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Sample records for braun lipoprotein mutant

  1. Comparative Global Gene Expression Profiles of Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant at Flea and Human Body Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristi L. Galindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Braun/murein lipoprotein (Lpp is involved in inflammatory responses and septic shock. We previously characterized a Δlpp mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 and found that this mutant was defective in surviving in macrophages and was attenuated in a mouse inhalation model of plague when compared to the highly virulent wild-type (WT bacterium. We performed global transcriptional profiling of WT Y. pestis and its Δlpp mutant using microarrays. The organisms were cultured at 26 and 37 degrees Celsius to simulate the flea vector and mammalian host environments, respectively. Our data revealed vastly different effects of lpp mutation on the transcriptomes of Y. pestis grown at 37 versus 26C. While the absence of Lpp resulted mainly in the downregulation of metabolic genes at 26C, the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant cultured at 37C exhibited profound alterations in stress response and virulence genes, compared to WT bacteria. We investigated one of the stress-related genes (htrA downregulated in the Δlpp mutant relative to WT Y. pestis. Indeed, complementation of the Δlpp mutant with the htrA gene restored intracellular survival of the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant. Our results support a role for Lpp in Y. pestis adaptation to the host environment, possibly via transcriptional activation of htrA.

  2. Comparative Analyses of Transcriptional Profiles in Mouse Organs Using a Pneumonic Plague Model after Infection with Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristi L. Galindo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We employed Murine GeneChips to delineate the global transcriptional profiles of the livers, lungs, and spleens in a mouse pneumonic plague infection model with wild-type (WT Y. pestis CO92 and its Braun lipoprotein (Δlpp mutant with reduced virulence. These organs showed differential transcriptional responses to infection with WT Y. pestis, but the overall host functional processes affected were similar across all three tissues. Gene expression alterations were found in inflammation, cytokine signaling, and apoptotic cell death-associated genes. Comparison of WT and Δlpp mutant-infected mice indicated significant overlap in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- associated gene expression, but the absence of Lpp perturbed host cell signaling at critical regulatory junctions resulting in altered immune response and possibly host cell apoptosis. We generated a putative signaling pathway including major inflammatory components that could account for the synergistic action of LPS and Lpp and provided the mechanistic basis of attenuation caused by deletion of the lpp gene from Y. pestis in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

  3. Deletion of the Braun lipoprotein-encoding gene and altering the function of lipopolysaccharide attenuate the plague bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Wang, Shaofei; Erova, Tatiana E; Kozlova, Elena V; Cao, Anthony; Cong, Yingzi; Fitts, Eric C; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Chopra, Ashok K

    2013-03-01

    Braun (murein) lipoprotein (Lpp) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are major components of the outer membranes of Enterobacteriaceae family members that are capable of triggering inflammatory immune responses by activating Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, respectively. Expanding on earlier studies that demonstrated a role played by Lpp in Yersinia pestis virulence in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague, we characterized an msbB in-frame deletion mutant incapable of producing an acyltransferase that is responsible for the addition of lauric acid to the lipid A moiety of LPS, as well as a Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant of the highly virulent Y. pestis CO92 strain. Although the ΔmsbB single mutant was minimally attenuated, the Δlpp single mutant and the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant were significantly more attenuated than the isogenic wild-type (WT) bacterium in bubonic and pneumonic animal models (mouse and rat) of plague. These data correlated with greatly reduced survivability of the aforementioned mutants in murine macrophages. Furthermore, the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant was grossly compromised in its ability to disseminate to distal organs in mice and in evoking cytokines/chemokines in infected animal tissues. Importantly, mice that survived challenge with the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant, but not the Δlpp or ΔmsbB single mutant, in a pneumonic plague model were significantly protected against a subsequent lethal WT CO92 rechallenge. These data were substantiated by the fact that the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant maintained an immunogenicity comparable to that of the WT strain and induced long-lasting T-cell responses against heat-killed WT CO92 antigens. Taken together, the data indicate that deletion of the msbB gene augmented the attenuation of the Δlpp mutant by crippling the spread of the double mutant to the peripheral organs of animals and by inducing cytokine/chemokine responses. Thus, the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant could provide a new live-attenuated background

  4. Escherichia coli Braun Lipoprotein (BLP) exhibits endotoxemia - like pathology in Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmikanth, Chikkamenahalli Lakshminarayana; Jacob, Shancy Petsel; Kudva, Avinash Kundadka; Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Yashaswini, Puttaraju Srikanta Murthy; Sumanth, Mosale Seetharam; Goncalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano F; Silva, Adriana R; Singh, Sridevi Annapurna; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Prabhu, Sandeep Kumble; McIntyre, Thomas M; Marathe, Gopal Kedihithlu

    2016-10-04

    The endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promotes sepsis, but bacterial peptides also promote inflammation leading to sepsis. We found, intraperitoneal administration of live or heat inactivated E. coli JE5505 lacking the abundant outer membrane protein, Braun lipoprotein (BLP), was less toxic than E. coli DH5α possessing BLP in Swiss albino mice. Injection of BLP free of LPS purified from E. coli DH5α induced massive infiltration of leukocytes in lungs and liver. BLP activated human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) ex vivo to adhere to denatured collagen in serum and polymyxin B independent fashion, a property distinct from LPS. Both LPS and BLP stimulated the synthesis of platelet activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator, in human PMNs. In mouse macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, while both BLP and LPS similarly upregulated TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA; BLP was more potent in inducing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and protein expression. Peritoneal macrophages from TLR2-/- mice significantly reduced the production of TNF-α in response to BLP in contrast to macrophages from wild type mice. We conclude, BLP acting through TLR2, is a potent inducer of inflammation with a response profile both common and distinct from LPS. Hence, BLP mediated pathway may also be considered as an effective target against sepsis.

  5. Escherichia coli Braun Lipoprotein (BLP) exhibits endotoxemia – like pathology in Swiss albino mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmikanth, Chikkamenahalli Lakshminarayana; Jacob, Shancy Petsel; Kudva, Avinash Kundadka; Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Yashaswini, Puttaraju Srikanta Murthy; Sumanth, Mosale Seetharam; Goncalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano F.; Silva, Adriana R.; Singh, Sridevi Annapurna; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Prabhu, Sandeep Kumble; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Marathe, Gopal Kedihithlu

    2016-01-01

    The endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promotes sepsis, but bacterial peptides also promote inflammation leading to sepsis. We found, intraperitoneal administration of live or heat inactivated E. coli JE5505 lacking the abundant outer membrane protein, Braun lipoprotein (BLP), was less toxic than E. coli DH5α possessing BLP in Swiss albino mice. Injection of BLP free of LPS purified from E. coli DH5α induced massive infiltration of leukocytes in lungs and liver. BLP activated human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) ex vivo to adhere to denatured collagen in serum and polymyxin B independent fashion, a property distinct from LPS. Both LPS and BLP stimulated the synthesis of platelet activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator, in human PMNs. In mouse macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, while both BLP and LPS similarly upregulated TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA; BLP was more potent in inducing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and protein expression. Peritoneal macrophages from TLR2−/− mice significantly reduced the production of TNF-α in response to BLP in contrast to macrophages from wild type mice. We conclude, BLP acting through TLR2, is a potent inducer of inflammation with a response profile both common and distinct from LPS. Hence, BLP mediated pathway may also be considered as an effective target against sepsis. PMID:27698491

  6. Deletion of Braun lipoprotein and plasminogen-activating protease-encoding genes attenuates Yersinia pestis in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lier, Christina J; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Cao, Anthony; Tiner, Bethany L; Erova, Tatiana E; Cong, Yingzi; Kozlova, Elena V; Popov, Vsevolod L; Baze, Wallace B; Chopra, Ashok K

    2014-06-01

    Currently, there is no FDA-approved vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Since both humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity are essential in providing the host with protection against plague, we developed a live-attenuated vaccine strain by deleting the Braun lipoprotein (lpp) and plasminogen-activating protease (pla) genes from Y. pestis CO92. The Δlpp Δpla double isogenic mutant was highly attenuated in evoking both bubonic and pneumonic plague in a mouse model. Further, animals immunized with the mutant by either the intranasal or the subcutaneous route were significantly protected from developing subsequent pneumonic plague. In mice, the mutant poorly disseminated to peripheral organs and the production of proinflammatory cytokines concurrently decreased. Histopathologically, reduced damage to the lungs and livers of mice infected with the Δlpp Δpla double mutant compared to the level of damage in wild-type (WT) CO92-challenged animals was observed. The Δlpp Δpla mutant-immunized mice elicited a humoral immune response to the WT bacterium, as well as to CO92-specific antigens. Moreover, T cells from mutant-immunized animals exhibited significantly higher proliferative responses, when stimulated ex vivo with heat-killed WT CO92 antigens, than mice immunized with the same sublethal dose of WT CO92. Likewise, T cells from the mutant-immunized mice produced more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4. These animals had an increasing number of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells than WT CO92-infected mice. These data emphasize the role of TNF-α and IFN-γ in protecting mice against pneumonic plague. Overall, our studies provide evidence that deletion of the lpp and pla genes acts synergistically in protecting animals against pneumonic plague, and we have demonstrated an immunological basis for this protection.

  7. Deletion of Braun Lipoprotein and Plasminogen-Activating Protease-Encoding Genes Attenuates Yersinia pestis in Mouse Models of Bubonic and Pneumonic Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lier, Christina J.; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Cao, Anthony; Tiner, Bethany L.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Cong, Yingzi; Kozlova, Elena V.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Baze, Wallace B.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no FDA-approved vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Since both humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity are essential in providing the host with protection against plague, we developed a live-attenuated vaccine strain by deleting the Braun lipoprotein (lpp) and plasminogen-activating protease (pla) genes from Y. pestis CO92. The Δlpp Δpla double isogenic mutant was highly attenuated in evoking both bubonic and pneumonic plague in a mouse model. Further, animals immunized with the mutant by either the intranasal or the subcutaneous route were significantly protected from developing subsequent pneumonic plague. In mice, the mutant poorly disseminated to peripheral organs and the production of proinflammatory cytokines concurrently decreased. Histopathologically, reduced damage to the lungs and livers of mice infected with the Δlpp Δpla double mutant compared to the level of damage in wild-type (WT) CO92-challenged animals was observed. The Δlpp Δpla mutant-immunized mice elicited a humoral immune response to the WT bacterium, as well as to CO92-specific antigens. Moreover, T cells from mutant-immunized animals exhibited significantly higher proliferative responses, when stimulated ex vivo with heat-killed WT CO92 antigens, than mice immunized with the same sublethal dose of WT CO92. Likewise, T cells from the mutant-immunized mice produced more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4. These animals had an increasing number of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than WT CO92-infected mice. These data emphasize the role of TNF-α and IFN-γ in protecting mice against pneumonic plague. Overall, our studies provide evidence that deletion of the lpp and pla genes acts synergistically in protecting animals against pneumonic plague, and we have demonstrated an immunological basis for this protection. PMID:24686064

  8. Oral administration of a Spirulina extract enriched for Braun-type lipoproteins protects mice against influenza A(H1N1) virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies indicate that Immulina, a commercial extract of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis, is a potent activator of innate immune cells and that Braun-type lipoproteins (a principal toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 ligand) are the main active components within this product. In the present study, ...

  9. Enhancement of natural killer cell activity in healthy subjects by Immulina®, a Spirulina extract enriched for Braun-type lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Balachandran, Premalatha; Christensen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Immulina®, a commercial extract of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a potent activator of THP-1 monocytes and CD4+ T cells IN VITRO and enhances several immunological functions in mice. We further characterized Immulina® by determining that Braun-type lipoproteins are responsible for a major...

  10. Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) contributes to virulence of yersiniae: potential role of Lpp in inducing bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jian; Agar, Stacy L; Baze, Wallace B; Olano, Juan P; Fadl, Amin A; Erova, Tatiana E; Wang, Shaofei; Foltz, Sheri M; Suarez, Giovanni; Motin, Vladimir L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Klimpel, Gary R; Peterson, Johnny W; Chopra, Ashok K

    2008-04-01

    Yersinia pestis evolved from Y. pseudotuberculosis to become the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. We identified a homolog of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lipoprotein (lpp) gene in Yersinia species and prepared lpp gene deletion mutants of Y. pseudotuberculosis YPIII, Y. pestis KIM/D27 (pigmentation locus minus), and Y. pestis CO92 with reduced virulence. Mice injected via the intraperitoneal route with 5 x 10(7) CFU of the Deltalpp KIM/D27 mutant survived a month, even though this would have constituted a lethal dose for the parental KIM/D27 strain. Subsequently, these Deltalpp KIM/D27-injected mice were solidly protected against an intranasally administered, highly virulent Y. pestis CO92 strain when it was given as five 50% lethal doses (LD(50)). In a parallel study with the pneumonic plague mouse model, after 72 h postinfection, the lungs of animals infected with wild-type (WT) Y. pestis CO92 and given a subinhibitory dose of levofloxacin had acute inflammation, edema, and masses of bacteria, while the lung tissue appeared essentially normal in mice inoculated with the Deltalpp mutant of CO92 and given the same dose of levofloxacin. Importantly, while WT Y. pestis CO92 could be detected in the bloodstreams and spleens of infected mice at 72 h postinfection, the Deltalpp mutant of CO92 could not be detected in those organs. Furthermore, the levels of cytokines/chemokines detected in the sera were significantly lower in animals infected with the Deltalpp mutant than in those infected with WT CO92. Additionally, the Deltalpp mutant was more rapidly killed by macrophages than was the WT CO92 strain. These data provided evidence that the Deltalpp mutants of yersiniae were significantly attenuated and could be useful tools in the development of new vaccines.

  11. Enhancement of natural killer cell activity in healthy subjects by Immulina®, a Spirulina extract enriched for Braun-type lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Balachandran, Premalatha; Christensen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Immulina®, a commercial extract of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis is a potent activator of THP-1 monocytes and CD4+ T cells IN VITRO and enhances several immunological functions in mice. We further characterized Immulina® by determining that Braun-type lipoproteins are responsible for a major...... portion of the IN VITRO monocyte activation exhibited by this material. In order to understand the effect of Immulina® on NK cell activity, a pilot study was conducted on ten healthy North American individuals who supplemented their diet with Immulina® (400 mg/day) for seven days. We observed a 40...

  12. Von Braun Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A fountain representing a rocket launch was dedicated in the Von Braun courtyard outside of Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center during the weekend celebrating the 30th arniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing. On hand for the festivities were many of the Saturn and Apollo astronauts.

  13. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  14. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  15. Dr. von Braun With Management Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is shown in this photograph, which was probably taken in the early 1960s, with members of his management team. Pictured from left to right are, Werner Kuers, Director of the Manufacturing Engineering Division; Dr. Walter Haeussermarn, Director of the Astrionics Division; Dr. William Mrazek, Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Division; Dr. von Braun; Dieter Grau, Director of the Quality Assurance Division; Dr. Oswald Lange, Director of the Saturn Systems Office; and Erich Neubert , Associate Deputy Director for Research and Development.

  16. Portrait of Dr. Von Braun with Walt Disney, 1954.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1954-01-01

    Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn project, also worked with Disney studios as a technical director in making three films about Space Exploration for television. Disney's tour of Marshall in 1965 was Von Braun's hope for a renewed public interest in the future of the Space Program at NASA.

  17. The odontological identification of Eva Braun Hitler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser-Nielsen, S; Strøm, F

    1983-01-01

    On May 7th-9th, 1945, a team of Russian pathologists autopsied several bodies found in and near the Fuehrer Bunker in Berlin; among them, a female body (No. 13) was later identified as that of Eva Braun Hitler (EBH), mainly by means of a gold bridge from the lower right jaw. A postmortem photograph of this bridge also shows a separate gold filling. Data now available on the dental treatment of EBH have permitted the present authors to substantiate that this gold filling also came from the mouth of EBH. Further speculation about the fate of EBH would henceforth seem professionally unfounded.

  18. Victor or Villain? Wernher von Braun and the Space Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jason L.; Sears, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    Set during the Cold War and space race, this historical role-play focuses on Wernher von Braun's involvement in and culpability for the use of slave laborers to produce V-2 rockets for Nazi Germany. Students will grapple with two central questions. Should von Braun have been allowed to emigrate to the United States given his affiliation with the…

  19. Interference of phenol during quantification of a bacterial lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accurate protein estimation is an essential requirement for any biochemical investigation. The bacterial Braun liporotein (BLP) from E. coli (a Toll-2 receptor ligand) is purified via phenol extraction on the basis of selective extraction of the lipoprotein. The procedure leaves behind the major endotoxin lipopolysaccharide ...

  20. Dr. von Braun and Army Ballistics Missile Agency (ABMA) Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-01-01

    This photograph of Dr. von Braun, shown here to the left of General Bruce Medaris, was taken in the fall of 1959, immediately prior to Medaris' retirement from the Army. At the time, von Braun and his associates worked for the Army Ballistics Missile Agency in Huntsville, Alabama. Those in the photograph have been identified as Ernst Stuhlinger, Frederick von Saurma, Fritz Mueller, Hermarn Weidner, E.W. Neubert (partially hidden), W.A. Mrazek, Karl Heimburg, Arthur Rudolph, Otto Hoberg, von Braun, Oswald Lange, Medaris, Helmut Hoelzer, Hans Maus, E.D. Geissler, Hans Heuter, and George Constan.

  1. Dr. Space the life of Wernher von Braun

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Written by veteran aerospace journalist Bob Ward, who spent years investigating his subject, this biography presents a revealing but even-handed portrait of the father of modern rocketry. As he chronicles Wernher von Braun's life, Ward explodes many myths and misconceptions about the controversial genius who was a hero to some, a villain to others. The picture of von Braun that emerges is of a brilliant scientist with limitless curiosity and a drive to achieve his goals at almost any price from, developing the world's first ballistic missile used against the Allies in World War II to help

  2. Oscar Braun: un referente ineludible para interpretar el presente nacional

    OpenAIRE

    Azpiazu, Daniel; Schorr, Martín; Instituto Interdisciplinario de Economía Política de Buenos Aires

    2008-01-01

    Se brinda un extracto de una conferencia que el economista Oscar Braun dictó en noviembre de 1973 en la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras de la Universidad de Buenos Aires. El texto completo fue publicado en 1974 por la editorial El Coloquio bajo el título El plan económico del gobierno popular. Se trata de una serie de reflexiones que a pesar de haber sido escritas en otro momento histórico, arrojan numerosas claves interpretativas de la particular coyuntura económica y socio-política de la ...

  3. Von Braun Rocket Team at Fort Bliss, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1940-01-01

    The German Rocket Team, also known as the Von Braun Rocket Team, poses for a group photograph at Fort Bliss, Texas. After World War II ended in 1945, Dr. Wernher von Braun led some 120 of his Peenemuende Colleagues, who developed the V-2 rocket for the German military during the War, to the United Sttes under a contract to the U.S. Army Corps as part of Operation Paperclip. During the following five years the team worked on high altitude firings of the captured V-2 rockets at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, and a guided missile development unit at Fort Bliss, Texas. In April 1950, the group was transferred to the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, and continued to work on the development of the guided missiles for the U.S. Army until transferring to a newly established field center of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  4. Use of Braun-Blanquet for the assessment of veld condition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Braun-Blanquet vegetation surveys are easier and quicker to undertake than point surveys. This paper reports on assessment of veld condition and calculation of grazing capacity of five plant communities of the Ea land type of the northeastern Orange Free State using Braun-Blanquet data. Veld condition scores were ...

  5. Variability in In Vitro Macrophage Activation by Commercially Diverse Bulk Echinacea Plant Material is Predominantly Due to Bacterial Lipoproteins and Lipopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously reported that the majority of in vitro monocyte/macrophage activation exhibited by extracts of Echinacea and other botanicals depends upon bacterial lipopolysaccharides and Braun-type bacterial lipoproteins. We determined the contribution made by these bacterial components to the overa...

  6. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Lipoprotein-a

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007262.htm Lipoprotein-a To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lipoproteins are molecules made of proteins and fat. They ...

  8. Revisiting the Gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVullo, Eric D; Wright, Lori F; Isabella, Vincent; Huntley, Jason F; Pavelka, Martin S

    2015-05-01

    The processing of lipoproteins (Lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted by the Lol system, with most Lpps inserted into the outer membrane (OM). We demonstrate here that the lnt gene is not essential to the Gram-negative pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu or to the live vaccine strain LVS. An LVS Δlnt mutant has a small-colony phenotype on sucrose medium and increased susceptibility to globomycin and rifampin. We provide data indicating that the OM lipoprotein Tul4A (LpnA) is diacylated but that it, and its paralog Tul4B (LpnB), still sort to the OM in the Δlnt mutant. We present a model in which the Lol sorting pathway of Francisella has a modified ABC transporter system that is capable of recognizing and sorting both triacylated and diacylated lipoproteins, and we show that this modified system is present in many other Gram-negative bacteria. We examined this model using Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which has the same Lol architecture as that of Francisella, and found that the lnt gene is not essential in this organism. This work suggests that Gram-negative bacteria fall into two groups, one in which full lipoprotein processing is essential and one in which the final acylation step is not essential, potentially due to the ability of the Lol sorting pathway in these bacteria to sort immature apolipoproteins to the OM. This paper describes the novel finding that the final stage in lipoprotein processing (normally considered an essential process) is not required by Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The paper provides a potential reason for this and shows that it may be widespread in other Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Lipoproteins of Bacterial Pathogens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs-Simon, A.; Titball, R. W.; Michell, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality, these proteins have a considerable significance in many phenomena, from cellular physiology through cell division and virulence. Here we give a general overview of lipoprotein biogenesis and highlight examples of the roles of lipoproteins in bacterial disease caused by a selection of medically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Neisseria meningitidis. Lipoproteins have been shown to play key roles in adhesion to host cells, modulation of inflammatory processes, and translocation of virulence factors into host cells. As such, a number of lipoproteins have been shown to be potential vaccines. This review provides a summary of some of the reported roles of lipoproteins and of how this knowledge has been exploited in some cases for the generation of novel countermeasures to bacterial diseases. PMID:20974828

  10. Lipoprotein(a)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Kamstrup, Pia R; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There are no recommendations in guidelines on measuring lipoprotein(a) in the fasting or nonfasting state, or on the influence of inflammation. We tested the hypotheses that lipoprotein(a) levels change only minimally in response to normal food intake, and to inflammation. Also, we...... tested whether normal food intake or inflammation influenced lipoprotein(a)'s ability to predict ischemic heart disease. METHODS: We studied 34 829 individuals from the Danish general population using the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study. RESULTS: Lipoprotein(a......) levels did not change in response to normal food intake: median fasting levels were 17.3 mg/dL, while median levels at 3-4 h since last meal were 19.4 mg/dL(p = 0.38). Lipoprotein(a) levels increased minimally with increasing levels of C-reactive protein(CRP): median lipoprotein(a) levels at CRP

  11. The use of the Almeida-Braun system in the measurement of Dutch dialect distances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, Wilbert; Braun, Angelika

    Measuring dialect distances can be based on the comparison of words, and the comparison words should be based on the comparison of sounds. In this research we used an adjusted version of an articulation-based system, developed by Almeida and Braun (1986) for finding sound distances, using the IPA

  12. Soccer fan violence: a holistic approach: a reply to Braun and Vliegenthart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaaij, R.; Anderson, A.

    2010-01-01

    Building on Braun and Vliegenthart’s recent study of soccer hooliganism, this article develops an explanatory model of soccer fan violence and collective violence more generally. The fabric of soccer fan violence becomes a richer tapestry if the diversity of the phenomenon is recognized and the

  13. Immunisation of two rodent species with new live-attenuated mutants of Yersinia pestis CO92 induces protective long-term humoral- and cell-mediated immunity against pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Cong, Yingzi; Kirtley, Michelle L; Andersson, Jourdan A; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    We showed recently that the live-attenuated Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail and Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 mutants of Yersinia pestis CO92 provided short-term protection to mice against developing subsequent lethal pneumonic plague. These mutants were either deleted for genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp), an acetyltransferase (MsbB) and the attachment invasion locus (Ail) (Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail) or contained a modified version of the ail gene with diminished virulence (Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2). Here, long-term immune responses were first examined after intramuscular immunisation of mice with the above-mentioned mutants, as well as the newly constructed Δlpp ΔmsbB Δpla mutant, deleted for the plasminogen-activator protease (pla) gene instead of ail. Y. pestis-specific IgG levels peaked between day 35 and 56 in the mutant-immunised mice and were sustained until the last tested day 112. Splenic memory B cells peaked earlier (day 42) before declining in the Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 mutant-immunised mice while being sustained for 63 days in the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail and Δlpp ΔmsbB Δpla mutant-immunised mice. Splenic CD4+ T cells increased in all immunised mice by day 42 with differential cytokine production among the immunised groups. On day 120, immunised mice were exposed intranasally to wild-type (WT) CO92, and 80-100% survived pneumonic challenge. Mice immunised with the above-mentioned three mutants had increased innate as well as CD4+ responses immediately after WT CO92 exposure, and coupled with sustained antibody production, indicated the role of both arms of the immune response in protection. Likewise, rats vaccinated with either Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail or the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δpla mutant also developed long-term humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to provide 100% protection against developing pneumonic plague. On the basis of the attenuated phenotype, the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail mutant was recently excluded from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention select agent list.

  14. Intramuscular Immunization of Mice with a Live-Attenuated Triple Mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 Induces Robust Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immunity To Completely Protect Animals against Pneumonic Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B; Fitts, Eric C; Popov, Vsevolod L; van Lier, Christina J; Erova, Tatiana E; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-12-01

    Earlier, we showed that the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 with deleted genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp), an acyltransferase (MsbB), and the attachment invasion locus (Ail), respectively, was avirulent in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. In this study, we further evaluated the immunogenic potential of the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant and its derivative by different routes of vaccination. Mice were immunized via the subcutaneous (s.c.) or the intramuscular (i.m.) route with two doses (2 × 10(6) CFU/dose) of the above-mentioned triple mutant with 100% survivability of the animals. Upon subsequent pneumonic challenge with 70 to 92 50% lethal doses (LD(50)) of wild-type (WT) strain CO92, all of the mice survived when immunization occurred by the i.m. route. Since Ail has virulence and immunogenic potential, a mutated version of Ail devoid of its virulence properties was created, and the genetically modified ail replaced the native ail gene on the chromosome of the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant, creating a Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 vaccine strain. This newly generated mutant was attenuated similarly to the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant when administered by the i.m. route and provided 100% protection to animals against subsequent pneumonic challenge. Not only were the two above-mentioned mutants cleared rapidly from the initial i.m. site of injection in animals with no histopathological lesions, the immunized mice did not exhibit any disease symptoms during immunization or after subsequent exposure to WT CO92. These two mutants triggered balanced Th1- and Th2-based antibody responses and cell-mediated immunity. A substantial increase in interleukin-17 (IL-17) from the T cells of vaccinated mice, a cytokine of the Th17 cells, further augmented their vaccine potential. Thus, the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail and Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 mutants represent excellent vaccine candidates for plague, with the latter mutant still retaining Ail immunogenicity but

  15. Phase description of the Huber-Braun neuron model for mammalian cold receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, J. A.; Finke, C.; Braun, H. A.; Feudel, U.

    2013-10-01

    The spiking activity of mammalian cold receptors is described by the Huber-Braun neuron model. Sweeping temperature as a control parameter across a biologically relevant range this model exhibits a complex bifurcation structure seen in the sequence of interspike intervals. The model's distinctive feature is the interaction between a fast spike generating dynamics and a slow subthreshold oscillation. Viewing the spike generation as a cycle, the dynamics may also be modeled phenomenologically by two phases, one for the spike cycle and the second for the slow subthreshold oscillation. In fact, a phase model of temperature-dependent mammalian cold receptors was already proposed by Roper et al. (2000). Here we follow their approach and investigate to what extent this model is able to reproduce the bifurcation patterns of the Huber-Braun model. Special attention is paid to the tonic firing to bursting transition observed in the low temperature range.

  16. Lipoprotein signal peptides are processed by Lsp and Eep of Streptococcus uberis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, E L; Ward, P N; Leigh, J A

    2008-07-01

    Lipoprotein signal peptidase (lsp) is responsible for cleaving the signal peptide sequence of lipoproteins in gram-positive bacteria. Investigation of the role of Lsp in Streptococcus uberis, a common cause of bovine mastitis, was undertaken using the lipoprotein MtuA (a protein essential for virulence) as a marker. The S. uberis lsp mutant phenotype displayed novel lipoprotein processing. Not only was full-length (uncleaved) MtuA detected by Western blotting, but during late log phase, a lower-molecular-weight derivative of MtuA was evident. Similar analysis of an S. uberis double mutant containing insertions disrupting both lsp and eep (a homologue of the Enterococcus faecalis "enhanced expression of pheromone" gene) indicated a role for eep in cleavage of lipoproteins in the absence of Lsp. Such a function may indicate a role for eep in maintenance of secretion pathways during disruption of normal lipoprotein processing.

  17. Does modified Braun enteroenterostomy improve alkaline reflux gastritis and marginal ulcer after pancreaticoduodenectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, An-Ping; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei-Guo; Zhang, Zhao-Da; Liu, Xu-Bao; Hu, Wei-Ming; Tian, Bo-Le

    2013-11-01

    The safety of pancreaticoduodenectomy has improved significantly. However, alkaline reflux gastritis and marginal ulcer are two substantial problems after pancreaticoduodenectomy. To identify whether Child reconstruction with a modified Braun enteroenterostomy decreases the incidence of alkaline reflux gastritis and marginal ulcer after pancreaticoduodenectomy better than Roux-en-Y reconstruction. Data on 57 consecutive patients who underwent standard pancreaticoduodenectomy between January 1, 2008 and January 31, 2012 were collected prospectively. Data on early and late complications of the Child reconstruction with a modified Braun enteroenterostomy and Roux-en-Y were gathered. The risk factors of alkaline reflux gastritis and marginal ulcer were also investigated by using univariate and multivariate analyses. Twenty-five patients received Roux-en-Y and 32 underwent Child reconstruction with a modified Braun enteroenterostomy. Early complications after the two reconstruction methods were insignificant. Significant differences in terms of later postoperative morbidity (P = 0.01) and change in body mass index (P = 0.03) were found 12 months after pancreaticoduodenectomy. No significant difference for alkaline reflux gastritis was observed between the two methods (14.8 vs. 28.6 %, P = 0.24). Marginal ulcer occurred significantly lower in patients with the modified reconstruction than in those with Roux-en-Y reconstruction (11.1 vs. 47.6 %, P = 0.01). Peptic ulcer history, diabetes mellitus, and reconstruction type had a significant effect on marginal ulcer formation. Child reconstruction with a modified Braun enteroenterostomy offers an advantage with respect to marginal ulcer after standard pancreaticoduodenectomy, potentially decreasing the incidence of alkaline reflux gastritis as effectively as Roux-en-Y reconstruction.

  18. A vinylic Rosenmund-von Braun reaction: practical synthesis of acrylonitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradal, Alexandre; Evano, Gwilherm

    2014-10-14

    An efficient system based on acetone cyanohydrin and catalytic amounts of copper(I) iodide and 1,10-phenanthroline is reported for the cyanation of alkenyl iodides. A wide range of polysubstituted acrylonitriles could be obtained in fair to good yields and with complete retention of the geometry of the double bond. This extension of the Rosenmund-von Braun reaction also enabled a straightforward formal synthesis of the naturally occurring acrylonitrile alliarinoside.

  19. Billroth II with Braun Enteroenterostomy Is a Good Alternative Reconstruction to Roux-en-Y Gastrojejunostomy in Laparoscopic Distal Gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Hai Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although Billroth II (BII reconstruction is simpler and faster than Billroth I or Roux-en-Y (RY reconstruction in patients undergoing totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (TLDG, BII reconstruction is associated with several complications, including more severe bile reflux. BII Braun anastomosis may be a better alternative to RY reconstruction. Methods. This retrospective study included 56 consecutive patients who underwent TLDG for gastric cancer, followed by BII Braun or RY reconstruction, between January 2013 and December 2015. Surgical outcomes, including length of operation, quantity of blood lost, and postoperative complications, were compared in the two groups. Results. Clinicopathological characteristics did not differ between the BII Braun and RY groups. Mean length of operation was significantly longer in the RY than the BII Braun group (157.3 min versus 134.6 min, p < 0.010, but length of hospital stay, blood loss, and complication rate did not differ between the two groups. Ileus occurred in three patients (10.0% in the RY group. Endoscopic findings 6 months after surgery showed bile reflux in seven (28% patients in the BII Braun group and five (17.2% in the RY group (p = 0.343, but no significant differences in rate of gastric residue or degree of gastritis in the remnant stomach in the two groups. Conclusions. B-II Braun anastomosis is a good alternative to RY reconstruction, reducing length of operation and ileus after TLDG.

  20. la teoría del desarrollo desigual de Óscar Braun. Un análisis critico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Phil

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available

    En este análisis crítico de la teoría del intercambio desigual de Oscar Braun, intentamos movernos consistentemente a través de un número de etapas analíticas distintas. Estas etapas son: a una discusión sobre el objeto del conocimiento en Braun, sin las restricciones de su propia problemática (sección 3; b una confrontación del objeto del conocímiento en Braun con el objeto real o concreto (sección4, y c una crítica a] objeto del conocimiento en Braun (secciones 2 y 5. La crítica del objeto del conocimiento en Braun se divide en dos partes ya que tratamos con dos problemas analíticos distintos: a la teoría del intercambio desigual puede estar representada como una teoría del imperialismo, y b la naturaleza del objeto del conocimiento contenida en la teoría del intercambio desigual de Braun es la que causa los problemas y la que lo lleva a constituirla como una teoría del imperialismo.

  1. ATM mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. ATM mutants. ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated). AT2BE and AT5B1 cells – fibroblast cell lines from Ataxia telangiectasia patients. Deletion mutants expressing truncated ATM protein which is inactive. Have been used in studies looking at the role of ATM in DNA damage ...

  2. Subunit II of Bacillus subtilis cytochrome c oxidase is a lipoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bengtsson, J; Tjalsma, H; Rivolta, C; Hederstedt, L

    The sequence of the N-terminal end of the deduced ctaC gene product of Bacillus species has the features of a bacterial lipoprotein. CtaC is the subunit II of cytochrome caa(3), which is a cytochrome c oxidase. Using Bacillus subtilis mutants blocked in lipoprotein synthesis, we show that CtaC is a

  3. Randomized trial comparing episiotomies with Braun-Stadler episiotomy scissors and EPISCISSORS-60®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawant G

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ganpat Sawant, Divya Kumar Dr DY Patil Medical College and Hospital, Nerul, Navi Mumbai, India Introduction: Episiotomy angle is a crucial factor in causation of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS, which are the major cause of female bowel incontinence. Sutured episiotomies angled too close to the midline (<30 degree or too far away from the midline (.60 degree fail to unload the perineum sufficiently and predispose to OASIS. A 25-degree post-delivery episiotomy suture angle has a 10% risk of OASIS while 45-degree episiotomy is associated with 0.5% risk. To account for perineal distension at crowning, a 60-degree episiotomy incision is required to achieve 43–50 degree suture angles. We compared episiotomy suture angles with commonly used Braun-Stadler episiotomy scissors with the new fixed angle EPISCISSORS-60®. Methods: Ethical approval was obtained. A prospective cluster randomization design was chosen. Thirty-one patients were required in each group for a 12-degree difference with power at 90% and 5% significance. Sutured episiotomy angles and post-delivery linear distance from caudal end of the sutured episiotomy to the anus were measured with protractors and rulers. Two-tailed t-tests were used to compare the two groups. Results: Thirty-one nulliparae had episiotomies with EPISCISSORS-60®, 32 with Braun-Stadler. Mean age (25 versus 24.8 years was similar. EPISCISSORS-60® episiotomies were angled 12 degrees more laterally away from the anus compared to Braun-Stadler (40.6 degrees, 95% confidence interval [CI] ±2, interquartile range [IQR] 35–45 versus 28.3 degrees, 95% CI ±2, IQR 25–30, P<0.0001. The post-delivery linear distance from caudal end of the sutured episiotomy to the anus was 15 mm more with the EPISCISSORS-60® compared to Braun-Stadler (35 mm, 95% CI ±2.2, IQR =30–39 versus 19.5; 95% CI ±1.3, IQR =14.75–22.25 P<0.0001. EPISCISSORS-60® episiotomies measured longer (47 mm versus 40 mm, P<0.0001. There were

  4. Two new species of Phyllodistomum Braun, 1899 (Trematoda: Gorgoderidae Looss, 1899) from Great Barrier Reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hei Wa; Bray, Rodney A; Cutmore, Scott C; Ward, Selina; Cribb, Thomas H

    2014-03-19

    Two new species of Phyllodistomum Braun, 1899 are described from the urinary bladder of fishes of the Great Barrier Reef. Phyllodistomum hoggettae n. sp. is described from Plectropomus leopardus (leopard coralgrouper) (Serranidae) and P. vaili n. sp. is described from Mulloidichthys vanicolensis (yellowfin goatfish) and M. flavolineatus (yellowstripe goatfish) (Mullidae). These species are compared with 26 previously described marine Phyllodistomum species and found to be distinct in combinations of body shape, sucker ratio and shape of the gonads. Preliminary molecular data also demonstrate that they are distinct from each other and for those other species for which data are available.

  5. Sex steroids and lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers Leuven, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lipoprotein metabolism is involved in atherogenesis. Female sex-hormones have substantial effects on both lipoprotein metabolism and the vessel wall. Cholesterol, one of the major lipids in lipoproteins, is both the substrate for, and the target of, the steroidal sex hormones.

  6. Albert Einstein and Wernher von Braun - the two great German-American physicists seen in a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2008-04-01

    It was Albert Einstein who for the first time changed our view of the universe to be a non-euclidean curved space-time. And it was Wernher von Braun who blazed the trail to take us into this universe, leaving for the first time the gravitational field of our planet earth, with the landing a man on the moon the greatest event in human history. Both these great physicists did this on the shoulders of giants. Albert Einstein on the shoulders of his landsman, the mathematician Bernhard Riemann, and Wernher von Braun on the shoulders of Goddard and Oberth. Both Einstein and von Braun made a Faustian pact with the devil, von Braun by accepting research funds from Hitler, and Einstein by urging Roosvelt to build the atom bomb (against Hitler). Both of these great men later regretted the use of their work for the killing of innocent bystanders, even though in the end the invention of nuclear energy and space flight is for the benefit of man. Their example serves as a warning for all of us. It can be formulated as follows: ``Can I in good conscience accept research funds from the military to advance scientific knowledge, for weapons developed against an abstract enemy I never have met in person?'' Weapons if used do not differentiate between the scientist, who invented these weapons, and the non-scientist.

  7. Lipoprotein Apheresis for Lipoprotein(a)-Associated Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeseler, Eberhard; Julius, Ulrich; Heigl, Franz

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lipoprotein(a)-hyperlipoproteinemia (Lp(a)-HLP) along with progressive cardiovascular disease has been approved as indication for regular lipoprotein apheresis (LA) in Germany since 2008. We aimed to study the long-term preventive effect of LA and to assess hypothetical clinical correl...

  8. Genetics of non-conventional lipoprotein fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoprotein subclass measures associate with cardiometabolic disease risk. Currently the information that lipoproteins convey on disease risk over that of traditional demographic and lipid measures is minimal, and so their use is clinics is limited. However, lipoprotein subclass perturbations repres...

  9. Lipoproteins of Gram-Positive Bacteria: Key Players in the Immune Response and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Thu; Götz, Friedrich

    2016-09-01

    Since the discovery in 1973 of the first of the bacterial lipoproteins (Lpp) in Escherichia coli, Braun's lipoprotein, the ever-increasing number of publications indicates the importance of these proteins. Bacterial Lpp belong to the class of lipid-anchored proteins that in Gram-negative bacteria are anchored in both the cytoplasmic and outer membranes and in Gram-positive bacteria are anchored only in the cytoplasmic membrane. In contrast to the case for Gram-negative bacteria, in Gram-positive bacteria lipoprotein maturation and processing are not vital. Physiologically, Lpp play an important role in nutrient and ion acquisition, allowing particularly pathogenic species to better survive in the host. Bacterial Lpp are recognized by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) of the innate immune system. The important role of Lpp in Gram-positive bacteria, particularly in the phylum Firmicutes, as key players in the immune response and pathogenicity has emerged only in recent years. In this review, we address the role of Lpp in signaling and modulating the immune response, in inflammation, and in pathogenicity. We also address the potential of Lpp as promising vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Apolipoprotein A-V interaction with members of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Lookene, Aivar; Beckstead, Jennifer A

    2007-01-01

    lipoprotein receptor family, the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and the mosaic type-1 receptor, SorLA. Experiments using surface plasmon resonance showed specific binding of both free and lipid-bound apolipoprotein A-V to both receptors. The binding was calcium dependent and was inhibited...... by the receptor associated protein, a known ligand for members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. Preincubation with heparin decreased the receptor binding of apolipoprotein A-V, indicating that overlap exists between the recognition sites for these receptors and for heparin. A double mutant...

  11. The ppm operon is essential for acylation and glycosylation of lipoproteins in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Mohiman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to their contribution to bacterial virulence, lipoproteins and members of the lipoprotein biogenesis pathway represent potent drug targets. Following translocation across the inner membrane, lipoprotein precursors are acylated by lipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt, cleaved off their signal peptides by lipoprotein signal peptidase (Lsp and, in Gram-negative bacteria, further triacylated by lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt. The existence of an active apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase (Ms-Ppm2 involved in the N-acylation of LppX was recently reported in M. smegmatis. Ms-Ppm2 is part of the ppm operon in which Ppm1, a polyprenol-monophosphomannose synthase, has been shown to be essential in lipoglycans synthesis but whose function in lipoprotein biosynthesis is completely unknown. RESULTS: In order to clarify the role of the ppm operon in lipoprotein biosynthesis, we investigated the post-translational modifications of two model lipoproteins (AmyE and LppX in C. glutamicum Δppm1 and Δppm2 mutants. Our results show that both proteins are anchored into the membrane and that their N-termini are N-acylated by Cg-Ppm2. The acylated N-terminal peptide of LppX was also found to be modified by hexose moieties. This O-glycosylation is localized in the N-terminal peptide of LppX and disappeared in the Δppm1 mutant. While compromised in the absence of Cg-Ppm2, LppX O-glycosylation could be restored when Cg-Ppm1, Cg-Ppm2 or the homologous Mt-Ppm1 of M. tuberculosis was overexpressed. CONCLUSION: Together, these results show for the first time that Cg-Ppm1 (Ppm synthase and Cg-Ppm2 (Lnt operate in a common biosynthetic pathway in which lipoprotein N-acylation and glycosylation are tightly coupled.

  12. Identification and Localization of Myxococcus xanthus Porins and Lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Swapna; Zhu, Xiang; Patel, Ricky P.; Orlando, Ron; Shimkets, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus DK1622 contains inner (IM) and outer membranes (OM) separated by a peptidoglycan layer. Integral membrane, β-barrel proteins are found exclusively in the OM where they form pores allowing the passage of nutrients, waste products and signals. One porin, Oar, is required for intercellular communication of the C-signal. An oar mutant produces CsgA but is unable to ripple or stimulate csgA mutants to develop suggesting that it is the channel for C-signaling. Six prediction programs were evaluated for their ability to identify β-barrel proteins. No program was reliable unless the predicted proteins were first parsed using Signal P, Lipo P and TMHMM, after which TMBETA-SVM and TMBETADISC-RBF identified β-barrel proteins most accurately. 228 β-barrel proteins were predicted from among 7331 protein coding regions, representing 3.1% of total genes. Sucrose density gradients were used to separate vegetative cell IM and OM fractions, and LC-MS/MS of OM proteins identified 54 β-barrel proteins. Another class of membrane proteins, the lipoproteins, are anchored in the membrane via a lipid moiety at the N-terminus. 44 OM proteins identified by LC-MS/MS were predicted lipoproteins. Lipoproteins are distributed between the IM, OM and ECM according to an N-terminal sorting sequence that varies among species. Sequence analysis revealed conservation of alanine at the +7 position of mature ECM lipoproteins, lysine at the +2 position of IM lipoproteins, and no noticable conservation within the OM lipoproteins. Site directed mutagenesis and immuno transmission electron microscopy showed that alanine at the +7 position is essential for sorting of the lipoprotein FibA into the ECM. FibA appears at normal levels in the ECM even when a +2 lysine is added to the signal sequence. These results suggest that ECM proteins have a unique method of secretion. It is now possible to target lipoproteins to specific IM, OM and ECM locations by manipulating the amino acid

  13. Synthetic Lipoproteins as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lipoprotein is an effective carrier of targeted delivery for drugs. It has the very small size, good biocompatibility, suitable half-life, and specific lipoprotein receptorbinding capacity. Compared with the traditional natural lipoprotein, synthetic lipoprotein not only retains the original biological characteristics and functions, but also exhibits the excellent characteristics in drug delivery. Herein, the advantages, development, applications, and prospect of synthetic lipoproteins as drug carriers were summarized.

  14. Floral and Seed Variability Patterns among Ethiopian Mustard (B. carinata A. Braun of East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeniji, OT.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In East Africa, Ethiopian mustard (Brassica carinata A. Braun is cultivated primarily for its leaves, but in Ethiopia preference is high for oil in the seed. Dual purpose importance of the seeds for planting and for oil suggests the need to improve seed production efficiency through understanding variation pattern for floral morphology and seed characters. We investigated genetic diversity and correlations for floral and seed characteristics among 14 accessions of Ethiopian mustard to improve seed set and yield. Field trials were conducted during 2008 and 2009; flowers were examined for short stamen height, long stamen height, pistil height, and silliqua for seed weight, seeds/silliqua and silliqua/plant. Results were largely consistent between years, indicating that the variation measured was mainly controlled by genetic factors. High genetic variation for seed characters and reproductive phenology among the accessions was noted. The number of days to appearance of flowers showed high discriminatory ability among the accessions. A wide continuous variation was observed among accessions for anther-stigma separation. Accessions 1, 3 and 14 were identified as early flowering. A significant and positive correlation coefficient between short stamen height and seed weight indicated a substantial complementation among these characters for seed yield improvement. The short stamen height is a good indicator for selection in favour of seed commercialization and indices for selection of pollen parent for seed yield improvement. Accessions 5, 7, 14, 16 and 22 are best for multiple characters and are recommended for seed production for any of the seasons in Arusha, Tanzania.

  15. Agronomic performance for biodiesel production potential of Brassica carinata A. Braun in Mediterranean marginal areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Montemurro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Brassicaceae are promising oil feedstock for cultivation in centralsouthern Italy. Therefore, a two-year investigation on Brassica carinata A. Braun (cv. CT 204 was carried out in three sites of Apulia region [Site 1, Alberobello - Murgia foreland; Site 2, Troia (Foggia - Daunian sub-Apennines; Site 3, Monteroni (Lecce - Area of Salento], and in one site of Basilicata region (Site 4, Hill of Matera. The aim was to identify site-specific management practices [by comparing minimum vs conventional tillage, low sowing density vs high sowing density; different levels of nitrogen (N supply and organic fertilisers] in the four different marginal areas, to achieve optimum yield performance for biodiesel prospective production. The crop showed a good adaptability in the study sites, and the highest N level positively influenced the yield performance in Sites 1, 2 and 3. Moreover, the reduction of mechanical operations (minimum tillage did not negatively influence crop production and seed oil content. The highest density of sowing tested determined the best crop performance in Site 3, particularly showing the maximum seed oil content with the lowest N supply. Finally, in Site 4 the compost mixed with mineral N fertiliser as well as the sewage sludge from urban wastewater determined productive results comparable to those obtained with mineral fertiliser, evidencing that organic fertilisers could (partially or completely substitute the mineral one for this crop in the study site. On the whole, seed yield and oil content showed a potential for biodiesel production of Brassica carinata cultivated with site-specific agronomic techniques in four different marginal areas of Southern Italy, suggesting it can be likely achieved the crop environmental adaptation.

  16. What are lipoproteins doing in the brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Eckel, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins in plasma transport lipids between tissues, however, only high-density lipoproteins (HDL) appear to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB); thus, lipoproteins found in the brain must be produced within the central nervous system. Apolipoproteins E (ApoE) and ApoJ are the most abundant apolipoproteins in the brain, are mostly synthesized by astrocytes, and are found on HDL. In the hippocampus and other brain regions, lipoproteins help to regulate neurobehavioral functions by processes that are lipoprotein receptor-mediated. Moreover, lipoproteins and their receptors also have roles in the regulation of body weight and energy balance, acting through lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (LRP). Thus, understanding lipoproteins and their metabolism in the brain provides a new opportunity with potential therapeutic relevance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transendothelial lipoprotein exchange and microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan Skov; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Jensen, Kurt Svarre

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Microalbuminuria associates with increased risk of atherosclerosis in individuals without diabetes. We hypothesized that transendothelial lipoprotein exchange is elevated among such individuals, possibly explaining increased intimal lipoprotein accumulation and thus atherosclerosis....... METHODS: Using an in vivo isotope technique, transendothelial exchange of low density lipoprotein (LDL) was measured in 77 non-diabetic individuals. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-h fractional escape rate was calculated as index of transendothelial exchange. RESULTS......: There was no difference in transendothelial LDL exchange between subjects with microalbuminuria versus normoalbuminuria (mean (95% confidence interval) 3.8%/h (3.3-4.3%/h) versus 4.2%/h (3.7-4.7%/h); P=0.33). In contrast, there was a positive correlation between transendothelial LDL exchange and (logarithmically...

  18. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, W Henry [Danville, CA; Krauss, Ronald M [Berkeley, CA; Blanche, Patricia J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-17

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  19. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  20. Classifying lipoproteins based on their polar profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Uversky, Vladimir N; Amkie, Rafael Zonana

    2016-01-01

    The lipoproteins are an important group of cargo proteins known for their unique capability to transport lipids. By applying the Polarity index algorithm, which has a metric that only considers the polar profile of the linear sequences of the lipoprotein group, we obtained an analytical and structural differentiation of all the lipoproteins found in UniProt Database. Also, the functional groups of lipoproteins, and particularly of the set of lipoproteins relevant to atherosclerosis, were analyzed with the same method to reveal their structural preference, and the results of Polarity index analysis were verified by an alternate test, the Cumulative Distribution Function algorithm, applied to the same groups of lipoproteins.

  1. Single-Particle Tracking of Human Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Messieres, Michel; Ng, Abby; Duarte, Cornelio J; Remaley, Alan T; Lee, Jennifer C

    2016-01-05

    Lipoproteins, such as high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL), play a critical role in heart disease. Lipoproteins vary in size and shape as well as in their apolipoprotein content. Here, we developed a new experimental framework to study freely diffusing lipoproteins from human blood, allowing analysis of even the smallest HDL with a radius of 5 nm. In an easily constructed confinement chamber, individual HDL, LDL, and VLDL particles labeled with three distinct fluorophores were simultaneously tracked by wide-field fluorescence microscopy and their sizes were determined by their motion. This technique enables studies of individual lipoproteins in solution and allows characterization of the heterogeneous properties of lipoproteins which affect their biological function but are difficult to discern in bulk studies.

  2. New horizons for lipoprotein receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Olav M.; Dagil, Robert; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2013-01-01

    The lipoprotein receptor (LR) family constitutes a large group of structurally closely related receptors with broad ligand-binding specificity. Traditionally, ligand binding to LRs has been anticipated to involve merely the complement type repeat (CR)-domains omnipresent in the family. Recently...

  3. Lipoprotein(a): the revenant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gencer, Baris; Kronenberg, Florian; Stroes, Erik S.; Mach, François

    2017-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, the days of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] were numbered and many people would not have placed a bet on this lipid particle making it to the next century. However, genetic studies brought Lp(a) back to the front-stage after a Mendelian randomization approach used for the first time

  4. Butter, margarine and serum lipoproteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids unfavorably affects blood lipoproteins. As margarines are a major source of trans, claims for the advantages of margarines over butter need to be scrutinized. Here we review dietary trials that directly compared the effects of butter and margarine on blood lipids. We

  5. Spiralin, a mycoplasmal membrane lipoprotein, induces T-cell-independent B-cell blastogenesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, C; Wróblewski, H; Le Henaff, M; Montagnier, L; Blanchard, A

    1997-10-01

    Mycoplasmas are bacteria which can cause respiratory, arthritic, and urogenital diseases. During the early phase of infection, mycoplasmas usually induce an inflammatory response and a humoral response preferentially directed against their membrane-bound, surface-exposed lipoproteins. In this report, we describe the effects on immune cells of spiralin, a well-characterized mycoplasmal lipoprotein. Purified spiralin stimulated the in vitro proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and murine splenocytes. The stimulation pathway was probably different from that followed by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide because the effect of spiralin was not abolished by polymyxin B. Comparison of the effects of whole, native spiralin with those induced by proteinase K-digested spiralin or by the C-terminal half of spiralin (peptide p[13.5]T) revealed that the first half of the protein, which contains the lipoylated N terminus, is responsible for the mitogenic activity. In contrast to whole spiralin, proteinase K-digested spiralin did not trigger murine B-cell differentiation and immunoglobulin G and M secretion. Stimulation of human or murine immune cells led to early secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (human tumor necrosis factor alpha and murine interleukin 1 or 6). Spiralin induced the T-cell-independent blastogenesis of murine B cells but did not stimulate T cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that spiralin possesses potent immunostimulating activity, similar to that reported for lipoproteins of pathogenic gracilicutes (gram-negative eubacteria; e.g., Borrelia burgdorferi OspA and E. coli Braun lipoprotein), and are consistent with the fact that lipoproteins are major antigens during mycoplasma infections.

  6. Revisiting the gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    The processing of lipoproteins (lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered to be an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein n-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted...

  7. Clearance of mutant huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, He; Li, Shihua

    2010-07-01

    Mutant huntingtin (htt) carries an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat (> 36 glutamines) in its N-terminal region, which leads htt to become misfolded and kill neuronal cells in Huntington disease (HD). The cytotoxicity of N-terminal mutant htt fragments is evident by severe neurological phenotypes of transgenic mice that express these htt fragments. Clearance of mutant htt is primarily mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasomal sysmtem (UPS) and autophagy. However, the relative efficiency of these two systems to remove toxic forms of mutant htt has not been rigorously compared. Using cellular and mouse models of HD, we found that inhibiting the UPS leads to a greater accumulation of mutant htt than inhibiting autophagy. Moreover, N-terminal mutant htt fragments, but not full-length mutant htt, accumulate in the HD mouse brains after inhibiting the UPS. These findings suggest that the UPS is more efficient than autophagy to remove N-terminal mutant htt.

  8. Lipoprotein(a) and dietary proteins: casein lowers lipoprotein(a) concentrations as compared with soy protein1-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilausen, Karin Johanne; Meinertz, H.

    1999-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a), plasma lipoproteins, dietary proteins, soy protein, casein, liquid-formula, coronary artery disease, men, Denmark......Lipoprotein(a), plasma lipoproteins, dietary proteins, soy protein, casein, liquid-formula, coronary artery disease, men, Denmark...

  9. Effects of hormones on lipids and lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.

    1991-12-01

    Levels of plasma lipids and lipoproteins are strong predictors for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. In women, as in men, numerous factors contribute to variations in plasma lipoproteins that may affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include age, dietary components, adiposity, genetic traits, and hormonal changes. Each of these factors may operate to varying degrees in determining changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles accompanying menopause- Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested increases in levels of cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins associated with menopause. High density lipoproteins (HDL), which are higher in women than men and are thought to contribute to relative protection of premenopausal women from cardiovascular disease, remain relatively constant in the years following menopause, although small, and perhaps transient reductions in the HDL{sub 2} subfraction have been reported in relation to reduced estradiol level following menopause. Despite these associations, it has been difficult to determine the role of endogenous hormones in influencing the plasma lipoproteins of postmenopausal women. In principle, the effects of hormone replacement should act to reverse any alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that are due to postmenopausal hormone changes. While there may be beneficial effects on lipoproteins, hormone treatment does not restore a premenopausal lipoprotein profile. Furthermore, it is not dear to what extent exogenous hormone-induced lipoprotein changes contribute to the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy.

  10. Postprandial Hyperlipidemia and Remnant Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Daisaku; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2017-02-01

    Fasting hypertriglyceridemia is positively associated with the morbidity of coronary heart disease (CHD), and postprandial (non-fasting) hypertriglyceridemia is also correlated with the risk status for CHD, which is related to the increase in chylomicron (CM) remnant lipoproteins produced from the intestine. CM remnant particles, as well as oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants, are highly atherogenic and act by enhancing systemic inflammation, platelet activation, coagulation, thrombus formation, and macrophage foam cell formation. The cholesterol levels of remnant lipoproteins significantly correlate with small, dense LDL; impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and CHD prevalence. We have developed an assay of apolipoprotein (apo)B-48 levels to evaluate the accumulation of CM remnants. Fasting apoB-48 levels correlate with the morbidity of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, type III hyperlipoproteinemia, the metabolic syndrome, hypothyroidism, chronic kidney disease, and IGT. Fasting apoB-48 levels also correlate with carotid intima-media thickening and CHD prevalence, and a high apoB-48 level is a significant predictor of CHD risk, independent of the fasting TG level. Diet interventions, such as dietary fibers, polyphenols, medium-chain fatty acids, diacylglycerol, and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ameliorate postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, moreover, drugs for dyslipidemia (n-3 PUFA, statins, fibrates or ezetimibe) and diabetes concerning incretins (dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitor or glucagon like peptide-1 analogue) may improve postprandial hypertriglyceridemia. Since the accumulation of CM remnants correlates to impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and atherosclerotic cardiovascular events, further studies are required to investigate the characteristics, physiological activities, and functions of CM remnants for the development of new interventions to reduce atherogenicity.

  11. Lipoprotein (a: Structure, Pathophysiology and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Cavalcante Maranhão

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemical structure of lipoprotein (a is similar to that of LDL, from which it differs due to the presence of apolipoprotein (a bound to apo B100 via one disulfide bridge. Lipoprotein (a is synthesized in the liver and its plasma concentration, which can be determined by use of monoclonal antibody-based methods, ranges from 1,000 mg/dL. Lipoprotein (a levels over 20-30 mg/dL are associated with a two-fold risk of developing coronary artery disease. Usually, black subjects have higher lipoprotein (a levels that, differently from Caucasians and Orientals, are not related to coronary artery disease. However, the risk of black subjects must be considered. Sex and age have little influence on lipoprotein (a levels. Lipoprotein (a homology with plasminogen might lead to interference with the fibrinolytic cascade, accounting for an atherogenic mechanism of that lipoprotein. Nevertheless, direct deposition of lipoprotein (a on arterial wall is also a possible mechanism, lipoprotein (a being more prone to oxidation than LDL. Most prospective studies have confirmed lipoprotein (a as a predisposing factor to atherosclerosis. Statin treatment does not lower lipoprotein (a levels, differently from niacin and ezetimibe, which tend to reduce lipoprotein (a, although confirmation of ezetimibe effects is pending. The reduction in lipoprotein (a concentrations has not been demonstrated to reduce the risk for coronary artery disease. Whenever higher lipoprotein (a concentrations are found, and in the absence of more effective and well-tolerated drugs, a more strict and vigorous control of the other coronary artery disease risk factors should be sought.

  12. Lgt processing is an essential step in Streptococcus suis lipoprotein mediated innate immune activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Wichgers Schreur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus suis causes invasive infections in pigs and occasionally in humans. The host innate immune system plays a major role in counteracting S. suis infections. The main components of S. suis able to activate the innate immune system likely include cell wall constituents that may be released during growth or after cell wall integrity loss, however characterization of these components is still limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: [corrected] A concentrated very potent innate immunity activating supernatant of penicillin-treated S. suis was SDS-PAGE fractionated and tested for porcine peripheral blood mononucleated cell (PBMC stimulating activity using cytokine gene transcript analysis. More than half of the 24 tested fractions increased IL-1β and IL-8 cytokine gene transcript levels in porcine PBMCs. Mass spectrometry of the active fractions indicated 24 proteins including 9 lipoproteins. Genetic inactivation of a putative prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt gene resulted in deficient lipoprotein synthesis as evidenced by palmitate labeling. The Lgt mutant showed strongly reduced activation of porcine PBMCs, indicating that lipoproteins are dominant porcine PBMC activating molecules of S. suis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study for the first time identifies and characterizes lipoproteins of S. suis as major activators of the innate immune system of the pig. In addition, we provide evidence that Lgt processing of lipoproteins is required for lipoprotein mediated innate immune activation.

  13. A vegetation survey of the Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve. I. The use of association-analysis and Braun-Blanquet methods*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Taylor

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The survey aimed to establish broad vegetation units that could be mapped on an extensive scale in the Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve at the southern tip of the Cape Peninsula. This paper compares the performance of two methods, association-analysis and the Braun-Blanquet method as developed by the Zurich-Montpellier School of Phytosociology. One hundred 50 m2  sample plots, covering the whole Reserve, were placed systematically at grid intersections on the 1:18 000 topographical map. at 1 000-yard (914 m intervals. Species lists, recording merely presence of all species with permanently recognizable aerial parts, were made for each plot. The association-analysis resulted in a classification of 23 final groups of sample plots, of which only five groups showed high floristic and ecological homogeneity. Of the remainder, eight groups contained some anomalous, misplaced plots, and ten represented small, isolated fragments of natural units. The original data were then analysed using Braun-Blanquet methods to provide an independent classification for comparison with the former. The Braun-Blanquet communities were found to be more homogeneous in terms of previously defined habitat groupings and showed floristic relationships consistent with these groupings. It is concluded that, with the type of sampling used, the synthetic phytosociological Braun-Blanquet method provides a more natural classification of plant communities of the Reserve than does the monothetic divisive association-analysis method.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldol...

  15. Streptococcus gordonii lipoproteins induce IL-8 in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A Reum; Ahn, Ki Bum; Kim, Hyun Young; Seo, Ho Seong; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-11-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, a Gram-positive oral bacterium, is a life-threatening pathogen that causes infective endocarditis. It is frequently isolated from the periapical lesions of patients with apical periodontitis and has thus been implicated in inflammatory responses. However, little is known about the virulence factors of S. gordonii responsible for the induction of inflammatory responses in the periapical areas. Here, we investigated the role of S. gordonii cell wall-associated virulence factors on interleukin (IL)-8 induction in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells using ethanol-inactivated wild-type S. gordonii, a lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-deficient mutant (ΔltaS), and a lipoprotein-deficient mutant (Δlgt). Wild-type S. gordonii induced IL-8 expression at both the protein and mRNA levels in human PDL cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. A transient transfection and reporter gene assay demonstrated that wild-type S. gordonii activated Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Additionally, IL-8 production induced by wild-type S. gordonii was substantially inhibited by anti-TLR2-neutralizing antibodies. Both wild-type S. gordonii and the ΔltaS mutant induced IL-8 production; however, this response was not observed when cells were stimulated with the Δlgt mutant. Interestingly, lipoproteins purified from S. gordonii induced IL-8 production, whereas purified LTA did not. In addition, purified lipoproteins stimulated TLR2 more potently than LTA. Furthermore, S. gordonii-induced IL-8 expression was specifically inhibited by blocking p38 kinase, while lipoprotein-induced IL-8 expression was inhibited by blocking p38 kinase, ERK, or JNK. Of particular note, exogenous addition of purified S. gordonii lipoproteins enhanced Δlgt-induced IL-8 production in human PDL cells to an extent similar to that induced by the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoproteins are an important component of S. gordonii for the induction of IL-8 production in human

  16. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Kersten

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs. Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels.

  17. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël B van Schalkwijk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to investigate whether lipoprotein metabolism indicators can improve cardiovascular risk prediction and therapy management. METHODS AND RESULTS: We calculated lipoprotein metabolism indicators for 1981 subjects (145 cases, 1836 controls from the Framingham Heart Study offspring cohort in which NMR lipoprotein profiles were measured. We applied a statistical learning algorithm using a support vector machine to select conventional risk factors and lipoprotein metabolism indicators that contributed to predicting risk for general cardiovascular disease. Risk prediction was quantified by the change in the Area-Under-the-ROC-Curve (ΔAUC and by risk reclassification (Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI and Integrated Discrimination Improvement (IDI. Two VLDL lipoprotein metabolism indicators (VLDLE and VLDLH improved cardiovascular risk prediction. We added these indicators to a multivariate model with the best performing conventional risk markers. Our method significantly improved both CVD prediction and risk reclassification. CONCLUSIONS: Two calculated VLDL metabolism indicators significantly improved cardiovascular risk prediction. These indicators may help to reduce prescription of unnecessary cholesterol-lowering medication, reducing costs and possible side-effects. For clinical application, further validation is required.

  18. The iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Jessica R; Heinrichs, David E

    2012-01-01

    Lipoproteins fulfill diverse roles in antibiotic resistance, adhesion, protein secretion, signaling and sensing, and many also serve as the substrate binding protein (SBP) partner to ABC transporters for the acquisition of a diverse array of nutrients including peptides, sugars, and scarcely abundant metals. In the staphylococci, the iron-regulated SBPs are significantly upregulated during iron starvation and function to sequester and deliver iron into the bacterial cell, enabling staphylococci to circumvent iron restriction imposed by the host environment. Accordingly, this subset of lipoproteins has been implicated in staphylococcal pathogenesis and virulence. Lipoproteins also activate the host innate immune response, triggered through Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) and, notably, the iron-regulated subset of lipoproteins are particularly immunogenic. In this review, we discuss the iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins with regard to their biogenesis, substrate specificity, and impact on the host innate immune response.

  19. Effects of deletion of the Streptococcus pneumoniae lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase gene lgt on ABC transporter function and on growth in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneeta Chimalapati

    Full Text Available Lipoproteins are an important class of surface associated proteins that have diverse roles and frequently are involved in the virulence of bacterial pathogens. As prolipoproteins are attached to the cell membrane by a single enzyme, prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt, deletion of the corresponding gene potentially allows the characterisation of the overall importance of lipoproteins for specific bacterial functions. We have used a Δlgt mutant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to investigate the effects of loss of lipoprotein attachment on cation acquisition, growth in media containing specific carbon sources, and virulence in different infection models. Immunoblots of triton X-114 extracts, flow cytometry and immuno-fluorescence microscopy confirmed the Δlgt mutant had markedly reduced lipoprotein expression on the cell surface. The Δlgt mutant had reduced growth in cation depleted medium, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, reduced zinc uptake, and reduced intracellular levels of several cations. Doubling time of the Δlgt mutant was also increased slightly when grown in medium with glucose, raffinose and maltotriose as sole carbon sources. These multiple defects in cation and sugar ABC transporter function for the Δlgt mutant were associated with only slightly delayed growth in complete medium. However the Δlgt mutant had significantly reduced growth in blood or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and a marked impairment in virulence in mouse models of nasopharyngeal colonisation, sepsis and pneumonia. These data suggest that for S. pneumoniae loss of surface localisation of lipoproteins has widespread effects on ABC transporter functions that collectively prevent the Δlgt mutant from establishing invasive infection.

  20. The majority of lipoprotein lipase in plasma is bound to remnant lipoproteins: A new definition of remnant lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Miyashita, Kazuya; Imamura, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Junji; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J; Machida, Tetsuo; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Masami; Schaefer, Ernst; Nakajima, Katsuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a multifunctional protein and a key enzyme involved in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. We determined the lipoproteins to which LPL is bound in the pre-heparin and post-heparin plasma. Tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), a potent inhibitor of serine lipases, was used to block the lipolytic activity of LPL, thereby preventing changes in the plasma lipoproteins due to ex vivo lipolysis. Gel filtration was performed to obtain the LPL elution profiles in plasma and the isolated remnant lipoproteins (RLP). When ex vivo lipolytic activity was inhibited by THL in the post-heparin plasma, majority of the LPL was found in the VLDL elution range, specifically in the RLP as inactive dimers. However, in the absence of THL, most of the LPL was found in the HDL elution range as active dimers. Furthermore, majority of the LPL in the pre-heparin plasma was found in the RLP as inactive form, with broadly diffused lipoprotein profiles in the presence and absence of THL. It is suggested that during lipolysis in vivo, the endothelial bound LPL dimers generates RLP, forming circulating RLP-LPL complexes in an inactive form that subsequently binds and initiates receptor-mediated catabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  2. Functional characterization of a lipoprotein-encoding operon in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Oakland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial lipoproteins have important functions in bacterial pathogenesis and physiology. In Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, the majority of lipoproteins have not been functionally characterized. Previously, we showed by DNA microarray that CmeR, a transcriptional regulator repressing the expression of the multidrug efflux pump CmeABC, modulates the expression of a three-gene operon (cj0089, cj0090, and cj0091 encoding a cluster of lipoproteins in C. jejuni. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we characterized the function and regulation of the cj0089-cj0090-cj0091 operon. In contrast to the repression of cmeABC, CmeR activates the expression of the lipoprotein genes and the regulation is confirmed by immunoblotting using anti-Cj0089 and anti-Cj0091 antibodies. Gel mobility shift assay showed that CmeR directly binds to the promoter of the lipoprotein operon, but the binding is much weaker compared with the promoter of cmeABC. Analysis of different cellular fractions indicated that Cj0089 was associated with the inner membrane, while Cj0091 was located on the outer membrane. Inactivation of cj0091, but not cj0089, significantly reduced the adherence of C. jejuni to INT 407 cells in vitro, indicating that Cj0091 has a function in adherence. When inoculated into chickens, the Cj0091 mutant also showed a defect in early colonization of the intestinal tract, suggesting that Cj0091 contributes to Campylobacter colonization in vivo. It was also shown that Cj0091 was produced and immunogenic in chickens that were naturally infected by C. jejuni. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that the lipoprotein operon is subject to direct regulation by CmeR and that Cj0091 functions as an adhesion mechanism in C. jejuni and contributes to Campylobacter colonization of the intestinal tract in animal hosts.

  3. Structural differences between wild-type and fish eye disease mutant of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Yana; Tchedre, Kissaou T; Nair, Maya P; Pritchard, P Haydn; Lacko, Andras G

    2006-08-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to investigate the conformational changes that occur upon binding of wild type (WT) and mutant (Thr123Ile) lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) to the potential substrates (dioleoyl-phosphatidyl choline [DOPC] and high density lipoprotein [HDL]). For a detailed analysis of structural differences between WT and mutant LCAT, we performed decompositional analysis of a set of tryptophan fluorescence spectra, measured at increasing concentrations of external quenchers (acrylamide and KI). The data obtained show that Thr123Ile mutation in LCAT leads to a conformation that is likely to be more rigid (less mobile/flexible) than that of the WT protein with a redistribution of charged residues around exposed tryptophan fluorophores. We propose that the redistribution of charged residues in mutant LCAT may be a major factor responsible for the dramatically reduced activity of the enzyme with HDL and reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL).

  4. Roles of the protruding loop of factor B essential for the localization of lipoproteins (LolB) in the anchoring of bacterial triacylated proteins to the outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-04-11

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed.

  5. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance...... of such genetic determinants with cardiovascular disease risk will either favor or disfavor that these lipoproteins are causally related to cardiovascular disease....

  6. Lipoproteins of slow-growing Mycobacteria carry three fatty acids and are N-acylated by apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase BCG_2070c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brülle, Juliane K; Tschumi, Andreas; Sander, Peter

    2013-10-05

    Lipoproteins are virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial lipoproteins are modified by the consecutive action of preprolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt), prolipoprotein signal peptidase (LspA) and apolipoprotein N- acyltransferase (Lnt) leading to the formation of mature triacylated lipoproteins. Lnt homologues are found in Gram-negative and high GC-rich Gram-positive, but not in low GC-rich Gram-positive bacteria, although N-acylation is observed. In fast-growing Mycobacterium smegmatis, the molecular structure of the lipid modification of lipoproteins was resolved recently as a diacylglyceryl residue carrying ester-bound palmitic acid and ester-bound tuberculostearic acid and an additional amide-bound palmitic acid. We exploit the vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG as model organism to investigate lipoprotein modifications in slow-growing mycobacteria. Using Escherichia coli Lnt as a query in BLASTp search, we identified BCG_2070c and BCG_2279c as putative lnt genes in M. bovis BCG. Lipoproteins LprF, LpqH, LpqL and LppX were expressed in M. bovis BCG and BCG_2070c lnt knock-out mutant and lipid modifications were analyzed at molecular level by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight analysis. Lipoprotein N-acylation was observed in wildtype but not in BCG_2070c mutants. Lipoprotein N- acylation with palmitoyl and tuberculostearyl residues was observed. Lipoproteins are triacylated in slow-growing mycobacteria. BCG_2070c encodes a functional Lnt in M. bovis BCG. We identified mycobacteria-specific tuberculostearic acid as further substrate for N-acylation in slow-growing mycobacteria.

  7. Resultados neonatais no parto vaginal espontâneo comparados aos dos partos com fórcipe de Simpson-Braun em primíparas Neonatal outcome of spontaneous deliveries as compared to Simpson-Braun forceps deliveries in nulliparous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmiro Gonçalves Pereira

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar os resultados neonatais dos partos vaginais espontâneos ou assistidos com fórcipe de Simpson-Braun em nulíparas. MÉTODO: em estudo de corte retrospectivo foram avaliados dois grupos de primíparas atendidas no Centro Obstétrico do CAISM/UNICAMP, que tiveram parto vaginal sob analgesia epidural. O grupo fórcipe foi formado por 119 pacientes que tiveram parto a fórcipe de Simpson-Braun, e o grupo normal por 114 casos de parto vaginal espontâneo. Foram estudadas as variáveis neonatais imediatas como o estado do líquido amniótico e os índices de Apgar, assim como a evolução neonatal nos primeiros dias de vida. Para análise estatística foram utilizados os testes c², exato de Fisher e t de Student para comparação de médias e considerada significativa a diferença correspondente a pPURPOSE: to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes between spontaneous vaginal and Simpson-Braun forceps deliveries in nulliparous women. METHOD: a retrospective study including two groups of nulliparous women, who had vaginal delivery under peridural anesthesia in the obstetric unit of the CAISM-UNICAMP: the forceps group included 119 women who had Simpson-Braun forceps delivery, and the normal group included 114 women who delivered spontaneously. Neonatal outcomes, such as Apgar score and the evolution in the first days of life, were studied. Data were compared in both groups and, for statistical analysis, c² test, Fisher exact, and Student t tests were used. The differences were considered significant when p<0.05. RESULTS: the indications for Simpson-Braun forceps delivery were maternal-fetal relief (90 cases and abbreviation of the expulsive period (29 cases. In the forceps group there were 8 cases (6.7% of vaginal injuries; a similar result was observed in the normal group. The number of hospitalization days for the parturient and the newborns was identical, 2.4 days. The newborns in the two groups had similar Apgar scores

  8. Lipoprotein profile, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and cardiovascular risk in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolla, Roberta; De Mauri, Andreana; Valsesia, Ambra; Vidali, Matteo; Chiarinotti, Doriana; Bellomo, Giorgio

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients; the increased risk of cardiovascular disease is due to accelerated atherosclerosis, inflammation and impaired lipoprotein metabolism. We aimed to evaluate lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) and some pro-inflammatory aspects of the lipoprotein profile in dialyzed patients in order to evaluate the relationship with the accelerated atherosclerosis and vascular accidents. In 102 dialysis patients and 40 non-uremic controls, we investigated the lipoprotein plasma profile, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), ceruloplasmin and serum amyloid A protein (SAA), and followed patients for 1 year to analyze the risk of acute cardiovascular events. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein plasma levels were significantly lower in uremic patients than controls, whereas CRP, SAA, ceruloplasmin, Lp-PLA2 and their ratio with apolipoprotein A1 were significantly higher. Patients with Lp-PLA2 levels >194 nmol/min/ml had more acute cardiovascular events than patients with lower values. Our results show that in dialysis subjects: (1) low-density lipoproteins show a more atherogenic phenotype than in the general population; (2) high-density lipoproteins are less anti-inflammatory; (3) Lp-PLA2 could potentially be used to evaluate cardiovascular risk.

  9. Current situation of lipoprotein apheresis in Saxony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julius, U; Taseva, K; Fischer, S; Passauer, J; Bornstein, S R

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the situation pertinent to treatment via lipoprotein apheresis in the federal state of Saxony, Germany in 2010. In total, 119 predominately male patients were treated in 10 centers; the majority of the patients was older than the mean age of the general population. Several risk factors were present, particularly a familial predisposition and hypertension. All patients had experienced cardiovascular events and the majority was taking statins. Patient data from the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus in Dresden concurred with data derived from patients treated at nephrological practices. In the mean, patients attended the centers for about 6 years, the majority weekly. LDL cholesterol concentrations prior to apheresis were clearly higher than target levels; apheresis sessions decreased LDL cholesterol by 69%. Lipoprotein(a) levels could be measured in 75 patients and were effectively reduced by lipoprotein apheresis. In Saxony, 29 patients per 1 million inhabitants received lipoprotein apheresis, which is higher than the proportion of patients treated in Germany as a whole. The need for this extracorporeal treatment seems to be much greater than its current utilization. Among the patients only one homozygous patient with familial hypercholesterolemia was observed. Physicians should be actively informed about this therapeutic possibility to reduce the cardiovascular risk efficiently. The introduction of new drugs may alter the position of lipoprotein apheresis within the therapeutic spectrum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Low density lipoprotein receptor internalizes low density and very low density lipoproteins that are bound to heparan sulfate proteoglycans via lipoprotein lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.; Lombardi, P.; Jansen, H.; Berkel, T.J.C. van; Frants, R.R.; Havekes, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    It has previously been shown that lipoprotein lipase (LPL) enhances the binding of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) to HepG2 cells and fibroblasts, up to 80-fold. This increase in binding is LDL receptor-independent and is due to a bridging of LPL between

  11. A Phospholipidomic Analysis of All Defined Human Plasma Lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Monireh; Kulik, Willem; Hoek, Frans; Veerman, Enno C.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Since plasma lipoproteins contain both protein and phospholipid components, either may be involved in processes such as atherosclerosis. In this study the identification of plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipids, which is essential for understanding these processes at the molecular level, are performed. LC-ESI/MS, LC-ESI-MS/MS and High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) analysis of different lipoprotein fractions collected from pooled plasma revealed the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and sphingomyeline (SM) only on lipoproteins and phosphatidylcholine (PC), Lyso-PC on both lipoproteins and plasma lipoprotein free fraction (PLFF). Cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and Phosphatidylserine (PS) were observed neither in the lipoprotein fractions nor in PLFF. All three approaches led to the same results regarding phospholipids occurrence in plasma lipoproteins and PLFF. A high abundancy of PE and SM was observed in VLDL and LDL fractions respectively. This study provides for the first time the knowledge about the phospholipid composition of all defined plasma lipoproteins. PMID:22355656

  12. Selective association of outer surface lipoproteins with the lipid rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T; Coleman, James L; LaRocca, Timothy J; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L

    2014-03-11

    Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ospA, ospB, and ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism's adaptation to changing environments. IMPORTANCE Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich clusters within the membranes of cells. Lipid rafts contain proteins that have functions in sensing the cell environment and transmitting signals. Although selective proteins are present in

  13. Morphological mutants of garlic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, A.D.; Dnyansagar, V.R. (Nagpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Botany)

    1982-01-01

    Cloves of garlic (Allium sativuum Linn.) were exposed to gamma rays with various doses and different concentrations of ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (dES) and ethylene imine (EI). In the second and third generations, 16 types of morphological mutants were recorded with varied frequencies. Of all the mutagens used, gamma rays were found to be the most effective in inducing the maximum number of mutations followed EI, EMS and dES in that order.

  14. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Beyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  15. Analysis of individual lipoproteins and liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, D.L.; Keller, R.A.; Nolan, J.P. [and others

    1997-08-01

    We describe the application of single molecule detection (SMD) technologies for the analysis of natural (serum lipoproteins) and synthetic (liposomes) transport systems. The need for advanced analytical procedures of these complex and important systems is presented with the specific enhancements afforded by SMD with flowing sample streams. In contrast to bulk measurements which yield only average values, measurement of individual species allows creation of population histograms from heterogeneous samples. The data are acquired in minutes and the analysis requires relatively small sample quantities. Preliminary data are presented from the analysis of low density lipoprotein, and multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles.

  16. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance of such gene......To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance...

  17. Staphylococcus aureus induces IL-8 expression through its lipoproteins in the human intestinal epithelial cell, Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok-Seong; Noh, Su Young; Park, Ok-Jin; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause the intestinal inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of S. aureus infection in the intestine. In the present study, we investigated whether S. aureus could stimulate human intestinal epithelial cells triggering inflammation. When the human intestinal epithelial cell-line, Caco-2, and the primary colon cells were stimulated with ethanol-inactivated S. aureus, IL-8 expression was induced in a dose-dependent manner. The inactivated S. aureus preferentially stimulated Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 rather than TLR4. Lipoproteins, lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN) are considered as potential TLR2 ligands of S. aureus. Interestingly, S aureus lipoproteins and Pam2CSK4 mimicking Gram-positive bacterial lipoproteins, but not LTA and PGN of S. aureus, significantly induced IL-8 expression in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, lipoprotein-deficient S. aureus mutant strain failed to induce IL-8 production. Collectively, these results suggest that S. aureus stimulates the human intestinal epithelial cells to induce the chemokine IL-8 production through its lipoproteins, potentially contributing the development of intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. TLR-mediated inflammatory responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae are highly dependent on surface expression of bacterial lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Gillian; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Pollard, Tracey; Lapp, Thabo; Cohen, Jonathan; Camberlein, Emilie; Stafford, Sian; Periselneris, Jimstan; Aldridge, Christine; Vollmer, Waldemar; Picard, Capucine; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Brown, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections induce inflammatory responses that contribute toward both disease pathogenesis and immunity, but the host-pathogen interactions that mediate these effects are poorly defined. We used the surface lipoprotein-deficient ∆lgt pneumococcal mutant strain to test the hypothesis that lipoproteins are key determinants of TLR-mediated immune responses to S. pneumoniae. We show using reporter assays that TLR2 signaling is dependent on pneumococcal lipoproteins, and that macrophage NF-κB activation and TNF-α release were reduced in response to the ∆lgt strain. Differences in TNF-α responses between Δlgt and wild-type bacteria were abrogated for macrophages from TLR2- but not TLR4-deficient mice. Transcriptional profiling of human macrophages revealed attenuated TLR2-associated responses to ∆lgt S. pneumoniae, comprising many NF-κB-regulated proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes. Importantly, non-TLR2-associated responses were preserved. Experiments using leukocytes from IL-1R-associated kinase-4-deficient patients and a mouse pneumonia model confirmed that proinflammatory responses were lipoprotein dependent. Our data suggest that leukocyte responses to bacterial lipoproteins are required for TLR2- and IL-1R-associated kinase-4-mediated inflammatory responses to S. pneumoniae. Copyright © 2014 The Authors.

  19. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor. G Ravikumar N B Vijayaprakash. General Article Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 748-755. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities in adolescents is increasing dramatically, the identification of relevant risk factors is a major public health challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a family history of diabetes could be a risk factor for lipid abnormalities in healthy individuals. This study is a ...

  1. Leukocyte activation by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Alipour (Arash); A.J.H.H.M. van Oostrom; A. Izraeljan (Alisa); C. Verseyden; J.M. Collins (Jennifer); K.N. Frayn (Keith); T.W.M. Plokker (Thijs); J.W.F. Elte (Jan Willem); M. Castro Cabezas (Manuel)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - Postprandial lipemia has been linked to atherosclerosis and inflammation. Because leukocyte activation is obligatory for atherogenesis, leukocyte activation by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) was investigated. METHODS AND RESULTS - The expression of CD11b and CD66b

  2. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-29

    Aug 29, 2011 ... As the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities in adolescents is increasing dramatically, the identification of relevant ... investigate whether a family history of diabetes could be a risk factor for lipid abnormalities in healthy individuals. This study is a ..... thickness in children with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes, 51: ...

  3. Normal and abnormal lipid and lipoprotein metabolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... NPC1P1 – Niemann-Pick C1-like protein 1; NEFA – non-esterified fatty acid. Hypercholesterolaemia of apoB-containing lipoproteins: 1 – LDLR mutations; 2 – familial binding-defective apolipoprotein B100; 3 – proconvertase subtilin/kexin type 9 (gain of function mutations destroys LDL receptors, loss of ...

  4. High density lipoproteins, 1978 -- an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R I

    1978-12-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) have come of age. For years it has been fashionable to study HDL as an approach to understanding lipoprotein structure and lipid binding. Available in abundant amounts from normal human plasma, readily separable into its individual lipid and soluble apolipoprotein components, HDL has provided much information for lipoprotein model building. Suddenly it has been thrust center stage clinically by a host of convincing epidemiologic studies that clearly establishes an inverse relationship between HDL levels and coronary vascular events. Biochemists, clinicians, cardiologists and epidemiologists are simultaneously focusing attention on HDL. Familial High Density Lipoprotein Deficiency (Tangier Disease) has been well described but is poorly understood as a clinical syndrome complex. We have suddenly become aware of how little we understand about HDL's normal ultracentrifugal and apoprotein heterogeneity, about its functional role(s) or the determinant(s) of its concentration in plasma. The relative contributions of the two sites of HDL origin, the liver and intestine, are yet to be determined as are the site(s) of degradation. Awareness of a problem and its importance is the first step toward the solution(s) of the problem.

  5. Disturbances of lipoprotein metabolism in metabolic syndro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Czyżewska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome (MS, called the atherogenic triad, includes elevated levels of plasma triglycerides (TGs, low levels of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-CH, and the presence of small dense low-density lipoproteins (sdLDLs with normal or slightly elevated LDL-CH levels. Insulin resistance drives the increase in the three main sources of TG for VLDL synthesis: fatty-acid flux from adipose tissue, de novo lipogenesis, and uptake of remnant lipoproteins. Overproduction of VLDL, predominantly triglyceride-rich large VLDL1 particles, induces the cascade of events which lead to abnormalities of other plasma lipoproteins. The accumulation of VLDL in plasma and decreased activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL impair the catabolism of chylomicrons. Moreover, hyperinsulinemia induces increased intestinal production of chylomicrons. These factors cause augmented postprandial lipemia. Hepatic overproduction of VLDL leads to an increased level of VLDL remnants in plasma. Highly atherogenic sdLDLs are generated from VLDL1 particles by the action of LPL, cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP, and hepatic lipase (HL. In the presence of hypertriglyceridemia, accelerated CETP-mediated lipid transfer generates TG-enriched HDL particles. This enhances HDL catabolism mediated by HL and endothelial lipase (EL. The assessment of risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in MS related to low HDL-CH and the presence of sdLDL particles may be improved by the incorporation of measurements of apolipoproteins (apo-B and apoA-I into clinical practice. In addition, the concentration of non-HDL-CH may be useful in quantifying apo-B-containing atherogenic lipoproteins.

  6. Triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins protect lipoprotein lipase from inactivation by ANGPTL3 and ANGPTL4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Anderson, Fredrick; Ericsson, Madelene; Larsson, Mikael; Makoveichuk, Elena; Lookene, Aivar; Heeren, Joerg; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2012-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is important for clearance of triacylglycerols (TG) from plasma both as an enzyme and as a bridging factor between lipoproteins and receptors for endocytosis. The amount of LPL at the luminal side of the capillary endothelium determines to what extent lipids are taken up. Mechanisms to control both the activity of LPL and its transport to the endothelial sites are regulated, but poorly understood. Angiopoietin-like proteins (ANGPTLs) 3 and 4 are potential control proteins for LPL, but plasma concentrations of ANGPTLs do not correlate with plasma TG levels. We investigated the effects of recombinant human N-terminal (NT) ANGPTLs3 and 4 on LPL-mediated bridging of TG-rich lipoproteins to primary mouse hepatocytes and found that the NT-ANGPTLs, in concentrations sufficient to cause inactivation of LPL in vitro, were unable to prevent LPL-mediated lipoprotein uptake. We therefore investigated the effects of lipoproteins (chylomicrons, VLDL and LDL) on the inactivation of LPL in vitro by NT-ANGPTLs3 and 4 and found that LPL activity was protected by TG-rich lipoproteins. In vivo, postprandial TG protected LPL from inactivation by recombinant NT-ANGPTL4 injected to mice. We conclude that lipoprotein-bound LPL is stabilized against inactivation by ANGPTLs. The levels of ANGPTLs found in blood may not be sufficient to overcome this stabilization. Therefore it is likely that the prime site of action of ANGPTLs on LPL is in subendothelial compartments where TG-rich lipoprotein concentration is lower than in blood. This could explain why the plasma levels of TG and ANGPTLs do not correlate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of dietary turmeric supplementation on plasma lipoproteins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of dietary turmeric supplementation on plasma lipoproteins, meat quality and fatty acid composition in broilers. ... concentrations of plasma triglyceride, total cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-c) at three weeks, and for plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c) at three and six weeks of age.

  8. The effect of interaction between Lipoprotein Lipase and ApoVLDL-II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SNP in apoVLDL-II and lipoprotein lipase genes significantly (P < 0.05) affected total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein. More likely, the interaction of apoVLDL-II and lipoprotein lipase significantly affect total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein and low density lipoprotein.

  9. Human Lipoproteins at Model Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, K L; Lind, T K; Maric, S

    2017-01-01

    High and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) are thought to play vital roles in the onset and development of atherosclerosis; the biggest killer in the western world. Key issues of initial lipoprotein (LP) interactions at cellular membranes need to be addressed including LP deposition and lipid...... exchange and lipid removal can be distinguished thanks to the combined use of hydrogenated and tail-deuterated lipids. Both HDL and LDL remove lipids from the bilayer and deposit hydrogenated material into the lipid bilayer, however, the extent of removal and exchange depends on LP type. These results...... support the notion of HDL acting as the 'good' cholesterol, removing lipid material from lipid-loaded cells, whereas LDL acts as the 'bad' cholesterol, depositing lipid material into the vascular wall....

  10. Increased transvascular lipoprotein transport in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan Skov; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: Diabetes is associated with a highly increased risk of atherosclerosis, especially if hypertension or albuminuria is present. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that the increased transvascular lipoprotein transport in diabetes may be further accelerated if hypertension or albuminuria is present...... of transvascular transport. RESULTS: Transvascular LDL transport was 1.8 (1.6-2.0), 2.3 (2.0-2.6), and 2.6 (1.3-4.0)%/[h x (liter/m2)] in healthy controls, diabetic controls, and diabetes patients with systolic hypertension or albuminuria, respectively (P = 0.013; F = 4.5; df =2; ANOVA). These differences most...... likely were not caused by altered hepatic LDL receptor expression, glycosylation of LDL, small LDL size, or medicine use. CONCLUSIONS: Transvascular LDL transport is increased in patients with diabetes mellitus, especially if systolic hypertension or albuminuria is present. Accordingly, lipoprotein flux...

  11. Lipoprotein (a) Management: Lifestyle and Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Leon-Acuna, Ana; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Perez-Martinez, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to be the first cause of mortality in developed countries. Moreover, far from diminishing, the cardiovascular risk factors leading towards the development of CVD are on the rise. Therefore, the preventive and therapeutic management which is currently in place is clearly not enough to stop this pandemic. In this context, a major resurgence in interest in lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] has occurred in light of its association with CVD. This series aims to review the basic and clinical aspects of Lp(a) biology. Specifically, the present review considers the current situation regarding the influence of lifestyle, hormones and other physiological or pathological conditions on Lp(a) plasma concentrations which might mitigate the harmful effects of this lipoprotein. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, and retinal arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Javadzadeh, Alireza; Argani, Hassan; Nezami, Nariman; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Rafeey, Mandana; Rohbaninoubar, Mohammad; Rahimi-Ardabili, Babak

    2008-09-15

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and homocysteine (Hcy) have been implicated as risk factors for vascular diseases. The study was performed to explore the possible relationship between retinal arteriosclerosis and serum Lp(a) and Hcy levels. Study subjects consisted of 80 nonsmoking male patients with retinal arteriosclerosis and 54 healthy nonsmoker males as controls. Retinal arteriosclerosis was graded according to the Scheie classification. Serum levels of lipids, lipoproteins, Lp(a), and Hcy were measured by standard methods. The serum level of Hcy was higher in patients (24.2+/-8.1 micromol/l) than controls (10.5+/-4.1 micromol/l); parteriosclerosis and Lp(a) level (r=0.61, parteriosclerosis and Hcy level (r=0.72, parteriosclerosis and serum Lp(a) and Hcy levels suggests that Lp(a) as well as Hcy could play a role in the development of retinal arteriosclerosis.

  13. Sortilins: new players in lipoprotein metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willnow, Thomas; Kjølby, Mads Fuglsang; Nykjær, Anders

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Sortilins are sorting receptors that direct proteins through secretory and endocytic pathways of the cell. Previously, these receptors have been shown to play important roles in regulating protein transport in neurons and to control neuronal viability and death in many diseases...... on the importance of sorting receptors in control of cellular and systemic lipoprotein metabolism and how altered trafficking pathways may represent a major risk factor for dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis in the human population....

  14. New targets and developments in lipoproteins control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norata GD

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Danilo Norata1–31Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy; 2Center for the Study of Atherosclerosis, Società Italiana Studio Aterosclerosi, Ospedale Bassini, Cinisello Balsamo, Italy; 3The Blizard Institute, Centre for Diabetes, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University, London, UKAbstract: Statins provide a very effective approach in reducing plasma cholesterol levels and cardiovascular risk. However, the proportion of patients who fail to achieve desirable plasma lipid levels ranges from 16%–53%, worldwide. This percentage reaches up to 80% in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. Additionally, many patients are unable to tolerate statins, particularly at the highest approved dose level. New treatments that aggressively reduce lipid levels in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia, or those unable to reach their lipid targets, are therefore required. The most promising approaches in this context, such as inhibitors of the synthesis of apolipoprotein B (apoB containing lipoproteins (apoB silencing or microsomal triglyceride transfer protein [MTP] inhibition or proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9 blockers, all decrease low-density lipoprotein (LDL extensively. Increasing low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol via cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors or apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA-1 inducers and improving their quality with HDL or ApoA-1 mimetics represent also important options. Drugs affecting HDL, however, may not be all alike and require adequate scrutiny of the mechanisms involved. Until we have a better understanding of these issues, further LDL lowering in high-risk patients represents the soundest approach.Keywords: apolipoproteins, lipids, lipoprotein classes, hypercholesterolemia, synthesis, LDL lowering

  15. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency with visceral xanthomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servaes, Sabah; Bellah, Richard [Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Verma, Ritu [Department of Gastroenterology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pawel, Bruce [Department of Pathology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LLD) is a rare metabolic disorder that typically presents with skin xanthomas and pancreatitis in childhood. We report a case of LLD in an infant who presented with jaundice caused by a pancreatic head mass. Abdominal imaging also incidentally revealed hyperechoic renal masses caused by renal xanthomas. This appearance of the multiple abdominal masses makes this a unique infantile presentation of LLD. (orig.)

  16. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L.; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  17. Gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Daniel; Méthot, Julie; Kastelein, John

    2012-08-01

    The present review summarizes the clinical development of adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)1-lipoprotein lipase (LPL)S447X gene therapy (alipogene tiparvovec) for lipoprotein lipase deficiency. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a rare inherited disease characterized by severe hypertriglyceridaemia, chylomicronaemia and risk of recurrent pancreatitis or other complications. AAV1-LPLS447X gene therapy is based on the rationale that by adding episomal copies of functional LPL genes into muscle cells lacking active LPL, metabolic function could be improved or restored. AAV1-LPLS447X is a nonreplicating and nonintegrating AAV of serotype 1 designed to deliver and express the human LPL gene variant S447X. The clinical development programme for AAV1-LPLS447X consisted of two observational studies, three open-label interventional studies and one case note review analysis. Intramuscular administration of AAV1-LPLS447X was generally well tolerated and was associated with reduction in overall pancreatitis incidence and signs of clinical improvement up to 2 years after administration. Results of interventional studies suggest that markers of postprandial metabolism could be more accurate than fasting plasma triglyceride concentration to monitor the effect of AAV1-LPLS447X . The overall benefit-risk ratio of AAV1-LPLS447X gene therapy appears positive to date, particularly for the patients presenting the highest risk of complications.

  18. Peptidoglycan Association of Murein Lipoprotein Is Required for KpsD-Dependent Group 2 Capsular Polysaccharide Expression and Serum Resistance in a Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Jingyu; Bouwman, Catrien; Yan, Donghong; Kang, Jing; Katakam, Anand K; Liu, Peter; Pantua, Homer; Abbas, Alexander R; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Austin, Cary; Reichelt, Mike; Sandoval, Wendy; Xu, Min; Whitfield, Chris; Kapadia, Sharookh B

    2017-05-23

    Murein lipoprotein (Lpp) and peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (Pal) are major outer membrane lipoproteins in Escherichia coli Their roles in cell-envelope integrity have been documented in E. coli laboratory strains, and while Lpp has been linked to serum resistance in vitro, the underlying mechanism has not been established. Here, lpp and pal mutants of uropathogenic E. coli strain CFT073 showed reduced survival in a mouse bacteremia model, but only the lpp mutant was sensitive to serum killing in vitro The peptidoglycan-bound Lpp form was specifically required for preventing complement-mediated bacterial lysis in vitro and complement-mediated clearance in vivo Compared to the wild-type strain, the lpp mutant had impaired K2 capsular polysaccharide production and was unable to respond to exposure to serum by elevating capsular polysaccharide amounts. These properties correlated with altered cellular distribution of KpsD, the predicted outer membrane translocon for "group 2" capsular polysaccharides. We identified a novel Lpp-dependent association between functional KpsD and peptidoglycan, highlighting important interplay between cell envelope components required for resistance to complement-mediated lysis in uropathogenic E. coli isolates.IMPORTANCE Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates represent a significant cause of nosocomial urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Many UPEC isolates are resistant to serum killing. Here, we show that a major cell-envelope lipoprotein (murein lipoprotein) is required for serum resistance in vitro and for complement-mediated bacterial clearance in vivo This is mediated, in part, through a novel mechanism by which murein lipoprotein affects the proper assembly of a key component of the machinery involved in production of "group 2" capsules. The absence of murein lipoprotein results in impaired production of the capsule layer, a known participant in complement resistance. These results demonstrate an important role for

  19. Paragonimus y paragonimiasis en el norte peruano. Infección natural de Pseudothelphusa chilensis por metacercarias de Paragonimus Braun, 1899

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Cuba

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Se ha estudiado el índice de infección natural y la intensidad del parasitismo en cangrejos recolectados en tres provincias del Departamento de Cajamarca, Perú, habiéndose encontrado metacercarias de Paragonimus Braun, 1899 en el 43.97% de 539 especímenes de Pseudothelphusa chilensis Milne Edwards, 1843, único cangrejo hallado en la zona. El órgano parasitado fue casi exclusivamente el hepatopancreas, siendo 10.33 el número promedio de metacercarias por cangrejo. Las formas adultos logradas mediante inoculación de las metacercarias, fueron identificadas como Paragonimus peruvianus Miyazaki, Ibáñez y Miranda, 1969, con excepción de tres ejemplares que correspondieron a lo especie Paragonimus caliensis Little, 1968.

  20. Hydrolysis of plasma triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins from immature and laying hens (Gallus domesticus) by lipoprotein lipase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, H; Grant, G; Perry, M

    1982-01-01

    Very-low-density (VLD) lipoproteins and portomicrons were isolated from the plasma of immature and laying hens and their size, lipid composition and susceptibility to hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase were compared. In agreement with other studies, VLD lipoproteins from laying hens were found to be smaller and have a different lipid composition than VLD lipoproteins from immature hens. Portomicrons from immature and laying hens had mean diameters of about 150 nm and similar lipid compositions. Hydrolysis of VLD lipoproteins from immature hens, and portomicrons from immature and laying hens, proceeded rapidly until at least 40% of the substrate had been used. In contrast only 1--15% of laying-hen VLD-lipoprotein triacylglycerol was readily hydrolysis occurred slowly. The limited susceptibility of laying-hen VLD lipoproteins appeared to be due to their low content of lipoprotein lipase activator apoprotein, which occurred despite an abundance of activator in the high-density lipoproteins of laying-hen plasma. The results provide further evidence that the liver of the laying hen synthesizes specialized lipoproteins. Their limited susceptibility to hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase is probably a major factor in ensuring transport of lipid to yolk rather than to other tissues. The form of transport of dietary lipid, however, is similar in immature and laying hens. PMID:7150269

  1. Structural and dynamic interfacial properties of the lipoprotein initiating domain of apolipoprotein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Aubrey S; Cook, Victoria A; Shelness, Gregory S; Weinberg, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    To better understand the earliest steps in the assembly of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins, we compared the biophysical and interfacial properties of two closely related apolipoprotein B (apoB) truncation mutants, one of which contains the complete lipoprotein initiating domain (apoB20.1; residues 1-912), and one of which, by virtue of a 50 amino acid C-terminal truncation, is incapable of forming nascent lipoproteins (apoB19; residues 1-862). Spectroscopic studies detected no major differences in secondary structure, and only minor differences in conformation and thermodynamic stability, between the two truncation mutants. Monolayer studies revealed that both apoB19 and apoB20.1 bound to and penetrated egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) monolayers; however, the interfacial exclusion pressure of apoB20.1 was higher than apoB19 (25.1 mN/m vs. 22.8 mN/m). Oil drop tensiometry revealed that both proteins bound rapidly to the hydrophobic triolein/water interface, reducing interfacial tension by approximately 20 mN/m. However, when triolein drops were first coated with phospholipids (PL), apoB20.1 bound with faster kinetics than apoB19 and also displayed greater interfacial elasticity (26.9 +/- 0.8 mN/m vs. 22.9 +/- 0.8 mN/m). These data establish that the transition of apoB to assembly competence is accompanied by increases in surface activity and elasticity, but not by significant changes in global structure.

  2. Lipoprotein biosynthesis as a target for anti-Wolbachia treatment of filarial nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slatko Barton E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are debilitating diseases caused by filarial nematodes. Disease pathogenesis is induced by inflammatory responses following the death of the parasite. Wolbachia endosymbionts of filariae are potent inducers of innate and adaptive inflammation and bacterial lipoproteins have been identified as the ligands that bind toll-like receptors (TLR 2 and TLR6. Lipoproteins are important structural and functional components of bacteria and therefore enzymes involved in Wolbachia lipoprotein biosynthesis are potential chemotherapeutic targets. Results Globomycin, a signal peptidase II (LspA inhibitor, has activity against Gram-negative bacteria and a putative lspA gene has been identified from the Wolbachia genome of Brugia malayi (wBm. The amino acids required for function are strictly conserved and functionality was verified by complementation tests in a temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli lspA mutant. Also, transformation of wild type E. coli with Wolbachia lspA conferred significant globomycin resistance. A cell-based screen has been developed utilizing a Wolbachia-containing Aedes albopictus cell line to assay novel compounds active against Wolbachia. Globomycin was screened using this assay, which resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in Wolbachia load. Furthermore, globomycin was also effective in reducing the motility and viability of adult B. malayi in vitro. Conclusions These studies validate lipoprotein biosynthesis as a target in an organism for which no genetic tools are available. Further studies to evaluate drugs targeting this pathway are underway as part of the A-WOL drug discovery and development program.

  3. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2 is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases.

  4. Altered activation of endothelial anti- and proapoptotic pathways by high-density lipoprotein from patients with coronary artery disease: role of high-density lipoprotein-proteome remodeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riwanto, Meliana; Rohrer, Lucia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Besler, Christian; Mocharla, Pavani; Mueller, Maja; Perisa, Damir; Heinrich, Kathrin; Altwegg, Lukas; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Lüscher, Thomas F; Landmesser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    ...). High-density lipoprotein from healthy subjects (HDL(Healthy)) has been proposed to exert endothelial antiapoptotic effects that may represent an important antiatherogenic property of the lipoprotein...

  5. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need...... that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with ASCVD and all-cause mortality. Finally, genetic evidence also demonstrates that high concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with low-grade inflammation. This suggests that an important part of inflammation...... in atherosclerosis and ASCVD is because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein degradation and uptake into macrophage foam cells in the arterial intima. Taken together, new insights now strongly suggest that elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins represent causal risk factors for low-grade inflammation, ASCVD, and all...

  6. [Lipoprotein(a): influence on cardiovascular manifestation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellwig, K-P; Schatton, C; Biermann, B; Kottmann, T; Horstkotte, D; van Buuren, F

    2015-04-01

    The clinical relevance of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) as a cardiovascular risk factor is currently underestimated. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of increased Lp(a) values on the development and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD).In our retrospective analysis of 31,274 patients, who were hospitalized for the first time, we compared patients with isolated increased Lp(a) (> 110 mg/dl) and normal Lp(a) (manifestation and severity of CAD.High Lp(a) concentration leads to an increased manifestation and severity of coronary artery disease. Additional risk factors do not aggravate manifestation of CAD.

  7. Prediction of lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Agnieszka; Willenbrock, Hanni; Von Heijne, G.

    2003-01-01

    A method to predict lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative Eubacteria, LipoP, has been developed. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was able to distinguish between lipoproteins (SPaseII-cleaved proteins), SPaseI-cleaved proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, and transmembrane proteins. This predictor...... was able to predict 96.8% of the lipoproteins correctly with only 0.3% false positives in a set of SPaseI-cleaved, cytoplasmic, and transmembrane proteins. The results obtained were significantly better than those of previously developed methods. Even though Gram-positive lipoprotein signal peptides differ...

  8. Computational lipidology: predicting lipoprotein density profiles in human blood plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hübner

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring cholesterol levels is strongly recommended to identify patients at risk for myocardial infarction. However, clinical markers beyond "bad" and "good" cholesterol are needed to precisely predict individual lipid disorders. Our work contributes to this aim by bringing together experiment and theory. We developed a novel computer-based model of the human plasma lipoprotein metabolism in order to simulate the blood lipid levels in high resolution. Instead of focusing on a few conventionally used predefined lipoprotein density classes (LDL, HDL, we consider the entire protein and lipid composition spectrum of individual lipoprotein complexes. Subsequently, their distribution over density (which equals the lipoprotein profile is calculated. As our main results, we (i successfully reproduced clinically measured lipoprotein profiles of healthy subjects; (ii assigned lipoproteins to narrow density classes, named high-resolution density sub-fractions (hrDS, revealing heterogeneous lipoprotein distributions within the major lipoprotein classes; and (iii present model-based predictions of changes in the lipoprotein distribution elicited by disorders in underlying molecular processes. In its present state, the model offers a platform for many future applications aimed at understanding the reasons for inter-individual variability, identifying new sub-fractions of potential clinical relevance and a patient-oriented diagnosis of the potential molecular causes for individual dyslipidemia.

  9. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-05

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Pneumococcal lipoproteins involved in bacterial fitness, virulence, and immune evasion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kohler, Sylvia; Voß, Franziska; Gómez Mejia, Alejandro; Brown, Jeremy S; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-01-01

    .... Pneumococcal lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins and have pivotal roles in bacterial fitness including envelope stability, cell division, nutrient acquisition, signal transduction, transport (as substrate...

  11. Changes in lipoprotein kinetics associated with type 2 diabetes affect the distribution of lipopolysaccharides among lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergès, Bruno; Duvillard, Laurence; Lagrost, Laurent; Vachoux, Christelle; Garret, Céline; Bouyer, Karine; Courtney, Michael; Pomié, Céline; Burcelin, Rémy

    2014-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are inflammatory components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and, in plasma, are mostly associated with lipoproteins. This association is thought to promote their catabolism while reducing their proinflammatory effects. Our aim was to determine the impact of lipoprotein kinetics on plasma LPS distribution and how it may affect patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We performed a kinetic study in 30 individuals (16 T2DM patients, 14 controls) and analyzed the impact of changes in lipoprotein kinetics on LPS distribution among lipoproteins. Plasma LPS levels in T2DM patients were not different from those in controls, but LPS distribution in the two groups was different. Patients with T2DM had higher LPS-very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL; 31% ± 7% vs 22% ± 11%, P = .002), LPS-high-density lipoprotein (HDL; 29% ± 9% vs 19% ± 10%, P = .015), free (nonlipoprotein bound) LPS (10% ± 4% vs 7% ± 4%, P = .043) and lower LPS-low-density lipoprotein (LDL; 30% ± 13% vs 52% ± 16%, P = .001). In multivariable analysis, VLDL-LPS was associated with HDL-LPS (P < .0001); LDL-LPS was associated with VLDL-LPS (P = .004), and VLDL apolipoprotein (apo) B100 catabolism (P = .002); HDL-LPS was associated with free LPS (P < .0001) and VLDL-LPS (P = .033); free LPS was associated with HDL-LPS (P < .0001). In a patient featuring a dramatic decrease in VLDL catabolism due to apoA-V mutation, LDL-LPS was severely decreased (0.044 EU/mL vs 0.788 EU/mL in controls). The difference between T2DM patients and controls for LDL-LPS fraction was no longer significant after controlling for VLDL apoB100 total fractional catabolic rate. Our data suggest that in humans, free LPS transfers first to HDL and then to VLDL, whereas the LPS-bound LDL fraction is mainly derived from VLDL catabolism; the latter may hence represent a LPS catabolic pathway. T2DM patients show lower LDL-LPS secondary to reduced VLDL catabolism, which may represent an

  12. Characterization of the β-barrel assembly machine accessory lipoproteins from Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Joshua P; Kenedy, Melisha R; Iqbal, Henna; Akins, Darrin R

    2015-03-24

    Like all diderm bacteria studied to date, Borrelia burgdorferi possesses a β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) complex. The bacterial BAM complexes characterized thus far consist of an essential integral outer membrane protein designated BamA and one or more accessory proteins. The accessory proteins are typically lipid-modified proteins anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane through their lipid moieties. We previously identified and characterized the B. burgdorferi BamA protein in detail and more recently identified two lipoproteins encoded by open reading frames bb0324 and bb0028 that associate with the borrelial BamA protein. The role(s) of the BAM accessory lipoproteins in B. burgdorferi is currently unknown. Structural modeling of B. burgdorferi BB0028 revealed a distinct β-propeller fold similar to the known structure for the E. coli BAM accessory lipoprotein BamB. Additionally, the structural model for BB0324 was highly similar to the known structure of BamD, which is consistent with the prior finding that BB0324 contains tetratricopeptide repeat regions similar to other BamD orthologs. Consistent with BB0028 and BB0324 being BAM accessory lipoproteins, mutants lacking expression of each protein were found to exhibit altered membrane permeability and enhanced sensitivity to various antimicrobials. Additionally, BB0028 mutants also exhibited significantly impaired in vitro growth. Finally, immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that BB0028 and BB0324 each interact specifically and independently with BamA to form the BAM complex in B. burgdorferi. Combined structural studies, functional assays, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that BB0028 and BB0324 are the respective BamB and BamD orthologs in B. burgdorferi, and are important in membrane integrity and/or outer membrane protein localization. The borrelial BamB and BamD proteins both interact specifically and independently with BamA to form a tripartite BAM complex in B

  13. Aequorin mutants with increased thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaoge; Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Ensor, Mark; Daunert, Sylvia

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescent labels can be especially useful for in vivo and live animal studies due to the negligible bioluminescence background in cells and most animals, and the non-toxicity of bioluminescent reporter systems. Significant thermal stability of bioluminescent labels is essential, however, due to the longitudinal nature and physiological temperature conditions of many bioluminescent-based studies. To improve the thermostability of the bioluminescent protein aequorin, we employed random and rational mutagenesis strategies to create two thermostable double mutants, S32T/E156V and M36I/E146K, and a particularly thermostable quadruple mutant, S32T/E156V/Q168R/L170I. The double aequorin mutants, S32T/E156V and M36I/E146K, retained 4 and 2.75 times more of their initial bioluminescence activity than wild-type aequorin during thermostability studies at 37 °C. Moreover, the quadruple aequorin mutant, S32T/E156V/Q168R/L170I, exhibited more thermostability at a variety of temperatures than either double mutant alone, producing the most thermostable aequorin mutant identified thus far.

  14. Serum lipoproteins attenuate macrophage activation and Toll-Like Receptor stimulation by bacterial lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis was previously shown to express a lipoprotein, the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip), exposed at the bacterial surface, and able to stimulate human primary monocytes/macrophages through Toll Like Receptor (TLR)2/TLR1/TLR6, and CD14. In PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells the proinflammatory activity of Mip was significantly higher in the absence than in the presence of serum. The present study aims to investigate the ability of different serum factors to attenuate Mip proinflammatory activity in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and in primary human differentiated macrophages. The study was also extend to another lipoprotein, the Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein (Osp)A. The proinflammatory activity was studied through Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) and Interleukin (IL)-8 release. Finally, TLR1/2 human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) transfected cells were used to test the ability of the serum factors to inhibit Mip and OspA proinflammatory activity. Results In the absence of any serum and in the presence of 10% delipidated FBS, production of Mip-induced TNF-α and IL-8 in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were similar whereas they were significantly decreased in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting an inhibiting role of lipids present in FBS. In the presence of 10% human serum, the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-8 were 2 to 5 times lower than in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting the presence of more potent inhibitor(s) in human serum than in FBS. Similar results were obtained in primary human differentiated macrophages. Different lipid components of human serum were then tested (total lipoproteins, HDL, LDL, VLDL, triglyceride emulsion, apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, B, E2, and E3). The most efficient inhibitors were LDL, VLDL, and apoB that reduced the mean concentration of TNF-α release in Mip-induced macrophages to 24, 20, and 2%, respectively (p lipoproteins and suggested that serum lipoproteins interact with acyl chains

  15. The Relationship of the Lipoprotein SsaB, Manganese, and Superoxide Dismutase in Streptococcus sanguinis Virulence for Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Katie E.; Bainbridge, Brian; Brusko, Sarah; Turner, Lauren S.; Ge, Xiuchun; Stone, Victoria; Xu, Ping; Kitten, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Summary Streptococcus sanguinis colonizes teeth and is an important cause of infective endocarditis. Our prior work showed that the lipoprotein SsaB is critical for S. sanguinis virulence for endocarditis and belongs to the LraI family of conserved metal transporters. In this study, we demonstrated that an ssaB mutant accumulates less manganese and iron than its parent. A mutant lacking the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, SodA, was significantly less virulent than wild-type in a rabbit model of endocarditis, but significantly more virulent than the ssaB mutant. Neither the ssaB nor the sodA mutation affected sensitivity to phagocytic killing or efficiency of heart valve colonization. Animal virulence results for all strains could be reproduced by growing bacteria in serum under physiological levels of O2. SodA activity was reduced, but not eliminated in the ssaB mutant in serum and in rabbits. Growth of the ssaB mutant in serum was restored upon addition of Mn2+ or removal of O2. Antioxidant supplementation experiments suggested that superoxide and hydroxyl radicals were together responsible for the ssaB mutant’s growth defect. We conclude that manganese accumulation mediated by the SsaB transport system imparts virulence by enabling cell growth in oxygen through SodA-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:24750294

  16. A phospholipidomic analysis of all defined human plasma lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dashti, M.; Kulik, W.; Hoek, F.; Veerman, E.C.; Peppelenbosch, M.P.; Rezaee, F.

    2011-01-01

    Since plasma lipoproteins contain both protein and phospholipid components, either may be involved in processes such as atherosclerosis. In this study the identification of plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipids, which is essential for understanding these processes at the molecular level, are

  17. The Lipoprotein Lipase HindIII Polymorphism And The Susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) enzyme plays a central role in lipid metabolism. The primary function of LPL enzyme is the hydrolysis of the core triglycerides of circulating chylomicron and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). It releases monoglycerides and free fatty acids, which are taken up by skeletal muscle or adipose tissue.

  18. A Phospholipidomic Analysis of All Defined Human Plasma Lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dashti, Monireh; Kulik, Willem; Hoek, Frans; Veerman, Enno C.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Since plasma lipoproteins contain both protein and phospholipid components, either may be involved in processes such as atherosclerosis. In this study the identification of plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipids, which is essential for understanding these processes at the molecular level, are

  19. Extreme lipoprotein(a) levels and improved cardiovascular risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-01-01

    The study tested whether extreme lipoprotein(a) levels and/or corresponding LPA risk genotypes improve myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction beyond conventional risk factors.......The study tested whether extreme lipoprotein(a) levels and/or corresponding LPA risk genotypes improve myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction beyond conventional risk factors....

  20. Mendelian Disorders of High-Density Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldoni, Federico; Sinke, Richard J.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are a highly heterogeneous and dynamic group of the smallest and densest lipoproteins present in the circulation. This review provides the current molecular insight into HDL metabolism led by articles describing mutations in genes that have a large affect on HDL

  1. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Lipoprotein Lipase Activity | Kotze | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baboons kept on hypovitaminotic C diets, but without clinical signs of scurvy, had significantly higher heart muscle lipoprotein lipase activity than baboons on vitamin C 34 mg/kg body mass/day. When the serum vitamin C levels were above 0,35 mg/100 ml the heart muscle lipoprotein lipase was repressed. Serum vitamin C ...

  2. Serum lipoprotein changes in dogs with renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling-Kelly, E

    2014-01-01

    People with renal disease develop a dyslipidemia that contributes to progression of renal injury and development of cardiovascular disease. Lipoproteins in dogs with renal disease have not been investigated. Dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have dyslipidemia characterized by increased lower density lipoproteins and decreased high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). The degree of dyslipidemia is positively correlated with severity of disease, as reflected by serum creatinine concentration. Prospective study of client-owned dogs presented to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals: 29 dogs with confirmed CKD, 5 dogs with nephrotic syndrome (NS), and 12 healthy control dogs presented for routine vaccinations, dental cleaning, or owned by students. Lipoprotein electrophoresis was used to quantify relative proportions of the 3 main classes of lipoproteins in canine serum: low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and HDL. Serum cholesterol and creatinine concentrations; urinalysis and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured by standard methods. Dyslipidemia was consistently found in dogs with CKD and NS and was characterized by a decrease in HDL and variable increases in LDL and VLDL. Dogs with NS had a proportionately greater increase in the VLDL fraction, as compared with dogs with CKD. Dyslipidemia similar to that documented in people with renal disease occurs in dogs with CKD, despite serum cholesterol concentrations often being within the reference interval. The contribution of altered lipoproteins to the pathogenesis of renal disease in dogs warrants additional study. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. A clustering analysis of lipoprotein diameters in the metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of smaller low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been associated with atherosclerosis risk, and the insulin resistance (IR) underlying the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, some research has supported the association of very low-, low- and high-density lipoprotein (VLDL HDL) particle...

  4. The usefulness of total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the usefulness of total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and/or highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol/total cholesterol ratios in the interpretation of lipid profile result in clinical practice. Methods: This is a prospective case-control study involving 109 diabetics, 98 diabetic hypertensives, 102 ...

  5. Lipoprotein lipase gene variants: Association with acute myocardial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Studies showed that lipid metabolism disorders are significant risk factors for myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore, genes involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism pathways such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), are proper candidates for susceptibility to CAD. Aim: To investigate the ...

  6. Human placenta secretes apolipoprotein B-100-containing lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Eva; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk; Andersen, Claus B

    2004-01-01

    early during pregnancy in the placenta. To examine whether the human placenta produces lipoproteins, we examined apoB and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) mRNA expression in placental biopsies. ApoB and MTP are mandatory for assembly and secretion of apoB-containing lipoproteins. Both...

  7. Mutations in the gene encoding the low-density lipoprotein receptor LRP4 cause abnormal limb development in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Chazottes, Dominique; Tutois, Sylvie; Kuehn, Michael; Evans, Martin; Bourgade, Franck; Cook, Sue; Davisson, Muriel T; Guénet, Jean-Louis

    2006-05-01

    Positional cloning of two recessive mutations of the mouse that cause polysyndactyly (dan and mdig-Chr 2) confirmed that the gene encoding MEGF7/LRP4, a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, plays an essential role in the process of digit differentiation. Pathologies observed in the mutant mice provide insight into understanding the function(s) of LRP4 as a negative regulator of the Wnt-beta-catenin signaling pathway and may help identify the genetic basis for common human disorders with similar phenotypes.

  8. Hypertriglyceridemia in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits was associated with increased production and reduced catabolism of very-low-density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Jin, Yingji; Liu, Tiequn; Liu, Feng; Ito, Tsunekata

    2009-01-01

    Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit is an animal model for human familial hypercholesterolemia. Recently, we segregated a new mutant of WHHL rabbits with plasma levels of triglycerides (TG) >500 mg/dl (designated as TGH-WHHL). To investigate the underlying mechanisms for hypertriglyceridemia, we compared TGH-WHHL with WHHL rabbits with lower plasma TG levels (hypertriglyceridemia exhibited by WHHL rabbits is caused by both increased production and impaired catabolism of TG-rich lipoproteins and associated with insulin resistance. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Nanotechnology for Synthetic High Density Lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthi, Andrea J.; Patel, Pinal C.; Ko, Caroline H.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Mirkin, Chad A.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the disease mechanism responsible for coronary heart disease (CHD), the leading cause of death worldwide. One strategy to combat atherosclerosis is to increase the amount of circulating high density lipoproteins (HDL), which transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The process, known as reverse cholesterol transport, is thought to be one of the main reasons for the significant inverse correlation observed between HDL blood levels and the development of CHD. This article highlights the most common strategies for treating atherosclerosis using HDL. We further detail potential treatment opportunities that utilize nanotechnology to increase the amount of HDL in circulation. The synthesis of biomimetic HDL nanostructures that replicate the chemical and physical properties of natural HDL provides novel materials for investigating the structure-function relationships of HDL and for potential new therapeutics to combat CHD. PMID:21087901

  10. Alterations of serum cholesterol and serum lipoprotein in breast cancer of women

    OpenAIRE

    Hasija, Kiran; Bagga, Hardeep K.

    2005-01-01

    Fasting blood sample of 50 normal subjects (control) and 100 patients of breast cancer were investigated for serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein cholesterol:low density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and total cholesterol:high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio during breast cancer of women. Five cancer stages, types, age groups, parity and menopausal status were undertaken...

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of THP-1 Macrophages Exposed to Lipoprotein Hydrolysis Products Generated by Lipoprotein Lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Marshall, Jenika D; Pickett, Arthur T; Schumacher, Clemens; Yang, Yanbo; Christian, Sherri L; Brown, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) induces lipid accumulation and promotes atherosclerosis. However, the effects of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL on macrophage-derived foam cell formation are not clearly understood. Thus, we analyzed the transcriptomic response to hydrolysis products via microarray analyses on RNA isolated from human THP-1 macrophages incubated with total lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL. The expression of 183 transcripts was significantly upregulated and 133 transcripts were significantly downregulated. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that there was a significant over-representation of genes involved in cell cycling, stress response, type I interferon signaling, cellular metal ion homeostasis, sterol metabolism, and nuclease activity. Interestingly, transcripts for 63 small nucleolar RNA were significantly upregulated. We verified the microarray data by quantitative real-time PCR and found that the expression of SNORA56, as well as the expression of genes associated with the cell cycle (PCNA and DKC1 variant 3), stress response (ATF3), type I interferon signaling (IFITM1), and lipid metabolism (CD36 and PLIN2) were significantly affected by LPL hydrolysis products. To determine if the free fatty acid (FFA) component of total lipoprotein hydrolysis products is sufficient to alter the expression of these genes, THP-1 macrophages were also incubated with the total FFA or individual classes of the FFA component. The gene regulation by the FFA component did not mimic that of the hydrolysis products, suggesting that the regulation of gene expression in THP-1 macrophages depends on the specific combination and concentration of lipid species present in the hydrolysis products, and not solely on FFA.

  12. Clinical Impact of Stomach-partitioning Gastrojejunostomy with Braun Enteroenterostomy for Patients with Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Unresectable Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigami, Takaaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Ishigami, Sumiya; Yanagita, Shigehiro; Okubo, Keishi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Kita, Yoshiaki; Mori, Shinichiro; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2016-10-01

    To compare adverse events and post-therapeutic clinical courses between stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy with Braun enteroenterostomy (SPGJ-BEE) and endoscopic metallic stent placement (EMSP) in patients with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) caused by unresectable gastric cancer and assess the clinical utility of SPGJ-BEE. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 16 and 9 patients with GOO undergoing SPGJ-BEE and EMSP, respectively. Re-obstruction caused by tumor overgrowth was identified in 3 (33.3%) out of 9 patients in the EMSP group. The GOO scoring system (GOOSS) revealed that its score after treatments was significantly higher in the SPGJ-BEE group than in the EMSP group (p<0.001). All patients in both groups received chemotherapy after treatments. The median survival times in the SPGJ-BEE and EMSP groups were 414 and 303 days, respectively. Our preliminary results suggest that SPGJ-BEE provides an improved long-term quality of life and the early induction of subsequent chemotherapy related with a better prognosis in patients with GOO. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Modulation of low-density lipoprotein-induced inhibition of intercellular communication by antioxidants and high-density lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, R M; de Haan, L. H. J.; Kuivenhoven, J A; Nusselder, I C

    In order to study the capacity of antioxidants and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to modulate the effects of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on intercellular communication, arterial smooth muscle cells and a dye transfer method were used. LDL, in contrast to HDL, inhibited the communication between

  14. Analytical capillary isotachophoresis: a routine technique for the analysis of lipoproteins and lipoprotein subfractions in whole serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, G; Borgmann, U; Assmann, G

    1985-02-22

    A capillary isotachophoretic separation technique was developed for lipoproteins in native serum which, compared with previous electrophoretic techniques, has negligible molecular sieve effects, does not need gel casting, is suitable for whole serum and has a high discriminative power for lipoprotein subfractions. The technique is based on pre-staining whole serum lipoproteins for 30 min at 4 degrees C before separation of 0.5 microliter of the sample in a free-flow capillary system (0.5 mm I.D.) with discontinuous buffer system. In normolipidaemic sera, high-density (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) are separated into two major subpopulations according to their net electric mobility. The identification of these fractions was confirmed by substitution with ultracentrifugally isolated lipoproteins and by their complete absence from Tangier and abetalipoproteinaemic serum. Triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) revealed a defined zone between the HDL and LDL subpopulations. Our preliminary results indicate that the separation of human whole serum lipoproteins by capillary isotachophoresis is a promising method for the determination of lipoprotein subfractions.

  15. Lipid droplet pattern and nondroplet-like structure in two fat mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Liu, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid is an important energy source and essential component for plasma and organelle membranes in all kinds of cells. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a label-free and nonlinear optical technique that can be used to monitor the lipid distribution in live organisms. Here, we utilize CARS microscopy to investigate the pattern of lipid droplets in two live Caenorhabditis elegans mutants (fat-2 and fat-3). The CARS images showed a striking decrease in the size, number, and content of lipid droplets in the fat-2 mutant but a slight difference in the fat-3 mutant as compared with the wild-type worm. Moreover, a nondroplet-like structure with enhanced CARS signal was detected for the first time in the uterus of fat-2 and fat-3 mutants. In addition, transgenic fat-2 mutant expressing a GFP fusion protein of vitellogenin-2 (a yolk lipoprotein) revealed that the enhanced CARS signal colocalized with the GFP signal, which suggests that the nondroplet-like structure is primarily due to the accumulation of yolk lipoproteins. Together, this study implies that CARS microscopy is a potential tool to study the distribution of yolk lipoproteins, in addition to lipid droplets, in live animals.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus Lpl Lipoproteins Delay G2/M Phase Transition in HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Thu; Deplanche, Martine; Nega, Mulugeta; Le Loir, Yves; Peisl, Loulou; Götz, Friedrich; Berkova, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle is an ordered set of events, leading to cell growth and division into two daughter cells. The eukaryotic cell cycle consists of interphase (G1, S, and G2 phases), followed by the mitotic phase and G0 phase. Many bacterial pathogens secrete cyclomodulins that interfere with the host cell cycle. In Staphylococcus aureus four cyclomodulins have been described so far that all represent toxins and are secreted into the culture supernatant. Here we show that the membrane-anchored lipoprotein-like proteins (Lpl), encoded on a genomic island called νSaα, interact with the cell cycle of HeLa cells. By comparing wild type and lpl deletion mutant it turned out that the lpl cluster is causative for the G2/M phase transition delay and also contributes to increased invasion frequency. The lipoprotein Lpl1, a representative of the lpl cluster, also caused G2/M phase transition delay. Interestingly, the lipid modification, which is essential for TLR2 signaling and activation of the immune system, is not necessary for cyclomodulin activity. Unlike the other staphylococcal cyclomodulins Lpl1 shows no cytotoxicity even at high concentrations. As all Lpl proteins are highly conserved there might be a common function that is accentuated by their multiplicity in a tandem gene cluster. The cell surface localized Lpls' suggests a correlation between G2/M phase transition delay and host cell invasion.

  17. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in rats exposed to premium motor spirit fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberare, Ogbevire L; Okuonghae, Patrick; Mukoro, Nathaniel; Dirisu, John O; Osazuwa, Favour; Odigie, Elvis; Omoregie, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Deliberate and regular exposure to premium motor spirit fumes is common and could be a risk factor for liver disease in those who are occupationally exposed. A possible association between premium motor spirit fumes and plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol using a rodent model could provide new insights in the pathology of diseases where cellular dysfunction is an established risk factor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effect of premium motor spirit fumes on lipids and lipoproteins in workers occupationally exposed to premium motor spirit fumes using rodent model. Twenty-five Wister albino rats (of both sexes) were used for this study between the 4(th) of August and 7(th) of September, 2010. The rats were divided into five groups of five rats each. Group 1 rats were not exposed to premium motor spirit fumes (control group), group 2 rats were exposed for 1 hour daily, group 3 for 3 hours daily, group 4 for 5 hours daily and group 5 for 7 hours daily. The experiment lasted for a period of 4 weeks. Blood samples obtained from all the groups after 4 weeks of exposure were used for the estimation of plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol and low density lipoprotein- cholesterol. Results showed significant increase in means of plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels (Plevel of high density lipoprotein, the ratio of low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein and the ratio of total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein did not differ significantly in exposed subjects when compared with the control group. These results showed that frequent exposure to petrol fumes may be highly deleterious to the liver cells.

  18. Lipoprotein particle distribution and skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase activity after acute exercise

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, Michael

    2012-06-06

    AbstractBackgroundMany of the metabolic effects of exercise are due to the most recent exercise session. With recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS), it is possible to gain insight about which lipoprotein particles are responsible for mediating exercise effects.MethodsUsing a randomized cross-over design, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) responses were evaluated in eight men on the morning after i) an inactive control trial (CON), ii) exercising vigorously on the prior evening for 100 min followed by fasting overnight to maintain an energy and carbohydrate deficit (EX-DEF), and iii) after the same exercise session followed by carbohydrate intake to restore muscle glycogen and carbohydrate balance (EX-BAL).ResultsThe intermediate, low and high density lipoprotein particle concentrations did not differ between trials. Fasting triglyceride (TG) determined biochemically, and mean VLDL size were lower in EX-DEF but not in EX-BAL compared to CON, primarily due to a reduction in VLDL-TG in the 70–120 nm (large) particle range. In contrast, VLDL-TG was lower in both EX-DEF and EX-BAL compared to CON in the 43–55 nm (medium) particle range. VLDL-TG in smaller particles (29–43 nm) was unaffected by exercise. Because the majority of VLDL particles were in this smallest size range and resistant to change, total VLDL particle concentration was not different between any of these conditions. Skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was also not different across these 3 trials. However, in CON only, the inter-individual differences in LPL activity were inversely correlated with fasting TG, VLDL-TG, total, large and small VLDL particle concentration and VLDL size, indicating a regulatory role for LPL in the non-exercised state.ConclusionsThese findings reveal a high level of differential regulation between different sized triglyceride-rich lipoproteins following exercise and feeding, in the absence of changes in LPL activity.

  19. The Acylation State of Surface Lipoproteins of Mollicute Acholeplasma laidlawii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakova, Marina V.; Demina, Irina A.; Galyamina, Maria A.; Kondratov, Ilya G.; Ladygina, Valentina G.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Acylation of the N-terminal Cys residue is an essential, ubiquitous, and uniquely bacterial posttranslational modification that allows anchoring of proteins to the lipid membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, acylation proceeds through three sequential steps requiring lipoprotein diacylglyceryltransferase, lipoprotein signal peptidase, and finally lipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The apparent lack of genes coding for recognizable homologs of lipoprotein N-acyltransferase in Gram-positive bacteria and Mollicutes suggests that the final step of the protein acylation process may be absent in these organisms. In this work, we monitored the acylation state of eight major lipoproteins of the mollicute Acholeplasma laidlawii using a combination of standard two-dimensional gel electrophoresis protein separation, blotting to nitrocellulose membranes, and MALDI-MS identification of modified N-terminal tryptic peptides. We show that for each A. laidlawii lipoprotein studied a third fatty acid in an amide linkage on the N-terminal Cys residue is present, whereas diacylated species were not detected. The result thus proves that A. laidlawii encodes a lipoprotein N-acyltransferase activity. We hypothesize that N-acyltransferases encoded by genes non-homologous to N-acyltransferases of Gram-negative bacteria are also present in other mollicutes and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:21540185

  20. Wild Accessions and Mutant Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    Lotus japonicus, Lotus burttii, and Lotus filicaulis are species of Lotus genus that are utilized for molecular genetic analysis such as the construction of a linkage map and QTL analysis. Among them, a number of mutants have been isolated from two wild accessions: L. japonicus Gifu B-129 and Miy...

  1. Corn oil intake favorably impacts lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein and lipoprotein particle levels compared with extra-virgin olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, K C; Lawless, A L; Kelley, K M; Kaden, V N; Geiger, C J; Palacios, O M; Dicklin, M R

    2017-01-01

    Corn oil (CO) and extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) are rich sources of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), but UFA profiles differ among oils, which may affect lipoprotein levels. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of CO versus EVOO intake on fasting lipoprotein and subfraction cholesterol levels, apolipoprotein (apo) A1, apo B, and low-density lipoprotein particle concentrations in men and women. As part of a weight maintenance diet, men and women were provided with food items prepared with 54 g per day of CO or EVOO (21-day treatment, 21-day washout) in a randomized, double-blind, controlled-feeding, crossover trial. Fasting lipoprotein cholesterol and related variables were determined with density gradient ultracentrifugation. Among the 54 completers, CO reduced total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), apo B and LDL particle concentration to a greater extent compared with EVOO intake. Changes in LDL-C and VLDL-C contributed to the larger reduction in non-HDL-C with CO compared with EVOO intake (-0.39 mmol/l vs -0.04 mmol/l; PEVOO in large LDL1+2-C (-0.22 mmol/l) and intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-0.12 mmol/l). HDL-C responses did not differ between treatments, but apo A1 increased more with EVOO compared with CO intake (4.6  versus 0.7 mg/dl, respectively, P=0.016). CO intake reduced atherogenic lipoprotein cholesterol and particle concentrations to a larger extent than did EVOO, which may have implications for cardiovascular disease risk.

  2. Neisserial surface lipoproteins: structure, function and biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyejin E; Bateman, Thomas J; Moraes, Trevor F

    2017-03-01

    The surface of many Gram-negative bacteria contains lipidated protein molecules referred to as surface lipoproteins or SLPs. SLPs play critical roles in host immune evasion, nutrient acquisition and regulation of the bacterial stress response. The focus of this review is on the SLPs present in Neisseria, a genus of bacteria that colonise the mucosal surfaces of animals. Neisseria contains two pathogens of medical interest, namely Neisseria meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. Several SLPs have been identified in Neisseria and their study has elucidated key strategies used by these pathogens to survive inside the human body. Herein, we focus on the identification, structure and function of SLPs that have been identified in Neisseria. We also survey the translocation pathways used by these SLPs to reach the cell surface. Specifically, we elaborate on the strategies used by neisserial SLPs to translocate across the outer membrane with an emphasis on Slam, a novel outer membrane protein that has been implicated in SLP biogenesis. Taken together, the study of SLPs in Neisseria illustrates the widespread roles played by this family of proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Lipoprotein(a in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Malaguarnera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a (Lp(a is an LDL-like molecule consisting of an apolipoprotein B-100 (apo(B-100 particle attached by a disulphide bridge to apo(a. Many observations have pointed out that Lp(a levels may be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Lp(a inhibits the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF and contributes to the growth of arterial atherosclerotic lesions by promoting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the migration of smooth muscle cells to endothelial cells. Moreover Lp(a inhibits plasminogen binding to the surfaces of endothelial cells and decreases the activity of fibrin-dependent tissue-type plasminogen activator. Lp(a may act as a proinflammatory mediator that augments the lesion formation in atherosclerotic plaques. Elevated serum Lp(a is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. Furthermore, Lp(a levels should be a marker of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, saphenous vein bypass graft atherosclerosis, and accelerated coronary atherosclerosis of cardiac transplantation. Finally, the possibility that Lp(a may be a risk factor for ischemic stroke has been assessed in several studies. Recent findings suggest that Lp(a-lowering therapy might be beneficial in patients with high Lp(a levels. A future therapeutic approach could include apheresis in high-risk patients in order to reduce major coronary events.

  4. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol: How High

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rajagopal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C is considered anti-atherogenic good cholesterol. It is involved in reverse transport of lipids. Epidemiological studies have found inverse relationship of HDL-C and coronary heart disease (CHD risk. When grouped according to HDL-C, subjects having HDL-C more than 60 mg/dL had lesser risk of CHD than those having HDL-C of 40-60 mg/dL, who in turn had lesser risk than those who had HDL-C less than 40 mg/dL. No upper limit for beneficial effect of HDL-C on CHD risk has been identified. The goals of treating patients with low HDL-C have not been firmly established. Though many drugs are known to improve HDL-C concentration, statins are proven to improve CHD risk and mortality. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP is involved in metabolism of HDL-C and its inhibitors are actively being screened for clinical utility. However, final answer is still awaited on CETP-inhibitors.

  5. Fasting remnant lipoproteins can predict postprandial hyperlipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagata Tomoki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertriglyceridemia and postprandial hyperlipidemia is thought to play an important role in atherosclerosis, but to select patients at high-risk for cardiovascular diseases is difficult with triglycerides (TG alone in these patients. Methods To predict postprandial hyperlipidemia without inconvenient test meal loading, we examined lipid concentrations before and after test meal loading and fasting adiponectin, and investigated which of these other than TG were significant during the fasting period in 45 healthy individuals (men: women, 26:19. Results TG, remnant-like particle-cholesterol and -triglyceride (RemL-C, RLP-C, and RLP-TG, and TG/apolipoprotein(apoB were significantly elevated after loading and fasting values significantly and positively correlated with incremental area under the curve (iAUC (r=0.80, r=0.79, r=0.63, r=0.58, r=0.54; p Conclusion Fasting triglyceride-rich lipoprotein-related values, especially RemL-C, RLP-C, RLP-TG, and TG/apoB are useful predictors of postprandial hyperlipidemia in young healthy individuals. Although fasting adiponectin concentration correlated with the iAUCs for TG, RemL-C, RLP-C, RLP-TG, and TG/apoB, it was not a significant predictor of postprandial hyperlipidemia in multivariable linear regression analysis.

  6. Apolipoprotein A-I configuration and cell cholesterol efflux activity of discoidal lipoproteins depend on the reconstitution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Luz Ángela; Prieto, Eduardo Daniel; Cabaleiro, Laura Virginia; Garda, Horacio Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Discoidal high-density lipoproteins (D-HDL) are critical intermediates in reverse cholesterol transport. Most of the present knowledge of D-HDL is based on studies with reconstituted lipoprotein complexes of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) obtained by cholate dialysis (CD). D-HDL can also be generated by the direct microsolubilization (DM) of phospholipid vesicles at the gel/fluid phase transition temperature, a process mechanistically similar to the "in vivo" apoAI lipidation via ABCA1. We compared the apoA-I configuration in D-HDL reconstituted with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine by both procedures using fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements with apoA-I tryptophan mutants and fluorescently labeled cysteine mutants. Results indicate that apoA-I configuration in D-HDL depends on the reconstitution process and are consistent with a "double belt" molecular arrangement with different helix registry. As reported by others, a configuration with juxtaposition of helices 5 of each apoAI monomer (5/5 registry) predominates in D-HDL obtained by CD. However, a configuration with helix 5 of one monomer juxtaposed with helix 2 of the other (5/2 registry) would predominate in D-HDL generated by DM. Moreover, we also show that the kinetics of cholesterol efflux from macrophage cultures depends on the reconstitution process, suggesting that apoAI configuration is important for this HDL function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  8. Heritability of Biomarkers of Oxidized Lipoproteins: Twin Pair Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fangwen; Schork, Andrew J; Maihofer, Adam X; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Marcovina, Santica M; Miller, Elizabeth R; Witztum, Joseph L; O'Connor, Daniel T; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-07-01

    To determine whether biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are genetically determined. Lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is a heritable risk factor and carrier of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL). We measured oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins (OxPL-apoB), Lp(a), IgG, and IgM autoantibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein, copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes in 386 monozygotic and dizygotic twins to estimate trait heritability (h(2)) and determine specific genetic effects among traits. A genome-wide linkage study followed by genetic association was performed. The h(2) (scale: 0-1) for Lp(a) was 0.91±0.01 and for OxPL-apoB 0.87±0.02, which were higher than physiological, inflammatory, or lipid traits. h(2) of IgM malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein, copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes were 0.69±0.04, 0.67±0.05, and 0.80±0.03, respectively, and for IgG malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein, copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes 0.62±0.05, 0.52±0.06, and 0.53±0.06, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between the major apo(a) isoform and OxPL-apoB (R=-0.49; Plipoprotein and copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes. Sib-pair genetic linkage of the Lp(a) trait revealed that single nucleotide polymorphism rs10455872 was significantly associated with OxPL-apoB after adjusting for Lp(a). OxPL-apoB and other biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are highly heritable cardiovascular risk factors that suggest novel genetic origins of atherothrombosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Lipoprotein Metabolism, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, David E.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease represents the most common cause of death in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD patients exhibit an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is characterized by an increased plasma concentration of triglycerides, reduced concentration of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that are smaller and more dense than normal. The pathogenesis of NAFLD-associated atherogenic dyslipidemia is multifaceted, but man...

  10. Lipoprotein(a) as a cardiovascular risk factor: current status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Chapman, M John; Ray, Kausik

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the study were, first, to critically evaluate lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] as a cardiovascular risk factor and, second, to advise on screening for elevated plasma Lp(a), on desirable levels, and on therapeutic strategies.......The aims of the study were, first, to critically evaluate lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] as a cardiovascular risk factor and, second, to advise on screening for elevated plasma Lp(a), on desirable levels, and on therapeutic strategies....

  11. Associations between airway hyperresponsiveness, obesity, and lipoproteins in a longitudinal cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Finn; Hancox, Robert; Nair, Parameswaran

    2013-01-01

    . The present study investigated the association between airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine and body mass index (BMI) and plasma lipoproteins [low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and total cholesterol]. Methods Associations between AHR, BMI and plasma lipoproteins were...

  12. The NlpD lipoprotein is a novel Yersinia pestis virulence factor essential for the development of plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Tidhar

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of plague. Previously we have isolated an attenuated Y. pestis transposon insertion mutant in which the pcm gene was disrupted. In the present study, we investigated the expression and the role of pcm locus genes in Y. pestis pathogenesis using a set of isogenic surE, pcm, nlpD and rpoS mutants of the fully virulent Kimberley53 strain. We show that in Y. pestis, nlpD expression is controlled from elements residing within the upstream genes surE and pcm. The NlpD lipoprotein is the only factor encoded from the pcm locus that is essential for Y. pestis virulence. A chromosomal deletion of the nlpD gene sequence resulted in a drastic reduction in virulence to an LD(50 of at least 10(7 cfu for subcutaneous and airway routes of infection. The mutant was unable to colonize mouse organs following infection. The filamented morphology of the nlpD mutant indicates that NlpD is involved in cell separation; however, deletion of nlpD did not affect in vitro growth rate. Trans-complementation experiments with the Y. pestis nlpD gene restored virulence and all other phenotypic defects. Finally, we demonstrated that subcutaneous administration of the nlpD mutant could protect animals against bubonic and primary pneumonic plague. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Y. pestis NlpD is a novel virulence factor essential for the development of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Further, the nlpD mutant is superior to the EV76 prototype live vaccine strain in immunogenicity and in conferring effective protective immunity. Thus it could serve as a basis for a very potent live vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague.

  13. Lipoprotein Particle Concentrations in Children and Adults following Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jonathan; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Xiaoying; Liu, Victoria; Sato, Yuichiro Z.; Jimenez-Fernandez, Susan; Newfield, Ron S.; Pourfarzib, Ray; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Gordon, John B.; Daniels, Lori B.; Burns, Jane C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that children and adults with history of Kawasaki disease (KD) are more likely to have abnormal lipoprotein particle profiles that could place them at increased risk of atherosclerosis later in life. Study design Fasting serum samples were obtained from 192 children and 63 adults with history of KD and 90 age-similar healthy controls. Lipoprotein particle (P) concentrations and sizes were measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (Liposcience Inc., Raleigh, NC) and serum was assayed for total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL)-C. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL)-C was estimated using the Friedewald formula. Data were analyzed in a least-square means model adjusting for age and sex and using Holm correction for multiple comparisons. Results Compared with respective control groups, both adult and pediatric subjects with KD had significantly lower mean very-low-density lipoprotein-chylomicron particle concentrations (VLDLC-P), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), TG, and TC concentrations. Pediatric subjects with KD had significantly lower LDL-P and LDL-C concentrations and lower mean TC/HDL-C ratio (ppediatric and adult subjects with KD regardless of their aneurysm status are no more likely than age-similar, healthy controls to have lipid patterns associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:25039043

  14. The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.M.; Plump, A.S.

    1993-12-01

    The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in vivo systems which can be subject to genetic manipulation. The power of overexpression is obvious: elucidating function in a relatively controlled genetic environment in which the whole system is present and operational. The not-so-obvious problem with transgenics is ``background,`` or for purposes of the current discussion, the mouse`s own lipoprotein system. With the advent of gene knockout, we have been given the ability to overcome ``background.`` By recreating the genetic complement of the mouse we can alter a system in essentially any manner desired. As unique tools, and in combination with one another, the overexpression of foreign genes and the targeted disruption or alteration of endogenous genes has already and will continue to offer a wealth of information on the biology of lipoprotein metabolism and its effect on atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  15. DETECTION OF MODIFIED LIPOPROTEINS IN ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESIONS OF HUMAN AORTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Pigarevsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Specific autoantibodies against acetylated, maleylated and malonic dialdehyde-(MDA-modified lipoproteins are detectable in human plasma. Immunization of rabbits with autologous, correspondingly modified low-density lipoproteins (LDLs did induce autoantibodies against acetylated, maleylated and MDA-modified lipoproteins. In atherosclerotic lesions from hyman aorta, the epitopes have been detected that were recognized by the antibodies to acetylated, maleylated, and MDA-modified LDLs. Such antigens were detected at all atherogenesis stages, beginning with the earliest lesions (lipid spots, and their deposition pattern was quite variable.Rabbit and human autoantibodies against acetylated, maleylated and MDA-modified lipoproteins recognized antigens in human atherosclerotic aorta. Modified proteins were localized both intra- and extracellular in tectum, superficial and deep layers of the atherosclerotic lesions. The most typical mode of depositions for all modified proteins si represented by extracellular deposits in the cap of lipid streaks and fibrous plaques, especially in transitional “shoulder” area.The intimal deposits of modified proteins shared similar features with distribution of apo-B-containing lipoproteins, like as of lipids detectable by Oil Red staining. The areas where modified proteins and apo-B-containing lipoproteins were revealed did often coincide with foci of IgG deposits. Modified proteins were not detectable in the non-affected segments of aortic intima.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  17. Prediction of lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncker, Agnieszka S; Willenbrock, Hanni; Von Heijne, Gunnar; Brunak, Søren; Nielsen, Henrik; Krogh, Anders

    2003-08-01

    A method to predict lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative Eubacteria, LipoP, has been developed. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was able to distinguish between lipoproteins (SPaseII-cleaved proteins), SPaseI-cleaved proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, and transmembrane proteins. This predictor was able to predict 96.8% of the lipoproteins correctly with only 0.3% false positives in a set of SPaseI-cleaved, cytoplasmic, and transmembrane proteins. The results obtained were significantly better than those of previously developed methods. Even though Gram-positive lipoprotein signal peptides differ from Gram-negatives, the HMM was able to identify 92.9% of the lipoproteins included in a Gram-positive test set. A genome search was carried out for 12 Gram-negative genomes and one Gram-positive genome. The results for Escherichia coli K12 were compared with new experimental data, and the predictions by the HMM agree well with the experimentally verified lipoproteins. A neural network-based predictor was developed for comparison, and it gave very similar results. LipoP is available as a Web server at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/LipoP/.

  18. Binding of human lipoproteins (low, very low, high density lipoproteins) to recombinant envelope proteins of hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monazahian, M; Kippenberger, S; Müller, A; Seitz, H; Böhme, I; Grethe, S; Thomssen, R

    2000-06-01

    Heterogeneities in the density of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA-carrying material from human sera (1.03-1.20 g/ml) are partially due to the binding of lipoproteins [low density (LDL), very low density (VLDL), high density (HDL) lipoproteins] and immunoglobulins. In this study we demonstrate the binding of recombinant HCV envelope protein (El/E2) to human LDL, VLDL and HDL on a molecular basis. The binding of lipoproteins was restricted to the middle part of the El gene product (amino acids 222-336) and the C-terminal part of the E2 protein (amino acids 523-809). Lipoproteins did not bind to recombinant HCV core protein.

  19. Beyond high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels evaluating high-density lipoprotein function as influenced by novel therapeutic approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    deGoma, Emil M; deGoma, Rolando L; Rader, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    A number of therapeutic strategies targeting high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and reverse cholesterol transport are being developed to halt the progression of atherosclerosis or even induce regression...

  20. The effect of vigorous treadmill exercise on plasma lipoproteins and hepatic lipoprotein production in Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelbach, J D; Kris-Etherton, P M

    1985-10-01

    Chronic exercise has been shown to alter plasma lipids in man and animals, but the mechanism(s) responsible for this phenomenon have not been clarified. In the present study we have examined the role of the liver in the production of lipoproteins following an intensive exercise regimen in lean and obese Zucker rats. Four-week-old lean and obese male Zucker rats were subjected to a vigorous exercise regimen of running on a motor-driven treadmill for 10 weeks. Hepatic lipoprotein cholesterol production was then assessed using liver perfusion techniques. Plasma cholesterol concentration was significantly lower in both lean and obese runners versus appropriate non-exercised controls. This decrease was due to a decline in both chylomicron and HDL cholesterol. Exercise had no affect on plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Hepatic VLDL cholesterol production was elevated in obese rats versus lean rats and was not affected by exercise in runners of either phenotype. Hepatic HDL cholesterol production was higher in lean runners but was unchanged in obese runners. Plasma triglyceride was reduced by 50% in exercised obese rats. In summary, intense exercise decreased plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol concentrations in lean and obese Zucker rats. Since hepatic HDL cholesterol production was increased and hepatic VLDL cholesterol production was unaffected by exercise, the changes in plasma lipid levels observed following exercise appear to be mediated by extrahepatic mechanisms.

  1. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J., E-mail: rbrown@mun.ca

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  2. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  3. Activated platelets contribute to oxidized low-density lipoproteins and dysfunctional high-density lipoproteins through a phospholipase A2-dependent mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blache, Denis; Gautier, Thomas; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Lagrost, Laurent

    Plasma activity of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) increases in patients with cardiovascular disease. The present study investigated whether platelet-released sPLA2 induces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) modifications that translate into changes in lipoprotein

  4. Proteome of human plasma very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein exhibits a link with coagulation and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dashty Rahmatabady, Monireh; Motazacker, Mohammad M.; Levels, Johannes; de Vries, Marcel; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Peppelenbosch, Maikel; Rezaee, Farhad

    Apart from transporting lipids through the body, the human plasma lipoproteins very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are also thought to serve as a modality for intra-organismal protein transfer, shipping proteins with important roles in inflammation and thrombosis

  5. Aminoacylation of the N-terminal cysteine is essential for Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes but does not depend on lipoprotein sorting signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ayumu; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Hara, Takashi; Nakayama, Jiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-11-08

    Lipoproteins are present in a wide variety of bacteria and are anchored to membranes through lipids attached to the N-terminal cysteine. The Lol system of Escherichia coli mediates the membrane-specific localization of lipoproteins. Aspartate at position 2 functions as a Lol avoidance signal and causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane, whereas lipoproteins having residues other than aspartate at position 2 are released from the inner membrane and localized to the outer membrane by the Lol system. Phospholipid:apolipoprotein transacylase, Lnt, catalyzes the last step of lipoprotein modification, converting apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein. To reveal the importance of this aminoacylation for the Lol-dependent membrane localization, apolipoproteins were prepared by inhibiting lipoprotein maturation. Lnt was also purified and used to convert apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein in vitro. The release of these lipoproteins was examined in proteoliposomes. We show here that the aminoacylation is essential for the Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes. Furthermore, lipoproteins with aspartate at position 2 were found to be aminoacylated both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that the lipoprotein-sorting signal does not affect lipid modification.

  6. Interfacial Tension and Surface Pressure of High Density Lipoprotein, Low Density Lipoprotein, and Related Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O. H. S.; Lamberg, A.; Lehtivaara, M.

    2012-01-01

    ) are essentially lipid droplets surrounded by specific proteins, their main function being to transport cholesterol. Interfacial tension and surface pressure of these particles are of great interest because they are related to the shape and the stability of the droplets and to protein adsorption at the interface...... of interfacial tension becomes significant for particles with a radius of similar to 5 nm, when the area per molecule in the surface region is......Lipid droplets play a central role in energy storage and metabolism on a cellular scale. Their core is comprised of hydrophobic lipids covered by a surface region consisting of amphiphilic lipids and proteins. For example, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively...

  7. Low density lipoproteins mediated nanoplatforms for cancer targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Kesharwani, Prashant, E-mail: prashant_pharmacy04@rediffmail.com; Jain, Narendra K., E-mail: jnarendr@yahoo.co.in [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-09-15

    Chemotherapy is a foremost remedial approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized tumors. In order to explore new treatment modalities for cancer, it is important to identify qualitative or quantitative differences in metabolic processes between normal and malignant cells. One such difference may be that of increased receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) by cancer cells. Lipoproteins in general and specifically LDL are ideal candidates for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents due to their biocompatibility. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the reconstituted lipoproteins can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. In this account, we review the field of low density inspired nanoparticles in relation to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapeutic agents. LDL has instinctive cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate various lipophillic molecules to transport them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins far off its constricted purview. In this review, we have discussed the various aspects of LDL including its role in cancer imaging and chemotherapy in retrospect and prospect and current efforts aimed to further improve the delivery efficacy of LDL-drug complexes with reduced chances of drug resistance leading to optimal drug delivery. This review provides a strong support for the concept of using LDL as a drug carrier.

  8. Low density lipoproteins mediated nanoplatforms for cancer targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Kesharwani, Prashant; Jain, Narendra K.

    2013-09-01

    Chemotherapy is a foremost remedial approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized tumors. In order to explore new treatment modalities for cancer, it is important to identify qualitative or quantitative differences in metabolic processes between normal and malignant cells. One such difference may be that of increased receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) by cancer cells. Lipoproteins in general and specifically LDL are ideal candidates for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents due to their biocompatibility. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the reconstituted lipoproteins can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. In this account, we review the field of low density inspired nanoparticles in relation to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapeutic agents. LDL has instinctive cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate various lipophillic molecules to transport them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins far off its constricted purview. In this review, we have discussed the various aspects of LDL including its role in cancer imaging and chemotherapy in retrospect and prospect and current efforts aimed to further improve the delivery efficacy of LDL-drug complexes with reduced chances of drug resistance leading to optimal drug delivery. This review provides a strong support for the concept of using LDL as a drug carrier.

  9. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti, E-mail: keertijain02@gmail.com; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar, E-mail: neelesh81mph@gmail.com; Jain, N. K., E-mail: dr.jnarendr@gmail.com [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  10. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  11. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Learning from biology: synthetic lipoproteins for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Cruz, William; Chen, Juan; Zheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic lipoproteins represent a relevant tool for targeted delivery of biological/chemical agents (chemotherapeutics, siRNAs, photosensitizers, and imaging contrast agents) into various cell types. These nanoparticles offer a number of advantages for drugs delivery over their native counterparts while retaining their natural characteristics and biological functions. Their ultra-small size (lipoprotein receptors, i.e., low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and Scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SRB1) that are found in a number of pathological conditions (e.g., cancer, atherosclerosis), make them superior delivery strategies when compared with other nanoparticle systems. We review the various approaches that have been developed for the generation of synthetic lipoproteins and their respective applications in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, we summarize the approaches employed to address the limitation on use of reconstituted lipoproteins by means of natural or recombinant apolipoproteins, as well as apolipoprotein mimetic molecules. Finally, we provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and discuss future perspectives for clinical translation of these nanoparticles. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Recombinant Lipoproteins as Novel Vaccines with Intrinsic Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Pele; Huang, Jui-Hsin; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2015-01-01

    A core platform technology for high production of recombinant lipoproteins with built-in immunostimulator for novel subunit vaccine development has been established. This platform technology has the following advantages: (1) easily convert antigen into lipidated recombinant protein using a fusion sequence containing lipobox and express high level (50-150mg/L) in Escherichia coli; (2) a robust high-yield up- and downstream bioprocess for lipoprotein production is successfully developed to devoid endotoxin contamination; (3) the lipid moiety of recombinant lipoproteins, which is identical to that of bacterial lipoproteins is recognized as danger signals by the immune system (Toll-like receptor 2 agonist), so both innate and adaptive immune responses can be induced by lipoproteins; and (4) successfully demonstrate the feasibility and safety of this core platform technology in meningococcal group B subunit vaccine, dengue subunit vaccine, novel subunit vaccine against Clostridium difficile-associated diseases, and HPV-based immunotherapeutic vaccines in animal model studies. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of partial ileal bypass on plasma lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R B; Buchwald, H; Varco, R L

    1980-09-01

    Plasma lipids and lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were determined before and at 3 months and 1 year after partial ileal surgery in 28 male survivors of first myocardial infarction (eight normolipidemic subjects and eight type II-A, two type II-B, eight type IV and two type V hyperlipoproteinemic subjects). All subjects had marked reductions in plasma total cholesterol (average 45% and 33% in the type V subjects and 37% and 31% in the other 26 subjects at 3 months and 1 year after surgeryyy). Except for the two type V subjects, all had even more marked reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol than in the total plasma cholesterol, averaging 51% at 3 months and 49% at 1 year after surger. There were no significant changes in high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels. The hypertriglyceridemic subjects had marked reductions in plasma triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, whereas the normotriglyceridemic subjects (normals and II-A) had slight increases in these two measurements after surgery. Partial ileal bypass tends to normalize elevated plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels and results in a maximal lowering in LDL-cholesterol concentrations without altering the HDL-cholesterol level.

  15. Gutscheine und Protektionismus / Gerald Braun

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Braun, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Euroopa Kohtu otsusest, mis käsitleb küsimust, millistel tingimustel võivad tööandjad väljastada oma töötajatele maksusoodustusega talonge, mida saab kasutada majutuseks, meelelahutuseks ja/või toitlustuseks (C‑179/14). Vt. ka lk. 439-440

  16. Auto antibodies against oxidized low density lipoprotein in severe preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Meenakshi; Sawhney, Harjeet; Aggarwal, Neelam; Vashistha, Kala; Majumdhar, Siddarth

    2004-06-01

    To study autoantibody titres against oxidized low density lipoprotein in preeclamsia. Ten millimeters of heparinized blood samples were collected from 20 primigravidae with severe preeclamsia (study group) and 20 gestation-matched normotensive primigravidae (control group). Concentration of malondialdehyde, metabolite of lipid peroxidation were measured in sera by HPLC and autoantibodies against oxidized low density lipoproteins (obtained after oxidation with 2 mm CuSO(4)) were determined by ELISA. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t-test and chi(2) test. Mean triglyceride levels were significantly (P /=1.32). In preeclamptic women, diastolic blood pressure, the amount of urinary protein excretion and the plasma level of urea were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in patients with higher auto antibody titre. Titres of autoantibodies to oxidized low density lipoprotein were similar in normotensive and preeclamptic women. In preeclamptic women, titres correlated positively with the severity of preeclampsia.

  17. Lipoprotein metabolism, dyslipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David E; Fisher, Edward A

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease represents the most common cause of death in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Patients with NAFLD exhibit an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is characterized by an increased plasma concentration of triglycerides, reduced concentration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that are smaller and more dense than normal. The pathogenesis of NAFLD-associated atherogenic dyslipidemia is multifaceted, but many aspects are attributable to manifestations of insulin resistance. Here the authors review the structure, function, and metabolism of lipoproteins, which are macromolecular particles of lipids and proteins that transport otherwise insoluble triglyceride and cholesterol molecules within the plasma. They provide a current explanation of the metabolic perturbations that are observed in the setting of insulin resistance. An improved understanding of the pathophysiology of atherogenic dyslipidemia would be expected to guide therapies aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with NAFLD. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Transvascular lipoprotein transport in patients with chronic renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While increased plasma cholesterol is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor in the general population, this is not so among patients with chronic renal disease. We hypothesized that the transvascular lipoprotein transport, in addition to the lipoprotein concentration in plasma......, determines the degree of atherosclerosis among patients with chronic renal disease. METHODS: We used an in vivo method for measurement of transvascular transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in 21 patients with chronic renal disease and in 42 healthy control patients. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL...... was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-hour fractional escape rate was taken as index of transvascular transport. RESULTS: Transvascular LDL transport tended to be lower in patients with chronic renal disease than in healthy control patients [3.3 (95% CI 2.4-4.2) vs. 4.2 (3.7-4.2)%/hour; NS]. However...

  19. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution among lipoproteins differs in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvie, Jennifer L; Wang, Hong; Kinney, Gregory L; Snell-Bergeon, Janet; Hokanson, John E; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    LpPLA2 mass and activity have been variably related to cardiovascular disease risk, and the distribution of LpPLA2 in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), wherein cardiovascular disease risk is high despite normal or higher levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, is unknown. To determine whether there are differences in the distribution of LpPLA2 mass and activity across lipoproteins and their association with coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with T1D. Men with T1D (n = 19) not on statins, with and without CAC progression, and men without diabetes matched for HDL cholesterol (n = 25) had lipoproteins separated by fast protein liquid chromatography. Both LpPLA2 mass and activity were found within low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and HDL pools with more LpPLA2 mass being associated with HDL (54% vs 44%; P-value lipoprotein subfractions was observed between all groups, and there was no relationship between LpPLA2 activity or mass and its distribution and CAC score progression in healthy or T1D men. LpPLA2 is found in both LDL and HDL and is distributed differently in men with T1D without any relationship to CAC score progression. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDb (https://scabusa.org/FgMutantDb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Thomas T; Basenko, Evelina; Harb, Omar; Brown, Neil A; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Bregitzer, Phil P

    2018-02-02

    There is no comprehensive storage for generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or data associated with these mutants. Instead, researchers relied on several independent and non-integrated databases. FgMutantDb was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web that will function as a centralized source of information on F. graminearum mutants. FgMutantDb aids in the maintenance and sharing of mutants within a research community. It will serve also as a platform for disseminating prepublication results as well as negative results that often go unreported. Additionally, the highly curated information on mutants in FgMutantDb will be shared with other databases (FungiDB, Ensembl, PhytoPath, and PHI-base) through updating reports. Here we describe the creation and potential usefulness of FgMutantDb to the F. graminearum research community, and provide a tutorial on its use. This type of database could be easily emulated for other fungal species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. JCL Roundtable: Hypertriglyceridemia due to defects in lipoprotein lipase function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. Virgil; Goldberg, Ira J.; Young, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In this Roundtable, our intent is to discuss those rare genetic disorders that impair the function of lipoprotein lipase. These cause severe hypertriglyceridemia that appears in early childhood with Mendelian inheritance and usually with full penetrance in a recessive pattern. Dr Ira Goldberg from New York University School of Medicine and Dr Stephen Young from the University of California, Los Angeles have agreed to answer my questions about this topic. Both have done fundamental work in recent years that has markedly altered our views on lipoprotein lipase function. I am going to start by asking them to give us a brief history of this enzyme system as a clinical entity. PMID:26073384

  2. Increased Binding of Apolipoproteins A-I and E4 to Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins is linked to Induction of Hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkova, Irina N; Atkinson, David

    2017-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is an independent factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and a hallmark of many metabolic disorders. However, the molecular etiology of HTG is still largely unknown. In mice, severe HTG may be induced by expression of specific mutants of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I or wild type (WT) apoE4. Expression of a certain apoE4 mutant results in mild HTG, while expression of another apoE4 mutant or WT apoA-I results in normal plasma triglyceride (TG) levels. Biophysical studies of the apoA-I and apoE4 forms associated with HTG help better understand the molecular mechanisms of induction of HTG by these proteins. The studies show that the apoA-I and apoE4 forms that induce HTG have a destabilized and more loosely folded conformation in solution than their counterparts not associated with HTG. Disruption of the protein salt bridge networks by the mutations is likely responsible for the observed structural changes. Each apoA-I and apoE4 form that induced HTG show enhanced binding to model TG-rich particles. HTG appeared to positively correlate with the apolipoprotein ability to bind to TG-rich particles. This implies that in vivo, the conformational changes in the apolipoproteins that induce HTG facilitate their binding to plasma TG-rich lipoproteins. We discuss metabolic pathways leading to the development of HTG that may result from enhanced binding of the apolipoproteins to TG-rich lipoproteins in circulation. While various factors may be involved in the development of HTG in humans, it is possible that structural alterations that increase affinity of apolipoproteins to TG-rich lipoproteins may contribute to some cases of this disorder.

  3. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particle assembly: Lipid capacity of the nascent lipoprotein particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchekar, Medha; Forte, Trudy M.; Datta, Geeta; Richardson, Paul E.; Segrest, Jere P.; Dashti, Nassrin

    2003-12-01

    We previously proposed that the N-terminal 1000 residue {beta}{alpha}{sub 1} domain of apolipoprotein B (apoB) forms a bulk lipid pocket homologous to that of lamprey lipovitellin (LV). In support of this ''lipid pocket'' hypothesis, apoB:1000 (residues 1-1000) was shown to be secreted by a stable transformant of McA-RH7777 cells as a monodisperse particle with HDL{sub 3} density and Stokes diameter of 112 {angstrom}. In contrast, apoB:931 (residues 1-931), missing only 69 residues of the sequence homologous to LV, was secreted as a particle considerably more dense than HDL with Stokes diameter of 110 {angstrom}. The purpose of the present study was to determine the stoichiometry of the lipid component of the apoB:931 and apoB:1000 particles. This was accomplished by metabolic labeling of cells with either [{sup 14}C]oleic acid or [{sup 3}H]glycerol followed by immunoprecipitation (IP) or nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (NDGGE) of secreted lipoproteins and by immunoaffinity chromatography of secreted unlabeled lipoproteins. The [{sup 3}H]-labeled apoB:1000-containing particles, isolated by NDGGE, contained 50 phospholipids (PL) and 11 triacylglycerols (TAG) molecules per particle. In contrast, apoB:931-containing particles contained only a few molecules of PL and were devoid of TAG. The unlabeled apoB:1000-containing particles isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography and analyzed for lipid mass, contained 56 PL, 8 TAG, and 7 cholesteryl ester molecules per particle. The surface:core lipid ratio of apoB:1000-containing particles was approximately 4:1 and was not affected by incubation of cells with oleate. Although small amounts of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) were associated with apoB:1000-containing particles, it never approached a 1:1 molar ratio of MTP to apoB. These results support a model in which: (1) the first 1000 amino acid residues of apoB are competent to complete the ''lipid pocket

  4. Lipoprotein lipase stimulates the binding and uptake of moderately oxidized low-density lipoprotein by J774 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, W L; van der Boom, H; van Vark, L C; Havekes, L M

    1996-03-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) stimulates the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) in different cell types, including macrophages, through bridging of LPL between lipoproteins and extracellular heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG). Because macrophages produce LPL and because modified lipoproteins are present in the arterial wall in vivo, we wondered whether LPL also enhances the uptake of oxidized LDL by J774 macrophages. LDL samples with different degrees of oxidation, as evaluated by relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) as compared with native LDL are used as well as native and acetylated LDL. Addition of 5 microg/ml LPL to the J774 cell culture medium stimulated the binding of both native LDL and moderately oxidized LDL (REM < 3.5) 50-100-fold, and their uptake was stimulated approx. 20-fold. The LPL-mediated binding of native LDL and moderately oxidized LDL was dose-dependent. Preincubation of the cells with heparinase (2.4 units/ml) inhibited the stimulatory effect of LPL, indicating that this LPL-mediated stimulation was due to bridging between the lipoproteins and HSPG. The binding to J774 macrophages of severely oxidized LDL (REM=4.3) was stimulated less than 3-fold by LPL, whereas its uptake was not stimulated significantly. The binding and uptake of acetylated LDL (AcLDL) were not stimulated by LPL, although the LPL-molecule itself does bind to AcLDL. Measurements of the cellular lipid content showed that addition of LPL also stimulated the accumulation in the cells of cholesteryl ester derived from both native LDL and moderately oxidized LDL in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that our results present experimental evidence for the hypothesis that LPL serves as an atherogenic component in the vessel wall.

  5. One precursor, three apolipoproteins: the relationship between two crustacean lipoproteins, the large discoidal lipoprotein and the high density lipoprotein/β-glucan binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieb, Stefanie; Roth, Ziv; Dal Magro, Christina; Fischer, Sabine; Butz, Eric; Sagi, Amir; Khalaila, Isam; Lieb, Bernhard; Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The novel discoidal lipoprotein (dLp) recently detected in the crayfish, differs from other crustacean lipoproteins in its large size, apoprotein composition and high lipid binding capacity, We identified the dLp sequence by transcriptome analyses of the hepatopancreas and mass spectrometry. Further de novo assembly of the NGS data followed by BLAST searches using the sequence of the high density lipoprotein/1-glucan binding protein (HDL-BGBP) of Astacus leptodactylus as query revealed a putative precursor molecule with an open reading frame of 14.7 kb and a deduced primary structure of 4889 amino acids. The presence of an N-terminal lipid bind- ing domain and a DUF 1943 domain suggests the relationship with the large lipid transfer proteins. Two-putative dibasic furin cleavage sites were identified bordering the sequence of the HDL-BGBP. When subjected to mass spectroscopic analyses, tryptic peptides of the large apoprotein of dLp matched the N-terminal part of the precursor, while the peptides obtained for its small apoprotein matched the C-terminal part. Repeating the analysis in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii revealed a similar protein with identical domain architecture suggesting that our findings do not represent an isolated instance. Our results indicate that the above three apolipoproteins (i.e HDL-BGBP and both the large and the small subunit of dLp) are translated as a large precursor. Cleavage at the furin type sites releases two subunits forming a heterodimeric dLP particle, while the remaining part forms an HDL-BGBP whose relationship with other lipoproteins as well as specific functions are yet to be elucidated.

  6. Incomplete flagellar structures in Escherichia coli mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, T; Komeda, Y

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with defects in 29 flagellar genes identified so far were examined by electron microscopy for possession of incomplete flagellar structures in membrane-associated fractions. The results are discussed in consideration of the known transcriptional interaction of flagellar genes. Hook-basal body structures were detected in flaD, flaS, flaT, flbC, and hag mutants. The flaE mutant had a polyhook-basal body structure. An intact basal body appeared in flaK mutants. Putative ...

  7. Relationship of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and oxidized low density lipoprotein in carotid atherosclerosis[S

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, Kasey C.; Maguire, Colin T.; Wolfert, Robert; Burns, Alan R.; Reardon, Michael; Geis, Richard; Holvoet, Paul; Morrisett, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma levels of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) have been identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Lp-PLA2 is the sole enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of oxidized phospholipids on LDL particles in atherosclerotic plaques. We have studied the relationship between Lp-PLA2 and oxLDL in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) tissues and in matched plasmas. In extracts from CEA anatomical segments, the levels of oxLDL were s...

  8. Rapid characterization of disease-causing mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene by overexpression in COS cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T G; Andresen, B S; Jensen, H K

    1996-01-01

    To characterize disease-causing mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene, COS cells are transfected with the mutant gene in an EBV-based expression vector and characterized by flow cytometry. Using antibodies against the LDL-receptor the amount of receptor protein on the cell...... surface is quantitated. The receptor activity is measured by incubating the cells with fluorescence labeled LDL (Dil-labelled LDL) at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C. The transfected cells stained with anti-LDL-R antibodies can also be analysed by immunofluorescence microscopy allowing the study...

  9. Cholesterol pathways affected by small molecules that decrease sterol levels in Niemann-Pick type C mutant cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Rujoi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease is a genetically inherited multi-lipid storage disorder with impaired efflux of cholesterol from lysosomal storage organelles.The effect of screen-selected cholesterol lowering compounds on the major sterol pathways was studied in CT60 mutant CHO cells lacking NPC1 protein. Each of the selected chemicals decreases cholesterol in the lysosomal storage organelles of NPC1 mutant cells through one or more of the following mechanisms: increased cholesterol efflux from the cell, decreased uptake of low-density lipoproteins, and/or increased levels of cholesteryl esters. Several chemicals promote efflux of cholesterol to extracellular acceptors in both non-NPC and NPC1 mutant cells. The uptake of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol is inhibited by some of the studied compounds.Results herein provide the information for prioritized further studies in identifying molecular targets of the chemicals. This approach proved successful in the identification of seven chemicals as novel inhibitors of lysosomal acid lipase (Rosenbaum et al, Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 2009, 1791:1155-1165.

  10. Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein increases the antiatherogenic potential of high density lipoproteins in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Haperen (Rien); A. van Tol (Arie); P. Vermeulen; M. Jauhiainen; T. van Gent (Teus); P.M. van den Berg (Paul); S. Ehnholm (Sonja); A.W.M. van der Kamp (Arthur); M.P.G. de Crom (Rini); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPlasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) transfers phospholipids between lipoprotein particles and alters high density lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction patterns in vitro, but its physiological function is poorly understood. Transgenic mice that overexpress

  11. Quantification of lipoprotein profiles by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aru, Violetta; Lam, Chloie; Khakimov, Bekzod

    2017-01-01

    Lipoproteins and their subfraction profiles have been associated to diverse diseases including Cardio Vascular Disease (CVD). There is thus a great demand for measuring and quantifying the lipoprotein profile in an efficient and accurate manner. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy...

  12. DMPD: Low density lipoprotein oxidation and its pathobiological significance. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9261091 Low density lipoprotein oxidation and its pathobiological significance. Ste...in oxidation and its pathobiological significance. PubmedID 9261091 Title Low density lipoprotein oxidation and its pathobiological

  13. High-density lipoproteins and adrenal steroidogenesis : A population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenwerf, Edward; Kerstens, Michiel N.; Links, Thera P.; Kema, Ido P.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    BACKGROUND: Cholesterol trafficked within plasma lipoproteins, in particular high-density lipoproteins (HDL), may represent an important source of cholesterol that is required for adrenal steroidogenesis. Based on a urinary gas chromatography method, compromised adrenal function has been suggested

  14. Serum lipids and lipoproteins in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri Sarvtin, Mehdi; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Shokohi, Tahereh; HajHeydari, Zohreh

    2014-05-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic and recurrent inflammatory skin disorder characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and infiltration of T cells, monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils into dermal and epidermal layers of the skin. The prevalence of cardiovascular disorders in these patients is remarkably higher compared to normal individuals, which seems to be associated with the hyperlipidemia. This study was designed and conducted to investigate the serum lipid profile in psoriatic patients and its association with the severity of disease. This case-control study was performed on 50 plaque-type psoriasis patients and 50 healthy individuals as control, matched for age and sex. Blood samples were collected after 14 h fasting. Serum triglyceride, cholesterol and lipoproteins were assayed using the standard kit (made by Pars Azmon Co. Iran). Certain parameters, including serum triglyceride, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), were significantly higher in the case group compared to the controls (P lipoprotein (HDL) was significantly lower in the former (P < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant relationship between severity of psoriasis and serum lipid profile. The results have revealed the higher plasma level of lipids in psoriatic patients. This may elevate the risk of atherosclerosis, particularly cardiovascular disorders. Therefore, from the epidemiological point of view, screening psoriatic patients, particularly those with severe psoriasis, is recommended.

  15. Lipoprotein (a) as a cause of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Langsted, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Human epidemiologic and genetic evidence using the Mendelian randomization approach in large-scale studies now strongly supports that elevated lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is a causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease, that is, for myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic stenosis, and aortic valve...

  16. Pneumococcal lipoproteins involved in bacterial fitness, virulence, and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Sylvia; Voß, Franziska; Gómez Mejia, Alejandro; Brown, Jeremy S; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) has evolved sophisticated strategies to survive in several niches within the human body either as a harmless commensal or as a serious pathogen causing a variety of diseases. The dynamic interaction between pneumococci and resident host cells during colonization of the upper respiratory tract and at the site of infection is critical for bacterial survival and the development of disease. Pneumococcal lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins and have pivotal roles in bacterial fitness including envelope stability, cell division, nutrient acquisition, signal transduction, transport (as substrate-binding proteins of ABC transporter systems), resistance to oxidative stress and antibiotics, and protein folding. In addition, lipoproteins are directly involved in virulence-associated processes such as adhesion, colonization, and persistence through immune evasion. Conversely, lipoproteins are also targets for the host response both as ligands for toll-like receptors and as targets for acquired antibodies. This review summarizes the multifaceted roles of selected pneumococcal lipoproteins and how this knowledge can be exploited to combat pneumococcal infections. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Inhibition of endothelial lipase activity by sphingomyelin in the lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Belikova, Natalia A; Billheimer, Jeff; Rader, Daniel J; Hill, John S; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major determinant of plasma HDL concentration, its activity being inversely proportional to HDL levels. Although it is known that it preferentially acts on HDL compared to LDL and VLDL, the basis for this specificity is not known. Here we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin, a major phospholipid in lipoproteins is a physiological inhibitor of EL, and that the preference of the enzyme for HDL may be due to low sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) ratio in HDL, compared to other lipoproteins. Using recombinant human EL, we showed that sphingomyelin inhibits the hydrolysis of PtdCho in the liposomes in a concentration-dependent manner. While the enzyme showed lower hydrolysis of LDL PtdCho, compared to HDL PtdCho, this difference disappeared after the degradation of lipoprotein sphingomyelin by bacterial sphingomyelinase. Analysis of molecular species of PtdCho hydrolyzed by EL in the lipoproteins showed that the enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PtdCho containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as 22:6, 20:5, 20:4 at the sn-2 position, generating the corresponding PUFA-lyso PtdCho. This specificity for PUFA-PtdCho species was not observed after depletion of sphingomyelin by sphingomyelinase. These results show that sphingomyelin not only plays a role in regulating EL activity, but also influences its specificity towards PtdCho species.

  18. Serum Lipid and Lipoprotein Profile in Nigerian Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the changes in lipid and lipoprotein patterns in adult patients with haematological cancers with any possible risk of cardiovascular event. Patients and Methods: The clinico-pathological types of haematological cancers, body mass index and ages of the of all 74 haematological cancer patients attending ...

  19. Evaluation of plasma lipids and lipoproteins in nigerians suffering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are conflicting reports on the role of plasma lipids in depressive illness. Very little is known about the lipid and lipoprotein status in Nigerian adults suffering from depression. One hundred subjects consisting of sixty (60) depressed patients with mean age (40.3±12.3 yrs) and forty (40) apparently healthy controls ...

  20. High density lipoproteins (HDLs) and atherosclerosis; the unanswered questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barter, Philip; Kastelein, John; Nunn, Alistair; Hobbs, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The concentration of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) has been found consistently to be a powerful negative predictor of premature coronary heart disease (CHD) in human prospective population studies. There is also circumstantial evidence from human intervention studies and direct

  1. High density lipoproteins, dyslipidemia, and coronary heart disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2010-01-01

    ... with premature coronary heart disease (CHD). These familial disorders include lipoprotein(a) excess, dyslipidemia (high triglycerides and low HDL), combined hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol and high triglycerides often with low HDL), hypoalphalipoproteinemia (low HDL), and hypercholesterolemia. We discuss the management of these disorders. W...

  2. Unfavorable apoAI-containing lipoproteins profile in Tunisian obese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    weight: less than 110% and more than 125% of the ideal body weight, respectively. Different lipid and lipoprotein parameters, including ... particularly in physiopathology associated with an elevated atherosclerosis risk, could ..... associated with the loss of the normal positive LCAT-. CETP correlation (Tato et al., 1997). Also ...

  3. Human placenta secretes apolipoprotein B-100-containing lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Eva; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk; Andersen, Claus B

    2004-01-01

    genes were expressed in placenta and microsomal extracts from human placenta contained triglyceride transfer activity, indicating expression of bioactive MTP. To detect lipoprotein secretion, biopsies from term placentas were placed in medium with [(35)S]methionine and [(35)S]cysteine for 3-24 h. Upon...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1475 - Lipoprotein test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lipoprotein test system. 862.1475 Section 862.1475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... of lipid disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), atherosclerosis, and various liver and renal diseases...

  5. Lipoprotein metabolism in hypothyroidism : the contribution of growth hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractCurrent data suggest a role for GH in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. In hypothyroidism not only the secretion of thyroid hormone, but also of GH is decreased. Generally the effects on plasma lipids seen in hypothyroid individuals are considered to be a consequence of

  6. Lipoprotein(a) as a cardiovascular risk factor : current status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Chapman, M John; Ray, Kausik; Borén, Jan; Andreotti, Felicita; Watts, Gerald F; Ginsberg, Henry; Amarenco, Pierre; Catapano, Alberico; Descamps, Olivier S; Fisher, Edward; Kovanen, Petri T; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Lesnik, Philippe; Masana, Luis; Reiner, Zeljko; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Tokgözoglu, Lale; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of the study were, first, to critically evaluate lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] as a cardiovascular risk factor and, second, to advise on screening for elevated plasma Lp(a), on desirable levels, and on therapeutic strategies. METHODS AND RESULTS: The robust and specific association between

  7. Human Low Density Lipoprotein as a Vehicle of Atherosclerosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-density lipoproteins have been sufficiently established as an important precursor of atherosclerosis. The actual mechanism is still unclear, and the current technique of using radioisotopes has clinical limitation. However, the current study techniques or methods excellently elucidate the functional aspects of ...

  8. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Cameron

    Full Text Available High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC. Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis.

  9. Epidemiological reference ranges for low-density lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although there is widespread acceptance that total cholesterol (TC) value reference ranges should be based on epidemiological rather than statistical considerations, the epidemiological action limits for Iow-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are still incomplete and only statistical reference ranges for apolipoprotein B ...

  10. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and risk of gallstone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Benn, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Drugs which reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) may protect against gallstone disease. Whether plasma levels of LDL-C per se predict risk of gallstone disease remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that elevated LDL-C is a causal risk factor for symptomatic gallstone...

  11. LDL receptor-independent and -dependent uptake of lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, T. J.; Fluiter, K.; van Velzen, A. G.; Vogelezang, C. J.; Ziere, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The liver plays a decisive role in the regulation of the plasma levels of atherogenic lipoproteins. The primary liver interaction site for chylomicron-remnants and VLDL remnants (beta-VLDL) is still unidentified, while the subsequent cellular uptake is likely to be mediated in concert by the LDL

  12. Evaluation of Homocysteine, Lipoprotein(a) and Endothelin as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indians have been reported to have high prevalence rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) even in the absence of traditional risk factors. The objective of this study was to assess the role of endothelin, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine and lipid profile as markers of CAD in Indian population. It was a hospital based ...

  13. [Residual risk: The roles of triglycerides and high density lipoproteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Tanja; Kleber, Marcus; Silbernagel, Günther; Scharnagl, Hubert; März, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    In clinical trials, the reduction of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins reduces the incidence rate of cardiovascular events by approximately one third. This means, that a sizeable "residual risk" remains. Besides high lipoprotein (a), disorders in the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high density liproteins have been implicated as effectors of the residual risk. Both lipoprotein parameters correlate inversely with each other. Therefore, the etiological contributions of triglycerides and / or of HDL for developing cardiovascular disease can hardly be estimated from either observational studies or from intervention studies. The largely disappointing results of intervention studies with inhibitors of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein and in particular the available set of genetically-epidemiological studies suggest that in the last decade, the importance of HDL cholesterol has been overvalued, while the importance of triglycerides has been underestimated. High triglycerides not always atherogenic, but only if they are associated with the accumulation relatively cholesterol-enriched, incompletely catabolized remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (familial type III hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus). The normalization of the concentration of triglycerides and remnants by inhibiting the expression of apolipoprotein C3 is hence a new, promising therapeutic target. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Hormone replacement therapy and lipoprotein changes during menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadr S

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effectiveness of conjugated estrogen (Premarin and progesterone in twenty-one postmenopausal women who had been menopause one year, we tested during a 6-month period the serum lipoprotein levels in subjects who offered by premarin in dosage of 0.625 milligram for days 1 to 25 and oral medroxy progestrone acetste for days 15 to 25 of a 30-day cycle. Twenty-one subjects completed at least 6-month follow-up serum total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL cholesterol and triglycerid (TG measurements by calorimetric method. The results, six months after treatment, is compared to before treatment. The median change in biochemical studies showed significant decrease in serum total cholesterol (248.85 compared with 229.4, P<0.001 serum LDL-cholesterol (155.7 compared with 130.6, P<0.05, but significant increase in serum HDL-cholesterol; (53.46 compared with 61.46, P<0.05 TG and VLDL levels did not occur. We concluded that conjugated estrogen is effective on serum total cholesterol, LDL and HLDL cholesterol in postmenopausal women

  15. Concentrations and compositions of plasma lipoprotein subfractions of Lpb5-Lpu1 homozygous and heterozygous swine with hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D M; Mok, T; Hasler-Rapacz, J; Rapacz, J

    1990-05-01

    Pigs with two mutant epitopes, Lpb5 of apolipoprotein B (apoB) and Lpu1 of a yet undefined apolipoprotein, specified by a haplotype Lpb5-Lpu1 and fed a cholesterol-free low fat diet show hypercholesterolemia. The purpose of this study was to establish whether a direct relationship exists between the swine lipoprotein concentration/composition and the genotype for the Lpb5-Lpu1 haplotype; i.e., homozygote versus heterozygote. Lipoproteins of fasted plasma from hypercholesterolemic swine, homozygous (HmHC) and heterozygous (HtHC) for Lpb5-Lpu1, and from normolipidemic (NL) pigs of other Lpb-Lpu haplotypes were separated into five layers by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Layer 1 contained particles of d less than 1.019 g/ml and layer 5 particles of d greater than 1.073 g/ml. Layers 2, 3, and 4 represented subfractions of low density lipoproteins (LDL). The plasma total cholesterol (TC) of the HmHC group (300 +/- 84 mg/dl) was different (P less than 0.05) from the HtHC group (200 +/- 80 mg/dl) and in both HmHC and HtHC, TC was significantly higher (P less than 0.0005 and P less than 0.005, respectively) than that of the NL group (69 +/- 14 mg/dl). The elevation in plasma TC was due to the increased TC in layers 2 and 3: a 13- and 7-fold increase in HmHC and a 7- and 4-fold increase in HtHC in layers 2 and 3, respectively. Parallel increases in unesterified cholesterol were observed in these two layers. Marked increases in apoB were also observed in layers 2 and 3 of HmHC and intermediate increases in apoB in the same two layers of HtHC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Elevated Lipoprotein(A Impairs Platelet Radiolabeling Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Granegger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Platelet radiolabeling in clinical routine usually results in labeling efficiencies (LE above 80%. A variety of risk factors and clinical conditions are known to impair platelet labeling yield, among them elevated triglycerides and low-density lipoproteins. The potential influence of lipoprotein(a (Lp(a, an atherogenic lipoprotein particle containing a kringle subunit, which is widely found in the proteins of fibrinolysis pathway, has never been studied. Normal Lp(a levels range below 30 mg/ dl. The exact prevalence of elevated Lp(a is unknown, most likely ranging below 10%. Even more rare is an isolated elevation despite an otherwise normal lipoprotein profile. Methods: We examined the role of isolated elevated Lp(a (> 50 mg/dl, ranging up to 440 mg/dl compared to patients with normal lipid profile. Platelets were radiolabeled with in-111-oxine at 37 °C for 5 minutes using ISORBE-consensus methodology. Results: The findings indicate that already at levels below 100 mg/dl Lp(a decreases LE. LE assessment after cross-incubation of hyper-Lp(a platelets with normal Lp(a plasma and vice versa reveals that platelets rather than the plasmatic environment are responsible for the deterioration of labeling yield. This behavior already has been reported for elevated low-density lipoproteins. Apparently, the quantitative influence of LDL and Lp(a/mg is comparable. Plotting the sum of LDL and Lp(a versus LE reveals a clear significant negative correlation. Conclusion: As extremely elevated Lp(a, particularly above 150 mg/dl, may significantly impair labeling results. We therefore recommend to include extremely elevated Lp(a into the list of parameters, which should be known before performing radiolabeling of human platelets.

  17. Lipoprotein genotype and conserved pathway for exceptional longevity in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Atzmon

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of single genes involved in nutrient and lipoprotein metabolism increases longevity in several animal models. Because exceptional longevity in humans is familial, it is likely that polymorphisms in genes favorably influence certain phenotypes and increase the likelihood of exceptional longevity. A group of Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians (n = 213, their offspring (n = 216, and an age-matched Ashkenazi control group (n = 258 were genotyped for 66 polymorphisms in 36 candidate genes related to cardiovascular disease (CVD. These genes were tested for association with serum lipoprotein levels and particle sizes, apolipoprotein A1, B, and C-3 levels and with outcomes of hypertension, insulin resistance, and mortality. The prevalence of homozygosity for the -641C allele in the APOC3 promoter (rs2542052 was higher in centenarians (25% and their offspring (20% than in controls (10% (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.001, respectively. This genotype was associated with significantly lower serum levels of APOC3 and a favorable pattern of lipoprotein levels and sizes. We found a lower prevalence of hypertension and greater insulin sensitivity in the -641C homozygotes, suggesting a protective effect against CVD and the metabolic syndrome. Finally, in a prospectively studied cohort, a significant survival advantage was demonstrated in those with the favorable -641C homozygote (p < 0.0001. Homozygosity for the APOC3 -641C allele is associated with a favorable lipoprotein profile, cardiovascular health, insulin sensitivity, and longevity. Because modulation of lipoproteins is also seen in genetically altered longevity models, it may be a common pathway influencing lifespan from nematodes to humans.

  18. Coconut oil affects lipoprotein composition and structure of neonatal chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, M; Hortal, J H; García-Fuentes, E; Zafra, M F; García-Peregrín, E

    1996-04-01

    Supplementation of 10 or 20% coconut oil in the diet for 1-2 weeks produced a significant hypercholesterolemia in neonatal chicks. Plasma triacylglycerol concentration significantly increased after the addition of 20% coconut oil for 2 weeks. These results show that newborn chicks are more sensitive to saturated fatty acids from coconut oil than adult animals. The effects of this saturated fat on lipoprotein composition were studied for the first 1-2 weeks of neonatal chick life. Coconut oil supplementation in the diet (20%) for 2 weeks increased cholesterol concentration in all the lipoprotein fractions, while 10% coconut oil only increased cholesterol in low-density and very-low-density lipoproteins, an increase that was significant after 1 week of treatment. Similar results were obtained for triacylglycerol concentration after 2 weeks of treatment. Changes in phospholipid and total protein levels were less profound. Coconut oil decreased low-density and very-low-density lipoprotein fluidity, measured as total cholesterol/phospholipid ratio. Changes in esterified cholesterol/phospholipid and triacylglycerol/phospholipid ratios suggest that coconut oil affects the distribution of lipid components in the core of very-low-density particles. Likewise, the esterified cholesterol/triacylglycerol ratio was clearly increased in the low-density, and especially in the very-low-density, fraction after the first week of coconut oil feeding. Our results show that neonatal chick provides a suitable model in which to study the role of very-low-density lipoproteins in atherogenesis and the rapid response to saturated fatty acids with 12-14 carbons.

  19. GPIHBP1 Missense Mutations Often Cause Multimerization of GPIHBP1 and Thereby Prevent Lipoprotein Lipase Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beigneux, Anne P; Fong, Loren G; Bensadoun, Andre

    2015-01-01

    , also led to protein dimerization/multimerization. The loss of GPIHBP1 monomers is quite relevant to the pathogenesis of chylomicronemia because only GPIHBP1 monomers-and not dimers or multimers-are capable of binding LPL. One GPIHBP1 mutant, GPIHBP1-W109S, had distinctive properties. GPIHBP1-W109S......Rationale: GPIHBP1, a GPI-anchored protein of capillary endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the subendothelial spaces and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. GPIHBP1 missense mutations that interfere with LPL binding cause familial chylomicronemia. Objective: We sought...... of dimers and multimers. Conclusions: Many amino acid substitutions in GPIHBP1's Ly6 domain that abolish LPL binding lead to protein dimerization/multimerization. Dimerization/multimerization is relevant to disease pathogenesis, given that only GPIHBP1 monomers are capable of binding LPL....

  20. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of insect lipoprotein : insight into LDL receptor functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, Dennis van

    2004-01-01

    The extracellular transport of water-insoluble lipids through the aqueous circulatory system of animals is mediated by lipoproteins. The lipoprotein of insects, lipophorin (Lp), is homologous to that of mammalian low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Moreover, an endocytic receptor for Lp has been

  1. Hindiii and S447x polymorphisms of lipoprotein lipase gene and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lipoprotein lipase is a key enzyme in lipoprotein metabolism and its gene is a major candidate gene for coronary heart disease. The aim of the present work was to study the association of HindIII and S447X polymorphisms in lipoprotein ...

  2. DMPD: Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses and cellularsaboteurs. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9287290 Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses and cell...9287290 Title Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses ...ularsaboteurs. Hajjar DP, Haberland ME. J Biol Chem. 1997 Sep 12;272(37):22975-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Lipoprotein traf...ficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses and cellularsaboteurs. PubmedID

  3. Effects of cardiovascular lifestyle change on lipoprotein subclass profiles defined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Decewicz, David J; Neatrour, David M; Burke, Amy; Haberkorn, Mary Jane; Patney, Heather L; Vernalis, Marina N; Ellsworth, Darrell L

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering is a primary goal in clinical management of patients with cardiovascular disease, but traditional cholesterol levels may not accurately reflect the true atherogenicity of plasma lipid profiles. The size and concentration of lipoprotein particles, which transport cholesterol and triglycerides, may provide additional information for accurately assessing cardiovascular risk. This study evaluated changes in plasma lipoprotein ...

  4. The response of lipoproteins to dietary fat and cholesterol in lean and obese persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katan, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Individuals differ in the response of their blood lipoproteins to cholesterol-lowering diets. One characteristic clearly associated with susceptibility to diet is leanness; many studies show that total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

  5. Deficiency of Lipoprotein Lipase in Neurons Decreases AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Leads to Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Yu

    Full Text Available Alterations in lipid metabolism have been found in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL hydrolyzes triacylglycerides in lipoproteins and regulates lipid metabolism in multiple organs and tissues, including the central nervous system (CNS. Though many brain regions express LPL, the functions of this lipase in the CNS remain largely unknown. We developed mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency that became obese on chow by 16 wks in homozygous mutant mice (NEXLPL-/- and 10 mo in heterozygous mice (NEXLPL+/-. In the present study, we show that 21 mo NEXLPL+/- mice display substantial cognitive function decline including poorer learning and memory, and increased anxiety with no difference in general motor activities and exploratory behavior. These neurobehavioral abnormalities are associated with a reduction in the 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl propanoic acid (AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 and its phosphorylation, without any alterations in amyloid β accumulation. Importantly, a marked deficit in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in the hippocampus precedes the development of the neurobehavioral phenotype of NEXLPL+/- mice. And, a diet supplemented with n-3 PUFA can improve the learning and memory of NEXLPL+/- mice at both 10 mo and 21 mo of age. We interpret these findings to indicate that LPL regulates the availability of PUFA in the CNS and, this in turn, impacts the strength of synaptic plasticity in the brain of aging mice through the modification of AMPA receptor and its phosphorylation.

  6. Antagonism of Secreted PCSK9 Increases Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression in HepG2 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNutt, Markey C.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R.; Horton, Jay D.; Lagace, Thomas A.; (USMC); (UTSMC)

    2009-07-10

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  7. Common genetic variants of lipoprotein lipase that relate to lipid transport in patients with premature coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Cavanna, J; Winkelman, B R; Shine, B; Gross, W; Marz, W; Galton, D J

    1995-12-01

    Two common coding sequence mutations of lipoprotein lipase (serine447-ter, producing a carboxy terminal truncation; and asp9-asn variants) were studied in 329 Caucasian subjects, of whom 243 had angiographic features of premature atheroscelerosis (220 with coronary artery disease; 23 with coronary and peripheral artery disease). As expected, the mean levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, ApoB and Lp(a) were significantly higher in the arterial disease group than in the controls. HDL levels were lower in the patient group. With regard to the common mutations, plasma triglycerides and VLDL-triglycerides were lower in subjects possessing the Serine447-Ter mutation (p = 0.06 and < 0.05, respectively). When the lipid distributions were analysed by tertiles, the Ser447-Ter mutation was significantly less frequent in the highest tertiles for triglycerides (p < 0.02), and VLDL (p < 0.04). The Asp9-Asn substitution was significantly more frequent in the lowest tertiles for ApoAI (p = 0.05). Case-control analyses of genotypic distributions between the two groups with or without arterial disease did not show any significant differences. The possible functional effects of these common mutants of lipoprotein lipase are discussed.

  8. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The induced mutagenesis method for deriving pigment mutants of a green microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-124 and their pigment composition as well as ability to assess mutability of contaminated aquatic ecosystems were studied. In the present study, 14086 mutants (colonies) were obtained by exposure of the ...

  9. Cadmium-Sensitive Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, R; Cobbett, C S

    1992-09-01

    A screening procedure for identifying Cd-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is described. With this procedure, two Cd-sensitive mutants were isolated. These represent independent mutations in the same locus, referred to as CAD1. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed that the mutation is closely linked to the tt3 locus on chromosome 5. In addition to Cd, the mutants are also significantly more sensitive to mercuric ions and only slightly more sensitive to Cu and Zn, while being no more sensitive than the wild type to Mn, thus indicating a degree of specificity in the mechanism affected by the mutation. Undifferentiated callus tissue is also Cd sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. Both wild-type and mutant plants showed increased sensitivity to Cd in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of the cadmium-binding (gamma-glutamylcysteine)(n)-glycine peptides, suggesting that the mutant is still able to synthesize these peptides. However, the effects of a cad1 mutation and buthionine sulfoximine together on cadmium sensitivity are essentially nonadditive, indicating that they may affect different aspects of the same detoxification mechanism. Assays of Cd uptake by intact plants indicate that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester Cd.

  10. Induced High Lysine Mutants in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, Hans; Køie, B.; Eggum, B. O.

    1974-01-01

    Screening of mutagenically treated materials by combined Kjeldahl nitrogen and dye-binding capacity determinations disclosed fourteen barley mutants, which have from a few to about 40 per cent more lysine in the protein and one mutant with 10 per cent less lysine in the protein than the parent...

  11. Effect of low-density lipoprotein receptor mutation on lipoproteins and cardiovascular disease risk: a parent-offspring study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeijvoets, Kristel C. M. C.; Wiegman, Albert; Rodenburg, Jessica; Defesche, Joep C.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.

    2005-01-01

    Studies on the clinical consequences of different low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor genotypes in adult patients have yielded conflicting results. We hypothesized that children with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) provide a better model to perform genotype-phenotype analyses than adults. We

  12. Los mutantes de la escuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Armando Jaramillo-Ocampo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo muestra los resultados parciales del estudio “Juegos en el recreo escolar: un escenario para la formación ciudadana”, cuya pretensión fue comprender los imaginarios sociales de juego en el recreo escolar y su relación con la convivencia social desde la proximidad del enfoque de complementariedad y el diseño de investigación emergente, planteado por Murcia y Jaramillo (2008. Se presentan los desarrollos logrados en dos categorías centrales del estudio: el patio y el cuerpo; dos categorías que mutan constantemente como entidades vivas en la escuela, hacia la configuración de sujetos que reconocen en el otro y lo otro su posibilidad. La escuela viva, donde es posible “ser en relación con”… se reduce a un espacio temporal y físico, limitado por la campana, “el recreo”. El texto muestra, desde la voz de los actores, esa vida que se da y se quita en la escuela y que se posiciona como una más de las imposiciones normalizadas para controlar. Reconoce, finalmente, una propuesta desde la posibilidad que estos dos mutantes propician para una escuela libre y dinámica.

  13. Age modification of the association of lipoprotein, lipid, and lipoprotein ratio with carotid intima-media thickness (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramsothy, Pathmaja; Katz, Ronit; Owens, David S; Burke, Gregory L; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; O'Brien, Kevin D

    2012-03-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated an age-related attenuation in risk associations of lipoproteins and lipoprotein ratios with cardiovascular disease events. We recently reported a similar age-related attenuation in risk associations of lipoproteins and lipoprotein ratios with coronary artery calcium. We assessed risk associations of lipoproteins and lipoprotein ratios with carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), which has not been reported previously. We performed multivariable linear regression using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). MESA participants were community-dwelling adults 45 to 84 years of age without clinically apparent cardiovascular disease at baseline, and 4,961 met inclusion criteria for these analyses. In fully adjusted models, differences in CIMT were similar across the MESA age spectrum, with differences in internal CIMT per SD increase in low-density lipoprotein of 0.037 mm (95% confidence interval 0.018 to 0.055) for those 45 to 54 years old and 0.087 mm (95% confidence interval 0.027 to 0.146) for those 75 to 84 years old (p for interaction = 0.2). Similarly, the difference in internal CIMT per SD increase in the total/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was 0.029 mm (95% confidence interval 0.009 to 0.049) for those 45 to 54 years old and 0.101 mm (95% confidence interval 0.033, 0.169) for those 75 to 84 years old (p for interaction = 0.03). In general, risk associations of lipoproteins and lipoprotein ratios were associated with similar differences in CIMT across all age categories. In conclusion, abnormal lipoproteins and lipoprotein ratios in middle-aged and older patients are powerful risk factors for early atherosclerosis as manifested by an increased CIMT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthetic lipoprotein as nano-material vehicle in the targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueqin; Huang, Gangliang

    2017-12-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), as human endogenous lipoprotein particles, have low toxicity, high selectivity, and good safety. They can avoid the recognition and clearance of human reticuloendothelial system. These synthetic lipoproteins (sLPs) have been attracted extensive attention as the nanovectors for tumor-targeted drug and gene delivery. Herein, recent advances in the field of anticancer based on these two lipid proteins and recombinant lipoproteins (rLPs) as target delivery vectors were analyzed and discussed.

  15. Christina von Braun, Dorothea Dornhof, Eva Johach (Hg.: Das Unbewusste. Krisis und Kapital der Wissenschaften. Studien zum Verhältnis von Wissen und Geschlecht. Bielefeld: transcript Verlag 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Simone Pfeiffer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Wissenschaft, die den Anspruch hat selbstreflexiv zu sein, sollte ihre unbewussten Anteile nicht ausblenden – das wird in den Beiträgen des von Christina von Braun, Dorothea Dornhof und Eva Johach herausgegebenen Sammelbandes auf überzeugende Weise gezeigt. Dabei geht es nicht primär um das Unbewusste als Objekt der Wissenschaften, sondern vielmehr um die Rolle des Unbewussten als Subjekt der Wissensordnung und Wissensproduktion, als „Krisis und Kapital“ der Wissenschaften, gleichermaßen als Sand und Öl imWissensgetriebe. Anstelle eines systematischen Überblicks liefert der interdisziplinär angelegte Band eine Vielzahl kluger, manchmal überraschender und durchgehend lesenswerter Perspektiven auf das visuelle und politische Unbewusste, seine Wissensgeschichte und seinen Ort in der Wissensordnung.Science, which purports to be self-reflexive, should not ignore its unconscious element – this is convincingly proven in the collected volume edited by Christina von Braun, Dorothea Dornhof, and Eva Johach. The focus is not merely on the unconscious as an object of the sciences, but on the role of the unconscious as a subject of knowledge organization and knowledge production, as “crisis and capital” of the sciences, indeed simultaneously functioning as sand and oil in the transmission of knowledge. In place of a systematic overview, the interdisciplinary volume offers a number of clever, sometimes surprising, and always well-worth reading perspectives on the visual and political unconscious, its history of knowledge, and its place in the order of knowledge.

  16. Beyond Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Respective Contributions of Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels, Triglycerides, and the Total Cholesterol/High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio to Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Apparently Healthy Men and Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsenault, Benoit J.; Rana, Jamal S.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Després, Jean-Pierre; Shah, Prediman K.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to test the hypothesis that at any low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level, other lipid parameters such as non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, triglyceride (TG) levels, and the total cholesterol (TC)/HDL-C are still associated with

  17. Pharmacogenetic interaction between dexamethasone and Cd36-deficient segment of spontaneously hypertensive rat chromosome 4 affects triacylglycerol and cholesterol distribution into lipoprotein fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Křen Vladimír

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dexamethasone (DEX is known to induce diabetes and dyslipidemia. We have compared fasting triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations across 20 lipoprotein fractions and glucose tolerance in control (standard diet and DEX-treated 7-month-old males of two rat strains, Brown Norway (BN and congenic BN.SHR-(Il6-Cd36/Cub (BN.SHR4. These two inbred strains differ in a defined segment of chromosome 4, originally transferred from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR including the mutant Cd36 gene, a known target of DEX. Compared to BN, the standard-diet-fed BN.SHR4 showed higher cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations across many lipoprotein fractions, particularly in small VLDL and LDL particles. Total cholesterol was decreased by DEX by more than 21% in BN.SHR4 contrasting with the tendency to increase in BN (strain*DEX interaction p = 0.0017. Similar pattern was observed for triacylglycerol concentrations in LDL. The LDL particle size was significantly reduced by DEX in both strains. Also, while control BN and BN.SHR4 displayed comparable glycaemic profiles during oral glucose tolerance test, we observed a markedly blunted DEX induction of glucose intolerance in BN.SHR4 compared to BN. In summary, we report a pharmacogenetic interaction between limited genomic segment with mutated Cd36 gene and dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance and triacylglycerol and cholesterol redistribution into lipoprotein fractions.

  18. The relationship between physical activity and serum lipids and lipoproteins in black children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, R H; Linder, C W; Harkess, J W; Gray, R G

    1983-03-01

    This study assesses the association between the serum lipid and lipoprotein levels of 62 black children and 37 black adolescents and their reported levels of habitual physical activity, 24-hour dietary intake, and physical measurements. In the children physical activity was not correlated with serum lipid and lipoprotein levels. Indicators of physical activity had a positive correlation (P less than 0.02) with high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and negative correlations (P less than 0.05) with the total serum cholesterol/high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol ratios in the adolescents. Subjects were stratified into "low activity" and "high activity" groups. High-activity subjects had lower (P less than 0.05) total serum cholesterol/high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol ratios than less active subjects. Subjects that ran track had lower (P less than 0.02) total serum cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol than non-track participants. The results suggest that increased habitual physical activity may have a favorable effect on serum lipid and lipoprotein levels in black adolescents.

  19. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  20. Reference serum protein and lipoprotein fractions of ostriches (Struthio camelus in Turkey : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Polat

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine for reference purposes the values of serum albumin, a1-globulin, a2-globulin, b-globulin, g-globulin, and a-lipoprotein (high density lipoprotein, pre-b-lipoprotein (very low density lipoprotein and b-lipoprotein (low density lipoprotein fractions of normal ostriches (Struthio camelus in Turkey. Five male and five female ostriches, 18 months old, were used. All the ostriches were fed on a diet that contained 15.14 % crude protein and 2 950 Kcal/kg of metabolizable energy. The serum protein and lipoprotein fractions were measured using agarose gel electrophoresis. The fractions were found to be 60.96 % albumin, 0.24% a1-globulin, 15.91 % a2-globulin, 13.34 % b-globulin, 9.55 % g-globulin, 53.77 % HDL, 0.60 % VLDL and 48.09 % LDL.

  1. Lipoprotein (a) and carotid atherosclerosis in young patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Nathalie; Ruidavets, Jean Bernard; Farghali, Ahmed; Guidolin, Brigitte; Perret, Bertrand; Larrue, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Elevated lipoprotein (a) concentration is associated with carotid atherosclerosis in middle-aged and older patients with ischemic stroke. This association has not been explored in young patients with stroke. A retrospective analysis of data from patients aged 16 to 54 years consecutively treated for acute ischemic stroke in a tertiary stroke unit during 4.5 years was performed. We graded carotid atherosclerosis using carotid duplex as: no atherosclerosis (A); plaque without stenosis (B); or stenosis≥50% (C). One hundred ninety-six patients were included (male/female: 119/77; mean age±SD: 44.3±8.6 years): 115 in Group A; 67 in Group B; and 14 in Group C. Multivariate analysis using polynomial logistic regression showed a graded association of lipoprotein (a) plasma concentration with carotid atherosclerosis (Patherosclerosis in young adults with ischemic stroke. This association was strong, graded, and independent of traditional risk factors including cholesterol.

  2. Modified lipoproteins as biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Quesada, José Luis; Pérez, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Prevention of high incidence of cardiovascular disease in diabetes is one of the challenges of endocrinology. Validation of new biomarkers that may contribute to a better assessment of cardiovascular risk and help implement treatment strategies is one of the promising approaches in research on prevention and reduction of cardiovascular risk. Modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key element in development of atherosclerotic lesions. Several pathophysiological characteristics of diabetes are crucial for the LDL of these patients to have higher modification rates as compared to the healthy population. Diabetic dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidative stress synergistically promote the occurrence of lipoperoxidation, glycosylation and glycoxidation processes, which will generate modified lipoproteins that stimulate development of atherosclerosis. This article reviews the role of different types of modified LDL in development of atherosclerosis in diabetes, as well as the possibility of using its quantification in cardiovascular risk prediction. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. [Various lipoprotein fractions and their relation to ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzuoli, V; Mondillo, S; Kristodhullu, A; De Stefano, R; Amatucci, G

    1983-01-01

    In a study carried out on over 700 patients with three different manifestations of aterosclerosis (cerebrovascular, coronary and peripheral), we could not find any statistically significant difference between the total cholesterol and triglyceride concentration in these three groups. Also, there was o difference in cholesterol and triglyceride levels between these three groups and 200 normal subjects. The same held true when we compared a selected group of 76 patients with ischaemic heart disease who had no other risk factor, with a group of 80 control subjects. On the contrary, when we compared several fractions of serum lipoproteins and the ratios of apolipoprotein A to Apolipoprotein B, LDL Cholesterol to HDL Cholesterol, and total Cholesterol to HDL Cholesterol of the two groups, the differences were statistically significant. We conclude that when other risk factors are excluded, the protein component, rather than the lipid component of the plasma lipoproteins correlates the presence of coronary artery disease.

  4. In vivo immunomodulation by Mycoplasma fermentans membrane lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Francisco; Moreno, Encarnación; Ruiz-Bravo, Alfonso; Jiménez-Valera, María

    2004-03-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of Mycoplasma fermentans-derived membrane lipoprotein (LAMPf) in BALB/c mice were examined. When injected intraperitoneally into mice, LAMPf induced a transitory splenomegaly followed by a suppression of the spleen cell proliferation in response to concanavalin A, whereas responses to lipopolysaccharide and to LAMPf were unchanged. The intravenous injection of a large dose of LAMPf induced leukopenia and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity in serum. A synthetic analogue of its N-terminal lipopeptide with ability to activate macrophages (MALP-2) was also able to induce GM-CSF in serum. Interestingly, GM-CSF induction by a low dose of MALP-2 was not associated with significant leukopenia. These data revealed that the in vitro moduline properties of mycoplasmal lipoproteins and lipopeptides correlate with interesting in vivo immunomodulatory effects.

  5. Lipoprotein particle subclasses, cardiovascular disease and HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duprez, Daniel A; Kuller, Lewis H; Tracy, Russell

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association of lipoprotein particles with CVD in a subgroup of HIV-infected patients who were enrolled in the Strategies for Management of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (SMART) study. SMART was a trial of intermittent use of ART (drug conservation [DC]) versus continuous of ART......-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and D-dimer. Latest levels of total HDL-p were also significantly inversely associated with CVD; treatment interruption led to decrease of total HDL-p; adjusting for latest HDL-p did not explain the greater risk of CVD that was observed in the DC versus VS group....... CONCLUSIONS: Lipoprotein particles, especially lower levels of small and large HDL-p identify HIV-infected patients at increased risk of CVD independent of other CVD risk factors....

  6. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankowski, Vera; Just, Alexander R; Pfeilschifter, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) leads to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, the most frequent causes of death worldwide. After menopause, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism changes and women are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease compared to fertile women. The aim...... of this study was to determine the prevalence of serum oxLDL in postmenopausal women and to identify possible associations of clinical and laboratory features with oxLDL in these patients. METHOD: After clinical examination and completing a clinical questionnaire, an ultrasound examination of both carotid...... arteries was conducted and blood was drawn from 533 postmenopausal women. oxLDL concentration was determined using proton NMR spectroscopy. RESULTS: Oxidized LDL was detected in 12.4% (95% confidence interval 9.7-15.5) of postmenopausal women with a median of 0.18 mg/dl (interquartile range 0...

  7. Low-density lipoprotein size and cardiovascular risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, M; Berneis, K.

    2017-01-01

    A predominance of small, dense low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been accepted as an emerging cardiovascular risk factor by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. LDL size seems to be an important predictor of cardiovascular events and progression of coronary heart disease and evidences suggests that both quality (particularly small, dense LDL) and quantity may increase cardiovascular risk. However, other authors have suggested that LDL size measurement does no...

  8. Dual role of lipoproteins in endothelial cell dysfunction in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancu, Camelia S; Toma, Laura; Sima, Anca V

    2012-08-01

    The endothelium is a key constituent of the vascular wall, being actively involved in maintaining the structural integrity and proper functioning of blood vessels. Hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and aging are important risk factors for the dysfunction of endothelial cells (EC). Circulating lipoproteins (Lp) synthesized and secreted from the intestine or liver have an important role in supplying peripheral tissues with fatty acids from triglyceride rich lipoproteins (TGRLp) for energy production or storage, and cholesterol from low density lipoproteins (LDL) or high density lipoproteins (HDL) for the synthesis of cellular membranes and steroid hormones. Under pathological conditions, Lp may suffer alterations in concentration and composition and become aggressors for EC. Modified LDL, remnant Lp, TGRLp lipolysis products, dysfunctional HDL are involved in the changes induced in EC morphology (reduced glycocalyx, overdeveloped endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and basement membrane), loose intercellular junctions, increased oxidative and inflammatory stress, nitric oxide/redox imbalance, excess Lp transport and storage, as well as loss of anti-thrombotic properties, all of these being characteristics of endothelial dysfunction. Normal HDL are able to counteract the harmful effects of atherogenic Lp in EC but under persistent pathological conditions they lose the protective properties and become pro-atherogenic. This review summarises recent advances in understanding the role of Lp in the induction of endothelial dysfunction and the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Its main focus is the antagonistic role of atherogenic Lp (LDL, VLDL, dysfunctional HDL) versus anti-atherogenic Lp (HDL), also pointing out the potential targets for arresting or reversing this process.

  9. Apolipoprotein (A) Isoform Distribution and Plasma Lipoprotein (a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma lipoprotein (a) Concentrations and apo(a) isoforms were determined in 101 healthy Nigerian subjects (M=63), F=38; age range 17-68 years), and coronary heart disease (CHD) patients (M=19, F=17, age range 30-79 years). Median Lp(a) level was 24.4 mg/di in the CHD patients and 22.1 mg/di in the controls.

  10. Lipoprotein Nanoplatform for Targeted Delivery of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Glickson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein (LDL provides a highly versatile natural nanoplatform for delivery of visible or near-infrared fluorescent optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents and photodynamic therapy and chemotherapeutic agents to normal and neoplastic cells that overexpress low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs. Extension to other lipoproteins ranging in diameter from about 10 nm (high-density lipoprotein [HDL] to over a micron (chylomicrons is feasible. Loading of contrast or therapeutic agents onto or into these particles has been achieved by protein loading (covalent attachment to protein side chains, surface loading (intercalation into the phospholipid monolayer, and core loading (extraction and reconstitution of the triglyceride/cholesterol ester core. Core and surface loading of LDL have been used for delivery of optical imaging agents to tumor cells in vivo and in culture. Surface loading was used for delivery of gadolinium-bis-stearylamide contrast agents for in vivo MRI detection in tumor-bearing mice. Chlorin and phthalocyanine near-infrared photodynamic therapy agents (≤ 400/LDL have been attached by core loading. Protein loading was used to reroute the LDL from its natural receptor (LDLR to folate receptors and could be used to target other receptors. A semisynthetic nanoparticle has been constructed by coating magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxylated cholesterol and overlaying a monolayer of phospholipid to which apolipoprotein A1 or E was adsorbed for targeting HDL or adsorbing synthetic amphipathic helical peptides ltargeting LDL or folate receptors. These particles can be used for in situ loading of magnetite into cells for MRI-monitored cell tracking or gene expression.

  11. Punicalagin Induces Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Influx to Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Atrahimovich, Dana; Khatib, Soliman; Sela, Shifra; Vaya, Jacob; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a primary initiating event in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the antiatherogenic effect of polyphenols has been shown to be exerted via a mechanism unrelated to their antioxidant capacity and to stem from their interaction with specific intracellular or plasma proteins. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the main polyphenol in pomegranate, punicalagin, with apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB100) that surrounds ...

  12. Lipoprotein metabolism in hypothyroidism : the contribution of growth hormone

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    1992-01-01

    textabstractCurrent data suggest a role for GH in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. In hypothyroidism not only the secretion of thyroid hormone, but also of GH is decreased. Generally the effects on plasma lipids seen in hypothyroid individuals are considered to be a consequence of decreased thyroid hormone levels. More then twenty years ago evidence was found that treatment of hypothyroid rats with GH in supraphysiologic doses affects plasma lipid concentrations, but whether a lack o...

  13. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goolab, S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available (Comerci et al., 2001; Delrue et al., 2001; Martinez-Nunez et al., 2010). Furthermore, gene expression profiling used to define Brucella pathogenesis identified the Omps, lipoproteins, stress response proteins, Frontiers in Microbiology | www... al., 1984; Martinez de Tejada and Moriyon, 1993). Moreover, resistance to the bactericidal oxygen- independent systems of phagocytes characterizes the Brucella OM as a result of the resistance the LPS have to polycations (Martin and Hancock, 1990...

  14. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6 Is a Novel Nutritional Therapeutic Target for Hyperlipidemia, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang-woong Go

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and has a unique structure, which facilitates its multiple functions as a co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and as a ligand receptor for endocytosis. The role LRP6 plays in metabolic regulation, specifically in the nutrient-sensing pathway, has recently garnered considerable interest. Patients carrying an LRP6 mutation exhibit elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose, which cooperatively constitute the risk factors of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Since the discovery of this mutation, the general role of LRP6 in lipid homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and atherosclerosis has been thoroughly researched. These studies have demonstrated that LRP6 plays a role in LDL receptor-mediated LDL uptake. In addition, when the LRP6 mutant impaired Wnt-LRP6 signaling, hyperlipidemia, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis developed. LRP6 regulates lipid homeostasis and body fat mass via the nutrient-sensing mechanistic target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Furthermore, the mutant LRP6 triggers atherosclerosis by activating platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-dependent vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. This review highlights the exceptional opportunities to study the pathophysiologic contributions of LRP6 to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, which implicate LRP6 as a latent regulator of lipid metabolism and a novel therapeutic target for nutritional intervention.

  15. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6) Is a Novel Nutritional Therapeutic Target for Hyperlipidemia, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, and Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Gwang-woong

    2015-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and has a unique structure, which facilitates its multiple functions as a co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and as a ligand receptor for endocytosis. The role LRP6 plays in metabolic regulation, specifically in the nutrient-sensing pathway, has recently garnered considerable interest. Patients carrying an LRP6 mutation exhibit elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose, which cooperatively constitute the risk factors of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Since the discovery of this mutation, the general role of LRP6 in lipid homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and atherosclerosis has been thoroughly researched. These studies have demonstrated that LRP6 plays a role in LDL receptor-mediated LDL uptake. In addition, when the LRP6 mutant impaired Wnt-LRP6 signaling, hyperlipidemia, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis developed. LRP6 regulates lipid homeostasis and body fat mass via the nutrient-sensing mechanistic target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Furthermore, the mutant LRP6 triggers atherosclerosis by activating platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-dependent vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. This review highlights the exceptional opportunities to study the pathophysiologic contributions of LRP6 to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, which implicate LRP6 as a latent regulator of lipid metabolism and a novel therapeutic target for nutritional intervention. PMID:26046396

  16. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  17. Lipoprotein (a): truly a direct prothrombotic factor in cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffa, Michael B; Koschinsky, Marlys L

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] have been determined to be a causal risk factor for coronary heart disease, and may similarly play a role in other atherothrombotic disorders. Lp(a) consists of a lipoprotein moiety indistinguishable from LDL, as well as the plasminogen-related glycoprotein, apo(a). Therefore, the pathogenic role for Lp(a) has traditionally been considered to reflect a dual function of its similarity to LDL, causing atherosclerosis, and its similarity to plasminogen, causing thrombosis through inhibition of fibrinolysis. This postulate remains highly speculative, however, because it has been difficult to separate the prothrombotic/antifibrinolytic functions of Lp(a) from its proatherosclerotic functions. This review surveys the current landscape surrounding these issues: the biochemical basis for procoagulant and antifibrinolytic effects of Lp(a) is summarized and the evidence addressing the role of Lp(a) in both arterial and venous thrombosis is discussed. While elevated Lp(a) appears to be primarily predisposing to thrombotic events in the arterial tree, the fact that most of these are precipitated by underlying atherosclerosis continues to confound our understanding of the true pathogenic roles of Lp(a) and, therefore, the most appropriate therapeutic target through which to mitigate the harmful effects of this lipoprotein. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. [Tobacco use and plasma lipid-lipoprotein profile in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Dartagnan Pinto; Guedes, Joana Elisabete Ribeiro Pinto; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; de Oliveira, Jair Aparecido

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the impact of tobacco use on plasma lipid lipoprotein profile in representative sample of adolescents. A sample of 452 subjects (246 girls and 206 boys) 15 to 18 years old were included in the study. Each participant completed a structured and self-administered questionnaire concerning tobacco use. Plasma lipid-lipoprotein concentrations were measured by standard procedures. Differences between mean values were evaluated by analysis of covariance, controlling for saturated fat and cholesterol intake. Odds ratio was used to estimate the relative risk of the smokers being classified with an undesirable level of a plasma lipidlipoprotein parameter. The proportion of smokers was 20.9% for boys and 15.4% for girls. The average consumption of cigarettes per day was 9.2+/-4.7 for boys and 5.6+/-3.1 for girls. When compared with non-smokers, boy and girl smokers showed a significantly higher serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein B100, and significantly lower serum levels of HDL-cholesterol. Adolescent smokers tended to show a two-fold higher risk of altered lipid-lipoprotein levels than non-smokers. The present data could imply that intervention promoting a healthy lifestyle, including non smoking, should start at an early age to prevent or delay development of atherosclerotic lesions and ultimately to minimize the appearance of premature coronary heart disease in adults.

  19. Platelet secretory products inhibit lipoprotein metabolism in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David R.; Arnold, Kay; Innerarity, Thomas L.

    1985-08-01

    Macrophages possess a receptor that binds low-density lipoproteins (LDL) containing lysine residues modified by acetylation (Ac LDL), acetoacetylation (AcAc LDL) or malondialdehyde treatment1-3. This receptor (referred to as the Ac LDL receptor or scavenger receptor) internalizes the bound lipoprotein. As a consequence, massive amounts of cholesteryl esters accumulate so that macrophages in culture resemble foam cells found in atherosclerotic lesions4,5. In an effort to identify an unmodified mammalian macromolecule that binds to the Ac LDL receptor, we investigated whether platelet secretory products affect the receptor-mediated endocytosis of chemically modified lipoproteins. Platelets are a potential source of such activity because they exist in close association with foam cells in developing atherosclerotic lesions6,7. Our study demonstrates that human blood platelets secrete a product that inhibits the binding and uptake of AcAc LDL by mouse peritoneal macrophages and the subsequent accumulation of cholesteryl esters. This is the first indication that an endogenous macromolecule interacts with Ac LDL receptor on macrophages.

  20. The charge and atherogenicity of low density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A S; Missyul, B V

    1992-01-01

    It is concluded on the basis of literature data, that apolipoprotein B-100 is the most high-molecular, hydrophobic, and positive charged protein compared to the other apoproteins of the plasma lipoproteins. Low density lipoproteins of healthy subjects, mainly containing apo B-100, have little heterogeneity on both charge and isoelectric point, in spite of heterogeneity on sizes and apolipoprotein composition. The reason of formation of subfraction with elevated negative charge is the damage with the free radicals and/or aldehydes. The reason of formation of more cationized subfraction is unclear. LDL charge changes are noted in some diseases and syndromes (ischemic heart diseases, familial hyper-alpha-lipoproteinemia, Tangier disease, X-bound ichthyosis and, possibly, others). Some IHD patients treatment with antioxidants leads to the disappearance of negative charged LDL subfraction, that shows participation of peroxidation products in their formation. Electrical characteristics of LDL of tissue fluids and of aorta wall differ essentially from those of the same class plasma lipoproteins. Lipid peroxidation and influences of several enzymes play the main role in these differences.

  1. Triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism in unique VLDL receptor, LDL receptor, and LRP triple-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espirito Santo, S.M.S.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Goudriaan, J.R.; Bensadoun, A.; Bovenschen, N.; Voshol, P.J.; Havekes, L.M.; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van

    2005-01-01

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) are the three main apolipoprotein E-recognizing endocytic receptors involved in the clearance of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins from plasma.

  2. The membrane bound LRR lipoprotein Slr, and the cell wall-anchored M1 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes both interact with type I collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bober

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen and surface structures allow it to adhere to, colonize and invade the human host. Proteins containing leucine rich repeats (LRR have been identified in mammals, viruses, archaea and several bacterial species. The LRRs are often involved in protein-protein interaction, are typically 20-30 amino acids long and the defining feature of the LRR motif is an 11-residue sequence LxxLxLxxNxL (x being any amino acid. The streptococcal leucine rich (Slr protein is a hypothetical lipoprotein that has been shown to be involved in virulence, but at present no ligands for Slr have been identified. We could establish that Slr is a membrane attached horseshoe shaped lipoprotein by homology modeling, signal peptidase II inhibition, electron microscopy (of bacteria and purified protein and immunoblotting. Based on our previous knowledge of LRR proteins we hypothesized that Slr could mediate binding to collagen. We could show by surface plasmon resonance that recombinant Slr and purified M1 protein bind with high affinity to collagen I. Isogenic slr mutant strain (MB1 and emm1 mutant strain (MC25 had reduced binding to collagen type I as shown by slot blot and surface plasmon resonance. Electron microscopy using gold labeled Slr showed multiple binding sites to collagen I, both to the monomeric and the fibrillar structure, and most binding occurred in the overlap region of the collagen I fibril. In conclusion, we show that Slr is an abundant membrane bound lipoprotein that is co-expressed on the surface with M1, and that both these proteins are involved in recruiting collagen type I to the bacterial surface. This underlines the importance of S. pyogenes interaction with extracellular matrix molecules, especially since both Slr and M1 have been shown to be virulence factors.

  3. Responses to novelty in staggerer mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misslin, R; Cigrang, M; Guastavino, J M

    1986-01-01

    Responses to novelty in normal C57BL/6 and staggerer mutant mice were recorded. The normal mice confronted a novel object in their familiar environment showed avoidance and burying responses while the staggerer mutant mice contacted it. When given the opportunity to move around freely in simultaneously presented novel and familiar environments, the mutant mice more quickly entered the novel areas than normal animals. these data reveal a significant decrease in the neophobic components of the neotic behaviour in the staggerer mice. However, since the mutant mice did not show a locomotor deficit, the impairment of neophobia seems not to be due to the gait abnormalities of these animals. The results support the view that the cerebellum may contribute to the organization of complex behaviours. Copyright © 1986. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Robust mutant strain design by pessimistic optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Meltem; Xu, Liang; Zeng, Bo; Qian, Xiaoning

    2017-10-03

    Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) based mathematical modeling enables in silico prediction of systems behavior for genome-scale metabolic networks. Computational methods have been derived in the FBA framework to solve bi-level optimization for deriving "optimal" mutant microbial strains with targeted biochemical overproduction. The common inherent assumption of these methods is that the surviving mutants will always cooperate with the engineering objective by overproducing the maximum desired biochemicals. However, it has been shown that this optimistic assumption may not be valid in practice. We study the validity and robustness of existing bi-level methods for strain optimization under uncertainty and non-cooperative environment. More importantly, we propose new pessimistic optimization formulations: P-ROOM and P-OptKnock, aiming to derive robust mutants with the desired overproduction under two different mutant cell survival models: (1) ROOM assuming mutants have the minimum changes in reaction fluxes from wild-type flux values, and (2) the one considered by OptKnock maximizing the biomass production yield. When optimizing for desired overproduction, our pessimistic formulations derive more robust mutant strains by considering the uncertainty of the cell survival models at the inner level and the cooperation between the outer- and inner-level decision makers. For both P-ROOM and P-OptKnock, by converting multi-level formulations into single-level Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) problems based on the strong duality theorem, we can derive exact optimal solutions that are highly scalable with large networks. Our robust formulations P-ROOM and P-OptKnock are tested with a small E. coli core metabolic network and a large-scale E. coli iAF1260 network. We demonstrate that the original bi-level formulations (ROOM and OptKnock) derive mutants that may not achieve the predicted overproduction under uncertainty and non-cooperative environment. The knockouts obtained by the

  5. Characterization of MarR Superrepressor Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Alekshun, Michael N.; Levy, Stuart B.

    1999-01-01

    MarR negatively regulates expression of the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) locus in Escherichia coli. Superrepressor mutants, generated in order to study regions of MarR required for function, exhibited altered inducer recognition properties in whole cells and increased DNA binding to marO in vitro. Mutations occurred in three areas of the relatively small MarR protein (144 amino acids). It is surmised that superrepression results from increased DNA binding activities of these mutant pr...

  6. Patulin degradation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: Sensitive mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonart, P; Sumbu, Z L; Bechet, J

    1985-03-01

    The present experiments (sensitive mutants and transient inhibition of growth) are compatible with the synthesis of an inductible detoxifying substance in the wild type strain. This substance could be glutathione because glutathione detoxification scheme essentially involves properties of the SH group and it is well known that patulin reacts with sulfhy dril groups.Studies are presently being carried out with sensitive mutants to establish definitively the relation between intracellular pool of glutathone and the resistance mechanism of a yeast to patulin.

  7. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease: evidence and guidance for management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, M John; Ginsberg, Henry N; Amarenco, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Even at low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal, patients with cardiometabolic abnormalities remain at high risk of cardiovascular events. This paper aims (i) to critically appraise evidence for elevated levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and low levels of high-density lipop...

  8. Copper-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, C; Anderson, C R; Cobbett, C S

    1995-11-01

    A Cu-sensitive mutant, cup1-1, of Arabidopsis thaliana has a pattern of heavy-metal sensitivity different from that of the cad1 and cad2 mutants, which are deficient in phytochelatin biosynthesis. The latter are significantly sensitive to Cd and Hg and only slightly sensitive to Cu, whereas the cup1-1 mutant is significantly sensitive to Cu, slightly sensitive to Cd, and not more sensitive to Hg, compared to the wild type. Genetic analysis has shown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus, which has been mapped to chromosome 1. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that the cup1-1 mutant is not affected in phytochelatin biosynthesis or function. The sensitive phenotype of the cup1-1 mutant is associated with, and probably due to, increased accumulation of higher levels of Cd and Cu compared with the wild type. Consistent with this, a Cu-inducible, root-specific metallothionein gene, MT2a, is expressed in cup1-1 roots under conditions in which it is not expressed in the wild type. Undifferentiated cup1-1 callus tissue did not show the Cu-sensitive phenotype, suggesting that the mutant phenotype, in contrast to cad1 and cad2, is not expressed at the cellular level.

  9. Triglyceride content in remnant lipoproteins is significantly increased after food intake and is associated with plasma lipoprotein lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Tokita, Yoshiharu; Sakamaki, Koji; Shimomura, Younosuke; Kobayashi, Junji; Kamachi, Keiko; Tanaka, Akira; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J; Wang, Tao; Machida, Tetsuo; Murakami, Masami

    2017-02-01

    Previous large population studies reported that non-fasting plasma triglyceride (TG) reflect a higher risk for cardiovascular disease than TG in the fasting plasma. This is suggestive of the presence of higher concentration of remnant lipoproteins (RLP) in postprandial plasma. TG and RLP-TG together with other lipids, lipoproteins and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in both fasting and postprandial plasma were determined in generally healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) after consuming a fat load or a more typical moderate meal. RLP-TG/TG ratio (concentration) and RLP-TG/RLP-C ratio (particle size) were significantly increased in the postprandial plasma of both healthy controls and CAD patients compared with those in fasting plasma. LPL/RLP-TG ratio demonstrated the interaction correlation between RLP concentration and LPL activity The increased RLP-TG after fat consumption contributed to approximately 90% of the increased plasma TG, while approximately 60% after a typical meal. Plasma LPL in postprandial plasma was not significantly altered after either type of meal. Concentrations of RLP-TG found in the TG along with its particle size are significantly increased in postprandial plasma compared with fasting plasma. Therefore, non-fasting TG determination better reflects the presence of higher RLP concentrations in plasma. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Quantitative fluorescence imaging reveals point of release for lipoproteins during LDLR-dependent uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompey, Shanica; Zhao, Zhenze; Luby-Phelps, Kate; Michaely, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The LDL receptor (LDLR) supports efficient uptake of both LDL and VLDL remnants by binding lipoprotein at the cell surface, internalizing lipoprotein through coated pits, and releasing lipoprotein in endocytic compartments before returning to the surface for further rounds of uptake. While many aspects of lipoprotein binding and receptor entry are well understood, it is less clear where, when, and how the LDLR releases lipoprotein. To address these questions, the current study employed quantitative fluorescence imaging to visualize the uptake and endosomal processing of LDL and the VLDL remnant β-VLDL. We find that lipoprotein release is rapid, with most release occurring prior to entry of lipoprotein into early endosomes. Published biochemical studies have identified two mechanisms of lipoprotein release: one that involves the β-propeller module of the LDLR and a second that is independent of this module. Quantitative imaging comparing uptake supported by the normal LDLR or by an LDLR variant incapable of β-propeller-dependent release shows that the β-propeller-independent process is sufficient for release for both lipoproteins but that the β-propeller process accelerates both LDL and β-VLDL release. Together these findings define where, when, and how lipoprotein release occurs and provide a generalizable methodology for visualizing endocytic handling in situ.

  12. Zn2+ Uptake in Streptococcus pyogenes: Characterization of adcA and lmb Null Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedde, Vittorio; Rosini, Roberto; Galeotti, Cesira L

    2016-01-01

    An effective regulation of metal ion homeostasis is essential for the growth of microorganisms in any environment and in pathogenic bacteria is strongly associated with their ability to invade and colonise their hosts. To gain a better insight into zinc acquisition in Group A Streptococcus (GAS) we characterized null deletion mutants of the adcA and lmb genes of Streptococcus pyogenes strain MGAS5005 encoding the orthologues of AdcA and AdcAII, the two surface lipoproteins with partly redundant roles in zinc homeostasis in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Null adcA and lmb mutants were analysed for their capability to grow in zinc-depleted conditions and were found to be more susceptible to zinc starvation, a phenotype that could be rescued by the addition of Zn2+ ions to the growth medium. Expression of AdcA, Lmb and HtpA, the polyhistidine triad protein encoded by the gene adjacent to lmb, during growth under conditions of limited zinc availability was examined by Western blot analysis in wild type and null mutant strains. In the wild type strain, AdcA was always present with little variation in expression levels between conditions of excess or limited zinc availability. In contrast, Lmb and HtpA were expressed at detectable levels only during growth in the presence of low zinc concentrations or in the null adcA mutant, when expression of lmb is required to compensate for the lack of adcA expression. In the latter case, Lmb and HtpA were overexpressed by several fold, thus indicating that also in GAS AdcA is a zinc-specific importer and, although it shares this function with Lmb, the two substrate-binding proteins do not show fully overlapping roles in zinc homeostasis.

  13. Macrophages create an acidic extracellular hydrolytic compartment to digest aggregated lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S; Grosheva, Inna; Chiang, Ethan; Buxbaum, Adina R; Baird, Barbara A; Pierini, Lynda M; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2009-12-01

    A critical event in atherogenesis is the interaction of macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins. Although most studies model this interaction by incubating macrophages with monomeric lipoproteins, macrophages in vivo encounter lipoproteins that are aggregated. The physical features of the lipoproteins require distinctive mechanisms for their uptake. We show that macrophages create an extracellular, acidic, hydrolytic compartment to carry out digestion of aggregated low-density lipoproteins. We demonstrate delivery of lysosomal contents to these specialized compartments and their acidification by vacuolar ATPase, enabling aggregate catabolism by lysosomal acid hydrolases. We observe transient sealing of portions of the compartments, allowing formation of an "extracellular" proton gradient. An increase in free cholesterol is observed in aggregates contained in these compartments. Thus, cholesteryl ester hydrolysis can occur extracellularly in a specialized compartment, a lysosomal synapse, during the interaction of macrophages with aggregated low-density lipoprotein. A detailed understanding of these processes is essential for developing strategies to prevent atherosclerosis.

  14. Recent advances in lipoprotein and atherosclerosis: A nutrigenomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López, Sergio

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a disease in which multiple factors contribute to the degeneration of the vascular wall. Many risk factors have been identified as having influence on the progression of atherosclerosis among them, the type of diet. Multifactorial interaction among lipoproteins, vascular wall cells, and inflammatory mediators has been recognised as the basis of atherogenesis. Dietary intake affects lipoprotein concentration and composition providing risk or protection at several stages of atherosclerosis. More intriguingly, it has been demonstrated that the extent to which each lipid or lipoprotein is associated with cardiovascular disease depends on the time to last meal; thus, postprandial lipoproteins, main lipoproteins in blood after a high-fat meal, have been shown to strongly influence atherogenesis. As a complex biological process, the full cellular and molecular characterization of atherosclerosis derived by diet, calls for application of the newly developing “omics” techniques of analysis. This review will considered recent studies using high-throughput technologies and a nutrigenomic approach to reveal the patho-physiological effects that the fasting and postprandial lipoproteins may exert on the vascular wall.La aterosclerosis es una enfermedad en la que múltiples factores, entre los que se encuentra la dieta, contribuyen a la degradación de la pared vascular. En la etiología de la aterogénesis son determinantes las lipoproteínas plasmáticas y los distintos tipos celulares de la pared vascular, incluyendo una respuesta inflamatoria. La ingesta de alimentos afecta la concentración y composición de las lipoproteínas, ejerciendo un papel de riesgo o protector durante las diferentes etapas del proceso aterosclerótico. Es importante destacar que la naturaleza de las lipoproteínas y por lo tanto su papel en la enfermedad cardiovascular, también depende del tiempo transcurrido entre comidas. Por ejemplo, las lipoprote

  15. Heritability of Biomarkers of Oxidized Lipoproteins: A Twin Pair Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fangwen; Schork, Andrew J.; Maihofer, Adam X.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Marcovina, Santica; Miller, Elizabeth R.; Witztum, Joseph L.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are genetically determined. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a heritable risk factor and carrier of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL). Approach and Results We measured OxPL-apoB, Lp(a), IgG and IgM autoantibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL), copper oxidized LDL (CuOxLDL) and apoB-immune complexes (ApoB-IC) in 386 monozygotic and dizygotic twins to estimate trait heritability (h2) and determine specific genetic effects among traits. A genome wide linkage study followed by genetic association was performed. The h2 (scale:0-1) for Lp(a) was 0.91±0.01 and for OxPL-apoB 0.87±0.02, which were higher than physiologic, inflammatory, or lipid traits. h2 of IgM MDA-LDL, CuOxLDL and ApoB-IC were 0.69±0.04, 0.67±0.05, and 0.80±0.03, respectively, and for IgG MDA-LDL, CuOxLDL and apoB-IC 0.62±0.05, 0.52±0.06, and 0.53±0.06, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between the major apo(a) isoform and OxPL-apoB (R=-0.49, plipoproteins are highly heritable cardiovascular risk factors that suggest novel genetic origins of atherothrombosis. PMID:25953646

  16. Correlation studies between serum concentrations of zinc and lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiki, Mitiko; Alves, Edson R.; Vasconcellos, M.B.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: mitiko@ipen.br, e-mail: eralves@ipen.br, e-mail: mbvascon@ipen.br; Sumita, Nairo M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas.Central Lab. Division and Laboratories of Medical Investigation (LIM-03)], e-mail: dlc.bioquimica@hcnet.usp.br; Jaluul, Omar; Jacob-Filho, Wilson [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina], e-mail: jaluul@uol.com.br, wiljac@usp.br

    2009-07-01

    In this study, serum zinc and lipoprotein concentrations were determined in order to assess the health status of an elderly population residing in Sao Paulo city, SP, Brazil. This population consisted of elderly considered healthy and participating of a 'Successful Ageing' program of the Sao Paulo University Medical School. Fasting blood samples were collected from 87 elderly individuals (63 females and 24 males) aged 60-91 and mean age of 72 +- 7 years. Zn concentrations were determined by neutron activation analysis at the IPEN/CNEN/ SP and, the lipoprotein (HDL, LDL and total cholesterol) concentrations were determined using routine analysis methods of the Central Laboratory Division, Hospital das Clinicas, FMUSP. Results obtained for Zn indicated that all the individuals presented this element within the recommended value. For total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol concentrations, 96 % of elderly presented levels within the desired range but for LDL cholesterol concentrations only about 70.0 % of individuals were in the desired range. Serum concentration of Zn were positively correlated to LDL-cholesterol levels (correlation coefficient r = 0.21, p < 0.06). Furthermore, the ratios of [HDL-cholesterol] / [LDL-cholesterol] were negatively correlated with Zn concentrations (r = - 0.234, p < 0.04). The positive correlation found between the serum concentrations of Zn and LDL-cholesterol indicates the possible effect of this element in serum lipoprotein profiles. Thus ,these findings suggest that more investigations should be conducted on Zn supplementation in elderly subjects with cardiovascular diseases. (author)

  17. Utilization of individual lecithins in intestinal lipoprotein formation in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Patton, G M; Clark, S B; Fasulo, J M; Robins, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    To determine the molecular species composition of lecithins of different nascent lipoproteins, high density lipoproteins (HDL), very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), and chylomicrons (CM) were isolated from the mesenteric lymph of rats. Lymph was collected at 0 degrees C with 5,5'-dithiobis-2-dinitrobenzoic acid added to inhibit lecithin-cholesterol acyl transferase. CM were separated by ultracentrifugation and HDL from VLDL by dextran SO4-MG+2 precipitation. Molecular species of lecithin wer...

  18. Novel fluorescent probe for low density lipoprotein, based on the enhancement of Europium emission band

    OpenAIRE

    Courrol, Lilia Coronato; Monteiro, A.M.; SILVA, F.R.O.; L. Gomes; VIEIRA, N.D.; Gidlund, Magnus; Figueiredo Neto, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    We report here the observation of the enhancement of Europium-tetracycline complex emission in Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) solutions. Europium emission band of tetracycline solution containing Europium (III) chloride hexahydrate was tested to obtain effective enhancement in the presence of native LDL and oxidized LDL. Europium emission lifetime in the presence of lipoproteins was measured, resulting in a simple method to measure the lipoproteins quantity in an aqueous solution at physiologi...

  19. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lol system as a lipoprotein sorting mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shin-Ya; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-05-04

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or the outer membrane depending on the residue that is present next to the N-terminal acylated Cys. Asp at position 2 causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane. In contrast, the accompanying study (9) revealed that the residues at positions 3 and 4 determine the membrane specificity of lipoproteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since the five Lol proteins involved in the sorting of E. coli lipoproteins are conserved in P. aeruginosa, we examined whether or not the Lol proteins of P. aeruginosa are also involved in lipoprotein sorting but utilize different signals. The genes encoding LolCDE, LolA, and LolB homologues were cloned and expressed. The LolCDE homologue thus purified was reconstituted into proteoliposomes with lipoproteins. When incubated in the presence of ATP and a LolA homologue, the reconstituted LolCDE homologue released lipoproteins, leading to the formation of a LolA-lipoprotein complex. Lipoproteins were then incorporated into the outer membrane depending on a LolB homologue. As revealed in vivo, lipoproteins with Lys and Ser at positions 3 and 4, respectively, remained in proteoliposomes. On the other hand, E. coli LolCDE released lipoproteins with this signal and transferred them to LolA of not only E. coli but also P. aeruginosa. These results indicate that Lol proteins are responsible for the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, as in the case of E. coli, but respond differently to inner membrane retention signals.

  20. Lipoprotein(a) and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora, S.; Kamstrup, Pia R; Rifai, N.

    2010-01-01

    (a) concentrations and incident type 2 diabetes (n = 1670) for a follow-up period of 13 years. We confirmed our findings in 9652 Danish men and women with prevalent diabetes (n = 419). Analyses were adjusted for risk factors that included age, race, smoking, hormone use, family history, blood pressure, body mass......BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that cardiovascular risk is higher with increased lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)]. Whether Lp(a) concentration is related to type 2 diabetes is unclear. METHODS: In 26 746 healthy US women (mean age 54.6 years), we prospectively examined baseline Lp...

  1. Biomimetic High Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles For Nucleic Acid Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kaylin M.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Tripathy, Sushant; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bobeica, Mariana; Shumaker, Dale K.; Luthi, Andrea J.; Helfand, Brian T.; Ardehali, Hossein; Mirkin, Chad A.; Volpert, Olga; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    We report a gold nanoparticle-templated high density lipoprotein (HDL AuNP) platform for gene therapy which combines lipid-based nucleic acid transfection strategies with HDL biomimicry. For proof-of-concept, HDL AuNPs are shown to adsorb antisense cholesterylated DNA. The conjugates are internalized by human cells, can be tracked within cells using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and regulate target gene expression. Overall, the ability to directly image the AuNP core within cells, the chemical tailorability of the HDL AuNP platform, and the potential for cell-specific targeting afforded by HDL biomimicry make this platform appealing for nucleic acid delivery. PMID:21319839

  2. Bam lipoproteins assemble BamA in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Hagan, Christine L.; Westwood, David B.; Kahne, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Bam machine assembles β-barrel membrane proteins into the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. The central component of the Bam complex, BamA, is a β-barrel that is conserved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have previously reported an in vitro assay for studying the assembly of β-barrel proteins by the Bam complex and now apply this assay to identify the specific components that are required for BamA assembly. We establish that BamB and BamD, two lipoprotein components of the comp...

  3. bam Lipoproteins Assemble BamA in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Christine L; Westwood, David B; Kahne, Daniel

    2013-09-03

    The Bam machine assembles β-barrel membrane proteins into the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. The central component of the Bam complex, BamA, is a β-barrel that is conserved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have previously reported an in vitro assay for studying the assembly of β-barrel proteins by the Bam complex and now apply this assay to identify the specific components that are required for BamA assembly. We establish that BamB and BamD, two lipoprotein components of the complex, bind to the unfolded BamA substrate and are sufficient to accelerate its assembly into the membrane.

  4. Plasmodium berghei: in vivo generation and selection of karyotype mutants and non-gametocyte producer mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, C. J.; Ramesar, J.; van den Berg, F. M.; Mons, B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously reported that karyotype and gametocyte-producer mutants spontaneously arose during in vivo asexual multiplication of Plasmodium berghei. Here we studied the rate of selection of these mutants in vivo. Gametocyte production and karyotype pattern were established at regular intervals

  5. Escherichia coli mutants with a temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorowitz, W; CLARK, D.

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to allyl alcohol were selected. Such mutants were found to lack alcohol dehydrogenase. In addition, mutants with temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase activity were obtained. These mutations, designated adhE, are all located at the previously described adh regulatory locus. Most adhE mutants were also defective in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  6. Native and Reconstituted Plasma Lipoproteins in Nanomedicine: Physicochemical Determinants of Nanoparticle Structure, Stability, and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pownall, Henry J; Rosales, Corina; Gillard, Baiba K; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-09-01

    Although many acute and chronic diseases are managed via pharmacological means, challenges remain regarding appropriate drug targeting and maintenance of therapeutic levels within target tissues. Advances in nanotechnology will overcome these challenges through the development of lipidic particles, including liposomes, lipoproteins, and reconstituted high-density lipoproteins (rHDL) that are potential carriers of water-soluble, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. Herein we summarize the properties of human plasma lipoproteins and rHDL, identify the physicochemical determinants of lipid transfer between phospholipid surfaces, and discuss strategies for increasing the plasma half-life of lipoprotein- and liposome-associated molecules.

  7. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Shapiro

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol-rich, apolipoprotein B (apoB-containing lipoproteins are now widely accepted as the most important causal agents of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Multiple unequivocal and orthogonal lines of evidence all converge on low-density lipoprotein and related particles as being the principal actors in the genesis of atherosclerosis. Here, we review the fundamental role of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins in cardiovascular disease and several other humoral and parietal factors that are required to initiate and maintain arterial degeneration. The biology of foam cells and their interactions with high-density lipoproteins, including cholesterol efflux, are also briefly reviewed.

  8. Wolbachia lipoproteins: abundance, localisation and serology of Wolbachia peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein and the Type IV Secretion System component, VirB6 from Brugia malayi and Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Denis; Guimarães, Ana F; Molyneux, Gemma R; Johnston, Kelly L; Ford, Louise; Taylor, Mark J

    2014-10-06

    Lipoproteins are the major agonists of Wolbachia-dependent inflammatory pathogenesis in filariasis and a validated target for drug discovery. Here we characterise the abundance, localisation and serology of the Wolbachia lipoproteins: Wolbachia peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein and the Type IV Secretion System component, VirB6. We used proteomics to confirm lipoprotein presence and relative abundance; fractionation, immunoblotting and confocal and electron immuno-microscopy for localisation and ELISA for serological analysis. Proteomic analysis of Brugia malayi adult female protein extracts confirmed the presence of two lipoproteins, previously predicted through bioinformatics: Wolbachia peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein (wBmPAL) and the Type IV Secretion System component, VirB6 (wBmVirB6). wBmPAL was among the most abundant Wolbachia proteins present in an extract of adult female worms with wBmVirB6 only detected at a much lower abundance. This differential abundance was reflected in the immunogold-labelling, which showed wBmPAL localised at numerous sites within the bacterial membranes, whereas wBmVirB6 was present as a single cluster on each bacterial cell and also located within the bacterial membranes. Immunoblotting of fractionated extracts confirmed the localisation of wBmPAL to membranes and its absence from cytosolic fractions of C6/36 mosquito cells infected with wAlbB. In whole worm mounts, antibody labelling of both lipoproteins were associated with Wolbachia. Serological analysis showed that both proteins were immunogenic and raised antibody responses in the majority of individuals infected with Wuchereria bancrofti. Two Wolbachia lipoproteins, wBmPAL and wBmVirB6, are present in extracts of Brugia malayi with wBmPAL among the most abundant of Wolbachia proteins. Both lipoproteins localised to bacterial membranes with wBmVirB6 present as a single cluster suggesting a single Type IV Secretory System on each Wolbachia cell.

  9. Metabolic factors clustering, lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, lipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein E phenotypes in premature coronary artery disease in French Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M; McNicoll, S; Marcil, M; Connelly, P; Lussier-Cacan, S; Davignon, J; Latour, Y; Genest, J

    1997-03-01

    Plasma lipoprotein cholesterol abnormalities, diabetes, hypertension and smoking have all been identified as independent predictors of cardiovascular events. Clustering of multiple risk factors suggests a common metabolic link among high blood pressure, insulin resistance, plasma lipoprotein abnormalities and obesity. New guidelines for the management of dyslipidemias target patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD), and high risk patients with multiple risk factors and severe genetic lipoprotein disorders, such as familial hypercholesterolemia. To determine the prevalence of lipoprotein, apolipoprotein and metabolic disorders in premature CAD, 243 men and 61 women with premature CAD (occurring before age 60 years) and 203 age- and sex-matched controls (152 men, 61 women) were studied. After correcting for beta-blocker use (40% of men and 54% of women), hypertension and diabetes were seen more frequently in CAD patients than in controls. In men and women, cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and lipoprotein (a) were significantly higher, and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was lower, in CAD patients than in controls. By stratifying patients according to LDL cholesterol: HDL cholesterol ratio (5 or less, or greater than 5) and by triglyceride levels (less than 2.3 mmol/L, or 2.3 mmol/L or greater), significantly more men and women with CAD were found to have an elevated LDL cholesterol:HDL cholesterol ratio and elevated triglycerides (13.8% versus 1.9%, men and women combined, CAD versus controls, P women versus 11.7% in controls (P women, low HDL cholesterol, lipoprotein (a), the presence of diabetes, smoking and apolipoprotein B levels were all predictors of risk (P < 0.05). However, the clustering of risk factors may be the best predictor of risk. In this selected population, HDL and lipoprotein (a) are the best metabolic markers of premature CAD; metabolic factor clustering is common in

  10. Targeting mutant NRAS signaling pathways in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Ha Linh; Aplin, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a devastating form of skin cancer and its incidence is increasing faster than any other preventable cancer in the United States. The mutant NRAS subset of melanoma is more aggressive and associated with poorer outcomes compared to non-NRAS mutant melanoma. The aggressive nature and complex molecular signaling conferred by this transformation has evaded clinically effective treatment options. This review examines the major downstream effectors of NRAS relevant in melanoma and the associated advances made in targeted therapies that focus on these effector pathways. We outline the history of MEK inhibition in mutant NRAS melanoma and recent advances with newer MEK inhibitors. Since MEK inhibitors will likely be optimized when combined with other targeted therapies, we focus on recently identified targets that can be used in combination with MEK inhibitors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Torrey

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection.

  12. High density lipoprotein2. Relationship of the plasma levels of this lipoprotein species to its composition, to the magnitude of postprandial lipemia, and to the activities of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase.

    OpenAIRE

    Patsch, J R; S. Prasad; Gotto, A M; Patsch, W

    1987-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in postheparin plasma of 38 normolipidemic volunteers was related to the magnitude of postprandial lipemia after a fat meal, to triglyceride content of high density lipoprotein2 (HDL2), to hepatic lipase (HL) activity, and to HDL2 levels. LPL activity correlated indirectly with lipemia, triglyceride content of HDL2, HL activity, and levels of HDL2 but not of HDL3. HL activity correlated directly with lipemia and indirectly with HDL2 levels. Triglyceride conte...

  13. Native Mutant Huntingtin in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Ellen; Valencia, Antonio; Li, Xueyi; Aronin, Neil; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Young, Anne B.; Wexler, Nancy; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of huntingtin (htt). Analysis of human postmortem brain lysates by SDS-PAGE and Western blot reveals htt as full-length and fragmented. Here we used Blue Native PAGE (BNP) and Western blots to study native htt in human postmortem brain. Antisera against htt detected a single band broadly migrating at 575–850 kDa in control brain and at 650–885 kDa in heterozygous and Venezuelan homozygous HD brains. Anti-polyglutamine antisera detected full-length mutant htt in HD brain. There was little htt cleavage even if lysates were pretreated with trypsin, indicating a property of native htt to resist protease cleavage. A soluble mutant htt fragment of about 180 kDa was detected with anti-htt antibody Ab1 (htt-(1–17)) and increased when lysates were treated with denaturants (SDS, 8 m urea, DTT, or trypsin) before BNP. Wild-type htt was more resistant to denaturants. Based on migration of in vitro translated htt fragments, the 180-kDa segment terminated ≈htt 670–880 amino acids. If second dimension SDS-PAGE followed BNP, the 180-kDa mutant htt was absent, and 43–50 kDa htt fragments appeared. Brain lysates from two HD mouse models expressed native full-length htt; a mutant fragment formed if lysates were pretreated with 8 m urea + DTT. Native full-length mutant htt in embryonic HD140Q/140Q mouse primary neurons was intact during cell death and when cell lysates were exposed to denaturants before BNP. Thus, native mutant htt occurs in brain and primary neurons as a soluble full-length monomer. PMID:22375012

  14. Aging Kit mutant mice develop cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ye

    Full Text Available Both bone marrow (BM and myocardium contain progenitor cells expressing the c-Kit tyrosine kinase. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of c-Kit mutations on: i. myocardial c-Kit(+ cells counts and ii. the stability of left ventricular (LV contractile function and structure during aging. LV structure and contractile function were evaluated (echocardiography in two groups of Kit mutant (W/Wv and W41/W42 and in wild type (WT mice at 4 and 12 months of age and the effects of the mutations on LV mass, vascular density and the numbers of proliferating cells were also determined. In 4 month old Kit mutant and WT mice, LV ejection fractions (EF and LV fractional shortening rates (FS were comparable. At 12 months of age EF and FS were significantly decreased and LV mass was significantly increased only in W41/W42 mice. Myocardial vascular densities and c-Kit(+ cell numbers were significantly reduced in both mutant groups when compared to WT hearts. Replacement of mutant BM with WT BM at 4 months of age did not prevent these abnormalities in either mutant group although they were somewhat attenuated in the W/Wv group. Notably BM transplantation did not prevent the development of cardiomyopathy in 12 month W41/W42 mice. The data suggest that decreased numbers and functional capacities of c-Kit(+ cardiac resident progenitor cells may be the basis of the cardiomyopathy in W41/W42 mice and although defects in mutant BM progenitor cells may prove to be contributory, they are not causal.

  15. Identification of a Novel Lipoprotein Regulator of Clostridium difficile Spore Germination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Fimlaid

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive spore-forming pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea. C. difficile infections are transmitted when ingested spores germinate in the gastrointestinal tract and transform into vegetative cells. Germination begins when the germinant receptor CspC detects bile salts in the gut. CspC is a subtilisin-like serine pseudoprotease that activates the related CspB serine protease through an unknown mechanism. Activated CspB cleaves the pro-SleC zymogen, which allows the activated SleC cortex hydrolase to degrade the protective cortex layer. While these regulators are essential for C. difficile spores to outgrow and form toxin-secreting vegetative cells, the mechanisms controlling their function have only been partially characterized. In this study, we identify the lipoprotein GerS as a novel regulator of C. difficile spore germination using targeted mutagenesis. A gerS mutant has a severe germination defect and fails to degrade cortex even though it processes SleC at wildtype levels. Using complementation analyses, we demonstrate that GerS secretion, but not lipidation, is necessary for GerS to activate SleC. Importantly, loss of GerS attenuates the virulence of C. difficile in a hamster model of infection. Since GerS appears to be conserved exclusively in related Peptostreptococcaeace family members, our results contribute to a growing body of work indicating that C. difficile has evolved distinct mechanisms for controlling the exit from dormancy relative to B. subtilis and other spore-forming organisms.

  16. Different effects of diets rich in olive oil, rapeseed oil and sunflower-seed oil on postprandial lipid and lipoprotein concentrations and on lipoprotein oxidation susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Pedersen, A.; Sandstrøm, B.

    2002-01-01

    oxidation of fasting and postprandial lipoproteins eighteen males consumed diets enriched with rapeseed oil (RO), olive oil (OO), or sunflower-seed oil (SO) in randomised order for periods of 3 weeks followed by a RO test meal. In the postprandial state the concentrations of cholesterol and triacylglycerol......Elevated concentrations of fasting and non-fasting triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins (TRL) as well as oxidative changes of lipoproteins may increase the risk of ischaemic heart disease. To compare the effects of different diets rich in unsaturated fatty acids on the concentrations and in vitro...

  17. The effect of endurance exercise training on plasma lipoprotein AI and lipoprotein AI:AII concentrations in sedentary adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilund, Kenneth R; Colvin, Perry L; Phares, Dana; Goldberg, Andrew P; Hagberg, James M

    2002-08-01

    The effect of 6 months of endurance exercise training on plasma concentrations of lipoprotein (Lp)AI and LpAI:AII was determined in 39 sedentary subjects (17 men, 22 women, average age, 57 years) with abnormal cholesterol concentrations (total cholesterol [TC] > 200 mg/dL, or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [HDL-C] AII concentrations. The change in plasma LpAI concentration was positively correlated to changes in total HDL-C (r =.495, P =.001), the sum of HDL4-C(nmr) + HDL5-C(nmr) (r =.417, P =.008), and average HDL particle size (r =.415, P =.009), but not to changes in body composition or Vo2max. In the 8 subjects with the greatest change in LpAI concentration following training, the size distribution of LpAI and LpAI:AII particles in plasma also was measured before and after training. In these subjects, the size distribution of LpAI:AII particles did not change with training, but there was a significant increase (0.1 nm; P =.048) in the peak size of the "medium" (7.8 to 9.8 nm) LpAI particles after training. In 7 subjects who served as age- and weight-matched sedentary controls, plasma concentrations of total apo A-I, the LpAI and LpAI:AII subfractions, and plasma lipoprotein-lipids did not differ significantly between baseline and final testing. These data indicate that endurance exercise training increases the average size and plasma concentrations of LpAI, but not LpAI:AII, particles, which may represent possible enhancements of reverse cholesterol transport and may provide insight into the role that exercise plays in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  18. Managing to low-density lipoprotein particles compared with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John A; Mallow, Peter J; Waters, Heidi C; Pokrywka, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analyses of clinical trials have shown that using statins to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) reduces cardiovascular events, and more intensive lowering of LDL-C further decreases the risk of occlusive vascular events. Lipoprotein studies suggest treating patients more aggressively when low-density lipoprotein particle (LDL-P) number is discordantly high in the presence of normal LDL-C levels. Failure to manage LDL-P numbers may lead to additional direct and indirect costs. This analysis modeled direct and indirect costs associated with cardiovascular events due to suboptimal treatment resulting from discordance between LDL-C and LDL-P levels. The analysis was conducted from the payer perspective and the employer perspective, respectively, over a 3-year time period. Clinical data were obtained from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a community-based population study. The employer perspective included indirect costs and quality-adjusted life years in addition to the direct costs and cardiovascular disease events considered in the payer analysis. All costs are reported in 2011 dollars. From the payer perspective, managing LDL-C and LDL-P in comparison with LDL-C alone reduced costs ($21,212) and cardiovascular events (9 events). Similar patterns were observed for managing LDL-P alone in comparison with LDL-C. From the employer perspective, managing both LDL-P alone or in combination with LDL-C also resulted in lower costs, fewer cardiovascular disease events, and increased quality-adjusted life years in comparison with LDL-C. This analysis indicates that the benefits of additional testing to optimally manage LDL-P levels outweigh the costs of more aggressive treatment. These favorable results depended on the cost of drug therapy. Copyright © 2013 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ovarian abnormalities in the staggerer mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastavino, Jean-Marie; Boufares, Salima; Crusio, Wim E

    2005-08-24

    Disturbances in several reproductive functions of the staggerer cerebellar mutant mouse have been observed. In this study, reproductive efficiency of staggerer mice was compared to normal mice by recording the number of pups produced and the number of oocytes occurring. It was found that staggerer mothers produced smaller litters than controls and the number of oocytes produced in their ovaries was reduced by the staggerer mutation. These results indicate a pleiotropic effect on fertility of the Rora(sg) gene underlying the cerebellar abnormalities of the staggerer mutant.

  20. Ovarian Abnormalities in the Staggerer Mutant Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Guastavino

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances in several reproductive functions of the staggerer cerebellar mutant mouse have been observed. In this study, reproductive efficiency of staggerer mice was compared to normal mice by recording the number of pups produced and the number of oocytes occurring. It was found that staggerer mothers produced smaller litters than controls and the number of oocytes produced in their ovaries was reduced by the staggerer mutation. These results indicate a pleiotropic effect on fertility of the Rorasg gene underlying the cerebellar abnormalities of the staggerer mutant.

  1. Surface-Associated Lipoproteins Link Enterococcus faecalis Virulence to Colitogenic Activity in IL-10-Deficient Mice Independent of Their Expression Levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soeren Ocvirk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The commensal Enterococcus faecalis is among the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Recent findings regarding increased abundance of enterococci in the intestinal microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and induction of colitis in IL-10-deficient (IL-10-/- mice put a new perspective on the contribution of E. faecalis to chronic intestinal inflammation. Based on the expression of virulence-related genes in the inflammatory milieu of IL-10-/- mice using RNA-sequencing analysis, we characterized the colitogenic role of two bacterial structures that substantially impact on E. faecalis virulence by different mechanisms: the enterococcal polysaccharide antigen and cell surface-associated lipoproteins. Germ-free wild type and IL-10-/- mice were monoassociated with E. faecalis wild type OG1RF or the respective isogenic mutants for 16 weeks. Intestinal tissue and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN were collected to characterize tissue pathology, loss of intestinal barrier function, bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelium and immune cell activation. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC were stimulated with bacterial lysates and E. faecalis virulence was additionally investigated in three invertebrate models. Colitogenic activity of wild type E. faecalis (OG1RF score: 7.2±1.2 in monoassociated IL-10-/- mice was partially impaired in E. faecalis lacking enterococcal polysaccharide antigen (ΔepaB score: 4.7±2.3; p<0.05 and was almost completely abrogated in E. faecalis deficient for lipoproteins (Δlgt score: 2.3±2.3; p<0.0001. Consistently both E. faecalis mutants showed significantly impaired virulence in Galleria mellonella and Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of E-cadherin in the epithelium was shown for all bacterial strains in inflamed IL-10-/- but not wild type mice. Inactivation of epaB in E. faecalis reduced microcolony and biofilm formation in vitro, altered bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelium of germ

  2. Lipoprotein (a) and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeira, Ástrid Camêlo; Leal, Adriana Amorim de F.; Ramos, Nathaly de Medeiros N.; de Alencar F., José; Simões, Mônica Oliveira da S.; Medeiros, Carla Campos M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCES: This systematic review included studies from 2001 to 2011, a ten-year time period. Epidemiological studies with children and/or adolescents published in English, Portuguese or Spanish and fully available online were included. The searches were performed in Science Direct, PubMed/Medline, BVS (Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases, using the following combination of key-words: "lipoprotein a" and "cardiovascular diseases" and "obesity". DATA SYNTHESIS: Overall, 672 studies were obtained but only seven were included. Some studies assessed the family history for CVD. In all of them, Lp(a) levels were increased in patients with family history for CVD. There was also a positive correlation between Lp(a) and LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels, suggesting an association between Lp(a) levels and the lipid profile. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence that CVD may originate in childhood and adolescence leads to the need for investigating the risk factors during this period in order to propose earlier and possibly more effective interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:24473960

  3. High-Density Lipoprotein Processing and Premature Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Corina; Gillard, Baiba K.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Pownall, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    High plasma concentrations of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) are a well-accepted risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the statin class of hypolipidemic drugs has emerged as an effective means of lowering LDL-C and reducing CVD risk. In contrast, the role of plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in protection against atherosclerotic vascular disease is the subject of considerable controversy. Although the inverse correlation between plasma HDL-C and CVD is widely acknowledged, reduction of CVD risk by interventions that increase HDL-C have not been uniformly successful. Several studies of large populations have shown that the first step in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), the transfer of cholesterol from the subendothelial space of the arterial wall via the plasma compartment to the liver for disposal, is impaired in patients with CVD. Here we review HDL function, the mechanisms by which HDL supports RCT, and the role of RCT in preventing CVD. PMID:26634027

  4. Brain lipoprotein lipase as a regulator of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline; Magnan, Christophe

    2017-07-24

    The central nervous system is an essential actor in the control of the energy balance. Indeed, many signals of nervous (vagal afferent for example) or circulating (hormone, nutrients) origin converge towards the brain to inform it permanently of the energetic status of the organism. In turn, the brain sends information to the periphery (sympathetic vagal balance, thyroid or corticotropic axis) which allows a fine regulation of the energy fluxes by acting on the hepatic glucose production, the secretion of the pancreatic hormones (glucagon, insulin) or food behavior. Among the nutrients, increasing amount of data assigns a signal molecule role to lipids such as fatty acids. These fatty acids may originate from the bloodstream but may also be the product of the hydrolysis of lipoproteins such as chylomicrons or VLDLs. Indeed, the identification of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the brain has led to the hypothesis that the LPL-dependent degradation of TG-enriched particles, and the addition of fatty acids, as informative molecules, to sensitive cells (neurons and/or astrocytes), plays a key role in maintaining the energy balance at equilibrium. Other lipases could also participate in these regulatory mechanisms. This review will summarize the state of the art and open up perspectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  5. Low density lipoproteins as circulating fast temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassl, Ruth; Pregetter, Magdalena; Amenitsch, Heinz; Kriechbaum, Manfred; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Chapman, John M; Laggner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The potential physiological significance of the nanophase transition of neutral lipids in the core of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is dependent on whether the rate is fast enough to integrate small (+/-2 degrees C) temperature changes in the blood circulation. Using sub-second, time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering technology with synchrotron radiation, we have monitored the dynamics of structural changes within LDL, which were triggered by temperature-jumps and -drops, respectively. Our findings reveal that the melting transition is complete within less than 10 milliseconds. The freezing transition proceeds slowly with a half-time of approximately two seconds. Thus, the time period over which LDL particles reside in cooler regions of the body readily facilitates structural reorientation of the apolar core lipids. Low density lipoproteins, the biological nanoparticles responsible for the transport of cholesterol in blood, are shown to act as intrinsic nano-thermometers, which can follow the periodic temperature changes during blood circulation. Our results demonstrate that the lipid core in LDL changes from a liquid crystalline to an oily state within fractions of seconds. This may, through the coupling to the protein structure of LDL, have important repercussions on current theories of the role of LDL in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  6. A trimeric lipoprotein assists in trimeric autotransporter biogenesis in enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grin, Iwan; Hartmann, Marcus D; Sauer, Guido; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte; Schütz, Monika; Wagner, Samuel; Madlung, Johannes; Macek, Boris; Felipe-Lopez, Alfonso; Hensel, Michael; Lupas, Andrei; Linke, Dirk

    2014-03-14

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) are important virulence factors of many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. TAAs form fibrous, adhesive structures on the bacterial cell surface. Their N-terminal extracellular domains are exported through a C-terminal membrane pore; the insertion of the pore domain into the bacterial outer membrane follows the rules of β-barrel transmembrane protein biogenesis and is dependent on the essential Bam complex. We have recently described the full fiber structure of SadA, a TAA of unknown function in Salmonella and other enterobacteria. In this work, we describe the structure and function of SadB, a small inner membrane lipoprotein. The sadB gene is located in an operon with sadA; orthologous operons are only found in enterobacteria, whereas other TAAs are not typically associated with lipoproteins. Strikingly, SadB is also a trimer, and its co-expression with SadA has a direct influence on SadA structural integrity. This is the first report of a specific export factor of a TAA, suggesting that at least in some cases TAA autotransport is assisted by additional periplasmic proteins.

  7. A Trimeric Lipoprotein Assists in Trimeric Autotransporter Biogenesis in Enterobacteria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grin, Iwan; Hartmann, Marcus D.; Sauer, Guido; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte; Schütz, Monika; Wagner, Samuel; Madlung, Johannes; Macek, Boris; Felipe-Lopez, Alfonso; Hensel, Michael; Lupas, Andrei; Linke, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) are important virulence factors of many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. TAAs form fibrous, adhesive structures on the bacterial cell surface. Their N-terminal extracellular domains are exported through a C-terminal membrane pore; the insertion of the pore domain into the bacterial outer membrane follows the rules of β-barrel transmembrane protein biogenesis and is dependent on the essential Bam complex. We have recently described the full fiber structure of SadA, a TAA of unknown function in Salmonella and other enterobacteria. In this work, we describe the structure and function of SadB, a small inner membrane lipoprotein. The sadB gene is located in an operon with sadA; orthologous operons are only found in enterobacteria, whereas other TAAs are not typically associated with lipoproteins. Strikingly, SadB is also a trimer, and its co-expression with SadA has a direct influence on SadA structural integrity. This is the first report of a specific export factor of a TAA, suggesting that at least in some cases TAA autotransport is assisted by additional periplasmic proteins. PMID:24369174

  8. Hypertriglyceridemia and unusual lipoprotein subclass distributions associated with late pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, T.M.; Kretchmer, N.; Silliman, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-03-15

    In the human adult population elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with decreased high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and decreased HDL and LDL particle sizes. Late pregnancy is a hypertriglyceridemic state where little is known about LDL and HDL subpopulation distribution. Plasma lipids, apolipoproteins (apo) and lipoprotein subpopulations were examined in 36 pregnant women at 36 wk pregnancy and 6 wk postpartum and correlated with HDL and LDL size. There was a significant decrease in LDL diameter at 36 wk pre, 25 {plus minus} 0.7 nm compared, with 6 wk post, 26.4 {plus minus} 0.8 nm. A total of 97% of the 36 wk pre subjects had small dense LDL which paralleled increases in apoB concentration. Unlike LDL HDL at 36 wks pre showed a significant increase in larger sized particles where HDL{sub 2b} predominated. There was a positive correlation between HDL{sub 2b} mass and apoAl and HDL-C concentrations. Late pregnancy is a metabolic state where the predominance of large, HDL{sub 2b} particles is discordant with the predominance of small LDL and elevated TG. This annual metabolic pattern may in part be due to hormonal changes occurring in late pregnancy.

  9. Lipoprotein (a) and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeira, Ástrid Camêlo; Leal, Adriana Amorim de F; Ramos, Nathaly de Medeiros N; Neto, José de Alencar F; Simões, Mônica Oliveira da S; Medeiros, Carla Campos M

    2013-12-01

    To review the relationship between lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children and adolescents. This systematic review included studies from 2001 to 2011, a ten-year time period. Epidemiological studies with children and/or adolescents published in English, Portuguese or Spanish and fully available online were included. The searches were performed in Science Direct, PubMed/Medline, BVS (Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases, using the following combination of key-words: "lipoprotein a" and "cardiovascular diseases" and "obesity". Overall, 672 studies were obtained but only seven were included. Some studies assessed the family history for CVD. In all of them, Lp(a) levels were increased in patients with family history for CVD. There was also a positive correlation between Lp(a) and LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels, suggesting an association between Lp(a) levels and the lipid profile. The evidence that CVD may originate in childhood and adolescence leads to the need for investigating the risk factors during this period in order to propose earlier and possibly more effective interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality rates.

  10. MicroRNAs and lipoproteins: a connection beyond atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Sala, Federica; Catapano, Alberico Luigi; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of cardiovascular diseases. In this review article, we have summarized the role of miRNAs in regulating lipid metabolism and how their therapeutical inhibition may lead to new approaches to treat cardiometabolic diseases, including atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Specific miRNAs, such as miR-33a and -33b, represent one of the most interesting and attractive targets for metabolic-related disorders and anti-miR33 approaches are under intensive investigation. In addition to miR-33, other miRNAs, including miR-122, are also emerging as key players in lipid metabolism. More recently miRNAs were shown to exert their activities in a paracrine manner and also systemically. The latter is possible due to lipid-carriers, including lipoproteins, that transport and protect miRNAs from degradation. The emerging strong connection between miRNAs, lipoproteins and lipid metabolism indicates the existence of a reciprocal modulation that might go beyond atherosclerosis. PMID:23260873

  11. Brucella ovis PA mutants for outer membrane proteins Omp10, Omp19, SP41, and BepC are not altered in their virulence and outer membrane properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu-Muñoz, Rebeca S; Sancho, Pilar; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2016-04-15

    Mutants in several genes have been obtained on the genetic background of virulent rough (lacking O-polysaccharide) Brucella ovis PA. The target genes encode outer membrane proteins previously associated with the virulence of smooth (bearing O-polysaccharide chains in the lipopolysaccharide) Brucella strains. Multiple attempts to delete omp16, coding for a homologue to peptidoglycan-associated lipoproteins, were unsuccessful, which suggests that Omp16 is probably essential for in vitro survival of B. ovis PA. Single deletion of omp10 or omp19-that encode two other outer membrane lipoproteins--was achieved, but the simultaneous removal of both genes failed, suggesting an essential complementary function between both proteins. Two other deletion mutants, defective in the Tol-C-homologue BepC or in the SP41 adhesin, were also obtained. Surprisingly when compared to previous results obtained with smooth Brucella, none of the B. ovis mutants showed attenuation in the virulence, either in the mouse model or in cellular models of professional and non-professional phagocytes. Additionally, and in contrast to the observations reported with smooth Brucella strains, several properties related to the outer membrane remained almost unaltered. These results evidence new distinctive traits between naturally rough B. ovis and smooth brucellae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of a New Lipoprotein Export Signal in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédééric Lauber

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes, including commensal organisms and opportunistic pathogens, harbor abundant surface-exposed multiprotein membrane complexes (Sus-like systems involved in carbohydrate acquisition. These complexes have been mostly linked to commensalism, and in some instances, they have also been shown to play a role in pathogenesis. Sus-like systems are mainly composed of lipoproteins anchored to the outer membrane and facing the external milieu. This lipoprotein localization is uncommon in most studied Gram-negative bacteria, while it is widespread in Bacteroidetes. Little is known about how these complexes assemble and particularly about how lipoproteins reach the bacterial surface. Here, by bioinformatic analyses, we identify a lipoprotein export signal (LES at the N termini of surface-exposed lipoproteins of the human pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus corresponding to K-(D/E2 or Q-A-(D/E2. We show that, when introduced in sialidase SiaC, an intracellular lipoprotein, this signal is sufficient to target the protein to the cell surface. Mutational analysis of the LES in this reporter system showed that the amino acid composition, position of the signal sequence, and global charge are critical for lipoprotein surface transport. These findings were further confirmed by the analysis of the LES of mucinase MucG, a naturally surface-exposed C. canimorsus lipoprotein. Furthermore, we identify a LES in Bacteroides fragilis and Flavobacterium johnsoniae surface lipoproteins that allow C. canimorsus surface protein exposure, thus suggesting that Bacteroidetes share a new bacterial lipoprotein export pathway that flips lipoproteins across the outer membrane.

  13. Low total, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with complex congenital heart disease after Fontan palliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Wendy; Tan, Meng; Yu, Sunkyung; Rocchini, Albert

    2013-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that patients with complex congenital heart disease who have undergone Fontan palliation have low total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. We retrospectively reviewed the random serum lipid profiles obtained at cardiology clinic visits between May 2010 and November 2011 in patients who had undergone the Fontan procedure. We compared these serum lipid levels against age- and sex-matched established normal data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Eighty-eight patients who had undergone the Fontan procedure also had laboratory test data obtained during their visits. Median total cholesterol level in the Fontan group was 127 mg/dL (IQR, 116-144 mg/dL), median HDL-C was 40 mg/dL (IQR, 33-45 mg/dL), median non-HDL-C was 86 mg/dL (IQR, 76-109 mg/dL), and median LDL-C was 66 mg/dL (IQR, 57-83 mg/dL). Total cholesterol, LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and HDL-C levels were significantly lower in patients who had undergone a Fontan procedure compared with age- and sex-matched normal individuals (mean z-score, -1.4, -1.2, -1.0, and -1.0 respectively; all P<.0001). Cholesterol levels were below the 25th percentile for age and sex for total cholesterol in 82% of patients, for LDL-C in 76%, for non-HDL-C in 67%, and for HDL-C in 57%. Patients who have undergone the Fontan procedure have significantly lower serum total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C and non-HDL-C levels than age- and sex-matched normal individuals. Although the implications of this finding are unknown, it raises the possibility of abnormalities in cholesterol absorption, synthesis, or catabolism in this patient population. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  15. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  16. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    The result of bio-test, using the resulting pigment mutant of C. reinhardtii 124y-1 showed that mutagenic activity was observed significantly in both Tekeli River and Pavlodar Oil Refinery in Kazakhstan; the waste water of the. Pavlodar Oil Refinery had high-toxicity while the water of the Tekeli River had medium-toxicity.

  17. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 25; Issue 1. Avirulent mutants of Macrophomina phaseolina and Aspergillus fumigatus initiate infection in Phaseolus mungo in the presence of phaseo-linone; levamisole gives protection. Suchandra Sett Santosh K Mishra Kazia I Siddiqui. Articles Volume 25 Issue 1 March ...

  18. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  19. Flocculation phenomenon of a mutant flocculent Saccharomyces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flocculation phenomenon of a mutant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain: Effects of metal ions, sugars, temperature, pH, protein-denaturants and ... was in the early stationary growth phase, which coincided with glucose depletion in the batch fermentation for the production of ethanol from kitchen refuse medium.

  20. Mutant PTEN in Cancer : Worse Than Nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leslie, Nick R; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressors block the development of cancer and are often lost during tumor development. Papa et al. show that partial loss of normal PTEN tumor suppressor function can be compounded by additional disruption caused by the expression of inactive mutant PTEN protein. This has significant

  1. Effect of apolipoprotein M on high density lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knock-out mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Moser, Markus

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the role of apoM in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism and atherogenesis, we generated human apoM transgenic (apoM-Tg) and apoM-deficient (apoM(-/-)) mice. Plasma apoM was predominantly associated with 10-12-nm alpha-migrating HDL particles. Human apoM overexpression (11-fold...... of alpha- to pre-alpha-migrating HDL was delayed in apoM-Tg mice. Moreover, lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase-independent generation of pre-beta-migrating apoA-I-containing particles in plasma was increased in apoM-Tg mice (4.2 +/- 1.1%, p = 0.06) and decreased in apoM(-/-) mice (0.5 +/- 0.3%, p = 0.......03) versus controls (1.8 +/- 0.05%). In the setting of low density lipoprotein receptor deficiency, apoM-Tg mice with approximately 2-fold increased plasma apoM concentrations developed smaller atherosclerotic lesions than controls. The effect of apoM on atherosclerosis may be facilitated by enzymatic...

  2. Interfacial Tension and Surface Pressure of High Density Lipoprotein, Low Density Lipoprotein, and Related Lipid Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, O. H. Samuli; Lamberg, Antti; Lehtivaara, Maria; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets play a central role in energy storage and metabolism on a cellular scale. Their core is comprised of hydrophobic lipids covered by a surface region consisting of amphiphilic lipids and proteins. For example, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively) are essentially lipid droplets surrounded by specific proteins, their main function being to transport cholesterol. Interfacial tension and surface pressure of these particles are of great interest because they are related to the shape and the stability of the droplets and to protein adsorption at the interface. Here we use coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations to consider a number of related issues by calculating the interfacial tension in protein-free lipid droplets, and in HDL and LDL particles mimicking physiological conditions. First, our results suggest that the curvature dependence of interfacial tension becomes significant for particles with a radius of ∼5 nm, when the area per molecule in the surface region is tensions in the used HDL and LDL models are essentially unaffected by single apo-proteins at the surface. Finally, interfacial tensions of lipoproteins are higher than in thermodynamically stable droplets, suggesting that HDL and LDL are kinetically trapped into a metastable state. PMID:22995496

  3. Age-modification of lipoprotein, lipid, and lipoprotein ratio-associated risk for coronary artery calcium (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramsothy, Pathmaja; Katz, Ronit; Owens, David S; Burke, Gregory L; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; O'Brien, Kevin D

    2010-02-01

    Although abnormal lipoproteins and lipoprotein ratios are powerful risk factors for clinical cardiovascular events, these associations are stronger in younger than in older subjects. Whether age modifies the relation of lipoproteins and lipoprotein ratios to the relative risk of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD), as assessed by coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores, has not been examined in a contemporary, multiethnic cohort. We performed multivariate relative risk regression analyses to determine the relative risks for associations of lipoproteins and lipoprotein ratios with prevalent CAC in participants in Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). The participants were community-dwelling adults aged 45 to 84 years without clinically apparent CVD at baseline. We excluded those taking lipid-lowering therapy (15%) and stratified the results by decades of age. A total of 5,092 participants met the inclusion criteria. In the fully adjusted models, per SD of low-density lipoprotein, the age-stratified, adjusted relative risk for CAC was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07 to 1.28) for those aged 45 to 84 years but was 1.05 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.10) for those aged 75 to 84 years (p-interaction = 0.12). The relative risk per SD of total/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was 1.20 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.29) for those aged 45 to 54 years but only 1.04 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.09) for those aged 75 to 84 years (p-interaction atherosclerosis, as manifested by prevalent CAC. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Utilization of Cow Milk Enriched with Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Decrease Body Weight, Cholesterol, Low Density Lipoprotein and to Increase Blood High Density Lipoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Suhartati, FM; Suryapratama, W; Rahayu, S

    2012-01-01

    An experiment to investigate the ability of cow milk enriched with conjugated linoleic acid to decrease body weight, total cholesterol, blood Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL), and to increase blood High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) has been conducted using in vivo experimental method. Research material consisted of 40 8-week-old white female rats (Rattus norvegicus) of Wistar strain (as an animal model). The method used was an experimental method with a Completely Randomized Design. The treatments ...

  5. Increased fluidity and oxidation of malarial lipoproteins: relation with severity and induction of endothelial expression of adhesion molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Looareesuwan Sornchai

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oxidative stress has been demonstrated in malaria. The potential oxidative modification of lipoproteins derived from malaria patients was studied. These oxidized lipids may have role in pathogenesis of malaria. Method The plasma lipid profile and existence of oxidized forms of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL were investigated in malaria (17 mild and 24 severe patients and 37 control subjects. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs, conjugated dienes, tryptophan fluorescence and fluidity of lipoproteins were determined as markers of oxidation. The biological effect of malarial lipoproteins was assessed by the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. Results Malarial lipoproteins had decreased cholesterol (except in VLDL and phospholipid. The triglyceride levels were unchanged. The cholesterol/phospholipid ratio of LDL was decreased in malaria, but increased in VLDL and HDL. TBARs and conjugate dienes were increased in malarial lipoproteins, while the tryptophan fluorescence was decreased. The fluidity of lipoproteins was increased in malaria. These indicated the presence of oxidized lipoproteins in malaria by which the degree of oxidation was correlated with severity. Of three lipoproteins from malarial patients, LDL displayed the most pronounced oxidative modification. In addition, oxidized LDL from malaria patients increased endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. Conclusion In malaria, the lipoproteins are oxidatively modified, and the degree of oxidation is related with severity. Oxidized LDL from malarial patients increases the endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. These suggest the role of oxidized lipoproteins, especially LDL, on the pathogenesis of disease.

  6. Characterization and Purification of Polydisperse Reconstituted Lipoproteins and Nanolipoprotein Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Hoeprich

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity is a fact that plagues the characterization and application of many self-assembled biological constructs. The importance of obtaining particle homogeneity in biological assemblies is a critical goal, as bulk analysis tools often require identical species for reliable interpretation of the results—indeed, important tools of analysis such as x-ray diffraction typically require over 90% purity for effectiveness. This issue bears particular importance in the case of lipoproteins. Lipid-binding proteins known as apolipoproteins can self assemble with liposomes to form reconstituted high density lipoproteins (rHDLs or nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs when used for biotechnology applications such as the solubilization of membrane proteins. Typically, the apolipoprotein and phospholipids reactants are self assembled and even with careful assembly protocols the product often contains heterogeneous particles. In fact, size polydispersity in rHDLs and NLPs published in the literature are frequently observed, which may confound the accurate use of analytical methods. In this article, we demonstrate a procedure for producing a pure, monodisperse NLP subpopulation from a polydisperse self-assembly using size exclusion chromatography (SEC coupled with high resolution particle imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM. In addition, NLPs have been shown to self assemble both in the presence and absence of detergents such as cholate, yet the effects of cholate on NLP polydispersity and separation has not been systematically examined. Therefore, we examined the separation properties of NLPs assembled in both the absence and presence of cholate using SEC and native gel electrophoresis. From this analysis, NLPs prepared with and without cholate showed particles with well defined diameters spanning a similar size range. However, cholate was shown to have a dramatic affect on NLP separation by SEC and native gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, under

  7. Nanoporous carbon sorbent for molecular-sieve chromatography of lipoprotein complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimkulova, A. R.; Mansurova, B. B.; Gil'manov, M. K.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2012-06-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of carbon sorbents are investigated. Electron microscopy data for the sorbent and separated lipoprotein complex are presented. It is found that the obtained carbon sorbent possess high porosity. Nanoporous carbon sorbents for the chromatography of molecular-sieve markers are obtained and tested. The applicability of nanoporous carbon sorbents for separation of lipoprotein complexes (LPC) is investigated.

  8. The influence of fasting/refeeding on the lipoprotein lipase activity of adipose tissue and muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botion L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein lipase activity in adipose tissue and muscle is modulated by changes in the pattern of food intake. We have measured total lipoprotein lipase activity in adipose tissue and muscle of male Wistar rats (N = 6-10, weighing 200-250 g (~12 weeks, during the refeeding/fasting state following 24 h of fasting. Lipoprotein lipase activity in tissue homogenates was evaluated using a [³H]-triolein-containing substrate, and released [³H]-free fatty acids were extracted and quantified by liquid scintillation. Adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase activity did not completely recover within 2 h of refeeding (60% of refed ad libitum values. Cardiac lipoprotein lipase activity remained increased even 2 h after refeeding (100% of refed ad libitum values, whereas no significant changes were observed in the soleus and diaphragm muscles. Adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase activities were consistently higher than the highest skeletal muscle or heart values. It is therefore likely that adipose tissue, rather than muscle makes the major contribution to triacylglycerol clearance. There was concomitant relatively high lipoprotein lipase activity in both adipose tissue and cardiac muscle during the first few hours of refeeding, therefore cardiac muscle may contribute significantly to triacylglycerol clearance during this period. The results suggest that during fasting, increased lipoprotein lipase activity provides a complementary source of free fatty acids from circulating triacylglycerol, allowing the heart to maintain its continuous, high-energy expenditure.

  9. Serum amyloid A is found on ApoB-containing lipoproteins in obese humans with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Anisa; Wilson, Patricia G; Hou, Tianfei; Brown, Aparna; King, Victoria L; Tannock, Lisa R

    2013-05-01

    In murine models of obesity/diabetes, there is an increase in plasma serum amyloid A (SAA) levels along with redistribution of SAA from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoprotein particles, namely, low-density lipoprotein and very low-density lipoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine if obesity is associated with similar SAA lipoprotein redistribution in humans. Three groups of obese individuals were recruited from a weight loss clinic: healthy obese (n = 14), metabolic syndrome (MetS) obese (n = 8), and obese with type 2 diabetes (n = 6). Plasma was separated into lipoprotein fractions by fast protein liquid chromatography, and SAA was measured in lipid fractions using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. Only the obese diabetic group had SAA detectable in apoB-containing lipoproteins, and SAA reverted back to HDL with active weight loss. In human subjects, SAA is found in apoB-containing lipoprotein particles only in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes, but not in healthy obese or obese subjects with MetS. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins in virulence and immunity - fighting with a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Katja; Sander, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are secreted membrane-anchored proteins characterized by a lipobox motif. This lipobox motif directs post-translational modifications at the conserved cysteine through the consecutive action of three enzymes: Lgt, LspA and Lnt, which results in di- or triacylated forms. Lipoproteins are abundant in all bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and often involved in virulence and immunoregulatory processes. On the one hand, disruption of the biosynthesis pathway of lipoproteins leads to attenuation of M. tuberculosis in vivo, and mycobacteria deficient for certain lipoproteins have been assessed as attenuated live vaccine candidates. On the other hand, several mycobacterial lipoproteins form immunodominant antigens which promote an immune response. Some of these have been explored in DNA or subunit vaccination approaches against tuberculosis. The immune recognition of specific lipoproteins, however, might also benefit long-term survival of M. tuberculosis through immune modulation, while others induce protective responses. Exploiting lipoproteins as vaccines is thus a complex matter which requires deliberative investigation. The dual role of lipoproteins in the immunity to and pathogenicity of mycobacteria is discussed here. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. ApoE and the role of very low density lipoproteins in adipose tissue inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal was too identify the role of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and apoE, a major apolipoprotein in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, in adipose tissue inflammation with high-fat diet induced obesity. Male apoE-/- and C57BL/6J wild-type mice fed high fat diets for 12 weeks were assessed for metab...

  12. Effects of Anabolic Steroids on Lipoprotein Profiles of Female Weight Lifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Robert J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effects of resistance exercise and anabolic steroids on lipoprotein profiles of female weightlifters. The study found that women who participate in resistance training have better lipoprotein profiles than their sedentary counterparts, but these changes do not offset the deleterious effects of steroid use. (SM)

  13. Fractionation of human serum lipoproteins and simultaneous enzymatic determination of cholesterol and triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qureshi, R.N.; Kok, W.T.; Schoenmakers, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    A method based on Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) was developed to separate different types of lipoproteins from human serum. The emphasis in the method optimization was on the possibilities to characterize the largest lipoprotein fractions (LDL and VLDL), which is usually not

  14. Low normal thyroid function as a determinant of increased large very low density lipoprotein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienhoven-Wind, Lynnda; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    Objectives: Low-normal thyroid function may relate to increases in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, but effects on lipoprotein subfractions are largely unknown. Associations of alterations in lipoprotein metabolism and functionality with low-normal thyroid function could be more pronounced in

  15. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency due to long-term heparinization presenting as severe hypertriglyceridaemia in pregnancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, G F; Cameron, J; Henderson, A; Richmond, W.

    1991-01-01

    A case of severe hypertriglyceridaemia presenting in the third trimester of pregnancy in a woman on long-term heparin prophylaxis is described. The hypertriglyceridaemia was attributed to impaired clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles secondary to heparin-induced reduction in the activity of the lipolytic enzyme, lipoprotein lipase.

  16. Human luteinized granulosa cells secrete apoB100-containing lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautier, Thomas; Becker, Steffi; Drouineaud, Veronique; Menetrier, Franck; Sagot, Paul; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; von Otte, Soeren; Lagrost, Laurent; Masson, David; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    Thus far, liver, intestine, heart, and placenta have been shown to secrete apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins. In the present study, we first investigated lipoproteins in human follicular fluid (FF), surrounding developing oocytes within the ovary, as well as in corresponding plasma

  17. Adaptive immune response to lipoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi Hai Vu,; Kolata, Julia; Stentzel, Sebastian; Beyer, Anica; Salazar, Manuela Gesell; Steil, Leif; Pane-Farre, Jan; Ruehmling, Vanessa; Engelmann, Susanne; Goetz, Friedrich; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Hecker, Michael; Maeder, Ulrike; Schmidt, Frank; Voelker, Uwe; Broeker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent commensal but also a dangerous pathogen, causing many forms of infection ranging from mild to life-threatening conditions. Among its virulence factors are lipoproteins, which are anchored in the bacterial cell membrane. Lipoproteins perform various functions in

  18. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RESEARCH ARTICLE. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low density lipoprotein receptor gene in hypercholesterolaemia mice. HAILONG OU1∗, QINGHAI ZHANG2 and JIA ZENG1. 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and 2Department of Biology, Guizhou Medical University, ...

  19. Drug delivery via lipoprotein-based carriers: answering the challenges in systemic therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabnis, Nirupama; Lacko, Andras G

    2012-05-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are transporters of lipids and other hydrophobic molecules in the mammalian circulation. Lipoproteins also have a strong potential to serve as drug-delivery vehicles due to their small size, long residence time in the circulation and high-drug payload. Consequently, lipoproteins and synthetic/reconstituted lipoprotein preparations have been evaluated with increasing interest towards clinical applications, particularly for cancer diagnostics/imaging and chemotherapy. In this review, past and current studies on lipoproteins and similar alternative drug carriers are discussed regarding their suitability as agents to deliver drugs, primarily to cancer cells and tumors. A lipoprotein-based delivery strategy may also provide a novel platform for improving the therapeutic efficacy of drugs that have previously been judged unsuitable or had only limited application due to poor solubility. An additional, and perhaps the most important aspect of the drug-delivery process via lipoprotein-type carriers, is the receptor-mediated uptake of the payload from the lipoprotein complex. Monitoring the expression of specific receptors prior to treatment could, thus, give rise to efficient selection of optimally responsive patients, resulting in a successful personalized therapy regimen.

  20. Effect of a High Intake of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Lipoprotein Levels in Healthy Human Subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, A.J.; Brouwer, I.A.; Siebelink, E.; Katan, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background -Trans fatty acids are produced either by industrial hydrogenation or by biohydrogenation in the rumens of cows and sheep. Industrial trans fatty acids lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and increase the risk of coronary

  1. Lipoprotein lipase S447X: a naturally occurring gain-of-function mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rip, Jaap; Nierman, Melchior C.; Ross, Colin J.; Jukema, Jan Wouter; Hayden, Michael R.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2006-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triglycerides in the circulation and promotes the hepatic uptake of remnant lipoproteins. Since the gene was cloned in 1989, more than 100 LPL gene mutations have been identified, the majority of which cause loss of enzymatic function. In contrast to this, the

  2. Changes in lipids and lipoprotein particle concentrations after interruption of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampe, Fiona C; Duprez, Daniel A; Kuller, Lewis H

    2010-01-01

    The effect of interruption of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on lipoprotein particle subclasses has not been studied. We examined short-term changes in lipids and lipoprotein particles among 332 HIV-infected individuals randomized to interrupt or continue ART in the "Strategies for Management...... of Antiretroviral Therapy" trial....

  3. Effect of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Lipoprotein Metabolism: A Comprehensive Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M.M. Ooi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Dietary fatty-acid composition regulates lipids and lipoprotein metabolism and may confer CVD benefit. This review updates understanding of the effect of dietary fatty-acids on human lipoprotein metabolism. In elderly participants with hyperlipidemia, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty-acids (PUFA consumption diminished hepatic triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL secretion and enhanced TRL to low-density lipoprotein (LDL conversion. n-3 PUFA also decreased TRL-apoB-48 concentration by decreasing TRL-apoB-48 secretion. High n-6 PUFA intake decreased very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations by up-regulating VLDL lipolysis and uptake. In a study of healthy subjects, the intake of saturated fatty-acids with increased palmitic acid at the sn-2 position was associated with decreased postprandial lipemia. Low medium-chain triglyceride may not appreciably alter TRL metabolism. Replacing carbohydrate with monounsaturated fatty-acids increased TRL catabolism. Trans-fatty-acid decreased LDL and enhanced high-density lipoprotein catabolism. Interactions between APOE genotype and n-3 PUFA in regulating lipid responses were also described. The major advances in understanding the effect of dietary fatty-acids on lipoprotein metabolism has centered on n-3 PUFA. This knowledge emphasizes the importance of regulating lipoprotein metabolism as a mode to improve plasma lipids and potentially CVD risk. Additional studies are required to better characterize the cardiometabolic effects of other dietary fatty-acids.

  4. PLASMA-LIPOPROTEIN ABNORMALITIES IN TYPE-1 (INSULIN-DEPENDENT) DIABETES-MELLITUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF

    Lipoprotein abnormalities may well contribute to the increased risk of coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and peripheral vascular disease observed in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. The spectrum of diabetes-associated changes in lipoprotein metabolism is discussed. The

  5. In vivo transfer of lipoprotein(a) into human atherosclerotic carotid arterial intima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Bo; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the atherogenic potential of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and LDL by measuring the intimal clearance of these two plasma lipoproteins in the atherosclerotic intima of the human carotid artery in vivo. Autologous 131I-Lp(a) and 125I-LDL were mixed and reinjected intr...

  6. Toward Reliable Lipoprotein Particle Predictions from NMR Spectra of Human Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsonis Centelles, Sandra; Hoefsloot, Huub C.J.; Khakimov, Bekzod; Ebrahimi, Parvaneh; Lind, Mads V.; Kristensen, Mette; Roo, De Niels; Jacobs, Doris M.; Duynhoven, Van John; Cannet, Claire; Fang, Fang; Humpfer, Eberhard; Schäfer, Hartmut; Spraul, Manfred; Engelsen, Søren B.; Smilde, Age K.

    2017-01-01

    Lipoprotein profiling of human blood by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a rapid and promising approach to monitor health and disease states in medicine and nutrition. However, lack of standardization of measurement protocols has prevented the use of NMR-based lipoprotein

  7. Lipoprotein(a) and ischemic heart disease-A causal association? A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    atherosclerosis and thrombosis, including accumulation of lipoprotein(a) in atherosclerotic plaques and attenuation of t-PA mediated plasminogen activation. No randomized clinical trial of the effect of lowering lipoprotein(a) levels on IHD prevention has ever been conducted. Lacking evidence from randomized...... are presently lacking. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved...

  8. Plasma lipoprotein(a) levels in patients with homozygous autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjouke, B.; Yahya, R.; Tanck, M.W.T.; Defesche, J.C.; Graaf, J. de; Wiegman, A.; Kastelein, J.J.; Mulder, M.T.; Hovingh, G.K.; Roeters van Lennep, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), caused by mutations in either low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (APOB), or proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) are characterized by high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and

  9. Nonbinding site-directed mutants of transferrin binding protein B exhibit enhanced immunogenicity and protective capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandoloso, Rafael; Martínez-Martínez, Sonia; Calmettes, Charles; Fegan, Jamie; Costa, Estela; Curran, Dave; Yu, Rong-Hua; Gutiérrez-Martín, César B; Rodríguez-Ferri, Elías F; Moraes, Trevor F; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2015-03-01

    Host-adapted Gram-negative bacterial pathogens from the Pasteurellaceae, Neisseriaceae, and Moraxellaceae families normally reside in the upper respiratory or genitourinary tracts of their hosts and rely on utilizing iron from host transferrin (Tf) for growth and survival. The surface receptor proteins that mediate this critical iron acquisition pathway have been proposed as ideal vaccine targets due to the critical role that they play in survival and disease pathogenesis in vivo. In particular, the surface lipoprotein component of the receptor, Tf binding protein B (TbpB), had received considerable attention as a potential antigen for vaccines in humans and food production animals but this has not translated into the series of successful vaccine products originally envisioned. Preliminary immunization experiments suggesting that host Tf could interfere with development of the immune response prompted us to directly address this question with site-directed mutant proteins defective in binding Tf. Site-directed mutants with dramatically reduced binding of porcine transferrin and nearly identical structure to the native proteins were prepared. A mutant Haemophilus parasuis TbpB was shown to induce an enhanced B-cell and T-cell response in pigs relative to native TbpB and provide superior protection from infection than the native TbpB or a commercial vaccine product. The results indicate that binding of host transferrin modulates the development of the immune response against TbpBs and that strategies designed to reduce or eliminate binding can be used to generate superior antigens for vaccines. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Prevention of neural tube defects in Lrp2 mutant mouse embryos by folic acid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Julia A; Stokes, Bethany A; Zohn, Irene E

    2017-01-20

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common structural birth defects in humans and are caused by the complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Periconceptional supplementation with folic acid can prevent NTDs in both mouse models and human populations. A better understanding of how genes and environmental factors interact is critical toward development of rational strategies to prevent NTDs. Low density lipoprotein-related protein 2 (Lrp2) is involved in endocytosis of the folic acid receptor among numerous other nutrients and ligands. We determined the effect of iron and/or folic acid supplementation on the penetrance of NTDs in the Lrp2(null) mouse model. The effects of supplementation on folate and iron status were measured in embryos and dams. Periconceptional dietary supplementation with folic acid did not prevent NTDs in Lrp2 mutant embryos, whereas high levels of folic acid supplementation by intraperitoneal injection reduced incidence of NTDs. Importantly, Lrp2(null/+) dams had reduced blood folate levels that improved with daily intraperitoneal injections of folate but not dietary supplementation. On the contrary, iron supplementation had no effect on the penetrance of NTDs in Lrp2 mutant embryos and negated the preventative effect of folic acid supplementation in Lrp2(null/null) mutants. Lrp2 is required for folate homeostasis in heterozygous dams and high levels of supplementation prevents NTDs. Furthermore, high levels of dietary iron supplementation interfered with folic acid supplementation negating the positive effects of supplementation in this model. Birth Defects Research 109:16-26, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Surface-Exposed Lipoproteins: An Emerging Secretion Phenomenon in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marlena M; Bernstein, Harris D

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are hydrophilic proteins that are anchored to a cell membrane by N-terminally linked fatty acids. It is widely believed that nearly all lipoproteins produced by Gram-negative bacteria are either retained in the inner membrane (IM) or transferred to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM). Lipoproteins that are exposed on the cell surface have also been reported but are generally considered to be rare. Results from a variety of recent studies, however, now suggest that the prevalence of surface-exposed lipoproteins has been underestimated. In this review we describe the evidence that the surface exposure of lipoproteins in Gram-negative bacteria is a widespread phenomenon and discuss possible mechanisms by which these proteins might be transported across the OM. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Lipoprotein(a) accelerates atherosclerosis in uremic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tanja X; McCormick, Sally P; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2010-01-01

    Uremic patients have increased plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels and elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. Lp(a) is a subfraction of LDL, where apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] is disulfide bound to apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Lp(a) binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPL), and uremia increases...... = 19), human apoB-100 (n = 20), or human apo(a) + human apoB [Lp(a)] (n = 15), and in wild-type (WT) controls (n = 21). The uremic mice received a high-fat diet, and aortic atherosclerosis was examined 35 weeks later. LDL-cholesterol was increased in apoB-Tg and Lp(a)-Tg mice, but it was normal in apo...

  13. Low-density lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ference, Brian A.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Graham, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Aims To appraise the clinical and genetic evidence that low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Methods and results We assessed whether the association between LDL and ASCVD fulfils the criteria for causality by evaluating the totality of evidence from...... genetic studies, prospective epidemiologic cohort studies, Mendelian randomization studies, and randomized trials of LDL-lowering therapies. In clinical studies, plasma LDL burden is usually estimated by determination of plasma LDL cholesterol level (LDL-C). Rare genetic mutations that cause reduced LDL...... receptor function lead to markedly higher LDL-C and a dose-dependent increase in the risk of ASCVD, whereas rare variants leading to lower LDL-C are associated with a correspondingly lower risk of ASCVD. Separate meta-analyses of over 200 prospective cohort studies, Mendelian randomization studies...

  14. Environmental determinants, liver function, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuller, L H; Hulley, S B; LaPorte, R E; Neaton, J; Dai, W S

    1983-04-01

    High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-chol) is negatively associated with coronary heart disease. Environmental heart disease risk factors may partially be related to coronary heart disease through alterations in HDL-chol concentrations. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms by which environmental factors are related to HDL-chol. The authors investigated a possible mechanism: changes in liver function as a mediating link between risk factors and HDL-chol concentrations in marathon runners, alcoholics, and participants in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Liver function, as measured by liver enzymes, was related to both coronary heart disease risk factors and alcohol consumption, suggesting that the increased levels of HDL-chol associated with alcohol were primarily the result of changes in liver function. The relationship of obesity to HDL-chol could not be explained by the alterations in liver function.

  15. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the oxylipin composition of lipoproteins in hypertriglyceridemic, statin-treated subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Oxylipins mediate many physiological processes, including inflammation and vascular function. Generally considered local and transient, we suggest their presence in lipoproteins indicates they also mediate the effects lipoproteins have on inflammation and vascular biology. To support th...

  16. Biominetic High Density Lipoproteins for the Delivery of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sushant

    Advances in nanotechnology have brought about novel inorganic and hybrid nanoparticles with unique physico-chemical properties that make them suitable for a broad range of applications---from nano-circuitry to drug delivery. A significant part of those advancements have led to ground-breaking discoveries that have changed the approaches to formulation of therapeutics against diseases, such as cancer. Now-a-days the focus does not lie solely on finding a candidate small-molecule therapeutic with minimal adverse effects, but researchers are looking up to nanoparticles to improve biodistribution and biocompatibility profile of clinically proven therapeutics. The plethora of conjugation chemistries offered by currently extant inorganic nanoparticles have, in recent years, led to great leaps in the field of biomimicry---a modality that promises high biocompatibility. Further, in the pursuit of highly specific therapeutic molecules, researchers have turned to silencing oligonucleotides and some have already brought together the strengths of nanoparticles and silencing oligonucleotides in search of an efficacious therapy for cancer with minimal adverse effects. This dissertation work focuses on such a biomimetic platform---a gold nanoparticle based high density lipoprotein biomimetic (HDL NP), for the delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first chapter of this body of work introduces the molecular target of the silencing oligonucleotides---VEGFR2, and its role in the progression of solid tumor cancers. The background information also covers important aspects of natural high density lipoproteins (HDL), especially their innate capacity to bind and deliver exogenous and endogenous silencing oligonucleotides to tissues that express their high affinity receptor SRB1. We subsequently describe the synthesis of the biomimetic HDL NP and its oligonucleotide conjugates, and establish their biocompatibility. Further on, experimental data demonstrate the efficacy of silencing

  17. Insulin Resistance Predicts Atherogenic Lipoprotein Profile in Nondiabetic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia De C. Cartolano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atherogenic diabetes is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic individuals; however, the impact of insulin resistance (IR in lipid metabolism in preclinical stages is generally underreported. For that, we evaluated the capacity of IR to predict an atherogenic lipid subfraction profile. Methods. Complete clinical evaluation and biochemical analysis (lipid, glucose profile, LDL, and HDL subfractions and LDL phenotype and size were performed in 181 patients. The impact of IR as a predictor of atherogenic lipoproteins was tested by logistic regression analysis in raw and adjusted models. Results. HDL-C and Apo AI were significantly lower in individuals with IR. Individuals with IR had a higher percentage of small HDL particles, lower percentage in the larger ones, and reduced frequency of phenotype A (IR = 62%; non-IR = 83%. IR individuals had reduced probability to have large HDL (OR = 0.213; CI = 0.999–0.457 and had twice more chances to show increased small HDL (OR = 2.486; CI = 1.341–7.051. IR was a significant predictor of small LDL (OR = 3.075; CI = 1.341–7.051 and atherogenic phenotype (OR = 3.176; CI = 1.469–6.867. Conclusion. IR, previously DM2 diagnosis, is a strong predictor of quantitative and qualitative features of lipoproteins directly associated with an increased atherogenic risk.

  18. Cholesterol Levels of Six Fractionated Serum Lipoproteins and its Relevance to Coronary Heart Disease Risk Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manita, Daisuke; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Hirowatari, Yuji

    2017-09-01

    Evaluation of serum lipoprotein profiles including triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein, that is, intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and chylomicron (CM) remnant is important to manage coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate CHD or cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk scores with cholesterol levels of six fractionated lipoprotein classes {high-density lipoprotein [HDL], low-density lipoprotein [LDL], IDL, VLDL, CM including CM remnant, and lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)]} in Japanese healthy men. The present study enrolled 161 healthy men without any medications. Lipoprotein profiles (fractionated lipoprotein cholesterol levels) were measured by anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (AEX-HPLC) method and were compared with age, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and three risk scores, that is, NIPPON DATA, Hisayama risk predicting model, and Suita score. Levels of LDL-cholesterol (C), VLDL-C, and CM-C significantly differed with age, while values of HDL-C, IDL-C, and Lp(a)-C were not different. The eGFR inversely correlated with LDL-C, IDL-C, VLDL-C, and CM-C. In a stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis, VLDL-C only correlated independently with eGFR. Three risk scores significantly correlated with CM-C. These results suggested that VLDL-C concentration contributes to an increased risk at early stages of renal dysfunction, and CM-C may serve as a marker for estimating CHD risk in Japanese healthy men.

  19. Bio F1B hamster: a unique animal model with reduced lipoprotein lipase activity to investigate nutrient mediated regulation of lipoprotein metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornish Marion L

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bio F1B hamster is an inbred hybrid strain that is highly susceptible to diet-induced atherosclerosis. We previously reported that feeding a high fat fish oil diet to Bio F1B hamster caused severe hyperlipidaemia. In this study we compared the effects of various diets in the Bio F1B hamster and the Golden Syrian hamster, which is an outbred hamster strain to investigate whether genetic background plays an important role in dietary fat mediated regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. We further investigated the mechanisms behind diet-induced hyperlipidaemia in F1B hamster. Methods The Bio F1B and Golden Syrian hamsters, 8 weeks old, were fed high fat diets rich in either monounsaturated fatty acids, an n-6: n-3 ratio of 5 or a fish oil diet for 4 weeks. Animals were fasted overnight and blood and tissue samples were collected. Plasma was fractionated into various lipoprotein fractions and assayed for triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations. Plasma lipoprotein lipase activity was measured using radioisotope method. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein activity was measured in the liver and intestine. Plasma apolipoproteinB48, -B100 and apolipoprotein E was measured using Western blots. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine the effect of diet type and animal strain. Results The fish oil fed F1B hamsters showed milky plasma after a 14-hour fast. Fish oil feeding caused accumulation of apolipoproteinB48 containing lipoprotein particles suggesting hindrance of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein clearance. There was no significant effect of diet or strain on hepatic or intestinal microsomal triglyceride transfer protein activity indicating that hyperlipidaemia is not due to an increase in the assembly or secretion of lipoprotein particles. F1B hamsters showed significantly reduced levels of lipoprotein lipase activity, which was inhibited by fish oil feeding. Conclusion Evidence is presented for the first time that alterations in

  20. Surface-Associated Lipoproteins Link Enterococcus faecalis Virulence to Colitogenic Activity in IL-10-Deficient Mice Independent of Their Expression Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengfelder, Isabella; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Steck, Natalie; Roh, Jung H.; Tchaptchet, Sandrine; Bao, Yinyin; Hansen, Jonathan J.; Huebner, Johannes; Carroll, Ian M.; Murray, Barbara E.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Haller, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The commensal Enterococcus faecalis is among the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Recent findings regarding increased abundance of enterococci in the intestinal microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and induction of colitis in IL-10-deficient (IL-10-/-) mice put a new perspective on the contribution of E. faecalis to chronic intestinal inflammation. Based on the expression of virulence-related genes in the inflammatory milieu of IL-10-/- mice using RNA-sequencing analysis, we characterized the colitogenic role of two bacterial structures that substantially impact on E. faecalis virulence by different mechanisms: the enterococcal polysaccharide antigen and cell surface-associated lipoproteins. Germ-free wild type and IL-10-/- mice were monoassociated with E. faecalis wild type OG1RF or the respective isogenic mutants for 16 weeks. Intestinal tissue and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were collected to characterize tissue pathology, loss of intestinal barrier function, bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelium and immune cell activation. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) were stimulated with bacterial lysates and E. faecalis virulence was additionally investigated in three invertebrate models. Colitogenic activity of wild type E. faecalis (OG1RF score: 7.2±1.2) in monoassociated IL-10-/- mice was partially impaired in E. faecalis lacking enterococcal polysaccharide antigen (ΔepaB score: 4.7±2.3; plipoproteins (Δlgt score: 2.3±2.3; pLipoprotein-deficient E. faecalis exhibited an impaired TLR2-mediated activation of BMDCs in vitro despite their ability to fully reactivate MLN cells as well as MLN-derived colitogenic T cells ex vivo. E. faecalis virulence factors accounting for bacterial adhesion to mucosal surfaces as well as intestinal barrier disruption partially contribute to colitogenic activity of E. faecalis. Beyond their well-known role in infections, cell surface-associated lipoproteins are essential structures for

  1. Fibrinolytic Activity of Recombinant Mutant Streptokinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Mobarrez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptokinase is a bacterial protein produced by different beta hemolytic streptococci and widely used in thrombolytic treatment. The main disadvantage of using streptokinase is antibody formation which causes allergic reaction to neutralize effects of streptokinase therapy. Aim of this study was investigate of recombinant mutant streptokinase fibrinolytic activity.Materials and Methods: In this study recombinant mutant streptokinase without 42 amino acids from the C terminal region was purified by affinity S-Tag column chromatography and its fibrinolytic activity was studied.Results: The concentration of expressed and purified protein was 10 mg/ml. Its enzyme activity was assayed using zymography, radial caseinolytic activity and fibrin plate test methods and estimated quantitatively by casein digestion method compared to a commercial form.Conclusion: It was found that this product had the more volume and more enzymatic activity.

  2. Characterization of a Legionella micdadei mip mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, W A; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Legionella micdadei is dependent upon its ability to infect alveolar phagocytes. To better understand the basis of intracellular infection by this organism, we examined the importance of its Mip surface protein. In Legionella pneumophila, Mip promotes infection of both human m...... Mip. Although unimpaired in its ability to grow in bacteriologic media, this Mip mutant was defective in its capacity to infect U937 cells, a human macrophage-like cell line. Most significantly, the Mip- organism displayed a 24-fold reduction in survivability immediately after its entry...... into the phagocyte. Similarly, the mutant was less able to parasitize Hartmannella amoebae. Taken together, these data argue that Mip specifically potentiates intracellular growth by L. micdadei....

  3. Low density lipoprotein receptors in bovine adrenal cortex. II. Low density lipoprotein binding to membranes prepared from fresh tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanen, P T; Basu, S K; Goldstein, J L; Brown, M S

    1979-03-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL)-binding activity was measured in whole homogenates and membranes prepared from fresh bovine adrenal cortex by an ultracentrifugation assay. The binding site for 125I-labeled LDL in isolated membranes shared the properties of the LDL receptor previously demonstrated in intact monolayers of cultured bovine adrenocortical cells. The amount of high affinity [125I]iodo-LDL-binding activity in the adrenal cortex was 6- to 12-fold higher than in the medulla of the same glands. Large amounts of high affinity [125I]iodo-LDL-binding activity were also present in the ovarian corpus luteum but not in the ovarian interstitium. Lesser amounts of high affinity binding activity were observed in 14 other bovine tissues. These results lend support to the concept that cells in the bovine adrenal cortex can obtain cholesterol for steroid hormone synthesis through the receptor-mediated uptake of plasma LDL.

  4. A new neurological rat mutant "mutilated foot".

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, J M; Scaravilli, F; Duchen, L W; Mertin, J

    1981-01-01

    A new autosomal recessive mutant rat (mutilated foot) with a neurological disorder is described. Affected animals become ataxic and the feet, generally of the hind limbs, are mutilated. Quantitative studies show a severe reduction in numbers of sensory ganglion cells and fibres, including unmyelinated fibres. The numbers of ventral root fibres, particularly those of small diameter, are also reduced. Markedly decreased numbers of spindles are found in the limb muscles. These quantitative abnor...

  5. Effects of APOA5 S19W polymorphism on growth, insulin sensitivity and lipoproteins in normoweight neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolipoprotein (Apo) A5 is a protein involved in the activation of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and the metabolism of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins. LPL plays a major role in the metabolism of TG-rich lipoproteins, and placental LPL activity is known to correlate positively with foetal fat deposit...

  6. A simple and sensitive method for lipoprotein and lipids profiles analysis of individual micro-liter scale serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Fan, Baoyan; Yang, Kangmin; Zhu, Haibo

    2012-02-01

    A simple and sensitive method to determine lipoprotein and lipids profiles in micro-liter scale individual serum sample is not presently available. Traditional lipoprotein separation techniques either by ultra-centrifugation or by liquid chromatography methods have their disadvantages in both lipoprotein separation and lipids component quantification. In this study we used small volume needing size-exclusion fast protein liquid chromatography to separate different lipoprotein subclasses in 50μL serum. And lipids contents, such as cholesterol, cholesterol ester and triacylglycerol, were measured by using two different fluorescence-based lipid detection methods. With this method, very low density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein could be easily separated, and follow-up lipid detection was completed by simple kinds of reactions. Serum lipoprotein and lipids profiling from C57BL/6 mice (n=5) and human (n=5) were analyzed. The elution profiles of five individuals were highly reproducible, and there were lipoprotein and lipids distribution variations between C57BL/6 mice and human beings. In conclusion, this method which combined small volume needing size-exclusion fast protein liquid chromatography and fluorescence-based lipids measurement, provided a simple, efficient, integrity and reproducible procedure for determining serum lipoprotein and lipids profiles in micro-liter scale levels. It becomes possible that determination of lipoprotein profiles and gaining information of lipids in different lipoproteins can be accomplished simultaneously. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. DMPD: The oxidation of lipoproteins by monocytes-macrophages. Biochemical andbiological mechanisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10473535 The oxidation of lipoproteins by monocytes-macrophages. Biochemical andbio.... (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The oxidation of lipoproteins by monocytes-macrophages. Biochemical and...biological mechanisms. PubmedID 10473535 Title The oxidation of lipoproteins by m

  8. Apolipoprotein AV Accelerates Plasma Hydrolysis OfTriglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins By Interaction With Proteoglycan BoundLipoprotein Lipase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-02-22

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences intriglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasmatriglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In hAPOA5 transgenic mice(hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and VLDL was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL).Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by crossbreeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knockout, and the hAPOA5tr to an LPL deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5 deficient mice,however, over expression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr HDL, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line.A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting.It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycans bound LPL for lipolysis.

  9. Relationship between Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Kazuyo; Harada, Sei; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kurihara, Ayako; Kubota, Yoshimi; Higashiyama, Aya; Hirata, Takumi; Nishida, Yoko; Kawasaki, Midori; Takebayashi, Toru; Okamura, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Atherosclerosis Society (JAS) Guidelines for Diagnosis and Prevention of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases for Japanese 2012 version have set a non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C)-management target of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) +30 mg/dL. However, the actual difference between non-HDL-C and LDL-C is not clear. Therefore, we evaluated its joint distribution and assessed the validity of this criterion in the general Japanese population. We used baseline cross-sectional data of 4,110 participants from two studies; the KOBE Study (n=1,108) and the Tsuruoka Metabolomic Cohort Study (n=3,002). To evaluate whether the difference between LDL-C and non-HDL-C in the general population match that of the current guidelines, we classified LDL-C levels into four groups according to the JAS Guideline and evaluated its agreement with the corresponding non-HDL-C group. Analysis was also done using six groups (the previous four groups plus the upper and lower cut-off values). The mean difference (mg/dL) between the non-HDL-C and LDL-C (for the KOBE Study and Tsuruoka Metabolomic Cohort Study, respectively) was 19.6 and 24.1 (ppopulation, the difference between non-HDL-C and LDL-C was lower than the expected difference of 30 mg/dL. Changes to the criteria for non-HDL-C target levels may be considered in the future.

  10. Effects of Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol on Coronary Artery Calcification Progression According to High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Se Eun; Park, Cheol-Young; Oh, Ki-Won; Park, Sung-Woo; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies reported that many patients are at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) despite achieving recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Therefore, we investigated whether the association between LDL-C and the risk for incident CVD differed according to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels using coronary artery calcium score (CACS) progression as a surrogate marker for predicting CVD. We investigated 2132 Korean men in a health screening program, in which CACS was measured at baseline and after 4 years. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) progression was defined as a change in CACS ≥0 over 4 years. We divided the subjects into nine groups according to baseline HDL-C and LDL-C levels and compared their risks for CAC progression. After 4 years, 475 subjects (22.3%) exhibited CAC progression. We identified a positive relationship between baseline LDL-C levels and the risk for incident CAC. However, this association was attenuated by high baseline HDL-C levels. Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, smoking, and exercise status revealed that the odds ratios for incident CAC in the lowest HDL-C tertile were 3.08 for LDL-C tertile 3 and 2.02 for LDL-C tertile 2 compared to LDL-C tertile 1. However, these differences disappeared in the highest HDL-C tertile (HDL-C ≥54.0 mg/dL). In this longitudinal study, we found that the positive relationship between LDL-C and the relative risk for incident CAC was attenuated by higher HDL-C levels. Therefore, HDL-C levels should be considered when estimating CVD risk. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and oxidized low density lipoprotein in carotid atherosclerosis[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Kasey C.; Maguire, Colin T.; Wolfert, Robert; Burns, Alan R.; Reardon, Michael; Geis, Richard; Holvoet, Paul; Morrisett, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma levels of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) have been identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Lp-PLA2 is the sole enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of oxidized phospholipids on LDL particles in atherosclerotic plaques. We have studied the relationship between Lp-PLA2 and oxLDL in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) tissues and in matched plasmas. In extracts from CEA anatomical segments, the levels of oxLDL were significantly associated with the levels of Lp-PLA2 protein (r = 0.497) and activity (r = 0.615). OxLDL and Lp-PLA2 mass/activity were most abundant in the carotid bifurcation and internal segments where plaque was most abundant. In extracts from CEA atheroma, the levels of oxLDL and Lp-PLA2 were significantly correlated (r = 0.634). In matched plasma and atheroma extracts, the levels of Lp-PLA2 were negatively correlated (r = − 0.578). The ratio of Lp-PLA2 to oxLDL was higher in atheromatous tissue (277:1) than in normal tissue (135:1) and plasma (13:1). Immunohistochemical experiments indicated that in plaques, oxLDL and Lp-PLA2 existed in overlapping but distinctly different distribution. Fluorescence microscopy showed both oxLDL and Lp-PLA2 epitopes on the same LDL particle in plasma but not in plaque. These results suggest that the relationship between Lp-PLA2 and oxLDL in the atherosclerotic plaque is different from that in the plasma compartment. PMID:19359705

  12. Courtship song analysis of Drosophila muscle mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Samya; Wajda, Mathew P; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2012-01-01

    As part of the mating ritual, males of Drosophila species produce species-specific courtship songs through wing vibrations generated by the thoracic musculature. While previous studies have shown that indirect flight muscles (IFM) are neurally activated during courtship song production, the precise role of these muscles in song production has not been investigated. Fortunately, IFM mutants abound in Drosophila melanogaster and studies spanning several decades have shed light on the role of muscle proteins in IFM-powered flight. Analysis of courtship songs in these mutants offers the opportunity to uncover the role of the IFM in a behavior distinct than flight and subject to different evolutionary selection regimes. Here, we describe protocols for the recording and analysis of courtship behavior and mating song of D. melanogaster muscle transgenic and mutant strains. To record faint acoustic signal of courtship songs, an insulated mating compartment was used inside a recording device (INSECTAVOX) equipped with a modified electret microphone, a low-noise power supply, and noise filters. Songs recorded in the INSECTAVOX are digitized using Goldwave, whose several features enable extraction of critical song parameters, including carrier frequencies for pulse song and sine song. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by showing that deletion of the N-terminal region of the myosin regulatory light chain, a mutation known to decrease wing beat frequency and flight power, affects courtship song parameters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mutants that fail to bind to plant cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, J L; Colby, S; Matthysse, A G

    1990-01-01

    Transposon insertion mutants of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were screened to obtain mutant bacteria that failed to bind to carrot suspension culture cells. A light microscope binding assay was used. The bacterial isolates that were reduced in binding to carrot cells were all avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana leaves and on carrot root disks. The mutants did not appear to be altered in cellulose production. The composition of the medium affected the ability of the parent and mutant bacteria ...

  14. Effect of proteolysis of low-density serum lipoproteins on their interaction with macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmanskii, I.M.; Kovaleva, G.G.; Viktorova, L.N.; Shpikiter, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously postulated, on the basis of changes observed in the structural stability of low-density lipoproteins during treatment with pepsin or aortic cathepsin, that enzymatic modifications may lead to potentiation of the atherogenic properties of the lipoproteins. They also reported that treatment of lipoproteins with trypsin causes an increase in their binding with aortic glycosaminoglycans and to increased degradation by fibroblasts of patients with hereditary hypercholesterolemia. Limited proteolysis of lipoproteins with pepsin facilitated their binding with fibronectin. In this paper the authors investigate the uptake and degradation of low-density lipoproteins by macrophages after their limited hydrolysis by pepsin, an analog of tissue cathepsin D. The lipoproteins were isolated from the serum of healthy blood donors by ultracentrifugation. Iodination of the proteins with I 125 was carried out by the iodine monochloride method. Uptake and retention of the labelled lipoprotein were measured with a gamma counter. The increased uptake of the proteins, partially hydrolized by pepsin, was accompanied by their more intense degradation by macrophages.

  15. The Impact of Cardiorespiratory Fitness on Age-Related Lipids and Lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Moon Mark; Sui, Xuemei; Liu, Junxiu; Zhou, Haiming; Kokkinos, Peter F.; Lavie, Carl J.; Hardin, James W.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence on the effect of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) on age-related longitudinal changes of lipids and lipoproteins is scarce. Objectives This study sought to assess the longitudinal, aging trajectory of lipids and lipoproteins for the life course in adults, and to determine whether CRF modifies the age-associated trajectory of lipids and lipoproteins. Methods Data came from 11,418 men, 20 to 90 years of age, without known high cholesterol, high triglycerides, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline and during follow-up from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. There were 43,821 observations spanning 2 to 25 (mean 3.5) health examinations between 1970 and 2006. CRF was quantified by a maximal treadmill exercise test. Marginal models using generalized estimating equations were applied. Results Total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) presented similar inverted U-shaped quadratic trajectories with aging: gradual increases were noted until the mid-40s to early 50s, with subsequent declines (all p lipoproteins in young to middle-aged men than in older men. Conclusions Our investigation reveals a differential trajectory of lipids and lipoproteins with aging according to CRF in healthy men, and suggests that promoting increased CRF levels may help delay the development of dyslipidemia. PMID:25975472

  16. The effect of cardiorespiratory fitness on age-related lipids and lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Moon Mark; Sui, Xuemei; Liu, Junxiu; Zhou, Haiming; Kokkinos, Peter F; Lavie, Carl J; Hardin, James W; Blair, Steven N

    2015-05-19

    Evidence on the effect of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) on age-related longitudinal changes of lipids and lipoproteins is scarce. This study sought to assess the longitudinal aging trajectory of lipids and lipoproteins for the life course in adults and to determine whether CRF modifies the age-associated trajectory of lipids and lipoproteins. Data came from 11,418 men, 20 to 90 years of age, without known high cholesterol, high triglycerides, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at baseline and during follow-up from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. There were 43,821 observations spanning 2 to 25 health examinations (mean 3.5 examinations) between 1970 and 2006. CRF was quantified by a maximal treadmill exercise test. Marginal models using generalized estimating equations were applied. Total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) presented similar inverted U-shaped quadratic trajectories with aging: gradual increases were noted until age mid-40s to early 50s, with subsequent declines (all p lipoproteins in young to middle-age men than in older men. Our investigation reveals a differential trajectory of lipids and lipoproteins with aging according to CRF in healthy men and suggests that promoting increased CRF levels may help delay the development of dyslipidemia. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients improves the atherogenic qualitative properties of the plasma lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julve, Josep; Pardina, Eva; Pérez-Cuéllar, Montserrat; Ferrer, Roser; Rossell, Joana; Baena-Fustegueras, Juan Antonio; Fort, José Manuel; Lecube, Albert; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Sánchez-Quesada, José Luis; Peinado-Onsurbe, Julia

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of weight loss induced in morbidly obese subjects by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass bariatric surgery on the atherogenic features of their plasma lipoproteins. Twenty-one morbidly obese subjects undergoing bariatric surgery were followed up for up to 1 year after surgery. Plasma and lipoproteins were assayed for chemical composition and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity. Lipoprotein size was assessed by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, and oxidised LDL by ELISA. Liver samples were assayed for mRNA abundance of oxidative markers. Lipid profile analysis revealed a reduction in the plasma concentrations of cholesterol and triglycerides, which were mainly associated with a significant reduction in the plasma concentration of circulating apoB-containing lipoproteins rather than with changes in their relative chemical composition. All patients displayed a pattern A phenotype of LDL subfractions and a relative increase in the antiatherogenic plasma HDL-2 subfraction (>2-fold; P lipoprotein-bound Lp-PLA2. Our data indicate that the weight loss induced by bariatric surgery ameliorates the atherogenicity of plasma lipoproteins by reducing the apoB-containing Lp-PLA2 activity and oxidised LDL, as well as increasing the HDL-2 subfraction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Environment-Mediated Accumulation of Diacyl Lipoproteins over Their Triacyl Counterparts in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Kenji; Kim, Min-Su; Ichikawa, Rie; Ryu, Kyoung-Hwa; Dohmae, Naoshi

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are believed to exist in only one specific lipid-modified structure, such as the diacyl form or the triacyl form, in each bacterium. In the case of Staphylococcus aureus, recent extensive matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis revealed that S. aureus lipoproteins exist in the α-aminoacylated triacyl form. Here, we discovered conditions that induce the accumulation of diacyl lipoproteins that lack α-aminoacylation in S. aureus. The accumulation of diacyl lipoproteins required a combination of conditions, including acidic pH and a post-logarithmic-growth phase. High temperatures and high salt concentrations additively accelerated the accumulation of the diacyl lipoprotein form. Following a post-logarithmic-growth phase where S. aureus MW2 cells were grown at pH 6, SitC lipoprotein was found almost exclusively in its diacyl structure rather than in its triacyl structure. This is the first report showing that the environment mediates lipid-modified structural alterations of bacterial lipoproteins. PMID:22467779

  19. Lipoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster—Assembly, Function, and Influence on Tissue Lipid Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Wilhelm; Sampaio, Julio L.; Brankatschk, Marko; Carvalho, Maria; Mahmoud, Ali; Shevchenko, Andrej; Eaton, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Interorgan lipid transport occurs via lipoproteins, and altered lipoprotein levels correlate with metabolic disease. However, precisely how lipoproteins affect tissue lipid composition has not been comprehensively analyzed. Here, we identify the major lipoproteins of Drosophila melanogaster and use genetics and mass spectrometry to study their assembly, interorgan trafficking, and influence on tissue lipids. The apoB-family lipoprotein Lipophorin (Lpp) is the major hemolymph lipid carrier. It is produced as a phospholipid-rich particle by the fat body, and its secretion requires Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein (MTP). Lpp acquires sterols and most diacylglycerol (DAG) at the gut via Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP), another fat body-derived apoB-family lipoprotein. The gut, like the fat body, is a lipogenic organ, incorporating both de novo–synthesized and dietary fatty acids into DAG for export. We identify distinct requirements for LTP and Lpp-dependent lipid mobilization in contributing to the neutral and polar lipid composition of the brain and wing imaginal disc. These studies define major routes of interorgan lipid transport in Drosophila and uncover surprising tissue-specific differences in lipoprotein lipid utilization. PMID:22844248

  20. Effects of cardiovascular lifestyle change on lipoprotein subclass profiles defined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decewicz, David J; Neatrour, David M; Burke, Amy; Haberkorn, Mary Jane; Patney, Heather L; Vernalis, Marina N; Ellsworth, Darrell L

    2009-06-29

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering is a primary goal in clinical management of patients with cardiovascular disease, but traditional cholesterol levels may not accurately reflect the true atherogenicity of plasma lipid profiles. The size and concentration of lipoprotein particles, which transport cholesterol and triglycerides, may provide additional information for accurately assessing cardiovascular risk. This study evaluated changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in patients participating in a prospective, nonrandomized lifestyle modification program designed to reverse or stabilize progression of coronary artery disease (CAD) to improve our understanding of lipoprotein management in cardiac patients. The lifestyle intervention was effective in producing significant changes in lipoprotein subclasses that contribute to CAD risk. There was a clear beneficial effect on the total number of LDL particles (-8.3%, p lifestyle change program were not confounded by lipid-lowering medications. In at risk patients motivated to participate, an intensive lifestyle change program can effectively alter traditional CAD risk factors and plasma lipoprotein subclasses and may reduce risk for cardiovascular events. Improvements in lipoprotein subclasses are more evident in men compared to women.

  1. Effects of cardiovascular lifestyle change on lipoprotein subclass profiles defined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patney Heather L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol lowering is a primary goal in clinical management of patients with cardiovascular disease, but traditional cholesterol levels may not accurately reflect the true atherogenicity of plasma lipid profiles. The size and concentration of lipoprotein particles, which transport cholesterol and triglycerides, may provide additional information for accurately assessing cardiovascular risk. This study evaluated changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy in patients participating in a prospective, nonrandomized lifestyle modification program designed to reverse or stabilize progression of coronary artery disease (CAD to improve our understanding of lipoprotein management in cardiac patients. Results The lifestyle intervention was effective in producing significant changes in lipoprotein subclasses that contribute to CAD risk. There was a clear beneficial effect on the total number of LDL particles (-8.3%, p Conclusion In at risk patients motivated to participate, an intensive lifestyle change program can effectively alter traditional CAD risk factors and plasma lipoprotein subclasses and may reduce risk for cardiovascular events. Improvements in lipoprotein subclasses are more evident in men compared to women.

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Sexual Sporulation Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, K.; Heemst, van D.; Slakhorst, M.; Debets, A.J.M.; Heyting, C.

    2001-01-01

    For the genetic dissection of sexual sporulation in Aspergillus nidulans, we started a collection of ascosporeless mutants. After mutagenization of conidiospores with high doses of UV, we isolated 20 mutants with defects in ascospore formation. We crossed these mutants in two successive rounds with

  3. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Contreras, R; Lira-Silva, E; Jasso-Chávez, R; Hernández-González, I.L.; Maeda, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Boogerd, F.C.; Sheng, L; Wood, TK; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed

  4. Strain improvement in dye decolourising mutants of Mucor mucedo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... The amounts of protoplasts obtained in the developed mutants of M. mucedo MMM1 (U.V. irradiated mutant) and MMM2 (ethyl methyl sulfonate treated mutant) which are very effective decolourisers were. 5.23 x 106 and 5.65 x 106 protoplasts/ml respectively. Among the 385 colonies isolated after ...

  5. Characterization of a novel curled-cotyledons mutant in soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... some organelles degradation, and membranous multilamellar appear at different stages. Protein and amino acid contents in seeds of mutant are higher than those of the wild type, especially methionine and cysteine. These results suggest that the curled-cotyledons mutant is a novel cotyledon development mutant, which ...

  6. Phosphorylation of Spo0A by the Histidine Kinase KinD Requires the Lipoprotein Med in Bacillus subtilis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banse, Allison V.; Hobbs, Errett C.; Losick, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The response regulatory protein Spo0A of Bacillus subtilis is activated by phosphorylation by multiple histidine kinases via a multicomponent phosphorelay. Here we present evidence that the activity of one of the kinases, KinD, depends on the lipoprotein Med, a mutant of which has been known to cause a cannibalism phenotype. We show that the absence of Med impaired and the overproduction of Med stimulated the transcription of two operons (sdp and skf) involved in cannibalism whose transcription is known to depend on Spo0A in its phosphorylated state (Spo0A∼P). Further, these effects of Med were dependent on KinD but not on kinases KinA, KinB, and KinC. Additionally, we show that deletion or overproduction of Med impaired or enhanced, respectively, biofilm formation and that these effects, too, depended specifically on KinD. Finally, we report that overproduction of Med bypassed the dominant negative effect on transcription of sdp of a truncated KinD retaining the transmembrane segments but lacking the kinase domain. We propose that Med directly or indirectly interacts with KinD in the cytoplasmic membrane and that this interaction is required for KinD-dependent phosphorylation of Spo0A. PMID:21622736

  7. Phosphorylation of Spo0A by the histidine kinase KinD requires the lipoprotein med in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banse, Allison V; Hobbs, Errett C; Losick, Richard

    2011-08-01

    The response regulatory protein Spo0A of Bacillus subtilis is activated by phosphorylation by multiple histidine kinases via a multicomponent phosphorelay. Here we present evidence that the activity of one of the kinases, KinD, depends on the lipoprotein Med, a mutant of which has been known to cause a cannibalism phenotype. We show that the absence of Med impaired and the overproduction of Med stimulated the transcription of two operons (sdp and skf) involved in cannibalism whose transcription is known to depend on Spo0A in its phosphorylated state (Spo0A∼P). Further, these effects of Med were dependent on KinD but not on kinases KinA, KinB, and KinC. Additionally, we show that deletion or overproduction of Med impaired or enhanced, respectively, biofilm formation and that these effects, too, depended specifically on KinD. Finally, we report that overproduction of Med bypassed the dominant negative effect on transcription of sdp of a truncated KinD retaining the transmembrane segments but lacking the kinase domain. We propose that Med directly or indirectly interacts with KinD in the cytoplasmic membrane and that this interaction is required for KinD-dependent phosphorylation of Spo0A.

  8. Actual situation of lipoprotein apheresis in Saxony in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmrich, U; Hohenstein, B; Julius, U

    2015-05-01

    Lipoprotein apheresis (LA) is an officially accepted therapeutic approach in Germany. Reliable population-based data on the patients are scarce. It is of special interest to learn what are the main indications for this extracorporeal treatment and how many new patients started over the last years. This paper is a summary of the situation of the treatment of high-risk patients via LA in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. The documentation of all patients who agreed to be included into this study have been evaluated. Patients were treated at the University Hospital Dresden (UHD) and in private practices of nephrologists. This evaluation aimed at the characterization of patients treated with LA in Saxony with respect to age, gender, lipid pattern, to the number of new patients per year and the development of the ratio of patients to the Saxon population between 2010 and 2013. The obtained data were compared with the official statistics published by the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians for whole Germany. In 2013, 181 patients, primarily males, were treated in 15 LA centers by 32 doctors. Still, the number of apheresis doctors per 1 million inhabitants is under the average in Germany (Saxony: 7.7/1 million inhabitants, average: 12/1 million inhabitants). The usage of LA is 45 per 1 million inhabitants in Saxony; in comparison to 2010, this is an increase of 16 per 1 million inhabitants. The number of new patients in 2013 with an isolated elevation of Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is twice as high than it was in 2011. The mean duration of all patients being treated with LA, most on a weekly basis, was 5.75 years (UHD: 6.2 years, range: 1 month to 23.1 years; other centers: 5.3 years, range: 1 month to 19.2 years). About 19.3% of all patients suffered from elevated triglyceride (TG) levels (>5 mmol/L). Non-high- density lipoprotein cholesterol (Non-HDL-C) was calculated, which is also acutely reduced by LA sessions. The following data were

  9. Rapid and simple profiling of lipoproteins by polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis to determine the heterogeneity of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) including small, dense LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Seo, Makoto; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Awata, Takuya; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis (PAGE) for lipoprotein profiling in clinical practice. Blood samples were collected from 146 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid parameters were assayed by PAGE, including small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (n = 41), and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant cholesterol (n = 37). We also used a commercial kit to measure small, dense LDL (n = 41). By PAGE, we obtained the percentage of the area under the curve (AUC %) of each peaks and calculated respective AUC% x total cholesterol (AUC%xTC) values. The calculated values of LDL-AUC%xTC, small LDL-AUC%xTC, and HDL-AUC%xTC values were correlated well with values from homogeneous assay for LDL-cholesterol, small, dense LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol assays (r = 0.94, 0.81, and 0.89, respectively). PAGE combined with measurement of total cholesterol and triglycerides provides a rapid evaluation of anti- or pro-atherogenic lipoproteins and a simple profiling system for both the "quantity" and "quality" of lipoproteins, allowing a better assessment of the risk of coronary artery diseases. This article discusses several methods for simple and rapid lipid profiling and outlines some recent patents relevant to the methods.

  10. Secretion of bacterial lipoproteins: through the cytoplasmic membrane, the periplasm and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zückert, Wolfram R

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-positive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporter-like LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the "+2 rule". Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  11. Recurrent Embolic Strokes of Undetermined Source in a Patient with Extreme Lipoprotein(a Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Bulwa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a is a plasma lipoprotein and known cardiovascular risk factor most recently implicated in the development of high-risk carotid atherosclerotic plaques without significant carotid stenosis. We present a case of a young African-American female with recurrent embolic strokes of undetermined source. After our thorough investigation we identified the link between a small, irregular plaque in the right internal carotid artery and an extremely elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a as the source of her embolic strokes.

  12. Extreme lipoprotein(a) levels and risk of myocardial infarction in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) levels are associated with myocardial infarction (MI) in some but not all studies. Limitations of previous studies include lack of risk estimates for extreme lipoprotein(a) levels, measurements in long-term frozen samples, no correction for regression dilution bias, and lack...... of absolute risk estimates in the general population. We tested the hypothesis that extreme lipoprotein(a) levels predict MI in the general population, measuring levels shortly after sampling, correcting for regression dilution bias, and calculating hazard ratios and absolute risk estimates....

  13. Evaluation of serum lipids and lipoproteins as prognosticators in leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganavi, B S; Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S

    2014-05-01

    Oral cancer is the 8th most common cancer worldwide. Squamous cell carcinomas constitute 94% of all oral malignancies and are often preceded by leukoplakia. Despite many adjunctive techniques to monitor transformation of leukoplakia to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the mortality rate is on the rise. Incidentally, patients diagnosed with oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and oral cancers manifest with low choles-terol levels. Given a thought, hypolipidemia may be a useful adjunctive tool as it reflects the initial changes within the neo-plastic cells, thus giving a red alert in malignant transformation of leukoplakia at the earlier stage. To evaluate the feasibility of serum lipid profile as an adjunct early marker for malignant transformation of leukoplakia to OSCC. To estimate the serum cholesterol, triglycerides and lipoprotein (HDL, LDL, VLDL) levels in patients with leukoplakia, OSCC and age matched healthy control group. To compare the serum cholesterol, triglycerides and lipoprotein levels between patients of leukoplakia, OSCC and age matched healthy control group. The study group comprised of selected 30 individuals which included 10 each of histopathologically confirmed OSCC, leukoplakia and healthy controls. A written consent was taken from all of them, and a thorough case history was recorded and then venous blood was collected 12 hours post fasting and centrifuged. The serum cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL were estimated by enzymatic and colorimetric methods using commercially available kits--Roche/ Hitachi cobas systems. Chemistry assay QC procured from Bio-Rad was used as control. VLDL and LDL were derived from these values. Results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tukey Test. Oral squamous cell carcinoma patients demonstrated significantly lower mean serum cholesterol level (151.60 mg/dl) than the control group (183.70 mg/dl). The mean cholesterol level in leukoplakia patients (173.90 mg/dl) was lower than that

  14. Role of adipocyte-derived lipoprotein lipase in adipocyte hypertrophy

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    Orlando Robert A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major portion of available fatty acids for adipocyte uptake is derived from lipoprotein lipase (LPL-mediated hydrolysis of circulating lipoprotein particles. In vivo studies aimed at identifying the precise role of adipocyte-derived LPL in fat storage function of adipose tissue have been unable to provide conclusive evidence due to compensatory mechanisms that activate endogenous fatty acid synthesis. To address this gap in knowledge, we have measured the effect of reducing adipocyte LPL expression on intracellular lipid accumulation using a well-established cultured model of adipocyte differentiation. Methods siRNA specific for mouse LPL was transfected into 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Expression of LPL was measured by quantitative real-time PCR and cell surface-associated LPL enzymatic activity was measured by colorimetric detection following substrate (p-nitrophenyl butyrate hydrolysis. Apolipoprotein CII and CIII expression ratios were also measured by qRT-PCR. Intracellular lipid accumulation was quantified by Nile Red staining. Results During differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes, LPL mRNA expression increases 6-fold resulting in a 2-fold increase in cell surface-associated LPL enzymatic activity. Parallel to this increase in LPL expression, we found that intracellular lipids increased ~10-fold demonstrating a direct correlation between adipocyte-derived LPL expression and lipid storage. We next reduced LPL expression in adipocytes using siRNA transfections to directly quantify the contributions of adipocyte-derived LPL to lipid storage, This treatment reduced LPL mRNA expression and cell surface-associated LPL enzymatic activity to ~50% of non-treated controls while intracellular lipid levels were reduced by 80%. Exogenous addition of purified LPL (to restore extracellular lipolytic activity or palmitate (as a source of free fatty acids to siRNA-treated cells restored intracellular lipid levels to those measured for non

  15. Arabinose Kinase-Deficient Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, O; Cobbett, C S

    1991-08-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is sensitive to exogenous l-arabinose has been isolated. Comparisons of growth of the wild type, mutant, and F1 and F2 progeny of crosses showed the arabinose-sensitive phenotype is semidominant and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Crosses of the mutant to marker strains showed the mutation is linked to the eceriferum-2 locus on chromosome 4. In vivo incorporation of exogenous labeled l-arabinose into ethanol-insoluble polysaccharides was greatly reduced in the mutant with a concomitant accumulation of free labeled arabinose. Enzyme assays of crude plant extracts demonstrated a defect in arabinose kinase activity in the mutant.

  16. First WHO/IFCC International Reference Reagent for Lipoprotein(a) for Immunoassay--Lp(a) SRM 2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dati, Francesco; Tate, Jillian R; Marcovina, Santica M; Steinmetz, Armin

    2004-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is an important predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. The lack of internationally accepted standardization has impeded the broad application of this lipoprotein in laboratory medicine. The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC), through its Working Group on Lipoprotein(a) and together with research institutions and several diagnostic companies, have succeeded in developing an international reference material that is intended for the transfer of a lipoprotein(a) concentration to manufacturers' master calibrators. IFCC SRM 2B has recently been accepted by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization as the 'First WHO/IFCC International Reference Reagent for Lipoprotein(a) for Immunoassay'. The assigned unitage of 0.1071 nanomoles of lipoprotein(a) per vial is traceable to the consensus reference method for lipoprotein(a) and will enable conformity by diagnostic companies to the European Union's Directive on In vitro Diagnostic Medical Devices for the metrological traceability of calibrator materials.

  17. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease: evidence and guidance for management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, M John; Ginsberg, Henry N; Amarenco, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Even at low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal, patients with cardiometabolic abnormalities remain at high risk of cardiovascular events. This paper aims (i) to critically appraise evidence for elevated levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and low levels of high......-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) as cardiovascular risk factors, and (ii) to advise on therapeutic strategies for management. Current evidence supports a causal association between elevated TRL and their remnants, low HDL-C, and cardiovascular risk. This interpretation is based on mechanistic and genetic...... cardiovascular risk; genetic evidence is unclear however, potentially reflecting the complexity of HDL metabolism. The Panel believes that therapeutic targeting of elevated triglycerides (= 1.7 mmol/L or 150 mg/dL), a marker of TRL and their remnants, and/or low HDL-C (...

  18. Distribution of soluble amino acids in maize endosperm mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Alejandro Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available For human nutrition the main source of vegetable proteins are cereal and legume seeds. The content of total soluble amino acids in mature endosperm of wild-type, opaque and floury maize (Zea mays L. mutants were determined by HPLC. The total absolute concentration of soluble amino acids among the mutants varied depending on the mutant. The o11 and o13 mutants exhibited the highest average content, whereas o10, fl3 and fl1 exhibited the lowest average content. In general, the mutants exhibited similar concentrations of total soluble amino acids when compared to the wild-type lines, with the clear exception of mutants o11 and fl1, with the o11 mutant exhibiting a higher concentration of total soluble amino acids when compared to its wild-type counterpart W22 and the fl1 mutant a lower concentration when compared to its wild-type counterpart Oh43. For methionine, the mutants o2 and o11 and wild-type Oh43 exhibited the highest concentrations of this amino acid. Significant differences were not observed between mutants for other amino acids such as lysine and threonine. The high lysine concentrations obtained originally for these mutants may be due to the amino acids incorporated into storage proteins, but not those present in the soluble form.

  19. Using of AFLP to evaluate gamma-irradiated amaranth mutants

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    Labajová Mária

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine which of several gamma-irradiated mutants of amaranth Ficha cultivar and K-433 hybrid are most genetically similar to their non-irradiated control genotypes, we performed amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP based analysis. A total of 40 selective primer combinations were used in reported analyses. First analyses of gamma-irradiated amaranth mutant lines were done used the AFLP. In the study, primers with the differentiation ability for all analysed mutant lines are reported. The very specific changes in the mutant lines´ non-coding regions based on AFLP length polymorphism were analysed. Mutant lines of the Ficha cultivar (C15, C26, C27, C82, C236 shared a genetic dissimilarity of 0,11 and their ISSR profiles are more similar to the Ficha than those of K-433 hybrid mutant lines. The K-433 mutant lines (D54, D279, D282 shared genetic dissimilarity of 0,534 but are more distinct to their control plant as a whole, as those of the Ficha mutant lines. Different AFLP fingerprints patters of the mutant lines when compared to the Ficha cultivar and K-433 hybrid AFLP profiles may be a consequence of the complex response of the intergenic space of mutant lines to the gamma-radiance. Although a genetic polymorphism was detected within accessions, the AFLP markers successfully identified all the accessions. The AFLP results are discussed by a combination of biochemical characteristics of mutant lines and their control genotypes.

  20. Human genetic insights into lipoproteins and risk of cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitziel, Nathan O

    2017-04-01

    Human genetic studies have been successfully used to identify genes and pathways relevant to human biology. Using genetic instruments composed of loci associated with human lipid traits, recent studies have begun to clarify the causal role of major lipid fractions in risk of cardiometabolic disease. The causal relationship between LDL cholesterol and coronary disease has been firmly established. Of the remaining two major fractions, recent studies have found that HDL cholesterol is not likely to be a causal particle in atherogenesis, and have instead shifted the causal focus to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Subsequent results are refining this view to suggest that triglycerides themselves might not be causal, but instead may be a surrogate for the causal cholesterol content within this fraction. Other studies have used a similar approach to address the association between lipid fractions and risk of type 2 diabetes. Beyond genetic variation in the target of statin medications, reduced LDL cholesterol associated with multiple genes encoding current or prospective drug targets associated with increased diabetic risk. In addition, genetically lower HDL cholesterol and genetically lower triglycerides both appear to increase risk of type 2 diabetes. Results of these and future human genetic studies are positioned to provide substantive insights into the causal relationship between lipids and human disease, and should highlight mechanisms with important implications for our understanding of human biology and future lipid-altering therapeutic development.

  1. Immunoquantification of lipoprotein(a): comparison of nephelometry with electroimmunodiffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiran, A; Tiran, B; Hojas, S; Kostner, G M; Wilders-Truschnig, M M

    1993-01-01

    A new fully automated nephelometric immunoassay for lipoprotein(a) quantification in human serum was evaluated using the Behring Nephelometer Analyzer. The assay exhibited a good linearity in the concentration range of 110-1,770 mg/l; at higher concentrations, samples were automatically diluted by a factor of 4. The method is simple, robust, and shows an excellent stability of the calibration curve over several weeks. Intra-assay and day-to-day coefficients of variation were 2% and 4.5%, respectively. The method correlated well with electroimmunodiffusion (r = 0.977; n = 123; P = 0.0001). Unspecific turbidity as expressed by an elevated blank value occurred in 3% of all freshly measured samples (n = 392). Storage of the samples for 1 week at 4 degrees C had no significant influence on the results. Frozen sera, on the other hand, cannot be assayed by this method. We believe that this assay is well suited for use in clinical routine work.

  2. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eGonzalez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysines in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen, a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to plasminogen, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp-plasminogen interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound plasminogen to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds plasminogen via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that plasminogen bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding plasminogen are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria.

  3. Punicalagin Induces Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Influx to Macrophages

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    Dana Atrahimovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL are a primary initiating event in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the antiatherogenic effect of polyphenols has been shown to be exerted via a mechanism unrelated to their antioxidant capacity and to stem from their interaction with specific intracellular or plasma proteins. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the main polyphenol in pomegranate, punicalagin, with apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB100 that surrounds LDL. Punicalagin bound to ApoB100 at low concentrations (0.25–4 μM. Upon binding, it induced LDL influx to macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 2.5-fold. In contrast, another polyphenol which binds to ApoB100, glabridin, did not affect LDL influx. We further showed that LDL influx occurs specifically through the LDL receptor, with LDL then accumulating in the cell cytoplasm. Taken together with the findings of Aviram et al., 2000, that pomegranate juice and punicalagin induce plasma LDL removal and inhibit macrophage cholesterol synthesis and accumulation, our results suggest that, upon binding, punicalagin stimulates LDL influx to macrophages, thus reducing circulating cholesterol levels.

  4. Punicalagin Induces Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Influx to Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrahimovich, Dana; Khatib, Soliman; Sela, Shifra; Vaya, Jacob; Samson, Abraham O

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a primary initiating event in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the antiatherogenic effect of polyphenols has been shown to be exerted via a mechanism unrelated to their antioxidant capacity and to stem from their interaction with specific intracellular or plasma proteins. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the main polyphenol in pomegranate, punicalagin, with apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB100) that surrounds LDL. Punicalagin bound to ApoB100 at low concentrations (0.25-4 μM). Upon binding, it induced LDL influx to macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 2.5-fold. In contrast, another polyphenol which binds to ApoB100, glabridin, did not affect LDL influx. We further showed that LDL influx occurs specifically through the LDL receptor, with LDL then accumulating in the cell cytoplasm. Taken together with the findings of Aviram et al., 2000, that pomegranate juice and punicalagin induce plasma LDL removal and inhibit macrophage cholesterol synthesis and accumulation, our results suggest that, upon binding, punicalagin stimulates LDL influx to macrophages, thus reducing circulating cholesterol levels.

  5. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol in thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agdeppa, D; Macaron, C; Mallik, T; Schnuda, N D

    1979-11-01

    The plasma levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were reduced in 16 hyperthyroid female patients compared to 37 euthyroid women (33.5 +/- 8 vs. 51.5 +/- 13 mg/dl (mean +/- SD); P less than 0.001). When 5 patients were restudied after restoration of the euthyroid state, plasma HDL-C increased from 29 +/- 5 to 43 +/- 11.5 mg/dl (P less than 0.05). In addition, in 22 hypothyroid women, HDL-C levels were also diminished compared to the euthyroid group (43.4 +/- 15.5 vs. 51.5 +/- 13 mg/dl; P less than 0.05). Nine patients were restudied after L-T4 replacement therapy; their levels of HDL-C increased but not to a statistically significant degree. The daily administration of 0.3 mg L-T4 to eight normal male volunteers for 1 month did not significantly affect HDL-C levels.

  6. Subclinical hypothyroidism in childhood obesity and its correlation with lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emokpae, M A; Adeleke, S I; Uwumarongie, H O

    2011-12-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the influence of subclinical hypothyroidism on body mass index. The objectives of the study were (i) to determine whether levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) are elevated in obese children, (ii) to compare the serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) in obese with non-obese and (iii) to examine the association of subclinical hypothyroidism with lipoproteins and body mass index. Fifty six obese children/adolescent girls aged 10.5 +/- 4.3 years, BMI 31.2 +/- 2.2 kg/m2 and apparently healthy children aged 11.2 +/- 5.2 years, BMI 21.0 +/- 2.1 kg/m2 were evaluated. Serum T3, T4 and TSH were measured using ELECSYS 1010 autoanalyzer while serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and glucose were measured using enzyme catalyzed colorimetric techniques. Subclinical hypothyroidism was observed in 10.7% of obese subjects. Significantly increase levels of T3 (p obese than control subjects. TSH and triglyceride correlated positively with body mass index. Subclinical hypothyroidism was present in 10.7% of obese children. TSH and triglyceride correlated positively with body mass index in childhood/adolescent obesity. There is need for this group ofsubjects to be evaluated for thyroid hormones so that those requiring therapy can be diagnosed and treated.

  7. Low fasting low high-density lipoprotein and postprandial lipemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorodila Konstandina

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol and disturbed postprandial lipemia are associated with coronary heart disease. In the present study, we evaluated the variation of triglyceride (TG postprandially in respect to serum HDL cholesterol levels. Results Fifty two Greek men were divided into 2 main groups: a the low HDL group (HDL p = 0.002. The low HDL group had significantly higher TG at 4, 6 and 8 h postprandially compared to the controls (p = 0.006, p = 0.002, and p p = 0.017 compared to the matched-control group. ROC analysis showed that fasting TG ≥ 121 mg/dl have 100% sensitivity and 81% specificity for an abnormal TG response (auc = 0.962, p Conclusions The delayed TG clearance postprandially seems to result in low HDL cholesterol even in subjects with low fasting TG. The fasting TG > 121 mg/dl are predictable for abnormal response to fatty meal.

  8. Parathyroid hormone is not an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnadottir, M; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1994-01-01

    The reduced lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities in uraemia are reflected by increased serum triglyceride concentrations and reduced HDL cholesterol concentrations. Both hyperparathyroidism and circulating inhibitor(s) of LPL have been associated with the disturbances of lipid metabolism in uraemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if parathyroid hormone (PTH) had an inhibitory effect on LPL activity. Plasma post-heparin LPL activities, plasma LPL inhibitory activities, serum PTHintact and serum PTHC-terminal concentrations were analysed in 20 patients on haemodialysis and 20 healthy controls. The effects of purified, human PTHintact and a carboxyterminal fragment of PTH (PTH39-84) on LPL activities in post-heparin plasma from healthy individuals and on the enzyme activity of purified, bovine milk LPL, activated with apolipoprotein CII, were studied. Patients had significantly higher plasma LPL inhibitory activities than controls, but there was no correlation between plasma LPL inhibitory activities and serum PTH concentrations. Neither PTHintact nor PTH39-84 had a significant effect on LPL activities in vitro. Thus there was no evidence of a direct inhibition of LPL activity by PTH under the present in-vivo or in-vitro conditions.

  9. Lipoprotein(a) and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora, Samia; Kamstrup, Pia R; Rifai, Nader

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that cardiovascular risk is higher with increased lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)]. Whether Lp(a) concentration is related to type 2 diabetes is unclear. METHODS: In 26 746 healthy US women (mean age 54.6 years), we prospectively examined baseline Lp......(a) concentrations and incident type 2 diabetes (n = 1670) for a follow-up period of 13 years. We confirmed our findings in 9652 Danish men and women with prevalent diabetes (n = 419). Analyses were adjusted for risk factors that included age, race, smoking, hormone use, family history, blood pressure, body mass...... index, hemoglobin A(1c) (Hb A(1c)), C-reactive protein, and lipids. RESULTS: Lp(a) was inversely associated with incident diabetes, with fully adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for quintiles 2-5 vs quintile 1 of 0.87 (0.75-1.01), 0.80 (0.68-0.93), 0.88 (0.76-1.02), and 0.78 (0.67-0.91); P...

  10. Lipoprotein(a) in android obesity and NIDDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassef, N; Sidhom, G; Zakareya el-K; Mohamed el-K

    1997-11-01

    To assess the level of serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] in nonobese and obese NIDDM subjects with android body distribution. Serum Lp(a) levels were measured in 30 long-standing NIDDM patients (duration of diabetes 12.5 +/- 3 years, mean +/- SD), with 15 of the patients being obese of android distribution (BMI > 30 kg/m2 and waist-to-hip ratio > 0.8). In addition, there were 15 android obese nondiabetic subjects and 10 healthy subjects serving as the control group. All groups of patients in this study (diabetic, obese, and obese diabetic) showed significantly higher levels of Lp(a) than the healthy control group. Lp(a) concentrations were significantly higher in NIDDM patients with android type of obesity than in nondiabetic androids (24.1 +/- 5.6 vs. 14.8 +/- 2.4 mg/dl, P android-obese and nonobese NIDDM patients regardless of the degree of glycemic control. Lp(a) is an independent risk factor showing greater elevations in those subjects complicated with diabetic vascular diseases.

  11. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofogianni, Areti; Alkagiet, Stelina; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2018-01-10

    In the last decades, the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has been the topic of intense research. Several markers of inflammation have shown predictive value for first and recurrent coronary events in patients without and with established coronary heart disease (CHD). Among these markers, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) has recently received considerable attention. In the present review, the potential role of Lp-PLA2 as a marker of CHD risk and as a therapeutic target is discussed. Elevated Lp-PLA2 mass and activity appears to be associated with increased risk for CHD, both in the general population and in patients with established CHD. However, it is unclear whether the measurement of Lp-PLA2 improves risk discrimination when incorporated in models that include traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Moreover, the lack of effect on CHD events of darapladib, a potent, selective Lp-PLA2 inhibitor, in two large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials and the mostly negative findings of genetic association studies suggest that Lp-PLA2 is unlikely to represent a causal factor in atherogenesis. Therefore, it is doubtful whether Lp-PLA2 will constitute a therapeutic target for the prevention of CHD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. High Density Lipoprotein: A Therapeutic Target in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Barter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available High density lipoproteins (HDLs have a number of properties that have the potential to inhibit the development of atherosclerosis and thus reduce the risk of having a cardiovascular event. These protective effects of HDLs may be reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the concentration of HDL cholesterol is frequently low. In addition to their potential cardioprotective properties, HDLs also increase the uptake of glucose by skeletal muscle and stimulate the synthesis and secretion of insulin from pancreatic β cells and may thus have a beneficial effect on glycemic control. This raises the possibility that a low HDL concentration in type 2 diabetes may contribute to a worsening of diabetic control. Thus, there is a double case for targeting HDLs in patients with type 2 diabetes: to reduce cardiovascular risk and also to improve glycemic control. Approaches to raising HDL levels include lifestyle factors such as weight reduction, increased physical activity and stopping smoking. There is an ongoing search for HDL-raising drugs as agents to use in patients with type 2 diabetes in whom the HDL level remains low despite lifestyle interventions.

  13. Ribosylurea accumulates in yeast urc4 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnberg, O; Vodnala, M; Domkin, V; Hofer, A; Rasmussen, A; Andersen, G; Piskur, J

    2010-06-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces (Lachancea) kluyveri urc4 mutants, unable to grow on uracil, biotransformed (14)C(2)-uracil into two labeled compounds, as detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These two compounds could also be obtained following organic synthesis of ribosylurea. This finding demonstrates that in the URC pyrimidine degradation pathway, the opening of the uracil ring takes place when uracil is attached to the ribose moiety. Ribosylurea has not been reported in the cell metabolism before and the two observed compounds likely represent an equilibrium mixture of the pyranosyl and furanosyl forms.

  14. Very-low-density lipoprotein binding to the apolipoprotein E receptor 2 is enhanced by lipoprotein lipase, and does not require apolipoprotein E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacken, P J; Beer, F D; Vark, L C; Havekes, L M; Hofker, M H; Willems Van Dijk K

    2000-04-15

    The apolipoprotein (apo)E receptor 2 (apoER2) is a recently cloned member of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) family, showing a high homology with both the LDLR and the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor (VLDLR). In the present study, the binding characteristics of the apoER2 with respect to apoE and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were investigated. VLDL was isolated from both apoE-deficient mice and mice expressing the human APOE2 (Arg(158)-->Cys) and APOE3-Leiden isoforms on an Apoe(-/-),Ldlr(-/-) double knock-out background. apoE-rich rabbit beta-VLDL was used as a positive control for binding. Binding experiments performed with Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the human apoER2 showed that the receptor was able to bind VLDL containing either of the apoE isoforms, as well as the apoE-deficient VLDL. Hence, in contrast with the VLDLR, the apoER2 is not strictly dependent on apoE for VLDL binding. Since LPL has been shown to enhance the binding of lipoproteins to several members of the LDLR family, including the LDLR-related protein, VLDL receptor, gp330 and the LDLR itself, VLDL binding experiments were performed in the presence of LPL. Addition of LPL resulted in a significant increase in apoER2 binding for all VLDL fractions used in this study. In conclusion, lipoprotein binding of VLDL to the apoER2 is enhanced in the presence of LPL, and is not restricted to apoE-containing lipoproteins.

  15. Effects of atorvastatin and simvastatin on low-density lipoprotein subfraction profile, low-density lipoprotein oxidizability, and antibodies to oxidized low-density lipoprotein in relation to carotid intima media thickness in familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tits, Lambertus J. H.; Smilde, Tineke J.; van Wissen, Sanne; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kastelein, John J. P.; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the effects of statins on the quality of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in relation to atherosclerosis progression. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized trial of 325 patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), we assessed the effects of high-dose

  16. Simvastatin but not bezafibrate decreases plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) mass in type 2 diabetes mellitus : Relevance of high sensitive C-reactive protein, lipoprotein profile and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) electronegativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Alexander; de Vries, Rindert; van Leeuwen, Jeroen J. J.; Gautier, Thomas; van Pelt, L. Joost; Tselepis, Alexandros D.; Lagrost, Laurent; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) levels predict incident cardiovascular disease, impacting Lp-PLA(2) as an emerging therapeutic target. We determined Lp-PLA(2) responses to statin and fibrate administration in type 2 diabetes mellitus, and assessed

  17. High Density Lipoproteins and Arteriosclerosis: Role of Cholesterol Efflux and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    von Eckardstein, Arnold; Nofer, Jerzy Roch; Assmann, Gerd

    2001-01-01

    Abstract—High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is an important risk factor for coronary heart disease, and HDL exerts various potentially antiatherogenic properties, including the mediation of reverse transport of cholesterol...

  18. Altered Serum Lipoprotein Profiles in Male and Female Power Lifters Ingesting Anabolic Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Serum lipoprotein profiles were measured in nine male and three female weightlifters who were taking anabolic steroids. The profiles suggest that steriod users may face an increased risk of coronary artery disease. (Author/MT)

  19. Improved cholesterol phenotype analysis by a model relating lipoprotein life cycle processes to particle size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, D.B. van; Graaf, A.A. de; Ommen, B. van; Bochove, K. van; Rensen, P.C.N.; Havekes, L.M.; Pas, N.C.A. van de; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Greef, J. van der; Freidig, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    Increased plasma cholesterol is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lipoprotein particles transport both cholesterol and triglycerides through the blood. It is thought that the size distribution of these particles codetermines cardiovascular disease risk. New types of measurements can

  20. Severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with lipoprotein lipase deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. van Walraven (L.); J.B.C. de Klerk (Johannes); R.R. Postema (Roelf)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAn 11-year-old girl with lipoprotein lipase deficiency experienced recurring episodes of abdominal pain. She initially underwent appendectomy for suspected appendicitis; however, the appendix was normal. Pancreatitis was subsequently identified as the cause of her pain.

  1. Moderate doses of alcoholic beverages with dinner and postprandial high density lipoprotein composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, H.F.J.; Veenstra, J.; Tol, A. van; Groener, J.E.M.; Schaafsma, G.

    1998-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. In this study, postprandial changes in plasma lipids, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) composition and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity levels

  2. Fractional composition of blood serum lipoproteins in mice and rats with Triton WR 1339-induced lipemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolenko, T A; Tuzikov, F V; Vasil'eva, E D; Cherkanova, M S; Tuzikova, N A

    2010-10-01

    We compared fractional composition of blood serum lipoproteins (LP) in female ICR mice and Wistar rats induced by single administration of a nonionic detergent Triton WR 1339 in doses of 300 and 500 mg/kg. Lipemia in animals of both species was characterized by a sharp increase in the concentration of cholesterol and, particularly, of triglycerides in blood serum lipoproteins by the 24th hour after administration of the detergent. We revealed a significant increase in the concentrations of atherogenic VLDL cholesterol (due to VLDL2), intermediate density lipoproteins, and LDL. These changes were more pronounced in rats. The model of lipemia can be used to study the role of fractional composition of lipoproteins and, particularly, of triglycerides in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, this model holds much promise for evaluation of the efficiency of hypolipidemic drugs (statins and fibrates) in normalizing the increased level of atherogenic cholesterol of VLDL and LDL.

  3. Behavioral versus genetic determination of lipoproteins andidentical twins discordant for exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Paul T.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein and weight differences between vigorously active and sedentary MZ twins are used to: (1) estimate the effects of training while controlling for genotype; (2) estimate genetic concordance in the presence of divergent lifestyles.

  4. Lipoprotein receptor LRP1 regulates leptin signaling and energy homeostasis in the adult central nervous system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Juan; Zerbinatti, Celina; Zhan, Yan; Kolber, Benedict J; Herz, Joachim; Muglia, Louis J; Bu, Guojun

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic characterized by excess fat storage in adipocytes. Although lipoprotein receptors play important roles in lipid uptake, their role in controlling food intake and obesity is not known...

  5. Serum Sialic Acid Concentration and Content in ApoB-Containing Lipoproteins in Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowska, Monika; Gruszewska, Ewa; Cylwik, Bogdan; Panasiuk, Anatol; Filisiak, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Chrostek, Lech

    2016-01-01

    The great significance for the metabolism of lipoproteins is the composition of carbohydrate chain of apolipoproteins, where sialic acid (SA) is located. In VILDL and LDL sialic acid is attached to apolipoprotein B. The sialylation of serum proteins including apolipoprotein B can be affected in the course of liver diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of liver diseases on the concentration and content of SA in ApoB-containing lipoproteins. The tested group consisted of 165 patients (118 males, 47 females) with liver diseases: alcoholic cirrhosis, non-alcoholic cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, toxic hepatitis, chronic viral hepatitis, and liver cancer. ApoB-containing lipoproteins were isolated by a turbidimetric procedure and SA concentration was measured according to an enzymatic method. There was a significant increase in the serum concentration of SA in ApoB-containing lipoproteins in viral hepatitis. Although the serum concentration of ApoB was not significantly different between specific liver diseases, the serum levels of SA in ApoB-containing lipoproteins appeared to be different. There is an association between SA concentration and triglycerides in alcoholic cirrhosis and viral hepatitis. Also, in viral hepatitis SA concentration correlated negatively with HDL-cholesterol. The content of SA in ApoB-containing lipoproteins in alcoholic cirrhosis and viral hepatitis was significantly higher than that in the control group, but did not differ between diseases. This study may explain the variations in serum lipids and lipoproteins in liver diseases. It seems that the reason for these abnormalities is the changes in the concentration of sialic acid in ApoB-containing lipoproteins.

  6. Studies on the Formation of Murein-Bound Lipoprotein in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-15

    proteins, contains the enzymes and the carrier .olecules that function in energy production (Ingledew and Poole, 1984), the enzymes for lipid and...proteins for th~ release of bacteriocins , and lipoproteins of unknown functions such as Pal (peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein), RpIA, RplB...pneuIDoniae, Gilson et. al., 1988), in surface exclusion (TraT of E. QQli, Perumal and Minkley, 1984), the release of bacteriocins (Hakkart et ~., 1981

  7. Short-term cooling increases serum triglycerides and small high-density lipoprotein levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeke, Geerte; Nahon, Kimberly J; Bakker, Leontine E H; Norkauer, Sabine S C; Dinnes, Donna L M; Kockx, Maaike; Lichtenstein, Laeticia; Drettwan, Diana; Reifel-Miller, Anne; Coskun, Tamer; Pagel, Philipp; Romijn, Fred P H T M; Cobbaert, Christa M; Jazet, Ingrid M; Martinez, Laurent O; Kritharides, Leonard; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N

    Cold exposure and β3-adrenergic receptor agonism, which both activate brown adipose tissue, markedly influence lipoprotein metabolism by enhancing lipoprotein lipase-mediated catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and increasing plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and functionality in mice. However, the effect of short-term cooling on human lipid and lipoprotein metabolism remained largely elusive. The objective was to assess the effect of short-term cooling on the serum lipoprotein profile and HDL functionality in men. Body mass index-matched young, lean men were exposed to a personalized cooling protocol for 2 hours. Before and after cooling, serum samples were collected for analysis of lipids and lipoprotein composition by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1)-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL was measured using [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded ABCA1-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. Short-term cooling increased serum levels of free fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Cooling increased the concentration of large very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles accompanied by increased mean size of VLDL particles. In addition, cooling enhanced the concentration of small LDL and small HDL particles as well as the cholesterol levels within these particles. The increase in small HDL was accompanied by increased ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux in vitro. Our data show that short-term cooling increases the concentration of large VLDL particles and increases the generation of small LDL and HDL particles. We interpret that cooling increases VLDL production and turnover, which results in formation of surface remnants that form small HDL particles that attract cellular cholesterol. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inefficient degradation of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein by HepG2 cells is due to a retarded transport to the lysosomal compartment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombardi, P.; Mulder, M.; Boom, H. van der; Frants, R.R.; Havekes, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    Binding studies at 37 °C showed that lipoprotein lipase-treated very low density lipoproteins (LPL-VLDL) and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), once taken up via the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, are poorly degraded by HepG2 cells as compared with LDL. Determination of the initial

  9. Lipid and lipoprotein reference values from 133,450 Dutch Lifelines participants : Age- and gender-specific baseline lipid values and percentiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balder, Jan W.; de Vries, Jeroen K.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Lansberg, Peter J.; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.

    BACKGROUND: Lipids and lipoproteins are recognized as the most important modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although reference values for the major lipoproteins, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, have been collected

  10. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, S. G.; Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  11. Indy mutants: live long and prosper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart eFrankel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Indy encodes the fly homologue of a mammalian transporter of di and tricarboxylatecomponents of the Krebs cycle. Reduced expression of fly Indy or two of the C. elegansIndy homologs leads to an increase in life span. Fly and worm tissues that play key roles inintermediary metabolism are also the places where Indy genes are expressed. One of themouse homologs of Indy (mIndy is mainly expressed in the liver. It has been hypothesizedthat decreased INDY activity creates a state similar to caloric restriction (CR. Thishypothesis is supported by the physiological similarities between Indy mutant flies on highcalorie food and control flies on CR, such as increased physical activity and decreases inweight, egg production, triglyceride levels, starvation resistance, and insulin signaling. Inaddition, Indy mutant flies undergo changes in mitochondrial biogenesis also observed inCR animals. Recent findings with mIndy knockout mice support and extend the findingsfrom flies. mIndy-/- mice display an increase in hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis, lipidoxidation and decreased hepatic lipogenesis. When mIndy-/- mice are fed high calorie foodthey are protected from adiposity and insulin resistance. These findings point to INDY as apotential drug target for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  12. A 90 minute soccer match decreases triglyceride and low density lipoprotein but not high-density lipoprotein and cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader - Rahnama

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: The association between the lipid profiles level and the incidence and severity of coronary heart disease (CHD is very pronounced in epidemiological studies, and an inverse relation between physical fitness and the incidence of coronary heart disease has been observed in many studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a soccer match on lipid parameters of professional soccer players.
    • METHODS: Twenty two professional soccer players participated in the study. Blood (10ml for determination of lipid profiles was obtained at rest and immediately after a 90 minute soccer match. Lipid parameters were measured using Boehringer Mannheim kits and Clinilab and BioMerieux analyser.
    • RESULTS: The results of this study showed that the triglyceride was significantly higher before the match than afterwards (159.09 ± 58.2 vs. 88.63 ± 34.1 mg/dl, p < 0.001, whereas the low-density lipoprotein (LDL was lower before the match than after it (98.04 ± 28.9 vs. 112.31 ± 30.5 mg/dl. Moreover, there were no significant differences in cholesterol concentration (171.4 ± 30.28 mg/dl vs. 173.18 ± 32.75 mg/dl and high-density lipoprotein (HDL concentration (34.04 ± 5.58 mg/dl vs. 34.4 ± 4.6 mg/dl between before and after the match.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Although the soccer competitive match has no favourable acute effect on lipid

    • [Lipoprotein (a) in an urban population of Venezuela: Evidence that estrogenic deprivation increase in lipoprotein (a) levels is transitory].

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bermúdez Pirela, V; Cabrera de Bravo, M; Mengual Moreno, E; Cano Ponce, C; Leal González, E; Lemus Antepaz, M; Amell de Díaz, A; Sorell Gómez, L

      2007-07-01

      Lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease and normal serum levels of this particle is not known in our country. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine plasma Lp (a) concentration in a population sample of Maracaibo. Fifth hundred out-patients, consulting at Centro de Investigaciones Endocrino-Metabólicas "Dr. Félix Gómez" were randomly underwent to venipunction to obtain a fasting blood simple to assess Lp (a) by a ELISA assay. No significantly differences were found when compared by sex or age separately, higher levels in Lp (a) was found in female 40-44 year group (median: 20,9 mg/dl). Thus, female population was divided in two sub-groups: < 40 years (median: 13 mg/dl) 40 yr and more (median: 16 mg/dl), finding higher Lp (a) levels in the second group (p < 0,02). Hormonal replace therapy was assessed by age, resulting that women subjected this approach shows lower levels of Lp (a) (p < 0,01), except in 60-64 year group. Lp (a) in a Maracaibo was within normal levels. Hormonal replace therapy diminishes Lp (a) concentration in menopausal women, but in menopausal women without hormonal therapy Lp (a) levels experienced a sustained decrease to normal levels in a age-depended manner.

    • Simultaneous low-density lipoprotein-C lowering and high-density lipoprotein-C elevation for optimum cardiovascular disease prevention with various drug classes, and their combinations: a meta-analysis of 23 randomized lipid trials.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Brown, B Greg; Stukovsky, Karen Hinckley; Zhao, Xue-Qiao

      2006-12-01

      Our analysis presents an alternative hypothesis to the prevailing view that low-density lipoprotein-C is the only important target of lipid therapy. Two recently published studies showed surprising results. In the Armed Forces Regression Study, low-density lipoprotein-C was lowered only 22% with cholystyramine, niacin and gemfibrozil. Coronary stenosis regressed, however, and the primary clinical event rate was reduced by 54%. Conversely, in the FIELD trial, the primary event rate reduction was only 11% (P = NS). These differences appeared to be explained largely by the difference in high-density lipoprotein response to these regimens (38 vs. 3%). This meta-analysis of 23 trials strongly supports the notion that the sum of percent reduction in low-density lipoprotein-C plus percent increase in high-density lipoprotein-C predicts benefits much more effectively than either lipoprotein component. Epidemiology suggests that the cardiovascular event rate is reduced by nearly 1% for each 1% reduction in low-density lipoprotein-C and by at least 1% for each 1% increase in high-density lipoprotein. These effects are statistically independent; thus, for moderate lipid changes, they are additive. If this simple algorithm is proven accurate, a 30% high-density lipoprotein-C increase and a 40% low-density lipoprotein-C reduction would result in a nearly 70% CHD risk reduction - and a revolution in cardiovascular prevention.

    • The Journey of Lipoproteins Through the Cell: One Birthplace, Multiple Destinations.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Szewczyk, J; Collet, J-F

      2016-01-01

      Bacterial lipoproteins are a very diverse group of proteins characterized by the presence of an N-terminal lipid moiety that serves as a membrane anchor. Lipoproteins have a wide variety of crucial functions, ranging from envelope biogenesis to stress response. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins can be targeted to various destinations in the cell, including the periplasmic side of the cytoplasmic or outer membrane, the cell surface or the external milieu. The sorting mechanisms have been studied in detail in Escherichia coli, but exceptions to the rules established in this model bacterium exist in other bacteria. In this chapter, we will present the current knowledge on lipoprotein sorting in the cell. Our particular focus will be on the surface-exposed lipoproteins that appear to be much more common than previously assumed. We will discuss the different targeting strategies, provide numerous examples of surface-exposed lipoproteins and discuss the techniques used to assess their surface exposure. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

    • Serum prolactin, leptin, lipids and lipoproteins levels during antipsychotics treatment in Parkinson's disease and related psychosis.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Rustembegovic, Avdo; Sofic, Emin; Wichart, Ildiko

      2006-01-01

      Weight gain is a common adverse effect associated with the use of most typical and atypical antipsychotic. Aim of this study was to investigate serum prolactin, leptin, cholesterol, triglyceride, lipoproteins, such high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD)-related psychosis during long-term medication with atypical antipsychotic. The study population comprised 40 patients, who were divided into 4 groups: olanzapine (n=10), risperidone (n=10), seroquel (n=10) monotherapy, a group of 10 patients receiving only antiparkinson drugs and a control group of 8 healthy persons. The patients were evaluated at baseline and at the sixth and twelfth week according to the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), body mass index (BMI), and fasting serum prolactin, leptin, lipids and lipoproteins levels. Treatment of patients with olanzapine caused marked increase of serum LDL, cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin levels (p<0,02). No changes in HDL concentrations. There was positive relationship between serum leptin, lipid levels and BMI. However, treatment of patients with seroquel did not cause changes in serum prolactin, leptin, lipids, and lipoproteins levels. Our results suggest that treatment of patients with PD-related psychosis with seroquel appears to have minimal influence on serum leptin, prolactin, lipids, lipoproteins and BMI compared with olanzapine and risperidone.

    • Serum cholesterol and triglyceride reference ranges of twenty lipoprotein subclasses for healthy Japanese men and women.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Furusyo, Norihiro; Ai, Masumi; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Ikezaki, Hiroaki; Ihara, Takeshi; Hayashi, Takeo; Hiramine, Satoshi; Ura, Kazuya; Kohzuma, Takuji; Schaefer, Ernst J; Hayashi, Jun

      2013-12-01

      This epidemiological study was done to generate normal ranges for the cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum lipoprotein subclasses isolated from healthy adults based on gender and menopausal status. Cholesterol and triglyceride levels in 20 lipoprotein subclasses as separated by high performance liquid chromatography were measured in serum obtained from 825 fasting healthy subjects (267 men, 558 women). For serum cholesterol, 13.7% was found in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) subclasses, 55.6% in low density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses, and 30.4% in high density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses. For serum triglycerides, these values were 52.1%, 27.9%, and 17.4%, respectively. Levels of cholesterol in some VLDL subclasses were inversely correlated with the levels of some HDL subclasses, while for triglycerides, elevated levels in any one subclass were generally strongly associated with elevated levels in all other subclasses. Men had significantly higher large VLDL-cholesterol levels than women (P cholesterol levels than men (P cholesterol levels than men (P cholesterol levels, and significantly higher all VLDL, LDL, and HDL-triglyceride levels than premenopausal women (P cholesterol and triglyceride subclass levels, as well as significant correlations between values in the various serum lipoprotein subclasses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    • Analysis of Drug Interactions with Lipoproteins by High-Performance Affinity Chromatography

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

      2013-01-01

      Lipoproteins such as high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are known to interact with drugs and other solutes in blood. These interactions have been examined in the past by methods such as equilibrium dialysis and capillary electrophoresis. This chapter describes an alternative approach that has recently been developed for examining these interactions by using high-performance affinity chromatography. In this method, lipoproteins are covalently immobilized to a solid support and used within a column as a stationary phase for binding studies. This approach allows the same lipoprotein preparation to be used for a large number of binding studies, leading to precise estimates of binding parameters. This chapter will discuss how this technique can be applied to the identification of interaction models and be used to differentiate between systems that have interactions based on partitioning, adsorption or mixed-mode interactions. It is also shown how this approach can then be used for the measurement of binding parameters for HDL and LDL with drugs. Examples of these studies are provided, with particular attention being given to the use of frontal analysis to examine the interactions of R- and S-propranolol with HDL and LDL. The advantages and possible limitations of this method are described. The extension of this approach to other types of drug-lipoprotein interactions is also considered. PMID:25392741

    • Relationship of pericardial fat with lipoprotein distribution: The Multi-Ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ong, Kwok-Leung; Ding, Jingzhong; McClelland, Robyn L; Cheung, Bernard M Y; Criqui, Michael H; Barter, Philip J; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Allison, Matthew A

      2015-08-01

      Pericardial fat and lipoprotein abnormalities contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated the relationship between pericardial fat volume and lipoprotein distribution, and whether the association of pericardial fat volume with subclinical atherosclerosis and incident CVD events differs according to lipoprotein distribution. We analyzed data from 5407 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who had measurements of pericardial fat volume, lipoprotein distribution, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), and coronary artery calcium (CAC). All participants were free of clinically apparent CVD at baseline. Incident CVD was defined as any adjudicated CVD event. After adjusting for demographic factors, traditional risk factors, and biomarkers of inflammation and hemostasis, a larger pericardial fat volume was associated with higher large VLDL particle (VLDL-P) concentration and small HDL particle (HDL-P) concentration, and smaller HDL-P size (regression coefficients = 0.585 nmol/L, 0.366 μmol/L, and -0.025 nm per SD increase in pericardial fat volume respectively, all P 0.05). Pericardial fat is associated with atherogenic lipoprotein abnormalities. However, its relationship with subclinical atherosclerosis and incident CVD events does not differ according to lipoprotein distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    • Allosteric Mutant IDH1 Inhibitors Reveal Mechanisms for IDH1 Mutant and Isoform Selectivity

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Xie, Xiaoling; Baird, Daniel; Bowen, Kimberly; Capka, Vladimir; Chen, Jinyun; Chenail, Gregg; Cho, YoungShin; Dooley, Julia; Farsidjani, Ali; Fortin, Pascal; Kohls, Darcy; Kulathila, Raviraj; Lin, Fallon; McKay, Daniel; Rodrigues, Lindsey; Sage, David; Touré, B. Barry; van der Plas, Simon; Wright, Kirk; Xu, Ming; Yin, Hong; Levell, Julian; Pagliarini, Raymond A.

      2017-03-01

      Oncogenic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations contribute to cancer via production of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we characterize two structurally distinct mutant- and isoform-selective IDH1 inhibitors that inhibit 2-HG production. Both bind to an allosteric pocket on IDH1, yet shape it differently, highlighting the plasticity of this site. Oncogenic IDH1R132H mutation destabilizes an IDH1 “regulatory segment,” which otherwise restricts compound access to the allosteric pocket. Regulatory segment destabilization in wild-type IDH1 promotes inhibitor binding, suggesting that destabilization is critical for mutant selectivity. We also report crystal structures of oncogenic IDH2 mutant isoforms, highlighting the fact that the analogous segment of IDH2 is not similarly destabilized. This intrinsic stability of IDH2 may contribute to observed inhibitor IDH1 isoform selectivity. Moreover, discrete residues in the IDH1 allosteric pocket that differ from IDH2 may also guide IDH1 isoform selectivity. These data provide a deeper understanding of how IDH1 inhibitors achieve mutant and isoform selectivity.

  1. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Melloni N. [University of Memphis; Dunning, Jonathan P [University of Memphis; Wiley, Ronald G [Vanderbilt University and Veterans Administration, Nashville, TN; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  2. Forward genetic screen for auxin-deficient mutants by cytokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Luo, Pan; Di, Dong-Wei; Wang, Li; Wang, Ming; Lu, Cheng-Kai; Wei, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Tian-Zi; Amakorová, Petra; Strnad, Miroslav; Novák, Ondřej; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-07-06

    Identification of mutants with impairments in auxin biosynthesis and dynamics by forward genetic screening is hindered by the complexity, redundancy and necessity of the pathways involved. Furthermore, although a few auxin-deficient mutants have been recently identified by screening for altered responses to shade, ethylene, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) or cytokinin (CK), there is still a lack of robust markers for systematically isolating such mutants. We hypothesized that a potentially suitable phenotypic marker is root curling induced by CK, as observed in the auxin biosynthesis mutant CK-induced root curling 1 / tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 (ckrc1/taa1). Phenotypic observations, genetic analyses and biochemical complementation tests of Arabidopsis seedlings displaying the trait in large-scale genetic screens showed that it can facilitate isolation of mutants with perturbations in auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling. However, unlike transport/signaling mutants, the curled (or wavy) root phenotypes of auxin-deficient mutants were significantly induced by CKs and could be rescued by exogenous auxins. Mutants allelic to several known auxin biosynthesis mutants were re-isolated, but several new classes of auxin-deficient mutants were also isolated. The findings show that CK-induced root curling provides an effective marker for discovering genes involved in auxin biosynthesis or homeostasis.

  3. Biomimetic High-Density Lipoproteins from a Gold Nanoparticle Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthi, Andrea Jane

    For hundreds of years the field of chemistry has looked to nature for inspiration and insight to develop novel solutions for the treatment of human diseases. The ability of chemists to identify, mimic, and modifiy small molecules found in nature has led to the discovery and development of many important therapeutics. Chemistry on the nanoscale has made it possible to mimic natural, macromolecular structures that may also be useful for understanding and treating diseases. One example of such a structure is high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The goal of this work is to use a gold nanoparticle (Au NP) as a template to synthesize functional mimics of HDL and characterize their structure and function. Chapter 1 details the structure and function of natural HDL and how chemistry on the nanoscale provides new strategies for mimicking HDL. This Chapter also describes the first examples of using nanoparticles to mimic HDL. Chapter 2 reports the synthesis and characterization of biomimetic HDL using different sizes of Au NPs and different surface chemistries and how these variables can be used to tailor the properties of biomimetic HDL. From these studies the optimal strategy for synthesizing biomimetic HDL was determined. In Chapter 3, the optimization of the synthesis of biomimetic HDL is discussed as well as a full characterization of its structure. In addition, the work in this chapter shows that biomimetic HDL can be synthesized on a large scale without alterations to its structure or function. Chapter 4 focuses on understanding the pathways by which biomimetic HDL accepts cholesterol from macrophage cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that biomimetic HDL is able to accept cholesterol by both active and passive pathways of cholesterol efflux. In Chapter 5 the preliminary results of in vivo studies to characterize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of biomimetic HDL are presented. These studies suggest that biomimetic HDL traffics through tissues prone to

  4. Gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency: working toward clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rip, Jaap; Nierman, Melchior C; Sierts, Jeroen A; Petersen, Wilma; Van den Oever, Karin; Van Raalte, Daniel; Ross, Colin J D; Hayden, Michael R; Bakker, Andrew C; Dijkhuizen, Paul; Hermens, Wim T; Twisk, Jaap; Stroes, Erik; Kastelein, John J P; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Meulenberg, Janneke M

    2005-11-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency causes hypertriglyceridemia and recurrent, potentially life-threatening pancreatitis. There currently is no adequate treatment for this disease. Previously, we showed that intramuscular administration of an adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) vector encoding the human LPL(S447X) variant cDNA (AAV1-LPL(S447X)) normalized the dyslipidemia of LPL-/- mice for more than 1 year. In preparation for a clinical trial, we evaluated the safety and biodistribution of AAV1-LPL(S447X) in wild-type mice and fully characterized six LPL-deficient patients. Toxicological analysis in mice showed that intramuscular administration was well tolerated. Acute inflammatory response markers were transiently increased, and anti- AAV1 antibodies were generated. Histological analyses indicated a dose-dependent reversible spleen hyperplasia, and myositis at the injection sites. Biodistribution data showed short-term vector leakage from injection sites into the circulation, followed by liver-mediated clearance. Persistence of vector DNA was limited to the injected muscle and draining lymph nodes, and spread to reproductive organs was limited. Characterization of LPL-deficient patients showed that all patients presented with hypertriglyceridemia and recurrent pancreatitis. LPL catalytic activity was absent, but LPL protein levels were 20-100% of normal. Myoblasts derived from skeletal muscle biopsies of these patients were efficiently transduced by AAV1-LPL(S447X) and secreted active LPL. These data support the initiation of a clinical trial in LPL-deficient patients, for which regulatory approval has been granted.

  5. Ethnicity and lipoprotein(a) polymorphism in Native Mexican populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo; De La Peña-Díaz, Aurora; Zamora-González, José; Gomez-Ortega, Rocio; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Izaguirre-Avila, Raul; Malvido-Miranda, Elsa; Morales-Anduaga, Maria Elena; Angles-Cano, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    Background Lp(a) is a lipoparticle of unknown function mainly present in primates and humans. It consists of a low-density lipoprotein and apo(a), a polymorphic glycoprotein. Apo(a) shares sequence homology and fibrin-binding with plasminogen inhibiting its fibrinolytic properties. Lp(a) is considered a link between atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Marked inter-ethnic differences in Lp(a) concentration related to the genetic polymorphism of apo(a), have been reported in several populations. Aim To study the structural and functional features of Lp(a) in three Native Mexican populations (Mayos, Mazahuas and Mayas) and in Mestizo subjects. Methods We determined the plasma concentration of Lp(a) by immunonephelometry, apo(a) isoforms by Western blot, Lp(a) fibrin-binding by immuno-enzymatic assay and STR polymorphic markers genetic analysis by capillary electrophoresis. Results Mestizos presented the less skewed distribution and the highest median Lp(a) concentration (13.25 mg/dL) relative to Mazahuas (8.2 mg/dL), Mayas (8.25 mg/dL) and Mayos (6.5 mg/dL). Phenotype distribution was different in Mayas and Mazahuas as compared to the Mestizo group. The higher Lp(a) fibrin-binding capacity was found in the Maya population. There was an inverse relationship between the size of apo(a) polymorphs and both Lp(a) levels and Lp(a) fibrin binding. Conclusion There is evidence of significative differences in Lp(a) plasma concentration and phenotype distribution in Native Mexican and the Mestizo group. PMID:16684693

  6. Oxidative stress and plasma lipoproteins in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maia, Fernanda Maria Machado; Santos, Emanuelly Barbosa; Reis, Germana Elias [Universidade Estadual do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the relation between oxidative stress and lipid profile in patients with different types of cancer. This was an observational cross-sectional. A total of 58 subjects were evaluated, 33 males, divided into two groups of 29 patients each: Group 1, patients with cancer of the digestive tract and accessory organs; Group 2 patients with other types of cancers, all admitted to a public hospital. The plasma levels (lipoproteins and total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides, for example) were analyzed by enzymatic kits, and oxidative stress based on thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, by assessing the formation of malondialdehyde. In general the levels of malondialdehyde of patients were high (5.00μM) as compared to 3.31μM for healthy individuals. The median values of lipids exhibited normal triacylglycerol (138.78±89.88mg/dL), desirable total cholesterol values (163.04±172.38mg/dL), borderline high LDL (151.30±178.25mg/dL) and low HDL (31.70±22.74mg/dL). Median HDL levels in Group 1 were lower (31.32mg/dL) than the cancer patients in Group 2 (43.67mg/dL) (p=0.038). Group 1 also showed higher levels of oxidative stress (p=0.027). The lipid profile of patients with cancer was not favorable, which seems to have contributed to higher lipid peroxidation rate, generating a significant oxidative stress.

  7. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein modulates activation of human leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Spirig

    Full Text Available An anti-inflammatory effect of reconstituted High Density Lipoprotein (rHDL has been demonstrated in atherosclerosis and in sepsis models. An increase of adhesion molecules as well as tissue factor expression on endothelial cells in response to inflammatory or danger signals are attenuated by the treatment with rHDL. Here we show the inhibitory effect of rHDL on the activation of human leukocytes in a whole blood assay as well as on monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC. Multiplex analysis of human whole blood showed that phytohaemagglutinin (PHA-induced secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2R, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12(p40, IL-15 and IFN-α was inhibited. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect on the production of the chemokines CCL-2, CCL-4, CCL-5, CXCL-9 and CXCL-10 was observed. Activation of granulocytes and CD14+ monocytes by PHA is inhibited dose-dependently by rHDL shown as decreased up-regulation of ICAM-1 surface expression. In addition, we found a strong inhibitory effect of rHDL on toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2- and TLR4-mediated maturation of DC. Treatment of DC with rHDL prevented the up-regulation of cell surface molecules CD80, CD83 and CD86 and it inhibited the TLR-driven activation of inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. These findings suggest that rHDL prevents activation of crucial cellular players of cellular immunity and could therefore be a useful reagent to impede inflammation as well as the link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  8. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein modulates activation of human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirig, Rolf; Schaub, Alexander; Kropf, Alain; Miescher, Sylvia; Spycher, Martin O; Rieben, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An anti-inflammatory effect of reconstituted High Density Lipoprotein (rHDL) has been demonstrated in atherosclerosis and in sepsis models. An increase of adhesion molecules as well as tissue factor expression on endothelial cells in response to inflammatory or danger signals are attenuated by the treatment with rHDL. Here we show the inhibitory effect of rHDL on the activation of human leukocytes in a whole blood assay as well as on monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC). Multiplex analysis of human whole blood showed that phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2R, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12(p40), IL-15 and IFN-α was inhibited. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect on the production of the chemokines CCL-2, CCL-4, CCL-5, CXCL-9 and CXCL-10 was observed. Activation of granulocytes and CD14+ monocytes by PHA is inhibited dose-dependently by rHDL shown as decreased up-regulation of ICAM-1 surface expression. In addition, we found a strong inhibitory effect of rHDL on toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)- and TLR4-mediated maturation of DC. Treatment of DC with rHDL prevented the up-regulation of cell surface molecules CD80, CD83 and CD86 and it inhibited the TLR-driven activation of inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. These findings suggest that rHDL prevents activation of crucial cellular players of cellular immunity and could therefore be a useful reagent to impede inflammation as well as the link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  9. Association of polymorphisms in genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism with plasma concentrations of remnant lipoproteins and HDL subpopulations before and after hormone therapy in postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. We evaluated the ut...

  10. SCARB1 Gene Variants Are Associated With the Phenotype of Combined High High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and High Lipoprotein (a)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Sethi, Amar A; Yanek, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    a missense mutation resulting in an S129L substitution in exon 3. To follow up, 2 cohorts (GeneSTAR, the family-based Genetic Study of Atherosclerosis Risk [n=543], and CCHS, the population-based Copenhagen City Heart Study [n=5835]) were screened for combined HDL cholesterol and Lp(a) elevations. Subjects......BACKGROUND: SR-B1 (scavenger receptor class B type 1), encoded by the gene SCARB1, is a lipoprotein receptor that binds both high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein. We reported that SR-B1 is also a receptor for lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)), mediating cellular uptake of Lp(a) in vitro...... and promoting clearance of Lp(a) in vivo. Although genetic variants in SCARB1 are associated with variations in HDL level, no SCARB1 variants affecting Lp(a) have been reported. METHODS AND RESULTS: In an index subject with high levels of HDL cholesterol and Lp(a), SCARB1 was sequenced and demonstrated...

  11. Correction of feline lipoprotein lipase deficiency with adeno-associated virus serotype 1-mediated gene transfer of the lipoprotein lipase S447X beneficial mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ross, Colin J. D.; Twisk, Jaap; Bakker, Andrew C.; Miao, Fudan; Verbart, Dennis; Rip, Jaap; Godbey, Tamara; Dijkhuizen, Paul; Hermens, Wim T. J. M. C.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Meulenberg, Janneke M.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Human lipoprotein lipase (hLPL) deficiency, for which there currently exists no adequate treatment, leads to excessive plasma triglycerides (TGs), recurrent abdominal pain, and life-threatening pancreatitis. We have shown that a single intramuscular administration of adeno-associated virus (AAV)

  12. Post-transcriptional regulation of lipoprotein receptors by the E3-ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Zelcer, Noam

    2012-06-01

    The hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is essential for clearing circulating LDL and is an important therapeutic target for treating cardiovascular disease. Abundance of the LDLR is subject to both transcriptional and nontranscriptional control. Here, we highlight a new post-transcriptional mechanism for controlling LDLR function via ubiquitination of the receptor by the E3-ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL). IDOL is a recently identified transcriptional target of the liver X receptors. Acting as an E3-ubiquitin ligase IDOL promotes ubiquitination of the LDLR, thereby marking it for lysosomal degradation. The determinants required for degradation of the LDLR by IDOL have been largely identified. IDOL also targets two related lipoprotein receptors, the very low-density lipoprotein receptor and apolipoprotein E receptor 2. Despite several similarities, the IDOL, and PCSK9 pathways for controlling LDLR abundance seem independent of each other. Genome-wide association studies have recently identified IDOL as a locus influencing variability in circulating levels of LDL, thereby highlighting the possible role of IDOL in human lipoprotein metabolism. Transcriptional induction of IDOL by liver X receptor defines a new post-transcriptional pathway for controlling LDLR abundance and LDL uptake independent of sterol regulatory element binding proteins. Targeting IDOL activity may offer a novel therapeutic approach complementary to statins for treating cardiovascular disease.

  13. Effect of human scavenger receptor class A overexpression in bone marrow-derived cells on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herijgers, N.; Winther, M.P.J. de; Eck, M. van; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Berkel, T.J.C. van

    2000-01-01

    Scavenger receptors, which include various classes, play an important role in atherogenesis by mediating the unrestricted uptake of modified lipoproteins, resulting in the massive accumulation of cholesteryl esters. Because macrophage-derived foam cells are considered to be an important feature in

  14. Google: a narrativa de uma marca mutante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizete de Azevedo Kreutz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As marcas mutantes já fazem parte de nossa realidade, embora ainda não totalmente percebidas e/ou aceitas como tal. O presente artigo busca refletir sobre a relevância dessas novas estratégias de comunicação e branding, identificando suas principais características. Para isso, utilizamos o método de estudo de caso, o Google, ancorado nos métodos de pesquisa bibliográfica e de internet. A escolha foi intencional, posto que a organização é referência em sua categoria, mecanismo de busca, e reflete essa estratégia comunicacional contemporânea. Como resultado, as informações obtidas nos possibilitam compreender essa tendência de comportamento de marca que busca a interação com seus públicos.

  15. Studies on mutant breeding of Hibiscus syriacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Ki Un; Kim, Young Taik

    1997-01-01

    Hibiscus has been known as a national flower of Korea. Hibiscus has such a characteristic of self-incompatibility that all the plant exist as natural hybrids and have heterogeneous genes. Many domestic 91 varieties of Hibiscus syriacus were collected. Radiosensitivity of H. Syriacus irradiated with {gamma}-ray was investigated in plant cuttings. The plant height was reduced by 45% in 5KR irradiated group, compared to control group. The radiation dose of 5KR could be recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus cuttings. Radiosensitivity of {gamma}-ray irradiated Hibiscus seed were investigated. The germination rate, survival rate and plant height was better in the 4KR irradiation plot than control. The radiation dose of 10{approx}12KR are recommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus. Promising mutant lines were selected form the varieties of Hwarang, Wolsan no. 176, Ilpyondansim, Emille, Hanol, Yongkwang, Saeyongkwang, Chungmu, Imjinhong, Arang, Hungdansim-1 and Hongdansim-2. (author). 66 refs., 16 tabs., 13 figs.

  16. Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0177 TITLE: Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Katerina...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0177 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...epigenomic landscape of EGFR mutant SCLCs and their corresponding pre- treatment LUADs. These are very rare specimens. Through our Yale rebiopsy program

  17. Mutant-specific gene programs in the zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Gerhard J.; Choe, Sung E; Dooley, Kimberly A.; Paffett-Lugassy, Noëlle N.; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.

    2005-01-01

    Hematopoiesis involves the production of stem cells, followed by the orchestrated differentiation of the blood lineages. Genetic screens in zebrafish have identified mutants with defects that disrupt specific stages of hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis, including the cloche, spadetail (tbx16), moonshine (tif1g), bloodless, and vlad tepes (gata1) mutants. To better characterize the blood program, gene expression profiling was carried out in these mutants and in scl-morphants (scl mo). Distinct ...

  18. Mutant p53 in Cancer: New Functions and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Patricia A.J.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Many different types of cancer show a high incidence of TP53 mutations, leading to the expression of mutant p53 proteins. There is growing evidence that these mutant p53s have both lost wild-type p53 tumor suppressor activity and gained functions that help to contribute to malignant progression. Understanding the functions of mutant p53 will help in the development of new therapeutic approaches that may be useful in a broad range of cancer types. PMID:24651012

  19. Green tea catechins prevent low-density lipoprotein oxidation via their accumulation in low-density lipoprotein particles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Taguchi, Chie; Kobayashi, Makoto; Ichitani, Masaki; Ukawa, Yuuichi; Sagesaka, Yuko M; Suzuki, Emiko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Green tea is rich in polyphenols, including catechins which have antioxidant activities and are considered to have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. In the present study, we investigated the effects of green tea catechins on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in vitro and in human studies to test the hypothesis that catechins are incorporated into LDL particles and exert antioxidant properties. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 19 healthy men ingested green tea extract (GTE) in the form of capsules at a dose of 1 g total catechin, of which most (>99%) was the gallated type. At 1 hour after ingestion, marked increases of the plasma concentrations of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and (-)-epicatechin gallate were observed. Accordingly, the plasma total antioxidant capacity was increased, and the LDL oxidizability was significantly reduced by the ingestion of GTE. We found that gallated catechins were incorporated into LDL particles in nonconjugated forms after the incubation of GTE with plasma in vitro. Moreover, the catechin-incorporated LDL was highly resistant to radical-induced oxidation in vitro. An additional human study with 5 healthy women confirmed that GTE intake sufficiently increased the concentration of gallated catechins, mainly in nonconjugated forms in LDL particles, and reduced the oxidizability of LDL. In conclusion, green tea catechins are rapidly incorporated into LDL particles and play a role in reducing LDL oxidation in humans, which suggests that taking green tea catechins is effective in reducing atherosclerosis risk associated with oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of acute exercise on high density lipoprotein cholesterol and high density lipoprotein subfractions in moderately trained females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, P M; Fowler, S; Warty, V; Danduran, M; Visich, P; Keteyian, S

    1998-03-01

    Increases in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels have previously been reported after moderate exercise bouts lasting less than two hours in men. Little information exists, however, on HDL-C responses after moderate duration exercise in women. Post-exercise HDL-C modifications may appear differently in women because of higher baseline HDL-C concentrations and differences in lipolytic activity. To determine the influence of exercise on acute HDL-C responses in women, 12 trained premenopausal women (22 (4) years old; mean (SD)) who ran 24-48 km a week exercised on a motor driven treadmill at 75% VO2MAX until 3.34 MJ (800 kcal) were expended (72 (9) min). Subjects were all tested during the early follicular phase of their menstrual cycle. Fasting blood samples were obtained before exercise (baseline), immediately after (IPE), one hour after (1 h PE), 24 hours after (24 h PE), and 48 hours after (48 h PE) exercise. Plasma was analysed for HDL-C, HDL2-C, and HDL3-C. A significant increase in HDL-C was observed 48 h PE (p<0.05). HDL3-C increased IPE (p<0.01) but returned to baseline at 1 h PE. In contrast, HDL2-C was not significantly different from baseline at any time point. The rise in HDL-C, however, was attributed to an increase in both HDL2 and HDL3. Moreover, at 48 h PE, the increase in HDL-C correlated highly with changes in HDL2-C (r = 0.92). Thus it appears that exercise of moderate duration can elicit similar post-exercise increases in HDL-C in women to those previously reported in men. However, the changes in HDL subfractions leading to the rise in HDL-C may be different in women.

  1. The impact of lipoprotein apheresis in patients with refractory angina and raised lipoprotein(a): Objectives and methods of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tina Z; Pottle, Alison; Pennell, Dudley J; Barbir, Mahmoud S

    2015-05-01

    It is well established that Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an independent cardiovascular risk factor and predictor of major adverse cardiovascular events. Lipoprotein apheresis is currently the most effective approved treatment available, with minimal effect conferred by conventional lipid lowering agents. A growing body of evidence suggests that aggressively lowering raised Lp(a) may improve cardiovascular and clinical outcomes, although more prospective research is required in this field. Angina which is refractory to conventional medical therapy and revascularisation is extremely challenging to manage. There is a significant unmet need to establish therapeutic options. Our goal is to determine the impact of lipoprotein apheresis on clinical parameters and symptoms of patients with refractory angina secondary to advanced coronary disease and raised Lp(a). Determining whether we should aggressively lower Lp(a) in such patients remains a very important question, which could potentially impact on the management of a large population. We will also gain insight into how this treatment works and the mechanisms via which Lp(a) increases cardiovascular risk. We are currently conducting a prospective, randomised controlled crossover study of patients with refractory angina and raised Lp(a), randomised to undergoing three months of weekly lipoprotein apheresis or sham apheresis. Patients will then crossover to the opposite study arm after a 1 month wash-out phase. We will assess myocardial perfusion, carotid atherosclerosis, endothelial vascular function, thrombogenesis, oxidised LDL and their antibodies, exercise capacity, angina and quality of life at the beginning and end of treatment, to determine the net true treatment effect on the above parameters. This is a novel area of research, as previous studies have not assessed the role of lipoprotein apheresis in patients with refractory angina and raised Lp(a) in a prospective randomised controlled manner. Copyright © 2015

  2. Polizei-Compliance / Frank Braun, Florian Albrecht

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Braun, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Normide ja seaduste järgimisest politsei tegevuses ning vastavussüsteemi juurutamisest politseiorganisatsioonis tegevuse läbipaistvamaks muutmiseks, halduse optimeerimiseks ja kodanike usalduse suurendamiseks

  3. Braun, Wernher von (1912-77)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Rocket scientist, born in Wirsitz, Germany, enthusiast of space travel from an early age, designer of the V-2 rocket used during the second World War. With 120 associates from Peenemunde, went to the United States and directed firings of captured V-2 rockets at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, following which he used a Jupiter-C (Juno I) to put America's first satellite, Explorer 1, into ...

  4. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: New Insights From Epidemiology, Genetics, and Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-02-19

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need to reduce levels to no advice on treatment. New insight in epidemiology now suggests that these lipoproteins, marked by high triglycerides, are strong and independent predictors of ASCVD and all-cause mortality, and that their cholesterol content or remnant cholesterol likewise are strong predictors of ASCVD. Of all adults, 27% have triglycerides >2 mmol/L (176 mg/dL), and 21% have remnant cholesterol >1 mmol/L (39 mg/dL). For individuals in the general population with nonfasting triglycerides of 6.6 mmol/L (580 mg/dL) compared with individuals with levels of 0.8 mmol/L (70 mg/dL), the risks were 5.1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with ASCVD and all-cause mortality. Finally, genetic evidence also demonstrates that high concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with low-grade inflammation. This suggests that an important part of inflammation in atherosclerosis and ASCVD is because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein degradation and uptake into macrophage foam cells in the arterial intima. Taken together, new insights now strongly suggest that elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins represent causal risk factors for low-grade inflammation, ASCVD, and all-cause mortality. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. [Measurement of sialic acid from lipoproteins and human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shoudong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Nana; Kan, Yujie; Li, Fuyu; Li, Yu; Li, Fangyuan; Qin, Shucun

    2014-11-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was established to quantify sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid, NANA) from lipoproteins and human plasma. The method was used to investigate the different contents of NANA from lipoproteins between diabetic with an average age of 51.6 years and healthy participants with an average age of 50.7 years. The NANA from lipoprotein samples was hydrolyzed by acetic acid (pH = 2) at 80 °C for 2 h and analyzed by the optimized LC-MS/MS method after high speed centrifugation and filtration. The limits of detection and quantification of NANA were 7.4 and 24.5 pg, respectively. The linear range was 2.5-80 ng/mL for NANA and the correlation coefficient (R2) was more than 0.998. The levels of NANA in the plasma of type II diabetics and healthy participants were (548.3 ± 88.9) and (415.3 ± 55.5) mg/L, respectively; and the levels of NANA from very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), and high density lipoproteins (HDL) of the type II diabetics and the healthy participants were (4.91 ± 0.19), (6.95 ± 0.28), (3.61 ± 0.22) μg/mg and (2.90 ± 0.27), (7.03 ± 0.04), (2.40 ± 0.09) μg/mg, respectively. The sialic acid levels of VLDL and HDL from the type II diabetics were markedly higher than those of the corresponding healthy participants with the similar ages (P lipoproteins, and is reproducible and time saving.

  6. Characterization of Two Metal Binding Lipoproteins as Vaccine Candidates for Enterococcal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Laverde, Diana; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Muller, Cécile; Bernay, Benoit; Benachour, Abdellah; Hartke, Axel; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium and faecalis are Gram-positive opportunistic pathogens that have become leading causes of nosocomial infections over the last decades. Especially multidrug resistant enterococci have become a challenging clinical problem worldwide. Therefore, new treatment options are needed and the identification of alternative targets for vaccine development has emerged as a feasible alternative to fight the infections caused by these pathogens. We extrapolate the transcriptomic data from a mice peritonitis infection model in E. faecalis to identify putative up-regulated surface proteins under infection conditions in E. faecium. After the bionformatic analyses two metal binding lipoproteins were identified to have a high homology (>72%) between the two species, the manganese ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (PsaAfm,) and the zinc ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (AdcAfm). These candidate lipoproteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The recombinant proteins were used to produce rabbit polyclonal antibodies that were able to induce specific opsonic antibodies that mediated killing of the homologous strain E. faecium E155 as well as clinical strains E. faecium E1162, Enterococcus faecalis 12030, type 2 and type 5. Mice were passively immunized with the antibodies raised against recombinant lipoproteins, showing significant reduction of colony counts in mice livers after the bacterial challenge and demonstrating the efficacy of these metal binding lipoproteins as promising vaccine candidates to treat infections caused by these enterococcal pathogens. Overall, our results demonstrate that these two metal binding lipoproteins elicited specific, opsonic and protective antibodies, with an extensive cross-reactivity and serotype-independent coverage among these two important nocosomial pathogens. Pointing these two protein antigens as promising immunogens, that can be used as single components or as carrier proteins

  7. EFFECTS OF EXERCISE TRAINING ON BLOOD LIPIDS AND LIPOPROTEINS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Stoedefalke

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The following review aims to describe what is known about the effects of exercise training in children and adolescents on the following blood lipids and lipoproteins: total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and triglycerides (TG. Only studies that described mode, frequency, duration and intensity of the exercise were included in the review. The results of the studies reviewed were equivocal. Clearly the effects of exercise training on the blood lipid and lipoprotein levels of normolipidemic children and adolescents are equivocal. Of the 14 studies reviewed, six observed a positive alteration in the blood lipid and lipoprotein profile, four of the studies observed no alteration in the blood lipid and lipoprotein profile and one study observed a negative effect on HDL-C but an overall improvement in the lipid and lipoprotein profile due to the decrease in the TC/HDL ratio. It appears that methodological problems present in the majority of the exercise training studies limits the ability to make a conclusive, evidence based statement regarding the effect exercise training has on blood lipid levels in normolipidemic children. Most of the research design flaws can be linked to one or more of the following: small numbers of subjects in each study, low or no representation of girls, inclusion of both boys and girls in the subject pool, inclusion of boys and girls at different maturational stages in the subject pool, exercise training regimes that do not adequately control for exercise intensity, exercise training regimes that do not last longer than 8 weeks and exercise training studies that do not have an adequate exercise volume to elicit a change. Ideally, future research should focus on longitudinal studies which examine the effects of exercise training from the primary school years through adulthood

  8. Lipoprotein lipase inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV infection by blocking virus cell entry.

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    Patrick Maillard

    Full Text Available A distinctive feature of HCV is that its life cycle depends on lipoprotein metabolism. Viral morphogenesis and secretion follow the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL biogenesis pathway and, consequently, infectious HCV in the serum is associated with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL hydrolyzes TRL within chylomicrons and VLDL but, independently of its catalytic activity, it has a bridging activity, mediating the hepatic uptake of chylomicrons and VLDL remnants. We previously showed that exogenously added LPL increases HCV binding to hepatoma cells by acting as a bridge between virus-associated lipoproteins and cell surface heparan sulfate, while simultaneously decreasing infection levels. We show here that LPL efficiently inhibits cell infection with two HCV strains produced in hepatoma cells or in primary human hepatocytes transplanted into uPA-SCID mice with fully functional human ApoB-lipoprotein profiles. Viruses produced in vitro or in vivo were separated on iodixanol gradients into low and higher density populations, and the infection of Huh 7.5 cells by both virus populations was inhibited by LPL. The effect of LPL depended on its enzymatic activity. However, the lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin restored only a minor part of HCV infectivity, suggesting an important role of the LPL bridging function in the inhibition of infection. We followed HCV cell entry by immunoelectron microscopy with anti-envelope and anti-core antibodies. These analyses demonstrated the internalization of virus particles into hepatoma cells and their presence in intracellular vesicles and associated with lipid droplets. In the presence of LPL, HCV was retained at the cell surface. We conclude that LPL efficiently inhibits HCV infection by acting on TRL associated with HCV particles through mechanisms involving its lipolytic function, but mostly its bridging function. These mechanisms lead to immobilization of the virus at the cell

  9. Characterization of Two Metal Binding Lipoproteins as Vaccine Candidates for Enterococcal Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Romero-Saavedra

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecium and faecalis are Gram-positive opportunistic pathogens that have become leading causes of nosocomial infections over the last decades. Especially multidrug resistant enterococci have become a challenging clinical problem worldwide. Therefore, new treatment options are needed and the identification of alternative targets for vaccine development has emerged as a feasible alternative to fight the infections caused by these pathogens.We extrapolate the transcriptomic data from a mice peritonitis infection model in E. faecalis to identify putative up-regulated surface proteins under infection conditions in E. faecium. After the bionformatic analyses two metal binding lipoproteins were identified to have a high homology (>72% between the two species, the manganese ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (PsaAfm, and the zinc ABC transporter substrate-binding lipoprotein (AdcAfm. These candidate lipoproteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The recombinant proteins were used to produce rabbit polyclonal antibodies that were able to induce specific opsonic antibodies that mediated killing of the homologous strain E. faecium E155 as well as clinical strains E. faecium E1162, Enterococcus faecalis 12030, type 2 and type 5. Mice were passively immunized with the antibodies raised against recombinant lipoproteins, showing significant reduction of colony counts in mice livers after the bacterial challenge and demonstrating the efficacy of these metal binding lipoproteins as promising vaccine candidates to treat infections caused by these enterococcal pathogens.Overall, our results demonstrate that these two metal binding lipoproteins elicited specific, opsonic and protective antibodies, with an extensive cross-reactivity and serotype-independent coverage among these two important nocosomial pathogens. Pointing these two protein antigens as promising immunogens, that can be used as single components or as carrier

  10. Growth and development of maize that contains mutant tubulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Wick

    2004-07-23

    Mutant maize plants containing a Mu transposon disrupting one of the five beta tubulin genes of interest were followed for several generations and hybridized with each other to produce plants containing disruptions in both copies of a single gene or disruption of more than one tubulin gene. Seedlings of some of these plants were grown under chilling conditions for a few weeks. After DOE funding ended, plants have been assessed to see whether mutant are more or less tolerant to chilling. Other mutant plants will be assessed for their male and female fertility relative to non-mutant siblings or other close relatives.

  11. Sphingolipid synthesis deficiency in a mutant of Bacteroides levii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumleve, B.; Lev, M.

    1986-05-01

    Bacteroides levii, an anaerobic bacterium, synthesizes two sphingolipids; the sphingomyelin analogue, ceramide phosphorylethanolamine (CPE), and also ceramide phosphorylglycerol (CPG). The first enzyme in the sphingolipid pathway, 3-ketodihydro-sphingosine (3KDS) synthase, has been partially purified previously. To study subsequent steps in the pathways, mutants defective in sphingolipid synthesis were derived by ethyl methanesulfonate and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Extracts of the mutant, 1075BB, show synthase activity although the cells do not synthesize CPE or CPG. The mutant differs from the wild type in that: (1) synthase activity was much diminished in the mutant, (2) sphingolipid synthesis does not occur in the mutant as evidenced by the absence of spots at sites where CPE and CPG migrate following two-dimensional thin layer chromatography, (3) incorporation of uniformly-labelled (/sup 14/C)serine carbon or (/sup 14/C)3KDS into sphingolipids was not observed in the mutant, (4) following incubation with (/sup 14/C)3KDS, radioactivity corresponding to dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and ceramide were observed in the mutant; no (/sup 14/C)DHS was detected in the wild type, and (5) enhanced incorporation of (/sup 14/C)serine carbon into two lipids not containing phosphorus was found in the mutant. The authors conclude, therefore, that this mutant, 1075BB, has a metabolic block at the terminal biosynthetic steps of sphingolipid synthesis.

  12. Large-scale preparation of the homogeneous LolA–lipoprotein complex and efficient in vitro transfer of lipoproteins to the outer membrane in a LolB-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Shoji; Oguchi, Yuki; Yokota, Naoko; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli releases lipoproteins destined to the outer membrane from the inner membrane as a complex with a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. Interaction of the LolA–lipoprotein complex with an outer membrane receptor, LolB, then causes localization of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. As far as examined, formation of the LolA–lipoprotein complex strictly depends on ATP hydrolysis by the LolCDE complex in the presence of LolA. It has be...

  13. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Ossoli

    Full Text Available Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT deficiency (FLD is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis.

  14. Human endothelial progenitor cells internalize high-density lipoprotein.

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    Kaemisa Srisen

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs originate either directly from hematopoietic stem cells or from a subpopulation of monocytes. Controversial views about intracellular lipid traffic prompted us to analyze the uptake of human high density lipoprotein (HDL, and HDL-cholesterol in human monocytic EPCs. Fluorescence and electron microscopy were used to investigate distribution and intracellular trafficking of HDL and its associated cholesterol using fluorescent surrogates (bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, cytochemical labels and fluorochromes including horseradish peroxidase and Alexa Fluor® 568. Uptake and intracellular transport of HDL were demonstrated after internalization periods from 0.5 to 4 hours. In case of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568, bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, a photooxidation method was carried out. HDL-specific reaction products were present in invaginations of the plasma membrane at each time of treatment within endocytic vesicles, in multivesicular bodies and at longer periods of uptake, also in lysosomes. Some HDL-positive endosomes were arranged in form of "strings of pearl"- like structures. HDL-positive multivesicular bodies exhibited intensive staining of limiting and vesicular membranes. Multivesicular bodies of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568-treated EPCs showed multilamellar intra-vacuolar membranes. At all periods of treatment, labeled endocytic vesicles and organelles were apparent close to the cell surface and in perinuclear areas around the Golgi apparatus. No HDL-related particles could be demonstrated close to its cisterns. Electron tomographic reconstructions showed an accumulation of HDL-containing endosomes close to the trans-Golgi-network. HDL-derived bodipy-cholesterol was localized in endosomal vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes and in many of the stacked Golgi cisternae and the trans-Golgi-network Internalized HDL-derived bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was channeled into the lysosomal

  15. Lipoproteins attenuate TLR2 and TLR4 activation by bacteria and bacterial ligands with differences in affinity and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Rutten, Lieke; Garssen, Johan; Vos, Arjan P; Hartog, Anita

    2016-10-28

    The small intestine is a specialized compartment were close interactions take place between host, microbes, food antigens and dietary fatty acids. Dietary fats get absorbed by epithelial cells and processed into a range of lipoprotein particles after which they are basolaterally secreted and collected in the lymphatics. In contrast to the colon, the small intestine is covered only by a thin mucus coat that allows for intimate interactions between host-cells and microbes. Lipoproteins have long been recognized as protective factors in infectious diseases via the neutralization of bacterial toxins like lipopolysaccharides. Much less attention has been given to the potential role of lipoproteins as factors contributing to the maintenance of small intestinal immune homeostasis via modulating bacteria-induced immune responses. Lipoproteins VLDL, LDL and HDL were found to neutralize TLR responses towards specific TLR-ligands or a selection of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Attenuation of TLR2 activity was acute and only slightly improved by longer pre-incubation times of ligands and lipoproteins with no differences between bacterial-lipopeptides or bacteria. In contrast, attenuation of TLR4 responses was only observed after extensive preincubation of lipoproteins and LPS. Preincubation of bacteria and lipoproteins led only to a modest attenuation of TLR4 activity. Moreover, compared to TLR2, TLR4 activity could only be attenuated by lipoproteins over a small ligand dose range. These results demonstrate the ability of lipoproteins VLDL, LDL and HDL to inhibit TLR responses towards bacterial-ligands and bacteria. Presence of lipoproteins was found to modulate the MAMP-induced cytokine release by primary human monocytes measured as changes in the release of IL-6, TNFα, GM-CSF and IFNγ. Using TLR2 and TLR4-reporter cells, lipoproteins were found to inhibit TLR responses with differences in affinity and kinetics. These data establish a role for lipoproteins as

  16. Therapeutic targeting of p53: all mutants are equal, but some mutants are more equal than others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, Kanaga; Lane, David P

    2017-09-26

    TP53, which encodes the tumour-suppressor protein p53, is the most frequently mutated gene across all cancer types. The presence of mutant p53 predisposes to cancer development, promotes the survival of cancer cells, and is associated with ineffective therapeutic responses and unfavourable prognoses. Despite these effects, no drug that abrogates the oncogenic functions of mutant p53 has yet been approved for the treatment of cancer. Current investigational therapeutic strategies are mostly aimed at restoring the wild-type activity of mutant p53, based on the assumption that all p53 mutants are functionally equal. Our increasing knowledge of mutant forms of p53, however, supports the antithetical hypothesis that not all p53 mutants have equivalent cellular effects; hence, a judicious approach to therapeutic targeting of mutant p53 is required. In this Review, we propose a categorization of the major classes of p53 mutants based on their functionality in tumour suppression and response to therapy. The emerging picture is that the mutations across TP53 form a 'rainbow of mutants', with varying degrees of functionality and different pathobiological consequences, necessitating the use of diverse therapeutic strategies to selectively target specific classes of mutation. The utility of this knowledge of TP53 mutations in developing selective therapeutic options, and in facilitating clinical decision-making is discussed.

  17. Prevacuolar compartment morphology in vps mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Jamie M; Eggleston, Matthew D; Attryde, Amanda L; Marshall, Pamela A

    2007-10-01

    Over 60 genes have been identified that affect protein sorting to the lysosome-like vacuole in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells with mutations in these vacuolar protein sorting (vps) genes fall into seven general classes based upon their vacuolar morphology. Class A mutants have a morphologically wild type vacuole, while Class B mutants have a fragmented vacuole. There is no discernable vacuolar structure in Class C mutants. Class D mutants have a slightly enlarged vacuole, but Class E mutants have a normal looking vacuole with an enlarged prevacuolar compartment (PVC), which is analogous to the mammalian late endosome. Class F mutants have a wild type appearing vacuole as well as fragmented vacuolar structures. vps mutants have also been found with a tubulo-vesicular vacuole structure. vps mutant morphology is pertinent, as mutants of the same class may work together and/or have a block in the same general step in the vacuolar protein sorting pathway. We probed PVC morphology and location microscopically in live cells of several null vps mutants using a GFP fusion protein of Nhx1p, an Na(+)/H(+) exchanger normally localized to the PVC. We show that cell strains deleted for VPS proteins that have been previously shown to work together, regardless of VPS Class, have the same PVC morphology. Cell strains lacking VPS genes that have not been implicated in the same pathway show different PVC morphologies, even if the mutant strains are in the same VPS Class. These new studies indicate that PVC morphology is another tier of classification that may more accurately identify proteins that function together in vacuolar protein sorting than the original vps mutation classes.

  18. 10 October 2013 - D. Braun First Deputy Minister for Regional Development, Czech Republic, P. Styczeń Deputy Minister of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy, Republic of Poland and F. Palko State Secretary, Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development, Slovak Republic visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group Leader J. M. Jimenez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    10 October 2013 - D. Braun First Deputy Minister for Regional Development, Czech Republic, P. Styczeń Deputy Minister of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy, Republic of Poland and F. Palko State Secretary, Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development, Slovak Republic visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group Leader J. M. Jimenez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

  19. Lipoprotein lipase and PPAR alpha gene polymorphisms, increased very-low-density lipoprotein levels, and decreased high-density lipoprotein levels as risk markers for the development of visceral leishmaniasis by Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Márcia Dias Teixeira; Alonso, Diego Peres; Vendrame, Célia Maria Vieira; Costa, Dorcas Lamounier; Costa, Carlos Henrique Nery; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; Goto, Hiro

    2014-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis (VL) endemic areas, a minority of infected individuals progress to disease since most of them develop protective immunity. Therefore, we investigated the risk markers of VL within nonimmune sector. Analyzing infected symptomatic and, asymptomatic, and noninfected individuals, VL patients presented with reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), elevated triacylglycerol (TAG), and elevated very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) levels. A polymorphism analysis of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene using HindIII restriction digestion (N = 156 samples) (H+ = the presence and H- = the absence of mutation) revealed an increased adjusted odds ratio (OR) of VL versus noninfected individuals when the H+/H+ was compared with the H-/H- genotype (OR = 21.3; 95% CI = 2.32-3335.3; P = 0.003). The H+/H+ genotype and the H+ allele were associated with elevated VLDL-C and TAG levels (P resistance to infection. The mutated LPL and the PPARα Leu/Val genotypes may be considered risk markers for the development of VL.

  20. Lifestyle intervention improves lipoprotein particle size and distribution without weight loss in obese Latino adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, J R; Vega-López, S; Ortega, R; Konopken, Y; Shaibi, G Q

    2013-10-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with a pro-atherogenic phenotype contributing to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This single-arm pilot study examined the effects of a lifestyle intervention on lipoprotein particle size and cholesterol distribution in obese Latino adolescents. Fifteen obese Latino adolescents (15.0 ± 1.0 years) completed a 12-week nutrition education and exercise intervention. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size and distribution of cholesterol in lipoprotein subclasses were determined via polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The intervention resulted in increases in mean LDL particle size (269.3 ± 3.4 to 271.6 ± 2.9 Å, P = 0.0003) and cholesterol in large high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions (22.4 ± 11.2 to 26.8 ± 10.6% area, P = 0.007) along with decreases of cholesterol in small LDL (1.6 ± 2.0 to 0.6 ± 1.2% area, P  0.05) and suggest that lifestyle modification in obese youth may reduce cardiovascular risk by shifting lipoprotein particle size and cholesterol distribution to a less atherogenic phenotype. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.