureminha, bravo bean and maniçoba hays were 3.205 and 2.911, 2.990 and 2.648, 2.728 and 2.419, respectively, when the ingredients test substituted 15% of the reference diet, and 2.678 and 2.371, 2.875 and 2.523, 2.277 and 1.956, respectively, when the ingredients test

  2. Fall-out of pollutants from distant industrial areas in a rural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Louvain-la-Neuve, a semi-rural area, one frequently observes the fall-out of sulphur dioxide attributable to various industrial areas within Belgium. Two techniques are employed for finding the sources: meteorological studies of the trajectories of the polluted air masses; elemental analysis of aerosols collected at the time of dioxide fall-out. With the latter technique it is possible to characterize the emitting industries and thus to determine the origin of the detected sulphur dioxide. (author)

  3. Fallout Deposition in the Marshall Islands from Bikini and Enewetak Nuclear Weapons Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Harold L.; Bouville, André; Moroz, Brian E.; Simon, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Deposition densities (Bq m-2) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in nuclear weapons testing fallout from tests conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls (1946-1958) have been estimated on a test-specific basis for all the 31 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. A complete review of various historical and contemporary data, as well as meteorological analysis, was used to make judgments regarding which tests deposited fallout in the Marshall Islands an...

  4. Estimated inventory of plutonium and uranium radionuclides for vegetation in aged fallout areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented pertinent to the contamination of vegetation by plutonium and other radionuclides in aged fallout areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The standing biomass of vegetation estimated by nondestructive dimensional methods varied from about 200 to 600 g/m2 for the different fallout areas. Estimated inventories of 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, and 235U in plants and their biological effects are discussed

  5. Processing of analogues of plume fallout in cold regions of Enceladus by energetic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergantini, A.; Pilling, S.; Nair, B. G.; Mason, N. J.; Fraser, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Enceladus, a small icy moon of Saturn, is one of the most remarkable bodies in the solar system. This moon is a geologically active object, and despite the lower temperatures on most of its surface, the geothermally heated south polar region presents geysers that spouts a plume made of water (~90%), carbon dioxide, methane, ammonia, and methanol, among other molecules. Most of the upward-moving particles do not have the velocity to escape from the gravitational influence of the moon and fall back to the surface. The molecules in the ice are continuously exposed to ionizing radiation, such as UV and X-rays photons, cosmic rays, and electrons. Over time, the ionizing radiation promotes molecular bond rupture, destroying and also forming molecules, radicals, and fragments. Aims: We analyse the processing of an ice mixture analogue to the Enceladus fallout ice in cold resurfaced areas (north pole) by 1 keV electrons. The main goal is to search for complex species that have not yet been detected in this moon, and to determine relevant physico-chemical parameters, such as destruction and formation cross-sections and the half-life of the studied molecules in the ice. Methods: The experiment consisted of the electron irradiation of an Enceladus-like ice mixture (H2O:CO2:CH4:NH3:CH3OH) in an ultra-high vacuum chamber at 20 K. The analysis was made by infrared spectrometry in the mid-infrared region (4000-800 cm-1 or 2.5-12.5 μm). Results: The absolute dissociation cross-sections of the parent molecules, the formation cross-section of daughter species, and the half-life of the parental species in a simulated Enceladus irradiation scenario were determined. Among the produced species, CO (carbon monoxide), OCN- (cyanate anion), HCONH2 (formamide), and H2CO (formaldehyde) were tentatively detected.

  6. Study on radioactive fallout from Fukushima nuclear accident by plant samples using an imaging plate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive fallout from the Fukushima nuclear accident was investigated by the radiation images of plant samples using an Imaging Plate System. Plant samples exposed by an imaging plate BASIII 2040 (Fujifilm, Japan) in overnight to one week, and radiation images were read by Typhoon FLA7000 (GE Healthcare Japan Corp.). Identifying and quantitative analysis of radionuclides were measured by Auto Well Gamma System ARC-380CL (Aloha Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). In the cross-sectional images of the bamboo shoot, the radioactive material is shown in heterogeneous distribution, it was found that it concentrated on the tip of the edible portion, and thin skin. These radionuclides were identified as 137Cs, 134Cs, and 40K. 40K is a natural radionuclide, on the other hand 137Cs and 134Cs would be derived from the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A high concentration of 134Cs was shown at the distance of 150 mm from the base of the bamboo shoot by cross-sectional cutting into the width of about 1 mm. It was estimated about 1 kBq of 134Cs would be included in about 400 g (wet weight) of this one bamboo shoot in an edible part. Imaging data suggests that the contamination of radioactive cesium in this bamboo shoot was caused not by the extraneous attachment but by the absorption from roots. Because bamboo is gather water from extensive area, bamboo shoot concentrates the radioactive material contained in the rain even at low concentrations of radioactive materials in soil. (author)

  7. Environmental radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ARL's radiation monitoring program is outlined. This includes the surveillance for the early detection of fresh fission products in ground-level air, monitoring during visits by nuclear powered warships and measurement of long-lived radionuclides. The radioactive fallout in Australia from nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere has been monitored on a continuous basis since the 1950s but since 1974 the extent of this program has been reduced

  8. Nuclear weapons testing fallout: proving causation for exposure injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent Federal District Court opinion dealing with exposure of civilians to fallout from atomic bomb testing more than two decades ago provides guidance on how court action may in the future, address this problem. Close to 1200 negligence liability claims have been brought against the US government in the names of individuals who had resided near the Nevada Test Site and who subsequently developed cancer or leukemia. Because of the importance and complexity of the cases, the parties involved mutually agreed to the selection of 24 bellwether cases which then provided a legal and factural pattern against which other cases may be subsequently matched. The trial court's decision announced in Allen vs. United States, concluded that the government had a duty to adequately monitor, warn, and educate the population put at risk by the tests and that it had failed to fulfill its duty. However, it is only through case-by-case decision making, by courts reviewing all of the evidence in specific cases and tailoring results to best fit the specific facts, that equitable solutions can be applied in our optimal number of cases

  9. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a core melt of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human deposition exposure are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in southern Asia where a core melt can subject 55 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  10. Dispersal and fallout simulations for urban consequences management (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinstein, Fernando F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wachtor, Adam J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patnik, Gopal [US NAVAL RESEARCH LAB.

    2010-01-01

    Hazardous chemical, biological, or radioactive releases from leaks, spills, fires, or blasts, may occur (intentionally or accidentally) in urban environments during warfare or as part of terrorist attacks on military bases or other facilities. The associated contaminant dispersion is complex and semi-chaotic. Urban predictive simulation capabilities can have direct impact in many threat-reduction areas of interest, including, urban sensor placement and threat analysis, contaminant transport (CT) effects on surrounding civilian population (dosages, evacuation, shelter-in-place), education and training of rescue teams and services. Detailed simulations for the various processes involved are in principle possible, but generally not fast. Predicting urban airflow accompanied by CT presents extremely challenging requirements. Crucial technical issues include, simulating turbulent fluid and particulate transport, initial and boundary condition modeling incorporating a consistent stratified urban boundary layer with realistic wind fluctuations, and post-processing of the simulation results for practical consequences management. Relevant fluid dynamic processes to be simulated include, detailed energetic and contaminant sources, complex building vortex shedding and flows in recirculation zones, and modeling of particle distributions, including particulate fallout, as well as deposition, re-suspension and evaporation. Other issues include, modeling building damage effects due to eventual blasts, addressing appropriate regional and atmospheric data reduction.

  11. Cancer mortality and radioactive fallout in southwestern Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer mortality was compared between a three-county region in southwestern Utah and the remainder of Utah in an investigation of reported excess cancer risks associated with residence in southwestern Utah during the period of above-ground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Because most of the fallout in southwestern Utah was deposited during 1953-1957, comparisons were limited to persons born before 1958, and deaths from leukemia and bone cancer during 1955-1980 and from other cancers during 1964-1980. There was no excess risk of cancer mortality in southwestern Utah, for single or grouped sites, with the single exception of leukemia which showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.45 based on 62 deaths at all ages, and 2.84 based on nine deaths at ages 0-14. The finding for childhood leukemia was based on different time periods and geographic comparisons from those of two earlier studies in which no such excess was found. Mortality from all cancer sites combined was significantly lower in southwestern Utah than in the remainder of the state, even after adjustment for the higher proportion of (lower risk) Mormons in southwestern Utah. The present results, including the positive association for leukemia, are inconsistent with the high excess risks reported by Johnson (JAMA 1984;251:230-6) based on an interview survey of cancer incidence among long-term Mormon residents of southwestern Utah

  12. Cancer mortality and radioactive fallout in southwestern Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, S.G.; Land, C.E.; McKay, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    Cancer mortality was compared between a three-county region in southwestern Utah and the remainder of Utah in an investigation of reported excess cancer risks associated with residence in southwestern Utah during the period of above-ground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Because most of the fallout in southwestern Utah was deposited during 1953-1957, comparisons were limited to persons born before 1958, and deaths from leukemia and bone cancer during 1955-1980 and from other cancers during 1964-1980. There was no excess risk of cancer mortality in southwestern Utah, for single or grouped sites, with the single exception of leukemia which showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.45 based on 62 deaths at all ages, and 2.84 based on nine deaths at ages 0-14. The finding for childhood leukemia was based on different time periods and geographic comparisons from those of two earlier studies in which no such excess was found. Mortality from all cancer sites combined was significantly lower in southwestern Utah than in the remainder of the state, even after adjustment for the higher proportion of (lower risk) Mormons in southwestern Utah. The present results, including the positive association for leukemia, are inconsistent with the high excess risks reported by Johnson (JAMA 1984;251:230-6) based on an interview survey of cancer incidence among long-term Mormon residents of southwestern Utah.

  13. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurgeirsson, M A; Arnalds, O; Palsson, S E; Howard, B J; Gudnason, K

    2005-01-01

    The retention of 137Cs in various types of Andosols in Iceland was investigated. Soils were sampled at 29 sites with varying precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0 to 5, 5 to 10, and 10 to 15 cm depths. The amount of radiocaesium present was quite variable, ranging between 300 and 4800 Bq m(-2) and correlated closely to total annual precipitation (r2=0.71). The majority of 137Cs, 82.7% on average, was retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil. The greatest penetration of 137Cs was observed for organic Histosols (76.3% in top 5 cm). The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with only 2-5% clay content and contain little organic matter (soils retained 74% of 137Cs in the top 5 cm. The results indicate that radiocaesium fallout is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferrihydrite. Most soils in Iceland are subject to severe and prolonged freezing and waterlogging; despite this, 137Cs is retained in the upper soil horizons and vertical migration is negligible in Icelandic Andosols. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the amount and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils. PMID:15571875

  14. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention of 137Cs in various types of Andosols in Iceland was investigated. Soils were sampled at 29 sites with varying precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0 to 5, 5 to 10, and 10 to 15 cm depths. The amount of radiocaesium present was quite variable, ranging between 300 and 4800 Bq m-2 and correlated closely to total annual precipitation (r2 = 0.71). The majority of 137Cs, 82.7% on average, was retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil. The greatest penetration of 137Cs was observed for organic Histosols (76.3% in top 5 cm). The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with only 2-5% clay content and contain little organic matter (137Cs in the top 5 cm. The results indicate that radiocaesium fallout is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferrihydrite. Most soils in Iceland are subject to severe and prolonged freezing and waterlogging; despite this, 137Cs is retained in the upper soil horizons and vertical migration is negligible in Icelandic Andosols. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the amount and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils

  15. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigurgeirsson, M.A. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Raudararstigur 10, IS-150 Reykjavik (Iceland)]. E-mail: ms@gr.is; Arnalds, O. [Agricultural Research Institute, Keldnaholt, IS-112 Reykjavik (Iceland); Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Raudararstigur 10, IS-150 Reykjavik (Iceland); Howard, B.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Gudnason, K. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Raudararstigur 10, IS-150 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2005-07-01

    The retention of {sup 137}Cs in various types of Andosols in Iceland was investigated. Soils were sampled at 29 sites with varying precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0 to 5, 5 to 10, and 10 to 15 cm depths. The amount of radiocaesium present was quite variable, ranging between 300 and 4800 Bq m{sup -2} and correlated closely to total annual precipitation (r{sup 2} = 0.71). The majority of {sup 137}Cs, 82.7% on average, was retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil. The greatest penetration of {sup 137}Cs was observed for organic Histosols (76.3% in top 5 cm). The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with only 2-5% clay content and contain little organic matter (<1%). Yet these soils retained 74% of {sup 137}Cs in the top 5 cm. The results indicate that radiocaesium fallout is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferrihydrite. Most soils in Iceland are subject to severe and prolonged freezing and waterlogging; despite this, {sup 137}Cs is retained in the upper soil horizons and vertical migration is negligible in Icelandic Andosols. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the amount and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils.

  16. Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

    2009-04-20

    The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at

  17. Epistemology of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific committee had assess Status of levels, effects and risks of ionizing radiation for General assembly, scientific community and public. The review of levels, sources and exposures. The natural sources of radiation include cosmic rays, terrestrial and artificial sources include medical issues, military activities, civil nuclear power occupational exposure and accidents. The global average exposure is 80% natural source, 20% medical examination 0.2% weapon fallout < 0.1% cherbonyl accidents and < 0.1 nuclear power. The effects of radiation incudes health effects, hereditable effects, bystander effects, and abscopal effects. The randon risks include lancer risk, plant and animal

  18. Review of medical findings in a Marshallese population twenty-six years after accidental exposure to radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 1954, radioactive debris from a thermonuclear weapon test at Bikini Atoll deviated from predicted trajectories and contaminated several atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. As a result, 239 native inhabitants of these islands along with 28 American servicemen and 23 Japanese fishermen received variably severe exposures to diverse ionizing radiations. Fallout material consisted largely of mixed fission products with small amounts of neutron-induced radionuclides and minimal amounts of fissionable elements, producing a complex spectrum of electromagnetic and particulate radiation. Individuals were exposed to deeply penetrating, whole-body gamma irradiation, to internal radiation emitters assimilated either by inhalation or by ingestion of contaminated water and food, and to direct radiation from material accumulating on body surfaces. That accident initiated a cascade of events, medical, social and political, which continue in varying forms to this day. Most of these have been discussed in the open medical literature and in periodic reports issued by the medical team headquartered at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report attempts to summarize some of the principal findings of medical significnce that have been observed during the subsequent 26 years with particular emphasis on the last six years

  19. Review of medical findings in a Marshallese population twenty-six years after accidental exposure to radioactive fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R.A.; Paglia, D.E.; Larsen, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    In March 1954, radioactive debris from a thermonuclear weapon test at Bikini Atoll deviated from predicted trajectories and contaminated several atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. As a result, 239 native inhabitants of these islands along with 28 American servicemen and 23 Japanese fishermen received variably severe exposures to diverse ionizing radiations. Fallout material consisted largely of mixed fission products with small amounts of neutron-induced radionuclides and minimal amounts of fissionable elements, producing a complex spectrum of electromagnetic and particulate radiation. Individuals were exposed to deeply penetrating, whole-body gamma irradiation, to internal radiation emitters assimilated either by inhalation or by ingestion of contaminated water and food, and to direct radiation from material accumulating on body surfaces. That accident initiated a cascade of events, medical, social and political, which continue in varying forms to this day. Most of these have been discussed in the open medical literature and in periodic reports issued by the medical team headquartered at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report attempts to summarize some of the principal findings of medical significnce that have been observed during the subsequent 26 years with particular emphasis on the last six years.

  20. Shuttle user analysis (study 2.2): Volume 3. Business Risk And Value of Operations in space (BRAVO). Part 4: Computer programs and data look-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Computer program listings as well as graphical and tabulated data needed by the analyst to perform a BRAVO analysis were examined. Graphical aid which can be used to determine the earth coverage of satellites in synchronous equatorial orbits was described. A listing for satellite synthesis computer program as well as a sample printout for the DSCS-11 satellite program and a listing of the symbols used in the program were included. The APL language listing for the payload program cost estimating computer program was given. This language is compatible with many of the time sharing remote terminals computers used in the United States. Data on the intelsat communications network was studied. Costs for telecommunications systems leasing, line of sight microwave relay communications systems, submarine telephone cables, and terrestrial power generation systems were also described.

  1. El valor del suelo habitacional y la intervención de agentes externos Valle de Bravo, Estado de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Zuleica Torres Pulido

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Como parte fundamental de los estudios de planeación se encuentra el territorio, el suelo como componente esencial de la estructura urbana y sustento de las diferentes actividades realizadas por el hombre, cobra singular importancia al momento que el valor, el uso y los agentes que en ellos interviene se vuelven factores que impulsan o retraen el desarrollo de un lugar, trayendo como consecuencia segregaciones sociales. De ahí que en este trabajo se da a conocer, a partir del caso de Valle de Bravo, la influencia que ejercen los agentes externos en los cambios del valor de suelo habitacional, tomando como punto de partida la evolución del patrón de ocupación del suelo y las actividades económicas.

  2. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, W.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-06-01

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs.

  3. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs

  4. A radioactive glasnost? Bravo!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scepticism is expressed about the new Soviet 'glasnost' (openness). Swiss politicians are criticized for on the one hand 'courageously' abandoning the Kaiseraugst project (in the light of the Chernobyl disaster) and on the other hand not demanding compensation from the Soviets for the effects of Chernobyl. (G.T.H.)

  5. Fallout from Chernobyl and atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. Chernobyl in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some results and experience gained so far in Sweden after the Chernobyl accident are discussed in the light of knowledge obtained from the studies of fallout from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. Cesium-137, which was an important radionuclide in the bomb fallout, was still more important after Chernobyl. For most Swedes the external irradiation from deposited Cs-137 was the dominating source of irradiation. Studies of Chernobyl fallout have given new information in the fate of contamination in the forest environment, lakes, urban areas, on shielding factors for houses etc. The releases from Chernobyl gave relatively lower dietary doses than expected form the same amount of Cs-137, released through nuclear weapons testing. However lake fish, moose and forest products have shown to be of greater importance than earlier realized. The main reason for the lower dietary doses from Chernobyl was the seasonal distribution of the fallout with deposition just before the start of the growing season. The various actions taken also reduced the intake of Cs-137 and Cs-134. Otherwise, there are no radical differences in the behaviour of cesium in the environment after the bombs and after Chernobyl. Differences may exist, primarily during the first year, due to different fallout conditions, where also the physical-chemical form of the fallout might have been of some importance. The average Swede will have an effective dose commitment of around 1 mSv from Chernobyl, which is about the same as from the bomb fallout. The highest doses due to Chernobyl area received by people living in high deposition areas (>80 kBq/m2 of CS-137) and consuming larger amounts of game animals, lake fish and reindeer. (66 refs.)

  6. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  7. Global risk of radioactive fallout after major nuclear reactor accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Major reactor accidents of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the cumulative, global risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents (the most severe ones on the International Nuclear Event Scale, INES 7, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. Our results indicate that previously the occurrence of INES 7 major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a major reactor accident of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance before being deposited. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human exposure due to deposition are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in West Europe and South Asia, where a major reactor accident can subject around 30 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  8. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigurgeirsson, M.A.; Arnalds, O.; Palsson, S.E.; Gudnason, K. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Division of Environmental Monitoring and Emergency Preparedness, Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2004-07-01

    In 2000-2002 the retention of {sup 137}Cs in various types of andosols, which are the most abundant soils in Iceland, was investigated. This is the first comprehensive attempt to determine radiocaesium levels and retention characteristics of Icelandic soils. Soils were sampled at 29 sites located near meteorological stations covering variation in precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0- 5, 5-10, and 10-15 cm depths. Several physical and chemical parameters were measured, such as organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, pH and clay mineral content. The radiocaesium activity is quite variable and ranges between 300 and 4800 Bq/m{sup 2} and correlates closely to total annual precipitation (r{sup 2}=0.9). Most of the radiocaesium is retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil, or 83% on average. The greatest penetration was observed for organic Histo-sols, where 6% of the total {sup 137}Cs was found at 10-15 cm depth compared to less than 3% for Andosols types. The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with low clay content and contain little organic matter (<1%). Yet these soils retained 74% of {sup 137}Cs in the top 5 cm in our study. The results clearly indicate that radioactive fallout caesium is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferri-hydrite. Winter frost, snow melt, crack flow, and animal activity seem to have little effect on the {sup 137}Cs distribution at the present sampling sites. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the aerial activity and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils. (author)

  9. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2000-2002 the retention of 137Cs in various types of andosols, which are the most abundant soils in Iceland, was investigated. This is the first comprehensive attempt to determine radiocaesium levels and retention characteristics of Icelandic soils. Soils were sampled at 29 sites located near meteorological stations covering variation in precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0- 5, 5-10, and 10-15 cm depths. Several physical and chemical parameters were measured, such as organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, pH and clay mineral content. The radiocaesium activity is quite variable and ranges between 300 and 4800 Bq/m2 and correlates closely to total annual precipitation (r2=0.9). Most of the radiocaesium is retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil, or 83% on average. The greatest penetration was observed for organic Histo-sols, where 6% of the total 137Cs was found at 10-15 cm depth compared to less than 3% for Andosols types. The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with low clay content and contain little organic matter (137Cs in the top 5 cm in our study. The results clearly indicate that radioactive fallout caesium is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferri-hydrite. Winter frost, snow melt, crack flow, and animal activity seem to have little effect on the 137Cs distribution at the present sampling sites. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the aerial activity and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils. (author)

  10. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  11. Evolution of childhood leukemia rates in the regions of the former Soviet Union contaminated by the Chernobyl reactor fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) that took place on April, 26th, 1986 led to a considerable release of radioactive substances which spread to vast parts of Europe. The regions most highly contaminated by this fall-out are Belarus, the Western parts of Russia, and the Northern parts of the Ukraine. It is known that leukaemias, especially the acute leukaemias predominant in children, can be induced by ionising radiation. This study was designed to elucidate the question whether the continued low radiation exposure after the ChNPP accident had led to an observable increase in the affected population. To this aim, all leukaemia cases that had occurred in children in the most highly contaminated regions between 1982 and 1998 were subjected to a pooled temporal and regional analysis, where the non-contaminated parts of Belarus served as control for the regional analysis. It could be shown that the analysed material is complete (also for the pre-accidental period) and, through retrospective case ascertainment, of extraordinarily high quality. This study documents comparable leukaemia rates in children in the contaminated and the noncontaminated regions, as well as in the pre-accidental and the post accidental periods. This result is in line with the estimation of expected excess cases using current risk estimates. It does, thus, not contradict the fact that leukaemias can principally be induced by radiation

  12. Migration studies of 137Cs from nuclear weapons fallout and the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vertical migration of 137Cs originating from nuclear weapons fallout (NWF) and the Chernobyl accident has been studied at 27 reference sites in western Sweden. An attempt to describe the present depth distribution with an alternative solution of the Convection-Dispersion Equation (CDE) with a pulse-like fallout as initial condition was made. The actual depth profiles in the soil samples were fit to a sum of the CDE for both NWF and Chernobyl debris. The magnitudes of the fallouts were estimated from precipitation calculations and GIS-mapping, leaving two free parameters (convection velocity and effective dispersion constant) for performing the fit of the depth profiles. In some cases using only two parameters is not sufficient to achieve an accurate representation for the depth profile, indicating an over- or underestimate of the magnitude of the fallout. In these cases the magnitude of the fallout is also varied. The fitted depth profiles were used to correct in situ measurements from the same locations for the actual depth distribution, showing good agreement with the accumulated activities in soil samples

  13. A century old record of lead-210 fallout on the Greenland ice sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic measurements of the stable oxygen isotope ratio (δ18O) and artificial radioactivity (total β) on a 77 m ice core the DYE 3 location in S.E. Greenland provided precise age indices to study the fallout of lead-210 during the last century. The results obtained on the Dye 3 core and those of similar studies conducted on two other ice cores from the Greenland locations, Camp Century and North Central, are discussed in relation to the average fallout of 210Pb and the probable contributions made by natural and artificial sources in the atmosphere. The results indicate that: (i) the fallout of 210Pb observed over a period of 100 years has not remained constant, an assumption usually made in geochronological studies; (ii) the fallout of 210Pb over the period 1886-1930 is observed to be higher at least by a factor of two than that observed in the period 1930-1975; (iii) the higher 210Pb fallout observed over the period 1886-1930 coincides with high volcanic activity in this period; (iv) there is no evidence for significant production of 210Pb due to testing of nuclear weapons in the three decades: 1950s to 1970s. (author) 28 refs

  14. Using total beta-activity measurements in milk to derive thyroid doses from Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Chernobyl accident, more than 200 childhood thyroid cancer cases have been observed in Brest Oblast of Belarus in territories slightly contaminated with 137Cs, but with suspected relatively high 131I fallout. The most helpful measurements available that can be used to estimate thyroid doses for the population of Brest Oblast are the total beta-activity measurements in cow's milk performed using DP-100 device within a few weeks after the accident. The 131I concentrations in milk were derived from the total beta-activity measurements on the basis of (1) a radioecological model used to estimate the variation with time of the radionuclide composition in milk and (2) the determination of the calibration factors of the DP-100 device for the most important radionuclides present in milk. As a result, 131I concentrations in milk were reconstructed for territories with different levels of 137Cs deposition. A non-linear dependence of the 131I concentration in milk on the 137Cs deposition density was obtained; it was used to estimate the thyroid doses from the consumption of 131I-contaminated cow's milk by the population of Brest Oblast. The average individual thyroid doses have been estimated to be 0.15, 0.18, 0.12, 0.06, 0.04 and 0.03 Gy for newborn, children aged 1, 5, 10 and 15 y and adults, respectively. The collective thyroid dose for the entire population of Brest Oblast is estimated to be 64,500 man Gy, the contribution from the adult population being about one half of the total. The methodology that is described could be applied in the framework of epidemiological studies of the relationship between radiation exposure to the thyroid gland and thyroid cancer in areas where numerous total beta-activity measurements in cow's milk were performed within a few weeks after the accident. (authors)

  15. Estimation of radionuclide ingestion: Lessons from dose reconstruction for fallout from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States conducted atmospheric testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site from 1951 through 1963. In 1979 the U.S. Department of Energy established the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project to compile a data base related to health effects from nuclear testing and to reconstruct doses to public residing off of the Nevada Test Site. This project is the most comprehensive dose reconstruction project to date, and, since similar assessments are currently underway at several other locations within and outside the U.S., lessons from ORERP can be valuable. A major component of dose reconstruction is estimation of dose from radionuclide ingestion. The PATHWAY food-chain model was developed to estimate the amount of radionuclides ingested. For agricultural components of the human diet, PATHWAY predicts radionuclide concentrations and quantities ingested. To improve accuracy and model credibility, four components of model analysis were conducted: estimation of uncertainty in model predictions, estimation of sensitivity of model predictions to input parameters, and testing of model predictions against independent data (validation), and comparing predictions from PATHWAY with those from other models. These results identified strengths and weaknesses in the model and aided in establishing the confidence associated with model prediction, which is a critical component risk assessment and dose reconstruction. For fallout from the Nevada Test Site, by far, the largest internal doses were received by the thyroid. However, the predicted number of fatal cancers from ingestion dose was generally much smaller than the number predicted from external dose. The number of fatal cancers predicted from ingestion dose was also orders of magnitude below the normal projected cancer rate. Several lessons were learned during the study that are relevant to other dose reconstruction efforts

  16. Radiation in living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aside from the atomic bomb attacks in 1945, the experience of radioactive contamination of human environment was the exposure of a tuna fishing boat to the radioactive fallout of a hydrogen bomb test explosion at Bikini atoll in March, 1954. Thereafter, radioactivity was frequently detected in fishes in central Pacific Ocean. Radioactivity was also detected in rain, which resulted in the contamination of agricultural products. Due to the great concern of general public for the radioactivity in food materials, the government initiated the national program of radioactivity surveillance. Since then, the fallout radioactivity due to nuclear test explosions was the main object surveillance in 1950s and 1960s, but the program was gradually expanded to include natural radiation, the artificial radioactivity due to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and other special programs. The history of the radioactive contamination of environment, natural radiation, medical exposure, the radioactive fallout due to nuclear tests, nuclear power generation and the Chernobyl accident are reported. (K.I.)

  17. The radioactive fall-out harm of nuclear burst to crops and its protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive contamination in the ground burst center is severe and the contaminated area is often large, as well as the effect of radioactive contamination is long. With different kinds of crops, the effects of external contamination caused by the fall-out are different. The contamination can easily be reduced by wind or rain. On the leaf surface it can be washed off and reduced to 10%. A small amount of fission product can be absorbed through plant roots. It is mainly distributed in leaves and stems. The radioactive contamination of fall-out would damage the crops and reduce the production. After an atmospheric test, the fall-out of 90Sr and 137Cs plays an important role in the biological effects. The absorption and distribution of radioactive contaminants in crops, their chemical states in soil and the measures to reduce the absorbed radioactivity are respectively studied

  18. Meteorological requirements and operational fallout prediction techniques for Plowshare nuclear detonations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meteorological support requirements for Plowshare nuclear detonations are shown to depend on a number of factors. The importance of adequate support to the effective planning and safe conduct of a nuclear detonation is described. An example of the influence of atmospheric conditions on radioactive cloud development and local transport and fallout of radioactive debris is presented. Prediction of the future state of atmospheric wind structure, required for fallout predictions depends on an adequate definition of its initial state and its rate of change. This definition, in turn, is shown to depend on an upper wind-sounding network of appropriate station density. An operational technique currently used for nuclear cratering fallout predictions is described and shown to produce results of useful accuracy. (author)

  19. Influence of the Chernobyl fallout on 137Cs wine activities on the Rhone valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of the Chernobyl fallout on 137CS wine activities on the Rhone valley. Some parts of the Rhone valley have been quite strongly, affected by the Chernobyl fallout, with 137Cs deposits sometimes higher than 20 000 Bq m-2. In those regions, most of agricultural surfaces are devoted to vineyards for famous vintages. This study shows that the consequences of the Chernobyl fallout in wine were visible but very weak. 137CS wine activities did not reached 1 Bq 1-1. Such limited consequences are linked to the date of the deposit, the first week of May 1986, at the beginning of vineyard plant foliar development. Since 1986, this activity has strongly decreased to be in 2000 close to those existing before the accident: some milli-becquerel per litre. 137Cs activities in soil, mainly contained within the 20 first centimeters, are weakly available for vineyard roots. (authors)

  20. Revision of the amphiamerican Neotetraonchus Bravo-Hollis, 1968 (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae), with a description of N. vegrandis n. sp. from the gill lamellae of the blue sea catfish Ariopsis guatemalensis (Siluriformes: Ariidae) off the Pacific Coast of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsky, Delane C; Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F; Bullard, Stephen A; Vidal-Martínez, Victor M

    2009-09-01

    Neotetraonchus Bravo-Hollis, 1968 is revised and reassigned to the Dactylogyridae Bychowsky, 1933 based on examinations of specimens representing four species from the gill lamellae of sea catfishes (Ariidae). The monotypic Neotetraonchidae Bravo-Hollis, 1968 is placed in synonymy with the Dactylogyridae. Neotetraonchus bychowskyi Bravo-Hollis, 1968 (type-species), is redescribed from the tete sea catfish Ariopsis seemanni (Günther) (type-host) in the eastern Pacific Ocean off Panama (new geographical record). Neotetraonchus vegrandis n. sp. is described from the blue sea catfish A. guatemalensis (Günther) off the Pacific Coast of Mexico. Neotetraonchus bravohollisae Paperna, 1977 is redescribed from the hardhead sea catfish A. felis (L.) in the Gulf of Mexico off the Yucatan Peninsula. Neotetraonchus felis (Hargis, 1955) Paperna, 1977 is redescribed from A. felis in the Gulf of Mexico off Mississippi and the Yucatan Peninsula (new geographical record). Morphological similarities between species of Neotetraonchus suggest the likely presence of geminate species pairs flanking the Isthmus of Panama. PMID:19633926

  1. Fallout deposition in the Marshall Islands from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Harold L; Bouville, André; Moroz, Brian E; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Deposition densities (Bq m(-2)) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in nuclear weapons testing fallout from tests conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls (1946-1958) have been estimated on a test-specific basis for 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. A complete review of various historical and contemporary data, as well as meteorological analysis, was used to make judgments regarding which tests deposited fallout in the Marshall Islands and to estimate fallout deposition density. Our analysis suggested that only 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in substantial fallout deposition on any of the 23 inhabited atolls. This analysis was confirmed by the fact that the sum of our estimates of 137Cs deposition from these 20 tests at each atoll is in good agreement with the total 137Cs deposited as estimated from contemporary soil sample analyses. The monitoring data and meteorological analyses were used to quantitatively estimate the deposition density of 63 activation and fission products for each nuclear test, plus the cumulative deposition of 239+240Pu at each atoll. Estimates of the degree of fractionation of fallout from each test at each atoll, as well as of the fallout transit times from the test sites to the atolls were used in this analysis. The estimates of radionuclide deposition density, fractionation, and transit times reported here are the most complete available anywhere and are suitable for estimations of both external and internal dose to representative persons as described in companion papers. PMID:20622548

  2. Hot particles and the Cold War. Investigating fallout from nuclear testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entering the next century, more than 2000 nuclear test explosions of various sizes and varieties will have been recorded. Nearly all of them were conducted during the Cold War period ending in the 1990s. Atmospheric nuclear tests dispersed radioactive residues into the environment. They are partitioned between the local ground (or water surface) and the tropospheric and stratospheric regions, depending on the type of test, location, and yield. The subsequent precipitation carrying the residues leads to both local and global fallout. Concentrations of certain radionuclides can result in formation of 'hot particles' - tiny bits of materials containing radioactive chemical elements. Local fallout includes large radioactive aerosols, particles which are generally deposited within about 100 kilometers of the test site. Local radioactive contamination at nuclear weapon test sites additionally is attributed to safety trials of nuclear devices that often dispersed fissile material. This material is released in various forms, including plutonium vapour, plutonium aerosols of various sizes, plutonium oxide particulates, plutonium-coated particles, and sizeable lumps of plutonium-contaminated structural material destroyed by the test explosion. Global fallout encompasses both tropospheric and stratospheric fallout. The first consists of aerosols that are not carried across the tropopause and that deposit With a mean residence time of up to 30 days. During this time, the residues become dispersed in the latitude band of injection, following trajectories governed by wind patterns. Stratospheric fallout arises from particles that later give rise to widespread global fallout, most of which is in the hemisphere where the nuclear test was conducted. It accounts for most of the residues of long-lived fission products

  3. Fallout 137Cs activity and associated dose in the coastal marine environment of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coastal marine environment is important for India since a considerable percentage of the human population resides in coastal areas. Fallout radionuclides as well as non-radioactive substances have polluted the coastal marine environment of India. The introduction of 137Cs, a fallout radionuclide, considered as global pollutant, into marine environment has created the need for marine environmental data. The main objective is to provide data on the present level of 137Cs that is important from the standpoint of radiological health and dose associated with it. Such database will also provide benchmark that will be helpful in assessing the impact of additional contribution to marine radioactivity in the future. (author)

  4. The I.R.S.N.-2003 model of Chernobylsk accident fallout in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conclusion, the whole of the method impreciseness, the sometime important variation between the very simplifying hypothesis used and the available data ( especially for the air contamination and the fallout of nuclear tests), the variations between the results of the model and the measurements, its incompatible results with these ones exposed and validated in the report I.P.S.N.-1997, lead to consider that the I.R.S.N.-2003 model does not allow a reliable quantitative estimation of Chernobylsk fallout and let alone the dosimetry estimations for which it has been used. (N.C.)

  5. Organizational and social-psychological issues relevant to fallout-shelter evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernette, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary review of the literature on organizational and social-psychological issues relevant to fallout-shelter evaluation. Fallout-shelter options are evaluated along two dimensions: shelter size, and extent of shelteree participation in the shelter construction. Four functional criteria are used in the evaluation: decision-making, member coordination, social control, and maintaining morale. Smaller shelters requiring shelteree participation in construction appear preferable as measured in most of these criteria. Additional factors mentioned include demographic characteristics of the shelter population, degree and type of ventilation system, and availability of medical equipment and personnel. 10 references.

  6. Distribution of neptunium and plutonium in New Mexico lichen samples (Usnea arizonica) contaminated by atmospheric fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of 237Np, 239Pu and 240Pu were determined in lichen samples (Usnea arizonica) that were collected from ten locations in New Mexico between 2011 and 2013 using isotope dilution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). The observed isotopic ratios for 237Np/239Pu and 240Pu/239Pu indicate trace contamination from global and regional fallout (e.g. Trinity test and atmospheric testing at the Nevada Test Site). The fact that actinide contamination is detected in recent lichen collections suggests continuous re-suspension of fallout radionuclides even 50 years after ratification of the Limited Test Ban Treaty. (author)

  7. Local fallout from nuclear test detonations. Volume 2. Compilation of fallout patterns and related test data. Supplement. Foreign nuclear tests. Sanitized

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenthau, M.; Showers, R.L.

    1964-10-01

    The available fallout patterns and related test data for nuclear weapon tests conducted by the United Kingdom, the Republic of France, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, are included in this supplement to NDL-TR-34. The related test data for the British and French tests include: date and time of detonation, location of test site, total yield, fission yield, type of burst and placement, height of burst, cloud-top and -bottom heights, crater data, and wind information up to nuclear cloud-top height. No fallout patterns are available for any of the Soviet detonations. The list of Soviet detonations, which is as comprehensive as possible, contains the chronological order of the detonations, date, yield, type of burst and location of test site.

  8. Re-suspension of the radioactive fallout after the Fukushima accident: risk of internal dose during the first week and the first two months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M.; Takeda, M.; Makino, M.; Owada, T.

    2012-04-01

    The nuclear accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011 contaminated an area of more than 100 km in diameter by radioactive material with amount of about 10-20% of that by the Chernobyl accident. According to the Chernobyl experience, a part of fallout radionuclide is expected to be re-suspended by wind, causing possible risk of internal dose. However, this re-suspension process and its amounts have not been studied very much due to the difficulty of direct measurement of low-density dusts. To estimate forms and periods of the re-suspension of the radioactive fallout, we used both the radiation dose rate data and vertical (downward) component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG) at Kakioka, 150 km away from the accident site. The data indicates: (1) During 14-15 March, the radioactive dust is most likely suspended in the air near the ground. (2) During 2-7 UT on 16 March, the radioactive dust is most likely blown up from the surface by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3) During 16-20 March, the radioactive dust most likely stayed re-suspended. (4) After the wet contamination on 20 March until late April, the radioactive fallout on the ground are re-suspended during daytime by daily convection due to sunshine, and transported to downwind direction. (5) At more than 30 km distance from the accident site, the re-suspension most likely ceased by the end of April. However, no data is available within 20 km distance from the accident site. Yamauchi, et al. (2012): Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement, Ann. Geophys., 30, 49-56, doi:10.5194/angeo-30-49-2012. Yamauchi (2012): Secondary wind transport of radioactive materials after the Fukushima accident, Earth Planet Space, accepted for publication.

  9. Variability of water content and of depth profiles of global fallout 137Cs in grassland soils and the resulting external gamma-dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    137Cs from global fallout of nuclear weapon testings in the 1950s and 1960s was determined in successive layers (0-30 cm) of eight undisturbed grassland soils in Bavaria, Germany. The maximum activity concentration was found in soil layers between 4 and 15 cm below the surface. Using the vertical distribution of the cesium activity, which varied considerably from site to site, the mean residence half-time of 137Cs from global fallout in each soil layer was evaluated with a compartment model. These values ranged from 1.0 to 6.3 years/cm. The mean residence half-time averaged over all soil layers and all sites was 2.7±1.4 years/cm and, thus, about twice the corresponding residence half-time of the Chernobyl-derived 137Cs as determined in the same soil layers (also in 1993). The dose rate of the external gamma-radiation due to 137Cs from global fallout in the soil determined from the depth distributions varied between 0.34 and 0.57 (mean: 0.45±0.07) nGy/h per kBq/m2. The effect of soil water content on the dose rate was studied by considering four states of the soil, from water content zero to complete water saturation of the total pore volume. It was shown that the difference between the dose rates at the permanent wilting point and the field capacity, which both represent the most relevant water contents of soils, was only 10% of the dose rate at the permanent wilting point for all sites. (orig.)

  10. Variability of water content and of depth profiles of global fallout {sup 137}Cs in grassland soils and the resulting external gamma-dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmack, W.; Bunzl, K. [Institute of Radiation Protection, GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Steindl, H. [Institute of Soil Ecology, GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1998-04-01

    {sup 137}Cs from global fallout of nuclear weapon testings in the 1950s and 1960s was determined in successive layers (0-30 cm) of eight undisturbed grassland soils in Bavaria, Germany. The maximum activity concentration was found in soil layers between 4 and 15 cm below the surface. Using the vertical distribution of the cesium activity, which varied considerably from site to site, the mean residence half-time of {sup 137}Cs from global fallout in each soil layer was evaluated with a compartment model. These values ranged from 1.0 to 6.3 years/cm. The mean residence half-time averaged over all soil layers and all sites was 2.7{+-}1.4 years/cm and, thus, about twice the corresponding residence half-time of the Chernobyl-derived {sup 137}Cs as determined in the same soil layers (also in 1993). The dose rate of the external gamma-radiation due to {sup 137}Cs from global fallout in the soil determined from the depth distributions varied between 0.34 and 0.57 (mean: 0.45{+-}0.07) nGy/h per kBq/m{sup 2}. The effect of soil water content on the dose rate was studied by considering four states of the soil, from water content zero to complete water saturation of the total pore volume. It was shown that the difference between the dose rates at the permanent wilting point and the field capacity, which both represent the most relevant water contents of soils, was only 10% of the dose rate at the permanent wilting point for all sites. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs.

  11. Variability of water content and of depth profiles of global fallout 137Cs in grassland soils and the resulting external gamma-dose rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmack, W; Steindl, H; Bunzl, K

    1998-04-01

    137Cs from global fallout of nuclear weapon testings in the 1950s and 1960s was determined in successive layers (0-30 cm) of eight undisturbed grassland soils in Bavaria, Germany. The maximum activity concentration was found in soil layers between 4 and 15 cm below the surface. Using the vertical distribution of the cesium activity, which varied considerably from site to site, the mean residence half-time of 137Cs from global fallout in each soil layer was evaluated with a compartment model. These values ranged from 1.0 to 6.3 years/cm. The mean residence half-time averaged over all soil layers and all sites was 2.7 +/- 1.4 years/cm and, thus, about twice the corresponding residence half-time of the Chernobyl-derived 137Cs as determined in the same soil layers (also in 1993). The dose rate of the external gamma-radiation due to 137Cs from global fallout in the soil determined from the depth distributions varied between 0.34 and 0.57 (mean: 0.45 +/- 0.07) nGy/h per kBq/m2. The effect of soil water content on the dose rate was studied by considering four states of the soil, from water content zero to complete water saturation of the total pore volume. It was shown that the difference between the dose rates at the permanent wilting point and the field capacity, which both represent the most relevant water contents of soils, was only 10% of the dose rate at the permanent wilting point for all sites. PMID:9615340

  12. In utero exposure to iodine-131 from Chernobyl fallout and anthropometric characteristics in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta, Gila; Hatch, Maureen; Kitahara, Cari M; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Bolshova, Elena V; Tereschenko, Valery P; Tronko, Mykola D; Brenner, Alina V

    2014-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to external radiation has been linked to growth retardation among atomic bomb survivors in adolescence. It is unclear from previous studies whether in utero exposure to internal radiation such as iodine-131 (I-131), which concentrates in the thyroid gland, has an effect on physical growth. We examined the associations between estimated thyroid gland dose from prenatal exposure to I-131 and self-reported height and weight in a cohort of 2,460 individuals exposed to radioactive fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident [mean I-131 dose = 72 (mGy)] and screened for thyroid diseases in adolescence. Using multivariable linear regression models, we estimated the mean differences in height, weight and body mass index (BMI) per unit increase in dose (100 mGy) in models adjusted for gender, age at examination, type of residence (rural/urban) and presence of thyroid disease diagnosed at screening. All of the adjustment factors as well as the trimester of exposure were evaluated as potential modifiers of the dose response. Overall, no significant dose response was found for height (P = 0.29), weight (P = 0.14) or BMI (P = 0.16). We found significant modification of the dose response for weight and BMI by presence/absence of thyroid disease (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively), but not for other factors. In individuals without thyroid disease (n = 1,856), there was a weak, significant association between I-131 thyroid dose and higher weight (210 g per 100 mGy, P = 0.02) or BMI (70 g/m² per 100 mGy, P = 0.02) that depended on individuals (n = 52) exposed to ≥500 mGy. In individuals with thyroid disease (n = 579, 67.4% with simple diffuse goiter) no significant association with I-131 for weight (P = 0.14) or BMI (P = 0.14) was found. These results do not support the hypothesis that in utero exposure to I-131 at levels experienced by a majority of study subjects may be associated with meaningful differences in adolescent anthropometry. However

  13. A Physical Assessment of the Opportunities for Improved Management of the Water Resources of the Bi-National Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, J.; McKinney, D.; Valdes, J.; Guitron, A.; Thomas, G.

    2007-05-01

    The hydro-physical opportunities for expanding the beneficial uses of the fixed water supply in the Rio Grande/Bravo Basin to better satisfy an array of water management goals are examined. These include making agriculture more resilient to periodic conditions of drought, improving the reliability of supplies to cities and towns, and restoring lost environmental functions in the river system. This is a comprehensive, outcome-neutral, model- based planning exercise performed by some 20 technical, primarily non-governmental institutions from both countries, aimed at proposing strategies that can reduce future conflicts over water throughout the entire basin. The second track consists in generating a set of future water management scenarios that respond to the needs and objectives of the basin stakeholders in each segment and each country. An array of scenarios for improved water management has been developed for the lower Rio Grande/Rio Bravo basin in Texas and the Mexican state of Tamaulipas. Another set under development will focus on the Rio Conchos and the El Paso/Juarez region. Eventually, scenarios will be generated such that will comprehend the entire basin on both sides of the border. These scenarios are the product of consultations with agricultural water districts, governmental organizations and environmental NGOs. They include strategies for reducing the physical losses of water in the system, conservation transfers, improvements in the operations of the Mexican and international reservoirs, improvements in environmental flow conditions, improvements in reliability of water supplies, and drought coping strategies.These scenarios will be evaluated for hydrologic feasibility by the basin-wide model and the gaming exercises. Modeling is necessary to understand how these options will affect the entire system and how they can be crafted to maximize the benefits and avoid unintended or uncompensated effects. The scenarios that have the potential to provide large

  14. Biological responses to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-nuclear war local and global fall-out distribution and levels are discussed in relation to fission products and neutron activation radionuclides. Tables are presented of the sensitivities of the major ecosystems to ionising radiations, of the sensitivity of dormant seed, of small animals and birds, and of the main factors affecting plant sensitivity to radiation. Representative bioconcentration factors for Co, Cs and Sr for various species are listed, together with whole-body dose estimates to marine biota from 10,000 MT nuclear war. Internal doses, and pathways to humans are discussed. It is concluded that the direct effects of fallout on humans would far exceed the indirect effects resulting from destruction or disturbance of ecological systems. (UK)

  15. Fallout of thorium and uranium isotopes from the 1982 eruption of the El Chichon volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marked increases in the concentration of thorium and uranium isotopes observed in rain samples collected at Fayetteville (36 deg N, 94 deg W), Arkansas, during 1983 are attributed to the fallout from the 1982 eruption of El chichon volcano in Mexico. (author)

  16. Multifractal analysis of Chernobyl fall-out: Self-organized criticality and hot spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors argue for a multifractal analysis of the Chernobyl fall-out, necessary to capture its high degree of inhomogeneity. They show that it may be the result of a (non classical) Self Organized Critical transport mechanism. The authors proceed to a preliminary empirical estimate of critical orders of moments corresponding to first order multifractal phase transitions

  17. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 1. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, prepared for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), presents a summary evaluation of various shelter options for use in the case where the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft2 per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft2 per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The authors find that the FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. The authors also find that, in terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements

  18. The IAEA programme on the acquisition of data for the fallout isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA, in collaboration with the World Meteorogical Organization, has been working since 1961 on a long-term project for acquistion, processing and publication of data for the isotopic composition (T,D, 180) of the fallout on a global scale. At present, IAEA has data, compiled from 347 hydrometeorogical stations in 79 countries. The analysis of isotope data, obtained from the global station network for more than 20 years, allows the following conclusions: (i)The global trends of forming the isotope composition of atmospheric fallout, which are one of the maior links of the hydrogeological cycle, are clarified; (ii)These regularities enabled the use of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in scientific research and the practice; (iii)Extensive studies of the resourses of surface and ground water and of their genesis and dynamics have been carried out, using the fallout isotopic composition as an input function; (iv)The effectiveness of further efforts in isotope composition data acquisition is limited by the lack of analyses using models of the global atmospheric circulation; (v)Further regular observations of the variations in fallout isotope composition are needed for some large regions of Eurasia, Africa and the polar region

  19. Assessment of leukemia and thyroid disease in relation to fallout in Utah: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of one year's work on the effects of fallout on the development of leukemia and thyroid disease in humans residing in Utah. Divided into 37 subphases, this report evaluates the development of predictive models, the use of dosimetry, and various cohort studies. (FI)

  20. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 2. Detailed analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a preliminary, detailed evaluation of various shelter options for use if the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft2 per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft2 per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. In terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements

  1. Gamma ray spectra recorded from the fallout collected in May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the gamma ray spectra recorded from the fallout collective in Bucharest and Brasov in May, 1986 was carried out. Relative activities of the assigned radionuclides were computed and the duration of the 235U fuel irradiation has been deduced. (author)

  2. Pine needle activity and the washing effect as a measure of fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallout and natural radionuclides in pine needles are measured by Ge(Li) detector coupled with a multichannel analyser. Washing effect on pine needle activity is also measured by washing the samples with water and other chemicals. High extents of washing-out of activity were observed in case of running water and hydrochloric acid. (author)

  3. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 2. Detailed analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, D.J.; Clinch, J.M.; Davis, F.H.; Hill, L.G.; Lynch, E.P.; Tanzman, E.A.; Wernette, D.R.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents a preliminary, detailed evaluation of various shelter options for use if the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft/sup 2/ per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft/sup 2/ per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. In terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements.

  4. Lead-210 and Beryllium-7 fallout rates on the southeastern coast of Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Christian J., E-mail: zinosanders@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Fluminense (UFF), Departamento de Geoquimica, Outeiro de Sao Joao Baptista s/n, Morro do Valonguinho Centro, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Smoak, Joseph M. [University of South Florida (USF), Environmental Science, St. Petersburg, FL (United States); Cable, Peter H. [Tulane University, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, New Orleans, LA (United States); Patchineelam, Sambasiva R. [Universidade Federal de Fluminense (UFF), Departamento de Geoquimica, Outeiro de Sao Joao Baptista s/n, Morro do Valonguinho Centro, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Sanders, Luciana M. [Istituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro 22780 (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    Total {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be fallout rates were measured on the coastal region of Niteroi, Brazil. The monthly depositional flux of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be varied by a factor of 26, from 1.7 to 43.3 mBq cm{sup -2} year{sup -1} and {approx}27, from 7.5 to 203.5 mBq cm{sup -2} year{sup -1}, respectively. The relatively large oscillations in the depositional flux of {sup 210}Pb at this study site were likely due to variations in air mass sources, while the {sup 7}Be fluctuations may be driven by a combination of weather conditions. Local geology could support the periodic high fluxes of {sup 210}Pb from continental air masses, as shifting oceanic wind sources were affirmed by the uncorrelated {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be fallout activities and {sup 7}Be/{sup 210}Pb ratios. The {sup 210}Pb atmospheric deposition was found to be in agreement with local sediment inventories, an important consideration in geochemical studies that estimate sedimentation processes. - Highlights: > Fallout rates of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be indicate depositional flux during a 12-month period. > Oscillations in {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be fallout are driven by geology ({sup 210}Pb) and weather. > Regional trends in {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb fluxes used in geochemical processes.

  5. Mushrooms and the radioactivity coming from Tchernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, since the accident of Tchernobyl in 1986, the radiation regular monitoring of the food and the environment shows that the mushrooms present cesium 137 content levels upper than all the other agricultural products. This paper presents and explains the today and future situation

  6. Distribution of Np and Pu in Swedish lichen samples (Cladonia stellaris) contaminated by atmospheric fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, Patric E-mail: patric.lindahl@radfys.lu.se; Roos, Per; Eriksson, Mats; Holm, Elis

    2004-07-01

    The activity concentrations of {sup 237}Np and the two Pu isotopes, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, were determined in lichen samples (Cladonia stellaris) contaminated by fallout from atmospheric nuclear test explosions and the Chernobyl accident. The samples were collected at 18 locations in Sweden, from north to south, between 1986 and 1988 and analysed with high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry. Data on the activity ratios {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs measured previously were also included in this study for comparison. The {sup 237}Np activity concentration ranged from 0.08{+-}0.01 to 2.08{+-}0.17 mBq kg{sup -1}, depending on the location of the sampling site and time of collection. The {sup 239+240}Pu activity concentration ranged from 0.09{+-}0.01 to 4.09{+-}0.15 Bq kg{sup -1}, with the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratio ranging between 0.16{+-}0.01 and 0.44{+-}0.03, the higher ratios indicating a combination of weapons test fallout and Chernobyl fallout. The {sup 237}Np/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratios ranged between 0.06{+-}0.01 and 0.42{+-}0.04, the lower ratios indicating combination of weapons test fallout and Chernobyl fallout. At a well-defined sampling site at Lake Rogen (62.32 deg. N, 12.38 deg. E), additional lichen samples were collected between 1987 and 1998 to study the distribution of Np and Pu in different layers. The concentrations of the two elements follow each other quite well in the profile.

  7. Radioactive fallout in the South Pacific : a history. Part 3: strontium-90 and caesium-137 deposition in New Zealand and resulting contamination of milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides a comprehensive analysis of milk radioactivity data, principally pertaining to 90Sr and 137Cs, collected in nine regions of New Zealand. Fallout deposition data are also reviewed and relationships between deposition and resulting milk contamination described. This report provides further information on 90Sr deposition in New Zealand and summarises period from 1961 to 1990. Trends in levels of 90Sr and 137Cs in milk over long periods and also annual trends are described, together with variations between regions, modelled relationships between fallout deposition and milk contamination levels, measurements of 131I and 89Sr in milk, and estimates of resulting dietary radiation exposure in New Zealand. A major aim of the present report was to summarise as much of the information contained in the deposition and dairy product databases as possible through the description of trends and derivation of relationships in order to improve understanding of the behaviour of artificial radioactive contaminants in the environment and their passage through food-chains. 34 refs., 29 tabs., 50 figs., 1 ill

  8. Vigilando la Calidad del Agua de los Grandes Rios de la Nacion: El Programa NASQAN del Rio Grande (Rio Bravo del Norte)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurry, Dee L.; Reutter, David C.; Wells, Frank C.; Rivera, M.C., (translator); Munoz, A.

    1998-01-01

    La Oficina del Estudio Geologico de los Estados Unidos (U.S. Geological Survey, 0 USGS) ha monitoreado la calidad del agua de la cuenca del Rio Grande (Rio Bravo del Norte) desde 1995 como parte de la rediseiiada Red Nacional para Contabilizar la Calidad del Agua de los Rios (National Stream Quality Accounting Network, o NASOAN) (Hooper and others, 1997). EI programa NASOAN fue diseiiado para caracterizar las concentraciones y el transporte de sedimento y constituyentes quimicos seleccionados, encontrados en los grandes rios de los Estados Unidos - incluyendo el Misisipi, el Colorado y el Columbia, ademas del Rio Grande. En estas cuatro cuencas, el USGS opera actualmente (1998) una red de 40 puntos de muestreo pertenecientes a NASOAN, con un enfasis en cuantificar el flujo en masa (la cantidad de material que pasa por la estacion, expresado en toneladas por dial para cada constituyente. Aplicacando un enfoque consistente, basado en la cuantificacion de flujos en la cuenca del Rio Grande, el programa NASOAN esta generando la informacion necesaria para identificar fuentes regionales de diversos contaminantes, incluyendo sustancias qui micas agricolas y trazas elementos en la cuenca. EI efecto de las grandes reservas en el Rio Grande se puede observar segun los flujos de constituyentes discurren a 10 largo del rio. EI analisis de los flujos de constituyentes a escala de la cuenca proveera los medios para evaluar la influencia de la actividad humana sobre las condiciones de calidad del agua del Rio Grande.

  9. Dual-core mass-balance approach for evaluating mercury and210Pb atmospheric fallout and focusing to lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, P.C.; Fuller, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    Determining atmospheric deposition rates of mercury and other contaminants using lake sediment cores requires a quantitative understanding of sediment focusing. Here we present a novel approach that solves mass-balance equations for two cores algebraically to estimate contaminant contributions to sediment from direct atmospheric fallout and from watershed and in-lake focusing. The model is applied to excess 210Pb and Hg in cores from Hobbs Lake, a high-altitude lake in Wyoming. Model results for excess 210Pb are consistent with estimates of fallout and focusing factors computed using excess 210Pb burdens in lake cores and soil cores from the watershed and model results for Hg fallout are consistent with fallout estimated using the soil-core-based 210Pb focusing factors. The lake cores indicate small increases in mercury deposition beginning in the late 1800s and large increases after 1940, with the maximum at the tops of the cores of 16-20 ??g/m 2year. These results suggest that global Hg emissions and possibly regional emissions in the western United States are affecting the north-central Rocky Mountains. Hg fallout estimates are generally consistent with fallout reported from an ice core from the nearby Upper Fremont Glacier, but with several notable differences. The model might not work for lakes with complex geometries and multiple sediment inputs, but for lakes with simple geometries, like Hobbs, it can provide a quantitative approach for evaluating sediment focusing and estimating contaminant fallout.

  10. Fallout: Hedley Marston and atomic bomb tests in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book tells the story of Australian scientists involved in the 1956 British atomic tests at Maralinga. The story involves several of the country's most respected and trusted scientists of the 1950s and spills over to the scientific organisations that mattered. As the drama unfolds we see how the controversy touched the lives of many senior Australian scientists, and in a few cases those of British scientists, too. What is described in this book, however, is more than an esoteric scientific dispute kept within laboratory walls; it is a story about the nature of science in relation to society that continues into the present day. This controversy was, and is, about the health effects of low-level ionising radiation. There is still, after all these years, intense debate about the health effects of low-level ionising radiation to which from time to time most Australians are exposed through the dental and medical industry

  11. The radiation effects of nuclear weapons explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy resulting from nuclear weapons explosions consists of thermal energy (heat radiation), shock waves, initial radiation (nuclear ray flash, gamma and neutron flash), and nuclear radiation of the fission products (fallout). The contribution of the different energy components depends on the energy amounts produced by fission or fusion reactions (A-weapon, H-weapon), on the components used for conversion to helium-4 (deuterium, tritium, lithium), the weapon design (radiation absorption and induced activity in auxiliaries), and on the type of employment (atmospheric, ground, or underground explosion). The damaging effects vary accordingly, consisting of thermal damage, blast effects, and radiation injuries. The effects are explained and compared. (orig.)

  12. [Comparative analysis of the radionuclide composition in fallout after the Chernobyl and the Fukushima accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotenko, K V; Shinkarev, S M; Abramov, Iu V; Granovskaia, E O; Iatsenko, V N; Gavrilin, Iu I; Margulis, U Ia; Garetskaia, O S; Imanaka, T; Khoshi, M

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear accident occurred at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) (March 11, 2011) similarly to the accident at the Chernobyl NPP (April 26, 1986) is related to the level 7 of the INES. It is of interest to make an analysis of the radionuclide composition of the fallout following the both accidents. The results of the spectrometric measurements were used in that comparative analysis. Two areas following the Chernobyl accident were considered: (1) the near zone of the fallout - the Belarusian part of the central spot extended up to 60 km around the Chernobyl NPS and (2) the far zone of the fallout--the "Gomel-Mogilev" spot centered 200 km to the north-northeast of the damaged reactor. In the case of Fukushima accident the near zone up to about 60 km considered. The comparative analysis has been done with respect to refractory radionuclides (95Zr, 95Nb, 141Ce, 144Ce), as well as to the intermediate and volatile radionuclides 103Ru, 106Ru, 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs, 140La, 140Ba and the results of such a comparison have been discussed. With respect to exposure to the public the most important radionuclides are 131I and 137Cs. For the both accidents the ratios of 131I/137Cs in the considered soil samples are in the similar ranges: (3-50) for the Chernobyl samples and (5-70) for the Fukushima samples. Similarly to the Chernobyl accident a clear tendency that the ratio of 131I/137Cs in the fallout decreases with the increase of the ground deposition density of 137Cs within the trace related to a radioactive cloud has been identified for the Fukushima accident. It looks like this is a universal tendency for the ratio of 131I/137Cs versus the 137Cs ground deposition density in the fallout along the trace of a radioactive cloud as a result of a heavy accident at the NPP with radionuclides releases into the environment. This tendency is important for an objective reconstruction of 131I fallout based on the results of 137Cs measurements of soil samples carried out at

  13. Análisis de los tipos de fibras musculares del toro bravo (Bos Taurus ibericus): su relación con algunas enzimas de fatiga muscular y el comportamiento durante la lidia

    OpenAIRE

    Ros Sempere, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Muestras de músculo esquelético y sangre fueron tomadas a 48 toros bravos (novillos) lidiados en la plaza de toros de Calasparra (Murcia). Los músculos seleccionados, cabeza larga del tríceps braquial y semitendinoso, fueron analizados desde el punto de vista histológico, con el fin de estudiar las características morfológicas e histoquímicas de los distintos tipos de miocitos y las posibles alteraciones consecuencia de la lidia. Las técnicas histoquímicas han posibilitado reconocer tres tipo...

  14. Análisis de los tipos de fibras musculares del toro bravo (Bos Taurus ibericus): su relación con algunas enzimas de fatiga muscular y el comportamiento durante la lidia

    OpenAIRE

    Ros Sempere, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Muestras de músculo esquelético y sangre fueron tomadas a 48 toros bravos (novillos) lidiados en la plaza de toros de Calasparra (Murcia). Los músculos seleccionados, cabeza larga del tríceps braquial y semitendinoso, fueron analizados desde el punto de vista histológico, con el fin de estudiar las características morfológicas e histoquímicas de los distintos tipos de miocitos y las posibles alteraciones consecuencia de la lidia. Las técnicas histoquímicas han posibilitado reconocer tres tip...

  15. Retention of simulated fallout nuclides in agricultural crops. 1. Experiments on leys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Aake; Rosen, K.; Haak, E

    1998-12-31

    Experiments with artificial wet depositions of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 85}Sr during the growth period were carried out. The studies are complementary to the experiences after the Chernobyl fallout. The aim was to get a description of the relative transfer to the harvest products of new clover-grass leys and old grass leys after initial depositions of tracer nuclides at different times during the growth period. The reduction in transfer with time, from deposition to sampling, depends partly on dilution by growth and partly on fall-off to the ground. The reduction half-time for the nuclide content showed a range 10 - 14 days. The data obtained in the experiments can extend the basis for prediction of the consequences of fallout events at different times to new as well as to old leys in the field 8 refs, 18 figs, 12 tabs

  16. RESUME95 Nordic field test of mobile equipment for nuclear fall-out monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, C.; Bresson, J.; Chiffot, T.; Guillot, L. [Centre d`Etudes de Valduc, Direction des Applications Militaires, Commissaiat a L`Energie Atomique, Tille (France)

    1997-12-31

    Nordic Safety Research (NKS) organised in August 1995 a field test of various techniques and instrumentation for monitoring radioactive fall-out. In an emergency situation, after a major release of radioactive material, many different measuring systems are going to be used, ranging from small hand hold intensitometer to complex spectrometer systems. In this test the following type of equipment were tested: Airborne spectrometers; Carborne spectrometers and dose rate meters; In situ spectrometers and intensitometers. Helinuc team was equipped of an airborne system and of a germanium device for in situ measurements. Different tasks were specified for each team: Mapping caesium fall-out and natural activity over two areas of 18 and 5 km{sup 2}; Research of hidden sources. For measurements and data processing the respect of time allowed was strictly controlled for testing the ability of each team. (au).

  17. Airborne fallout mapping of {sup 137}Cs Finnish defence forces team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettunen, M.; Heininen, T. [Finnish Defence Forces Research Centre, Lakiala (Finland); Pulakka, M. [Finnish Air Force Depot, Tampere (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The main task of the team was to create a fallout map of {sup 137}Cs in a specified area in Padasjoki Auttoinen village. The team used an MI-8 helicopter of the Finnish Air Force. The team had an HPGe system (relative efficiency 70%) to measure nuclide specific ground contamination level. For navigation the team took advantage of the DGPS service provided by Finnish Broadcasting company utilizing the RDS-channel to get position accuracy within 2 meters. The correction signal is reachable nationwide on the FM transmitter network. The system produced a distribution map for {sup 40}K and fallout maps for {sup 134,137}Cs using a Micro Station Program with TerraModeler application. The maximum measured {sup 137}Cs ground contamination exceeded 130-140 kBqm{sup -2}. (au).

  18. Detection of hot fallout on Taiwan in the period 1971-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observation of fallout during the period of 1971-1975 is presented. Relatively high activity from nuclear tests at Lop Nor off mainland China was detected twice in this period. The gamma-ray spectrum of the hot fallout after the 11th nuclear test is given. The high activity peaks in the figures included are indicated with corresponding dates and sequence number of the tests for easy identification and comparison. The calibration of thermoluminescent dosimeters for the low exposure rates is presented. The gross beta activities are much more likely to build up in milk and surface water samples. Their intensity and duration are more significant than other foodstuff samples, and the timing of their appearance is more predictable. (author)

  19. RESUME95 Nordic field test of mobile equipment for nuclear fall-out monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordic Safety Research (NKS) organised in August 1995 a field test of various techniques and instrumentation for monitoring radioactive fall-out. In an emergency situation, after a major release of radioactive material, many different measuring systems are going to be used, ranging from small hand hold intensitometer to complex spectrometer systems. In this test the following type of equipment were tested: Airborne spectrometers; Carborne spectrometers and dose rate meters; In situ spectrometers and intensitometers. Helinuc team was equipped of an airborne system and of a germanium device for in situ measurements. Different tasks were specified for each team: Mapping caesium fall-out and natural activity over two areas of 18 and 5 km2; Research of hidden sources. For measurements and data processing the respect of time allowed was strictly controlled for testing the ability of each team. (au)

  20. Airborne fallout mapping of {sup 137}Cs - STUK/HUT team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikkinen, M.; Aarnio, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Honkamaa, T.; Tiilikainen, H. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The task of the team was to create a fallout map of {sup 137}Cs on a specified area in Padasjoki Auttoinen village. The team used AB-420 helicopter of the Finnish Frontier Guard. The team had two measuring systems: HPGe system (relative efficiency 18%) and NaI system (5`x5`). Both systems produced similar maps. The average {sup 137}Cs fallout within the area (lakes and ponds included) was 88 kBq m{sup -2,} the maximum value being 161 kBq m{sup -2}. In an emergency the HPGe is superior to NaI because of its better energy resolution, giving possibility to obtain nuclide-specific results. (au).

  1. Atmospheric lead fallout over the last century recorded in Gulf of Lions sediments (Mediterranean Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six marine sediment cores from the Gulf of Lions continental slope (700-1700 m water depth) were analyzed for stable lead isotopes and 21Pb geochronology in order to reconstruct lead atmospheric fallout pattern during the last century. The detrital lead contribution is 25 μg g-1 and the mean sediment anthropogenic inventory is 110 ± 7 μg cm-2, a little bit higher than atmospheric deposition estimate. Anthropogenic lead accumulation in sediments peaked in early 1970s (1973 ± 2) in agreement with lead emissions features. For the period 1986-1997, the sediment signal also reflect the decrease of atmospheric lead described by independent atmospheric fallout investigations. The anthropogenic Pb deposition in the late 1990s was similar to the 1950s deposition, attesting thus of the output of European environmental policies

  2. Total alpha and beta activity of air and fallout in Belgrade from 2006 to 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of radioactivity control of air and fallout in Belgrade from 2006 to 2008 are presented. The measurements were carried out by low-background proportional gas alpha beta counter PIC-WPC-9550. The system was calibrated with 241Am for total alpha and 90Sr for total beta activity measurements. Efficiency for α and β activity measurement was 31% and 46%, respectively. Monthly average values of the total alpha and beta activity in air varied between 0.003 and 0.053 mBq/m3 and between 0.02 and 0.40 mBq/m3, respectively. Monthly average of the total alpha and beta activity of fallout varied between 0.022 and 0.55 Bq/m2 and between 0.15 and 4.7 Bq/m2, respectively. (author)

  3. Determination of soil loss by 137Cs fallout radionuclide in Ömerli watershed of İstanbul, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    KIZILTAŞ, Muhammet Sahip; HACIYAKUPOĞLU, Sevilay; Gökbulak, Ferhat; HIZAL, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Soil erosion and sedimentation in watersheds are usually part of the information to be considered for soil and water conservation measures. Soil loss is generally estimated with models or measured with plot studies. Although fallout radionuclides (FRN) methodology provides a powerful technique for predicting the impacts of proposed land management strategies on soil erosion and sediment yield within river basins and estimates erosion based on fallout radioisotopes (Cs-137, Pb-210, Be-7) radio...

  4. United theory of biological evolution:Disaster-forced evolution through Supernova, radioactive ash fall-outs, genome instability, and mass extinctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshikazu Ebisuzaki; Shigenori Maruyama

    2015-01-01

    We present the disaster-forced biological evolution model as a general framework that includes Darwinian “phylogenic gradualism”, Eldredge-Gould’s “punctuated equilibrium”, mass extinctions, and allopatric, parapatric, and sympatric speciation. It describes how reproductive isolation of organisms is established through global disasters due to supernova encounters and local disasters due to radioactive volcanic ash fall-outs by continental alkaline volcanism. Our new evolution model uniquely highlights three major factors of disaster-forced speciation: enhanced mutation rate by higher natural radiation level, smaller population size, and shrunken habitat size (i.e., isolation among the individual pop-ulations). We developed a mathematical model describing speciation of a half-isolated group from a parental group, taking into account the population size (Ne), immigration rate (m), and mutation rate (m). The model gives a quantitative estimate of the speciation, which is consistent with the observations of speciation speed. For example, the speciation takes at least 105 generations, if mutation rate is less than 10?3 per generation per individual. This result is consistent with the previous studies, in which m is assumed to be 10?3e10?5. On the other hand, the speciation is much faster (less than 105 generations) for the case that m is as large as 0.1 in parapatric conditions (mfall-outs. They raise natural radiation level by a factor of 100e1000. Such rapid speciation events can also contribute to macro-evolution during mass extinction events, such as observed during the Cambrian explosion of biodiversity. A similar rapid speciation (though in a much smaller

  5. Use of 7Be fallout to document soil erosion and soil redistribution within Chilean vineyards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated Watershed Management for the Sustainability of Agricultural Lands was initiated in 2005 with the aim of developing a management model for sustainable agricultural systems through the use of nuclear and chemical techniques to assess the impacts of human practices. The project focuses mainly on pesticides management and modelling, including a test of the use of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) especially 7Be, as a short term erosion/sedimentation soil tracer

  6. Source apportionment of mercury in dust fallout at urban residential area of Central India

    OpenAIRE

    S. Pervez; G. Balakrishna; Tiwari, S

    2009-01-01

    The components and quantities of atmospheric dust fallout have been reported to be the pollution indicator of large urban areas. The multiplicity and complexity of sources of atmospheric dusts in urban regions (e.g. industrial complexes composed of a variety of industrial processes, automobiles, construction activities etc.) has put forward the need of source apportionment of these sources indicating their contribution to specific environmental receptor. The study presented...

  7. Fallout in East Tennessee following Chinese nuclear tests of 1976 to 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fallout levels in East Tennessee following the Chinese nuclear tests of 1976 to 1978 are given. The environmental surveillance activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are outlined, as well as their integration into the nationwide monitoring network. A method for rapid determination of 131I in milk is described; these levels in milk are highlighted, along with airfilter and rainwater data. Maximum radiological dose commitments, as a result of the recent tests, are presented

  8. Radioactive fallout caused by the reactor accident at Chernobyl: Observations April-May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma spectrum of 25 samples has been measured. The release has contained some 30 isotopes. Zr 95, Nb 95, Ru 103, Te 129, Te 131, Te 132, I 131, I 132, Cs 134, Cs 136, Cs 137, Ba 140, La 140 and Ce 141 have been most frequent. Te 132 and/or I 131 have constituted the major part of the enhanced activity, in the areas with increased fallout (G.B.)

  9. Spatially-resolved analyses of aerodynamic fallout from a uranium-fueled nuclear test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U (238U/235U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < 235U/238U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < 235U/238U < 7.41 within a single spherule. In two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between 234U/238U, 235U/238U, and 236U/238U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members. - Highlights: • We measured the spatial distribution of U isotopes, major elements, and radioactivity in five glassy fallout spherules. • In two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is heterogenous and correlated with major elements. • In two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is approximately homogenous. • These results reflect variable mixing within fallout spherules between U from the device and U from the soil. • We use these results to discuss the evidence and roles of various fallout formation processes

  10. Observations of Fallout from the Fukushima Reactor Accident in San Francisco Bay Area Rainwater

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Eric B; Chodash, Perry A

    2011-01-01

    We have observed fallout from the recent Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor accident in samples of rainwater collected in the San Francisco Bay area. Gamma ray spectra measured from these samples show clear evidence of fission products - 131,132I, 132Te, and 134,137Cs. The activity levels we have measured for these isotopes are very low and pose no health risk to the public.

  11. Transfer of fallout radionuclides by Fukushima NPP accident from tree crown to forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Y.; Kato, H.; Wakahara, T.; Kawamori, A.; Tsujimura, M.

    2011-12-01

    Radioactive contamination has been detected in Fukushima and the neighboring prefectures due to the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) following the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. The total deposition of radioactive materials in fallout samples for 137Cs ranged from 0.02to >10 M Bq/m2 for Cs-137. Experimental catchments have been established in Yamakiya district, Kawamata Town, Fukushima prefecture, located about 35 km from Fukushima power plant, and designated as the evacuated zone. Approximate Cs-137 fallout in this area is 200-600k Bq/m2. We established 3 forest sites: broad leaf tree forest and two Japanese cedar forest plantation (young and mature). In each site we installed towers of 8-12 meters. Using these towers, we sampled tree leaves, and measure Cs-137 and Cs-134 in the laboratory, and also we have measure Cs-137, Cs-134 content at various height in each forest using a portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector (Ortech; Detective-EX). We also measured the throughfall, stem flow and litter fall inside of the forest. In each site, we establish the 20 m x 20 m plot to monitor the changes of fallout radionuclides through time with the portable HPGe detector. The monitoring is now ongoing but we found significant amount of Cs-134 and Cs-137 has been trapped by cedar forest plantations especially young trees, but not so much in broad leaf trees. The trapped Cs-137 and Cs-134 is then washed by rainfall and found into throughfall. Therefore, in forest ecosystems, the fallout has been still ongoing, and and effective remediation method in forested area (especially cedar plantation) can be removing the trees.

  12. Twenty-year review of medical findings in a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is presented of results of medical examinations of inhabitants of the Marshall Islands during the 20-year period following the exposure of Rongelap people to radioactive fallout in 1954. The initial effect observed was β burns of the skin of some individuals. Few significant findings were observed during the subsequent 9-year period, although an increase in miscarriages and stillbirths among the exposed women was noted. In 1963 some thyroid abnormalities and growth retardation of some children were noted. (177 references)

  13. Surficial redistribution of fallout 131iodine in a small temperate catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Landis, Joshua D.; Hamm, Nathan T.; Renshaw, Carl E.; Dade, W. Brian; Magilligan, Francis J.; Gartner, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Isotopes of iodine play significant environmental roles, including a limiting micronutrient (127I), an acute radiotoxin (131I), and a geochemical tracer (129I). But the cycling of iodine through terrestrial ecosystems is poorly understood, due to its complex environmental chemistry and low natural abundance. To better understand iodine transport and fate in a terrestrial ecosystem, we traced fallout 131iodine throughout a small temperate catchment following contamination by the 11 March 2011 ...

  14. Time-dependent behaviour of radiocaesium: A new method to compare the mobility of weapons test and Chernobyl derived fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental radiocaesium (137Cs) originates primarily from two sources, atmospheric nuclear weapons testing, and the Chernobyl accident. It has not, to our knowledge, previously been possible statistically to compare changes in the environmental mobility of 137Cs from these two sources since the weapons test fallout varied in a complex manner over a number of years. A novel technique is presented for curve-fitting measurements with a time-dependent input function such as that for weapons test fallout. Different models were fitted to measurements of both pre- and post-Chernobyl 137Cs activity concentrations in five major Finnish rivers. It was shown that there was no significant difference in the temporal changes in 137Cs mobility from these two sources during the years after fallout. Transport parameters derived from weapons test measurements gave good predictions of the long-term contamination of these rivers by Chernobyl fallout. Changes in 137Cs activity concentrations in rivers after Chernobyl have previously been shown to decline as a result of slow sorption to clay minerals in catchment soils. It is shown that weapons test fallout also exhibited this slow decline over time. Rates of decline in 137Cs activity concentrations 10 years after fallout correspond to effective ecological half-lives (Teff) in the range 10-30 years. Removal of activity from the catchment was found to have no significant effect on the long-term decline in 137Cs activity concentrations in these rivers

  15. Automating the Coupling of ORIGEN with GADRAS via the Fallout Analysis Tool for National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear forensic teams will be deployed to collect and evaluate fallout samples on the ground in the scenario of a low-yield nuclear detonation in a heavily populated area. Quick non-destructive methods of predicting the quality of the sample before it is analyzed in detail are essential for efficient post-event collections. In this work, the process of exporting Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) results into Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) has been automated within the Fallout Analysis Tool. This coupling allows for the simulation of detector responses to fallout samples with varying degrees of fractionation. The degree to which the samples are fractionated depends on the location of the samples in the fallout field. In the following study, this phenomenon is examined, as its understanding is important to the investigation of debris distribution. The simulated detector spectra from GADRAS can be used to compare peak ratios of volatile-refractory isotope pairs in order to determine the degree of fractionation. Simulated fractionated fallout samples from DELFIC for a 10 kt, pure 235U fission surface burst were modeled for distances ranging to 256 km out from ground zero, and for times up to 1 week from detonation. The fractionation ratios, also known as r values, from isotope concentrations, photon lines and peak areas of four volatile-refractory pairs were calculated and compared. Fractionation prediction via the peak areas method was evaluated for each pair by comparing the results with the simulated radionuclide inventory.

  16. Concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs rain and dry fallout, milk and service water in Aichi Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation by radioactivation analysis was carried out on the Sr-90 and Cs-137 concentrations in fallout, milk and source water and tap water from 1977 to 1987. The variation of the monthly and yearly amounts of Sr-90 and Cs-137 fallouts agreed well, and those have decreased for the last 11 years though affected by the nuclear experiments in China. The effect of the Chernobyl-4 accident on April 26, 1986 appeared conspicuously in the Cs-137 fallout, and the monthly fallout in May, 1986 was 3.50 mCi/km2. As to the Sr-90 and Cs-137 concentrations in milk and service water, only the Cs-137 concentration in milk was correlated with the course for years before the Chernobyl-4 accident. The effect of the Chernobyl-4 accident was conspicuous in the Cs-137 concentration similarly to the case of fallout. In this case, in the measurement of service water after a half year, the data returned to the normal value, but in the case of milk, the decrease was slow. The method of investigation, the monthly and yearly fallout of Sr-90 and Cs-137, the Sr-90 and Cs-137 concentrations in milk and service water are reported. (K.I.)

  17. Variations of 129I in the atmospheric fallout of Tokyo, Japan: 1963-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Chiaki; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Uchida, Yuka; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Aoyama, Michio; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric fallout samples collected from Tokyo between 1963 and 2003 were analyzed using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in order to determine (129)I/(127)I ratios and to examine the deposition rate of (129)I and its secular variation in Tokyo. The (129)I/(127)I ratios in the atmosphere during 1963-1977 ranged from 1 × 10(-8) to 2 × 10(-8). This is roughly 4 orders of magnitude higher than pre-atomic levels, possibly due to atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The calculated monthly atmospheric deposition rates of (129)I differed from those produced by nuclear fallout of (90)Sr and (137)Cs, indicating that the variations in (129)I deposition are not influenced exclusively by either nuclear bomb testing or by the Chernobyl accident. After 1978, high (129)I depositions (up to 0.13 mBq/m(2)/month) were observed. The (129)I depositions started to increase markedly at the latter half of the 1970s. The secular variation of the estimated annual (129)I deposition in Tokyo showed a close relationship between the annual atmospheric discharge of (129)I from the Tokai Reprocessing plant. Therefore, the atmospheric fallout collected from Tokyo after the late 1970s is influenced primary by the (129)I discharge from the Tokai Reprocessing plant. PMID:22694935

  18. Concentration of 7Be in the lower atmosphere and fallout rate in Tokai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium-7, cosmic ray produced radioactivity, its monthly average concentration in the lower atmosphere and monthly fallout rate were measured in Tokai, Japan. Then, the monthly variations were compared with those of fission products due to nuclear detonations in the atmosphere. The concentration of 7Be in the lower atmosphere ranged from 0.5 x 10-1 pCi/m3 to 2.5 x 10-1 pCi/m3 in Tokai between the observed period, 1975 - 1977. The fallout rate of 7Be vibrated widely, its range was from the detection limits to 1.2 x 104 pCi/m2. The monthly variations were not always the same with variations of the fission products. Fallout rate of 7Be depended on the rain strongly. The concentration of 7Be in the rain was measured, too. Then the range was from 9.2 pCi/l to 1.9 x 102 pCi/l between the observed period 1976.9 - 1977.2. (author)

  19. Estimation of the Adriatic sea water turnover time using fallout 90Sr as a radioactive tracer

    CERN Document Server

    Franic, Z

    2004-01-01

    Systematic, long term measurements, starting in 1963, of 90Sr activity concentrations in sea water have been performed at four locations (cities of Rovinj, Rijeka, Split and Dubrovnik) along the Croatian coast of the Adriatic sea. In addition, fallout samples were collected in the city of Zadar. 90Sr activity concentrations are in good correlation with the fallout activity, the coefficient of correlation being 0.72. After the nuclear moratorium on atmospheric nuclear bomb tests in 1960s, 90Sr activity concentrations in sea water exponentially dropped from 14.8 +/- 2.4 Bq/m3 in 1963 to 2.0 +/- 0.3 Bq/m3 in 2003. In the same period, the total annual 90Sr land surface deposit in Zadar fell by three orders of magnitude, from 713.3 Bq/m2 in 1963 to 0.4 Bq/m2 in 2003. Using strontium sea water and fallout data, a mathematical model was developed to describe the rate of change of 90Sr activity concentrations in the Adriatic sea water and estimate its mean residence time in the Adriatic. By fitting the experimental d...

  20. Low doses of radiation: epidemiological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of small dozes of radiation was investigated with the help epidemiologic evidence. Correlation analysis, regression analysis and frequency analysis were used for investigating morbidity of various cancer illnesses. The pollution of the environment and the fallout of radionuclides in 1962 and 1986 years have an influence upon morbidity of cancer. Influence of small dozes of radiation on health of the population is multifactorial. Therefore depending on other adverse external conditions the influence of radiation in small dozes can be increased or is weakened. Such character of influence of radiation in small dozes proposes the differentiated approach at realization of preventive measures. Especially it concerns regions with favorable ecological conditions.

  1. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Merril Eisenbud, January 26, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merril Eisenbud was interviewed on January 26, 1995 by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Following a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Eisenbud relates his remembrances as the AEC's first industrial hygienist, the setting up of AEC's Health and Safety Laboratory, monitoring radioactive fallout, and use or exposure of humans to radiation

  2. E-Alerts: Environmental pollution and control (radiation pollution and control). E-mail newsletter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses pollution of the environment by particle and electromagnetic radiation from natural and synthetic sources, including neutrons, X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, microwaves, alpha particles; Radon; Sampling and analytical techniques; Fallout; Biological and ecological effects; Laws, legislation, and regulations; Public administration; and Economics

  3. The radiation goes on. What is to be done?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even today, the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident is detectable in West Germany, in Bavaria and in Baden-Wuerttemberg. The article tries to assess the current and future radiation burden of the population induced through the food chain, considering the values measured in cereals, potatoes, vegetables, milk, soy, meat, fish, game, and mushrooms. (DG)

  4. Bikini Atoll ionizing radiation survey - May 1985 - May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1946 and 1958, the United States conducted 23 nuclear tests at the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The single largest detonation was the Bravo test, which resulted in extensive radioactive contamination of a number of islands and prevented the timely resettlement of the native population. Since 1958, many studies have been conducted to assess clean up options and the internal and external radiation doses the Bikinians would likely receive, should they resettle the islands. Although the external dose rates from β and γ radiation have been previously determined by aerial and ground measurement techniques, technical constraints limited the assessment of external β dose rates from the Cs-137 and Sr-90/Y-90 contamination on the islands. Now, because of the recent development of very thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), these external β dose rates can be measured

  5. Environmental radioactivity and radiation measurements in Taiwan, Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rather high radium content in the Peitou hot spring presents a special feature in Taiwan's natural radiation environment. The inhabitants of Peitou usually use the hot spring for both bathing and drinking. Because of the existence of the hot spring, Peitou is also a well-known resort which attracts many tourists and visitors each day. However, it is not advisable to use the hot spring for drinking, as radium-226 content is 16 times higher than the rest of Taiwan's water. Before 1964 the fallout in Taiwan was due to the nuclear weapon tests in Siberia. However, after 1964 the fallout contamination in Taiwan was due to the nuclear weapon tests at Lop Nor. As compared with other countries such as Japan and U.S.A., the agricultural products in Taiwan have shown a rather low fallout content. (U.S.)

  6. The design of a real-time formative evaluation of the implementation process of lifestyle interventions at two worksites using a 7-step strategy (BRAVO@Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wierenga Debbie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs offer an attractive opportunity to improve the lifestyle of employees. Nevertheless, broad scale and successful implementation of WHPPs in daily practice often fails. In the present study, called BRAVO@Work, a 7-step implementation strategy was used to develop, implement and embed a WHPP in two different worksites with a focus on multiple lifestyle interventions. This article describes the design and framework for the formative evaluation of this 7-step strategy under real-time conditions by an embedded scientist with the purpose to gain insight into whether this this 7-step strategy is a useful and effective implementation strategy. Furthermore, we aim to gain insight into factors that either facilitate or hamper the implementation process, the quality of the implemented lifestyle interventions and the degree of adoption, implementation and continuation of these interventions. Methods and design This study is a formative evaluation within two different worksites with an embedded scientist on site to continuously monitor the implementation process. Each worksite (i.e. a University of Applied Sciences and an Academic Hospital will assign a participating faculty or a department, to implement a WHPP focusing on lifestyle interventions using the 7-step strategy. The primary focus will be to describe the natural course of development, implementation and maintenance of a WHPP by studying [a] the use and adherence to the 7-step strategy, [b] barriers and facilitators that influence the natural course of adoption, implementation and maintenance, and [c] the implementation process of the lifestyle interventions. All data will be collected using qualitative (i.e. real-time monitoring and semi-structured interviews and quantitative methods (i.e. process evaluation questionnaires applying data triangulation. Except for the real-time monitoring, the data collection will take place at baseline and

  7. Environmental radiation and exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to 1977 the exposure to radiation of the population of the Federal Republic of Germany from both natural and artificial radiation sources has not greatly charged. The amin part of exposure to natural radiation is caused by environmental radiation and by the absorption of naturally radioactive substances into the body. Artificial exposure to radiation of the population is essentially caused by the use of ionizing rays and radioactive substances in medicine. When radioactive materials are released from nuclear facilities the exposure to radiation of the population is only very slightly increased. The real exposure to radiation of individual people can even in the worst affected places, have been at most fractions of a millirem. The exposure to radiation in the worst afected places in the area of a hard-coal power station is higher than that coming from a nuclear power station of the same capacity. The summation of all contributions to the exposure of radiation by nuclear facilities to the population led in 1978 in the Federal Republic of Germany to a genetically significant dose of clearly less than 1 millerem per year. The medium-ranged exposure to radiation by external radiation effects through professional work was in 1978 at 80 millirems. No difference to 1977. The contribution of radionuclide from the fallout coming from nuclear-weapon tests and which has been deposited in the soil, to the whole-body dose for 1978 applies the same as the genetically significant dose of the population with less than 1 millirem. (orig./HP)

  8. Behavior and food consumption pattern of the population exposed in 1949-1962 to fallout from Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Schonfeld, Sara; Akimzhanov, Kuat; Aldyngurov, Daulet; Land, Charles E; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Potischman, Nancy; Schwerin, Michael J; Semenova, Yulia; Tokaeva, Alma; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L

    2011-03-01

    The relationship between radiation exposure from nuclear weapons testing fallout and thyroid disease in a group of 2,994 subjects has been the subject of study by the US National Cancer Institute. In that study, radiation doses to the thyroid were estimated for residents of villages in Kazakhstan possibly exposed to deposition of radioactive fallout from nuclear testing conducted by the Soviet Union at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site in Kazakhstan between 1949 and 1962. The study subjects included individuals of both Kazakh and Russian origin who were exposed during childhood and adolescence. An initial dose reconstruction used for the risk analysis of Land et al. (Radiat Res 169:373-383, 2008) was based on individual information collected from basic questionnaires administered to the study population in 1998. However, because data on several key questions for accurately estimating doses were not obtained from the 1998 questionnaires, it was decided to conduct a second data collection campaign in 2007. Due to the many years elapsed since exposure, a well-developed strategy was necessary to encourage accurate memory recall. In our recent study, a focus group interview data collection methodology was used to collect historical behavioral and food consumption data. The data collection in 2007 involved interviews conducted within four-eight-person focus groups (three groups of women and one group of men) in each of four exposed villages where thyroid disease screening was conducted in 1998. Population-based data on relevant childhood behaviors including time spent in- and outdoors and consumption rates of milk and other dairy products were collected from women's groups. The data were collected for five age groups of children and adolescents ranging from less than 1 year of age to 21 years of age. Dairy products considered included fresh milk and other products from cows, goats, mares, and sheep. Men's focus group interviews pertained to construction materials of

  9. Transfer of 137Cs from Chernobyl fallout to meat and milk in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air, soil, forage, milk and meat samples were analysed for 137Cs and 134Cs following the Chernobyl accident. Deposition of fallout varied widely, the heaviest being in northwestern Hungary. Controlled experiments were conducted on State farms at four locations to determine the transfer coefficients from forage to the milk (Fm) of cows, sheep and goats and to the meat (Ff) of cows and sheep, goats and roe deer. Forage contaminated by Chernobyl fallout in late May of 1986 produced lower Fm and Ff values than worldwide fallout in the 1960s because the form of 137Cs deposited on forage was less available to cattle and sheep. The lower transfer has important implications for assessing the dose commitment of the human population. The second cutting of forage in 1986 and all cuttings in 1987 had greatly reduced concentrations of 137Cs but the Fm and Ff values were much higher, thereby suggesting that after removal of the original deposition the 137Cs in plants was in a more soluble form. Roe deer were fed the same hay as sheep for 50 days and the Ff was 0.35 for deer meat and 0.08 for sheep meat. Cattle fed the same hay produced beef with an Ff of 0.007. Potassium ferric hexacyanoferrate was fed at 0.3 or 0.6 g/d to lactating goats for 9 weeks. The Fm and Ff values were reduced to about 20% of those for the controls. (author). 10 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. Transfer of 137Cs in two farm ecosystems. Calculated effects of counter-measures following a postulated fallout land contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were performed on two farms, B and R, in southern Sweden to calculate the consequences after a postulated nuclear reactor accident involving contamination of land by 137Cs (1 MBq per m2). The activity transfer to crops and animal products during the sixth year after the fallout was calculated for situations without and with counter-measures taken. The effects of counter-measures, fertilizing with potassium, deep-ploughing and also modified crop and animal production, were supposed to have reached all parts of the agricultural systems. Steady state conditions were assumed to be prevailing in both situations. Calculations based on the present (in 1985) production on the farms and compiled for the situation without any counter-measures taken, indicate the root uptake of 137Cs in the crops during the year to be 53 MBq (B) and 280 MBq (R) corresponding to 1.0 and 1.6 MBq per hectare, respectively. Through the crops 46 MBq (B) and 187 MBq (R) are ingested by the animals. On the basis of the mean daily activity intake per animal, a total of about 5 MBq on each farm is calculated to be transferred to the animal products (milk and meat). Related to the land area this corresponds to 0.09 and 0.03 MBq per hectare on B and R respectively. The mean internal radiation dose during the year per person on the farms through home-produced food is calculated to be 0.1 mSv (B) and 0.2 mSv (R), and the mean external radiation dose to people working on the farms to be the same as that from the natural background. Calculations for the year in the situation with counter-measures taken indicate that the transferred activity of 137Cs to the crops per hectare is reduced by factors of 10 (B) and 3 (R). The corresponding transfer to animal products is by factors of 23 or 45 (B) and 3 (R), although in the latter case the size of animal production is considerably increased. The external and possibly also the internal radiation doses to people on both farms will be reduced

  11. Local fall-out and the animal food chain; Retombees locales et chaine alimentaire animale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat, G.; Mercier, F.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The local consequences of fresh fall-out, especially in the case of atmospheric nuclear explosions, are reviewed from the point of view of the internal contamination of the consumer of foodstuffs of animal origin. The edibility of foodstuffs derived from animals having grazed in the presence of fall-out is evaluated both from the wholesome and radio-toxicological points of view. The contamination level of these foodstuffs is calculated as a function of the ground fall-out, and of agronomical and ecological parameters for each radio-nuclide of the animal food chain. The internal exposure of the human consumer is calculated from this level as a function of the diet and of various parameters especially temporal. The equivalent dose to each critical organ, including the digestive tract is deduced from the burdens of each organ. From this a nutritional hygiene in the areas affected by fall-out is obtained, in relationship to the action levels fixed by the responsible authorities in exceptional circumstances. Criteria for these action levels are given as function of the food rations. (authors) [French] Les consequences locales des retombees fraiches, notamment dans le cas d'explosions nucleaires atmospheriques, sont passees en revue en ce qui concerne les problemes de contamination interne du consommateur de denrees d'origine animale. La comestibilite des aliments provenant de betes de boucherie ayant pature sous les retombees est evaluee au double point de vue de la salubrite et de la radiotoxicologie. Le niveau de contamination de ces denrees est calcule en fonction de la retombee au sol, des parametres agronomiques et ecologiques pour chaque radioelement de la chaine alimentaire animale. La contamination interne du consommateur humain est calculee a partir de ce niveau en fonction des modalites d'ingestion et de divers parametres, notamment temporels. L'equivalent de dose au niveau de chaque organe critique, y compris le tube digestif, est deduit

  12. Uranium fallout from the nuclear-powered satellites and volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing trends of the concentrations of sup(234)U, sup(235)U and sup(238)U in rain observed during the period between April 1984 and June 1985 at Fayetteville (36 deg N, 94 deg W), Arkansas, and peak concentrations of sup(234)U and sup(235)U observed in a number of rain samples collected in May and June 1985 appear to be the effects of delayed fallout from the eruption of El Chichon volcano and the 1983 fall of the nuclear-powered satellite Kosmos-1402, respectively. (author)

  13. Soluble and particle-associated fallout radionuclides in Mediterranean water and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From measurements in Mediterranean seawater and sediments, fallout 137Cs, 90Sr, and 239240Pu behaved mostly as soluble nuclides tracing Mediterranean water movement, whereas 55Fe and 241Am behaved more as particle-associated nuclides and were relatively rapidly removed to the sediments. Patterns of nuclide distribution within sediments showed depths of penetration in the order 55Fe > (239240Pu, 137Cs) > 241Am and were thought to result from biological mixing on nuclides whose arrival rates varied in the same order

  14. Far field nuclear fallout experience and countermeasure strategy: A cost-benefit re-appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time of the year (April, May) when the fallout occurred, had influence on the consequences. In spring no animals were out grazing and almost no standing crops could receive direct surface contamination. However, uptake and the transfer in the semi-natural ecosystem became considerable important. In semi-natural ecosystems, soils often have a low mineral content and very little clay and this usually means less findings of the radiocaesium. Even before the Chernobyl accident occurred, it was known that the root uptake of radiocaesium in a semi-natural ecosystem was higher than average in agricultural ecosystems

  15. The Wasteland violin:sonic modality and affective immersion in Fallout 3: New Vegas

    OpenAIRE

    Sallamo, L. (Lauri)

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find new tools for examining the mechanics underlying the onset of emotive response and consequently the experience of immersion during gameplay. My method was to investigate how particular sound events and soundscapes may affect the gaming experience as a whole by analyzing the soundscape crafted for a game that mixes elements of two popular game genres in its sound design. The game used as the primary source in this study was Fallout 3: New Vegas by Obsi...

  16. Appendix to health and safety laboratory environmental quarterly. [Tabulated data on fallout radioactivity in environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-04-01

    Data are tabulated on: the content of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 89/Sr in monthly deposition at monitoring sites in the USA and other locations throughout the world; the content of /sup 90/Sr in milk samples collected in New York City; the content of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr in samples of drinking water collected in New York City; and the content of fallout radionuclides and lead in samples of surface air collected at various world sites during 1976. (CH)

  17. A fractal view of Chernobyl fallout in Northern Italy and Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractals are associated with irregularity and represent a powerful tool for investigating phenomena featuring a complex behaviour, as it is the case of the atmospheric processes playing a role in spreading the radioactive pollution of Chernobyl in the environment. The introduction of fractals in environmental sciences is quite recent. Fractals may account for the presence of strong fluctuations and for the high variability characterising the natural events involved in the Chernobyl fallout: the geographical sparseness of pollutant and the presence of 'hot spots' make it advisable to use fractals as a theoretical framework for modelling

  18. Fallout deposits of Chernobyl radiocesium in the Norwegian Sea and North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of Cs-137 and Cs-134 from the Chernobyl fallout in the marine environment is described and quantified. Seawater samples and sediments from the Norwegian Sea were analysed by γ-spectroscopy. The influence of biogenic processes in the surface layer of the ocean on sedimentation was investigated and the type and bonding of radiocesium to suspended particles from the German Bight was assessed by sequential extractions. The results are compared with long-standing pollution from fuel reprocessing plants and nuclear arms tests. (HP) With 44 figs., 15 tabs

  19. The transfer of fallout cesium-137 from browse to moose. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are investigating the transfer of fallout cesium-137 from soil to browse to moose (Alces alces) to wolf (Canis lupis) to promote our understanding of the movement of radionuclides through natural food chains. The first part of this study is concerned with moose food habits. Early winter food habits of moose from Hecla Island and Manitoba Game Hunting Area 26 in south central and south eastern Manitoba were studied. In 86 rumen samples, 25 food types were identified. Three methods of food habit determination were used: (1) percentage occurrence of food types, (2) subjective abundance scores and (3) percentage dry weight. All three methods yielded very similar results

  20. Forage intake rates of mule deer estimated with fallout cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forage intake rates of 87 wild, Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) collected over a 2-year period from the Cache la Poudre Drainage, Colorado, were estimated utilizing available data on fallout cesium-137 concentrations in the deer and their inferred diet. The method employed involved the convolution of an intake function and a retention function. Ingestion rates are reported and analyzed by sex, season, and age class. An overall mean forage intake of 21.9 grams air dry forage/kg carcass weight/day was calculated. Adult animals consumed significantly (less than 0.01) more than adults throughout the year. (U.S.)

  1. Severe radiation accidents and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In severe radiation accidents with releases of radionuclides into the environment, high enough radiation doses are formed to potentially cause direct radiation injury of natural ecosystems. The dose fields characterizing the irradiation of plants, animals and humans in radioactive contamination of the environment are highly heterogeneous, and irradiation of natural objects per se has features such as non-equidosal effects. In other words, humans and various objects in the natural environment can receive different absorbed doses for an equal density of radioactive fallout. 5 refs

  2. Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, June 1, 1977--September 1, 1977. [Fallout radioactivity monitoring at selected world sites, trace metals in surface air and marine sediments, and N/sub 2/O concentrations in stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, E.P. Jr.

    1977-10-01

    This report presents current information from the HASL environmental programs, the Australian Radiation Laboratory, the Air Resources Laboratories of NOAA, the Air Monitoring Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre in Bombay, India and the National Radiation Laboratory in New Zealand. The initial section consists of interpretive reports and notes on background corrections for /sup 90/Sr in ion-exchange resin used in the Australian fallout network, corrections to previously reported N/sub 2/O concentrations in the stratosphere, trace metal concentrations in a marine sediment as measured by five laboratories, an estimate of maximum credible atmospheric radioactivity concentrations from nuclear tests, strontium-90 concentrations in human bone in New York City and San Francisco through 1976, and worldwide deposition of /sup 90/Sr through 1976. Subsequent sections include tabulations of radionuclide and stable lead concentrations in surface air; strontium-90 in deposition, milk, diet and tapwater; fallout and atmospheric radioactivity measurements in India and environmental radioactivity measurements in New Zealand. A bibliography of recent publications related to environmental studies is also presented.

  3. Information at radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken in order to plan an information strategy for possible future accidents involving radioactivity. Six health visitors and six farmers working in the districts of Norway which received the largest amounts of fallout from the Chernobyl accident, were interviewed. The questions were intended to give an indication of their knowledge about radioactivity and radiation, as well as their needs for information in case of a future accident. The results indicate a relatively low educational background in radiation physics and risk estimation. On the other hand the two groups showed a remarkable skill and interest in doing their own evaluation on the background of information that was linked to their daily life. It is suggested that planning of information in this field is done in close cooperation with the potential users of the information

  4. Feasibility of using 236U to reconstruct close-in fallout deposition from the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first results on the feasibility of using 236U to reconstruct the level and spatial distribution of close-in fallout deposition from the Hiroshima A-bomb are reported, coupled with the use of global fallout 137Cs and 239+240Pu. The results for global fallout 236U in soil samples (0-30 cm) from Ishikawa prefecture showed that the deposition density of 236U from the global fallout can be accurately evaluated using AMS. All deposited 236U, 137Cs and 239+240Pu appeared to have been recovered using 30-cm cores. It was also noted from the depth profiles for 236U/239+240Pu and 236U/137Cs ratios that the downward behavior of 236U in the soil was apparently similar to that of 239+240Pu, while the 137Cs was liable to be retained in upper layers compared with 236U and 239+240Pu. The accumulated levels were 1.78 x 1013 atoms m-2 for 236U, 4340 Bq m-2 for 137Cs and 141 Bq m-2 for 239+240Pu. The ratios of 236U/137Cs and 236U/239+240Pu were (4.10 ± 0.12) x 109 and (1.26 ± 0.04) x 1011 atoms Bq-1, respectively. Results of 236U, 137Cs and 239+240Pu measurements for the seven soil cores (0-30 cm) from Hiroshima were discussed on the basis of ratios of 236U/137Cs and 236U/239+240Pu by comparing with those from the background area in Ishikawa, indicating that the global fallout dominates the current level of 236U accumulation in soil in the Black-rain area around Hiroshima after the Hiroshima bomb, and the contribution of the close-in fallout 236U produced by the Hiroshima A-bomb seems difficult to observe.

  5. Nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Privatisation of the power industry in the UK is one of the government's main policies. As such its abandonment, or postponement into a later possible term, is seen to be politically intolerable, despite the complex problems that have already been encountered. To meet this absolute criteria, major changes in the early plans have recently been announced that have profound importance for many of those involved. Civil engineering is one of the groups concerned and this review considers the practical limitations facing government and the likely consequential changes for the industry as the privatisation process is implemented. (author)

  6. Fallout beryllium-7 as a soil and sediment tracer in river basins: current status and needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alex; Blake, Will H.; Smith, Hugh G.; Mabit, Lionel; Keith-Roach, Miranda J.

    2013-04-01

    Beryllium-7 is a cosmogenic radionuclide formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation of nitrogen and oxygen. Its constant natural production and fallout via precipitation coupled with its ability to bind to soil particles have underpinned its application as a sediment tracer. The short half-life of beryllium-7 (53.3 days) lends itself to tracing sediment dynamics over short time periods, thus, enabling assessment of the effect of land use change upon soil redistribution. Although beryllium-7 has been widely applied as a tracer to date, there remain crucial gaps in understanding relating to the assumptions for its use. To further support the application of beryllium-7 as a tracer across a range of environments requires consideration of both the current strengths and shortcomings of the technique to direct research needs. Here we review research surrounding the assumptions underpinning beryllium-7 use as a tracer and identify key knowledge gaps relating to i) the effects of rain shadowing and vegetation interception upon beryllium-7 fallout uniformity at the hillslope-scale; ii) the effect of preferential flow pathways upon beryllium-7 depth distribution in soil and overland flow upon beryllium-7 inventory uniformity and iii) the potential for beryllium-7 desorption in saline and reducing environments. To provide continued support for the use of beryllium-7 as a hillslope and catchment-scale tracer, there is an urgent need to undertake further research to quantify the effect of these factors upon tracer estimates.

  7. Migration of fallout radiocaesium in a grassland soil from 1986 to 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vertical migration of 134Cs, deposited by the Chernobyl fallout (1986), and 137Cs, deposited by the Chernobyl and the global fallout, in the soil of an undisturbed Bavarian grassland in Germany was investigated from 1986 to 2001. The activity-depth profiles of both isotopes at ten sampling dates were evaluated by the classical convection-dispersion equation and a random walk particle model. In both models, the apparent migration velocity v and the apparent dispersion coefficient D were assumed to be independent of time. However, optimized values of v and D were significantly different for the different locations sampled at different times. If nevertheless constant values of v and D were used, the simulated activity densities per soil layer were out of the range of the spatial variability of the observed activity densities determined in 2001. It is concluded that without further simultaneous investigations e.g. on bioturbation at the study site, migration parameters of radiocaesium determined by classical transport models based on convection and dispersion during the first years after the deposition of the activity cannot be used for predictive purposes

  8. Vertical distribution and migration of global fallout Pu in forest soils in southwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil samples collected in southwestern China were analyzed for Pu isotopes. The 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios were around 0.18, which indicated the dominant source of global fallout. Consistent sub-surface maximums followed by exponential decline of 239+240Pu activities in the soil cores were observed. Most of the Pu has still remained in the 0–10 cm layers since its deposition. Convection velocities and dispersion coefficients for Pu migration in the soils were estimated by the convection–dispersion equation (CDE) model. The effective convection velocities and effective dispersion coefficients ranged from 0.05 to 0.11 cm/y and from 0.06 to 0.29 cm2/y, respectively. Other factors that control the vertical migration of Pu in soil besides precipitation, soil particle size distribution and organic matter were suggested. Long-term migration behaviors of Pu in the soils were simulated. The results provide the Pu background baseline for further environmental monitoring and source identification of non-global fallout Pu inputs in the future. - Highlights: • Pu isotopes in the soil cores collected in southwestern China were analyzed. • Background baseline data of Pu isotopes in the soils were given. • Parameters of convection–dispersion equation model for Pu migration were estimated. • Long-term migration behavior of Pu in soil was simulated

  9. Transfer of 131I to sheep milk from vegetation contaminated by Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer of 131I to sheep milk was measured in a controlled feeding experiment using herbage recently contaminated by fallout from the Chernobyl accident. The transfer coefficient (Fm) of 131I from the Chernobyl-contaminated herbage was 0.29±0.017 day litre-1. The daily proportion of 131I intake which was secreted in milk was 56±0.035%. This is an order of magnitude higher than for cattle and agrees with the higher transfer of stable iodine from plasma to milk which occurs in sheep and goats. At the same time the biological half-life of 131I was measured in ewes which had been grazing outside during deposition of the Chernobyl fallout and were then housed and fed an 131I-free diet. The loss of 131I in sheep milk was described using a double exponential relationship. The calculated biological half-life for the first component in the milk was 1 day, accounting for 97.4% of the reduction in the concentration of 131I activity in the milk. The 131I-free diet had a comparatively high stable iodine content since it was saltmarsh vegetation, however, the calculated half-life was similar to previously estimated values for goats. (Author)

  10. Use of 137Cs and other fallout radionuclide in soil erosion investigations: progress, problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerated erosion and soil degradation currently represent serious problems for the global environment. Against this background there is a need to assemble reliable information on the rates of soil loss involved. Existing techniques for documenting rates of soil loss possess many limitations and there is increasing interest in the potential for using fallout radionuclides, particularly 137Cs, to obtain such information. An example of the application of the 137Cs approach to a cultivated field at Rufford Forest Farm, Nottinghamshire, UK, is presented to illustrate its value. The key advantages of the approach are that it provides a means of assembling retrospective estimates of medium-term (ca. 40 years) rates of soil loss and the spatial pattern of erosion and deposition involved, on the basis of a single site visit. There are, however, currently a number of problems and uncertainties associated with the use of 137Cs in soil erosion investigations, and these are reviewed and needs for further research identified. Potential developments of the approach, including the use of other fallout radionuclides such as unsupported 210Pb and 7Be are also considered. (author)

  11. Varieties of fuel particles in fallout of the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil in the Chernobyl NPP 30-km zone is known to be contaminated by fine particles of dispersed irradiated fuel. Experimental data obtained by the authors shortly after the accident indicated a significant excess of 95Zr in the particles compared with its calculated amount. This suggested that particles of the U fuel also contain construction material from the core, activated Zr. The authors have isolated particles of radioactive material from the heavy soil fraction in order experimentally to confirm this. Their dimensions varied from 85 to 750 μm; their mass, from 10 to 700 μg. Such characteristics as the microstructure, elemental composition, and the concentration of 144Ce and other radionuclides obtained from electron microscope measurements, microprobe analysis, and γ- and α-spectrometry were used to classify the particles. It was found that two types of highly active particles are characteristic of the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone (up to 4-5 km) and the western track of the fallout for a distance of 20 km from the destroyed fourth block. The first type are genuine particles of irradiated fuel. The second type are aggregates consisting of U and Zr oxides. The second type predominates in fallout of the exclusion zone and in the western track

  12. Consequences of the Chernobyl fallout for wild populations in South-Eastern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out in Sweden aimed at studying the impact of the Chernobyl fallout on the environment. Wild small mammals (orders Rodentia and Insectivora) were used as biological indicators of radioactive contamination of a region of south-eastern Sweden. The animals were captured in three differently contaminated areas, and for control, in an area with negligible fallout. The results obtained show that the activity in the captured animals was correlated with surface deposition. The differences between the species investigated and the influence of feeding habits on the contamination levels are discussed. A mutagenicity test (bone marrow micronucleus test) was also performed on the rodents in order to verify the occurrence of a genetic damage. A positive correlation between the increase of genetic damage and both 137Cs content in muscle and surface contamination in trapping sites was found. The estimated doses absorbed by the investigated animals were too low to explain the obtained effects. An explanation of this discrepancy between dose and measured biological effect is not available, yet similar results have been repeatedly reported after the Chernobyl accident and should be matter of further discussions. It is possible that an increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations might occur already at minimal dose gradients. (author)

  13. 137Cs fallout depth distributions in forest versus field sites: implications for external gamma dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depth profile of 137Cs fallout in soil from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests was measured at neighboring field and forest areas for seven sites in northeastern US. The inferred dose rates in air at 1 m above the ground per unit inventory of 137Cs averaged a factor of 1.8 higher in forest as compared to field areas. Calculations indicate that dose rate in forest areas would be a factor of four higher than that over deeply ploughed land. Based on a limited set of historical measurements made since 1972, it appears that the dose rate per unit inventory in both field and forest areas has more or less stabilized after a sharp decrease following deposition events in the early 1960s. Estimated dose commitments for various land types are compared to the value suggested by UNSCEAR and implications with respect to certain population groups are discussed. The findings may have application in estimating future external doses from deposited 137Cs associated with Chernobyl fallout in Europe. (author)

  14. Food chains and biogeochemical pathways: contributions of fallout and other radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews examples of how measurements of global fallout in the environment and related tracer radionuclides have been used to enhance our basic knowledge of biogeochemical processes and food-chain pathways. Because it is these fundamental, natural processes that control the transport and accumulation of such trace substances in the environment, direct measurements of trace substances over time and space reveal strong insights into these processes. The necessity to monitor global fallout transport, although largely motivated by human health concerns, gave rise to a plethora of new information about plants, animals, and natural and agricultural ecosystems and how they function. This review provides a small selection of examples in the areas of plant and animal physiology, productivity and energy transfer in food chains, biogeochemical cycles of certain elements and their analogues, feeding relationships and movements of organisms, and the agriculture-based human food chain. It is concluded that if society is to cope successfully with continued growth of the human population and resource consumption, more knowledge is still required about these fundamental processes. The use of radiotracers can contribute greatly to this need, but current funding priorities, societal attitudes, and onerous regulations on the use of radioactivity may continue to limit such applications. (author)

  15. Estimation of dose to human tissues from ingestion of foods exposed to fallout from nuclear weapons tests in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a brief overview of the methodology developed to estimate the transport of radionuclides through agricultural ecosystems to persons of various ages, lifestyles, and geographic locations. The methodology, embodied in the computer code PATHWAY, was used to convert estimates of fallout deposition to time-dependent concentrations of radionuclides in food products, total intakes by people, and organ-specific doses from 21 radionuclides in fallout from 86 nuclear test events. A summary of model prediction uncertainties, an assessment of predictive accuracy, and a discussion of the relative importance of different exposure pathways is also provided. 14 refs

  16. Assessment of the Adriatic sea-water mean residence time using fallout 90Sr as radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In physical oceanography 90Sr can be used as radioactive tracer to study circulation of sea water. As a part of an extended monitoring programme, 90Sr has been analysed in sea water samples and fallout on the Adriatic since 1963. Samples of surface sea water have been collected on four locations of the Adriatic Sea: towns of Rovinj and Rijeka in North Adriatic, town of Split in Mid-Adriatic and town of Dubrovnik in South Adriatic. Fallout samples have been collected monthly in the city of Zadar (Mid-Adriatic)

  17. Resistência de amendoim-bravo aos herbicidas inibidores da enzima acetolactato sintase Wild poinsettia resistance to acetolactate synthase inhibitor herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribas A. Vidal

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available O controle contínuo de plantas daninhas através da aplicação de herbicidas que apresentam atividade em um único local de ação nas plantas favorece a seleção de biótipos resistentes a estes herbicidas, em certas espécies vegetais. Quatro experimentos foram conduzidos em condições casa-de-vegetação, na Faculdade de Agronomia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, com os objetivos de avaliar a ocorrência de resistência aos herbicidas inibidores da enzima acetolactato sintase (ALS em vários biótipos de leiteiro ou amendoim-bravo (Euphorbia heterophylla EPHHL e avaliar a ocorrência de resistência múltipla a herbicidas com atividade em outros locais de ação. Biótipo oriundo de Passo Fundo foi resistente ao imazethapyr, enquanto biótipo oriundo de Porto Alegre foi suscetível. O biótipo de Passo Fundo apresentou resistência cruzada aos herbicidas imidazolinonas: imazapyr, imazaquin e imazethapyr; sulfoniluréias: chlorimuron, nicosulfuron e metsulfuron; e sulfonanilida: flumetsulan. Este biótipo não foi resistente aos herbicidas com os seguintes mecanismos de ação: inibidores de EPSPs, mimetizadores de auxina, inibidores dos fotossistemas I e II e inibidores de PROTOX. A confirmação de resistência aos inibidores de ALS em biótipos oriundos de Nãome-Toque, Passo Fundo e Rio Pardo sugere ampla dispersão no Rio Grande do Sul de resistência de E. heterophylla aos herbicidas deste mecanismo de ação.The continuous weed control with herbicides of only one site of action selects biotypes resistant to these herbicides. Four experiments were conducted in greenhouse of UFRGS, Brazil, to confirm the occurence of wild poinsettia (Euphorbia heterophylla biotypes resistance to herbicides inhibitors of acetholactate synthase (ALS, and to determine whether there was cross resistance to herbicides with other site of action. A biotype from Passo Fundo -RS was resistant to imazethapyr, whereas a biotype from Porto Alegre -RS

  18. First Steps Towards the Paleoseismological History of the Pastores and Venta de Bravo Faults, Acambay Graben, Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, M.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Aguirre-Díaz, G.; Villamor, P.; Langridge, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Acambay graben is part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) which strikes ESE-WNW across central Mexico. The belt is an active, calc-alkaline volcanic arc that is related to the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates underneath the North American plate (e.g. Suter et al. 1995). The TMVB comprises a series of intra-arc basins that form the Chapala-Tula fault zone (450 km long, 50 km wide, Suter et al. 1995). The Acambay graben is c. 80 km long, 15 to 35 km wide and limited by four large E-W striking normal faults that are from west to east, the Epitacio-Huerta (EHF) and the Acambay-Tixmadejé faults (ATF) in the north and the Venta de Bravo (VBF) and the Pastores faults (PF) in the south. In the region, there is a low current seismicity but two known historic earthquakes occurred in the graben, the November 19, 1912, ms = 7.0 Acambay event and the February 22, 1979, ms = 4.9 Maravatío earthquake (Astíz-Delgado 1980). The paleoseismic history of the ATF has been previously studied by Langridge et al. (2000). Our focus lies on the paleoseismicity of the southern faults. The rupture history is assessed by tectonic geomorphology and paleoseismic trenches. To study the recent paleoseismic history of the two southern faults, we excavated two trenches on the PF. These trenches lie on young alluvial fans protruding from the Pastores fault scarp. Their location was chosen because of ' steps'\\ in the surface of the alluvial fan that might indicate the position of the most recent fault scarps, in combination with georadar profiles that confirmed vertical displacements in reflectors underneath those steps. The strata in the trenches consist of lake sediments at the base of one trench overlain by interbedded volcanic pyroclastic flows and ash falls which are found in both trenches. In both trenches we found evidence for one paleoearthquake respectively. We are in the process of dating these events by means abundant charcoal which we found in the pyroclastic

  19. Design and methods for the Better Resiliency Among Veterans and non-Veterans with Omega-3's (BRAVO) study: A double blind, placebo-controlled trial of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation among adult individuals at risk of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Bernadette P; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Killeen, Therese K; Magruder, Kathryn M; Holes-Lewis, Kelly; Tolliver, Bryan K; Turner, Travis H

    2016-03-01

    Suicide remains the 10th leading cause of death among adults in the United States (U.S.). Annually, approximately 30 per 100,000 U.S. military Veterans commit suicide, compared to 14 per 100,000 U.S. civilians. Symptoms associated with suicidality can be treatment resistant and proven-effective pharmaceuticals may have adverse side-effects. Thus, a critical need remains to identify effective approaches for building psychological resiliency in at-risk individuals. Omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 HUFAs) are essential nutrients, which must be consumed in the diet. N-3 HUFAs have been demonstrated to reduce symptoms of depression, anxiety, and impulsivity - which are associated with suicide risk. Here we present the design and methods for the Better Resiliency Among Veterans and non-Veterans with Omega-3's (BRAVO) study, which is a double blind, randomized, controlled trial among individuals at risk of suicide of an n-3 HUFA versus placebo supplementation in the form of all natural fruit juice beverages. The BRAVO study seeks to determine if dietary supplementation with n-3 HUFAs reduces the risk for serious suicidal behaviors, suicidal thinking, negative emotions, and symptoms associated with suicide risk. Sub-analyses will evaluate efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms, alcohol, and nicotine use. A sub-study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate the neuropsychological and neurophysiological effects of n-3 HUFAs. We also outline selection of appropriate proxy outcome measures for detecting response to treatment and collection of ancillary data, such as diet and substance use, that are critical for interpretation of results. PMID:26855120

  20. Revision of Parancylodiscoides Caballero y C. & Bravo-Hollis, 1961 (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae), with a redescription of P. longiphallus (MacCallum, 1915) from the Atlantic spadefish Chaetodipterus faber (Broussonet) (Acanthuroidei: Ephippidae) in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsky, Delane C

    2012-02-01

    The generic diagnosis of Parancylodiscoides Caballero y C. & Bravo-Hollis, 1961 (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae), with three valid species, was amended to include dactylogyrids having: a haptor with dorsal and ventral anchor/bar complexes, 14 hooks (seven pairs) and four reservoirs (two pairs); a dorsal bar with bifurcate ends; hooks with protruding, blunt and slightly depressed thumbs and undilated shanks; a dextroventral vaginal aperture leading to an elongate and oblique vaginal vestibule; a germarium dextral to the testis; a vas deferens looping the left intestinal caecum; a copulatory complex lacking an accessory piece; and two intestinal caeca lacking diverticula and united posterior to the gonads. Parancylodiscoides is most similar to Sundatrema Lim & Gibson, 2009, from which it differs only by the position of the vaginal aperture (sinistroventral in Sundatrema spp.) and by lacking a sucker-like genital pore. New information concerning the number and distribution of haptoral hooks, the relative positions of the gonads and the course of the vas deferens was provided for the type-species, P. chaetodipteri Caballero y C. & Bravo-Hollis, 1961. Parancylodiscoides longiphallus (MacCallum, 1915) Lim & Gibson, 2009 was redescribed based on specimens collected from the Atlantic spadefish Chaetodipterus faber from the Gulf of Mexico off Mississippi and Guaratuba Bay, Paraná, Brazil; its occurrence on the Atlantic spadefish from the Gulf of Mexico, Guaratuba Bay and off Puerto Rico represented new geographical records for this helminth. Parancylodiscoides caballerobravorum Cezar, Luque & Amato, 1999 was considered a junior subjective synonym of P. longiphallus. The monotypic Isohaliotrema Young, 1968 was placed in synonymy with Parancylodiscoides and its type-species, I. platacis Young, 1968, transferred to Parancylodiscoides as Parancylodiscoides platacis (Young, 1968) n. comb. PMID:22183919

  1. Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout: Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement (ORPEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowdall, M. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, OEsteraas (Norway)); Smethurst, M.A. (Univ. of Exeter and Avalonia Geophysics, Cornwall Campus, Penryn (United Kingdom)); Andersson, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Aage, H.K. (Danish Emergency Management Agency, Birkeroed (Denmark)); Palsson, S.E. (Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Reykjavik (Iceland))

    2011-10-15

    In recent years carborne gamma spectrometry has expanded from its role as a geological survey platform to serving as a useful asset in the field of emergency response to radiological and nuclear situations. Its two main applications are searching for orphan sources and for surveying in the aftermath of an accident involving the release of radioactive materials. Despite this expansion, the opportunities for gaining practical experience in the field are limited by cost considerations and practicability. These limitations are exacerbated by the fact that data generated and displayed in the field differ significantly from gamma spectral data generated in a laboratory environment. As a means of exercising existing emergency measuring/surveying capability and introducing carborne measurements to a larger group, a virtual exercise was devised. The exercise ORPEX (Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement) featured two typical emergency scenarios in which carborne measuring systems might be deployed: firstly a search for multiple orphan sources and secondly surveying to delineate patchy fallout from a local release point. In the first scenario, synthetic spectral data were generated for imaginary point sources and inserted into genuine carborne measurements from in the Trondheim area of Norway. Participants were presented with a typical software tool and data in a range of typical formats and asked to report the source locations and isotopes within a time limit. In the second scenario, synthetic spectral data representing fallout from a local fire involving radioactive material were added to real carborne data from the Trondheim area. Participants were asked to produce maps that identify and characterise the regions of contamination within the same time limit. Fourteen individual organisations from seven different countries supplied results. Results from participants indicate that for strong sources of isotopes with simple spectra featuring

  2. Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout: Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement (ORPEX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years carborne gamma spectrometry has expanded from its role as a geological survey platform to serving as a useful asset in the field of emergency response to radiological and nuclear situations. Its two main applications are searching for orphan sources and for surveying in the aftermath of an accident involving the release of radioactive materials. Despite this expansion, the opportunities for gaining practical experience in the field are limited by cost considerations and practicability. These limitations are exacerbated by the fact that data generated and displayed in the field differ significantly from gamma spectral data generated in a laboratory environment. As a means of exercising existing emergency measuring/surveying capability and introducing carborne measurements to a larger group, a virtual exercise was devised. The exercise ORPEX (Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement) featured two typical emergency scenarios in which carborne measuring systems might be deployed: firstly a search for multiple orphan sources and secondly surveying to delineate patchy fallout from a local release point. In the first scenario, synthetic spectral data were generated for imaginary point sources and inserted into genuine carborne measurements from in the Trondheim area of Norway. Participants were presented with a typical software tool and data in a range of typical formats and asked to report the source locations and isotopes within a time limit. In the second scenario, synthetic spectral data representing fallout from a local fire involving radioactive material were added to real carborne data from the Trondheim area. Participants were asked to produce maps that identify and characterise the regions of contamination within the same time limit. Fourteen individual organisations from seven different countries supplied results. Results from participants indicate that for strong sources of isotopes with simple spectra featuring

  3. About some aspects of absorbed and effective ionizing radiation dose computation of population under external and internal radiation influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the investigation is to develop methods of dose assessment, absorbed by individual human organs, or effective dose of population, as well as to study factors effecting on uncertainties in their computation. The dose assessment for the Thyroid or other organ is based on retrospective information obtained from radioecological monitoring and according to the information about radioactive fallout's on the surface after each nuclear test, as well as the information about concrete living conditions of local population. The main parameter in proposed algorithms is gamma-radiation dose rate at open area, which is a result of direct measurements. When assessing internal radiation dose, in the course of inhalation, the whole period of local fallout's is taken into consideration. The developed method allows obtaining a systematic information describing irradiation of people by means of the radioactive traces, as well as tabulated information for model computations of internal and external radiation dose

  4. Caracterização dos taninos condensados das espécies maniçoba (Manihot pseudoglazovii, flor-de-seda (Calotropis procera, feijão-bravo (Capparis flexuosa, L e jureminha (Desmanthus virgatus Characterization of condensed tannin of the species maniçoba (Manihot pseudoglaziovii, flor-de-seda (Calotropis procera, feijão-bravo (Capparis flexuosa and jureminha (Desmanthus virgatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E.S.B.S. Cruz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Caracterizaram-se os taninos condensados (TC e determinaram-se a composição bromatológica e a digestibilidade in vitro da matéria seca (DIVMS das espécies maniçoba (Manihot pseudoglazovii Pax & Hoffman, flor-de-seda (Calotropis procera, feijão-bravo (Capparis flexuosa, L e jureminha (Desmanthus virgatus (L. Willd. As concentrações em tanino solúvel, tanino ligado ao resíduo e tanino total (TT das espécies foram determinadas pelo método butanol-HCL e a adstringência pelo método de difusão radial. Para a DIVMS, foi utilizado método de dois estágios. Foram observadas diferenças entre as espécies (PCondensed tannins (CT of the species maniçoba (Manihot pseudoglaziovii, flor-de-seda (Calotropis procera, feijão-bravo (Capparis flexuosa and jureminha (Desmanthus virgatus were characterized and the chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD of those species were determined. Concentration of soluble tannin (ST, bound tannin (BT and total tannin (TT of the plants was determined using butanol-HCL method; astringency was determined, using radial diffusion method, and the IVDMD was determined using two-stages method. Concentration and astringency of condensed tannins varied between species (P<0.01. Jureminha was the species that presented the highest value (2.4% TT and 13.7-3 astringency. No tannins were detected in flor-de-seda. Crude protein was higher than 16% in all studied species, and the ADF and lignin values were lower than 39 and 15%, respectively. The IVDMD was low in jureminha (43% and high in flor-de-seda (80%. The correlation between IVDMD and TT was low (r²=0.097.

  5. Photographs and Pamphlet about Nuclear Fallout. The Constitution Community: Postwar United States (1945 to Early 1970s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, John M., Jr.

    In August 1945, the United States unleashed an atomic weapon against the Japanese at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and brought an end to World War II. These bombs killed in two ways -- by the blast's magnitude and resulting firestorm, and by nuclear fallout. After the Soviet Union exploded its first atom bomb in 1949, the Cold War waged between the two…

  6. Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly. Final tabulation of monthly /sup 90/Sr fallout data: 1954--1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-10-01

    This report presents the monthly /sup 90/Sr deposition data derived from a global network of stations started in 1954. This program was carried out to assess the distribution patterns and inventory the amount of fallout of radionuclies from atmospheric nuclear tests. In 1976, monthly deposition rates had diminished to the point where measurable levels of /sup 90/Sr were rarely observed.

  7. Appendix to Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, June 1, 1976--September 1, 1976. [Fallout radionuclides and Pb in environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, E.P. Jr.

    1976-10-01

    Tabulated data are presented on the content of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 89/Sr in fallout deposited at various world land sites; /sup 90/Sr in milk and drinking water samples from various locations; and the content of Pb in samples of surface air. (CH)

  8. Distribution and characterization of fall-out and airborne activity from 10 to 160 miles from Ground Zero, Spring 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baurmash, L.; Neel, J.W.; Vance, W.K. III; Mork, H.M.; Larson, K.H.

    1958-09-01

    Fall-out patterns of four tower shots were delineated by survey-instrument methods to distances of approximately 160 miles from Ground Zero. Surface-contamination levels in terms of ..mu..c/ft/sup 2/ and fall-out particle-size distributions were determined by soil-sample analyses. Airborne radioactivity concentrations determined by air samplers of different types and supports agreed within a factor of 4; aerosol radioactivity median diameters of < 5 ..mu.. were determined by cascade impactors. The solubilities of fall-out and airborne radioactivity in 0.1N HCl ranged from 20 to 30 and 65 to 85%, respectively. More than 90% of the fall-out from two shots was magnetic. Beta-decay slopes ranged from T/sup -0/ /sup 80/ to T/sup -1/ /sup 59/, and field gamma-decay slops ranged from T/sup -1/ /sup 07/ to T/sup -2/ /sup 10/. Principal beta-energy peaks of 0.6 and 2.0 MeV were observed.

  9. Array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) analysis of premenopausal breast cancers from a nuclear fallout area and matched cases from Western New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, G; Varma, R; Huang, H; Pryshchepava, A; Groth, J; Fleming, D; Nowak, N J; McQuaid, D; Conroy, J; Mahoney, M; Moysich, K; Falkner, K L; Geradts, J

    2005-09-19

    High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) analysis of DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) was performed on breast carcinomas in premenopausal women from Western New York (WNY) and from Gomel, Belarus, an area exposed to fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident. Genomic DNA was isolated from 47 frozen tumour specimens from 42 patients and hybridised to arrays spotted with more than 3000 BAC clones. In all, 20 samples were from WNY and 27 were from Belarus. In total, 34 samples were primary tumours and 13 were lymph node metastases, including five matched pairs from Gomel. The average number of total CNAs per sample was 76 (range 35-134). We identified 152 CNAs (92 gains and 60 losses) occurring in more than 10% of the samples. The most common amplifications included gains at 8q13.2 (49%), at 1p21.1 (36%), and at 8q24.21 (36%). The most common deletions were at 1p36.22 (26%), at 17p13.2 (26%), and at 8p23.3 (23%). Belarussian tumours had more amplifications and fewer deletions than WNY breast cancers. HER2/neu negativity and younger age were also associated with a higher number of gains and fewer losses. In the five paired samples, we observed more discordant than concordant DNA changes. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis revealed two distinct groups of tumours: one comprised predominantly of Belarussian carcinomas and the other largely consisting of WNY cases. In total, 50 CNAs occurred significantly more commonly in one cohort vs the other, and these included some candidate signature amplifications in the breast cancers in women exposed to significant radiation. In conclusion, our high-density aCGH study has revealed a large number of genetic aberrations in individual premenopausal breast cancer specimens, some of which had not been reported before. We identified a distinct CNA profile for carcinomas from a nuclear fallout area, suggesting a possible molecular fingerprint of radiation-associated breast cancer. PMID:16222315

  10. Identifying Sources of Non-fallout Nuclear Contamination in Hudson River Sediments by Plutonium and Neptunium isotope ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Chillrud, S. N.

    2002-12-01

    In an effort to identify and characterize nuclear contaminants released from sources contained within the Hudson River drainage basin, Pu isotopes and 237Np have been measured in a series of sediment cores collected from various locations within the region. During the last several decades, the Hudson River has received input of radioactive contamination from several sources. The first and most significant, has been global fallout, which was a result of atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons primarily by governments of the United States and Former Soviet Union in the 1950s and 1960s. The second, is contamination resulting from reactor releases at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant (IPNPP) located on the Hudson River about 35 miles north of New York City. This facility began operation in 1962. A third source of radioactive contamination to the region is contamination resulting from activities at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) located on the Mohawk River, which began operation in 1946. Our research entails identifying different sources of nuclear contamination by measurement of plutonium and neptunium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The isotopic composition of a nuclear contaminant is a sensitive indicator of its origin. By comparing the isotopic composition measured in fluvial sediments to mean values reported for global fallout (i.e. 240Pu/239Pu = 0.18 ñ 0.014, 237Np/239Pu = 0.48 ñ 0.07, and 241Pu/239Pu = .00194 ñ 00028) it is possible to identify contaminants as non-fallout in origin. To date, we have analyzed selected samples from 3 sediment cores collected from the following locations: 1) the Mohawk River downstream of KAPL, 2) the Hudson River above its confluence with the Mohawk River, and 3) the lower Hudson River at a location in close proximity to IPNPP. Isotopic analysis of sediments from the Mohawk River indicates contamination that is clearly non-fallout in origin (240Pu/239Pu ranges between 0

  11. Fallout by the disaster of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant at Nagoya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vast amounts of radioactive materials were released to environment by the nuclear disaster of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant (NPP) in March 2011. A small amount of radionuclides were detected in rainwater even at Nagoya, 440 km far from the NPP. We report here results for fallouts in the unit of Bq/m2 at Nagoya, which are estimated from activity concentrations (Bq/cm3) and precipitations (mm) of rainwaters collected in the period from 20 March to 12 May 2011. -- Highlights: ► Vast amounts of radioactive materials were released from Fukushima Daiichi NPP. ► Low-level activities were included in rains at Nagoya, 440 km from the NPP. ► The first detection in rain was on 25 Mar, 2011, and the maximum was on 18 Apr. ► No artificial radionuclide was observed after 1 May, 2011. ► The activity concentrations was less than that of natural radionuclide, 7Be

  12. The Chernobyl fallout in Greece and its effects on the dating of archaeological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the fallout from the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl have been monitored at various sites in Greece. Here we present the first estimates of gamma dose rates, an essential parameter in the dating of archaeological materials by thermoluminescence (TL) and ESR methods. The dose rates are derived from the long-lived radionuclides of 137Cs, 134Cs, 106Ru and 144Ce (with t1/2 ≥ 1 yr). The present dose rates vary between 30 and 60 mrad/yr, but maximum values of around 811 mrad/yr have also been recorded, for ground-surface exposures. These dose rate values must be regarded as very significant to TL and ESR dating of samples from now on and a correction factor should be applied. (orig.)

  13. Radioactive fallout in air and rain: results to the end of 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of atmospheric particulate and rainwater have been collected from the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Results are presented of analyses of these samples for various fission products and certain other radionuclides. Average concentrations of Cs-137 in air in the United Kingdom in 1990 were 1% of those in 1986. They were attributable mainly to the resuspension of deposited activity resulting from the Chernobyl accident of April 1986. Plutonium concentrations in air and rainwater were a very small fraction of the National Radiological Protection Board's Generalised Derived Limit for members of the public. Estimates are given of the worldwide deposit of Cs-137 and Sr-90 to the end of 1990. The gamma and beta-ray dose rates from fallout at Chilton are estimated from the observed deposition. (author)

  14. Understanding Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon transfers at the catchment scale combining chemical and fallout radionuclide analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateuille, D.; Evrard, O.; Lefevre, I.; Moreau-Guigon, E.; Alliot, F.; Chevreuil, M.; Mouchel, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Reducing environmental contamination constitutes a major challenge for industrialized countries. Furthermore, in the European Union, Water Framework Directive (WFD; Directive 2000/60/EC) requires that the member state water bodies reach good ecological and chemical status by 2015. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants considered as priority pollutants because of their mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. They are mostly emitted by human activities such as household heating or road traffic. Although emissions have decreased during the last decades, a large amount of PAHs have been released into the atmosphere for the last two centuries. In recent years, studies dealing with PAHs have grown in number but most of them were restricted to the measurement of PAHs concentrations in the different compartments of the environment (air, soil, sediment, water, etc.). In this context, there remains a lack of knowledge about the transfers and, consequently, about the persistence of these compounds in the environment. This question is particularly acute in the Seine River basin where very high concentrations in PAHs are reported in sediment, thereby compromising the achievement of the good chemical status required by WFD. Our study aims to quantify PAHs transfers at the catchment scale by combining chemical analysis with gamma spectrometry. Atmospheric fallout, soil, river water and sediment samples were collected in two upstream sub-catchments of the Seine River basin during one year. Chemical analyses, restricted to 15 of the 16 PAHs selected by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), were carried out to determine PAHs concentrations in all samples. Contamination spectra were used to outline the potential origin of pollution. Measurement of fallout radionuclides (Beryllium-7, Lead-210, Caesium-137) in both rainfall and river sediment provided a way to discriminate between freshly eroded sediment vs. material that

  15. Effect of fallout on measurement of 131I around nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early July 1974, 131I produced by detonaion of a nuclear device by the People's Republic of China appeared in fallout over New York State. Radioiodine levels in milk were measured using a β-γ coincidence system with a sensitivity of 0.02 pCi/liter. Peak levels of 1.6 pCi/liter of milk in early July tapered off to approx.0.1 pCi/liter by early October. When fresh pasture growth ceased and supplemental feed was provided, radioiodine was no longer detectable. This episode shows that operators of light-water power reactors must analyze background samples collected some distance from the reactor site to meet the present U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission analytical requirements for 131I as expressed in Appendix I to 10CFR50 and Regulatory Guide 1.42

  16. Body burden of fallout 137Cs in the inhabitants of Moscow in 1980-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several groups of people living in Moscow were measured for fallout 137Cs in 1980-1983. In vivo measurements of incorporated 137Cs were made with use of a whole-body counter. The minimum measurable activities of 137Cs were 37 and 17 Bq consequently for time of measurement 15 and 30 min. All persons measured were classified into four groups, personnel of whole-body counters laboratory, teenagers-sportsman, patients of a Moscow hospital (with heart and kidneys diseases) and normal adults-inhabitants of Moscow. The activity of 137Cs in the normal adults and patients was observed to decrease during the period of investigation. It was shown that by the end of 1983 the great majority of the results were similar and below the minimum measurable activity (for time of measurement 15 min)

  17. Risks associated with volcanic ash fallout from Mt.Etna with reference to industrial filtration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent eruption of the Icelandic volcano has focused the worldwide attention on volcanic ash effects for the population, road, rail and air traffic and production activities. This paper aims to study of technological (industrial) accidental scenarios triggered by ash fallout and, more specifically, to define and quantify the potential damage on filtration systems. Malfunctions due to the filter clogging and service interruptions caused by the rupture of the filtering surface have been analysed in order to define the vulnerability of the equipment to such damages. Results are given in terms of threshold values of deposit on the filtering surface and exceedance probability curves of ash concentrations and the duration of the ash emission. This data can be easily implemented in the standard risk assessment with the aim to include the estimation of Natural-Technological (Na-Tech) hazards

  18. Transport of fallout plutonium to the ocean by the Mississippi River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mississippi River suspended sediment shows a continual decrease of sup(239,240)Pu content over a seven-year time period. An exponential curve best-fit through the data predicts a half-time of decrease equal to 4.3 years. However, unsupported 210Pb, a naturally occurring nuclide at steady state in the environment, maintains constant concentration over the same time period. The decrease in Pu content of river sediment results from several factors: cessation of atmospheric weapons testing; transport of Pu to deeper levels of soil profiles; storage of sediment in floodplains and behind dams; and dilution by erosion of older, prebomb soil material. Most of the fallout Pu in the Mississippi drainage basin will remain on the continent unless there are major changes in erosion and sediment transport patterns in the basin itself. (orig.)

  19. Atmospheric diffusion and fallout and alkaline materials produced by sodium fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present works deals with a theoretic approach of the diffusion in air of colloidal Na2O coming out of sodium fires, consequent to sodium losses from the cooling circuit of a fast breeder reactor, in case of accident. The theoretical pattern has subsequently been applied to a numerical assessment of the Na2O concentration in air and on the ground (due to fallout), either inside or outside the sodium hall of the Cpv-1 facility at the Brasimone site. The assessment refers to the maximum credible accident 'pool burning', in the most unfavourable meteorological conditions. Protectionistic recomendations are given, and emergency procedures are described, in that concerns boot people professionally employed within the reactor site and the external population

  20. Shelter to provide protection from nuclear fallout and/or war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shelter to provide protection from nuclear fall-out and/or war gas is described. It has a flexible inflatable envelope containing its own life support system and can be stored in a collapsed condition until required. A sealable access is provided and an over-pressure within the envelope can be maintained by means of a hand-operated air compressor which draws in external air through an air inlet and through a dust and war gas filter. The shelter can be divided into two chambers of which one can form an air-lock chamber between the access opening and the other chamber. Sanitary and decontamination equipment can be provided in the air-lock chamber. (author)

  1. A simple model to estimate deposition based on a statistical reassessment of global fallout data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palsson, S.E.; Howard, B.J.; Bergan, T.D.;

    2013-01-01

    . A correlation was identified between fallout deposition and precipitation and an uneven distribution with latitude. In this study, the available data from 1954 to 1976 for 90Sr and 137Cs were reanalysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and logarithmically transformed values of the monthly deposition...... precipitation at each site, latitude and change with time and a simple linear model was produced with similar explanatory power as the GAM. The estimates improved as the temporal resolution of the precipitation data increased. A good logelog fit could be obtained if a bias of about 1e6 mm precipitation per...... relationship has been the outcome of some studies linking wash-out and rain-out coefficients with rain intensity. Our results showed that the precipitation rate was an important parameter, not just the total amount. The simple model presented here allows the recreation of the deposition history at a site...

  2. Lichen forage ingestion rates of free-roaming caribou estimated with fallout cesium-137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichen forage ingestion rates of free-roaming caribou herds in northern Alaska during 1963 to 1970 were estimated by applying a two-compartment, eight parameter cesium-137 kinetics model to measured fallout 137Cs concentrations in lichen and caribou. Estimates for winter equilibrium periods (January to April) for each year ranged from 3.7 to 6.9 kg dry weight lichens per day for adult female caribou. Further refinement of these estimations were obtained by calculating probabilistic distributions of intake rates by stochastic processes based upon the mean and standard error intervals of the eight parameters during 1965 and 1968. A computer program generated 1,000 randomly sampled values within each of the eight parameter distributions. Results substantiate the contention that lichen forage ingestion rates by free-roaming caribou are significantly greater than previously held

  3. Neogene fallout tuffs from the Yellowstone hotspot in the Columbia Plateau region, Oregon, Washington and Idaho, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P Nash

    Full Text Available Sedimentary sequences in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 16-4 Ma contain fallout tuffs whose origins lie in volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in northwestern Nevada, eastern Oregon and the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Silicic volcanism began in the region contemporaneously with early eruptions of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG, and the abundance of widespread fallout tuffs provides the opportunity to establish a tephrostratigrahic framework for the region. Sedimentary basins with volcaniclastic deposits also contain diverse assemblages of fauna and flora that were preserved during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, including Sucker Creek, Mascall, Latah, Virgin Valley and Trout Creek. Correlation of ashfall units establish that the lower Bully Creek Formation in eastern Oregon is contemporaneous with the Virgin Valley Formation, the Sucker Creek Formation, Oregon and Idaho, Trout Creek Formation, Oregon, and the Latah Formation in the Clearwater Embayment in Washington and Idaho. In addition, it can be established that the Trout Creek flora are younger than the Mascall and Latah flora. A tentative correlation of a fallout tuff from the Clarkia fossil beds, Idaho, with a pumice bed in the Bully Creek Formation places the remarkably well preserved Clarkia flora assemblage between the Mascall and Trout Creek flora. Large-volume supereruptions that originated between 11.8 and 10.1 Ma from the Bruneau-Jarbidge and Twin Falls volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in the central Snake River Plain deposited voluminous fallout tuffs in the Ellensberg Formation which forms sedimentary interbeds in the CRBG. These occurrences extend the known distribution of these fallout tuffs 500 km to the northwest of their source in the Snake River Plain. Heretofore, the distal products of these large eruptions had only been recognized to the east of their sources in the High Plains of Nebraska and Kansas.

  4. Indication of the radioactive fallout in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhomashi, N; Almasoud, Fahad I

    2016-02-01

    On March 2011, a severe damage has occurred to Fukushima Di-iachi nuclear reactor complex in Japan following the huge earthquake and the resulting Tsunami. Consequently, vast amounts of radioactive fallout were released into the atmosphere and contaminated the environment in Japan. Soon after the accident, traces of anthropogenic radionuclides were detected in environmental samples collected in many parts in the northern hemisphere even very far away from Japan creating a global concern. There is no information about radioactive contamination in the Arabian Peninsula caused by the Japanese Fukushima nuclear accident. The first evidence of Fukushima radioactive fallout in Riyadh (24° 43' N, 46° 38' E), Saudi Arabia has been confirmed in April 8, 2011. The airborne fission products (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were measured in air samples. The radionuclide concentrations were determined by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. Their activity concentrations were studied as a function of time over a period of 20 days at the end of which they had mostly fallen below our limit of detection. The maximum activity concentration of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs in air of, respectively, 323.7 ± 18.5, 17.2 ± 1.0 and 26.0 ± 1.8 μBq m(-3) were observed on April 10-11, 2011. The (131)I/(137)Cs and (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio values in air were presented and discussed. Finally, the effective doses to the public of Riyadh city from inhalation of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs due to contribution from Fukushima incident was found far below levels of concern. PMID:26650827

  5. Modeling the fallout from stabilized nuclear clouds using the HYSPLIT atmospheric dispersion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Air Resources Laboratory, has been configured to simulate the dispersion and deposition of nuclear materials from a surface-based nuclear detonation using publicly available information on nuclear explosions. Much of the information was obtained from “The Effects of Nuclear Weapons” by Glasstone and Dolan (1977). The model was evaluated against the measurements of nuclear fallout from six nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1957 at the Nevada Test Site using the global NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Project (NNRP) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorological data as input. The model was able to reproduce the general direction and deposition patterns using the coarse NNRP data with Figure of Merit in Space (FMS – the percent overlap between predicted and measured deposition patterns) scores in excess of 50% for four of six simulations for the smallest dose rate contour, with FMS scores declining for higher dose rate contours. When WRF meteorological data were used the FMS scores were 5–20% higher in five of the six simulations, especially at the higher dose rate contours. The one WRF simulation where the scores declined slightly (10–30%) was also the best scoring simulation when using the NNRP data. When compared with measurements of dose rate and time of arrival from the Town Data Base (Thompson et al., 1994), similar results were found with the WRF simulations providing better results for four of six simulations. The overall result was that the different plume simulations using WRF data had more consistent performance than the plume simulations using NNRP data fields. - Highlights: • Modeled the fallout from six Nevada nuclear tests between 1951 and 1957 using HYSPLIT. • Modeled dose rate patterns compared favorably to measurements. • Plume overlap was best for the smallest dose rate

  6. Radioactivity measurements in Europe after the Chernobyl accident. Part II: Fallout and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection of deposition measurements, presented in this report and included in the floppy disk in the back cover has been put together as part of the REM programme (Radioactivity environmental Monitoring). This follows the compilation of air measurements (part 1) published previously (Raes, 1989). The objective of these compilations is to promote the integration of Chernobyl data on a European-wide basis to make them widely available in a coherent form for scientific study. Deposition measurements come in many forms (fallout, rain, soil) but all reflect the phenomena by which radionuclides in the air reach the surface. Depending on the manner of sampling, measurements can reflect integral values (e.g. from surface soil) or some fraction of the deposition (e.g. daily deposition using fallout or rain collectors). The latter can also be expressed as wet or dry according to the sampling apparatus used. The original sources of information from which this compilation was made vary widely : some of the data were obtained directly from floppy disks or tapes; others were copied manually from tables found in reports or papers in the scientific literature. The sets of measurements presented in this report were selected from this large patrimony of data in the REM data bank. Specific criteria were used to make this selection. Overall, only those data were used which had fully defined records. For daily deposition data actually sampled over 24 hourly periods were selected. With cumulative deposition care was taken to select data which covered the whole period of deposition marked by the passage of the cloud. The resulting data are presented on a unified format and as far as possible keep to individual measured values. In this manner the greatest flexibility is given to the user of this data

  7. Rainfall erosivity in catchments contaminated with fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Chartin, Caroline; Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Garcia-Sanchez, Laurent; Cerdan, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 resulted in the fallout of significant quantities of radiocesium over the Fukushima region. After reaching the soil surface, radiocesium is quickly bound to fine soil particles. Thereafter, rainfall and snowmelt run-off events transfer particle-bound radiocesium downstream. Characterizing the precipitation regime of the fallout-impacted region is thus important for understanding post-deposition radiocesium dynamics. Accordingly, 10 min (1995-2015) and daily precipitation data (1977-2015) from 42 meteorological stations within a 100 km radius of the FDNPP were analyzed. Monthly rainfall erosivity maps were developed to depict the spatial heterogeneity of rainfall erosivity for catchments entirely contained within this radius. The mean average precipitation in the region surrounding the FDNPP is 1420 mm yr-1 (SD 235) with a mean rainfall erosivity of 3696 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1 (SD 1327). Tropical cyclones contribute 22 % of the precipitation (422 mm yr-1) and 40 % of the rainfall erosivity (1462 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1 (SD 637)). The majority of precipitation (60 %) and rainfall erosivity (82 %) occurs between June and October. At a regional scale, rainfall erosivity increases from the north to the south during July and August, the most erosive months. For the remainder of the year, this gradient occurs mostly from northwest to southeast. Relief features strongly influence the spatial distribution of rainfall erosivity at a smaller scale, with the coastal plains and coastal mountain range having greater rainfall erosivity than the inland Abukuma River valley. Understanding these patterns, particularly their spatial and temporal (both inter- and intraannual) variation, is important for contextualizing soil and particle-bound radiocesium transfers in the Fukushima region. Moreover, understanding the impact of tropical cyclones will be important for managing sediment and sediment-bound contaminant

  8. Lichen (sp. Cladonia) as a deposition indicator for transuranium elements investigated with the Chernobyl fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paatero, Jussi; Jaakkola, Timo; Kulmala, Seija [Helsinki Univ., Radiochemistry Lab., Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-06-01

    The feasibility of employing carpet-forming lichens (sp. Cladonia) as a measure for the deposition of transuranium elements was investigated with the Chernobyl fallout. In Finland, the deposition of these elements after the accident was very uneven. The highest deposition values for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm and {sup 243,244}Cm were 5.7, 3.0, 1.3, 98 and 0.025 Bq m{sup -2}, respectively. The amount of deposited {sup 239,240}Pu was, however, only some percent of the fallout of the nuclear test explosions of the 1950s and the 1960s. Instead, practically no {sup 242}Cm was released into the environment during the weapons` testing. The correlation between the refractory nuclides {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm, {sup 95}Zr and {sup 144}Ce in lichen was high (r = 0.709-0.979), but the correlation between the transuranium elements and volatile {sup 137}Cs was much lower (r = 0.227-0.276). The calculated biological half-lives of Pu and Am in lichen were 730 and 320 days, respectively. The {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239,240}Pu activity ratio in the top parts of lichen samples was 0.54 ``+`` 0.02 corresponding to a burn-up value of 12 MWd kg{sup -1}. The {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239,240}Pu activity ratios of 0.43 and 0.69 measured from two isolated hot particles correspond to burn-up values of 10 and 14 MWd kg{sup -1}, respectively. (author).

  9. Nuclear fallout and heavy metal deposition in ombrogenous peats in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent decades, significant quantities of fallout radionuclides and trace metals have been released to the atmosphere as a result of man's activities. In this study, the use of ombrotrophic peat bogs to determine the deposition history of these elements has been examined in detail. Ten peat cores taken from three unmodified blanket and raised bogs in Ireland were sectioned and analysed for a range of radionuclides including 134Cs, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am and 210Pb. Lead-210, 134Cs and 137Cs were measured by high resolution gamma spectrometry, while the transuranium nuclides were determined after chemical separation by alpha spectrometry. Plutonium-241, present on the electroplated discs together with Pu(α), was measured directly by lo-level liquid scintillation counting. In addition, the concentrations of fifteen trace and major elements were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Core chronologies were established using 210Pb dating techniques and checked with fallout radionuclides from weapons tests. The deposition profiles of the pollutant elements Pb, Zn and Cu showed significant increases over the past century with highest levels recorded in the most industrialised area. By way of contrast, the profiles of the major elements, Ca, Mg, Na, P and S, were similar to that of the mass deposition, indicating little or no anthropogenic input. The integrated totals of these elements were low compared with the amounts measured in precipitation. The heavy metals, on the other hand, showed no evidence of mobility and appeared, when compared with other reported values, to have been completely retained by the peat. (author)

  10. Statistical analysis of fallout radionuclides transfer to paddy-field rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides released from nuclear facilities to atmosphere are transported through various pathways in biosphere and cause human exposure. Among these radionuclides transfer pathways, an ingestion of crops containing radionuclides is one of the dominant pathway for human exposure. For the safety assessment of nuclear facilities, it is important to understand the behavior of radionuclides in agricultural environment and to describe them in a mathematical model. In this paper, a statistical model is proposed for estimating the concentration of fallout radionuclides in paddy-field rice, the staple food for Japanese people. For describing behavior of fallout radionuclides in a paddy-field, a dynamic model and a statistical model have been proposed respectively. The model used in this study has been developed assuming that the amount of radionuclides transfer to brown rice (hulled rice) or polished rice through direct deposition of airborne radionuclides (the direct deposition pathway) and root uptake from a paddy soil (the root uptake pathway) are proportional to the deposition flux of radionuclides and concentration of radionuclides in paddy soil respectively. That is, the model has two independent variables; the deposition flux of radionuclides and the concentration of radionuclides in the paddy soil, and has single dependent variable; the concentration of radionuclides in brown rice or polished rice. The regression analysis is applied by using environmental monitoring data. Then the distribution of radionuclides between rice-bran (skin part of rice crop) and polished rice (core part) through both the direct deposition pathway and the root uptake pathway are evaluated by the model. (author)

  11. The new conversion model MODERN to derive erosion rates from inventories of fallout radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Laura; Meusburger, Katrin; Frenkel, Elena; A'Campo-Neuen, Annette; Iurian, Andra-Rada; Ketterer, Michael E.; Mabit, Lionel; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) has become one of the most commonly used methods to quantify soil erosion and depositional processes. FRNs include anthropogenic radionuclides (e.g. 137Cs, 239+240Pu) released into the atmosphere during nuclear bomb tests and power plant accidents (e.g Chernobyl, Fukushima-Daiichi), as well as natural radiotracers such as 210Pbex and 7Be. FRNs reach the land surface by dry and wet fallouts from the atmosphere. Once deposited, FRNs are tightly adsorbed by fine soil particles and their subsequent redistribution is mostly associated with soil erosion processes. FRNs methods are based on a qualitative comparison: the inventory (total radionuclide activity per unit area) at a given sampling site is compared to that of a so called reference site. The conversion of FRN inventories into soil erosion and deposition rates is done with a variety of models, which suitability is dependent on the selected FRN, soil cultivation (ploughed or unploughed) and movement (erosion or deposition). The authors propose a new conversion model, which can be easily and comprehensively used for different FRNs, land uses and soil redistribution processes. This new model i.e. MODERN (MOdelling Deposition and Erosion rates with RadioNuclides) considers the precise depth distribution of a given FRN at a reference site, and allows adapting it for any specific site conditions. MODERN adaptability and performance has been tested on two published case studies: (i) a 137Cs study in an alpine and unploughed area in the Aosta valley (Italy) and (ii) a 210Pbex study on a ploughed area located in Romania. The results show a good agreement and a significant correlation (r= 0.91, pProfile Distribution Model and the Mass Balance Model). The open access code and the cost free accessibility of MODERN will ensure the promotion of a wider application of FRNs for investigating soil erosion and sedimentation processes.

  12. Radiation: boon or bane?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankind has been exposed to radiation ever since the very first stage of its evolutionary development. Radiation is one of the greatest discoveries of mankind. Radiation has turned out to be a razor-sharp double-edged sword. In earlier days, it worried no one, because nobody knew about it. The correct application of radiation, be it in any field, have made lives better. Radiation in reality, a boon as well as a curse. Radiation is important but it is time we have to decide where to draw the line. For example, the match stick by itself is just a harmless object. One can use it to light a lamp or light a fire for cooking. In the hands of a mother lighting the lamp or the cooking fire, it becomes beneficial. The same match stick in the hands of a small careless child could prove to be fatal. The increased use of radiation has created fear in the minds of people regarding its possible adverse effects on living systems. Radiation is highly dangerous if not used with caution. This fear is heightened by nuclear fallouts, nuclear accidents and of high levels of natural background radiation in geographical areas in a number of countries. Terrorists may take advantage of technology and may produce nuclear weapons, which is a great risk for entire world. There are numerous reports about increasing health hazards like headache, sleep disorders, lack of concentration, infertility, memory loss, cardiovascular problems, cancer etc. which arises due to over exposure of radiation. Apart from human race, radiation affects other animals and overall environment. Although it has adverse effects on living beings but it cannot be denied that today radiation is a common and valuable tool in medicine, agriculture, research and industry. Radiation has contributed to significant improvements in fields of communications technology and energy. Radiation has proved to be an excellent source in terms of amount of energy production with generation of minimal waste. Even though it produces small

  13. Information by the German Federal Government. Environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The information by the German Federal Government on environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2011 includes the following issues: (I) natural radiation exposure: radiation sources; contributions to the radiation exposure (cosmic and terrestric radiation, radioactive building materials, food and drinking water, radon); assessment of the components of natural radioactivity. (II) civil radiation exposure: nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel processing plants, other nuclear facilities (interim storage plants and final repositories); summarizing assessment of nuclear facilities; environmental radioactivity from mining and remedial action in the Wismut AG; radioactive materials and ionizing radiation in research, engineering and households; residuals from industry and mining; fallout from reactor accidents and nuclear weapon testing. (III) Occupational radiation exposure: civil radiation sources, natural radiation sources (aircraft personnel, water plants, therapeutic baths). (IV) medical radiation exposure: X-ray diagnostics, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, radiopharmaceuticals, assessment of medical radiation exposure. (V) non-ionizing radiation: electromagnetic fields, optical radiation.

  14. 2. interim report on radiation situation in Finland from 5 to 16 May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This second interim report is a continuation of the first 'Fallout situation in Finland from April 26 to May 4' STUK-B-VALO-44. It deals with the results from external radiation measurements and analysis of environmental and foodstuff samples between 5 and 16 May, i.e. the development of the situation after the fallout peak. The whole-body counter measurements of tourists returning from the Soviet Union and from other countries in Eastern Europe after the accident are also reported

  15. The decision-making process in returning relocated populations to the Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1946 and 1958, the United States conducted a nuclear weapons testing program in the northern Marshall Islands, detonating 66 nuclear weapons at Bikini and Enewetak. The indigenous populations at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls were evacuated prior to the initiation of testing at these respective atolls. Fallout in these cases were typically distributed within a few miles of the detonation. The 15-megaton thermonuclear Bravo device at Bikini resulted in the inadvertent deposition of radioactive fallout on the 253 inhabitants of Rongelap and Utirik atolls. The Rongelap and Utirik populations had not been evacuated prior to this test designed to detonate at about 5 megatons. 65 Rongelap individuals received whole body fallout doses of about 1.8 sievert (180 rem), 18 Ailinginae individuals received whole body doses of about 0.7 sievert (70 rem), and 157 Marshallese individuals at Utirik received a whole body fallout doses of about 0.14 sievert (14 rem.) The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have provided special medical surveillance and treatment of radiation-related injury and illness for the surviving members of the populations of Rongelap and Utirik exposed during the 'Bravo' test. In addition, DOE conducts environmental and radiological monitoring and performs agricultural research studies to characterize the radioactivity remaining at the four atolls of Bikini in the aftermath of the 1946-58 U.S. nuclear testing program. (R.P.)

  16. Radiocaesium in Swedish reindeer after the Chernobyl accident. Progress report to the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of 137CS in freely grazing reindeer, and thus in reindeer pasture, continue to decrease, with an average Tef at 3.9 years from 1986/87 (the first year after the Chernobyl fallout) to 1996/97. The decline was more rapid during the first five years after the fallout than during the following five years. This, together with a tendency to a relatively slow decline in areas with mainly old fallout (from the nuclear weapon tests) indicate that radiocesium become more fixed in reindeer pasture with time. As a combined effect of the general decline and of different countermeasures, the transfer of radiocaesium via reindeer meat and the corresponding radiation dose to humans has been reduced with time. By different countermeasures, the total collective dose to the Swedish population, over a 10-year period following the Chernobyl accident, has been reduced with 676 manSv at a cost of 489 million SEK

  17. Results of EPR dosimetry for population in the vicinity of the most contaminating radioactive fallout trace after the first nuclear test in the Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for tooth enamel is applied to individual radiation dose determination to residents of two villages (Dolon and Mostik) in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. These villages are located near the central axis of the radioactive fallout trace of the most contaminating surface nuclear test conducted in 1949. It is found that excess doses obtained by subtraction of natural background dose from dose absorbed in enamel range up to 440 mGy to residents of Dolon, whose enamel was formed before 1949, and do not exceed 120 mGy to younger residents. To residents of Mostik, excess doses do not exceed 100 mGy regardless of age except for one resident with an extremely high dose of 1.25 Gy. These results are in agreement with the pattern of radioactive contamination of the territory after the nuclear test of 1949 except one case of extremely high dose, which should be additionally investigated. (author)

  18. Comparative levels of radioactive air pollutants from industry and fallout. A progress report of radioecological investigations of airborne radioactivity in the Utah environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported of measurements carried on during the year 1971 and the first two months of 1972 on the radioactivity from natural as compared to artificial radiation sources in the environment in Utah. During this time, a major portion of our work was devoted to analyses of the data and preparation of a report related to the Baneberry venting event and the accumulation of data on fallout from the January 7, 1972 Chinese nuclear explosion. Calibration procedures were developed for air samplers for the establishment of the numbers of pCi/m3 in air. The responses of the air monitors in relationship to the ventilation index, seasonal effect, and the industrial complexity of the area were analyzed. Continuous measurements were made of the levels of radioactive materials in soils and vegetation and the results of these studies are presented mainly in tabular form. Comparisons have been made of the levels of radioactive materials in soils on the basis of square mile levels and the distribution of the radioactive materials in the soil profiles. Measurements of farm crops, including the major sources from which dairy products would be produced, have been made, and some comparisons by year and location have been made. Studies of secondary aerosols have been made using the dust accumulated on farm implements as the indicator of the kinds of secondary aerosols to which farmers and outdoorsmen might be exposed. These results would also be indicative of the kinds of dusts produced when high winds resuspend soil deposited radionuclides

  19. Information by the German Federal Government. Environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The information by the German Federal Government on the environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure in 2010 includes five chapters. (I) Natural radiation exposure: radiation sources, contributions from cosmic radiation, contaminated construction materials, food and drinking water, and radon, evaluation of the different components of natural radiation exposure. (II) Civilization caused radiation exposure: nuclear power plants, research centers, nuclear fuel processing plants, other nuclear facilities (interim storage facilities, repositories); summarizing evaluation for nuclear facilities; environmental radioactivity due to mining; radioactive materials in research, technology and households; industrial and mining residues; fall-out as a consequence of the Chernobyl reactor accident and nuclear weapon testing. (III) Occupational radiation exposure: civil radiation sources, natural radiation sources, special events. (IV) Medical radiation exposure; X-ray diagnostics; nuclear medicine; radiotherapy using ionizing radiation; radiotherapy using open radioactive materials; evaluation of radiotherapy. (V) Non-ionizing radiation: electromagnetic fields; optical radiation; certification of solaria.

  20. Long-range volcanic ash transport and fallout during the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Adam J.; Villarosa, Gustavo; Rose, William I.; Delmelle, Pierre; Prata, Alfred J.; Viramonte, José G.

    2012-01-01

    The May 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile, provided a rare opportunity to measure the long-range transport of volcanic emissions and characteristics of a widely-dispersed terrestrial ash deposit. Airborne ash mass, quantified using thermal infrared satellite remote sensing, ranged between 0.2 and 0.4 Tg during the period 3-7 May 2008. A high level of spatiotemporal correspondence was observed between cloud trajectories and changes in surface reflectivity, which was inferred to indicate ash deposition. The evolution of the deposit was mapped for the first time using satellite-based observations of surface reflectivity. The distal (>80 km) ash deposit was poorly sorted and fine grained, and mean particle size varied very little beyond a distance >300 km. There were three particle size subpopulations in fallout at distances >300 km which mirror those identified in fallout from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, known to have a high propensity for aggregation. Discrete temporal sampling and characterisation of fallout demonstrated contributions from specific eruptive phases. Samples collected at the time of deposition were compared to bulk samples collected months after deposition and provided some evidence for winnowing. Experimentally-derived ash leachates had near-neutral pH values and charge balance which indicates minimal quantities of adsorbed acids. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed surface enrichments in Ca, Na and Fe and the presence of coatings of mixed Ca-, Na- and Fe-rich salts on ash particles prior to deposition. Low S:Cl ratios in leachates indicate that the eruption had a low S content, and high Cl:F ratios imply gas-ash interaction within a Cl-rich environment. We estimate that ash fallout had potential to scavenge ∼42% of total S released into the atmosphere prior to deposition. XPS analyses also revealed ash particle surfaces were strongly enriched in Fe (in contrast to the results from bulk leachate

  1. Dating of a sediment core from Lake Biel (Switzerland) and source characterization of fallout Pu; {sup 210}Pb- und {sup 137}Cs-Datierung eines Sedimentbohrkerns aus dem Bieler See (CH) und Ursprungsbestimmung von Pu-Fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pregler, Anja

    2016-08-01

    A sediment core from Lake Biel was dated by means of the naturally occurring radioactive isotope {sup 210}Pb as well as by the anthropogenic isotope {sup 137}Cs. The latter one can be detected as radioactive fallout of certain events in the sediment layers and accordingly be correlated with a distinct date. A verification of the correlated events is accomplished by particular isotope ratios of the anthropogenic isotopes {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu as well as {sup 241}Am as a decay product of the short-lived {sup 241}Pu. Furthermore, the percentage of the total {sup 137}Cs fallout was calculated corresponding to the specific events.

  2. Soil-plant-milk transfer of fallout cesium and strontium in Austrian pastures and in an area affected by local fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Semipalatinsk test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the nuclear accident in Chernobyl the radiocesium transfer along the soil-plant-milk food chain was investigated quite intensively. For various reasons the assessment of the 90Sr transfer was largely neglected. The objectives of this survey were to investigate the mobility of 137Cs and 90Sr at four different pastures in Austria and at the village of Dolon in Kazakhstan. Two of the Austrian pastures are lowland, the other two alpine pastures. Dolon is adjacent to the Semipalatinsk test site and it was affected by local fallout from various nuclear test explosions. At the investigated alpine pastures the 137CS and 90Sr plant uptake is enhanced compared to the lowland pastures. A strong positive correlation exists between the soil to plant transfer of both nuclides. This indicates that certain parameters, which are typical for alpine environments, have a similar influence on the plant uptake of these two nuclides. The obtained data demonstrate that milk can be used as an indicator of the average plant contamination not only for radiocesium but also for radiostrontium. Due to various reasons considerable uncertainties are associated with this. Even a few decades after the local fallout events the majority of 90Sr in soil samples from Dolon is fallout particle bound. Therefore, it can be assumed that this is also the case for 137CS . This has favorable consequences with regards to the bioavailability and the transport of these radionuclides through various food chains. Because of the stability of the fallout particles it can be concluded that the majority of 90Sr and 137CS will decay before being released due to physical and chemical weathering or microbial activity. (author)

  3. First Results of a Systematic Study of Internal Contamination Due to Fall-Out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since September 1961 the Service Central de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants (Central Radiological Protection Service) has carried out more than 500 examinations with whole-body counter. Numerous individuals were examined at intervals of three or six months, and, in many cases, the urine was radio analysed during these examinations. A systematic examination of the urine sample by gamma-spectrometry generally preceded the radiochemical study. A comparative study of the results of the various examinations yielded a certain amount of data on internal contamination from radioactive fall-out. (1) Caesium-137 was the only-artificial radioisotope which was consistently detected by the whole-body, counter. The changes-occurring in the mean body burden could be observed throughout the entire period of the examinations. The normal variation in body burden depending on sex could also be observed. (2) For the low-level activities usually found, it was possible to study the ratio of the urinary excretion of caesium-: 137 to the total body burden of this isotope. The results seemed to confirm the ratios found by other authors for higher levels of contamination. (3) The presence of fission products, with moderate half-lives, particularly zirconium-95 and niobium-95 and, to a lesser extent, ruthenium-103, could be observed as a transitory phenomenon, at certain times. (4) A knowledge of the total body burden of strontium-90 would be extremely. useful but, in the case of low- level activities, this isotope cannot be measured directly with the whole-body counter. The authors therefore tried to estimate the order of magnitude of this burden in two different ways. A first approximation was arrived at by studying caesium-137, since the percentages of strontium-90 and caesium-137 in radioactive fall-out evolve along very similar lines. Then, the urinary excretion of strontium-90 in a number of individuals was measured in an attempt to deduce the body burden or, at least, to

  4. The Time Analysis and Frequency Distribution of Caesium-137 Fall-Out in Muscle Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For low concentrations of artificial radioactivity in the body, detrimental effect will be most likely in that fraction of the population having many times the average amount. A meaningful evaluation of the nuclear fall-out hazard can only be made if the frequency distribution of radioactivity in the population is known. Attempts to determine the shape of the distribution curve from Kulp's data on strontium-90 concentration in children's bones have met limited success because of the small sample size and lack of strontium-90-calcium equilibrium in bone. To overcome these limitations, we have measured the caesium-137 content in approximately 900 muscle samples. These tissue samples were removed during post-mortem operations from January 1959 to August 1963. The use of caesium-137 as a fission product monitor assures that all members of the group, regardless of their age, were essentially in equilibrium with the radioactive environment at the time of death. The period of investigation coincides with the first weapon test moratorium and the resumption of large- scale testing in the fall of 1961. Average caesium-137 in the samples was relatively constant throughout 1959, decreased a factor of two during 1960, and remained relatively stable until the early summer of 1962. Since mid-1962 the average level of caesium-137 radioactivity in the sample population has steadily increased and was four times greater than the 1962 minimum by the summer of 1963. Time-independent histograms of the data have been assembled by fitting a polynomial to the raw data (sample radioactivity as a function of data of death). This pooled data has been tested statistically against normal, log-normal, and gamma frequency distributions. Results indicate that the experimental distribution is definitely not Gaussian and is best fitted by a gamma distribution. By using the empirically derived gamma distribution it is possible to predict the fraction of the population having N times the average

  5. Measurements of Background and Fall-out T Radioactivity in Samples from the Baltic Bay of Tvaeren, 1957-1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnedahl, P.O.

    1965-01-15

    To get information on the possible effects of future releases of radioactive effluents into Tvaeren, a bay of the Baltic, the Atomic Energy Company has had to carry out a biological and radiological programme in Tvaeren. The work was scheduled to extend over at least two years but in fact proceeded from 1957 to 1963. Unfortunately, no exact idea of the natural activity could be gained on account of the fallout from the repeated atomic bomb tests. Instead, the work developed into a study of the variations in biological samples caused by these tests. This report studies the correlation between the activity in fallout and that in flora and fauna. The contribution of natural activity from the radionuclide K-40 has been determined and is given for all samples. The following values may be regarded as representative of total {beta}-activity and activity of K-40 in the investigated samples. T 1204 has been used as standard.

  6. Cesium-137 and potassium contents in low-teens in areas of different fall-out levels in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative measurements were made by a whole body counter equipped in the University of Tokyo with regard to the 137Cs body burden of 88 Japanese male low-teens in Akita and Tokyo. In spite of the heavy fall-out level in Akita, the mean 137Cs body burden was significantly lower than that in Tokyo where the fall-out deposition was about half. The major cause of the difference in the body burden was considered to be the difference in the daily volume of milk consumption in the two groups which was disclosed from the results of an interview with each subject. The 137Cs content showed a very low correlation with the potassium content in each group. The fact raised an important question concerning the effectiveness of the concept of ''cesium unit'' for describing the level of internal contamination in man. (auth.)

  7. Assessment at the 66. day of projected external doses for populations living in the North-West fallout zone of the Fukushima nuclear accident. Impact of population evacuation measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports a dose assessment study performed by the IRSN (the French Radioprotection and Safety Nuclear Institute) 66 days after the Fukushima nuclear accident. A new dose assessment was carried out by IRSN to estimate projected doses due to external exposure from radioactive deposits, for exposure durations of 3 months, 1 year and 4 years before evacuation. The purpose of this report is to provide insight on all radiological assessments performed to the knowledge of the IRSN (the French Radioprotection and Safety Nuclear Institute) to date and the impact of population evacuation measures to be taken to minimize the medium and long-term risks of developing leukaemia or other radiation-induced cancers. This report only considers the external doses already received as well as the doses that may be received in the future from fallout deposits, regardless of doses received previously from the radioactive plume

  8. Fallout and drinking water contamination by I-131 and Cs-134, 137 in Japan, from the Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelecom, Alphonse; Miyashita, Erika; Kelecom, Patrick Vicent [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The earthquake followed by a tsunami in Japan, on last March 11, seriously damaged four of the six reactors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (NPS). Radioactive smokes and highly contaminated water were released for weeks to the environment. Since March 12, when the plant operator TEPCO and Japan's nuclear agency (NISA) confirmed the presence of radionuclides near the NPS, a giant environmental monitoring operation was set up, covering the entire Japanese territory. Daily thousands measurements are realized. We here analyze data released during 60 days on I-131 and Cs-134,137 radioactive concentrations in drinking water and fallout for 45 prefectures. Miyagi and Fukushima, that requires a separate study, are not considered here. Drinking water contamination by I-131 was observed in 13 prefectures, including Tokyo. The most impacted one was Tochigi (maximum of 110 Bq/l, March 24). This value turned water not drinkable for infants and babies. Cs-137 was detected in drinking water in 8 prefectures, with a maximum level of 18 Bq/l in Ibaraki. These levels do not affect potability of tap water. I-131 was observed in fallout in 27 prefectures, with level reaching 93 kBq/m2 in Ibaraki and 36 kBq/m{sup 2} in Tokyo on March 21 and 23 respectively. Fallout of Cs-137 was observed in 19 prefectures. The maximum deposition occurred again in Ibaraki (13kBq/m{sup 2}, March 21) and in Tokyo (5.3 kBq/m2, March 22). Since mid April, only trace contamination has been observed for both radionuclides in drinking water. Sporadically medium levels of Cs-137 are still observed in fallout. (author)

  9. A ‘Helen Archer’ moment? the abused, the perpetrator and the fall-out from domestic violence

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The huge interest generated by The Archers domestic abuse story line has raised awareness that behind the closed doors of supposedly nice, middle class families, sexual violence may lurk, and it is not only a phenomenon of the disadvantaged and dispossessed. After putting the storyline into context, Professor Jennifer Brown takes a further look at the profiles of those who abuse and policy implications of dealing with the fall-out for health and criminal justice interventions.

  10. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.).

  11. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.)

  12. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in air and fallouts from an e-waste polluted region in southeast China: insight into levels, compositional profiles, and seasonal variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Junxia; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Lili; Lin, Kuangfei

    2015-12-01

    Air and fallout samples were collected seasonally in an e-waste polluted region in southeast of China in 2013-2014. The annual polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) concentrations in air and fallout samples were 200 ± 162 pg m(-3) and 320 ± 255 ng g(-1), respectively. The deposition flux calculated from the fallout concentration was 110 ± 77.3 ng m(-2) day(-1). The PBDE levels and deposition fluxes of the samples deployed within the e-waste central area were three to four times higher than those in the surrounding area. The congener profiles in the air samples could be commonly found in commercial penta-BDE mixtures. BDE209 was the most dominant congener in fallout samples. Debromination processes were confirmed to occur both in the air and fallouts due to the minor amounts or inexistence of some congeners in technical PBDE products. The highest gaseous PBDE concentration was found during the summer while lowest during the autumn. PBDE concentration in fallouts turned up higher in the cold months while lower in the warm months. The similarity of deposition fluxes at sites in the e-waste central area indicated a steady PBDE emission source, whereas the significant relationship between deposition fluxes and particle weights at sites in the e-waste surrounding area suggested the scavenging of PBDEs in this area was largely associated with particles. PMID:26278903

  13. Airborne Measurement in the Ash Plume from Mount Sakurajima: Analysis of Gravitational Effects on Dispersion and Fallout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Eliasson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash concentrations in the plume from Sakurajima volcano in Japan are observed from airplanes equipped with optical particle counters and GPS tracking devices. The volcano emits several puffs a day. The puffs are also recorded by the Sakurajima Volcanological Observatory. High concentrations are observed in the puffs and fallout driven by vertical air current, called streak fallout. Puffs dispersion is analyzed by the classical diffusion-advection method and a new gravitational dispersion method. The fluid mechanic of the gravitational dispersion, streak fallout, and classical diffusion-advection theory is described in three separate appendices together with methods to find the time gravitational dispersion constant and the diffusion coefficient from satellite photos. The diffusion-advection equation may be used to scale volcanic eruptions so the same eruption plumes can be scaled to constant flux and wind conditions or two eruptions can be scaled to each other. The dispersion analyses show that dispersion of volcanic plumes does not follow either theories completely. It is most likely diffusion in the interface of the plume and the ambient air, together with gravitational flattening of the plumes core. This means larger boundary concentration gradients and smaller diffusion coefficients than state of the art methods can predict.

  14. Evaluation of 239+240Pu, 137Cs and natural 210Pb fallout in agricultural upland fields in Rokkasho, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The background distributions of 239+240Pu and 137Cs fallout in agricultural soil were investigated in Rokkasho where Japan's first commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant is now being constructed. The mean inventories of 239+240Pu and 137Cs in three fields with non-yam-cultivation history were 116 Bq x m-2 and 3.4 kBq x m-2, respectively. The mean atomic ratio of 240Pu/239Pu for all studied fields was 0.18±0.04, and was similar to that of global fallout. The 239+240Pu concentrations correlated very well with 137Cs (r = 0.97) in spite of heavy disturbance of the soil, and the activity ratio of 239+240Pu/137Cs was 0.037 ± 0.007, which is a typical value for global fallout. These results showed that the nuclides had similar behavior in agricultural upland fields in Rokkasho. Since 210Pb is steadily deposited from the atmosphere to the land, this nuclide could be an index for the degree of disturbance of a field and of soil lost from the field. The ratio of excess 210Pb inventory in the soil to the equivalent inventory of atmospheric 210Pb deposition was 96%, and indicated that soil was not lost from the cultivated fields. (author)

  15. GLODEP2: a computer model for estimating gamma dose due to worldwide fallout of radioactive debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GLODEP2 computer code provides estimates of the surface deposition of worldwide radioactivity and the gamma-ray dose to man from intermediate and long-term fallout. The code is based on empirical models derived primarily from injection-deposition experience gained from the US and USSR nuclear tests in 1958. Under the assumption that a nuclear power facility is destroyed and that its debris behaves in the same manner as the radioactive cloud produced by the nuclear weapon that attached the facility, predictions are made for the gamma does from this source of radioactivity. As a comparison study the gamma dose due to the atmospheric nuclear tests from the period of 1951 to 1962 has been computed. The computed and measured values from Grove, UK and Chiba, Japan agree to within a few percent. The global deposition of radioactivity and resultant gamma dose from a hypothetical strategic nuclear exchange between the US and the USSR is reported. Of the assumed 5300 Mton in the exchange, 2031 Mton of radioactive debris is injected in the atmosphere. The highest estimated average whole body total integrated dose over 50 years (assuming no reduction by sheltering or weathering) is 23 rem in the 30 to 50 degree latitude band. If the attack included a 100 GW(e) nuclear power industry as targets in the US, this dose is increased to 84.6 rem. Hotspots due to rainfall could increase these values by factors of 10 to 50

  16. GLODEP2: a computer model for estimating gamma dose due to worldwide fallout of radioactive debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, L.L.; Harvey, T.F.; Peterson, K.R.

    1984-03-01

    The GLODEP2 computer code provides estimates of the surface deposition of worldwide radioactivity and the gamma-ray dose to man from intermediate and long-term fallout. The code is based on empirical models derived primarily from injection-deposition experience gained from the US and USSR nuclear tests in 1958. Under the assumption that a nuclear power facility is destroyed and that its debris behaves in the same manner as the radioactive cloud produced by the nuclear weapon that attached the facility, predictions are made for the gamma does from this source of radioactivity. As a comparison study the gamma dose due to the atmospheric nuclear tests from the period of 1951 to 1962 has been computed. The computed and measured values from Grove, UK and Chiba, Japan agree to within a few percent. The global deposition of radioactivity and resultant gamma dose from a hypothetical strategic nuclear exchange between the US and the USSR is reported. Of the assumed 5300 Mton in the exchange, 2031 Mton of radioactive debris is injected in the atmosphere. The highest estimated average whole body total integrated dose over 50 years (assuming no reduction by sheltering or weathering) is 23 rem in the 30 to 50 degree latitude band. If the attack included a 100 GW(e) nuclear power industry as targets in the US, this dose is increased to 84.6 rem. Hotspots due to rainfall could increase these values by factors of 10 to 50.

  17. Multiparameter analysis of fall-out plutonium burdens in human liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of multiple factors on Pu liver burdens is estimated for a group of 310 people who were selected to have relative uniform exposure to fall-out plutonium (239Pu plus 240Pu), based on age in 1952, the start of atmospheric testing of thermonuclear weapons, and based on residence history in eastern Colorado, where they died between 1975 and 1979. The data were analysed using multiple linear regression of the logarithm of the total liver plutonium burden on other available covariates. The results of the regression indicated that the liver burden was increased by 34% in very heavy smokers (100 pack year history) compared to non-smokers, decreased by 27% in females compared to males, decreased by 24% in people with a neoplasm in the liver compared to those without a neoplasm, and decreased by 64% in people with cirrhosis compared to those without cirrhosis. However, all of those parameters accounted for only 26% of the variability in liver burdens observed among these people, indicating that there remains a large unexplained variation. (author)

  18. The impact of Chernobyl fallout on Mytilus sp. collected from the French coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial distributions of 103Ru, 106Ru, 110mAg, 134Cs and 13/Cs levels in Mytilus sp. samples gathered from the entire French coast subsequent to the explosion of unit 4 at the Soviet nuclear power plant in Chernobyl are largely in line with those based on aerosol and terrestrial measurements. Thus measurements of this bio-indicator found Channel levels to be lower by a factor of 10 than those observed on the eastern section of the Mediterranean coasts. Areas subject to chronic low-level industrial radioactive discharges, such as the Cotentin shoreline and the Rhone estuary, display a slight increase of 106Ru and 137Cs radioactivity levels. In contrast, contamination is especially clear-cut in areas initially free from radionuclides (i.e. surrounding Nice) where biological removal with time has been characterized and modelized, for both ruthenium isotopic forms, and covering 10 and 94 day biological periods. These data, when compared with those found in the literature, indicate that the memorizing time in the event of an accidental release of ruthenium is shorter than for chronic releases. An assessment of public health implications following the ingestion of mussels labelled solely by Chernobyl fallout is of the same order of magnitude as that of mussels gathered in an area exposed to Rhone industry, i.e. 10-5 of the annual dose limit to the whole body for the public at large

  19. Spatial distribution of fallout 137Cs in coastal marine water of Tamil Nadu coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very little information on the fallout 137Cs activity exists for the Bay of Bengal. Normally the volume of sea water required for detecting fall out level of 137Cs in coastal marine environment ranges from 100 litres to 1000 litres. The studies on distribution of 137Cs in surface seawater of Tamil Nadu in Bay of Bengal were carried out in April 2009. On the eastern coastal lines of Bay of Bengal in Tamil Nadu, seven offshore locations were selected namely Chennai, Pondicherry, Karaikal, Rameshwaram, Tuticorin, Nagercoil and Kanyakumari. In situ preconcentration method was adopted and the experiments were carried out using motor boats well equipped to carry the instruments and provide power supply to operate the pump. 1000 litres of seawater was passed each time through CFCN filters at all the locations at a flow rate of 8 litres per minute. The activity concentrations of 137Cs was in the range of 0.90 to 2.2 Bq/m3. These data represents reference values for coastal environment of Tamil Nadu and will be used to estimate radionuclide inventory in Indian marine environment, particularly of East Coast. The 137Cs activity indicates that there are no new inputs of these radionuclides into the area. (author)

  20. Yttrium and lanthanides in human lung fluids, probing the exposure to atmospheric fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Censi, P., E-mail: censi@unipa.it [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy); I.A.M.C.-CNR - UOS di Capo Granitola, Via faro, 1 - 91026 Torretta Granitola, Campobello di Mazara (TP) (Italy); En.Bio.Tech. - Via Aquileia, 35 90100 Palermo (Italy); Tamburo, E. [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy); Speziale, S. [Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam, 14473 (Germany); Zuddas, P. [Institut Genie de l' Environnement et Ecodeveloppement and Departement Sciences de la Terre, UMR 5125, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue R. Dubois, Bat GEODE 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Randazzo, L.A. [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy); I.A.M.C.-CNR - UOS di Capo Granitola, Via faro, 1 - 91026 Torretta Granitola, Campobello di Mazara (TP) (Italy); En.Bio.Tech. - Via Aquileia, 35 90100 Palermo (Italy); Institut Genie de l' Environnement et Ecodeveloppement and Departement Sciences de la Terre, UMR 5125, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue R. Dubois, Bat GEODE 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Punturo, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita di Catania, Corso Italia, 55 - 95129 Catania (Italy); Cuttitta, A. [I.A.M.C.-CNR - UOS di Capo Granitola, Via faro, 1 - 91026 Torretta Granitola, Campobello di Mazara (TP) (Italy); Arico, P. [Dipartimento C.F.T.A., Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36 90123 - Palermo (Italy)

    2011-02-28

    Inhalation of airborne particles can produce crystallization of phosphatic microcrysts in intraaveolar areas of lungs, sometimes degenerating into pulmonary fibrosis. Results of this study indicate that these pathologies are induced by interactions between lung fluids and inhaled atmospheric dust in people exposed to volcanic dust ejected from Mount Etna in 2001. Here, the lung solid-liquid interaction is evaluated by the distribution of yttrium and lanthanides (YLn) in fluid bronchoalveolar lavages on selected individuals according the classical geochemical approaches. We found that shale-normalised patterns of yttrium and lanthanides have a 'V shaped' feature corresponding to the depletion of elements from Nd to Tb when compared to the variable enrichments of heavy lanthanides, Y, La and Ce. These features and concurrent thermodynamic simulations suggest that phosphate precipitation can occur in lungs due to interactions between volcanic particles and fluids. We propose that patterns of yttrium and lanthanides can represent a viable explanation of some pathology observed in patients after prolonged exposure to atmospheric fallout and are suitable to become a diagnostic parameter of chemical environmental stresses.

  1. Mid-term radioecological and radiobiological consequences of Chernobyl fallout in an Alpine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parts of the Eastern and Central Alps in Austria (provinces of Salzburg and Upper Austria) and in Germany (southern Bavaria) are among the regions which received the highest surface deposition of radioactive fallout in western Europe due to the nuclear accident at Chernobyl in April 1986. The contamination with 137Cs varied between 10 and 80 kBq/m2 at the time of deposition. The contamination was very inhomogeneous, mostly because of different geographical situations and meteorological conditions at the time of passage of the radioactive cloud. The most contaminated regions are situated at the northern flank of the Alps and the northern parts of the Hohe Tauern region because of the higher precipitation rates at the windward position in these geographical regions. Also, the nuclide transfer factors and nuclide binding efficiency vary considerably for the different soil types. Though most of the agricultural land is characterized by low transfer factors, resulting in minor contamination of the food produced in these areas, in some parts of the country at higher altitudes the bioavailability of radionuclides is much higher. As these areas are intensively used for agricultural production during the summer, this can result in considerable contamination of local food products. Furthermore, whole body activity concentration of workers was also increased temporarily because of the consumption of predominantly local food products. 5 refs, 3 figs

  2. Content and depth profiles of fall-out 137Cs in Spanish soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the knowledge on the inventory of fallout radionuclides in Spain, a research project has been started, which aim is to know the content and depth profile of long lived radionuclides, mainly 137Cs and 90Sr, and to develop migration models for characteristic soils. For this purpose a 150 x 150 km mesh grid has been applied to the territory and in each one of the squares of the grid a sample has been collected. The set of sampling points have been selected to cover the vast majority of Spanish types of soil and such that a rainfall recording station with monthly records, at least since 1950, is near the sampling position. Sampling has been performed following international standards, and such that at each sampling point two samples 1.25m deep. Both sub-samples have been mixed to make up the sample to be analysed.. From the measurements, the correlation between mean annual rainfall and inventory has been studied, finding that a linear relationship exists between them. Using this relation and a dense set of mean annual rainfall data a map showing the distribution of 137Cs deposition has been obtained. (author)

  3. Radioactive fallout in air and rain: results to end of 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of atmospheric dust and rainwater have been collected from the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Results are presented of analyses of these samples for various fission products and certain other radionuclides. The average concentrations of long-lived fission products in air and rain in the U.K. in 1979 were about one third those in 1978 and less than 1% of the maximum which was reached in 1963-64. Plutonium concentrations in air and rainwater generally follow the pattern of long-lived fission products. 140Ba and 131I indicative of a recent atmospheric test were detected in the atmosphere in the U.K. after the low yield Chinese explosion of 14 December 1978 but ceased, to be detectable by mid-January 1979. In the southern hemisphere the mean concentration of 137Cs in air in 1979 was about two thirds that in 1978. An estimate is made of the worldwide deposit of 137Cs and 90Sr. The gamma and beta-ray dose rates from fallout at Chilton (UK) are estimated from the observed deposition. (author)

  4. Radioactive fallout in air and rain: results for 1985 and 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of atmospheric particulate and rainwater have been collected from the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Results are presented of analyses of these samples for various fission products and certain other radionuclides. The average concentrations of long-lived fission products in air and rain in the United Kingdom in 1985 were near to or below the limit of detection and lower than at any time since measurements began in 1953. The Chernobyl accident of 26 April 1986 produced a sharp increase in the concentrations of caesium-137 in air and rain in the northern hemisphere. Levels of Cs-137 in some parts of the United Kingdom were greater than any previously recorded. Plutonium concentrations in air and rainwater were a very small fraction of the NRPB's Generalised Derived Limit for members of the public. There was negligible contribution from the Chernobyl accident. Strontium-90 deposited in the United Kingdom in 1985 was below the limit of detection. The deposits in 1986 were generally about 2% of that from Cs-137. The estimated cumulative worldwide deposit of Cs-137 at the end of 1986 is about 10% greater than at the end of 1985. This increase is attributable to the Chernobyl accident. The gamma and beta-ray dose rates from fallout at Chilton are estimated from the observed deposition. (author)

  5. SIMS Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, L. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Knight, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Matzel, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Prussin, S. G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ryerson, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kinman, W. S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zimmer, M. M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hutcheon, I. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-09

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x ray spectroscopy. Several samples display distinctive compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing, and exhibit heterogeneity in U isotopes with 0.02 < 235U/ 238U < 11.8 among all five samples and 0.02 < 235U/ 238U < 7.81 within a single sample. In two samples, the 235U/ 238U ratio is correlated with major element composition, consistent with the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are quasi-homogeneous with respect to composition and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due longer residence time in the fireball. Correlated variations between 234U, 235U, 236U and 238U abundances point to mixing of end-members corresponding to uranium derived from the device and natural U ( 238U/ 235U = 0.00725) found in soil.

  6. Biological effects of radiation accidents on humans. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the impact of radiation accidents on humans. Radiation exposure assessment for determining appropriate medical treatment is discussed. The effects of ingesting food or inhaling air irradiated by accidental fallout are considered. Follow-up studies of the survivors of specific nuclear accidents are included in an attempt to evaluate long and short term health effects of accidents. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Radiation effects blamed on Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strictly speaking, the nature of an epidemiological study would not permit the same causal links to be established as an experimental study does. Instead, it merely provides circumstantial evidence, from which some conclusions can be drawn as to the causative factors in the occurrences recorded. To summarize it may be stated that as fas as the Germans are concerned no scientific evidence has so far been provided to prove health impairments attributable to an added radiation load from the Chernobyl fallout. On the other hand, it can not be denied that there are indications of health damage in a few individuals unreasonably changing their eating habits for fear of radiation injuries. The question as to whether the event instilled a permanent feeling of unease in some population groups still remains largely obscure. (orig.)

  8. Radiation exposure of the UK population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man is continuously exposed to radiation from many sources, both natural and man-made. The man-made sources include medical irradiation, exposure from radioactive waste disposal, fallout from nuclear weapons tests and various 'miscellaneous sources' which include consumer products. The National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) keeps these contributions to the radiation exposure of the population under continuous review and publishes reports on the subject periodically. This is the second such report and contains considerably more information than the first published in 1974. The balance of the report reflects the availability of data and the advice given in the sixth report of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution. The conclusions are: (a) that the major contribution to the dose to the population is from natural background radiation; (b) that the largest man-made contribution is from medical uses of radiation; (c) that the largest contribution from environmental contamination is still from the residual effects of fallout from nuclear weapons testing; (d) that occupational exposure and irradiation from miscellaneous sources, considered as contributions to the per caput dose to the population, are the next largest components; (e) that radioactive waste disposal is the smallest contributor to the per caput dose to the population. It was also felt useful to review the past trends in the doses resulting from the various sources and the authors have attempted to make some tentative predictions of doses up to the year 2000. (author)

  9. Sources of radiation exposure - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources of radiation exposure are reviewed from the perspective of mining and milling of radioactive ores in Australia. The major sources of occupational and public exposure are identified and described, and exposures from mining and milling operations are discussed in the context of natural radiation sources and other sources arising from human activities. Most radiation exposure of humans comes from natural sources. About 80% of the world average of the effective dose equivalents received by individual people arises from natural radiation, with a further 15-20% coming from medical exposures*. Exposures results from human activities, such as mining and milling of radioactive ores, nuclear power generation, fallout from nuclear weapons testing and non-medical use of radioisotopes and X-rays, add less than 1% to the total. 9 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs

  10. Towards prediction of redistribution of fallout radiocesium on forested area discharged from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Satoru; Aoyama, Michio; Ito, Eriko; Shichi, Koji; Takata, Daisuke; Masaya, Masumori; Sekiya, Nobuhito; Kobayashi, Natsuko; Takano, Naoto; Kaneko, Shinji; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko

    2015-04-01

    Redistribution of fallout 137Cs on forested area discharged from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) is an issue of major concern for the people in Fukushima and its surrounding areas. To approach this question we investigated global fallout 137Cs (137Cs-GFO) from nuclear weapon tests in the atmosphere in the 1950s and 60s, and 137Cs distribution derived from FNPP (137Cs-FK) within the whole trees contaminated directly. We examined concentrations and amounts of 137Cs-GFO in surface soils (0-5, 5-15 and 15-30 cm in depth) of 3470 samples at 316 sites all over Japan, which were collected just before the accident of FNPP. We determined 137Cs-GFO activities by NaI well-type scintillation counter with its accuracy verified using measurements by a germanium detector. We divided 316 sampling sites into 10 groups separated by one longitudinal line and four transversal lines on the terrain of Japan islands, then analyzed rainfall and geomorphological effects on 137Cs-GFO inventories. In addition to this dataset, we collected three whole tree samples of 26 year-old Quercus serrata at a contaminated area by FNPP accident in April, 2014 and examined concentrations of 137Cs-FK of above- and belowground tree parts by a germanium detector. We estimated an average of 137Cs-GFO inventories of forest soils in Japan to be 1.7 ± 1.4 kBq m-2 as of 2008. 137Cs-GFO inventories varied largely from 0-7.9 kBq m-2 among the country and accumulated greater in the north-western part along the Sea of Japan side. We detected rainfall effect on 137Cs-GFO inventories, which were greater where winter rainfall was large. As for vertical distribution of 137Cs-GFO, 44% of 137Cs-GFO remained within the uppermost 5 cm of soil profiles whereas the rest of 56% existed in 5-30 cm in depth. This indicated that considerable downward migration of 137Cs-GFO has happened during these fifty years in forest soils in Japan. However, multiple linear regression analysis by geomorphological factors related to soil

  11. Assessment of Soil Erosion and Sedimentation: The Role of Fallout Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide soil degradation is affecting 1.9 billion hectares and is increasing at a rate of 5 to 7 million hectares each year. About 80% of the world’s agricultural land suffers moderate to severe erosion, and 10% suffers slight to moderate erosion. As a result of climate change and global warming, water erosion risk is even expected to increase. Land degradation by soil erosion has also wider negative ecological and socio-economic impacts and the economic costs of both on-site and offsite impacts of soil erosion in agricultural land have been estimated at $400 billion per year. The current concerns about declining soil productivity, increasing downstream sedimentation, and its related environmental pollution problems in agro-ecosystems, generate an urgent need for obtaining reliable quantitative data on the extent and rates of soil erosion. To efficiently control and mitigate soil losses by erosion and reduce their environmental impacts, soil conservation measures need to be targeted to areas with high erosion and sediment transfer. For this purpose, reliable and comprehensive data on the magnitude and spatial extent of soil redistribution are needed. Traditional monitoring and modelling techniques to quantify soil erosion and sedimentation are capable of meeting some of the information requirements, but they have a number of important limitations. The quest for alternative techniques of soil erosion assessment to complement existing methods and to meet new requirements has directed attention to a particular group of environmental radionuclides, namely fallout radionuclides (FRNs). These natural and anthropogenic radioisotopic tracers represent effective and valuable tools for the assessment of erosion and deposition within the landscape at several temporal and spatial scales. The use of FRNs can complement and in some cases even substitute conventional measurements to evaluate erosion and sedimentation processes for developing and improving land management and

  12. Territory contamination with the radionuclides representing the fuel component of Chernobyl fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashparov, V A; Lundin, S M; Zvarych, S I; Yoshchenko, V I; Levchuk, S E; Khomutinin, Y V; Maloshtan, I M; Protsak, V P

    2003-12-30

    The data obtained through a series of experiments were used to specify the correlation of activities of the fuel component radionuclides of Chernobyl fallout and to create the maps of the 30-km Chernobyl zone terrestrial density of contamination with 154Eu, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am (on 01.01.2000). In the year 2000, total inventories of the fuel component radionuclides in the upper 30-cm soil layer of the 30-km Chernobyl zone in Ukraine (outside the ChNPP industrial site, excluding the activity located in the radioactive waste storages and in the cooling pond) were estimated as: 90Sr--7.7 x 10(14) Bq; 137Cs--2.8 x 10(15) Bq; 154Eu--1.4 x 10(13) Bq; 238Pu--7.2 x 10(12) Bq; 239+240Pu--1.5 x 10(13) Bq; 241Am--1.8 x 10(13) Bq. These values correspond to 0.4-0.5% of their amounts in the ChNPP unit 4 at the moment of the accident. The current estimate is 3 times lower than the previous widely-cited estimates. Inventories of the fuel component radionuclides were also estimated in other objects within the 30-km zone and outside it. This allowed more accurate data to be obtained on the magnitude of a relative release of radionuclides in the fuel particles (FP) matrix during the Chernobyl accident outside the ChNPP industrial site. It amounts to 1.5+/-0.5% of these radionuclides in the reactor, which is 2 times lower than the previous estimates. Two-thirds of the radionuclides release in the FP was deposited on the territory of Ukraine. PMID:14630415

  13. Guidelines for Using Fallout Radionuclides to Assess Erosion and Effectiveness of Soil Conservation Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil degradation currently affects 1.9 billion hectares of agricultural land worldwide, and the area of degraded land is increasing rapidly at a rate of 5 to 7 million hectares each year. Most of this degradation is caused by inappropriate and poor land management practices in agriculture and livestock production. Among all degradation processes, including soil acidification, salinization and nutrient mining, soil erosion is by far the most common type of land degradation, accounting for 84% of affected areas, with more than three quarters of the affected surface land area located in developing countries. Current concerns about the impacts of soil erosion on crop productivity and the environment, as well as the deployment of effective soil conservation measures, have generated an urgent need to obtain reliable quantitative data on the extent and actual rates of soil erosion to underpin sustainable soil conservation strategies. The quest for new approaches for assessing soil erosion to complement conventional methods has led to the development of methodologies based on the use of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) as soil erosion tracers. With increasing attention being paid to land degradation worldwide, this publication explains and demonstrates FRN based methods to trace soil movement and to assess soil erosion at different spatial and temporal scales, and to evaluate the effectiveness of soil conservation strategies to ensure sustainable land management in agricultural systems. This publication summarizes the experiences and knowledge gained since the end of the 1990s in the use of FRNs by the IAEA and by scientists from both developed and developing countries involved in IAEA research networks. This publication provides guidance in the application of FRNs to stakeholders involved in sustainable agricultural development

  14. Monitoring of Chernobyl fallout 137Cs in semi-natural coniferous forest of central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring the behaviour of 137Cs in semi-natural coniferous forest ecosystem of central Sweden was investigated between 1990 and 1994. Results demonstrated that soil in the area of study is thin layer characterised with high organic matter fraction and acidic pH. Most of Chernobyl fallout deposited 137Cs retained in the upper 5 cm with venial migration into deeper layers of soil profile The activity concentration of 137Cs in the dominant plants showed some variation, which presumed to be due to high variations in the different soil parameters and species-specificity of plants in 137Cs uptake. Fractionation of soil bound 137Cs using sequential extracted procedure predicted that easily extractable 137Cs fraction that includes water soluble and NH4OAc exchangeable comprises ∼25% of total soil radiocaesium inventory in the upper 5 cm layer of forest soil. These fractions, represent the soil mobile 137Cs in the forest ecosystem. About 37% of total forest soil 137Cs inventory could be accounted for soil organically bound 137Cs that include oxidizable and acid digestible organic matter. These fractions require a long term big-degradation process by soil micro-organisms, before becoming available for plant uptake. More over a substantial fraction Of 137Cs was firmly bound onto soil compartments of organic and/or mineral nature as a residual (36%). This means that binding processes of 137Cs onto humic forest soil with high fraction of organic matter and acidic reaction is time dependent. The most distinguished soil parameters that might influenced 137Cs transfer to and/or uptake by natural plants in the area of study were soil OM%, and soil pH. Soil biological activity might also be considered, (although it was not determined in this study). The long term 137Cs availability in this type of forest soil must be related to the organically bound 137Cs fractions. (author)

  15. Radioactive fallout in air and rain: results to the end of 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of atmospheric dust and rainwater have been collected from the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Results are presented an analyses of these samples for various fission products and certain other radionuclides. The average concentration of the long-lived fission product caesium-137 in air in the United Kingdom was, in 1976, about one-third of that in 1975 and about 1% of the maximum which was reached in 1963 to 64. The concentration in rain and the deposition of caesium-137 and strontium-90 averaged over the United Kingdom for 1976 were about half those for 1975. No barium-140 or iodine-131, indicative of recent atmospheric tests, was detected in the United Kingdom after the Chinese explosion on 24 January 1976 but measurable concentrations were detected in air at Hong Kong during February. Fresh activity from the Chinese explosion on 26 September 1976 was detected in the United Kingdom. The peak deposition of iodine-131 that occurred in the second week in Octber was greater than at any time since January 1963 although the total deposition of iodine-131 was less than one-tenth of that in 1962 to 63. Trace amounts of fresh activity attributable to the high-yield Chinese explosion of 17 November were detected in the United Kingdom in December 1976. In the southern hemisphere the mean concentration of caesium-137 in air in 1976 was about half that in 1975. An estimate is made of the worldwide deposit of caesium-137 and strontium-90. The gamma and beta-ray dose rates from fallout at Chilton are estimated from the observed deposition. Measurements of short-lived fission products in air and rain are given in an Appendix. (author)

  16. Long-term availability of Sr-90 in foodstuff after nuclear fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the many radionuclides possibly released in a severe reactor accident or a nuclear weapons detonation 137Cs and 90Sr are of particular importance. Due to their long physical half-life of 30 and 28.5 years respectively, the exposure of the population by these nuclides will last for decades and has to be taken into account in estimating the total 50 year-exposure caused by the fallout and in evaluating countermeasures with regard to land utilization. However, their effective decrease in the environment with regard to the population exposure follows a much shorter half-life reducing the exposure of the public much quicker than estimated from the physical half-life and therefore, permits an earlier re-utilization of a highly contaminated territory. A thorough knowledge of the decrease in availability of these nuclides in foodstuffs relevant to the ingestion dose, therefore, is of great importance. While for Cs this was investigated before, this work concentrated on the effective decrease in 90Sr. The long-term availability of 90Sr in milk was investigated as a main indicator of the environmental behavior of this radionuclide in the environment and as the most important foodstuff with regard to 90Sr-intake of the infant. An estimate of the dose to infants and the adult in central Europe 35 years after the end of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing and 14 years after the reactor accident in Chernobyl is presented and compared to the dose of other long-lived radionuclides in the environment. Since 137Cs is easier to determine and therefore often used as main indicator for the contamination of the environment, ratios of 90Sr to 137Cs are given for the period after the weapons tests and after the Chernobyl accident up to the present time. The variation in this ratio with time and its causes as well as the differences in environmental decay of these two radionuclides are discussed. (author)

  17. Territory contamination with the radionuclides representing the fuel component of Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data obtained through a series of experiments were used to specify the correlation of activities of the fuel component radionuclides of Chernobyl fallout and to create the maps of the 30-km Chernobyl zone terrestrial density of contamination with 154Eu, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am (on 01.01.2000). In the year 2000, total inventories of the fuel component radionuclides in the upper 30-cm soil layer of the 30-km Chernobyl zone in Ukraine (outside the ChNPP industrial site, excluding the activity located in the radioactive waste storages and in the cooling pond) were estimated as: 90Sr-7.7x1014 Bq; 137Cs-2.8x1015 Bq; 154Eu-1.4x1013 Bq; 238Pu-7.2x1012 Bq; 239+240Pu-1.5x1013 Bq; 241Am-1.8x1013 Bq. These values correspond to 0.4-0.5% of their amounts in the ChNPP unit 4 at the moment of the accident. The current estimate is 3 times lower than the previous widely-cited estimates. Inventories of the fuel component radionuclides were also estimated in other objects within the 30-km zone and outside it. This allowed more accurate data to be obtained on the magnitude of a relative release of radionuclides in the fuel particles (FP) matrix during the Chernobyl accident outside the ChNPP industrial site. It amounts to 1.5±0.5% of these radionuclides in the reactor, which is 2 times lower than the previous estimates. Two-thirds of the radionuclides release in the FP was deposited on the territory of Ukraine

  18. Use of Fallout Cesium-137 in Soil Erosion Investigations: A Case of Study in Camaguey, Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesium-137 (137Cs) measurements offer considerable potential to quantify erosion and sedimentation rates. Some results of using this technique for investigating patterns of soil erosion on small selected study site in the watershed of Maximo River are reported. A total of 160 soil samples were collected at the study and reference sites for 137Cs analysis using either a steel core or sampling frame and scraper plate. The soil samples were dried and analysed for 137Cs using high resolution gamma spectrometry. Within this approach considerable importance is place on establishing the local total 137CS fallout or inventory at reference site. This work reports an investigation of the spatial variability of 137CS inventories. Although the total variability may be derived from four sources, the observed variability was due to random spatial variations in 137Cs inventories. The reference inventory range (at the 95% confidence level) was 585-765 Bq.m-2 with a mean value of 674 Bq.m-2 and coefficient of variation of 27.5%. By comparing 137Cs inventories at individual sampling points with a reference inventory and using the calibration models for converting 137Cs measurements to estimates of soil redistribution rates, estimates of soil loss were calculated to be between 11 and 23 t.ha-1.year-1 for the field 9 and between 3 and 5.7 t.ha-1.year-1 for the field 17 depending on the assumptions and methods used. The 137Cs measurements have provided evidence of the feasibility of applying this approach for studying soil erosion and sedimentation in tropical environments. (Author)

  19. Distribution of global fallouts cesium-137 in taiga and tundra catenae at the Ob River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenkov, I. N.; Usacheva, A. A.; Miroshnikov, A. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    The classification of soil catenae at the Ob River basin is developed and applied. This classification reflects the diverse geochemical conditions that led to the formation of certain soil bodies, their combinations and the migration fields of chemical elements. The soil and geochemical diversity of the Ob River basin catenae was analyzed. The vertical and lateral distribution of global fallouts cesium-137 was studied using the example of the four most common catenae types in Western Siberia tundra and taiga. In landscapes of dwarf birches and dark coniferous forests on gleysols, cryosols, podzols, and cryic-stagnosols, the highest 137Cs activity density and specific activity are characteristic of the upper soil layer of over 30% ash, while the moss-grass-shrub cover is characterized by low 137Cs activity density and specific activity. In landscapes of dwarf birches and pine woods on podzols, the maximum specific activity of cesium-137 is typical for moss-grass-shrub cover, while the maximum reserves are concentrated in the upper soil layer of over 30% ash. Bog landscapes and moss-grass-shrub cover are characterized by a minimum activity of 137Cs, and its reserves in soil generally decrease exponentially with depth. The cesium-137 penetration depth increases in oligotrophic histosols from northern to middle taiga landscapes from 10-15 to 40 cm. 137Cs is accumulated in oligotrophic histosols for increases in pH from 3.3 to 4.0 and in concretionary interlayers of pisoplinthic-cryic-histic-stagnosols. Cryogenic movement, on the one hand, leads to burying organic layers enriched in 137Cs and, on the other hand, to deducing specific activity when mixed with low-active material from lower soil layers.

  20. Erosion/Disposition Data Derived from Fallout Radionuclides (FRNS) Using Geostatistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FRN (Fallout Radionuclides) methodologies to assess erosion and sedimentation processes have been used worldwide for more than 40 years. However, some aspects of the methodology in particular data spatialisation and interpretation need further improvement. The aim of this work is to characterize the spatial distribution of FRN and to establish an isotope and sediment budget using FRN data and geostatistics. The spatial correlation of 137Cs, soil organic matter content (SOM) and soil erosion-sedimentation patterns was estimated in a 2.16 ha field (located in the southern part of the Boyer River watershed, in Eastern Canada) using geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS). The spatial variability of the parameters was characterized through a geostatistical approach which considers the randomized and structured nature of spatial variables and the spatial distribution of the samples. Semivariograms were produced to take into account the spatial structure present in the data. A strong spatial dependence was found for each tested parameter (0.87 ≤ R2 ≤ 0.95 and 0.7 ≤ Scale/Sill ≤ 0.96). SOM spatial redistribution was correlated to soil erosion and sedimentation as shown by the significant relationship (r2 = 0.63; p 137Cs and SOM. The spatial distribution of FRN was estimated by Ordinary Kriging (OK) to design contour maps. Using different interpolation methods and 'area weighted mean' of the 137Cs redistribution map, a radioisotope budget was established. Since 1954, around 2x107 Bq of 137Cs were exported from the studied field. The net sediment production was estimated at 16.6 t ha-1 a-1 with a sediment delivery ratio (SDR) of 99%. The paper demonstrates the efficient contribution of geostatistics in studies using environmental radionuclides to estimate soil redistribution rates and isotope and sediment budgets. This approach could be used for 210Pb or 7Be as well as 137Cs. (author)

  1. Fire as an agent in redistributing fallout 137Cs in the Canadian boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of fallout 137Cs in the boreal forest and the effect of fire in redistributing 137Cs were studied in the remote region of Wood Buffalo National Park, N.W.T., Canada. Results of a preliminary study of five burned (the fire occurred in 1981) and five unburned stands conducted in 1986 revealed that 137Cs concentrations were higher in the surface soil of the burned stands than in the unburned ones. In 1989, a comprehensive study was conducted, in which one burned and one unburned white spruce stand were sampled in greater detail. The latter investigation also revealed a difference in the distribution of 137Cs within the burned stand compared to the unburned one. Specifically, in the unburned stand, the highest 137Cs concentration was identified in the epiphytic lichens and in the mosses, whereas in the burned stand, the highest concentration was measured in the surface organic soil. These results indicate that fire caused the mobilization of part of the 137Cs bound to the above-ground matter and concentrated it in the ash layer of the burned surface soil. An additional ecologically important finding in our study was that significantly lower total 137Cs load was observed in the burned stand compared to the unburned one. Hence, our data not only provide evidence that 137Cs is being redistributed within the burned stand to the surface soil, but also that part of the 137Cs is lost due to fire, presumably contaminating other ecosystems. Volatilization and fly-ash during the fire, and runoff (e.g. from snow melt) after the fire are the most likely mechanisms for the 137Cs removal. These findings point to fire as an agent of 137Cs secondary contamination for initially unaffected systems, as well as for those previously contaminated

  2. Feeding green-cut forage contaminated by radioactive fallout to dairy cows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass contaminated by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident was cut with 150 mm (Treatment 1) and 50 mm (Treatment 2) stubble height and fed to 20 dairy cows. The transfer of 137Cs and 131I from the greencut forage to milk was studied during a four-week and a two-week period, respectively. The four-week period was followed by a three-week period with nearly uncontaminated feeds. Cutting with high stubble height significantly reduced the activity concentration in forage compared with low stubble cutting, the average contents kg-1 dry matter being 385 Bq 137Cs and 24 Bq 131I in Treatment 1 versus 6656 Bq 137Cs and 249 Bq 131I in Treatment 2. Apparent treatment effects were also demonstrated by the 137Cs concentration in milk, with maximum weekly means of 23 Bq kg-1 (Treatment 1) and 92 Bq kg-1 (Treatment 2). Single day maximum concentrations of 131I in milk were 4 Bq kg-1 (Treatment 1) and 9 Bq kg-1 (Treatment 2). The mean transfer coefficients (d kg-1) were calculated to be 0.67 X 10(-2) and 0.19 X 10(-2) for 137Cs (weeks 2-4) and 1.8 X 10(-2) and 0.2 X 10(-2) for 131I (week 2) in Treatments 1 and 2, respectively. The lower value for 137Cs might possibly be associated with an enhanced ash content of the forage. Feeding nearly uncontaminated rations rapidly decreased the 137Cs levels in milk in both treatments with calculated effective half-times over the three-week period of 10 and 7 d, respectively

  3. Pathway: a dynamic food-chain model to predict radionuclide ingestion after fallout deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manuscript describes the structure and basis for parameter values of a computerized food-chain transport model for radionuclides. The model, called PATHWAY, estimates the time-integrated ingestion intake by humans of 20 radionuclides after a single deposition from the atmosphere to the landscape. The model solves a set of linear, coupled differential equations to estimate the inventories and concentrations of radionuclides in soil, vegetation, animal tissues and animal products as a function of time following deposition. Dynamic processes in the model include foliar interception, weathering and absorption; plant growth, uptake, harvest and senescence; soil resuspension, percolation, leaching and tillage; radioactive decay; and livestock ingestion, absorption and excretion. Human dietary data are included to permit calculation of time-dependent radionuclide ingestion rates, which are then numerically integrated. The model considers seasonal changes in the biomass of vegetation and animal diets, as well as specific plowing and crop-harvest dates; thus the integrated radionuclide intakes by humans are dependent on the seasonal timing of deposition. The agricultural data base represents the arid and semi-arid regions of the western United States. The foliar deposition parameters apply to regional fallout out to a few hundred miles from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. With modification, the model could be applied to chronic or other acute releases, providing the ground deposition in Bq m-2 could be estimated. The output of PATHWAY (Bq ingested per Bq m-2 deposited) may be multiplied by the deposition and a dose conversion factor (Gy Bq-1) to yield an organ-specific dose estimate. The model may be run deterministically to yield single estimates or stochastically (''Monte-Carlo'' mode) to provide distributional output that reflects uncertainty in the output due to uncertainty in parameters

  4. Experimental investigation of the radiation exposure of inhabitants of contaminated areas in Northern Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large areas of northern Ukraine have been contaminated as a consequence of the accident of Chernobyl in April 1986 with various radionuclides from the reactor. Presently, of all the radionuclides of the Chernobyl-fallout, mainly 137Cs is dangerous for those people, who are occasionally returning to the contaminated areas, after having been evacuated ten years ago. These persons are, besides some exceptions, living from what they plant, produce and collect there. For the question of resettlement it is important to estimate the radiation exposure from the remaining caesium in the soil. In order to access the external radiation exposure, deposition and downward migration of 137Cs were examined in different contaminated areas of the Ukraine. To measure the internal radiation exposure of the returned habitants, the transfer of fallout-caesium from the soil via relevant food to man has been examined under the conditions of the contaminated villages by freeland- and feeding-experiments in an animal model. (orig.)

  5. Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental Studies and Internal Dosimetry projects include: Environmental Protection; 1977 Environmental Monitoring Report; Sewage Sludge Disposal on the Sanitary Landfill; Radiological Analyses of Marshall Islands Environmental Samples, 1974 to 1976; External Radiation Survey and Dose Predictions for Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik, Ailuk, and Wotje Atolls; Marshall Islands - Diet and Life Style Study; Dose Reassessment for Populations on Rongelap and Utirik Following Exposure to Fallout from BRAVO Incident (March 1, 1954); Whole Body Counting Results from 1974 to 1979 for Bikini Island Residents; Dietary Radioactivity Intake from Bioassay Data, a Model Applied to 137Cs Intake by Bikini Island Residents; and External Exposure Measurements at Bikini Atoll

  6. Evolution of childhood leukemia rates in the regions of the former Soviet Union contaminated by the Chernobyl reactor fallout; Entwicklung der Leukaemieraten bei Kindern in den durch Tschernobyl radioaktiv belasteten Gebieten der ehemaligen Sowjetunion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Susanne I.

    2003-07-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) that took place on April, 26th, 1986 led to a considerable release of radioactive substances which spread to vast parts of Europe. The regions most highly contaminated by this fall-out are Belarus, the Western parts of Russia, and the Northern parts of the Ukraine. It is known that leukaemias, especially the acute leukaemias predominant in children, can be induced by ionising radiation. This study was designed to elucidate the question whether the continued low radiation exposure after the ChNPP accident had led to an observable increase in the affected population. To this aim, all leukaemia cases that had occurred in children in the most highly contaminated regions between 1982 and 1998 were subjected to a pooled temporal and regional analysis, where the non-contaminated parts of Belarus served as control for the regional analysis. It could be shown that the analysed material is complete (also for the pre-accidental period) and, through retrospective case ascertainment, of extraordinarily high quality. This study documents comparable leukaemia rates in children in the contaminated and the noncontaminated regions, as well as in the pre-accidental and the post accidental periods. This result is in line with the estimation of expected excess cases using current risk estimates. It does, thus, not contradict the fact that leukaemias can principally be induced by radiation.

  7. The role of the Veterinary services in efforts to introduce measures to reduce harmful effects of the Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apart from the former Sovjet Union, Norway was the country most widely and severely affected by the impact of radioactive fallout (137Cs+134Cs) from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in April 1986. The fallout created considerable problems for sheep, goats and cattle grazing mountain pastures, and also for reindeer farming. Effective countermeasures, inter alia pre-slaughter feeding of livestock on uncountaminated fodder, and the use of caesium binders, had to be introduced. Further new methods to measure levels of radioactive caesium in live animals had to be developed, in order to alleviate the adverse effects on livestock and the human population. The veterinary services were, like other authorities involved, poorly prepared for this type of emergency. The Official Meat Inspection Acts and regulations and instructions issued in its pursuance, places the responsibility for protecting the public from hazards posed by contaminants in meat on the veterinary services. The veterinary authorities were therefore deeply involved in the development, management and implemention of measures to ensure that radioactivity levels in meat did not exceed official intervention levels. In this work, the veterinary services and individual veterinarians, benefitted from previous experience and training in contingency planning and tackling emergencies and were able to apply similar principles as these used to deal with emergency situations in the veterinary field, for example, outbreaks of serious infectious animal diseases. Efforts to reduce the detrimental impact of the Chernobyl radioactive fallout on agriculture and reindeer farming have been prolonged and comprehensive. So far, it seems fair to say that the veterinary services have born their share of responsibility and tackled the task to salvage as much meat as possible, in a reliable and economically justifiable manner

  8. Modeling the early-phase redistribution of radiocesium fallouts in an evergreen coniferous forest after Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Gonze, M.-A.; Mourlon, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the scientific community gained numerous data on the transfer of radiocesium in European forest ecosystems, including information regarding the short-term redistribution of atmospheric fallout onto forest canopies. In the course of international programs, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) developed a forest model, named TREE4 (Transfer of Radionuclides and External Exposure in FORest systems), 15 years ago. Recently published papers on a Japanese evergreen coniferous forest contaminated by Fukushima radiocesium fallout provide interesting and quantitative data on radioactive mass fluxes measured within the forest in the months following the accident. The present study determined whether the approach adopted in the TREE4 model provides satisfactory results for Japanese forests or whether it requires adjustments. This study focused on the interception of airborne radiocesium by forest canopy, and the subsequent transfer to the forest floor through processes such as litterfall, throughfall, and stemflow, in the months following the accident. We demonstrated that TREE4 quite satisfactorily predicted the interception fraction (20%) and the canopy-to-soil transfer (70% of the total deposit in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest. This dynamics was similar to that observed in the Höglwald spruce forest. However, the unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall (31% in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest could not be reproduced in our simulations (2.5%). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed; and sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in deposition conditions was analyzed. - Highlights: • Transfer of radiocesium atmospheric fallout in evergreen forests was modeled. • The model was tested using observations from Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. • Model predictions of canopy interception and depuration agree with measurements. • Unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall for the

  9. The Long-term Decrease of 90Sr in the Environment and its Transfer to Man after a Nuclear Fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its long physical half-life, and the fact that its long-term mobility in the environment as well as its radiotoxicity is higher than that of 137Cs, the long-term bio-availability of 90Sr in the environment is of importance with regard to the long-term population exposure after fallout from nuclear weapons detonations or a severe reactor accident. It will also substantially influence the time-span required until re-utilisation of highly contaminated territory is possible again. An assessment of the long-term decrease of the activity concentration in all foodstuffs relevant for internal exposure after severe 90Sr fallout was performed. The observed effective half-lives were approximately 1.8-2.1 years in the first 2-3 years after the end of fallout and 8-10 years in the following three decades. This is equivalent to a biological half-life of about 13.2 years and results in a total 50 year dose of 6.2 times the first year exposure. Due to this decline in 90Sr-availability, the average annual activity intake of 90Sr in Austria has decreased from 840 Bq at the climax of the nuclear weapons tests to about 42 Bq in 1997 for adults, and from 500 Bq to about 35 Bq for 1 year old infants. This is equivalent to a 90Sr ingestion dose of 1.2 μSv for adults and 2.5 μSv for 1 year old infants in 1997 or less than 0.4% of the ingestion dose by natural radionuclides in the diet. (author)

  10. Modeling the early-phase redistribution of radiocesium fallouts in an evergreen coniferous forest after Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the scientific community gained numerous data on the transfer of radiocesium in European forest ecosystems, including information regarding the short-term redistribution of atmospheric fallout onto forest canopies. In the course of international programs, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) developed a forest model, named TREE4 (Transfer of Radionuclides and External Exposure in FORest systems), 15 years ago. Recently published papers on a Japanese evergreen coniferous forest contaminated by Fukushima radiocesium fallout provide interesting and quantitative data on radioactive mass fluxes measured within the forest in the months following the accident. The present study determined whether the approach adopted in the TREE4 model provides satisfactory results for Japanese forests or whether it requires adjustments. This study focused on the interception of airborne radiocesium by forest canopy, and the subsequent transfer to the forest floor through processes such as litterfall, throughfall, and stemflow, in the months following the accident. We demonstrated that TREE4 quite satisfactorily predicted the interception fraction (20%) and the canopy-to-soil transfer (70% of the total deposit in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest. This dynamics was similar to that observed in the Höglwald spruce forest. However, the unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall (31% in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest could not be reproduced in our simulations (2.5%). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed; and sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in deposition conditions was analyzed. - Highlights: • Transfer of radiocesium atmospheric fallout in evergreen forests was modeled. • The model was tested using observations from Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. • Model predictions of canopy interception and depuration agree with measurements. • Unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall for the

  11. The controversy over radiation safety. A historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J S

    1989-08-01

    The hazards of ionizing radiation have aroused concern since a short time after the discovery of x-rays and natural radioactivity in the 1890s. Misuse of x-rays and radium prompted efforts to encourage radiation safety and to set limits on exposure, culminating in the first recommended "tolerance doses" in 1934. After World War II, the problems of radiation protection became more complex because of the growing number of people subjected to radiation injury and the creation of radioactive elements that had never existed before the achievement of atomic fission. Judging the hazards of radiation became a matter of spirited controversy. Major public debates over the dangers of radioactive fallout from atmospheric bomb testing in the 1950s and early 1960s and the risks of nuclear power generation in later periods focused attention on the uncertainties about the consequences of exposure to low-level radiation and the difficulties of resolving them. PMID:2664237

  12. Radiation effects in wild terrestrial vertebrates - the EPIC collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents data on radiation effects in populations of wild vertebrate animals inhabiting contaminated terrestrial ecosystems. The data were extracted from the database 'Radiation effects on biota', compiled within the framework of the EC Project EPIC (2000-2003). The data collection, based on publications in Russian, demonstrates radiation effects in the areas characterized with high levels of radionuclides (Kyshtym radioactive trace; 'spots' of enhanced natural radioactivity in the Komi region of Russia; territories contaminated from the Chernobyl fallout). The data covers a wide range of exposures from acute accidental irradiation to lifetime exposures at relatively low dose rates. Radiation effects include mortality, changes in reproduction, decrease of health, ecological effects, cytogenetic effects, adaptation to radiation, and others. Peculiarities of radiation effects caused by different radionuclides are described, also the severity of effects as they appear in different organisms (e.g. mice, frogs, birds, etc.)

  13. Radiation doses from residual radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter available data and calculations for assessing the exposure of survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs and persons who entered the cities after the bombings have been presented. It appears that it is possible to produce firm estimates only for external radiation and, while the internal contribution for long-lived fission products appears small, there is no way to evaluate potential exposures to the short-lived fission products. The radiation exposure in the most highly contaminated fallout area of a few hectares at Nishiyama, Nagasaki, is estimated as 20 to 40 R when integrated from one hour to infinity using a decay exponent of -1.2. For the Hiroshima Koi-Takasu area, the corresponding exposure is estimated as 1 to 3 R. The falloff with distance for Nagasaki is not steep and an exposure of one-fifth of the maximum is spread over an area of perhaps 1000 ha. With the assumption stated above, the potential maximum exposures to external radiation from induced radioactivity at the hypocenter is estimated to be about 80 R fir Hiroshima and 30 to 40 R for Nagasaki with the assumptions stated above. These exposures fall off with both time and distance. The cumulative exposure would be about one-third as large after a day and only a few percent after a week. The falloff with distance is less striking, but can be estimated from the areas listed or from the curves shown in Gritzner and Woolson. Unlike the fallout, which exposed individuals in their living areas, exposures to induced activity came from reentry of individuals into the area around the hypocenter. As an example, an individual entering the Hiroshima hypocenter area after one day and working 10 or 20 hours a day for a week would have been exposed to about 10 R. If the person had been working at a distance of 500 m, the exposure would have been about 1 R and, at 1000 m, about 20 mR. The exposure described apply to the specified areas in the two cities. Application of these values to individuals

  14. Sediment dynamics during the rainy season in tropical highland catchments of central Mexico using fallout radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tropical regions are affected by intense soil erosion associated with deforestation, overgrazing, and cropping intensification. This land degradation leads to important on-site (e.g., decrease in soil fertility) and off-site (e.g., reservoir siltation and water pollution) impacts. This study determined the mean soil particle and sediment residence times in soils and rivers of three sub-catchments (3-12 km2) with contrasted land uses (i.e., cropland, forests, and rangelands) draining to a reservoir located in highlands of the trans-volcanic Mexican belt. Calculations were based on rainfall amount and river discharges as well as on fallout radionuclide measurements (Be-7, Cs-137, and Pb-210) conducted on rainfall precipitated samples, soil sampled in the catchments, and suspended sediment collected by automatic samplers in the river during most storms recorded throughout the 2009 rainy season. Calculations using a radionuclide two-box balance model showed that the mean residence time of particles in soils ranged between 5000 ± 1500 and 23, 300 ± 7000 years. In contrast, sediment residence time in rivers was much shorter, fluctuating between 50 ± 30 and 200 ± 70 days. The shortest mean residence times were measured in a hilly catchment dominated by cropland and rangelands, whereas they were the longest in an undulating catchment dominated by forests and cropland. Calculation of the Be-7/excess-Pb-210 in both rainfall and sediment allowed gaining insight on sediment dynamics throughout the rainy season. The first heavy storms of the year exported the bulk of the sediment stock accumulated in the river channel during the previous year. Then, during the rainy season, the two steeper catchments dominated by cropland and rangelands reacted strongly to rainfall. Sediment was indeed eroded and exported from both catchments during single heavy storms on several occasions in 2009. In contrast, the agro-forested catchment with gentler slopes exported sediment at a constant

  15. New simple deposition model based on reassessment of global fallout data 1954 - 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons began in 1945 and largely ceased in 1963. This testing is the major cause of distribution of man-made radionuclides over the globe and constitutes a background that needs to be considered when effects of other sources are estimated. The main radionuclides of long term (after the first months) concern are generally assumed to be 137Cs and 90Sr. It has been known for a long time that the deposition density of 137Cs and 90Sr is approximately proportional to the amount of precipitation. But the use of this proportional relationship raised some questions such as (a) over how large area can it be assumed that the concentration in precipitation is the same at any given time; (b) how does this agree with the observed latitude dependency of deposition density and (c) are the any other parameters that could be of use in a simple model describing global fallout? These issues were amongst those taken up in the NKS-B EcoDoses activity. The preliminary results for 137Cs and 90Sr showed for each that the measured concentration had been similar at many European and N-American sites at any given time and that the change with time had been similar. These finding were followed up in a more thorough study in this (DepEstimates) activity. Global data (including the US EML and UK AERE data sets) from 1954 - 1976 for 90Sr and 137Cs were analysed testing how well different potential explanatory variables could describe the deposition density. The best fit was obtained by not assuming the traditional proportional relationship, but instead a non-linear power function. The predictions obtained using this new model may not be significantly different from those obtained using the traditional model, when using a limited data set such as from one country as a test in this report showed. But for larger data sets and understanding of underlying processes the new model should be an improvement. (Author)

  16. Understanding Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon transfers at the catchment scale combining chemical and fallout radionuclides analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateuille, David; Evrard, Olivier; Lefevre, Irène; Moreau-Guigon, Elodie; Alliot, fabrice; Chevreuil, Marc; Mouchel, Jean-Marie

    2013-04-01

    Contamination of river water and sediment constitutes a major environmental issue for industrialized countries. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants characterized by two or more fused rings. In recent years, studies dealing with PAHs have grown in number. Some PAHs present indeed a high risk for environment and human health because of their carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. However, most of these studies focused on measuring PAH concentration in the different compartments of the environment (air, soil, sediment, water, etc.) In this context, there remains a lack of understanding regarding the various processes responsible for PAH transfers from one environmental compartment to another. Our study aims to quantify PAHs transfers at the catchment scale by combining chemical analysis with gamma spectrometry. Air, soil, river water and sediment samples (n=820) were collected in two upstream sub-catchments of the Seine River basin (France) during one year. Chemical analyses were carried out to determine PAHs concentrations in all samples. Furthermore, measurement of fallout radionuclides (Beryllium-7, Lead-210, Caesium-137) in both rainfall and river sediment provided a way to discriminate between freshly eroded sediment vs. resuspension of older material that previously deposited on the riverbed. This information is crucial to estimate PAH residence time and transfer velocities in the Seine River basin. The results show that the PAH behaviour varies from one subcatchment to the next. PAH transfers depend indeed on both the characteristics of the catchment (e.g. topography, presence of drained cropland in catchments) and the local anthropogenic pressures. A significant increase in atmospheric deposition of PAHs is observed during winter due to a larger number of sources (household heating). The 14-month study has also highlighted the seasonal variations of PAH fluxes, which are mainly related to the hydrological

  17. New simple deposition model based on reassessment of global fallout data 1954 - 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Bergan, T.D. [Directorate for Civil Protection and Emergency Planning, Toensberg (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Ikaeheimonen, T.K. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Isaksson, M. [Univ. of Gothenburg. Dept. of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgren Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Nielsen, Sven P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nutech, Roskilde (Denmark); Paatero, J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute. Observation Services, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons began in 1945 and largely ceased in 1963. This testing is the major cause of distribution of man-made radionuclides over the globe and constitutes a background that needs to be considered when effects of other sources are estimated. The main radionuclides of long term (after the first months) concern are generally assumed to be {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr. It has been known for a long time that the deposition density of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr is approximately proportional to the amount of precipitation. But the use of this proportional relationship raised some questions such as (a) over how large area can it be assumed that the concentration in precipitation is the same at any given time; (b) how does this agree with the observed latitude dependency of deposition density and (c) are the any other parameters that could be of use in a simple model describing global fallout? These issues were amongst those taken up in the NKS-B EcoDoses activity. The preliminary results for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr showed for each that the measured concentration had been similar at many European and N-American sites at any given time and that the change with time had been similar. These finding were followed up in a more thorough study in this (DepEstimates) activity. Global data (including the US EML and UK AERE data sets) from 1954 - 1976 for {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were analysed testing how well different potential explanatory variables could describe the deposition density. The best fit was obtained by not assuming the traditional proportional relationship, but instead a non-linear power function. The predictions obtained using this new model may not be significantly different from those obtained using the traditional model, when using a limited data set such as from one country as a test in this report showed. But for larger data sets and understanding of underlying processes the new model should be an improvement. (Author)

  18. Transfer of fall-out plutonium in the food-chain lichen→reindeer→man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fall-out of 239Pu and 238Pu was investigated by studying samples of lichen collected during 1947-1961 at different places in Scandinavia and between 1961-1972 at Lake Rogen in Sweden, which lies 62.30N, 12.40E. The maximum 239Pu level in the lichen carpet, which occurred in 1963, was about 300 pCi per kg dry weight and decreased to about 200 pCi per kg dry weight in 1970. The 238Pu concentration showed a maximum value during 1963 corresponding to about 12pCi per kg dry weight. This concentration decreased to about 7 pCi per kg dry weight in 1967. During 1966-1970 the 238Pu concentration increased and resulted in an increase in the 238Pu/239Pu activity ratio from 0.026 to 0.046. The activity concentration of 239Pu has been studied in the bone, liver, kidney and flesh of reindeer slaughtered in 1964-1974. The average concentrations found in cortical bone were 0.4 pCi/kg fresh weight, in trabecular bone 0.8 pCi/kg, in liver 5.2 pCi/kg, in kidneys 0.6 pCi/kg and in flesh 0.04 pCi/kg. A study of the transfer of 239Pu through the food-chain has been performed by using a simple compartment model. The average values of fsub(a), the estimated fraction of ingested activity retained, were in cortical bone 4.6x10-6, in trabecular bone 2.7x10-6, in liver 14x10-6 and in flesh 2.5x10-6. The maximum mean residence times were estimated to be about 11 a, 14 a, 8 a and 5 a, respectively. On the basis of reindeer meat consumption and the estimated fractional residence time, tau'=fsub(a)xtau, the 239Pu content of Lapps due to this food-chain was estimated to be about 0.1 fCi/kg in bone and 1 fCi/kg in liver. (author)

  19. A high resolution record of chlorine-36 nuclear-weapons-tests fallout from Central Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.R. E-mail: jaromy.green@gcccks.edu; Cecil, L.D.; Synal, H.-A.; Santos, J.; Kreutz, K.J.; Wake, C.P

    2004-08-01

    The Inilchek Glacier, located in the Tien Shan Mountains, central Asia, is unique among mid-latitude glaciers because of its relatively large average annual accumulation. In July 2000, two ice cores of 162 and 167 meters (m) in length were collected from the Inilchek Glacier for (chlorine-36) {sup 36}Cl analysis a part of a collaborative international effort to study the environmental changes archived in mid-latitude glaciers worldwide. The average annual precipitation at the collection site was calculated to be 1.6 m. In contrast, the reported average annual accumulations at the high-latitude Dye-3 glacial site, Greenland, the mid-latitude Guliya Ice Cap, China, and the mid-latitude Upper Fremont Glacier, Wyoming, USA, were 0.52, 0.16 and 0.76 m, respectively. The resolution of the {sup 36}Cl record in one of the Inilchek ice cores was from 2 to 10 times higher than the resolution of the records at these other sites and could provide an opportunity for detailed study of environmental changes that have occurred over the past 150 years. Despite the differences in accumulation among these various glacial sites, the {sup 36}Cl profile and peak concentrations for the Inilchek ice core were remarkably similar in shape and magnitude to those for ice cores from these other sites. The {sup 36}Cl peak concentration from 1958, the year during the mid-1900s nuclear-weapons-tests period when {sup 36}Cl fallout was largest, was preserved in the Inilchek core at a depth of 90.56 m below the surface of the glacier (74.14-m-depth water equivalent) at a concentration of 7.7 x 10{sup 5} atoms of {sup 36}Cl/gram (g) of ice. Peak {sup 36}Cl concentrations from Dye-3, Guliya and the Upper Fremont glacial sites were 7.1 x 10{sup 5}, 5.4 x 10{sup 5} and 0.7 x 10{sup 5} atoms of {sup 36}Cl/g of ice, respectively. Measurements of {sup 36}Cl preserved in ice cores improve estimates of historical worldwide atmospheric deposition of this isotope and allow the sources of {sup 36}Cl in ground

  20. Update of Previous Investigations on the Use of Fallout Radionuclides in Mistelbach-Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study performed in 2006-2008 by the Soil Science Unit in collaboration with Boku University in Mistelbach watershed (Austria) was to evaluate the magnitude of deposition rates using 137Cs and 210Pbex and the erosion rates using runoff plot measurements. The final results published recently in the peer-reviewed journal Geoderma can be summarised as following: (i) Erosion measurements (1994-2006) from runoff plots located in the upper part of an agricultural field just up-slope from a deposition area reached 29.4 t ha-1 · a-1 from the conventional tilled plot, 4.2 t ha-1 · a-1 from the conservation tillage plot and 2.7 t ha-1 · a-1 from the direct seeding treatment. Soil losses were reduced significantly by a factor of 10 using no tillage, direct seeding treatment. (ii) Using the 137Cs data that integrate the 1954-2007 period, the sedimentation rates down slope of the field containing the runoff plots were estimated at: - 26.1 t-1 · ha-1 · ha-1 using the 137Cs depth distribution profile - 20.3 t-1 · ha-1 · a-1 using the Mass Balance Model 2 (MBM2). (iii) The erosion rates under conventional tillage are in agreement with the sedimentation rates estimated down slope of the field by the 137Cs depth distribution profile and MBM2. (iv) In the lowest part of the watershed a sedimentation rate of 50.5 t-1 · ha-1 · a-1 was highlighted by the 137Cs depth distribution profile. This value was greater than the average erosion rate measured by the erosion plots because this area is more representative of sedimentation processes occurring in the study area due to its topographical position and the basin geomorphology. While 137Cs produced exploitable results, the 210Pb method was not applicable due to very low concentrations of 210Pbex associated to a high uncertainty in the measurements and a high fallout variability