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Sample records for brassicacea family analysed

  1. Arsenic absorption by members of the Brassicacea family, analysed by neutron activation, k{sub 0}-method - preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, George; Matos, Ludmila Vieira da Silva; Silva, Maria Aparecida da; Ferreira, Alexandre Santos Martorano; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros Correia [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: george@cdtn.br, e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Thailand and the United States of America and also in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities has been contributing to aggravate natural contamination. Brassicacea is a plant family with edible species (arugula, cabbage, cauliflower, cress, kale, mustard, radish), ornamental ones (alysssum, field pennycress, ornamental cabbages and kales) and some species are known as metal and metalloid accumulators (Indian mustard, field pennycress), like chromium, nickel, and arsenic. The present work aimed at studying other taxa of the Brassicaceae family to verify their capability in absorbing arsenic, under controlled conditions, for possible utilisation in remediation activities. The analytical method chosen was neutron activation analysis, k{sub 0} method, a routine technique at CDTN, and also very appropriate for arsenic studies. To avoid possible interference from solid substrates, like sand or vermiculite, attempts were carried out to keep the specimens in 1/4 Murashige and Skoog basal salt solution (M and S). Growth was stumped, plants withered and perished, showing that modifications in M and S had to be done. The addition of nickel and silicon allowed normal growth of the plant specimens, for periods longer than usually achieved (more than two months); yielding samples large enough for further studies with other techniques, like ICP-MS, and other targets, like speciation studies. The results of arsenic absorption are presented here and the need of nickel and silicon in the composition of M and S is discussed. (author)

  2. Molecular Resources from Transcriptomes in the Brassicaceae Family

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    Lua Lopez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly falling costs and the increasing availability of large DNA sequence data sets facilitate the fast and affordable mining of large molecular markers data sets for comprehensive evolutionary studies. The Brassicaceae (mustards are an important species-rich family in the plant kingdom with taxa distributed worldwide and a complex evolutionary history. We performed Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs mining using de novo assembled transcriptomes from 19 species across the Brassicaceae in order to study SSR evolution and provide comprehensive sets of molecular markers for genetic studies within the family. Moreover, we selected the genus Cochlearia to test the transferability and polymorphism of these markers among species. Additionally, we annotated Cochlearia pyrenaica transcriptome in order to identify the position of each of the mined SSRs. While we introduce a new set of tools that will further enable evolutionary studies across the Brassicaceae, we also discuss some broader aspects of SSR evolution. Overall, we developed 2012 ready-to-use SSR markers with their respective primers in 19 Brassicaceae species and a high quality annotated transcriptome for C. pyrenaica. As indicated by our transferability test with the genus Cochlearia these SSRs are transferable to species within the genus increasing exponentially the number of targeted species. Also, our polymorphism results showed substantial levels of variability for these markers. Finally, despite its complex evolutionary history, SSR evolution across the Brassicaceae family is highly conserved and we found no deviation from patterns reported in other Angiosperms.

  3. Reproduction on orbit by plants in the Brassicaceae family

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    Musgrave, Mary E.; Kuang, Anxiu; Xiao, Ying; Matthews, Sharon W.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies on growth and development during spaceflight had indicated that the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth was particularly difficult for plants. Our objective has been to study how the spaceflight environment impacts the different steps in plant reproduction. This goal has been pursued in two general ways: by using plants that had been pre-grown to the flowering stage on earth, and by using plants that developed completely on orbit. Our objectives have been met by a combination of experiments that required essentially no crew time on orbit, and those that required an extensive commitment of crew time. The plants chosen for the studies were closely related members of the family Brassicaceae: Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. In a series of short-duration experiments with Arabidopsis on the space shuttle we found that depletion of carbon dioxide in closed chambers resulted in aborted development of both the male and female reproductive apparatus in microgravity. Normal development was restored by addition of carbon dioxide or by providing air flow. A subsequent shuttle experiment with Brassica utilizing hardware that provides a vigorous air flow confirmed embryo development following pollination on orbit. Brassica plants grown from seed on the Mir space station produced seed that germinated and grew when replanted on orbit. Future experiments will determine effects of multiple generations in space.

  4. Molecular Phylogenetics, Temporal Diversification, and Principles of Evolution in the Mustard Family (Brassicaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couvreur, T.L.P.; Franzke, A.; Al-Shehbaz, I.A.; Bakker, F.T.; Koch, M.A.; Mummenhoff, K.

    2010-01-01

    Brassicaceae is an important family at both the agronomic and scientific level. The family not only inlcudes several model species, but it is also becoming an evolutionary model at the family level. However, resolving the phylogenetic relationships within the family has been problematic, and a

  5. Characterization of the lignin polymer in Brassicaceae family

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    S. Hemmati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Residues of medicinal plants after extraction and weeds are suitable candidates for bioethanol production. Significant barriers exist to make the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstock to biofuel cost effective and environmentally friendly; one of which is the lignin polymer. Brassicaceae family is one of the potential targets for biofuel production. The structural characteristics of lignin from Hirschfeldia incana, Sisymbrium altissimum and Cardaria draba were studied in comparison to that of Brassica napus. Methods: Lignin deposition was observed by phloroglucinol and Mäule staining. The total lignin content was determined by Klason method. Maximum UV absorbance and FT-IR spectra were compared. Ratio of syringyl to guaiacyl lignin (S/G ratio as a metric of lignin digestibility was determined by DFRC followed by GC-MS analysis. 1H-NMR spectra of the total lignin was compared with other spectroscopic methods. Results: Staining of thestem cross sections of C. draba showed higher G units in contrast to the higher S units in S. altissimum which was in agreement with 1H-NMR analysis. Total lignin content for H. incana, C. draba and S. altissimum was 27.10%, 23.8% and 24.5%, respectively. The specific maximum UV absorbance appeared between 230-260 nm. FT-IR analysis confirmed the presence of more aromatic structures in the seed maturation stage than the flowering stage. S/G ratio was 0.26, 0.10 and 0.22 for H. incana, C. draba and S. altissimum, respectively.  Conclusion: Except Cardaria draba with the predominance of G subunits in lignin polymer, Hirschfeldia incana and Sisymbrium altissimum are suitable candidates for bioethanol production.

  6. Progesterone 5β-reductase genes of the Brassicaceae family as function-associated molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkert, J; Costa, C; Budeanu, O; Petersen, J; Bertolucci, S; Fischer, G; Müller-Uri, F; Kreis, W

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to define progesterone 5β-reductases (P5βR, EC 1.3.99.6, enone 1,4-reductases) as function-associated molecular markers at the plant family level. Therefore cDNAs were isolated from 25 Brassicaceae species, including two species, Erysimum crepidifolium and Draba aizoides, known to produce cardiac glycosides. The sequences were used in a molecular phylogeny study. The cladogram created is congruent to the existing molecular analyses. Recombinant His-tagged forms of the P5βR cDNAs from Aethionema grandiflorum, Draba aizoides, Nasturtium officinale, Raphanus sativus and Sisymbrium officinale were expressed in E. coli. Enone 1,4-reductase activity was demonstrated in vitro using progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one as substrates. Evidence is provided that functional P5βRs are ubiquitous in the Brassicaceae. The recombinant P5βR enzymes showed different substrate preferences towards progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one. Sequence comparison of the catalytic pocket of the P5βR enzymes and homology modelling using Digitalis lanata P5βR (PDB ID: 2V6G) as template highlighted the importance of the hydrophobicity of the binding pocket for substrate discrimination. It is concluded that P5βR genes or P5βR proteins can be used as valuable function-associated molecular markers to infer taxonomic relationship and evolutionary diversification from a metabolic/catalytic perspective. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  7. Plastome phylogeny and early diversification of Brassicaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xinyi; Liu, Jianquan; Hao, Guoqian; Zhang, Lei; Mao, Kangshan; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Dan; Ma, Tao; Hu, Quanjun; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A.; Koch, Marcus A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The family Brassicaceae encompasses diverse species, many of which have high scientific and economic importance. Early diversifications and phylogenetic relationships between major lineages or clades remain unclear. Here we re-investigate Brassicaceae phylogeny with complete plastomes from 51 species representing all four lineages or 5 of 6 major clades (A, B, C, E and F) as identified in earlier studies. Results Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses using a partiti...

  8. Glucosinolates in members of the family brassicaceae: separation and identification by LC/ESI-MS-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, B; Luftmann, H

    2000-06-01

    Seeds of 14 different members of the family Brassicaceae were investigated with regard to their content and composition of glucosinolates by HPLC-UV/ESI-MS-MS coupling. The seeds were extracted with hot methanol/water (70:30 v/v) and the desulfoglucosinolates isolated by anion-exchange chromatography with solid-phase extraction columns. The desulfoglucosinolates were detected by UV and identified by ESI-MS/MS with the neutral loss method. Nineteen different glucosinolates were detected in the seeds with a wide range of contents (10-200 micromol/g) and a great variation in the composition.

  9. Corolla monosymmetry: evolution of a morphological novelty in the Brassicaceae family.

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    Busch, Andrea; Horn, Stefanie; Mühlhausen, Andreas; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Zachgo, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    Evolution of floral monosymmetry is thought to be a major driving force of angiosperm radiation, making angiosperms the most successful land plant group in terms of species richness. Monosymmetry evolved from a polysymmetric ancestor repeatedly in different angiosperm lineages, where it likely facilitated diversification through the interaction with insects. Most monosymmetric taxa are thus dominated by monosymmetric members. However, in the Brassicaceae, only few members develop a monosymmetric corolla with two petal pairs of unequal size, making them an ideal system to study the evolution of molecular mechanisms enhancing flower complexity. Monosymmetry is controlled by the TCP transcription factors that belong to the CYC2 clade in distantly related taxa. In Iberis amara, the first crucifer analyzed in terms of monosymmetry development, unequal corolla formation is due to a stronger CYC2 clade gene expression in the smaller adaxial petals compared with the larger abaxial ones. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the crucifer family reveals that the monosymmetric genera Iberis, Calepina, and Teesdalia belong to one major crucifer lineage. Monosymmetry is most pronounced in Iberis and less so in Calepina and Teesdalia, with a positive dosage-dependent correlation between the strength of a CYC2 expression difference and the extent of monosymmetry formation. An early adaxial CYC2 expression in floral meristems, observed in many distantly related taxa, might have facilitated the repeated evolution of CYC2-controlled monosymmetry. Comparison of early and late CYC2 expression in monosymmetric and polysymmetric crucifers representative for the four major crucifer lineages reveals that an adaxial CYC2 expression in floral meristems is likely ancestral for the Brassicaceae. However, it got lost in all analyzed monosymmetric members and is, as such, not a prerequisite for the establishment of corolla monosymmetry in crucifers. Here, monosymmetry evolved via a heterochronic CYC2

  10. Effect of sulfur fertilization on the sanitary state of plants of the family Brassicaceae

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    Tomasz P. Kurowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out in the years 2006-2008 in Bałcyny (N=53°35'49"; E=19°51'20". The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sulfur fertilization on the sanitary state of spring oilseed rape, winter oilseed rape, white mustard and Chinese mustard as well as on the species composition of fungi colonizing their seeds. Sulfur fertilization had a beneficial effect on the health of Brassicaceae plants infested by Alternaria blight, grey mould, Sclerotinia stem rot, Phoma stem canker and Verticillium wilt, but it had a varying effect on the occurrence of powdery mildew. Alternaria alternata and Penicillium spp. were isolated most frequently from Brassicaceae seeds. In general, more fungi (including pathogenic to Brassicaceae were isolated from the seeds of plants grown in non-sulfur fertilized plots. Pathogens occurred primarily on the seed surface, and their number decreased after surface disinfection of seeds.

  11. The Brassicaceae family displays divergent, shoot-skewed NLR resistance gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, David; Gupta, Vikas; Bachmann, Asger

    2018-01-01

    ,235 NLRs from 9 plant species. We found stable NLR root/shoot expression ratios within species, suggesting organ-specific hardwiring of NLR expression patterns in anticipation of distinct challenges. Most monocot and dicot plant species preferentially expressed NLRs in roots. In contrast, Brassicaceae...... species, including oilseed rape and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, were unique in showing NLR expression skewed towards the shoot across multiple phylogenetically distinct groups of NLRs. The Brassicaceae are also outliers in the sense that they have lost the common symbiosis signaling pathway...

  12. Determination of S-methyl-L-methionine (SMM) from Brassicaceae Family Vegetables and Characterization of the Intestinal Transport of SMM by Caco-2 Cells.

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    Song, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Hae-Rim; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the current study were to determine S-methyl-L-methionine (SMM) from various Brassicaceae family vegetables by using validated analytical method and to characterize the intestinal transport mechanism of SMM by the Caco-2 cells. The SMM is well known to provide therapeutic activity in peptic ulcers. The amount of SMM from various Brassicaceae family vegetables ranged from 89.08 ± 1.68 μg/g to 535.98 ± 4.85 μg/g of dry weight by using validated ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry method. For elucidating intestinal transport mechanism, the cells were incubated with or without transport inhibitors, energy source, or a metabolic inhibitor. Phloridzin and verapamil as inhibitors of sodium glucose transport protein (SGLT1) and P-glycoprotein, respectively, were not responsible for cellular uptake of SMM. Glucose and sodium azide were not affected by the cellular accumulation of SMM. The efflux ratio of SMM was 0.26, implying that it is not effluxed through Caco-2 cells. The apparent coefficient permeability (Papp ) of SMM was 4.69 × 10(-5) cm/s, indicating that it will show good oral absorption in in vivo. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  13. Biosystematic studies on Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) in Egypt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdel Khalik, K.N.E.

    2002-01-01

    The present work deals with a systematic investigation of 45 taxa belonging to 23 genera of the tribes Arabideae, Euclidieae, Hesperideae, Lunarieae, Matthioleae and Sisymbrieae of the family Brassicaceae from Egypt. This work is largely based on herbarium material

  14. Consequences of Whole-Genome Triplication as Revealed by Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum and Three Other Brassicaceae Species[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghe, Gaurav D.; Hufnagel, David E.; Tang, Haibao; Xiao, Yongli; Dworkin, Ian; Town, Christopher D.; Conner, Jeffrey K.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidization events are frequent among flowering plants, and the duplicate genes produced via such events contribute significantly to plant evolution. We sequenced the genome of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum), a Brassicaceae species that experienced a whole-genome triplication event prior to diverging from Brassica rapa. Despite substantial gene gains in these two species compared with Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata, ∼70% of the orthologous groups experienced gene losses in R. raphanistrum and B. rapa, with most of the losses occurring prior to their divergence. The retained duplicates show substantial divergence in sequence and expression. Based on comparison of A. thaliana and R. raphanistrum ortholog floral expression levels, retained radish duplicates diverged primarily via maintenance of ancestral expression level in one copy and reduction of expression level in others. In addition, retained duplicates differed significantly from genes that reverted to singleton state in function, sequence composition, expression patterns, network connectivity, and rates of evolution. Using these properties, we established a statistical learning model for predicting whether a duplicate would be retained postpolyploidization. Overall, our study provides new insights into the processes of plant duplicate loss, retention, and functional divergence and highlights the need for further understanding factors controlling duplicate gene fate. PMID:24876251

  15. Deteksi dan Identifikasi Cendawan Terbawa Benih Brassicaceae

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    Anthoni Sulthan Harahap

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Seed quality is very critical in agricultural production, especially to gain high yield and reduce disease problems in the field. New diseases or pathogens is potentially entering a country through seed movement by import activity. This study aimed to detect and identify seed-borne fungi from Brassicaceae seeds imported from the United States and Malaysia. Seeds were incubated on 5 sheets of wet blotting paper at a temperature of 27–30 °C for 14 days following surface sterilization. Each fungus that grows on the seed was isolated on potato dextrose agar and malt extract agar for further morphological identification. The three fungi most commonly found either on the seed with or without surface-sterilization were Aspergillus flavus, Curvularia lunata and A. niger. All of the  fungi were a potential pathogen in the family Brassicaceae seeds and seedlings. Important pathogen in Brassicaceae crops, i.e. Phoma lingam was also found in small amounts and only on white pak choy seeds.

  16. Production of cybrids in Brassicaceae species.

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    Vasylenko, Maksym; Ovcharenko, Olga; Gleba, Yuri; Kuchuk, Nikolay

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes a method of cytoplasm transfer within the brassicaceae family through Ca-PEG-mediated protoplast fusion. The method includes a protocol of nonmutagenic albinism induction based on spectinomycin-induced plastid ribosome deficiency (PRD). The proposed application of spectinomycin-mediated albinism allows speeding up creation of albino lines, as well as of hybrid production with substituted cytoplasm. According to described method cybrids between Orychophragmus violaceus and Brassica napus, O. violaceus and Lesquerella fendleri have been produced. Methods of further molecular analysis are also presented. The time-scale and reliability of described methods are indicated.

  17. From species to trait evolution in Aethionema (Brassicaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadin, Setareh

    2017-01-01

    The plant family Brassicaceae (or crucifers) is an economically important group that includes many food crops (e.g. cabbages and radishes), horticultural species (e.g. Draba, Iberis, Lunaria), and model plant species (particularly Arabidopsis thaliana). Because of the fundamental importance of A.

  18. Secondary evolution of a self-incompatibility locus in the Brassicaceae genus Leavenworthia.

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    Sier-Ching Chantha

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (SI is the flowering plant reproductive system in which self pollen tube growth is inhibited, thereby preventing self-fertilization. SI has evolved independently in several different flowering plant lineages. In all Brassicaceae species in which the molecular basis of SI has been investigated in detail, the product of the S-locus receptor kinase (SRK gene functions as receptor in the initial step of the self pollen-rejection pathway, while that of the S-locus cysteine-rich (SCR gene functions as ligand. Here we examine the hypothesis that the S locus in the Brassicaceae genus Leavenworthia is paralogous with the S locus previously characterized in other members of the family. We also test the hypothesis that self-compatibility in this group is based on disruption of the pollen ligand-producing gene. Sequence analysis of the S-locus genes in Leavenworthia, phylogeny of S alleles, gene expression patterns, and comparative genomics analyses provide support for both hypotheses. Of special interest are two genes located in a non-S locus genomic region of Arabidopsis lyrata that exhibit domain structures, sequences, and phylogenetic histories similar to those of the S-locus genes in Leavenworthia, and that also share synteny with these genes. These A. lyrata genes resemble those comprising the A. lyrata S locus, but they do not function in self-recognition. Moreover, they appear to belong to a lineage that diverged from the ancestral Brassicaceae S-locus genes before allelic diversification at the S locus. We hypothesize that there has been neo-functionalization of these S-locus-like genes in the Leavenworthia lineage, resulting in evolution of a separate ligand-receptor system of SI. Our results also provide support for theoretical models that predict that the least constrained pathway to the evolution of self-compatibility is one involving loss of pollen gene function.

  19. Comparison in accumulation of lanthanide elements among three Brassicaceae plant sprouts.

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    Anan, Yasumi; Awaya, Yumi; Ogihara, Yurie; Yoshida, Miyuki; Yawata, Ayako; Ogra, Yasumitsu

    2012-07-01

    Three kinds of sprouts in the Brassicaceae family of plants, namely, pink kale, radish and mustard were evaluated for the possibility of phytoremediation of lanthanides. The mustard sprout more efficiently accumulated lanthanides (e.g. 0.26 nmol La/g) than other Brassicaceae family plant sprouts (0.16 nmol La/g in the radish), however the radish sprout showed the fastest growth among three sprouts. Faster growth compensated for less efficiency in lanthanide accumulation (28 pmol La in the radish vs. 12 pmol La in the mustard) indicating that the radish is the most preferable sprout for the phytoremediation of lanthanides.

  20. Chalcone synthase family genes have redundant roles in anthocyanin biosynthesis and in response to blue/UV-A light in turnip (Brassica rapa; Brassicaceae).

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    Zhou, Bo; Wang, Yu; Zhan, Yaguang; Li, Yuhua; Kawabata, Saneyuki

    2013-12-01

    The epidermis of Brassica rapa (turnip) cv. Tsuda contains light-induced anthocyanins, visible signs of activity of chalcone synthase (CHS), a key anthocyanin biosynthetic enzyme, which is encoded by the CHS gene family. To elucidate the regulation of this light-induced pigmentation, we isolated Brassica rapa CHS1-CHS6 (BrCHS1-CHS6) and characterized their cis-elements and expression patterns. Epidermises of light-exposed swollen hypocotyls (ESHS) were harvested to analyze transcription levels of BrCHS genes by real-time PCR. Different promoters for the genes were inserted into tobacco to examine pCHS-GUS activity by histochemistry. Yeast-one-hybridization was used to detect binding activity of BrCHS motifs to transcription factors. Transcript levels of BrCHS1, -4, and -5 and anthocyanin-biosynthesis-related genes F3H, DFR, and ANS were high, while those of BrCHS2, -3, and -6 were almost undetectable in pigmented ESHS. However, in leaves, CHS5, F3H, and ANS expression was higher than in nonpigmented ESHS, but transcription of DFR was not detected. In the analysis of BrCHS1 and BrCHS3 promoter activity, GUS activity was strong in pigmented flowers of BrPCHS1-GUS-transformed tobacco plants, but nearly absent in BrPCHS3-GUS-transformed plants. Transcript levels of regulators, BrMYB75 and BrTT8, were strongly associated with the anthocyanin content and were light-induced. Coregulated cis-elements were found in promoters of BrCHS1,-4, and -5, and BrMYB75 and BrTT8 had high binding activities to the BrCHS Unit 1 motif. The chalcone synthase gene family encodes a redundant set of light-responsive, tissue-specific genes that are expressed at different levels and are involved in flavonoid biosynthesis in Tsuda turnip.

  1. Underexplored biodiversity of Eastern Mediterranean biota: systematics and evolutionary history of the genus Aubrieta (Brassicaceae).

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    Koch, Marcus A; Karl, Robert; German, Dmitry A

    2017-01-01

    Aubrieta is a taxonomically difficult genus from the Brassicaceae family with approximately 20 species centred in Turkey and Greece. Species boundaries and their evolutionary history are poorly understood. Therefore, we analysed bio- and phylogeographic relationships and evaluated morphological variation to study the evolution of this genus. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence variation of nuclear-encoded loci and plastid DNA were used to unravel phylogeographic patterns. Morphometric analyses were conducted to study species delimitation. DNA sequence-based mismatch distribution and climate-niche analyses were performed to explain various radiations in space and time during the last 2·5 million years. Species groups largely show non-overlapping distribution patterns in the eastern Mediterranean and Asia Minor. We recognized 20 species and provide evidence for overlooked species, thereby highlighting taxonomical difficulties but also demonstrating underexplored species diversity. The centre of origin of Aubrieta is probably Turkey, from which various clades expanded independently towards Asia Minor, south to Lebanon and west to Greece and the Balkans during the Pleistocene. Pleistocene climatic fluctuations had a pronounced effect on Aubrieta speciation and radiation during the last 1·1 million years in the Eastern Mediterranean and Asia Minor. In contrast to many other Brassicaceae, speciation processes did not involve excessive formation of polyploids, but displayed formation of diploids with non-overlapping present-day distribution areas. Expansions from the Aubrieta centre of origin and primary centre of species diversity showed adaptation trends towards higher temperature and drier conditions. However, later expansion and diversification of taxa from within the second centre of species diversity in Greece started ∼0·19 Mya and were associated with a general transition of species adaptation towards milder temperatures and less dry conditions. © The

  2. Genomic analyses of the ancestral Manila family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Wan, Xuehua; Koster, Kent; Qian, Lishi; Desmond, Edward; Brostrom, Richard; Hou, Shaobin; Douglas, James T

    2017-01-01

    With its airborne transmission and prolonged latency period, Mycobacterium tuberculosis spreads worldwide as one of the most successful bacterial pathogens and continues to kill millions of people every year. M. tuberculosis lineage 1 is inferred to originate ancestrally based on the presence of the 52-bp TbD1 sequence and analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Previously, we briefly reported the complete genome sequencing of M. tuberculosis strains 96121 and 96075, which belong to the ancient Manila family and modern Beijing family respectively. Here we present the comprehensive genomic analyses of the Manila family in lineage 1 compared to complete genomes in lineages 2-4. Principal component analysis of the presence and absence of CRISPR spacers suggests that Manila isolate 96121 is distinctly distant from lineages 2-4. We further identify a truncated whiB5 gene and a putative operon consisting of genes encoding a putative serine/threonine kinase PknH and a putative ABC transporter, which are only found in the genomes of Manila family isolates. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms are uniquely conserved in 38 Manila strains. Moreover, when compared to M. tuberculosis H37Rv, 59 proteins are under positive selection in Manila family isolate 96121 but not in Beijing family isolate 96075. The unique features further serve as biomarkers for Manila strains and may shed light on the limited transmission of this ancestral lineage outside of its Filipino host population.

  3. Multivariate differential analyses of adolescents' experiences of aggression in families

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    Chris Myburgh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggression is part of South African society and has implications for the mental health of persons living in South Africa. If parents are aggressive adolescents are also likely to be aggressive and that will impact negatively on their mental health. In this article the nature and extent of adolescents' experiences of aggression and aggressive behaviour in the family are investigated. A deductive explorative quantitative approach was followed. Aggression is reasoned to be dependent on aspects such as self-concept, moral reasoning, communication, frustration tolerance and family relationships. To analyse the data from questionnaires of 101 families (95 adolescents, 95 mothers and 91 fathers Cronbach Alpha, various consecutive first and second order factor analyses, correlations, multiple regression, MANOVA, ANOVA and Scheffè/ Dunnett tests were used. It was found that aggression correlated negatively with the independent variables; and the correlations between adolescents and their parents were significant. Regression analyses indicated that different predictors predicted aggression. Furthermore, differences between adolescents and their parents indicated that the experienced levels of aggression between adolescents and their parents were small. Implications for education are given.

  4. A novel indirect defence in Brassicaceae: structure and function of extrafloral nectaries in Brassica juncea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathur, V.; Wagenaar, R.; Caissard, J.C.; Reddy, A.S.; Vet, L.E.M.; Cortesero, A.M.; Dam, van N.M.

    2013-01-01

    While nectaries are commonly found in flowers, some plants also form extrafloral nectaries on stems or leaves. For the first time in the family Brassicaceae, here we report extrafloral nectaries in Brassica juncea. The extrafloral nectar (EFN) was secreted from previously amorphic sites on stems,

  5. A novel indirect defence in Brassicaceae: Structure and function of extrafloral nectaries in Brassica juncea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathur, V.; Wagenaar, R.; Caissard, J.C.; Sankara Reddy, A.; Vet, L.E.M.; Cortesero, A.M.; Van Dam, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    While nectaries are commonly found in flowers, some plants also form extrafloral nectaries on stems or leaves. For the first time in the family Brassicaceae, here we report extrafloral nectaries in Brassica juncea. The extrafloral nectar (EFN) was secreted from previously amorphic sites on stems,

  6. Comparison of the emergence of three Brassicaceae species of different origins grown in Spain and USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thlaspi arvense, Camelina sativa, C. microcarpa and Neslia paniculata are four Brassicaceae family species that are becoming rare in North-Eastern Spain. Conversely, both T. arvense and C. sativa are being investigated as oilseed crops in North America for industrial/biofuel purposes. C. microcarpa ...

  7. Phylogenetic relationships in Brassicaceae tribe Alysseae inferred from nuclear ribosomal and chloroplast DNA sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rešetnik, Ivana; Satovic, Zlatko; Schneeweiss, Gerald M; Liber, Zlatko

    2013-12-01

    Numerous molecular systematic studies within Brassicaceae have resulted in a strongly improved classification of the family, as morphologically defined units at and above the generic level were often found to poorly reflect phylogenetic relationships. Here, we focus on tribe Alysseae, which despite its size (accounting for about 7% of all species) has only received limited coverage in previous phylogenetic studies. Specifically, we want to test phylogenetic hypotheses implied by current tribal and generic circumscriptions and to put diversification within tribe Alysseae into a temporal context. To this end, sequence data from the nrDNA ITS and two plastid regions (ndhF gene, trnL-F intergenic spacer) were obtained for 176 accessions, representing 16 out of 17 currently recognized genera of the tribe, and were phylogenetically analysed, among others, using a relaxed molecular clock. Due to large discrepancies with respect to published ages of Brassicaceae, age estimates concerning Alysseae are, however, burdened with considerable uncertainty. The tribe is monophyletic and contains four strongly supported major clades and Alyssum homalocarpum, whose relationships among each other remain uncertain due to incongruences between nuclear and plastid DNA markers. The largest genus of the tribe, Alyssum, is not monophyletic and contains, apart from A. homalocarpum, two distinct lineages, corresponding to sections Alyssum, Psilonema, Gamosepalum and to sections Odontarrhena and Meniocus, respectively. Clypeola, whose monophyly is supported only by the plastid data, is very closely related to and possibly nested within the second Alyssum lineage. Species of the genus Fibigia intermingle with those of Alyssoides, Clastopus, Degenia, and Physoptychis, rendering Fibigia polyphyletic. The monotypic genera Leptoplax and Physocardamum are embedded in Bornmuellera. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolution and protein interactions of AP2 proteins in Brassicaceae: Evidence linking development and environmental responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Liping; Yin, Yue; You, Chenjiang; Pan, Qianli; Xu, Duo; Jin, Taijie; Zhang, Bailong; Ma, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Plants have evolved a large number of transcription factors (TF), which are enriched among duplicate genes, highlighting their roles in complex regulatory networks. The APETALA2/EREBP-like genes constitute a large plant TF family and participate in development and stress responses. To probe the conservation and divergence of AP2/EREBP genes, we analyzed the duplication patterns of this family in Brassicaceae and identified interacting proteins of representative Arabidopsis AP2/EREBP proteins. We found that many AP2/EREBP duplicates generated early in Brassicaceae history were quickly lost, but many others were retained in all tested Brassicaceae species, suggesting early functional divergence followed by persistent conservation. In addition, the sequences of the AP2 domain and exon numbers were highly conserved in rosids. Furthermore, we used 16 A. thaliana AP2/EREBP proteins as baits in yeast screens and identified 1,970 potential AP2/EREBP-interacting proteins, with a small subset of interactions verified in planta. Many AP2 genes also exhibit reduced expression in an anther-defective mutant, providing a possible link to developmental regulation. The putative AP2-interacting proteins participate in many functions in development and stress responses, including photomorphogenesis, flower development, pathogenesis, drought and cold responses, abscisic acid and auxin signaling. Our results present the AP2/EREBP evolution patterns in Brassicaceae, and support a proposed interaction network of AP2/EREBP proteins and their putative interacting proteins for further study. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of the GALACTINOL SYNTHASE Gene Family in Rapeseed and Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghai Fan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Galactinol synthase (GolS is a key enzyme in raffinose family oligosaccharide (RFO biosynthesis. The finding that GolS accumulates in plants exposed to abiotic stresses indicates RFOs function in environmental adaptation. However, the evolutionary relationships and biological functions of GolS family in rapeseed (Brassica napus and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum remain unclear. In this study, we identified 20 BnGolS and 9 NtGolS genes. Subcellular localization predictions showed that most of the proteins are localized to the cytoplasm. Phylogenetic analysis identified a lost event of an ancient GolS copy in the Solanaceae and an ancient duplication event leading to evolution of GolS4/7 in the Brassicaceae. The three-dimensional structures of two GolS proteins were conserved, with an important DxD motif for binding to UDP-galactose (uridine diphosphate-galactose and inositol. Expression profile analysis indicated that BnGolS and NtGolS genes were expressed in most tissues and highly expressed in one or two specific tissues. Hormone treatments strongly induced the expression of most BnGolS genes and homologous genes in the same subfamilies exhibited divergent-induced expression. Our study provides a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of GolS genes among the Brassicaceae and Solanaceae as well as an insight into the biological function of GolS genes in hormone response in plants.

  10. Distinct cell wall architectures in seed endosperms in representatives of the Brassicaceae and Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kieran J D; Dekkers, Bas J W; Steinbrecher, Tina; Walsh, Cherie T; Bacic, Antony; Bentsink, Leónie; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard; Knox, J Paul

    2012-11-01

    In some species, a crucial role has been demonstrated for the seed endosperm during germination. The endosperm has been shown to integrate environmental cues with hormonal networks that underpin dormancy and seed germination, a process that involves the action of cell wall remodeling enzymes (CWREs). Here, we examine the cell wall architectures of the endosperms of two related Brassicaceae, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the close relative Lepidium (Lepidium sativum), and that of the Solanaceous species, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The Brassicaceae species have a similar cell wall architecture that is rich in pectic homogalacturonan, arabinan, and xyloglucan. Distinctive features of the tobacco endosperm that are absent in the Brassicaceae representatives are major tissue asymmetries in cell wall structural components that reflect the future site of radicle emergence and abundant heteromannan. Cell wall architecture of the micropylar endosperm of tobacco seeds has structural components similar to those seen in Arabidopsis and Lepidium endosperms. In situ and biomechanical analyses were used to study changes in endosperms during seed germination and suggest a role for mannan degradation in tobacco. In the case of the Brassicaceae representatives, the structurally homogeneous cell walls of the endosperm can be acted on by spatially regulated CWRE expression. Genetic manipulations of cell wall components present in the Arabidopsis seed endosperm demonstrate the impact of cell wall architectural changes on germination kinetics.

  11. Complex networks of self-incompatibility signaling in the Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantikanjana, Titima; Nasrallah, Mikhail E; Nasrallah, June B

    2010-10-01

    The self-pollination barrier of self-incompatibility in the Brassicaceae is based on the activity of a polymorphic stigma receptor and its pollen ligand, whose allele-specific interaction triggers a signaling cascade within the stigma epidermal cell that culminates in the inhibition of pollen tube development. Recent analyses have identified signaling intermediates and revealed unexpected cross-talk between self-incompatibility signaling and pistil development. The self-incompatibility response is now thought to be based on a phosphorylation and ubiquitin-mediated degradation pathway that inhibits the secretion of factors required for successful pollination. Because manipulation of the identified signaling intermediates results in only partial disruption of the self-incompatibility reaction, this pathway likely functions in conjunction with other as-yet unidentified signaling pathways to effect complete inhibition of self-pollen. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolutionary analyses of non-family genes in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Li, Ting [ORNL; Yin, Hengfu [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    There are a large number of non-family (NF) genes that do not cluster into families with three or more members per genome. While gene families have been extensively studied, a systematic analysis of NF genes has not been reported. We performed comparative studies on NF genes in 14 plant species. Based on the clustering of protein sequences, we identified ~94 000 NF genes across these species that were divided into five evolutionary groups: Viridiplantae wide, angiosperm specific, monocot specific, dicot specific, and those that were species specific. Our analysis revealed that the NF genes resulted largely from less frequent gene duplications and/or a higher rate of gene loss after segmental duplication relative to genes in both lowcopy- number families (LF; 3 10 copies per genome) and high-copy-number families (HF; >10 copies). Furthermore, we identified functions enriched in the NF gene set as compared with the HF genes. We found that NF genes were involved in essential biological processes shared by all plant lineages (e.g. photosynthesis and translation), as well as gene regulation and stress responses associated with phylogenetic diversification. In particular, our analysis of an Arabidopsis protein protein interaction network revealed that hub proteins with the top 10% most connections were over-represented in the NF set relative to the HF set. This research highlights the roles that NF genes may play in evolutionary and functional genomics research.

  13. Evolutionary analyses of non-family genes in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Li, Ting [ORNL; Yin, Hengfu [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL

    2013-03-01

    There are a large number of non-family (NF) genes that do not cluster into families with three or more members per genome. While gene families have been extensively studied, a systematic analysis of NF genes has not been reported. We performed comparative studies on NF genes in 14 plant species. Based on the clustering of protein sequences, we identified ~94,000 NF genes across these species that were divided into five evolutionary groups: Viridiplantae-wide, angiosperm-specific, monocot-specific, dicot-specific, and those that were species-specific. Our analysis revealed that the NF genes resulted largely from less frequent gene duplications and/or a higher rate of gene loss after segmental duplication relative to genes in both low-copy-number families (LF; 3 10 copies per genome) and high-copy-number families (HF; >10 copies). Furthermore, we identified functions enriched in the NF gene set as compared with the HF genes. We found that NF genes were involved in essential biological processes shared by all plant lineages (e.g., photosynthesis and translation), as well as gene regulation and stress responses associated with phylogenetic diversification. In particular, our analysis of an Arabidopsis protein-protein interaction network revealed that hub proteins with the top 10% most connections were over-represented in the NF set relative to the HF set. This research highlights the roles that NF genes may play in evolutionary and functional genomics research.

  14. Evolution of genome size in Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J Spencer; Pepper, Alan E; Hall, Anne E; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Hodnett, George; Drabek, Janice; Lopez, Rebecca; Price, H James

    2005-01-01

    Brassicaceae, with nearly 340 genera and more than 3350 species, anchors the low range of angiosperm genome sizes. The relatively narrow range of DNA content (0.16 pg Lepidium virginicum and Brassica rapa. Branches in the phylogenetic tree that represent probable evolutionary increases in genome size terminate in Arabidopsis halleri, A. lyrata, Arabis hirsuta, Capsella rubella, Caulanthus heterophyllus, Crucihimalaya, Lepidium sativum, Sisymbrium and Thlaspi arvense. Branches within one clade containing Brassica were identified that represent two ancient ploidy events (2x to 4x and 4x to 6x) that were predicted from published comparative mapping studies.

  15. Cytoplasmic male sterility in Brassicaceae crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Bhat, Shripad R.

    2014-01-01

    Brassicaceae crops display strong hybrid vigor, and have long been subject to F1 hybrid breeding. Because the most reliable system of F1 seed production is based on cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), various types of CMS have been developed and adopted in practice to breed Brassicaceae oil seed and vegetable crops. CMS is a maternally inherited trait encoded in the mitochondrial genome, and the male sterile phenotype arises as a result of interaction of a mitochondrial CMS gene and a nuclear fertility restoring (Rf) gene. Therefore, CMS has been intensively investigated for gaining basic insights into molecular aspects of nuclear-mitochondrial genome interactions and for practical applications in plant breeding. Several CMS genes have been identified by molecular genetic studies, including Ogura CMS from Japanese radish, which is the most extensively studied and most widely used. In this review, we discuss Ogura CMS, and other CMS systems, and the causal mitochondrial genes for CMS. Studies on nuclear Rf genes and the cytoplasmic effects of alien cytoplasm on general crop performance are also reviewed. Finally, some of the unresolved questions about CMS are highlighted. PMID:24987289

  16. Evolution of CONSTANS Regulation and Function after Gene Duplication Produced a Photoperiodic Flowering Switch in the Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Samson; Rühl, Mark; de Montaigu, Amaury; Wötzel, Stefan; Coupland, George

    2015-09-01

    Environmental control of flowering allows plant reproduction to occur under optimal conditions and facilitates adaptation to different locations. At high latitude, flowering of many plants is controlled by seasonal changes in day length. The photoperiodic flowering pathway confers this response in the Brassicaceae, which colonized temperate latitudes after divergence from the Cleomaceae, their subtropical sister family. The CONSTANS (CO) transcription factor of Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of the Brassicaceae, is central to the photoperiodic flowering response and shows characteristic patterns of transcription required for day-length sensing. CO is believed to be widely conserved among flowering plants; however, we show that it arose after gene duplication at the root of the Brassicaceae followed by divergence of transcriptional regulation and protein function. CO has two close homologs, CONSTANS-LIKE1 (COL1) and COL2, which are related to CO by tandem duplication and whole-genome duplication, respectively. The single CO homolog present in the Cleomaceae shows transcriptional and functional features similar to those of COL1 and COL2, suggesting that these were ancestral. We detect cis-regulatory and codon changes characteristic of CO and use transgenic assays to demonstrate their significance in the day-length-dependent activation of the CO target gene FLOWERING LOCUS T. Thus, the function of CO as a potent photoperiodic flowering switch evolved in the Brassicaceae after gene duplication. The origin of CO may have contributed to the range expansion of the Brassicaceae and suggests that in other families CO genes involved in photoperiodic flowering arose by convergent evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. Evolutionary origins of Brassicaceae specific genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background All sequenced genomes contain a proportion of lineage-specific genes, which exhibit no sequence similarity to any genes outside the lineage. Despite their prevalence, the origins and functions of most lineage-specific genes remain largely unknown. As more genomes are sequenced opportunities for understanding evolutionary origins and functions of lineage-specific genes are increasing. Results This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the origins of lineage-specific genes (LSGs) in Arabidopsis thaliana that are restricted to the Brassicaceae family. In this study, lineage-specific genes within the nuclear (1761 genes) and mitochondrial (28 genes) genomes are identified. The evolutionary origins of two thirds of the lineage-specific genes within the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are also identified. Almost a quarter of lineage-specific genes originate from non-lineage-specific paralogs, while the origins of ~10% of lineage-specific genes are partly derived from DNA exapted from transposable elements (twice the proportion observed for non-lineage-specific genes). Lineage-specific genes are also enriched in genes that have overlapping CDS, which is consistent with such novel genes arising from overprinting. Over half of the subset of the 958 lineage-specific genes found only in Arabidopsis thaliana have alignments to intergenic regions in Arabidopsis lyrata, consistent with either de novo origination or differential gene loss and retention, with both evolutionary scenarios explaining the lineage-specific status of these genes. A smaller number of lineage-specific genes with an incomplete open reading frame across different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions are further identified as accession-specific genes, most likely of recent origin in Arabidopsis thaliana. Putative de novo origination for two of the Arabidopsis thaliana-only genes is identified via additional sequencing across accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana and closely related sister species

  18. Self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae crops: lessons for interspecific incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Nasrallah, June B

    2014-05-01

    Most wild plants and some crops of the Brassicaceae express self-incompatibility, which is a mechanism that allows stigmas to recognize and discriminate against "self" pollen, thus preventing self-fertilization and inbreeding. Self-incompatibility in this family is controlled by a single S locus containing two multiallelic genes that encode the stigma-expressed S-locus receptor kinase and its pollen coat-localized ligand, the S-locus cysteine-rich protein. Physical interaction between receptor and ligand encoded in the same S locus activates the receptor and triggers a signaling cascade that results in inhibition of "self" pollen. Sequence information for many S-locus haplotypes in Brassica species has spurred studies of dominance relationships between S haplotypes and of S-locus structure, as well as the development of methods for S genotyping. Furthermore, molecular genetic studies have begun to identify genes that encode putative components of the self-incompatibility signaling pathway. In parallel, standard genetic analysis and QTL analysis of the poorly understood interspecific incompatibility phenomenon have been initiated to identify genes responsible for the inhibition of pollen from other species by the stigma. Herewith, we review recent studies of self-incompatibility and interspecific incompatibility, and we propose a model in which a universal pollen-inhibition pathway is shared by these two incompatibility systems.

  19. Duplication and adaptive evolution of the COR15 genes within the highly cold-tolerant Draba lineage (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dangwei; Zhou, Jie; Meng, Lihua; Wang, Qingbiao; Xie, He; Guan, Yucheng; Ma, Zeyang; Zhong, Yang; Chen, Fan; Liu, Jianquan

    2009-07-15

    Plants have evolved diverse adaptive mechanisms that enable them to tolerate abiotic stresses, to varying degrees, and such stresses may have strongly influenced evolutionary changes at levels ranging from molecular to morphological. Previous studies on these phenomena have focused on the adaptive evolution of stress-related orthologous genes in specific lineages. However, heterogenetic evolution of the paralogous genes following duplication has only been examined in a very limited number of stress-response gene families. The COR15 gene encodes a low molecular weight protein that plays an important role in protecting plants from cold stresses. Although two different copies of this gene have been found in the model species, Arabidopsis thaliana, evolutionary patterns of this small gene family in plants have not been previously explored. In this study, we cloned COR15-like sequences and performed evolutionary analyses of these sequences (including those previously reported) in the highly cold-tolerant Draba lineage and related lineages of Brassicaceae. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that all COR15-like sequences clustered into four clades that corresponded well to the morphological lineages. Gene conversions were found to have probably occurred before/during the divergence of Brassica and Draba lineage. However, repeated, independent duplications of this gene have occurred in different lineages of Brassicaceae. Further comparisons of all sequences suggest that there have been significant inter-lineage differences in evolutionary rates between the duplicated and original genes. We assessed the likelihood that the differences between two well-supported gene subfamilies that appear to have originated from a single duplication, COR15a and COR15b, within the Draba lineage have been driven by adaptive evolution. Comparisons of their non-synonymous/synonymous substitution ratios and rates of predicted amino acid changes indicate that these two gene groups are evolving

  20. Phenotype and genotype analyses in seven families with dentinogenesis imperfecta or dentin dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Liu, Y; Liu, H; Yang, J; Zhang, F; Feng, H

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary dentin defects can be categorised into two classes according to their clinical manifestations: dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI), which includes three types (DGI-I, DGI-II and DGI-III), and dentin dysplasia (DD), which includes two types (DD-I and DD-II). This study investigated the phenotypic characteristics and genetic causes of hereditary dentin defects in seven Chinese families. Seven families affected with DGI-II, DGI-III or DD-II were enrolled. Clinical examinations were performed to determine the phenotypic characteristics, and DNA samples were collected for Sanger sequencing. Clinical diagnoses revealed DGI-II in five families, DGI-III in one family and DD-II in one family. Variants of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene were found in six of the seven families. Of these, c.52G>T was identified in two families. Each of the remaining four families had a different variant: c.2684delG, c.52-2A>G, c.1874-1877delACAG and c.3509-3521del13bp; the last three variants were novel. This is the first study to analyse all three important types of hereditary dentin defect and include comprehensive genetic analyses of both dentin sialoprotein and dentin phosphoprotein in Chinese families. This study expands the spectrum of DSPP variants, highlighting their associated phenotypic continuum. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Strategies for genetic association analyses combining unrelated case-control individuals and family trios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirea, Lucia; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Sun, Lei; Bull, Shelley B

    2012-07-01

    In genetic association studies, analyses integrating data or estimates from unrelated case-control individuals and case trios (case offspring and their parents) can increase statistical power to identify disease susceptibility loci. Data on control trios may also be available, but how and when their use is advantageous is less familiar and is described here. In addition, the authors examine assumptions and properties of hybrid analyses combining association estimates from unrelated case-control individuals together with case and control family trios, focusing on low-prevalence disease. One such assumption is absence of population stratification bias (PSB), a potential source of confounding in case-control analyses. For detection of PSB, the authors discuss 4 possible tests that assess equality between individual-level and family-based estimates. Furthermore, a weighted framework is presented, in which estimates from analyses combining unrelated individuals and families (most powerful but subject to PSB) and family-based analyses (robust to PSB) are weighted according to the observed PSB test P value. In contrast to existing hybrid designs that combine individuals and families only if no significant PSB is detected, the weighted framework does not require specification of an arbitrary PSB testing level to establish significance. The statistical methods are evaluated using simulations and applied to a candidate gene study of childhood leukemia (Quebec Childhood Leukemia Study, 1980-2000).

  2. Analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bent

    2007-01-01

    Analyse i Politiken om frynsegoder med udgangspunkt i bogen Occupational Welfare - Winners and Losers publiceret på Edward Elgar......Analyse i Politiken om frynsegoder med udgangspunkt i bogen Occupational Welfare - Winners and Losers publiceret på Edward Elgar...

  3. Isolation and sequence analysis of a chalcone synthase cDNA of Matthiola incana R. Br. (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epping, B; Kittel, M; Ruhnau, B; Hemleben, V

    1990-06-01

    A cDNA clone (pcM12) of the chalcone synthase (CHS) of Matthiola incana R. Br. (Brassicaceae) was isolated from a cDNA library, sequenced and analysed. It comprises the complete coding sequence for the CHS and 5' and 3' untranslated regions. The deduced amino acid sequence shows that the Matthiola incana CHS consists of 394 amino acid residues. Comparison with CHS amino acid sequences of other plants indicates more than 82% homology.

  4. The extracellular pollen coat in members of the Brassicaceae: composition, biosynthesis, and functions in pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D J

    2006-08-01

    I have used cellular and molecular genetic and bioinformatic approaches to characterise the components of the pollen coat in plants of the family Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis thaliana and several brassicas including Brassica napus, B. oleracea, and B. rapa. The pollen coat in these species is mostly made up of a unique mixture of lipids that is highly enriched in acylated compounds, such as sterol esters and phospholipids. These acyl lipids are characterised by an unusually high degree of saturation. The fatty acids typically contain 70-90% saturated acyl residues such as myristate, palmitate, and stearate. The major sterol components of the pollen coat are saturated fatty acyl esters of stigmasterol, campesterol, and campestdienol. In addition to lipids, the second major component of the pollen coat is a specific group of proteins that is dominated by a family of proteins that we term pollenins. Although pollenins are by far the major protein components of the pollen coat of members of the Brassicaceae, proteomic analysis reveals that there are several additional protein components, including lipases, protein kinases, a pectin esterase, and a caleosin. The biosynthesis of these lipids and proteins and their significance for overall pollen function are reviewed and discussed.

  5. The Chinese Family Assessment Instrument (C-FAI): Hierarchical Confirmatory Factor Analyses and Factorial Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Ma, Cecilia M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines the dimensionality and factorial invariance of the Chinese Family Assessment Instrument (C-FAI) using multigroup confirmatory factor analyses (MCFAs). Method: A total of 3,649 students responded to the C-FAI in a community survey. Results: Results showed that there are five dimensions of the C-FAI (communication,…

  6. Phylogenetic analyses suggest multiple changes of substrate specificity within the Glycosyl hydrolase 20 family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horner David S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-N-acetylhexosaminidases belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase 20 (GH20 family are involved in the removal of terminal β-glycosidacally linked N-acetylhexosamine residues. These enzymes, widely distributed in microorganisms, animals and plants, are involved in many important physiological and pathological processes, such as cell structural integrity, energy storage, pathogen defence, viral penetration, cellular signalling, fertilization, development of carcinomas, inflammatory events and lysosomal storage diseases. Nevertheless, only limited analyses of phylogenetic relationships between GH20 genes have been performed until now. Results Careful phylogenetic analyses of 233 inferred protein sequences from eukaryotes and prokaryotes reveal a complex history for the GH20 family. In bacteria, multiple gene duplications and lineage specific gene loss (and/or horizontal gene transfer are required to explain the observed taxonomic distribution. The last common ancestor of extant eukaryotes is likely to have possessed at least one GH20 family member. At least one gene duplication before the divergence of animals, plants and fungi as well as other lineage specific duplication events have given rise to multiple paralogous subfamilies in eukaryotes. Phylogenetic analyses also suggest that a second, divergent subfamily of GH20 family genes present in animals derive from an independent prokaryotic source. Our data suggest multiple convergent changes of functional roles of GH20 family members in eukaryotes. Conclusion This study represents the first detailed evolutionary analysis of the glycosyl hydrolase GH20 family. Mapping of data concerning physiological function of GH20 family members onto the phylogenetic tree reveals that apparently convergent and highly lineage specific changes in substrate specificity have occurred in multiple GH20 subfamilies.

  7. Signaling pathways regulated by Brassicaceae extract inhibit the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The goal of this study was identification signaling molecules mediated the formation of AGEs in brain of rats injected with CdCl2 and the role of camel whey proteins and Brassicaceae extract on formation of AGEs in brain. Methods: Ninety male rats were randomly grouped into five groups; Normal control (GpI) ...

  8. KEEFEKTIFAN LIMBAH TANAMAN BRASSICACEAE UNTUK PENGENDALI NEMATODA PURU AKAR (MELOIDOGYNE SPP. PADA MIKROPLOT DI LAPANGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jabal Nur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Effectivenes of Brassicaceae plant wastes to control the root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp. at a field microplot scale. Meloidogyne spp. is a soil borne pathogen that infects plant roots and causes root galls. Root knot nematodes can reduce crop production by 15 to 95%, so that the control measures are needed. One of the control methods is using plants as biofumigant. Plants of the family Brassicaceae were reported contain glucosinolate (GSL. During decomposition, GSL is hydrolized to isothiocyanates (ITS which is a highly toxic compound to soil organisms, including nematodes. The research objective was to determine the effectiveness of five Brassicaceous plant wastes, namely cabbage (B. oleracea var capitata, radish (Raphanus sativus, broccoli (B. oleracea var italica, chinese cabbage (B. chinensis and pakcoy (B. rapa var parachinensis to suppress root knot nematodes (RKN. The experiment was conducted on microplot scale in the field. The experimental design used was a 4x5 factorial CRD. The first factors are waste of Brassica and the second factors are the amount of Brassica wastes per microplot. The experiments were made in 6 replications. Application of 5 Brassica plant wastes at all doses tested effectively reduced the number of root knot by 45.65% to 94.43% and increased the average number of tomato fruits. Tomato plants grew better at microplots when treated with chinese cabbage and pakcoy wastes.

  9. Understanding of MYB Transcription Factors Involved in Glucosinolate Biosynthesis in Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mi-Suk; Kim, Jung Sun

    2017-09-14

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) are widely known secondary metabolites that have anticarcinogenic and antioxidative activities in humans and defense roles in plants of the Brassicaceae family. Some R2R3-type MYB (myeloblastosis) transcription factors (TFs) control GSL biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. However, studies on the MYB TFs involved in GSL biosynthesis in Brassica species are limited because of the complexity of the genome, which includes an increased number of paralog genes as a result of genome duplication. The recent completion of the genome sequencing of the Brassica species permits the identification of MYB TFs involved in GSL biosynthesis by comparative genome analysis with A. thaliana. In this review, we describe various findings on the regulation of GSL biosynthesis in Brassicaceae. Furthermore, we identify 63 orthologous copies corresponding to five MYB TFs from Arabidopsis, except MYB76 in Brassica species. Fifty-five MYB TFs from the Brassica species possess a conserved amino acid sequence in their R2R3 MYB DNA-binding domain, and share close evolutionary relationships. Our analysis will provide useful information on the 55 MYB TFs involved in the regulation of GSL biosynthesis in Brassica species, which have a polyploid genome.

  10. Comparison of Genome-Wide Association Methods in Analyses of Admixed Populations with Complex Familial Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Naveen; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Sørensen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ) levels. We also compared type-I error rates among models in analyses of publicly available human and dog datasets. The models corrected for none, one, or both structure levels. Correction for K was performed with linear mixed models incorporating familial relationships estimated from pedigrees or genetic......Population structure is known to cause false-positive detection in association studies. We compared the power, precision, and type-I error rates of various association models in analyses of a simulated dataset with structure at the population (admixture from two populations; P) and family (K...... and genomic relationships. In summary, in association studies using samples with both P and K, ancestries estimated using principal components or structured assignment were not sufficient to correct type-I errors. In such cases type-I errors may be controlled by use of linear mixed models with relationships...

  11. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Chinese cabbage, cauliflower, collards, garden cress, upland cress, water cress, kale, Chinese kale, Siberian kale, kohlrabi, mustard, pakchoi, radish, rape, rutabaga, and turnip. (a) General description. (1...

  12. Species delimitation and interspecific relationships of the genus Orychophragmus (Brassicaceae inferred from whole chloroplast genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIt is rather difficult to delimit recently diverged species and construct their interspecific relationships because of insufficient informative variations of sampled DNA fragments (Schluter, 2000; Arnold, 2006. The genome-scale sequence variations were found to increase the phylogenetic resolutions of both high- and low-taxonomic groups (e.g., Yoder et al., 2013; Lamichhaney et al., 2015. It is still expensive to collect nuclear genome variations between species for most none-model genera without the reference genome. However, chloroplast genomes (plastome are relatively easy to be assembled to examine interspecific relationships for phylogenetic analyses, especially in addressing unresolved relationship at low taxonomic levels (Wu et al., 2010; Nock et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2013; Huang et al., 2014; Carbonell-Caballero et al., 2015. Plastomes are haploid with maternal inheritance in most angiosperms (Corriveau and Coleman, 1988; Zhang and Liu, 2003; Hagemann, 2004 and are highly conservative in gene order and genome structure with rare recombinations (Jansen et al., 2007; Moore et al., 2010. In this study, we aimed to examine species delimitation and interspecific relationships in Orychophragmus through assembling chloroplast genomes of multiple individuals of tentatively delimited species (Hu et al., 2015a. Orychophragmus is a small genus in the mustard family (Brassicaceae, Cruciferae distributed in northern, central, and southeastern China (Zhou et al., 2001. Its plants have been widely cultivated as ornamentals, vegetables, or source of seed oil (Sun et al., 2011. Despite controversial species delimitations in the genus (Zhou et al., 1987; Tan et al., 1998; Wu and Zhao, 2003; Al-Shehbaz and Yang, 2000; Zhou et al., 2001; Sun et al., 2012, our recent study based on nuclear (nr ITS sequence variations suggested the recognition of seven species (Hu et al., 2015a. Orychophragmus is sister to Sinalliaria, which is a genus endemic

  13. Comparison of genome-wide association methods in analyses of admixed populations with complex familial relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen K Kadri

    Full Text Available Population structure is known to cause false-positive detection in association studies. We compared the power, precision, and type-I error rates of various association models in analyses of a simulated dataset with structure at the population (admixture from two populations; P and family (K levels. We also compared type-I error rates among models in analyses of publicly available human and dog datasets. The models corrected for none, one, or both structure levels. Correction for K was performed with linear mixed models incorporating familial relationships estimated from pedigrees or genetic markers. Linear models that ignored K were also tested. Correction for P was performed using principal component or structured association analysis. In analyses of simulated and real data, linear mixed models that corrected for K were able to control for type-I error, regardless of whether they also corrected for P. In contrast, correction for P alone in linear models was insufficient. The power and precision of linear mixed models with and without correction for P were similar. Furthermore, power, precision, and type-I error rate were comparable in linear mixed models incorporating pedigree and genomic relationships. In summary, in association studies using samples with both P and K, ancestries estimated using principal components or structured assignment were not sufficient to correct type-I errors. In such cases type-I errors may be controlled by use of linear mixed models with relationships derived from either pedigree or from genetic markers.

  14. Interspecific and intergeneric hybridization and chromosomal engineering of Brassicaceae crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yukio; Bang, Sang Woo

    2014-05-01

    In Brassicaceae crop breeding programs, wild relatives have been evaluated as genetic resources to develop new cultivars with biotic and abiotic stress resistance. This has become necessary because of the diversification of ecotypes of diseases and pests, changing food preferences, advances in production technology, the use of new approaches such as in vitro breeding programs, and the need for economical production of F1 seed. To produce potential new cultivars, interspecific and intergeneric hybridizations have been performed between cultivated species and between cultivated species and their wild relatives. Furthermore, interspecific and intergeneric hybrids have been successfully produced using embryo rescue techniques. In this paper, we review the interspecific and intergeneric incompatibilities between Brassicaceae crops and their wild relatives, and the production, characterization, and improvement of synthetic amphidiploid lines, alien gene introgression lines, alloplasmic lines, monosomic alien chromosome addition lines, and monosomic alien chromosome substitution lines. The goal is to provide useful materials to support practical breeding strategies and to study the genetic effects of individual chromosomes on plant traits, the number of genes that control a trait, their linkage relationships, and genetic improvement in Brassicaceae crops.

  15. Evolution of TWIN SISTER of FT (TSF Genes in Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunyan Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FT and its homolog, TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF, act redundantly as integrators in floral transition pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana. The evolution of these key flowering regulatory genes during Brassicaceae speciation has not been well studied; therefore, we investigated their evolution in 13 sequenced Brassicaceae species. While the phylogenetic analysis indicated that FT gene evolution has followed two independent lineage-specific routes, TSF evolution does not appear to have been completely consistent within the Brassicaceae lineage I and lineage II division. The two TSF copies in the Thellungiella genus were divided into A and B groups in the phylogenetic analysis. Examination of conserved non-coding sequences and conserved domains within a 5 kb region upstream of the TSF start codon revealed the same group division inferred by the phylogenetic analysis. In addition, TSF genes retained syntenic relationships among genes in the same group, but not between group A and group B. The two copies of the TSF gene in the Thellungiella species were syntenic to the TSF genes in group A and group B, respectively. We also identified TSF-A gene residues in the syntenic region of group B species, but no TSF-B residues could be found in the group A syntenic region. Therefore, we inferred that the TSF genes in lineage II species experienced a duplication event after diversification from lineage I. Following their split from Thellungiella, Brassica species lost the ancestral TSF gene and retained the duplicated copy.

  16. Control of corolla monosymmetry in the Brassicaceae Iberis amara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Andrea; Zachgo, Sabine

    2007-10-16

    Establishment of morphological novelties has contributed to the enormous diversification of floral architecture. One such novelty, flower monosymmetry, is assumed to have evolved several times independently during angiosperm evolution. To date, analysis of monosymmetry regulation has focused on species from taxa where monosymmetry prevails, such as the Lamiales and Fabaceae. In Antirrhinum majus, formation of a monosymmetric corolla is specified by the activity of the TCP transcription factors CYCLOIDEA (CYC) and DICHOTOMA (DICH). It was shown that establishment of monosymmetry likely requires an early asymmetric floral expression of CYC homologs that needs to be maintained until late floral stages. To understand how CYC homologs might have been recruited during evolution to establish monosymmetry, we characterized the likely CYC ortholog IaTCP1 from Iberis amara (Brassicaceae). Species of the genus Iberis form a monosymmetric corolla, whereas the Brassicaceae are otherwise dominated by genera developing a polysymmetric corolla. Instead of four equally sized petals, I. amara produces two small adaxial and two large abaxial petals. The timing of IaTCP1 expression differs from that of its Arabidopsis homolog TCP1 and other CYC homologs. IaTCP1 lacks an asymmetric early expression but displays a very strong differential expression in the corolla at later floral stages, when the strongest unequal petal growth occurs. Analysis of occasionally occurring peloric Iberis flower variants and comparative functional studies of TCP homologs in Arabidopsis demonstrate the importance of an altered temporal IaTCP1 expression within the Brassicaceae to govern the formation of a monosymmetric corolla.

  17. Family structure and posttraumatic stress reactions: a longitudinal study using multilevel analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nygaard Egil

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited research on the relevance of family structures to the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress following disasters. We longitudinally studied the effects of marital and parental statuses on posttraumatic stress reactions after the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami and whether persons in the same households had more shared stress reactions than others. Method The study included a tourist population of 641 Norwegian adult citizens, many of them from families with children. We measured posttraumatic stress symptoms with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised at 6 months and 2 years post-disaster. Analyses included multilevel methods with mixed effects models. Results Results showed that neither marital nor parental status was significantly related to posttraumatic stress. At both assessments, adults living in the same household reported levels of posttraumatic stress that were more similar to one another than adults who were not living together. Between households, disaster experiences were closely related to the variance in posttraumatic stress symptom levels at both assessments. Within households, however, disaster experiences were less related to the variance in symptom level at 2 years than at 6 months. Conclusions These results indicate that adult household members may influence one another's posttraumatic stress reactions as well as their interpretations of the disaster experiences over time. Our findings suggest that multilevel methods may provide important information about family processes after disasters.

  18. Genome-wide evolutionary characterization and expression analyses of WRKY family genes in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Zhu, Hong; Li, Peng; Jiang, Min; Mao, Wenqing; Ong, Chermaine; Chu, Zhaoqing

    2014-06-01

    Members of plant WRKY gene family are ancient transcription factors that function in plant growth and development and respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. In our present study, we have investigated WRKY family genes in Brachypodium distachyon, a new model plant of family Poaceae. We identified a total of 86 WRKY genes from B. distachyon and explored their chromosomal distribution and evolution, domain alignment, promoter cis-elements, and expression profiles. Combining the analysis of phylogenetic tree of BdWRKY genes and the result of expression profiling, results showed that most of clustered gene pairs had higher similarities in the WRKY domain, suggesting that they might be functionally redundant. Neighbour-joining analysis of 301 WRKY domains from Oryza sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and B. distachyon suggested that BdWRKY domains are evolutionarily more closely related to O. sativa WRKY domains than those of A. thaliana. Moreover, tissue-specific expression profile of BdWRKY genes and their responses to phytohormones and several biotic or abiotic stresses were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the expression of BdWRKY genes was rapidly regulated by stresses and phytohormones, and there was a strong correlation between promoter cis-elements and the phytohormones-induced BdWRKY gene expression. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  19. Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of the Apple Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao eZhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs play essential roles in the regulatory networks controlling many developmental processes in plants. Members of the basic leucine (Leu zipper (bZIP TF family, which is unique to eukaryotes, are involved in regulating diverse processes, including flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling and defense responses to pathogens. The bZIP proteins have a characteristic bZIP domain composed of a DNA-binding basic region and a Leu zipper dimerization region. In this study, we identified 112 apple (Malus domestica Borkh bZIP TF-encoding genes, termed MdbZIP genes. Synteny analysis indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events, as well as whole genome duplication, have contributed to the expansion of the apple bZIP family. The family could be divided into 11 groups based on structural features of the encoded proteins, as well as on the phylogenetic relationship of the apple bZIP proteins to those of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtbZIP genes. Synteny analysis revealed that several paired MdbZIP genes and AtbZIP gene homologs were located in syntenic genomic regions. Furthermore, expression analyses of group A MdbZIP genes showed distinct expression levels in ten different organs. Moreover, changes in these expression profiles in response to abiotic stress conditions and various hormone treatments identified MdbZIP genes that were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as to different phytohormones.

  20. Marital and Family Satisfaction as a Function of Work-Family Demands and Community Resources: Individual- and Couple-Level Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Andrew J.; Desrochers, Stephan; Kopko, Kimberly; Moen, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    This study uses individual- and couple-level analyses to examine the influence of work-family demands and community resources on marital and family satisfaction within a sample of dual-earner parents with dependent children (N = 260 couples, 520 individuals). Total couple work hours were strongly negatively associated with marital satisfaction for…

  1. Transcriptome analyses of the Dof-like gene family in grapevine reveal its involvement in berry, flower and seed development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    da Silva, Danielle Costenaro; da Silveira Falavigna, Vítor; Fasoli, Marianna; Buffon, Vanessa; Porto, Diogo Denardi; Pappas, Jr, Georgios Joannis; Pezzotti, Mario; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Revers, Luís Fernando

    2016-01-01

    .... Additionally, the expression of the entire gene family was assessed in 54 grapevine tissues and organs using an integrated approach with microarray (cv Corvina) and real-time PCR (cv Pinot Noir) analyses...

  2. DNA analyses of the remains of the Prince Branciforte Barresi family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, O; Martínez-Labarga, C; Favaro, M; Frezza, D; Mallegni, F

    2001-01-01

    The five skeletons found buried in the church of Militello di Catania, Sicily, were tentatively identified by morphological analysis and historical reports as the remains of Prince Branciforte Barresi, two of his children, his brother and another juvenile member of the family (sixteenth and seventeenth centuries). In order to attempt to clarify the degree of relationships of the five skeletons, sex testing and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence analysis of the hypervariable segments I and II (HV1 and HV2) of control region were performed. Moreover, the 9 bp-deletion marker of region V (COII/tRNAlys) was examined. Molecular genetic analyses were consistent with historical expectations, although they did not directly demonstrate that these are in fact the remains of the Prince and his relatives, due to the impossibility of obtaining DNA from living maternal relatives of the Prince.

  3. Genetic Analyses of a Three Generation Family Segregating Hirschsprung Disease and Iris Heterochromia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Cui

    Full Text Available We present the genetic analyses conducted on a three-generation family (14 individuals with three members affected with isolated-Hirschsprung disease (HSCR and one with HSCR and heterochromia iridum (syndromic-HSCR, a phenotype reminiscent of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (WS4. WS4 is characterized by pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, eyes and/or hair, sensorineural deafness and HSCR. None of the members had sensorineural deafness. The family was screened for copy number variations (CNVs using Illumina-HumanOmni2.5-Beadchip and for coding sequence mutations in WS4 genes (EDN3, EDNRB, or SOX10 and in the main HSCR gene (RET. Confocal microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess the functional impact of the mutations. A heterozygous A/G transition in EDNRB was identified in 4 affected and 3 unaffected individuals. While in EDNRB isoforms 1 and 2 (cellular receptor the transition results in the abolishment of translation initiation (M1V, in isoform 3 (only in the cytosol the replacement occurs at Met91 (M91V and is predicted benign. Another heterozygous transition (c.-248G/A; -predicted to affect translation efficiency- in the 5'-untranslated region of EDN3 (EDNRB ligand was detected in all affected individuals but not in healthy carriers of the EDNRB mutation. Also, a de novo CNVs encompassing DACH1 was identified in the patient with heterochromia iridum and HSCR Since the EDNRB and EDN3 variants only coexist in affected individuals, HSCR could be due to the joint effect of mutations in genes of the same pathway. Iris heterochromia could be due to an independent genetic event and would account for the additional phenotype within the family.

  4. Expanding Proteoform Identifications in Top-Down Proteomic Analyses by Constructing Proteoform Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Leah V; Shortreed, Michael R; Cesnik, Anthony J; Frey, Brian L; Solntsev, Stefan K; Scalf, Mark; Smith, Lloyd M

    2018-01-16

    In top-down proteomics, intact proteins are analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry and proteoforms, which are defined forms of a protein with specific sequences of amino acids and localized post-translational modifications, are identified using precursor mass and fragmentation data. Many proteoforms that are detected in the precursor scan (MS1) are not selected for fragmentation by the instrument and therefore remain unidentified in typical top-down proteomic workflows. Our laboratory has developed the open source software program Proteoform Suite to analyze MS1-only intact proteoform data. Here, we have adapted it to provide identifications of proteoform masses in precursor MS1 spectra of top-down data, supplementing the top-down identifications obtained using the MS2 fragmentation data. Proteoform Suite performs mass calibration using high-scoring top-down identifications and identifies additional proteoforms using calibrated, accurate intact masses. Proteoform families, the set of proteoforms from a given gene, are constructed and visualized from proteoforms identified by both top-down and intact-mass analyses. Using this strategy, we constructed proteoform families and identified 1861 proteoforms in yeast lysate, yielding an approximately 40% increase over the original 1291 proteoform identifications observed using traditional top-down analysis alone.

  5. Characterization of the definitive classical calpain family of vertebrates using phylogenetic, evolutionary and expression analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macqueen, Daniel J.; Wilcox, Alexander H.

    2014-01-01

    The calpains are a superfamily of proteases with extensive relevance to human health and welfare. Vast research attention is given to the vertebrate ‘classical’ subfamily, making it surprising that the evolutionary origins, distribution and relationships of these genes is poorly characterized. Consequently, there exists uncertainty about the conservation of gene family structure, function and expression that has been principally defined from work with mammals. Here, more than 200 vertebrate classical calpains were incorporated in phylogenetic analyses spanning an unprecedented range of taxa, including jawless and cartilaginous fish. We demonstrate that the common vertebrate ancestor had at least six classical calpains, including a single gene that gave rise to CAPN11, 1, 2 and 8 in the early jawed fish lineage, plus CAPN3, 9, 12, 13 and a novel calpain gene, hereafter named CAPN17. We reveal that while all vertebrate classical calpains have been subject to persistent purifying selection during evolution, the degree and nature of selective pressure has often been lineage-dependent. The tissue expression of the complete classic calpain family was assessed in representative teleost fish, amphibians, reptiles and mammals. This highlighted systematic divergence in expression across vertebrate taxa, with most classic calpain genes from fish and amphibians having more extensive tissue distribution than in amniotes. Our data suggest that classical calpain functions have frequently diverged during vertebrate evolution and challenge the ongoing value of the established system of classifying calpains by expression. PMID:24718597

  6. Nasturtium officinale (Brassicaceae: nueva cita para la Flora del Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Degen Naumann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se documenta la presencia de Nasturtium officinale W. T. Aiton (Brassicaceae, nuevo género y especie para la Flora del Paraguay. La misma fue encontrada en los arroyos de la ciudad de Areguá, Capital del Departamento Central en la región Oriental del Paraguay. Se incluyen en este trabajo una descripción breve, comentarios sobre su distribución, el hábitat, la fenología, el nombre vernacular y observaciones sobre su uso.

  7. Nasturtium officinale (Brassicaceae): nueva cita para la Flora del Paraguay

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Degen Naumann; Fátima Mereles Haydar

    2016-01-01

    Se documenta la presencia de Nasturtium officinale W. T. Aiton (Brassicaceae), nuevo género y especie para la Flora del Paraguay. La misma fue encontrada en los arroyos de la ciudad de Areguá, Capital del Departamento Central en la región Oriental del Paraguay. Se incluyen en este trabajo una descripción breve, comentarios sobre su distribución, el hábitat, la fenología, el nombre vernacular y observaciones sobre su uso.

  8. Species-specific and leaf-age dependent effects of ultraviolet radiation on two Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifenrath, Kerstin; Müller, Caroline

    2007-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation affects the chemical composition of a plant. Since young leaves are of higher value due to their increased photosynthetic activity, for these a more efficient protection and thus stronger responses to a short-term exposure to natural radiation including or excluding UV-A plus UV-B radiation ("+UV" vs. "-UV") were expected than for old leaves. Nutrients and characteristic secondary metabolites of two species of Brassicaceae were analysed after two days exposure in foil-tents with different UV filtering qualities. Contents of water, carbon, nitrogen and soluble protein were found to be affected by both UV and leaf-age in Sinapis alba L. but mainly by leaf-age in Nasturtium officinale L. Glucosinolates and myrosinases, both partners of the defence system of Brassicaceae, responded highly species-specific to UV exposure. Moreover, leaf-age mainly affected total glucosinolate concentrations in S. alba, but myrosinase activities in N. officinale. The most pronounced response to UV was found in the accumulation of flavonoids which are needed to shield the leaf interior against UV. In S. alba, relative contents of quercetin flavonols increased at the expense of kaempferols in +UV exposed leaves. In N. officinale, total flavonoid quantities were 10-fold lower in -UV exposed young leaves compared to S. alba, and flavonoid accumulation was induced by UV specifically in old leaves. Hydroxycinnamic acid concentrations were not affected in both species. In total, these herbaceous species showed a highly species-specific and age-dependent plasticity in response to short-term exposure to UV which is discussed with respect to their defence strategies.

  9. Seed storage protein gene promoters contain conserved DNA motifs in Brassicaceae, Fabaceae and Poaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauteux, François; Strömvik, Martina V

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate computational identification of cis-regulatory motifs is difficult, particularly in eukaryotic promoters, which typically contain multiple short and degenerate DNA sequences bound by several interacting factors. Enrichment in combinations of rare motifs in the promoter sequence of functionally or evolutionarily related genes among several species is an indicator of conserved transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. This provides a basis for the computational identification of cis-regulatory motifs. Results We have used a discriminative seeding DNA motif discovery algorithm for an in-depth analysis of 54 seed storage protein (SSP) gene promoters from three plant families, namely Brassicaceae (mustards), Fabaceae (legumes) and Poaceae (grasses) using backgrounds based on complete sets of promoters from a representative species in each family, namely Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.), soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) respectively. We have identified three conserved motifs (two RY-like and one ACGT-like) in Brassicaceae and Fabaceae SSP gene promoters that are similar to experimentally characterized seed-specific cis-regulatory elements. Fabaceae SSP gene promoter sequences are also enriched in a novel, seed-specific E2Fb-like motif. Conserved motifs identified in Poaceae SSP gene promoters include a GCN4-like motif, two prolamin-box-like motifs and an Skn-1-like motif. Evidence of the presence of a variant of the TATA-box is found in the SSP gene promoters from the three plant families. Motifs discovered in SSP gene promoters were used to score whole-genome sets of promoters from Arabidopsis, soybean and rice. The highest-scoring promoters are associated with genes coding for different subunits or precursors of seed storage proteins. Conclusion Seed storage protein gene promoter motifs are conserved in diverse species, and different plant families are characterized by a distinct combination of conserved motifs

  10. Seed storage protein gene promoters contain conserved DNA motifs in Brassicaceae, Fabaceae and Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauteux François

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate computational identification of cis-regulatory motifs is difficult, particularly in eukaryotic promoters, which typically contain multiple short and degenerate DNA sequences bound by several interacting factors. Enrichment in combinations of rare motifs in the promoter sequence of functionally or evolutionarily related genes among several species is an indicator of conserved transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. This provides a basis for the computational identification of cis-regulatory motifs. Results We have used a discriminative seeding DNA motif discovery algorithm for an in-depth analysis of 54 seed storage protein (SSP gene promoters from three plant families, namely Brassicaceae (mustards, Fabaceae (legumes and Poaceae (grasses using backgrounds based on complete sets of promoters from a representative species in each family, namely Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh., soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. and rice (Oryza sativa L. respectively. We have identified three conserved motifs (two RY-like and one ACGT-like in Brassicaceae and Fabaceae SSP gene promoters that are similar to experimentally characterized seed-specific cis-regulatory elements. Fabaceae SSP gene promoter sequences are also enriched in a novel, seed-specific E2Fb-like motif. Conserved motifs identified in Poaceae SSP gene promoters include a GCN4-like motif, two prolamin-box-like motifs and an Skn-1-like motif. Evidence of the presence of a variant of the TATA-box is found in the SSP gene promoters from the three plant families. Motifs discovered in SSP gene promoters were used to score whole-genome sets of promoters from Arabidopsis, soybean and rice. The highest-scoring promoters are associated with genes coding for different subunits or precursors of seed storage proteins. Conclusion Seed storage protein gene promoter motifs are conserved in diverse species, and different plant families are characterized by a distinct combination

  11. Molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of FGF23 mutations in familial tumoral calcinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garringer, Holly J.; Malekpour, Mahdi; Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Mortazavi, Seyed M. J.; Davis, Siobhan I.; Farrow, Emily G.; Yu, Xijie; Arking, Dan E.; Dietz, Harry C.; White, Kenneth E.

    2008-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a hormone required for normal renal phosphate reabsorption. FGF23 gain-of-function mutations result in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR), and FGF23 loss-of-function mutations cause familial hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis (TC). In this study, we identified a novel recessive FGF23 TC mutation, a lysine (K) substitution for glutamine (Q) (160 C > A) at residue 54 (Q54K). To understand the molecular consequences of all known FGF23-TC mutants (H41Q, S71G, M96T, S129F, and Q54K), these proteins were stably expressed in vitro. Western analyses revealed minimal amounts of secreted intact protein for all mutants, and ELISA analyses demonstrated high levels of secreted COOH-terminal FGF23 fragments but low amounts of intact protein, consistent with TC patients' FGF23 serum profiles. Mutant protein function was tested and showed residual, yet decreased, bioactivity compared with wild-type protein. In examining the role of the FGF23 COOH-terminal tail (residues 180–251) in protein processing and activity, truncated mutants revealed that the majority of the residues downstream from the known FGF23 SPC protease site (176RXXR179/S180) were not required for protein secretion. However, residues adjacent to the RXXR site (between residues 188 and 202) were required for full bioactivity. In summary, we report a novel TC mutation and demonstrate a common defect of reduced FGF23 stability for all known FGF23-TC mutants. Finally, the majority of the COOH-terminal tail of FGF23 is not required for protein secretion but is required for full bioactivity. PMID:18682534

  12. Phylogenomic analyses of more than 4000 nuclear loci resolve the origin of snakes among lizard families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, Jeffrey W; Wiens, John J

    2017-09-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are the most diverse group of terrestrial vertebrates, with more than 10 000 species. Despite considerable effort to resolve relationships among major squamates clades, some branches have remained difficult. Among the most vexing has been the placement of snakes among lizard families, with most studies yielding only weak support for the position of snakes. Furthermore, the placement of iguanian lizards has remained controversial. Here we used targeted sequence capture to obtain data from 4178 nuclear loci from ultraconserved elements from 32 squamate taxa (and five outgroups) including representatives of all major squamate groups. Using both concatenated and species-tree methods, we recover strong support for a sister relationship between iguanian and anguimorph lizards, with snakes strongly supported as the sister group of these two clades. These analyses strongly resolve the difficult placement of snakes within squamates and show overwhelming support for the contentious position of iguanians. More generally, we provide a strongly supported hypothesis of higher-level relationships in the most species-rich tetrapod clade using coalescent-based species-tree methods and approximately 100 times more loci than previous estimates. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Social relations model analyses of perceived self-control and trust in families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büyükcan Tetik, A.; Finkenauer, C.; Siersema, M.; Vander Heyden, K.; Krabbendam, L.

    2015-01-01

    How do people know which family member is trustworthy? In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that people use their perception of a family member's self-control as an indicator of his or her trustworthiness. Eighty-four Dutch families consisting of 2 parents and 2 children completed

  14. Genetic heterogeneity in psoriasis vulgaris based on linkage analyses of a large family material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlstroem, J.; Swanbeck, G.; Inerot, A. [ Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Information on psoriasis among parents and siblings in 14,008 families has been collected. On the basis of this material, evidence for monogenetic autosomal recessive inheritance of psoriasis has recently been presented. Indications from more than one type of non-pustular psoriasis has been obtained from the population genetic data. Molecular genetic linkage analysis of psoriasis to a number of polymorphic genetic markers for a large number of families has been made. It is apparent that there is genetic heterogeneity in a psoriasis population with regard to psoriasis genes. Using the computer program Linkage 5.0 and a formula for heterogeneity, a lodscore over 3.0 for one locus has been obtained. This locus has further been confirmed by several other markers in the vicinity. The locus found is linked to slightly over half of the families, indicating that there are more genetically independent types of psoriasis. The age at onset of those families that are apparently linked to this locus have a slightly higher age at onset than those not linked to that locus but with a considerable overlap. In spite of close coverage of the whole chromosomes number 6 and 17, no linkage has been found in this regions. This indicates that neither the HLA region nor the region earlier found to be involved in one family with psoriasis are primarily involved in our families.

  15. POT1-independent single-strand telomeric DNA binding activities in Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakirov, Eugene V; McKnight, Thomas D; Shippen, Dorothy E

    2009-06-01

    Telomeres define the ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes and are required for genome maintenance and continued cell proliferation. The extreme ends of telomeres terminate in a single-strand protrusion, termed the G-overhang, which, in vertebrates and fission yeast, is bound by evolutionarily conserved members of the POT1 (protection of telomeres) protein family. Unlike most other model organisms, the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana encodes two divergent POT1-like proteins. Here we show that the single-strand telomeric DNA binding activity present in A. thaliana nuclear extracts is not dependent on POT1a or POT1b proteins. Furthermore, in contrast to POT1 proteins from yeast and vertebrates, recombinant POT1a and POT1b proteins from A. thaliana, and from two additional Brassicaceae species, Arabidopsis lyrata and Brassica oleracea (cauliflower), fail to bind single-strand telomeric DNA in vitro under the conditions tested. Finally, although we detected four single-strand telomeric DNA binding activities in nuclear extracts from B. oleracea, partial purification and DNA cross-linking analysis of these complexes identified proteins that are smaller than the predicted sizes of BoPOT1a or BoPOT1b. Taken together, these data suggest that POT1 proteins are not the major single-strand telomeric DNA binding activities in A. thaliana and its close relatives, underscoring the remarkable functional divergence of POT1 proteins from plants and other eukaryotes.

  16. Analyses and thought on countermeasures for the family formation trend among floating population in Wuhan city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Sun, L

    1997-01-01

    The familized floating population in China consists of families formed from blood kinship networks of floating population. This study examines the size of the familized floating population in Wuhan City in 1995 and the negative impacts for urban management, supplies, family planning, education, and employment. Floating population families are formed due to the presence of rural and urban differences, the desire for income, and a goal of permanent urban residence with family stability and steady economic gains. Data were obtained from a 1% sample survey among the floating population who lived in rented, borrowed, or self-built houses or apartments for over 6 months. 69.2% of the floating population, or 335,000 people, were familized floating population. 55.01% of the familized floating population were women, and 60.41% of the laborers were women. 33.50% of the women who "should" be employed were not. 50% of the women in some districts were unemployed. 30.61% were children under 14 years of age. The dependency burden for the employed floating population was greater than for the urban employed population. The birth rate among the familized floating population was 44.60%. 89.59% of women aged older than 15 years in the familized floating population were of childbearing age. Most had a low level of education. The floating population creates the need for educating 15,000 new students every year; this requires construction of 10 new schools every year. The floating population increases the need to produce more electricity, clothing, food, houses, and other services or facilities. The floating population brings norms about a higher family size, which challenges urban residents' beliefs and impedes smooth implementation of the family planning policy. Management needs to regulate population flow, reduce consumption, and control family formation and childbearing. Management needs to increase mobility costs.

  17. [Effort-Reward Imbalance in Household and Family Work--Analysing the Psychometric Properties among Fathers of Underage Children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Stefanie; Barre, Felix; Otto, Friederike

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the concept of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) developed by Siegrist had been applied to unpaid household and family work (ERI-HF). Evidence suggests that the imbalance between effort spent and reward received in family and domestic labor is associated with poor mental and physical health. However, so far, the adopted questionnaire ERI-HF was exclusively used among women in childcare responsibility. This paper reports on the application of the model to men in childcare responsibility using data from a clinical sample of fathers in rehabilitation clinics (N=415). Analogous to the original version, ERI-HF is divided into 2 components: (i) dysbalance of effort and reward, and (ii) overcommitment. For both components, confirmatory factor analyses revealed good to satisfactory properties. Overall, 13.4% of men in childcare responsibility showed a dysbalance between high effort and low reward of household and family work. High levels of effort were more frequently reported than high levels of low reward. With percentages ranging between 24.3 and 59.6%, a significant proportion of fathers reported difficulties to withdraw from household and family work obligations. Analyses of construct validity revealed significant associations between ERI and socio-demographic factors (number of children, employment status, single fatherhood, work-family-conflict) as well as subjective health. Taken together, our findings suggest that the instrument is applicable to men in childcare responsibility. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Variability Abstractions: Trading Precision for Speed in Family-Based Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimovski, Aleksandar; Brabrand, Claus; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Family-based (lifted) data-flow analysis for Software Product Lines (SPLs) is capable of analyzing all valid products (variants) without generating any of them explicitly. It takes as input only the common code base, which encodes all variants of a SPL, and produces analysis results corresponding...... transformation that translates any SPL program into an abstracted version of it, such that the analysis of the abstracted SPL coincides with the corresponding abstracted analysis of the original SPL. We implement the transformation in a tool, that works on Object-Oriented Java program families, and evaluate...

  19. Numerical taxonomy of the genus Matthiola (Brassicaceae in Northeast of Iran based on morphological traits

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    Mozhgan Rashid Taranloo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Matthiola R. BR. (Brassicaceae consists of 48 species in the Iranian plateau, of which only seven species are distributed in northeast of Iran. Six species erre collected from the region under study including M. afghanica, M. alyssifolia, M. chenopodiifolia, M. chorassanica, M. dumulosa and M. farinose. Two species, M. flavida and M. revoluta were recorded for the first time in this study. Some specimens of an unknown taxon entitled Matthiola sp. are also collected in the region and included in the present study. In this study, we tried to use a set of morphologically informative characters which could determine species boundaries and also provide appropriate identification key to the genus in the northeast of Iran. 71 morphological features including quantitative and qualitative were examined on 68 herbarium and field-collected accessions followed by statistical analyses. The results of the univariate analysis indicated that "presence/absence of trichome on the stem and leaf" and "presence/absence of glandular trichomes on the sepal and pedicel" did not significantly differentiate the species and they were excluded from the subsequent analysis. The results of multivariate analysis showed that the species under study were grouped within three groups. First group included specimens of the species M. alyssifolia, the species M. afghanica, M. chenopodiifolia, M. dumulosa, M. farinosa, M. flavida and Matthiola sp. were placed in second group and third group included specimens of the two species M. chorassanica and M. revoluta.

  20. Differential and correlation analyses of microarray gene expression data in the CEPH Utah families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jinghua; Li, Shuxia

    2008-01-01

    The widespread microarray technology capable of analyzing global gene expression at the level of transcription is expanding its application not only in medicine but also in studies on basic biology. This paper presents our analysis on microarray gene expression data in the CEPH Utah families...

  1. Molecular and morphological analyses reveal phylogenetic relationships of stingrays focusing on the family Dasyatidae (Myliobatiformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kean Chong Lim

    Full Text Available Elucidating the phylogenetic relationships of the current but problematic Dasyatidae (Order Myliobatiformes was the first priority of the current study. Here, we studied three molecular gene markers of 43 species (COI gene, 33 species (ND2 gene and 34 species (RAG1 gene of stingrays to draft out the phylogenetic tree of the order. Nine character states were identified and used to confirm the molecularly constructed phylogenetic trees. Eight or more clades (at different hierarchical level were identified for COI, ND2 and RAG1 genes in the Myliobatiformes including four clades containing members of the present Dasyatidae, thus rendering the latter non-monophyletic. The uncorrected p-distance between these four 'Dasytidae' clades when compared to the distance between formally known families confirmed that these four clades should be elevated to four separate families. We suggest a revision of the present classification, retaining the Dasyatidae (Dasyatis and Taeniurops species but adding three new families namely, Neotrygonidae (Neotrygon and Taeniura species, Himanturidae (Himantura species and Pastinachidae (Pastinachus species. Our result indicated the need to further review the classification of Dasyatis microps. By resolving the non-monophyletic problem, the suite of nine character states enables the natural classification of the Myliobatiformes into at least thirteen families based on morphology.

  2. Proteomic analyses of Ehrlichia ruminantium highlight differential expression of MAP1-family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Isabel; de Almeida, André Martinho; Brito, Catarina; Meyer, Damien F; Barreto, Mónica; Sheikboudou, Christian; Franco, Catarina F; Martinez, Dominique; Lefrançois, Thierry; Vachiéry, Nathalie; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Coelho, Ana Varela; Alves, Paula M

    2012-05-04

    The Rickettsiales Ehrlichia ruminantium (ER) is the causative agent of heartwater, a fatal tick-borne disease of livestock in sub-Saharan Africa and in the Caribbean, posing strong economical constraints to livestock production. In an attempt to identify the most prominent proteins expressed by this bacterium, especially those encoded by the major antigenic protein 1 (map1) multigene family, a proteome map of ER cultivated in endothelial cells was constructed by using two dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry. Among the sixty-four spots detected, we could identify only four proteins from the MAP1-family; the other proteins detected were mainly related to energy, amino acid and general metabolism (26%), to protein turnover, chaperones and survival (21%) and to information processes (14%) or classified as hypothetical proteins (23%). Additional studies on MAP1-family protein using immunochemical labeling also revealed that these proteins are differentially expressed along the bacterium life cycle, presenting different structural organization. Interestingly, when infectious elementary bodies (EBs) are released from host cells, MAP1 appears to be organized in SDS and heat-resistant dimers and trimers stabilized by disulfide bridges. Overall, the results presented herein not only reveal the first partial proteome map of ER but provide new insights on the expression ER MAP1-family proteins in host endothelial cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Predicting the occurrence of alate aphids in Brassicaceae

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    Francisco Jorge Cividanes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to predict the occurrence of alates of Brevicoryne brassicae, Lipaphis erysimi, and Myzus persicae (Hemiptera, Aphididae in Brassicaceae. The alate aphids were collected in yellow water traps from July 1997 to August 2005. Aphid population peaks were predicted using a degree‑day model. The meteorological factors, temperature, air relative humidity, rainfall, and sunshine hours, were used to provide precision indexes to evaluate the best predictor for the date of the first capture of alate aphids by the traps. The degree‑day model indicated that the peak population of the evaluated aphid species can be predicted using one of the following biofix dates: January 1st, June 1st, and the date of the first capture of the alate aphid species by the yellow water traps. The best predictor of B. brassicae occurrence is the number of days with minimum temperature >15°C, and of L. erysimi and M. persicae, the number of days with rainfall occurrence.

  4. Cytological studies of Brassicaceae burn. (Cruciferae juss.) from Western Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeelani, S M; Rani, S; Kumar, S; Kumari, S; Gupta, R C

    2013-01-01

    Cytological studies have been carried out on 12 species of Brassicaceae Burn. on population basis from different geographical areas of Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh in the Western Himalayas. Variable chromosome reports for Barbaraea intermedia (n = 16), Cardamine loxostemonoides (n = 8), Nasturtium officinale (n = 8), Sisymbrium orientale (n = 14) on world-wide basis have been added to the previous reports of these species. The chromosome numbers in seven species as Barbaraea intermedia (n = 8), B. vulgaris (n = 8), Capsella bursa-pastoris (n = 8), Descuriania sophia (n = 10), Rorippa islandica (n = 8), Sisymbrium strictum (n = 7) and Thlaspi alpestre (n = 7) have been worked out for the first time from India. The meiotic course in the populations of seven species such as Barbaraea intermedia, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Coronopus didymus, Descuriania sophia, Nasturtium officinale, Sisymbrium orientale and S. strictum varies from normal to abnormal while all the populations of two species Barbaraea vulgaris and Sisymbrium irio show abnormal meiotic course. Meiotic abnormalities are in the form of cytomixis, chromosomal stickiness, unoriented bivalents, inter-bivalent connections, formation of laggards and bridges, all resulting into abnormal microsporogenesis. Heterogenous sized fertile pollen grains and reduced reproductive potentialities have invariably been observed in all the meiotically abnormal populations. However, the meiotic course in all the populations of Cardamine loxostemonoides, Rorippa islandica and Thalspi alpestre is found to be normal with high pollen fertility.

  5. Molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of FGF23 mutations in familial tumoral calcinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Garringer, Holly J.; Malekpour, Mahdi; Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Mortazavi, Seyed M. J.; Davis, Siobhan I.; Farrow, Emily G; Yu, Xijie; Arking, Dan E.; Dietz, Harry C.; White, Kenneth E.

    2008-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a hormone required for normal renal phosphate reabsorption. FGF23 gain-of-function mutations result in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR), and FGF23 loss-of-function mutations cause familial hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis (TC). In this study, we identified a novel recessive FGF23 TC mutation, a lysine (K) substitution for glutamine (Q) (160 C > A) at residue 54 (Q54K). To understand the molecular consequences of all known FGF23-TC m...

  6. Correlated mutation analyses on super-family alignments reveal functionally important residues.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R.K.P.; Joosten, H.J.; Verwiel, E.; Paans, S.; Akerboom, J.; Oost, J. van der; Leferink, N.G.; Berkel, W.J. van; Vriend, G.; Schaap, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Correlated mutation analyses (CMA) on multiple sequence alignments are widely used for the prediction of the function of amino acids. The accuracy of CMA-based predictions is mainly determined by the number of sequences, by their evolutionary distances, and by the quality of the alignments. These

  7. Correlated mutation analyses on super-family alignments reveal functionally important residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R.K.; Joosten, H.J.; Verwiel, E.; Paans, J.; Akerboom, J.; Oost, van der J.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Vriend, G.; Schaap, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Correlated mutation analyses (CMA) on multiple sequence alignments are widely used for the prediction of the function of amino acids. The accuracy of CMA-based predictions is mainly determined by the number of sequences, by their evolutionary distances, and by the quality of the alignments. These

  8. [Psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents in family law proceedings. Empirical analyses from psychological expert assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbach, Jelena; Kolbe, Florian; Lübbehüsen, Bärbel; Koglin, Ute

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the frequency and distribution of mental health problems in children and adolescents who had previously been psychologically evaluated in family law proceedings. The data stem from psychological evaluations (N=298) conducted between 2008 and 2012 at an evaluation institute in Bremen, Germany. The reports included were analyzed for indications of mental health problems by means of a content analysis. The total sample consisted of 496 children and adolescents. At least one mental health problem (according to ICD-F) was found in 39.5% of the children and adolescents. The comorbidity rate was 38.7%. Developmental deficits appeared in 12.3%, emotional or conduct problems in 22.8% of the sample. Furthermore, 11.5% were reported as having been victims of violence. Frequency distributions of mental health problems with respect to the juridical issues in question are given. These results provide a first empirical overview of mental health problems in psychologically evaluated children and adolescents. Our findings highlight the need for future studies to further examine mental health problems of children and adolescents in family court proceedings with respect to the juridical issues in question.

  9. Lineage-specific evolution of the vertebrate Otopetrin gene family revealed by comparative genomic analyses

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    Ryan Joseph F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the Otopetrin 1 gene (Otop1 in mice and fish produce an unusual bilateral vestibular pathology that involves the absence of otoconia without hearing impairment. The encoded protein, Otop1, is the only functionally characterized member of the Otopetrin Domain Protein (ODP family; the extended sequence and structural preservation of ODP proteins in metazoans suggest a conserved functional role. Here, we use the tools of sequence- and cytogenetic-based comparative genomics to study the Otop1 and the Otop2-Otop3 genes and to establish their genomic context in 25 vertebrates. We extend our evolutionary study to include the gene mutated in Usher syndrome (USH subtype 1G (Ush1g, both because of the head-to-tail clustering of Ush1g with Otop2 and because Otop1 and Ush1g mutations result in inner ear phenotypes. Results We established that OTOP1 is the boundary gene of an inversion polymorphism on human chromosome 4p16 that originated in the common human-chimpanzee lineage more than 6 million years ago. Other lineage-specific evolutionary events included a three-fold expansion of the Otop genes in Xenopus tropicalis and of Ush1g in teleostei fish. The tight physical linkage between Otop2 and Ush1g is conserved in all vertebrates. To further understand the functional organization of the Ushg1-Otop2 locus, we deduced a putative map of binding sites for CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF, a mammalian insulator transcription factor, from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq data in mouse and human embryonic stem (ES cells combined with detection of CTCF-binding motifs. Conclusions The results presented here clarify the evolutionary history of the vertebrate Otop and Ush1g families, and establish a framework for studying the possible interaction(s of Ush1g and Otop in developmental pathways.

  10. Transcriptome analyses of the Dof-like gene family in grapevine reveal its involvement in berry, flower and seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Danielle Costenaro; da Silveira Falavigna, Vítor; Fasoli, Marianna; Buffon, Vanessa; Porto, Diogo Denardi; Pappas, Georgios Joannis; Pezzotti, Mario; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Revers, Luís Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) protein family spans a group of plant transcription factors involved in the regulation of several functions, such as plant responses to stress, hormones and light, phytochrome signaling and seed germination. Here we describe the Dof-like gene family in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.), which consists of 25 genes coding for Dof. An extensive in silico characterization of the VviDofL gene family was performed. Additionally, the expression of the entire gene family was assessed in 54 grapevine tissues and organs using an integrated approach with microarray (cv Corvina) and real-time PCR (cv Pinot Noir) analyses. The phylogenetic analysis comparing grapevine sequences with those of Arabidopsis, tomato, poplar and already described Dof genes in other species allowed us to identify several duplicated genes. The diversification of grapevine DofL genes during evolution likely resulted in a broader range of biological roles. Furthermore, distinct expression patterns were identified between samples analyzed, corroborating such hypothesis. Our expression results indicate that several VviDofL genes perform their functional roles mainly during flower, berry and seed development, highlighting their importance for grapevine growth and production. The identification of similar expression profiles between both approaches strongly suggests that these genes have important regulatory roles that are evolutionally conserved between grapevine cvs Corvina and Pinot Noir.

  11. Global analyses of TetR family transcriptional regulators in mycobacteria indicates conservation across species and diversity in regulated functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhana, Ricardo J C; Singla, Ashima; Sikder, Mahmudul Hasan; Withers, Mike; Kendall, Sharon L

    2015-06-27

    Mycobacteria inhabit diverse niches and display high metabolic versatility. They can colonise both humans and animals and are also able to survive in the environment. In order to succeed, response to environmental cues via transcriptional regulation is required. In this study we focused on the TetR family of transcriptional regulators (TFTRs) in mycobacteria. We used InterPro to classify the entire complement of transcriptional regulators in 10 mycobacterial species and these analyses showed that TFTRs are the most abundant family of regulators in all species. We identified those TFTRs that are conserved across all species analysed and those that are unique to the pathogens included in the analysis. We examined genomic contexts of 663 of the conserved TFTRs and observed that the majority of TFTRs are separated by 200 bp or less from divergently oriented genes. Analyses of divergent genes indicated that the TFTRs control diverse biochemical functions not limited to efflux pumps. TFTRs typically bind to palindromic motifs and we identified 11 highly significant novel motifs in the upstream regions of divergently oriented TFTRs. The C-terminal ligand binding domain from the TFTR complement in M. tuberculosis showed great diversity in amino acid sequence but with an overall architecture common to other TFTRs. This study suggests that mycobacteria depend on TFTRs for the transcriptional control of a number of metabolic functions yet the physiological role of the majority of these regulators remain unknown.

  12. Molecular markers for population genetic analyses in the family Psittacidae (Psittaciformes, Aves

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    Patrícia J. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The selection of molecular markers for population studies is an important tool for biodiversity conservation. The family Psittacidae contains many endangered and vulnerable species and we tested three kinds of molecular markers for their potential use in population studies of five psitacid species: 43 hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus, 42 blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna, 23 red-and-green macaws (Ara chloroptera, 19 red-spectacled amazons (Amazona pretrei; and 18 red-tailed amazons (Amazona brasiliensis. We tested 21 clones from a genomic library of golden conure (Guarouba guarouba minisatellites and 12 pairs of microsatellite primers developed for the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus and A. hyacinthinus. We also tested seven tetranucleotide repeat primers for their ability to amplify regions between microsatellite loci (inter simple sequence repeats, ISSRs. We were able to select seven markers that were variable in different degrees for three species (A. hyacinthinus, A. chloroptera and A. ararauna. The mini and microsatellites produced more polymorphic patterns than the ISSRs. The genetic variability of the species studied seems to be correlated with their endangered status.

  13. Differential and correlation analyses of microarray gene expression data in the CEPH Utah families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jinghua; Li, Shuxia; Christiansen, Lene; Kruse, Torben A; Christensen, Kaare

    2008-08-01

    The widespread microarray technology capable of analyzing global gene expression at the level of transcription is expanding its application not only in medicine but also in studies on basic biology. This paper presents our analysis on microarray gene expression data in the CEPH Utah families focusing on the demographic characteristics such as age and sex on differential gene expression patterns. Our results show that the differential gene expression pattern between age groups is dominated by down-regulated transcriptional activities in the old subjects. Functional analysis on age-regulated genes identifies cell-cell signaling as an important functional category implicated in human aging. Sex-dependent gene expression is characterized by genes that may escape X-inactivation and, most interestingly, such a pattern is not affected by the aging process. Analysis on sibship correlation on gene expression revealed a large number of significant genes suggesting the importance of a genetic mechanism in regulating transcriptional activities. In addition, we observe an interesting pattern of sibship correlation on gene expression that increases exponentially with the mean of gene expression reflecting the enhanced genetic control over the functionally active genes.

  14. Identification and comprehensive analyses of the CBL and CIPK gene families in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Wang, Yan; Wang, Meng; Li, Tingting; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Xiatian; Wei, Shuya; He, Guangyuan; Yang, Guangxiao

    2015-11-04

    Calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins belong to a unique group of calcium sensors in plant that decode the Ca(2+) signature by interacting with CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs). Although CBL-CIPK complexes have been shown to play important roles in the responses to various stresses in plants, little is known about their functions in wheat. A total of seven TaCBL and 20 TaCIPK genes were amplified from bread wheat, Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring. Reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in silico expression analyses showed that TaCBL and TaCIPK genes were expressed at different levels in different tissues, or maintained at nearly constant expression levels during the whole life cycle of the wheat plant. Some TaCBL and TaCIPK genes showed up- or down-regulated expressions during seed germination. Preferential interactions between TaCBLs and TaCIPKs were observed in yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments. Analyses of a deletion series of TaCIPK proteins with amino acid variations at the C-terminus provided new insights into the specificity of the interactions between TaCIPKs and TaCBLs, and indicated that the TaCBL-TaCIPK signaling pathway is very complex in wheat because of its hexaploid genome. The expressions of many TaCBLs and TaCIPKs were responsive to abiotic stresses (salt, cold, and simulated drought) and abscisic acid treatment. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaCIPK24 exhibited improved salt tolerance through increased Na(+) efflux and an enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging capacity. These results contribute to our understanding of the functions of CBL-CIPK complexes and provide the basis for selecting appropriate genes for in-depth functional studies of CBL-CIPK in wheat.

  15. Review on Cardamine diphylla (Michx.) A. wood (Brassicaceae): ethnobotany and glucosinolate chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaut, Sabine; Bleeker, René S

    2013-09-16

    Cardamine diphylla (Michx.) A. Wood, commonly called toothwort, is a spring perennial herb belonging to the Brassicaceae family. This endemic plant of Eastern North America has been widely used by multiple American First Nations (i.e. indigenous people of North America) for food and medicine for centuries. The aim of the review is to describe the botany, ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and bioactivity of Cardamine diphylla. The review covers literature on Cardamine diphylla, and the alternative name Dentaria diphylla, from English and French language sources. Multiple traditional uses of Cardamine diphylla by American First Nations are well documented. Initial health studies showed that the tested concentrations of the extract were not toxic against brine shrimp larvae and the same extract had a weak free-radical scavenging activity. However, bioactive compounds in the form of aliphatic and indole glucosinolates and some indole alkaloids have been isolated from this plant. Ecological research regarding Cardamine diphylla-insect interactions (such as feeding and oviposition) is also available in the literature. The wide range of traditional uses by multiple American First Nations suggests that the antibacterial, antiviral, immunostimulant, analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory activities of this plant should be explored in in vitro and in vivo tests. Traditional modes of preparation of the plant suggest that some of the medicinal properties could certainly be attributed to glucosinolate degradation products (i.e. isothiocyanates), but a clear assignment of active molecules and mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated. The presence of glucosinolates indicates that the plant could be probed for cancer chemopreventive properties. Overall, the review shows that more investigation is necessary to determine the possible benefits of Cardamine diphylla extracts to pharmaceutical companies as a nutraceutic specialty phytotherapeutic agent against respiratory

  16. Comparison of Five Major Trichome Regulatory Genes in Brassica villosa with Orthologues within the Brassicaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayidu, Naghabushana K.; Kagale, Sateesh; Taheri, Ali; Withana-Gamage, Thushan S.; Parkin, Isobel A. P.; Sharpe, Andrew G.; Gruber, Margaret Y.

    2014-01-01

    Coding sequences for major trichome regulatory genes, including the positive regulators GLABRA 1(GL1), GLABRA 2 (GL2), ENHANCER OF GLABRA 3 (EGL3), and TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA 1 (TTG1) and the negative regulator TRIPTYCHON (TRY), were cloned from wild Brassica villosa, which is characterized by dense trichome coverage over most of the plant. Transcript (FPKM) levels from RNA sequencing indicated much higher expression of the GL2 and TTG1 regulatory genes in B. villosa leaves compared with expression levels of GL1 and EGL3 genes in either B. villosa or the reference genome species, glabrous B. oleracea; however, cotyledon TTG1 expression was high in both species. RNA sequencing and Q-PCR also revealed an unusual expression pattern for the negative regulators TRY and CPC, which were much more highly expressed in trichome-rich B. villosa leaves than in glabrous B. oleracea leaves and in glabrous cotyledons from both species. The B. villosa TRY expression pattern also contrasted with TRY expression patterns in two diploid Brassica species, and with the Arabidopsis model for expression of negative regulators of trichome development. Further unique sequence polymorphisms, protein characteristics, and gene evolution studies highlighted specific amino acids in GL1 and GL2 coding sequences that distinguished glabrous species from hairy species and several variants that were specific for each B. villosa gene. Positive selection was observed for GL1 between hairy and non-hairy plants, and as expected the origin of the four expressed positive trichome regulatory genes in B. villosa was predicted to be from B. oleracea. In particular the unpredicted expression patterns for TRY and CPC in B. villosa suggest additional characterization is needed to determine the function of the expanded families of trichome regulatory genes in more complex polyploid species within the Brassicaceae. PMID:24755905

  17. Comparison of five major trichome regulatory genes in Brassica villosa with orthologues within the Brassicaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghabushana K Nayidu

    Full Text Available Coding sequences for major trichome regulatory genes, including the positive regulators GLABRA 1(GL1, GLABRA 2 (GL2, ENHANCER OF GLABRA 3 (EGL3, and TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA 1 (TTG1 and the negative regulator TRIPTYCHON (TRY, were cloned from wild Brassica villosa, which is characterized by dense trichome coverage over most of the plant. Transcript (FPKM levels from RNA sequencing indicated much higher expression of the GL2 and TTG1 regulatory genes in B. villosa leaves compared with expression levels of GL1 and EGL3 genes in either B. villosa or the reference genome species, glabrous B. oleracea; however, cotyledon TTG1 expression was high in both species. RNA sequencing and Q-PCR also revealed an unusual expression pattern for the negative regulators TRY and CPC, which were much more highly expressed in trichome-rich B. villosa leaves than in glabrous B. oleracea leaves and in glabrous cotyledons from both species. The B. villosa TRY expression pattern also contrasted with TRY expression patterns in two diploid Brassica species, and with the Arabidopsis model for expression of negative regulators of trichome development. Further unique sequence polymorphisms, protein characteristics, and gene evolution studies highlighted specific amino acids in GL1 and GL2 coding sequences that distinguished glabrous species from hairy species and several variants that were specific for each B. villosa gene. Positive selection was observed for GL1 between hairy and non-hairy plants, and as expected the origin of the four expressed positive trichome regulatory genes in B. villosa was predicted to be from B. oleracea. In particular the unpredicted expression patterns for TRY and CPC in B. villosa suggest additional characterization is needed to determine the function of the expanded families of trichome regulatory genes in more complex polyploid species within the Brassicaceae.

  18. Root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis obtained Brassicaceae-specific strictosidine synthase-like genes by horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Besides gene duplication and de novo gene generation, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is another important way of acquiring new genes. HGT may endow the recipients with novel phenotypic traits that are important for species evolution and adaption to new ecological niches. Parasitic systems expectedly allow the occurrence of HGT at relatively high frequencies due to their long-term physical contact. In plants, a number of HGT events have been reported between the organelles of parasites and the hosts, but HGT between host and parasite nuclear genomes has rarely been found. Results A thorough transcriptome screening revealed that a strictosidine synthase-like (SSL) gene in the root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and the shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis showed much higher sequence similarities with those in Brassicaceae than with those in their close relatives, suggesting independent gene horizontal transfer events from Brassicaceae to these parasites. These findings were strongly supported by phylogenetic analysis and their identical unique amino acid residues and deletions. Intriguingly, the nucleus-located SSL genes in Brassicaceae belonged to a new member of SSL gene family, which were originated from gene duplication. The presence of introns indicated that the transfer occurred directly by DNA integration in both parasites. Furthermore, positive selection was detected in the foreign SSL gene in O. aegyptiaca but not in C. australis. The expression of the foreign SSL genes in these two parasitic plants was detected in multiple development stages and tissues, and the foreign SSL gene was induced after wounding treatment in C. australis stems. These data imply that the foreign genes may still retain certain functions in the recipient species. Conclusions Our study strongly supports that parasitic plants can gain novel nuclear genes from distantly related host species by HGT and the foreign genes may execute certain functions in the new hosts

  19. Root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis obtained Brassicaceae-specific strictosidine synthase-like genes by horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dale; Qi, Jinfeng; Yue, Jipei; Huang, Jinling; Sun, Ting; Li, Suoping; Wen, Jian-Fan; Hettenhausen, Christian; Wu, Jinsong; Wang, Lei; Zhuang, Huifu; Wu, Jianqiang; Sun, Guiling

    2014-01-13

    Besides gene duplication and de novo gene generation, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is another important way of acquiring new genes. HGT may endow the recipients with novel phenotypic traits that are important for species evolution and adaption to new ecological niches. Parasitic systems expectedly allow the occurrence of HGT at relatively high frequencies due to their long-term physical contact. In plants, a number of HGT events have been reported between the organelles of parasites and the hosts, but HGT between host and parasite nuclear genomes has rarely been found. A thorough transcriptome screening revealed that a strictosidine synthase-like (SSL) gene in the root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and the shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis showed much higher sequence similarities with those in Brassicaceae than with those in their close relatives, suggesting independent gene horizontal transfer events from Brassicaceae to these parasites. These findings were strongly supported by phylogenetic analysis and their identical unique amino acid residues and deletions. Intriguingly, the nucleus-located SSL genes in Brassicaceae belonged to a new member of SSL gene family, which were originated from gene duplication. The presence of introns indicated that the transfer occurred directly by DNA integration in both parasites. Furthermore, positive selection was detected in the foreign SSL gene in O. aegyptiaca but not in C. australis. The expression of the foreign SSL genes in these two parasitic plants was detected in multiple development stages and tissues, and the foreign SSL gene was induced after wounding treatment in C. australis stems. These data imply that the foreign genes may still retain certain functions in the recipient species. Our study strongly supports that parasitic plants can gain novel nuclear genes from distantly related host species by HGT and the foreign genes may execute certain functions in the new hosts.

  20. Transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify a family of chlorhexidine efflux proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Karl A.; Jackson, Scott M.; Penesyan, Anahit; Patching, Simon G.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Brown, Melissa H.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Paulsen, Ian. T.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorhexidine is widely used as an antiseptic or disinfectant in both hospital and community settings. A number of bacterial species display resistance to this membrane-active biocide. We examined the transcriptomic response of a representative nosocomial human pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, to chlorhexidine to identify the primary chlorhexidine resistance elements. The most highly up-regulated genes encoded components of a major multidrug efflux system, AdeAB. The next most highly overexpressed gene under chlorhexidine stress was annotated as encoding a hypothetical protein, named here as AceI. Orthologs of the aceI gene are conserved within the genomes of a broad range of proteobacterial species. Expression of aceI or its orthologs from several other γ- or β-proteobacterial species in Escherichia coli resulted in significant increases in resistance to chlorhexidine. Additionally, disruption of the aceI ortholog in Acinetobacter baylyi rendered it more susceptible to chlorhexidine. The AceI protein was localized to the membrane after overexpression in E. coli. This protein was purified, and binding assays demonstrated direct and specific interactions between AceI and chlorhexidine. Transport assays using [14C]-chlorhexidine determined that AceI was able to mediate the energy-dependent efflux of chlorhexidine. An E15Q AceI mutant with a mutation in a conserved acidic residue, although unable to mediate chlorhexidine resistance and transport, was still able to bind chlorhexidine. Taken together, these data are consistent with AceI being an active chlorhexidine efflux protein and the founding member of a family of bacterial drug efflux transporters. PMID:24277845

  1. Analyses for binding of the transferrin family of proteins to the transferrin receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Tong, Xiangjun; Kawanami, Takafumi; Wano, Yuji; Hirose, Yuko; Sugai, Susumu; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2004-11-01

    Transferrin receptor 2 alpha (TfR2 alpha), the major product of the TfR2 gene, is the second receptor for transferrin (Tf), which can mediate cellular iron uptake in vitro. Homozygous mutations of TfR2 cause haemochromatosis, suggesting that TfR2 alpha may not be a simple iron transporter, but a regulator of iron by identifying iron-Tf. In this study, we analysed the ligand specificity of TfR2 alpha using human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and TfR2 alpha-stably transfected and expressing cells and flow-cytometric techniques. We showed that human TfR2 alpha interacted with both human and bovine Tf, whereas human TfR1 interacted only with human Tf. Neither human TfR1 nor TfR2 alpha interacted with either lactoferrin or melanotransferrin. In addition, by creating point mutations in human TfR2 alpha, the RGD sequence in the extracellular domain of TfR2 alpha was shown to be crucial for Tf-binding. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutated TfR2 alpha (Y250X), which has been reported in patients with hereditary haemochromatosis, also lost its ability to interact with both human and bovine Tf. Although human TfR1 and TfR2 alpha share an essential structure (RGD) for ligand-binding, they have clearly different ligand specificities, which may be related to the differences in their roles in iron metabolism.

  2. Global trophic position comparison of two dominant mesopelagic fish families (Myctophidae, Stomiidae using amino acid nitrogen isotopic analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Anela Choy

    Full Text Available The δ(15N values of organisms are commonly used across diverse ecosystems to estimate trophic position and infer trophic connectivity. We undertook a novel cross-basin comparison of trophic position in two ecologically well-characterized and different groups of dominant mid-water fish consumers using amino acid nitrogen isotope compositions. We found that trophic positions estimated from the δ(15N values of individual amino acids are nearly uniform within both families of these fishes across five global regions despite great variability in bulk tissue δ(15N values. Regional differences in the δ(15N values of phenylalanine confirmed that bulk tissue δ(15N values reflect region-specific water mass biogeochemistry controlling δ(15N values at the base of the food web. Trophic positions calculated from amino acid isotopic analyses (AA-TP for lanternfishes (family Myctophidae (AA-TP ∼2.9 largely align with expectations from stomach content studies (TP ∼3.2, while AA-TPs for dragonfishes (family Stomiidae (AA-TP ∼3.2 were lower than TPs derived from stomach content studies (TP∼4.1. We demonstrate that amino acid nitrogen isotope analysis can overcome shortcomings of bulk tissue isotope analysis across biogeochemically distinct systems to provide globally comparative information regarding marine food web structure.

  3. One or three species in Megadenia (Brassicaceae): insight from molecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukova, E V; Kozyrenko, M M; Boltenkov, E V; Gorovoy, P G

    2014-08-01

    Megadenia Maxim. is a small genus of the Brassicaceae endemic to East Asia with three disjunct areas of distribution: the eastern edge of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, the Eastern Sayan Mountains in southern Siberia, and Chandalaz Ridge in the southern Sikhote-Alin Mountains. Although distinct species (M. pygmaea Maxim., M. bardunovii Popov, and M. speluncarum Vorob., Vorosch. and Gorovoj) have been described from each area, they have lately been reduced to synonymy with M. pygmaea due to high morphological similarity. Here, we present the first molecular study of Megadenia. Using the sequences of 11 noncoding regions from the cytoplasmic (chloroplast and mitochondrial) and nuclear genomes, we assessed divergence within the genus and explored the relationships between Megadenia and Biscutella L. Although M. bardunovii, M. speluncarum, and M. pygmaea were found to be indiscernible with regard to the nuclear and mitochondrial markers studied, our data on the plastid genome revealed their distinctness and a clear subdivision of the genus into three lineages matching the three described species. All of the phylogenetic analyses of the chloroplast DNA sequences provide strong support for the inclusion of Megadenia and Biscutella in the tribe Biscutelleae. A dating analysis shows that the genus Megadenia is of Miocene origin and diversification within the genus, which has led to the three extant lineages, most likely occurred during the Early-Middle Pleistocene, in agreement with the vicariance pattern. Given the present-day distribution, differences in habitat preferences and in some anatomical traits, and lack of a direct genealogical relationship, M. pygmaea, M. bardunovii, and M. speluncarum should be treated as distinct species or at least subspecies.

  4. Structure-function analyses of a PL24 family ulvan lyase reveal key features and suggest its catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaganathan, ThirumalaiSelvi; Helbert, William; Kopel, Moran; Banin, Ehud; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2018-01-30

    Ulvan is a major cell wall component of green algae of the genus Ulva and some marine bacteria encode enzymes that can degrade this polysaccharide. The first ulvan degrading lyases have been recently characterized and several putative ulvan lyases have been recombinantly expressed, confirmed as ulvan lyases and partially characterized. Two families of ulvan degrading lyases, PL24 and PL25, have recently been established. The PL24 lyase LOR_107 from the bacterial Alteromonadales sp. strain LOR degrades ulvan endolytically, cleaving the bond at the C4 of a glucuronic acid. However, the mechanism and LOR_107 structural features involved are unknown. We present here the crystal structure of LOR_107, representing the first PL24 family structure. We found that LOR_107 adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller fold with a deep canyon on one side of the protein. Comparative sequence analysis revealed a cluster of conserved residues within this canyon, and site-directed mutagenesis disclosed several residues essential for catalysis. We also found that LOR_107 uses the His/Tyr catalytic mechanism, common to several PL families. We captured a tetrasaccharide substrate in the structures of two inactive mutants, which indicated a two-step binding event, with the first substrate interaction near the top of the canyon coordinated by Arg-320, followed by sliding of the substrate into the canyon toward the active-site residues. Surprisingly, the LOR_107 structure was very similar to that of PL25 family PLSV_3936, despite only ~14% sequence identity between the two enzymes. On the basis of our structural and mutational analyses, we propose a catalytic mechanism for LOR_107 that differs from the typical His/Tyr mechanism. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Assessing the risk of Glyphosate to native plants and weedy Brassicaceae species of North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to determine the ecological risk to native plants and weedy Brassicaceae species which may be growing in areas affected by off target movement of glyphosate applied to glyphosate-resistant canola (Brassica napus). Ten native grass and forb species were ...

  6. Brassica database (BRAD) version 2.0: integrating and mining Brassicaceae species genomic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaobo; Wu, Jian; Liang, Jianli; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-01-01

    The Brassica database (BRAD) was built initially to assist users apply Brassica rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic data efficiently to their research. However, many Brassicaceae genomes have been sequenced and released after its construction. These genomes are rich resources for comparative genomics, gene annotation and functional evolutionary studies of Brassica crops. Therefore, we have updated BRAD to version 2.0 (V2.0). In BRAD V2.0, 11 more Brassicaceae genomes have been integrated into the database, namely those of Arabidopsis lyrata, Aethionema arabicum, Brassica oleracea, Brassica napus, Camelina sativa, Capsella rubella, Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and three extremophiles Schrenkiella parvula, Thellungiella halophila and Thellungiella salsuginea. BRAD V2.0 provides plots of syntenic genomic fragments between pairs of Brassicaceae species, from the level of chromosomes to genomic blocks. The Generic Synteny Browser (GBrowse_syn), a module of the Genome Browser (GBrowse), is used to show syntenic relationships between multiple genomes. Search functions for retrieving syntenic and non-syntenic orthologs, as well as their annotation and sequences are also provided. Furthermore, genome and annotation information have been imported into GBrowse so that all functional elements can be visualized in one frame. We plan to continually update BRAD by integrating more Brassicaceae genomes into the database. Database URL: http://brassicadb.org/brad/. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Assessment of cadmium accumulation, toxicity, and tolerance in Brassicaceae and Fabaceae plants--implications for phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Naser A; Umar, Shahid; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2014-09-01

    This study, based on a greenhouse pot culture experiment conducted with 15-day-old rapeseed (Brassica campestris L. cv. Pusa Gold; family Brassicaceae) and moong bean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek cv. Pusa Ratna; family Fabaceae) plants treated with cadmium (Cd) concentrations (0, 50, and 100 mg kg(-1) soil), investigates their potential for Cd accumulation and tolerance, and dissects the underlying basic physiological/biochemical mechanisms. In both species, plant dry mass decreased, while Cd concentration of both root and shoot increased with increase in soil Cd. Roots harbored a higher amount of Cd (vs. shoot) in B. campestris, while the reverse applied to V. radiata. By comparison, root Cd concentration was higher in B. campestris than in V. radiata. The high Cd concentrations in B. campestris roots and V. radiata shoots led to significant elevation in oxidative indices, as measured in terms of electrolyte leakage, H2O2 content, and lipid peroxidation. Both plants displayed differential adaptation strategies to counteract the Cd burden-caused anomalies in their roots and shoots. In B. campestris, increasing Cd burden led to a significantly decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) content but a significant increase in activities of GSH reductase (GR), GSH peroxidase (GPX), and GSH sulfotransferase (GST). However, in V. radiata, increasing Cd burden caused significant increase in GSH content and GR activity, but a significant decline in activities of GPX and GST. Cross talks on Cd burden of tissues and the adapted Cd tolerance strategies against Cd burden-accrued toxicity indicated that B. campestris and V. radiata are good Cd stabilizer and Cd extractor, respectively, wherein a fine tuning among the major components (GR, GPX, GST, GSH) of the GSH redox system helped the plants to counteract differentially the Cd load-induced anomalies in tissues. On the whole, the physiological/biochemical characterization of the B. campestris and V. radiata responses to varying Cd

  8. Genome-wide classification and evolutionary and expression analyses of citrus MYB transcription factor families in sweet orange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jin Hou

    Full Text Available MYB family genes are widely distributed in plants and comprise one of the largest transcription factors involved in various developmental processes and defense responses of plants. To date, few MYB genes and little expression profiling have been reported for citrus. Here, we describe and classify 177 members of the sweet orange MYB gene (CsMYB family in terms of their genomic gene structures and similarity to their putative Arabidopsis orthologs. According to these analyses, these CsMYBs were categorized into four groups (4R-MYB, 3R-MYB, 2R-MYB and 1R-MYB. Gene structure analysis revealed that 1R-MYB genes possess relatively more introns as compared with 2R-MYB genes. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that these CsMYBs are distributed across nine chromosomes. Sweet orange includes a relatively small number of MYB genes compared with the 198 members in Arabidopsis, presumably due to a paralog reduction related to repetitive sequence insertion into promoter and non-coding transcribed region of the genes. Comparative studies of CsMYBs and Arabidopsis showed that CsMYBs had fewer gene duplication events. Expression analysis revealed that the MYB gene family has a wide expression profile in sweet orange development and plays important roles in development and stress responses. In addition, 337 new putative microsatellites with flanking sequences sufficient for primer design were also identified from the 177 CsMYBs. These results provide a useful reference for the selection of candidate MYB genes for cloning and further functional analysis forcitrus.

  9. Genome-Wide Classification and Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of Citrus MYB Transcription Factor Families in Sweet Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiao-Jin; Li, Si-Bei; Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    MYB family genes are widely distributed in plants and comprise one of the largest transcription factors involved in various developmental processes and defense responses of plants. To date, few MYB genes and little expression profiling have been reported for citrus. Here, we describe and classify 177 members of the sweet orange MYB gene (CsMYB) family in terms of their genomic gene structures and similarity to their putative Arabidopsis orthologs. According to these analyses, these CsMYBs were categorized into four groups (4R-MYB, 3R-MYB, 2R-MYB and 1R-MYB). Gene structure analysis revealed that 1R-MYB genes possess relatively more introns as compared with 2R-MYB genes. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that these CsMYBs are distributed across nine chromosomes. Sweet orange includes a relatively small number of MYB genes compared with the 198 members in Arabidopsis, presumably due to a paralog reduction related to repetitive sequence insertion into promoter and non-coding transcribed region of the genes. Comparative studies of CsMYBs and Arabidopsis showed that CsMYBs had fewer gene duplication events. Expression analysis revealed that the MYB gene family has a wide expression profile in sweet orange development and plays important roles in development and stress responses. In addition, 337 new putative microsatellites with flanking sequences sufficient for primer design were also identified from the 177 CsMYBs. These results provide a useful reference for the selection of candidate MYB genes for cloning and further functional analysis forcitrus. PMID:25375352

  10. Cloning, characterization and phylogenetic analyses of members of three major venom families from a single specimen of Walterinnesia aegyptia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu; Wang, Ying Ming; Tsai, Inn-Ho

    2008-06-01

    Walterinnesia aegyptia is a monotypic elapid snake inhabiting in Africa and Mideast. Although its envenoming is known to cause rapid deaths and paralysis, structural data of its venom proteins are rather limited. Using gel filtration and reverse-phase HPLC, phospholipases A(2) (PLAs), three-fingered toxins (3FTxs), and Kunitz-type protease inhibitors (KIns) were purified from the venom of a single specimen of this species caught in northern Egypt. In addition, specific primers were designed and PCR was carried out to amplify the cDNAs encoding members of the three venom families, respectively, using total cDNA prepared from its venom glands. Complete amino acid sequences of two acidic PLAs, three short chain 3FTxs, and four KIns of this venom species were thus deduced after their cDNAs were cloned and sequenced. They are all novel sequences and match the mass data of purified proteins. For members of each toxin family, protein sequences were aligned and subjected to molecular phylogenetic analyses. The results indicated that the PLAs and a Kunitz inhibitor of W. aegyptia are most similar to those of king cobra venom, and its 3FTxs belongs to either Type I alpha-neurotoxins or weak toxins of orphan-II subtype. It is remarkable that both king cobra and W. aegyptia cause rapid deaths of the victims, and a close evolutionary relationship between them is speculated.

  11. The molecular phylogeny of Matthiola R. Br. (Brassicaceae) inferred from ITS sequences, with special emphasis on the Macaronesian endemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaén-Molina, Ruth; Caujapé-Castells, Juli; Reyes-Betancort, Jorge Alfredo; Akhani, Hossein; Fernández-Palacios, Olga; de Paz, Julia Pérez; Febles-Hernández, Rosa; Marrero-Rodríguez, Aguedo

    2009-12-01

    Matthiola (Brassicaceae) is a genus that is widespread in the Mediterranean and Irano-Turanian regions and includes two species that are endemic to the archipelagos of Madeira and the Canaries in Macaronesia, which is an insular oceanic hotspot of biodiversity harboring many radiating endemic plant lineages. Sequence analyses of the nuclear ITS-1 and ITS-2 regions in a comprehensive geographical sample of Matthiola, encompassing all the endemic Macaronesian populations known to date, suggest independent Mediterranean and NW African origins of the taxa in Madeira and the Canaries, respectively. These molecular data reveal a complex evolutionary landscape that converges with morphological analyses in the recognition of two new Madeiran species. The data also suggest that the Canarian infra-specific endemic taxa described thus far have high (but non-diagnostic) levels of morphological and genetic diversity, and should be included in the single endemic Matthiola bolleana. In agreement with earlier investigations that revealed a high genetic differentiation between the populations of Matthiola in Fuerteventura and Lanzarote, our phylogeny supports independent founder events from the same mainland congener to either island. The consistently derived position of the Moroccan populations within a mostly Canarian clade suggests a further back-colonization of the continent. Notably, the ITS sequence resolution offered by Matthiola is higher than that found in many of the radiating Canarian endemic lineages for which molecular phylogenetic studies abound. Hence, our research discovers largely unexplored pathways to understand plant diversification in this oceanic insular hotspot through the investigation of non-speciose endemics.

  12. Thiouracil-Forming Bacteria Identified and Characterized upon Porcine In Vitro Digestion of Brassicaceae Feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiebooms, Julie A. L.; Wauters, Jella; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Houf, Kurt; De Vos, Paul; Van Trappen, Stefanie; Cleenwerck, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the frequent detection of the banned thyreostat thiouracil (TU) in livestock urine has been related to endogenous TU formation following digestion of glucosinolate-rich Brassicaceae crops. Recently, it was demonstrated that, upon in vitro digestion of Brassicaceae, fecal bacteria induce TU detection in livestock (porcine livestock > bovines). Therefore, the present study was intended to isolate and identify bacteria involved in this intestinal TU formation upon Brassicaceae digestion and to gain more insight into the underlying mechanism in porcine livestock. Twenty porcine fecal inocula (gilts and multiparous sows) were assessed through static in vitro colonic-digestion simulations with rapeseed. After derivatization and extraction of the fecal suspensions, TU was analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS2). On average, lower TU concentrations were observed in fecal colonic simulations in gilts (8.35 ng g−1 rapeseed ± 3.42 [mean ± standard deviation]) than in multiparous sows (52.63 ng g−1 ± 16.17), which correlates with maturation of the gut microbial population with age. Further exploration of the mechanism showed cell-dependent activity of the microbial conversion and sustained TU-forming activity after subjection of the fecal inoculum to moderate heat over a time span of up to 30 min. Finally, nine TU-producing bacterial species were successfully isolated and identified by a combination of biochemical and molecular techniques as Escherichia coli (n = 5), Lactobacillus reuteri (n = 2), Enterococcus faecium (n = 1), and Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae (n = 1). This report demonstrates that endogenous formation of TU is Brassicaceae induced and occurs under colonic conditions most likely through myrosinase-like enzyme activity expressed by different common intestinal bacterial species. PMID:25261511

  13. Polymorphic DNA microsatellite markers for forensic individual identification and parentage analyses of seven threatened species of parrots (family Psittacidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Jan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The parrot family represents one of the bird group with the largest number of endangered species, as a result of habitat destruction and illegal trade. This illicit traffic involves the smuggling of eggs and animals, and the laundering through captive breeding facilities of wild-caught animals. Despite the huge potential of wildlife DNA forensics to determine with conclusive evidence illegal trade, current usage of DNA profiling approaches in parrots has been limited by the lack of suitable molecular markers specifically developed for the focal species and by low cross-species polymorphism. In this study, we isolated DNA microsatellite markers in seven parrot species threatened with extinction (Amazona brasiliensis, A. oratrix, A. pretrei, A. rhodocorytha, Anodorhynchus leari, Ara rubrogenys and Primolius couloni. From an enriched genomic library followed by 454 pyrosequencing, we characterized a total of 106 polymorphic microsatellite markers (mostly tetranucleotides in the seven species and tested them across an average number of 19 individuals per species. The mean number of alleles per species and across loci varied from 6.4 to 8.3, with the mean observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.65 to 0.84. Identity and parentage exclusion probabilities were highly discriminatory. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci demonstrates their potential utility to perform individual genotyping and parentage analyses, in order to develop a DNA testing framework to determine illegal traffic in these threatened species.

  14. Brassicaceae Mustards: Traditional and Agronomic Uses in Australia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmudur Rahman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Commonly cultivated Brassicaceae mustards, namely garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata, white mustard (Brassica alba, Ethiopian mustard (B. carinata, Asian mustard (B. juncea, oilseed rape (B. napus, black mustard (B. nigra, rapeseed (B. rapa, white ball mustard (Calepina irregularis, ball mustard (Neslia paniculata, treacle mustard (Erysimum repandum, hedge mustard (Sisymbrium officinale, Asian hedge mustard (S. orientale, smooth mustard (S. erysimoides and canola are the major economically important oilseed crops in many countries. Mustards were naturalized to Australia and New Zealand and Australia is currently the second largest exporter of Brassicaceae oilseeds to meet the global demand for a healthy plant-derived oil, high in polyunsaturated fats. Apart from providing edible oil, various parts of these plants and many of their phytochemicals have been used traditionally for both agronomic as well as medicinal purposes, with evidence of their use by early Australian and New Zealand settlers and also the indigenous population. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of traditional and agronomic uses of Brassicaceae oilseeds and mustards with a focus on their importance in Australia and New Zealand.

  15. A comparative study of flavonoid compounds, vitamin C, and antioxidant properties of baby leaf Brassicaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, Ascensión; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Gil, María I; Ferreres, Federico

    2008-04-09

    A comparative study of antioxidant compounds, flavonoids and vitamin C, and also antioxidant activity was carried out in four species of Brassicaceae vegetables used for salads: watercress ( Nasturtium officinale R. Br.), mizuna [ Brassica rapa L. subsp. nipposinica (L.H. Bailey) Haneltand], wild rocket [ Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC.], and salad rocket [ Eruca vesicaria (L.) Cav.]. The characterization of individual phenolic compounds by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS-ESI in watercress and mizuna completes the polyphenol study previously reported for wild rocket and salad rocket. The qualitative study of flavonoids in watercress leaves showed a characteristic glycosylation pattern with rhamnose at the 7 position. Isorhamnetin 3,7-di- O-glucoside was identified in mizuna leaves and may be considered a chemotaxonomical marker in some B. rapa subspecies. Brassicaceae species showed differences in the quantitative study of flavonoids, and the highest content was detected in watercress leaves. Watercress and wild rocket leaves had the highest content of vitamin C. The antioxidant activity evaluated by different methods (ABTS, DPPH, and FRAP assays) showed a high correlation level with the content of polyphenols and vitamin C. In conclusion, the Brassicaceae leaves studied, watercress, mizuna, wild rocket, and salad rocket, presented a large variability in the composition and content of antioxidant compounds. These baby leaf species are good dietary sources of antioxidants with an important variability of bioactive compounds.

  16. Selection of sugar cane families by using BLUP and multi-diverse analyses for planting in the Brazilian savannah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, M H P; Ferreira, A; Peixoto, L A; Resende, M D V; Nascimento, M; Silva, F F

    2014-03-12

    This study evaluated different strategies to select sugar cane families and obtain clones adapted to the conditions of the Brazilian savannah. Specifically, 7 experiments were conducted, with 10 full sib families, and 2 witnesses in common to all experiments, in each experiment. The plants were grown in random blocks, with witnesses in common (incomplete blocks), and 6 repetitions of each experiment. The data were analyzed through the methodology of mixed patterns, in which the matrices of kinship between the families were identified by the method of restricted maximum likelihood. The characteristics that were evaluated included soluble solids content (BRIX), BRIX ton/ha, average mass of a culm, number of culms/m, and tons of culms/ha. A multi-diverse alternative based on the analysis of groupings by using the UPGMA method was used to identify the most viable families for selection, when considering the genotypic effects on all characteristics. This method appeared suitable for the selection of families, with 5 family groups being formed. The families that formed Group 2 appeared superior to all other families for all the evaluated characteristics. It is recommended that the families in Group 2 are preferentially used in sugar cane improvement programs to obtain varieties optimally adapted to the conditions of the Brazilian savannah.

  17. Bidirectional genetic and environmental influences on mother and child behavior: the family system as the unit of analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills-Koonce, W Roger; Propper, Cathi B; Gariepy, Jean-Louis; Blair, Clancy; Garrett-Peters, Patricia; Cox, Martha J

    2007-01-01

    Family systems theory proposes that an individual's functioning depends on interactive processes within the self and within the context of dyadic family subsystems. Previous research on these processes has focused largely on behavioral, cognitive, and psychophysiological properties of the individual and the dyad. The goals of this study were to explore genetic and environmental interactions within the family system by examining how the dopamine receptor D2 gene (DRD2) A1+ polymorphism in mothers and children relates to maternal sensitivity, how maternal and child characteristics might mediate those effects, and whether maternal sensitivity moderates the association between DRD2 A1+ and child affective problems. Evidence is found for an evocative effect of child polymorphism on parenting behavior, and for a moderating effect of child polymorphism on the association between maternal sensitivity and later child affective problems. Findings are discussed from a family systems perspective, highlighting the role of the family as a context for gene expression in both mothers and children.

  18. Stem base diseases of winter wheat grown after forecrops of the family Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Majchrzak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A study into the sanitary state of roots and culm base of winter wheat was carried out in 1999-2002 in the Production and Experimental Station in Bałcyny near Ostróda. Experimental wheat was cultivated after spring cross plants such as spring oilseed rape (Brassica napus ssp. oleiferus Metz., white mustard (Sinapis alba L, chinese mustard (Brassica juncea L., oleiferous radish (Raphanus sativus var. oleiferus L., false flax (Camelina sativa L., crambe (Crambe abbysinica Hoechst. and after oats (Avena sativa L. as a control. The other experimental factor was the method of after-harvest residue management, i.e. ploughing in the stubble, ploughing in the stubble and straw, ploughing in the stubble and straw with nitrogen added. The occurrence of root rot and stem base diseases was affected by weather conditions and forecrop species. Winter wheat roots were attacked to the lowest degree when spring rape and radish were used as forecrops, and to the highest degree - when grown after oat. The culm base was most intensely infected with fusarium foot rot (Fusarium spp.. The remaining root-rot diseases occurred every year but with different intensity. The method of utilization of after-harvest residues did not have a clear effect on the intensity of infection of the roots and culm base of winter wheat.

  19. Verbreitung und Ökologie von Nasturtium x sterile (Airy Shaw) Oef. (Brassicaceae) in Mitteleuropa

    OpenAIRE

    Bleeker, Walter; Hurka, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Anhand der Ergebnisse von Chromosomenzählungen wird die Verbreitung der Nasturtium- Taxa (Brassicaceae) in Mitteleuropa diskutiert. Nasturtium officina/e R. Br. (2n = 32) und Nasturtium microphyllum (Boenn.) Rchb. (2n = 64) sind primär geographisch isoliert, wobei N. officinale seinen Verbreitungsschwerpunkt im südlichen Mitteleuropa hat, während N. microphyllum im nördlichen Mitteleuropa vorkommt. Die natürlichen Areale der Taxa sind durch den ehemaligen Anbau von Nasturtium als Salatpflanze...

  20. Phytophagy of the predator Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851 (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae fed on prey and Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. J. Grigolli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the development and reproduction of the zoophytophagous predator Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae fed kale, broccoli and cabbage affects its. Nymphs and adults of this predator were fed on larvae of Plutella xylostella (L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae as prey with kale, cabbage, or broccoli. In the nymph period, the duration and prey consumption were similar with all the Brassicacea cultivar. However, nymph viability was higher for predators with broccoli leaves. The mean weight of 5th-instar nymphs, newly emerged females and the sex ratio were similar among the Brassicacea cultivars, while newly emerged males were heavier with kale and broccoli leaves. The supply of broccoli leaves resulted in greater oviposition, higher number of eggs per egg mass and longer longevity of P. nigrispinus males and females. Furthermore, the consumption of P. xylostella larvae by adult predators was higher with these cultivars. The net reproductive rate (R0 and mean generation time (T were highest for predators with prey and broccoli leaves. The reproductive parameters of P. nigrispinus were enhanced when fed on P. xylostella larvae with and broccoli leaves, which can be an alternative diet in laboratory rearing of this predator.

  1. Genome-Wide Analyses of the Soybean F-Box Gene Family in Response to Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qi; Xiao, Zhi-Xia; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Sun, Song; Liang, Kang-Jing; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2017-04-12

    The F-box family is one of the largest gene families in plants that regulate diverse life processes, including salt responses. However, the knowledge of the soybean F-box genes and their roles in salt tolerance remains limited. Here, we conducted a genome-wide survey of the soybean F-box family, and their expression analysis in response to salinity via in silico analysis of online RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to predict their potential functions. A total of 725 potential F-box proteins encoded by 509 genes were identified and classified into 9 subfamilies. The gene structures, conserved domains and chromosomal distributions were characterized. There are 76 pairs of duplicate genes identified, including genome-wide segmental and tandem duplication events, which lead to the expansion of the number of F-box genes. The in silico expression analysis showed that these genes would be involved in diverse developmental functions and play an important role in salt response. Our qRT-PCR analysis confirmed 12 salt-responding F-box genes. Overall, our results provide useful information on soybean F-box genes, especially their potential roles in salt tolerance.

  2. Recombination structure and genetic relatedness among members of the family Bromoviridae based on their RNAs 1 and 2 sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila, Moncef

    2009-06-01

    In determining putative recombination events and their evolution rates in the RNAs 1 and 2 of currently the known members of the family Bromoviridae, a detailed study comprising 107 accessions retrieved from the international databases, has been carried out by using RECCO and RDP v3.31beta algorithms. These programs allowed the detection of potential recombination sites in all the five virus genera composing the family Bromoviridae with various degrees of consistency. The RNAs 1 and 2 showed inferred phylogenies fully congruent and clearly delineated five clusters representing the five studied virus genera. In this respect, we proposed to classify the Ilarviruses in three distinct subgroups instead of 10 as mentioned in several reports of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses where its suggestions were based on antigenic differences. Moreover, we confirmed that Alfalfa mosaic virus should be considered as a component of the Ilarvirus genus instead of being the unique representative of Alfamovirus genus. In addition, Pelargonium zonate spot and Olive latent 2 viruses fully deserve their affiliation to the family Bromoviridae.

  3. The SULTR gene family in maize (Zea mays L.): Gene cloning and expression analyses under sulfate starvation and abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qin; Wang, Meiping; Xia, Zongliang

    2017-11-10

    Sulfur is an essential macronutrient required for plant growth, development and stress responses. The family of sulfate transporters (SULTRs) mediates the uptake and translocation of sulfate in higher plants. However, basic knowledge of the SULTR gene family in maize (Zea mays L.) is scarce. In this study, a genome-wide bioinformatic analysis of SULTR genes in maize was conducted, and the developmental expression patterns of the genes and their responses to sulfate starvation and abiotic stress were further investigated. The ZmSULTR family includes eight putative members in the maize genome and is clustered into four groups in the phylogenetic tree. These genes displayed differential expression patterns in various organs of maize. For example, expression of ZmSULTR1;1 and ZmSULTR4;1 was high in roots, and transcript levels of ZmSULTR3;1 and ZmSULTR3;3 were high in shoots. Expression of ZmSULTR1;2, ZmSULTR2;1, ZmSULTR3;3, and ZmSULTR4;1 was high in flowers. Also, these eight genes showed differential responses to sulfate deprivation in roots and shoots of maize seedlings. Transcript levels of ZmSULTR1;1, ZmSULTR1;2, and ZmSULTR3;4 were significantly increased in roots during 12-day-sulfate starvation stress, while ZmSULTR3;3 and ZmSULTR3;5 only showed an early response pattern in shoots. In addition, dynamic transcriptional changes determined via qPCR revealed differential expression profiles of these eight ZmSULTR genes in response to environmental stresses such as salt, drought, and heat stresses. Notably, all the genes, except for ZmSULTR3;3, were induced by drought and heat stresses. However, a few genes were induced by salt stress. Physiological determination showed that two important thiol-containing compounds, cysteine and glutathione, increased significantly under these abiotic stresses. The results suggest that members of the SULTR family might function in adaptations to sulfur deficiency stress and adverse growing environments. This study will lay a

  4. Haplotype and quantitative transcript analyses of Portuguese breast/ovarian cancer families with the BRCA1 R71G founder mutation of Galician origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Catarina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Vega, Ana; Soares, Maria José; Cerveira, Nuno; Bizarro, Susana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pereira, Deolinda; Rodrigues, Helena; Castro, Fernando; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the functional effect of the missense variant c.211A>G (R71G) localized at position -2 of exon 5 donor splice site in the BRCA1 gene and evaluated whether Portuguese and Galician families with this mutation share a common ancestry. Three unrelated Portuguese breast/ovarian cancer families carrying this variant were studied through qualitative and quantitative transcript analyses. We also evaluated the presence of loss of heterozigosity and the histopathologic characteristics of the carcinomas in those families. Informative families (two from Portugal and one from Galicia) were genotyped for polymorphic microsatellite markers flanking BRCA1 to reconstruct haplotypes. Qualitative RNA analysis revealed the presence of two alternative transcripts both in carriers of the BRCA1 R71G variant and in controls. Semi-quantitative fragment analysis and real-time RT-PCR showed a significant increase of the transcript with an out of frame deletion of the last 22nt of exon 5 (BRCA1-Delta22ntex5) and a decrease of the full-length transcript (BRCA1-ex5FL) in patients carrying the R71G mutation as compared to controls, whereas no significant differences were found for the transcript with in frame skipping of exon 5 (BRCA1-Deltaex5). One haplotype was found to segregate in the two informative Portuguese families and in the Galician family. We demonstrate that disruption of alternative transcript ratios is the mechanism causing hereditary breast/ovarian cancer associated with the BRCA1 R71G mutation. Furthermore, our findings indicate a common ancestry of the Portuguese and Galician families sharing this mutation.

  5. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 5 Enzyme with an Unexpected [beta]-Fucosidase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Park, David S.; Bae, Brian; Mackie, Roderick; Cann, Isaac K.O.; Nair, Satish K. (UIUC)

    2012-02-15

    We present characterization of PbFucA, a family 5 glycoside hydrolase (GH5) from Prevotella bryantii B{sub 1}4. While GH5 members typically are xylanases, PbFucA shows no activity toward xylan polysaccharides. A screen against a panel of p-nitrophenol coupled sugars identifies PbFucA as a {beta}-D-fucosidase. We also present the 2.2 {angstrom} resolution structure of PbFucA and use structure-based mutational analysis to confirm the role of catalytically essential residues. A comparison of the active sites of PbFucA with those of family 5 and 51 glycosidases reveals that while the essential catalytic framework is identical between these enzymes, the steric contours of the respective active site clefts are distinct and likely account for substrate discrimination. Our results show that members of this cluster of orthologous group (COG) 5520 have {beta}-D-fucosidase activities, despite showing an overall sequence and structural similarity to GH-5 xylanases.

  6. Proteomic analyses reveal an acidic prime side specificity for the astacin metalloprotease family reflected by physiological substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Barré, Olivier; Schilling, Oliver; Auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Ohler, Anke; Broder, Claudia; Schütte, André; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Stöcker, Walter; Overall, Christopher M

    2011-09-01

    Astacins are secreted and membrane-bound metalloproteases with clear associations to many important pathological and physiological processes. Yet with only a few substrates described their biological roles are enigmatic. Moreover, the lack of knowledge of astacin cleavage site specificities hampers assay and drug development. Using PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage site specificity) and TAILS (terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates) degradomics approaches >3000 cleavage sites were proteomically identified for five different astacins. Such broad coverage enables family-wide determination of specificities N- and C-terminal to the scissile peptide bond. Remarkably, meprin α, meprin β, and LAST_MAM proteases exhibit a strong preference for aspartate in the peptide (P)1' position because of a conserved positively charged residue in the active cleft subsite (S)1'. This unparalleled specificity has not been found for other families of extracellular proteases. Interestingly, cleavage specificity is also strongly influenced by proline in P2' or P3' leading to a rare example of subsite cooperativity. This specificity characterizes the astacins as unique contributors to extracellular proteolysis that is corroborated by known cleavage sites in procollagen I+III, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor)-A, IL (interleukin)-1β, and pro-kallikrein 7. Indeed, cleavage sites in VEGF-A and pro-kallikrein 7 identified by terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates matched those reported by Edman degradation. Moreover, the novel substrate FGF-19 was validated biochemically and shown to exhibit altered biological activity after meprin processing.

  7. Variation of antioxidative activity and growth enhancement of Brassicaceae induced by low-pressure oxygen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of growth enhancement induced by active oxygen species generated in an oxygen plasma is investigated. The plant growth enhancement induced by the active oxygen species would relate to an antioxidative activity, which is one of the biological responses. The amount of generated active oxygen species is varied by the oxygen gas pressure in a low-pressure RF glow discharge plasma. The antioxidative activity of sprouts of Brassicaceae induced by the oxygen plasma is maximized at pressures between 30 and 40 Pa, whereas the antioxidative activity becomes small at around 60 and 80 Pa. The pressure dependence of the antioxidative activity of sprout stems is opposite to that of the stem length of the sprouts. The growth enhancement would be induced by the increase in the concentration of active oxygen species in plants owing to the decrease in the amount of antioxidative substances.

  8. Biochemical and biological characterization of two Brassicaceae after their commercial expiry date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombra, Maria Neve; Cozzolino, Autilia; Nazzaro, Filomena; d'Acierno, Antonio; Tremonte, Patrizio; Coppola, Raffaele; Fratianni, Florinda

    2017-03-01

    Two Brassicaceae (Eruca sativa, Brassica oleracea var. sabauda) were stored in air and under a modified atmosphere for several days after their expiry date and then analyzed. The polyphenol content and composition, as well as the antioxidant activity of the extracts, were assessed, compared to the fresh products. Antimicrobial properties on tester strains (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and in vitro anti-proliferative activity were evaluated. The cabbage extracts exhibited antimicrobial activity mainly on the ninth day after the expiry date and retained significant inhibitory effects against colon carcinoma (CaCo-2) cells. The rocket salad extract exhibited antiproliferative but not antimicrobial activity. Overall, our results indicated that they might represent a good source of natural antioxidants with antimicrobial and anti-proliferative activity, also after their expiry date, suggesting their exploitation for the recovery of important biomolecules used in the food and health industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analyses of Aquaporin Gene Family during Development and Abiotic Stress in Banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Hou, Xiaowan; Huang, Chao; Yan, Yan; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Juhua; Miao, Hongxia; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Meiying; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-08-20

    Aquaporins (AQPs) function to selectively control the flow of water and other small molecules through biological membranes, playing crucial roles in various biological processes. However, little information is available on the AQP gene family in bananas. In this study, we identified 47 banana AQP genes based on the banana genome sequence. Evolutionary analysis of AQPs from banana, Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice indicated that banana AQPs (MaAQPs) were clustered into four subfamilies. Conserved motif analysis showed that all banana AQPs contained the typical AQP-like or major intrinsic protein (MIP) domain. Gene structure analysis suggested the majority of MaAQPs had two to four introns with a highly specific number and length for each subfamily. Expression analysis of MaAQP genes during fruit development and postharvest ripening showed that some MaAQP genes exhibited high expression levels during these stages, indicating the involvement of MaAQP genes in banana fruit development and ripening. Additionally, some MaAQP genes showed strong induction after stress treatment and therefore, may represent potential candidates for improving banana resistance to abiotic stress. Taken together, this study identified some excellent tissue-specific, fruit development- and ripening-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MaAQP genes, which could lay a solid foundation for genetic improvement of banana cultivars.

  10. Phylogeographic analyses of submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans and Etelis "marshi" (family Lutjanidae reveal concordant genetic structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly R Andrews

    Full Text Available The Hawaiian Archipelago has become a natural laboratory for understanding genetic connectivity in marine organisms as a result of the large number of population genetics studies that have been conducted across this island chain for a wide taxonomic range of organisms. However, population genetic studies have been conducted for only two species occurring in the mesophotic or submesophotic zones (30+m in this archipelago. To gain a greater understanding of genetic connectivity in these deepwater habitats, we investigated the genetic structure of two submesophotic fish species (occurring ∼200-360 m in this archipelago. We surveyed 16 locations across the archipelago for submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans (N = 787 and E. "marshi" (formerly E. carbunculus; N = 770 with 436-490 bp of mtDNA cytochrome b and 10-11 microsatellite loci. Phylogeographic analyses reveal no geographic structuring of mtDNA lineages and recent coalescence times that are typical of shallow reef fauna. Population genetic analyses reveal no overall structure across most of the archipelago, a pattern also typical of dispersive shallow fishes. However some sites in the mid-archipelago (Raita Bank to French Frigate Shoals had significant population differentiation. This pattern of no structure between ends of the Hawaiian range, and significant structure in the middle, was previously observed in a submesophotic snapper (Pristipomoides filamentosus and a submesophotic grouper (Hyporthodus quernus. Three of these four species also have elevated genetic diversity in the mid-archipelago. Biophysical larval dispersal models from previous studies indicate that this elevated diversity may result from larval supplement from Johnston Atoll, ∼800 km southwest of Hawaii. In this case the boundaries of stocks for fishery management cannot be defined simply in terms of geography, and fishery management in Hawaii may need to incorporate external larval supply into management

  11. The tRNA(Tyr) multigene family of Nicotiana rustica: genome organization, sequence analyses and expression in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, T; Beier, D; Beier, H

    1992-12-01

    Tobacco tRNA(Tyr) genes are mainly organized as a dispersed multigene family as shown by hybridization with a tRNA(Tyr)-specific probe to Southern blots of Eco RI-digested DNA. A Nicotiana genomic library was prepared by Eco RI digestion of nuclear DNA, ligation of the fragments into the vector lambda gtWES.lambda B and in vitro packaging. The phage library was screened with a 5'-labelled synthetic oligonucleotide complementary to nucleotides 18 to 37 of cytoplasmic tobacco tRNA(Tyr). Eleven hybridizing Eco RI fragments ranging in size from 1.7 to 7.5 kb were isolated from recombinant lambda phage and subcloned into pUC19 plasmid. Four of the sequenced tRNA(Tyr) genes code for the known tobacco tRNA1(Tyr) (G psi A) and seven code for tRNA2(Tyr) (G psi A). The two tRNA species differ in one nucleotide pair at the basis of the T psi C stem. Only one tRNA(Tyr) gene (pNtY5) contains a point mutation (T54-->A54). Comparison of the intervening sequences reveals that they differ considerably in length and sequence. Maturation of intron-containing pre-tRNAs was studied in HeLa and wheat germ extracts. All pre-tRNAs(Tyr)--with one exception--are processed and spliced in both extracts. The tRNA(Tyr) gene encoded by pNtY5 is transcribed efficiently in HeLa extract but processing of the pre-tRNA is impaired.

  12. Genome-wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

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    Eunyoung Seo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analyses of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding.

  13. Performance of the Family Satisfaction with the End-of-Life Care (FAMCARE) measure in an ethnically diverse cohort: psychometric analyses using item response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresi, Jeanne A; Ornstein, Katherine; Ocepek-Welikson, Katja; Ramirez, Mildred; Siu, Albert

    2014-02-01

    The Family Satisfaction with End-of-Life Care (FAMCARE) has been used widely among caregivers to individuals with cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of this measure using item response theory (IRT). The analytic sample was comprised of caregivers to 1,983 patients with advanced cancer. Among the patients, 56 % were females, with mean age 59.9 years (s.d. = 11.8), 20 % were non-Hispanic Black. The majority were family members either living with (44 %) or not living with (35 %) the patient. Factor analyses and IRT were used to examine the dimensionality, information, and reliability of the FAMCARE. Although a bi-factor model fit the data slightly better than did a unidimensional model, the loadings on the group factors were very low. Thus, a unidimensional model appears to provide adequate representation for the item set. The reliability estimates, calculated along the satisfaction (theta) continuum, were adequate (>0.80) for all levels of theta for which subjects had scores. Examination of the category response functions from IRT showed overlap in the lower categories with little unique information provided; moreover, the categories were not observed to be interval. Based on these analyses, a three-response category format was recommended: very satisfied, satisfied, and not satisfied. Most information was provided in the range indicative of either dissatisfaction or high satisfaction. These analyses support the use of fewer response categories and provide item parameters that form a basis for developing shorter-form scales. Such a revision has the potential to reduce respondent burden.

  14. Inheritance and expression patterns of BN28, a low temperature induced gene in Brassica napus, throughout the Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, G P; Nykiforuk, C L; Johnson-Flanagan, A M; Boothe, J G

    1996-08-01

    Molecular genetics is becoming an important tool in the breeding and selection of agronomically important traits. BN28 is a low temperature induced gene in Brassicaceae species. PCR and Southern blot analysis indicate that BN28 is polymorphic in the three diploid genomes: Brassica rapa (AA), Brassica nigra (BB), and Brassica oleracea (CC). Of the allotetraploids, Brassica napus (AACC) is the only species to have inherited homologous genes from both parental genomes. Brassica juncea (AABB) and Brassica carinata (BBCC) have inherited homologues from the AA and CC genomes, respectively, while Sinapsis arvensis (SS) contains a single homologue from the BB genome and Sinapsis alba (dd) appears to be different from all the diploid parents. All species show message induction when exposed to low temperature. However, differences in expression were noticed at the protein level, with silencing occurring in the BB genome at the level of translation. Results suggest that silencing is occurring in diploid species where duplication may not have occurred. Molecular characterization and inheritance of BN28 homologues in the Brassicaceae may play an important role in determining their quantitative function during exposure to low temperature. Key words : Brassicaceae, BN28, inheritance, polymorphism.

  15. Investigation of genes encoding calcineurin B-like protein family in legumes and their expression analyses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Meena

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is a ubiquitous second messenger that transmits various internal and external signals including stresses and, therefore, is important for plants' response process. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs are one of the plant calcium sensors, which sense and convey the changes in cytosolic Ca2+-concentration for response process. A search in four leguminous plant (soybean, Medicago truncatula, common bean and chickpea genomes identified 9 to 15 genes in each species that encode CBL proteins. Sequence analyses of CBL peptides and coding sequences (CDS suggested that there are nine original CBL genes in these legumes and some of them were multiplied during whole genome or local gene duplication. Coding sequences of chickpea CBL genes (CaCBL were cloned from their cDNAs and sequenced, and their annotations in the genome assemblies were corrected accordingly. Analyses of protein sequences and gene structures of CBL family in plant kingdom indicated its diverse origin but showed a remarkable conservation in overall protein structure with appearance of complex gene structure in the course of evolution. Expression of CaCBL genes in different tissues and in response to different stress and hormone treatment were studied. Most of the CaCBL genes exhibited high expression in flowers. Expression profile of CaCBL genes in response to different abiotic stresses and hormones related to development and stresses (ABA, auxin, cytokinin, SA and JA at different time intervals suggests their diverse roles in development and plant defence in addition to abiotic stress tolerance. These data not only contribute to a better understanding of the complex regulation of chickpea CBL gene family, but also provide valuable information for further research in chickpea functional genomics.

  16. Analyses of Sox-B and Sox-E Family Genes in the Cephalopod Sepia officinalis: Revealing the Conserved and the Unusual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Focareta

    Full Text Available Cephalopods provide an unprecedented opportunity for comparative studies of the developmental genetics of organ systems that are convergent with analogous vertebrate structures. The Sox-family of transcription factors is an important class of DNA-binding proteins that are known to be involved in many aspects of differentiation, but have been largely unstudied in lophotrochozoan systems. Using a degenerate primer strategy we have isolated coding sequence for three members of the Sox family of transcription factors from a cephalopod mollusk, the European cuttlefish Sepia officinalis: Sof-SoxE, Sof-SoxB1, and Sof-SoxB2. Analyses of their expression patterns during organogenesis reveals distinct spatial and temporal expression domains. Sof-SoxB1 shows early ectodermal expression throughout the developing epithelium, which is gradually restricted to presumptive sensory epithelia. Expression within the nervous system appears by mid-embryogenesis. Sof-SoxB2 expression is similar to Sof-SoxB1 within the developing epithelia in early embryogenesis, however appears in largely non-overlapping expression domains within the central nervous system and is not expressed in the maturing sensory epithelium. In contrast, Sof-SoxE is expressed throughout the presumptive mesodermal territories at the onset of organogenesis. As development proceeds, Sof-SoxE expression is elevated throughout the developing peripheral circulatory system. This expression disappears as the circulatory system matures, but expression is maintained within undifferentiated connective tissues throughout the animal, and appears within the nervous system near the end of embryogenesis. SoxB proteins are widely known for their role in neural specification in numerous phylogenetic lineages. Our data suggests that Sof-SoxB genes play similar roles in cephalopods. In contrast, Sof-SoxE appears to be involved in the early stages of vasculogenesis of the cephalopod closed circulatory system, a novel

  17. Analyses of Sox-B and Sox-E Family Genes in the Cephalopod Sepia officinalis: Revealing the Conserved and the Unusual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focareta, Laura; Cole, Alison G

    2016-01-01

    Cephalopods provide an unprecedented opportunity for comparative studies of the developmental genetics of organ systems that are convergent with analogous vertebrate structures. The Sox-family of transcription factors is an important class of DNA-binding proteins that are known to be involved in many aspects of differentiation, but have been largely unstudied in lophotrochozoan systems. Using a degenerate primer strategy we have isolated coding sequence for three members of the Sox family of transcription factors from a cephalopod mollusk, the European cuttlefish Sepia officinalis: Sof-SoxE, Sof-SoxB1, and Sof-SoxB2. Analyses of their expression patterns during organogenesis reveals distinct spatial and temporal expression domains. Sof-SoxB1 shows early ectodermal expression throughout the developing epithelium, which is gradually restricted to presumptive sensory epithelia. Expression within the nervous system appears by mid-embryogenesis. Sof-SoxB2 expression is similar to Sof-SoxB1 within the developing epithelia in early embryogenesis, however appears in largely non-overlapping expression domains within the central nervous system and is not expressed in the maturing sensory epithelium. In contrast, Sof-SoxE is expressed throughout the presumptive mesodermal territories at the onset of organogenesis. As development proceeds, Sof-SoxE expression is elevated throughout the developing peripheral circulatory system. This expression disappears as the circulatory system matures, but expression is maintained within undifferentiated connective tissues throughout the animal, and appears within the nervous system near the end of embryogenesis. SoxB proteins are widely known for their role in neural specification in numerous phylogenetic lineages. Our data suggests that Sof-SoxB genes play similar roles in cephalopods. In contrast, Sof-SoxE appears to be involved in the early stages of vasculogenesis of the cephalopod closed circulatory system, a novel role for a member of

  18. Dynamic Subcellular Localization of Iron during Embryo Development in Brassicaceae Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Ibeas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential micronutrient for plants. Little is know about how iron is loaded in embryo during seed development. In this article we used Perls/DAB staining in order to reveal iron localization at the cellular and subcellular levels in different Brassicaceae seed species. In dry seeds of Brassica napus, Nasturtium officinale, Lepidium sativum, Camelina sativa, and Brassica oleracea iron localizes in vacuoles of cells surrounding provasculature in cotyledons and hypocotyl. Using B. napus and N. officinale as model plants we determined where iron localizes during seed development. Our results indicate that iron is not detectable by Perls/DAB staining in heart stage embryo cells. Interestingly, at torpedo development stage iron localizes in nuclei of different cells type, including integument, free cell endosperm and almost all embryo cells. Later, iron is detected in cytoplasmic structures in different embryo cell types. Our results indicate that iron accumulates in nuclei in specific stages of embryo maturation before to be localized in vacuoles of cells surrounding provasculature in mature seeds.

  19. Relaxed pollinator-mediated selection weakens floral integration in self-compatible taxa of Leavenworthia (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ingrid A; Busch, Jeremiah W

    2006-06-01

    Natural selection should favor the integration of floral traits that enhance pollen export and import in plant populations that rely upon pollinators. If this is true, then phenotypic correlations between floral traits should weaken in self-fertilizing groups that do not require pollinator visitation to produce seed. We tested this hypothesis in Leavenworthia, a plant genus in which there have been multiple independent losses of the sporophytic self-incompatibility system found throughout the Brassicaceae. In particular, we conducted phylogenetically independent contrasts of floral trait correlations between two pairs of self-incompatible (SI) and self-compatible (SC) sister taxa. In support of the hypothesis that pollinator-mediated selection integrates floral traits, we found that both SC Leavenworthia taxa have weaker overall floral correlations in comparison to sister taxa that rely upon pollinators. The two independently derived SC Leavenworthia flowers have significantly weaker stamen-petal or pistil-petal correlations, respectively, whereas the stamen-pistil correlation remains constant. These patterns suggest that relaxation of pollinator-mediated selection weakens the integration of traits associated with pollen export and import. The retention of high stamen-pistil correlations in the SC taxa of Leavenworthia further implies that the integration of these traits is either constrained or maintained by selection favoring the successful transfer of pollen within flowers to secure self-pollination.

  20. Species Delimitation and Interspecific Relationships of the Genus Orychophragmus (Brassicaceae) Inferred from Whole Chloroplast Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huan; Hu, Quanjun; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A; Luo, Xin; Zeng, Tingting; Guo, Xinyi; Liu, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations from few chloroplast DNA fragments show lower discriminatory power in the delimitation of closely related species and less resolution ability in discerning interspecific relationships than from nrITS. Here we use Orychophragmus (Brassicaceae) as a model system to test the hypothesis that the whole chloroplast genomes (plastomes), with accumulation of more variations despite the slow evolution, can overcome these weaknesses. We used Illumina sequencing technology via a reference-guided assembly to construct complete plastomes of 17 individuals from six putatively assumed species in the genus. All plastomes are highly conserved in genome structure, gene order, and orientation, and they are around 153 kb in length and contain 113 unique genes. However, nucleotide variations are quite substantial to support the delimitation of all sampled species and to resolve interspecific relationships with high statistical supports. As expected, the estimated divergences between major clades and species are lower than those estimated from nrITS probably due to the slow substitution rate of the plastomes. However, the plastome and nrITS phylogenies were contradictory in the placements of most species, thus suggesting that these species may have experienced complex non-bifurcating evolutions with incomplete lineage sorting and/or hybrid introgressions. Overall, our case study highlights the importance of using plastomes to examine species boundaries and establish an independent phylogeny to infer the speciation history of plants.

  1. Dynamic Subcellular Localization of Iron during Embryo Development in Brassicaceae Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibeas, Miguel A; Grant-Grant, Susana; Navarro, Nathalia; Perez, M F; Roschzttardtz, Hannetz

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for plants. Little is know about how iron is loaded in embryo during seed development. In this article we used Perls/DAB staining in order to reveal iron localization at the cellular and subcellular levels in different Brassicaceae seed species. In dry seeds of Brassica napus, Nasturtium officinale, Lepidium sativum, Camelina sativa, and Brassica oleracea iron localizes in vacuoles of cells surrounding provasculature in cotyledons and hypocotyl. Using B. napus and N. officinale as model plants we determined where iron localizes during seed development. Our results indicate that iron is not detectable by Perls/DAB staining in heart stage embryo cells. Interestingly, at torpedo development stage iron localizes in nuclei of different cells type, including integument, free cell endosperm and almost all embryo cells. Later, iron is detected in cytoplasmic structures in different embryo cell types. Our results indicate that iron accumulates in nuclei in specific stages of embryo maturation before to be localized in vacuoles of cells surrounding provasculature in mature seeds.

  2. Evolution of DNA methylation patterns in the Brassicaceae is driven by differences in genome organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danelle K Seymour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an ancient molecular modification found in most eukaryotes. In plants, DNA methylation is not only critical for transcriptionally silencing transposons, but can also affect phenotype by altering expression of protein coding genes. The extent of its contribution to phenotypic diversity over evolutionary time is, however, unclear, because of limited stability of epialleles that are not linked to DNA mutations. To dissect the relative contribution of DNA methylation to transposon surveillance and host gene regulation, we leveraged information from three species in the Brassicaceae that vary in genome architecture, Capsella rubella, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that the lineage-specific expansion and contraction of transposon and repeat sequences is the main driver of interspecific differences in DNA methylation. The most heavily methylated portions of the genome are thus not conserved at the sequence level. Outside of repeat-associated methylation, there is a surprising degree of conservation in methylation at single nucleotides located in gene bodies. Finally, dynamic DNA methylation is affected more by tissue type than by environmental differences in all species, but these responses are not conserved. The majority of DNA methylation variation between species resides in hypervariable genomic regions, and thus, in the context of macroevolution, is of limited phenotypic consequence.

  3. Analysing clinical decision analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habbema, J. D.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Dippel, D. W.; Marshall, S.; Hilden, J.

    1990-01-01

    We present a critical review of aspects of clinical decision analysis which uses an application to screening for familial intracranial aneurysms. The analysis is reported together with methods for assessing decision trees. These methods appear to be powerful checks on the usually rather intuitive

  4. Effect of biofumigation with brassica pellets combined with Brassicaceae cover crops and plastic cover on the survival and infectivity of inoculum of Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Molina, M Carmen; Serrano-Pérez, Paula; Palo, Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Biofumigation with defatted seed meal of Brassicaceae in the form of pellets has several advantages over the incorporation of fresh Brassicaceae crops to control soil-borne diseases. Two field experiments were established to evaluate the effect of biofumigation with brassica pellets on the survival and infectivity of Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan inoculum introduced before treatments. In the spring experiment the incorporation of additional Brassicaceae cover crop (Brassica nigra L. and Sinapis alba L.) was tested, and in the summer experiment two brassica pellet doses were applied. Biofumigation with brassica pellets in spring (3000 kg ha(-1) with and without plastic) or in summer (3000 kg ha(-1) with or without plastic; 6000 kg ha(-1) without plastic) had no significant effect on the survival of P. nicotianae, regardless of the incorporation of additional Brassicaceae cover crop in spring. Reduction in infectivity in spring was related to the application of plastic, especially when combined with brassica pellets and Brassicaceae crop. In summer, soil temperature was the main factor in the inactivation of the inoculum, especially when plastic was applied, and no additional inactivation was achieved with brassica pellets. In spring and summer, biofumigation with brassica pellets had no effect on the survival of P. nicotianae. Application of plastic in spring may reduce infectivity. Soil temperature is the main factor in the inactivation of inoculum in summer, especially when plastic is applied. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. The PIN gene family in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum): genome-wide identification and gene expression analyses during root development and abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Peng; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Limin; Zhang, Yuzhou; Wang, Xiaosi; Xiao, Hui; Yu, Jianing; Xiao, Guanghui

    2017-07-03

    Cell elongation and expansion are significant contributors to plant growth and morphogenesis, and are often regulated by environmental cues and endogenous hormones. Auxin is one of the most important phytohormones involved in the regulation of plant growth and development and plays key roles in plant cell expansion and elongation. Cotton fiber cells are a model system for studying cell elongation due to their large size. Cotton is also the world's most utilized crop for the production of natural fibers for textile and garment industries, and targeted expression of the IAA biosynthetic gene iaaM increased cotton fiber initiation. Polar auxin transport, mediated by PIN and AUX/LAX proteins, plays a central role in the control of auxin distribution. However, very limited information about PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux carriers in cotton is known. In this study, 17 PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux carrier family members were identified in the Gossypium hirsutum (G. hirsutum) genome. We found that PIN1-3 and PIN2 genes originated from the At subgenome were highly expressed in roots. Additionally, evaluation of gene expression patterns indicated that PIN genes are differentially induced by various abiotic stresses. Furthermore, we found that the majority of cotton PIN genes contained auxin (AuxREs) and salicylic acid (SA) responsive elements in their promoter regions were significantly up-regulated by exogenous hormone treatment. Our results provide a comprehensive analysis of the PIN gene family in G. hirsutum, including phylogenetic relationships, chromosomal locations, and gene expression and gene duplication analyses. This study sheds light on the precise roles of PIN genes in cotton root development and in adaption to stress responses.

  6. Diversification and the evolution of dispersal ability in the tribe Brassiceae (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, C G; Hall, J C; Rubio de Casas, R; Wang, T Y; Donohue, K

    2014-12-01

    Dispersal and establishment ability can influence evolutionary processes such as geographic isolation, adaptive divergence and extinction probability. Through these population-level dynamics, dispersal ability may also influence macro-evolutionary processes such as species distributions and diversification. This study examined patterns of evolution of dispersal-related fruit traits, and how the evolution of these traits is correlated with shifts in geographic range size, habitat and diversification rates in the tribe Brassiceae (Brassicaceae). The phylogenetic analysis included 72 taxa sampled from across the Brassiceae and included both nuclear and chloroplast markers. Dispersal-related fruit characters were scored and climate information for each taxon was retrieved from a database. Correlations between fruit traits, seed characters, habitat, range and climate were determined, together with trait-dependent diversification rates. It was found that the evolution of traits associated with limited dispersal evolved only in association with compensatory traits that increase dispersal ability. The evolution of increased dispersal ability occurred in multiple ways through the correlated evolution of different combinations of fruit traits. The evolution of traits that increase dispersal ability was in turn associated with larger seed size, increased geographic range size and higher diversification rates. This study provides evidence that the evolution of increased dispersal ability and larger seed size, which may increase establishment ability, can also influence macro-evolutionary processes, possibly by increasing the propensity for long-distance dispersal. In particular, it may increase speciation and consequent diversification rates by increasing the likelihood of geographic and thereby reproductive isolation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Divergence of regulatory networks governed by the orthologous transcription factors FLC and PEP1 in Brassicaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Julieta L; Tilmes, Vicky; Madrigal, Pedro; Severing, Edouard; Richter, René; Rijkenberg, Colin W M; Krajewski, Paweł; Coupland, George

    2017-12-19

    Genome-wide landscapes of transcription factor (TF) binding sites (BSs) diverge during evolution, conferring species-specific transcriptional patterns. The rate of divergence varies in different metazoan lineages but has not been widely studied in plants. We identified the BSs and assessed the effects on transcription of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and PERPETUAL FLOWERING 1 (PEP1), two orthologous MADS-box TFs that repress flowering and confer vernalization requirement in the Brassicaceae species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabis alpina, respectively. We found that only 14% of their BSs were conserved in both species and that these contained a CArG-box that is recognized by MADS-box TFs. The CArG-box consensus at conserved BSs was extended compared with the core motif. By contrast, species-specific BSs usually lacked the CArG-box in the other species. Flowering-time genes were highly overrepresented among conserved targets, and their CArG-boxes were widely conserved among Brassicaceae species. Cold-regulated (COR) genes were also overrepresented among targets, but the cognate BSs and the identity of the regulated genes were usually different in each species. In cold, COR gene transcript levels were increased in flc and pep1-1 mutants compared with WT, and this correlated with reduced growth in pep1-1 Therefore, FLC orthologs regulate a set of conserved target genes mainly involved in reproductive development and were later independently recruited to modulate stress responses in different Brassicaceae lineages. Analysis of TF BSs in these lineages thus distinguishes widely conserved targets representing the core function of the TF from those that were recruited later in evolution. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  8. Identification, and Functional and Expression Analyses of the CorA/MRS2/MGT-Type Magnesium Transporter Family in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyou; Du, Hanmei; Huang, Kaifeng; Chen, Xin; Liu, Tianyu; Gao, Shibin; Liu, Hailan; Tang, Qilin; Rong, Tingzhao; Zhang, Suzhi

    2016-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg(2+)) is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development, and the CorA/MRS2/MGT-type Mg(2+) transporters play important roles in maintaining Mg(2+) homeostasis in plants. Although the MRS2/MGT genes have been identified in two model plant species, Arabidopsis and rice, a comprehensive analysis of the MRS2/MGT gene family in other plants is lacking. In this work, 12 putative MRS2/MGT genes (ZmMGT1- ZmMGT12) were identified in maize and all of them were classified into five distinct subfamilies by phylogenetic analysis. A complementation assay in the Salmonella typhimurium MM281 strain showed that five representatives of the 12 members possess Mg(2+) transport abilities. Inhibition of ZmMGT protein activity using the hexaamminecobalt (III) (Co-Hex) inhibitor indicated that the ZmMGT protein mediated both low-affinity and high-affinity Mg(2+) transport in maize. A semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that eight genes were constitutively expressed in all of the detected tissues, with one being specifically expressed in roots and three having no detectable expression signals. A quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that some ZmMGT members displayed differential responses to Mg(2+) deficiency and aluminum (Al) stress. Furthermore, root growth inhibition and Mg(2+) accumulation analyses in two maize inbred lines, which conferred different levels of Al tolerance, revealed that ZmMGT proteins contributed to the Al resistance of the Al tolerance genotype. We hypothesize that ZmMGT family members function as Mg(2+) transporters and may play a role in linking Mg(2+) deficiency and Al stress responses. Our results will be valuable in a further analysis of the important biological functions of ZmMGT members in maize. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Circular job-related spatial mobility in Germany:Comparative analyses of two representative surveys on the forms, prevalence and relevance in the context of partnership and family development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Rüger

    2012-01-01

    In this regard, the present article aims at achieving three essential objectives. First, we will introduce a common indicator for circular job mobility patterns found in the two surveys. On the basis of this common indicator, we will comparatively analyse the prevalence of different mobility forms and their composition according to key socio-demographic characteristics. In addition, we will use multivariate analyses to illustrate the relevance of job mobility for partnership and family development. Results suggest mobility patterns to be an important individual context factor when explaining processes relevant to partnerships and family. In particular, women who exhibit some degree of job mobility are less often married and rarely have children.

  10. Genome-wide investigation and expression analyses of WD40 protein family in the model plant foxtail millet (Setaria italica L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awdhesh Kumar Mishra

    Full Text Available WD40 proteins play a crucial role in diverse protein-protein interactions by acting as scaffolding molecules and thus assisting in the proper activity of proteins. Hence, systematic characterization and expression profiling of these WD40 genes in foxtail millet would enable us to understand the networks of WD40 proteins and their biological processes and gene functions. In the present study, a genome-wide survey was conducted and 225 potential WD40 genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis categorized the WD40 proteins into 5 distinct sub-families (I-V. Gene Ontology annotation revealed the biological roles of the WD40 proteins along with its cellular components and molecular functions. In silico comparative mapping with sorghum, maize and rice demonstrated the orthologous relationships and chromosomal rearrangements including duplication, inversion and deletion of WD40 genes. Estimation of synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates revealed its evolutionary significance in terms of gene-duplication and divergence. Expression profiling against abiotic stresses provided novel insights into specific and/or overlapping expression patterns of SiWD40 genes. Homology modeling enabled three-dimensional structure prediction was performed to understand the molecular functions of WD40 proteins. Although, recent findings had shown the importance of WD40 domains in acting as hubs for cellular networks during many biological processes, it has invited a lesser research attention unlike other common domains. Being a most promiscuous interactors, WD40 domains are versatile in mediating critical cellular functions and hence this genome-wide study especially in the model crop foxtail millet would serve as a blue-print for functional characterization of WD40s in millets and bioenergy grass species. In addition, the present analyses would also assist the research community in choosing the candidate WD40s for comprehensive studies towards crop improvement

  11. Progressive late-onset sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular impairment with vertigo (DFNA9/COCH): longitudinal analyses in a belgian family.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemaire, F.X.; Feenstra, L.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Fransen, E.; Devriendt, K.; Camp, G. van; Vantrappen, G.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Wackym, P.A.; Koss, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate audiometric and vestibular signs and symptoms in a new DFNA9 family. SETTING: Tertiary referral centers. METHODS: A multigeneration Belgian family with late-onset progressive sensorineural hearing loss and concomitant ves-tibular impairment with an autosomal dominant pattern

  12. One-step Multiplex RT-PCR Method for Simultaneous Detection of Seed Transmissible Bacterium and Virus Occurring on Brassicaceae Crop Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyusik Jeong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to develop specific and sensitive PCR-based procedures for simultaneous detection of economically important plant pathogenic bacteria and seed borne virus in commercial Brassicaceae crop seeds, Xanthomonns campestris pv. campestris (Xcc and Lettuce Mosaic Virus (LMV. Bacterial and virus diseases of Brassicaceae leaves are responsible for heavy losses. PCR with arbitral primers: selection of specific primers, performance of PCR with specific primers and determination of the threshold level for pathogens detection. To detect simultaneously the Xcc and LMV in commercial Brassicaceae crop seeds (lettuce, kohlrabi, radish, chinese cabbage and cabbage, two pairs of specific primer (LMV-F/R, Xcc-F/R were synthesized by using primer-blast program (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/tools/ primer-blast/. The multiplex PCR for the two pathogens in Brassicaceae crop seeds could detect specifically without interference among primers and/or cDNA of other plant pathogens. The pathogen detection limit was determined at 1 ng of RNA extracted from pathogens. In the total PCR results for pathogen detection using commercial kohlrabi (10 varieties, lettuce (50 varieties, radish (20 varieties, chinese cabbage (20 varieties and cabbage (20 varieties, LMV and Xcc were detected from 39 and 2 varieties, respectively. In the PCR result of lettuce, LMV and Xcc were simultaneously detected in 8 varieties.

  13. Mulher, trabalho e família: uma análise sobre a dupla jornada feminina e seus reflexos no âmbito familiar (Women, work and family: analysing feminine work and its consequenses to family affairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Édina Schimanski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O presente artigo está fundamentado em pesquisa realizada para o TCC (Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso do Curso de Serviço Social da Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa e tem por objetivo discutir sobre a inserção da mulher no mercado de trabalho e o impacto disto no âmbito familiar. O estudo busca contextualizar historicamente a categoria trabalho a partir de diferentes compreensões histórico-teóricas, bem como a inserção da mulher no mercado de trabalho e os reflexos da dupla jornada feminina no contexto da família. Devido à natureza do objeto de estudo, adotou-se a pesquisa qualitativa, fundamentada na técnica de entrevista semi-estruturada, na revisão bibliográfica, na observação participante e no estudo documental, seguida de análise de dados, como referência para o presente estudo. Dentre as categorias emergentes na análise dos dados destaca-se o precoce ingresso da mulher no mercado de trabalho, bem como os fatores impulsionadores deste processo e suas conseqüências. O texto aponta, ainda, reflexões sobre a divisão das tarefas domésticas no âmbito familiar e as dificuldades pela conciliação entre casa e trabalho.Abstract: The background of this study is framed on the final assignment presented to obtain the degree of Social Worker at the Social Work Department at State University of Ponta Grossa. The main idea is to reflect on the process of inclusion of woman in the work system and its impacts on the family relationships. The article discusses the work as a historical and theoretical category that embraces the social inclusion of woman in the context of work world. From this, the study refers to the impacts from the female insertion in the work system related to family affairs. The study is based on qualitative research and it uses as methodological tools a set of different approaches such as semi-structured interviews, bibliographical review, participant observation and documental analyses. As a

  14. Structure of a Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like Enzyme with an Active Site Specific to the Plant Family Brassicaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Bastian; Wallner, Silvia; Steiner, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    to the replacement of a cysteine with a histidine. In addition, the structure reveals the interaction of a glutamic acid (Glu426) with an aspartic acid (Asp369) at the active site, which appear to share a proton. This arrangement leads to the delocalization of a negative charge at the active site that may...

  15. Analyses of Sox-B and Sox-E Family Genes in the Cephalopod Sepia officinalis: Revealing the Conserved and the Unusual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Focareta, Laura; Cole, Alison G

    2016-01-01

    .... The Sox-family of transcription factors is an important class of DNA-binding proteins that are known to be involved in many aspects of differentiation, but have been largely unstudied in lophotrochozoan systems...

  16. ADICIONES A LA FLORA DE COLOMBIA: NOVEDADES TAXONÓMICAS, COROLÓGICAS Y SINOPSIS DE LA TRIBU ARABIDEAE (BRASSICACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARRA-O. CARLOS

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan novedades taxonómicas, corológicas y una sinopsis de la tribuArabideae (Brassicaceae en Colombia. Se incluye una clave para diferenciar losgéneros de la tribu presentes en el país, y claves adicionales para diferenciar lasespecies dentro de Cardamine y Rorippa. Se enumeran las especies encontradas ypara cada una se incluye información sobre su distribución geográfica y altitudinal.Se presentan ocho nuevos registros de Arabideae para Colombia, tres en Cardaminey cinco en Rorippa. Nueve taxones, descritos con base en material recolectado enColombia dentro de Cardamine, son reducidos a la sinonimia de algunas de lasespecies aquí presentadas, y se incluyen comentarios que justifican tales decisiones.

  17. Confirmation of the genetic heterogeneity of retinitis pigmentosa: Linkage analyses of the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase (PDEB) in ten families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojis, T.L.; Heinzmann, C.; Bateman, J.B. [Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the gene for the {beta}-subunit of the human rod photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB) are responsible for some recessively inherited cases of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The gene has been localized to human chromosome 4p16.3, near the Huntington disease locus (IT15), by in situ hybridization, somatic cell hybrid and linkage mapping. We previously identified and characterized RFLPs within PDEB, which we have used to establish the linkage relationships with nine other chromosome 4p16 markers in the CEPH v.6.0 database; the most likely locus order is D4S90-[PDEB-D4S115-D4S43]-[D4S95-D4S125]-IT15-[D4S126-D4S412]-D4S10. Using a combination of PDEB RFLPs and microsatellite variation in these linked marker loci, we analyzed ten families manifesting autosomal forms of RP for linkage to the PDEB reigon. PDEB was excluded as the disease-causing gene in three autosomal dominant (AD) RP families using PDEB RFLPs. While linkage to PDEB itself could not be ruled out, tight linkage to two closely linked markers (D4S115 and D4S43) was excluded in two additional AD and in three of five autosomal recessive (AR) RP families. Our data provide further evidence for the genetic heterogeneity in families with autosomal forms of RP.

  18. How Family Support and Internet Self-Efficacy Influence the Effects of E-Learning among Higher Aged Adults--Analyses of Gender and Age Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Regina Ju-chun

    2010-01-01

    Gender and age differences in the effects of e-learning, including students' satisfaction and Internet self-efficacy, have been supported in prior research. What is less understood is how these differences are shaped, especially for higher aged adults. This article examines the utility of family support (tangible and emotional) and Internet…

  19. Structural analyses of the CRISPR protein Csc2 reveal the RNA-binding interface of the type I-D Cas7 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrle, Ajla; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Sharma, Kundan; Ebert, Judith; Basquin, Claire; Urlaub, Henning; Marchfelder, Anita; Conti, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Upon pathogen invasion, bacteria and archaea activate an RNA-interference-like mechanism termed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). A large family of Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins mediates the different stages of this sophisticated immune response. Bioinformatic studies have classified the Cas proteins into families, according to their sequences and respective functions. These range from the insertion of the foreign genetic elements into the host genome to the activation of the interference machinery as well as target degradation upon attack. Cas7 family proteins are central to the type I and type III interference machineries as they constitute the backbone of the large interference complexes. Here we report the crystal structure of Thermofilum pendens Csc2, a Cas7 family protein of type I-D. We found that Csc2 forms a core RRM-like domain, flanked by three peripheral insertion domains: a lid domain, a Zinc-binding domain and a helical domain. Comparison with other Cas7 family proteins reveals a set of similar structural features both in the core and in the peripheral domains, despite the absence of significant sequence similarity. T. pendens Csc2 binds single-stranded RNA in vitro in a sequence-independent manner. Using a crosslinking - mass-spectrometry approach, we mapped the RNA-binding surface to a positively charged surface patch on T. pendens Csc2. Thus our analysis of the key structural and functional features of T. pendens Csc2 highlights recurring themes and evolutionary relationships in type I and type III Cas proteins.

  20. Structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic analyses suggest that indole-3-acetic acid methyltransferase is an evolutionarily ancient member of the SABATH family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Ross, Jeannine; Guan, Ju; Yang, Yue; Pichersky, Eran; Noel, Joseph P; Chen, Feng

    2008-02-01

    The plant SABATH protein family encompasses a group of related small-molecule methyltransferases (MTs) that catalyze the S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methylation of natural chemicals encompassing widely divergent structures. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) methyltransferase (IAMT) is a member of the SABATH family that modulates IAA homeostasis in plant tissues through methylation of IAA's free carboxyl group. The crystal structure of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) IAMT (AtIAMT1) was determined and refined to 2.75 A resolution. The overall tertiary and quaternary structures closely resemble the two-domain bilobed monomer and the dimeric arrangement, respectively, previously observed for the related salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase from Clarkia breweri (CbSAMT). To further our understanding of the biological function and evolution of SABATHs, especially of IAMT, we analyzed the SABATH gene family in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome. Forty-one OsSABATH genes were identified. Expression analysis showed that more than one-half of the OsSABATH genes were transcribed in one or multiple organs. The OsSABATH gene most similar to AtIAMT1 is OsSABATH4. Escherichia coli-expressed OsSABATH4 protein displayed the highest level of catalytic activity toward IAA and was therefore named OsIAMT1. OsIAMT1 exhibited kinetic properties similar to AtIAMT1 and poplar IAMT (PtIAMT1). Structural modeling of OsIAMT1 and PtIAMT1 using the experimentally determined structure of AtIAMT1 reported here as a template revealed conserved structural features of IAMTs within the active-site cavity that are divergent from functionally distinct members of the SABATH family, such as CbSAMT. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that IAMTs from Arabidopsis, rice, and poplar (Populus spp.) form a monophyletic group. Thus, structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic evidence supports the hypothesis that IAMT is an evolutionarily ancient member of the SABATH family likely to play a critical role in IAA

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis, Classification, Evolution, and Expression Analysis of the Cytochrome P450 93 Family in Land Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai; Ran, Feng; Dong, Hong-Li; Wen, Jing; Li, Jia-Na; Liang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 93 family (CYP93) belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily plays important roles in diverse plant processes. However, no previous studies have investigated the evolution and expression of the members of this family. In this study, we performed comprehensive genome-wide analysis to identify CYP93 genes in 60 green plants. In all, 214 CYP93 proteins were identified; they were specifically found in flowering plants and could be classified into ten subfamilies-CYP93A-K, with the last two being identified first. CYP93A is the ancestor that was derived in flowering plants, and the remaining showed lineage-specific distribution-CYP93B and CYP93C are present in dicots; CYP93F is distributed only in Poaceae; CYP93G and CYP93J are monocot-specific; CYP93E is unique to legumes; CYP93H and CYP93K are only found in Aquilegia coerulea, and CYP93D is Brassicaceae-specific. Each subfamily generally has conserved gene numbers, structures, and characteristics, indicating functional conservation during evolution. Synonymous nucleotide substitution (dN/dS) analysis showed that CYP93 genes are under strong negative selection. Comparative expression analyses of CYP93 genes in dicots and monocots revealed that they are preferentially expressed in the roots and tend to be induced by biotic and/or abiotic stresses, in accordance with their well-known functions in plant secondary biosynthesis.

  2. Targeting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation, Stemness and Metastatic Potential Using Brassicaceae Extracts Enriched in Isothiocyanates: A 3D Cell Model-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucília P. Pereira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC recurrence is often attributable to circulating tumor cells and/or cancer stem cells (CSCs that resist to conventional therapies and foster tumor progression. Isothiocyanates (ITCs derived from Brassicaceae vegetables have demonstrated anticancer effects in CRC, however little is known about their effect in CSCs and tumor initiation properties. Here we examined the effect of ITCs-enriched Brassicaceae extracts derived from watercress and broccoli in cell proliferation, CSC phenotype and metastasis using a previously developed three-dimensional HT29 cell model with CSC-like traits. Both extracts were phytochemically characterized and their antiproliferative effect in HT29 monolayers was explored. Next, we performed cell proliferation assays and flow cytometry analysis in HT29 spheroids treated with watercress and broccoli extracts and respective main ITCs, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC and sulforaphane (SFN. Soft agar assays and relative quantitative expression analysis of stemness markers and Wnt/β-catenin signaling players were performed to evaluate the effect of these phytochemicals in stemness and metastasis. Our results showed that both Brassicaceae extracts and ITCs exert antiproliferative effects in HT29 spheroids, arresting cell cycle at G2/M, possibly due to ITC-induced DNA damage. Colony formation and expression of LGR5 and CD133 cancer stemness markers were significantly reduced. Only watercress extract and PEITC decreased ALDH1 activity in a dose-dependent manner, as well as β-catenin expression. Our research provides new insights on CRC therapy using ITC-enriched Brassicaceae extracts, specially watercress extract, to target CSCs and circulating tumor cells by impairing cell proliferation, ALDH1-mediated chemo-resistance, anoikis evasion, self-renewal and metastatic potential.

  3. Additions to the type collection of Cruciferae Juss. (Brassicaceae Burnett) of Siberia and Russian Far East kept in Herbarium of V. L. Komarov Botanical Institute (LE)

    OpenAIRE

    V. I. Dorofeyev

    2017-01-01

    A complete set of the type specimens of Cruciferae (Brassicaceae) of Siberia and Far East stored in the Komarov Botanical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences was investigated. Previously uncounted samples of 130 taxa from 23 genera have been identified. Lectotypification of 119 taxa is done in the paper. Most valuable contribution into the study of Siberian and the Far Eastern Cruciferae biodiversity was made by the works of N. A. Busch (genera Arabis, Draba, Erysimum, Nasturtium), E. Re...

  4. Possibilities of direct introgression from Brassica napus to B. juncea and indirect introgression from B. napus to related Brassicaceae through B. juncea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Mai; Ohsawa, Ryo; Tabei, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The impact of genetically modified canola (Brassica napus) on biodiversity has been examined since its initial stage of commercialization. Various research groups have extensively investigated crossability and introgression among species of Brassicaceae. B. rapa and B. juncea are ranked first and second as the recipients of cross-pollination and introgression from B. napus, respectively. Crossability between B. napus and B. rapa has been examined, specifically in terms of introgression from B. napus to B. rapa, which is mainly considered a weed in America and European countries. On the other hand, knowledge on introgression from B. napus to B. juncea is insufficient, although B. juncea is recognized as the main Brassicaceae weed species in Asia. It is therefore essential to gather information regarding the direct introgression of B. napus into B. juncea and indirect introgression of B. napus into other species of Brassicaceae through B. juncea to evaluate the influence of genetically modified canola on biodiversity. We review information on crossability and introgression between B. juncea and other related Brassicaseae in this report. PMID:24987292

  5. Molecular and evolutionary analyses of a variable series of genes in Borrelia burgdorferi that are related to ospE and ospF, constitute a gene family, and share a common upstream homology box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, R T; Sung, S Y; Hughes, C A; Carlyon, J A

    1996-10-01

    In this study we report on the molecular characterization of a series of genes that constitute a gene family related to ospE and ospF. Some members of this family appear to represent recombined or variant forms of ospE and ospF. Variant ospE and ospF genes were found in several Borrelia burgdorferi isolates, demonstrating that their occurrence is not a phenomenon relevant to only a single isolate. Hybridization analyses revealed that the upstream sequence originally identified 5' of the full-length ospEF operon exists in multiple copies ranging in number from two to six depending on the isolate. This repeated sequence, which we refer to as the upstream homology box (UHB), carries a putative promoter element. In some isolates, UHB elements were found to flank copies of ospE and ospF that exist independently of each other. We refer to this group of UHB-flanked genes collectively as the UHB gene family. The evolutionary relationships among UHB gene family members were assessed through DNA sequence analysis and gene tree construction. These analyses suggest that some UHB-flanked genes might actually represent divergent forms of other previously described genes. Analysis of the restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns of the UHB-flanked genes among B. burgdorferi isolates demonstrated that these patterns are highly variable among isolates, suggesting that these genes are not phylogenetically conserved. The variable restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns could indicate recombinational activity in these sequences. The presence of numerous copies of the UHB elements and the high degree of homology among UHB-flanked genes could provide the necessary elements to allow for homologous recombination, leading to the generation of recombination variants of UHB gene family members.

  6. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL) subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analysis of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding. PMID:27559340

  7. Genus-Wide Comparative Genome Analyses of Colletotrichum Species Reveal Specific Gene Family Losses and Gains during Adaptation to Specific Infection Lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Pamela; Narusaka, Mari; Kumakura, Naoyoshi; Tsushima, Ayako; Takano, Yoshitaka; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-05-22

    Members from Colletotrichum genus adopt a diverse range of lifestyles during infection of plants and represent a group of agriculturally devastating pathogens. In this study, we present the draft genome of Colletotrichum incanum from the spaethianum clade of Colletotrichum and the comparative analyses with five other Colletotrichum species from distinct lineages. We show that the C. incanum strain, originally isolated from Japanese daikon radish, is able to infect both eudicot plants, such as certain ecotypes of the eudicot Arabidopsis, and monocot plants, such as lily. Being closely related to Colletotrichum species both in the graminicola clade, whose members are restricted strictly to monocot hosts, and to the destructivum clade, whose members are mostly associated with dicot infections, C. incanum provides an interesting model system for comparative genomics to study how fungal pathogens adapt to monocot and dicot hosts. Genus-wide comparative genome analyses reveal that Colletotrichum species have tailored profiles of their carbohydrate-degrading enzymes according to their infection lifestyles. In addition, we show evidence that positive selection acting on secreted and nuclear localized proteins that are highly conserved may be important in adaptation to specific hosts or ecological niches. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Genome-wide identification, phylogeny, and expression analyses of the 14-3-3 family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana

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    meiying li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant 14-3-3 proteins act as critical components of various cellular signaling processes and play an important role in regulating multiple physiological processes. However, less information is known about the 14-3-3 gene family in banana. In this study, 25 14-3-3 genes were identified from the banana genome. Based on the evolutionary analysis, banana 14-3-3 proteins were clustered into ε and non-ε groups. Conserved motif analysis showed that all identified banana 14-3-3 genes had the typical 14-3-3 motif. The gene structure of banana 14-3-3 genes showed distinct class-specific divergence between the ε group and the non-ε group. Most banana 14-3-3 genes showed strong transcript accumulation changes during fruit development and postharvest ripening in two banana varieties, indicating that they might be involved in regulating fruit development and ripening. Moreover, some 14-3-3 genes also showed great changes after osmotic, cold, and salt treatments in two banana varieties, suggested their potential role in regulating banana response to abiotic stress. Taken together, this systemic analysis reveals the involvement of banana 14-3-3 genes in fruit development, postharvest ripening, and response to abiotic stress and provides useful information for understanding the functions of 14-3-3 genes in banana.

  9. Phylogenomic and structural analyses of 18 complete plastomes across nearly all families of early-diverging eudicots, including an angiosperm-wide analysis of IR gene content evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanxia; Moore, Michael J; Zhang, Shoujun; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Zhao, Tingting; Meng, Aiping; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Jianqiang; Wang, Hengchang

    2016-03-01

    The grade of early-diverging eudicots includes five major lineages: Ranunculales, Trochodendrales, Buxales, Proteales and Sabiaceae. To examine the evolution of plastome structure in early-diverging eudicots, we determined the complete plastome sequences of eight previously unsequenced early-diverging eudicot taxa, Pachysandra terminalis (Buxaceae), Meliosma aff. cuneifolia (Sabiaceae), Sabia yunnanensis (Sabiaceae), Epimedium sagittatum (Berberidaceae), Euptelea pleiosperma (Eupteleaceae), Akebia trifoliata (Lardizabalaceae), Stephania japonica (Menispermaceae) and Papaver somniferum (Papaveraceae), and compared them to previously published plastomes of the early-diverging eudicots Buxus, Tetracentron, Trochodendron, Nelumbo, Platanus, Nandina, Megaleranthis, Ranunculus, Mahonia and Macadamia. All of the newly sequenced plastomes share the same 79 protein-coding genes, 4 rRNA genes, and 30 tRNA genes, except for that of Epimedium, in which infA is pseudogenized and clpP is highly divergent and possibly a pseudogene. The boundaries of the plastid Inverted Repeat (IR) were found to vary significantly across early-diverging eudicots; IRs ranged from 24.3 to 36.4kb in length and contained from 18 to 33 genes. Based on gene content, the IR was classified into six types, with shifts among types characterized by high levels of homoplasy. Reconstruction of ancestral IR gene content suggested that 18 genes were likely present in the IR region of the ancestor of eudicots. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of a 79-gene, 97-taxon data set that included all available early-diverging eudicots and representative sampling of remaining angiosperm diversity largely agreed with previous estimates of early-diverging eudicot relationships, but resolved Trochodendrales rather than Buxales as sister to Gunneridae, albeit with relatively weak bootstrap support, conflicting with what has been found for these three clades in most previous analyses. In addition, Proteales was

  10. Gene network and familial analyses uncover a gene network involving Tbx5/Osr1/Pcsk6 interaction in the second heart field for atrial septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke K; Xiang, Menglan; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Jielin; Curry, Nathan; Heine Suñer, Damian; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Qin; Xie, Linglin

    2016-03-15

    Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a common human congenital heart disease (CHD) that can be induced by genetic abnormalities. Our previous studies have demonstrated a genetic interaction between Tbx5 and Osr1 in the second heart field (SHF) for atrial septation. We hypothesized that Osr1 and Tbx5 share a common signaling networking and downstream targets for atrial septation. To identify this molecular networks, we acquired the RNA-Seq transcriptome data from the posterior SHF of wild-type, Tbx5(+/) (-), Osr1(+/-), Osr1(-/-) and Tbx5(+/-)/Osr1(+/-) mutant embryos. Gene set analysis was used to identify the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways that were affected by the doses of Tbx5 and Osr1. A gene network module involving Tbx5 and Osr1 was identified using a non-parametric distance metric, distance correlation. A subset of 10 core genes and gene-gene interactions in the network module were validated by gene expression alterations in posterior second heart field (pSHF) of Tbx5 and Osr1 transgenic mouse embryos, a time-course gene expression change during P19CL6 cell differentiation. Pcsk6 was one of the network module genes that were linked to Tbx5. We validated the direct regulation of Tbx5 on Pcsk6 using immunohistochemical staining of pSHF, ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and luciferase reporter assay. Importantly, we identified Pcsk6 as a novel gene associated with ASD via a human genotyping study of an ASD family. In summary, our study implicated a gene network involving Tbx5, Osr1 and Pcsk6 interaction in SHF for atrial septation, providing a molecular framework for understanding the role of Tbx5 in CHD ontogeny. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Deciphering the regulon of a GntR family regulator via transcriptome and ChIP-exo analyses and its contribution to virulence in Xanthomonas citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Yan, Qing; Wang, Nian

    2017-02-01

    Xanthomonas contains a large group of plant-associated species, many of which cause severe diseases on important crops worldwide. Six gluconate-operon repressor (GntR) family transcriptional regulators are predicted in Xanthomonas, one of which, belonging to the YtrA subfamily, plays a prominent role in bacterial virulence. However, the direct targets and comprehensive regulatory profile of YtrA remain unknown. Here, we performed microarray and high-resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease (ChIP-exo) experiments to identify YtrA direct targets and its DNA binding motif in X. citri ssp. citri (Xac), the causal agent of citrus canker. Integrative microarray and ChIP-exo data analysis revealed that YtrA directly regulates three operons by binding to a palindromic motif GGTG-N16 -CACC at the promoter region. A similar palindromic motif and YtrA homologues were also identified in many other bacteria, including Stenotrophomonas, Pseudoxanthomonas and Frateuria, indicating a widespread phenomenon. Deletion of ytrA in Xac abolishes bacterial virulence and induction of the hypersensitive response (HR). We found that YtrA regulates the expression of hrp/hrc genes encoding the bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) and controls multiple biological processes, including motility and adhesion, oxidative stress, extracellular enzyme production and iron uptake. YtrA represses the expression of its direct targets in artificial medium or in planta. Importantly, over-expression of yro3, one of the YtrA directly regulated operons which contains trmL and XAC0231, induced weaker canker symptoms and down-regulation of hrp/hrc gene expression, suggesting a negative regulation in Xac virulence and T3SS. Our study has significantly advanced the mechanistic understanding of YtrA regulation and its contribution to bacterial virulence. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. Transcriptome analyses reveal protein and domain families that delineate stage-related development in the economically important parasitic nematodes, Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heizer, Esley; Zarlenga, Dante S; Rosa, Bruce; Gao, Xin; Gasser, Robin B; De Graef, Jessie; Geldhof, Peter; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-02-22

    Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi are among the most important gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle worldwide. The economic losses caused by these parasites are on the order of hundreds of millions of dollars per year. Conventional treatment of these parasites is through anthelmintic drugs; however, as resistance to anthelmintics increases, overall effectiveness has begun decreasing. New methods of control and alternative drug targets are necessary. In-depth analysis of transcriptomic data can help provide these targets. The assembly of 8.7 million and 11 million sequences from C. oncophora and O. ostertagi, respectively, resulted in 29,900 and 34,792 transcripts. Among these, 69% and 73% of the predicted peptides encoded by C. oncophora and O. ostertagi had homologues in other nematodes. Approximately 21% and 24% were constitutively expressed in both species, respectively; however, the numbers of transcripts that were stage specific were much smaller (~1% of the transcripts expressed in a stage). Approximately 21% of the transcripts in C. oncophora and 22% in O. ostertagi were up-regulated in a particular stage. Functional molecular signatures were detected for 46% and 35% of the transcripts in C. oncophora and O. ostertagi, respectively. More in-depth examinations of the most prevalent domains led to knowledge of gene expression changes between the free-living (egg, L1, L2 and L3 sheathed) and parasitic (L3 exsheathed, L4, and adult) stages. Domains previously implicated in growth and development such as chromo domains and the MADF domain tended to dominate in the free-living stages. In contrast, domains potentially involved in feeding such as the zinc finger and CAP domains dominated in the parasitic stages. Pathway analyses showed significant associations between life-cycle stages and peptides involved in energy metabolism in O. ostertagi whereas metabolism of cofactors and vitamins were specifically up-regulated in the parasitic stages of C

  13. Phylogeny and expression analyses reveal important roles for plant PKS III family during the conquest of land by plants and angiosperm diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Xie

    2016-08-01

    diversification of plant type III PKS enzymes played a critical role in the ancient conquest of the land by early plants and angiosperm diversification.Keywords PKS III multigene family, CHS, STS, phylogenetic reconstruction, functional diversification, gene expression, cis-elements

  14. Dendrochronological study of the endangered shrub Vella pseudocytisus subsp. paui (Brassicaceae: implications for its recovery and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Génova, Mar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendrochronology is useful to determine plant longevity, to provide insights into the structure and dynamics of plant populations and to study the relationships between growth and environmental determinants. The dendrochronology of endangered shrubs is unexplored, although their use represents an opportunity to produce better conservation guidelines. We collected for this study 63 samples from already dead specimens of Vella pseudocytisus subsp. paui (Brassicaceae, an endangered Spanish endemism from three localities. We analyzed the relationship between ring data and plant size to determine the accuracy of using size as a proxy for plant age. We also explored the relationships between ring data and environmental variables to detect growth determinants. This shrub showed a high longevity as older individuals presented nearly 50 growth rings. The relationship between age and size is weak although it could be established based on the logarithmic function of plant biovolume. Significant relationships were found between rainfall and ring widths, showing that water limited annual growth. Finally, age structure characterized differences among populations, highlighting the effects of disturbance and land use. These results provided new opportunities for management within the ongoing recovery plan for the species.La dendrocronología es útil para determinar la longevidad de la planta, proporcionar información sobre la estructura y dinámica de las poblaciones vegetales y estudiar las relaciones entre el crecimiento y las variables ambientales. Hasta ahora no se había hecho uso de la dendrocronología en arbustos en peligro de extinción, aunque su empleo puede mejorar las directrices de conservación. En este estudio se han recolectado 63 especímenes ya muertos de tres localidades de Vella pseudocytisus subsp. paui (Brassicaceae, un endemismo español en peligro de extinción. Se han analizado las relaciones entre los grosores del anillo de

  15. Plant Size as Determinant of Species Richness of Herbivores, Natural Enemies and Pollinators across 21 Brassicaceae Species.

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    Hella Schlinkert

    Full Text Available Large plants are often more conspicuous and more attractive for associated animals than small plants, e.g. due to their wider range of resources. Therefore, plant size can positively affect species richness of associated animals, as shown for single groups of herbivores, but studies usually consider intraspecific size differences of plants in unstandardised environments. As comprehensive tests of interspecific plant size differences under standardised conditions are missing so far, we investigated effects of plant size on species richness of all associated arthropods using a common garden experiment with 21 Brassicaceae species covering a broad interspecific plant size gradient from 10 to 130 cm height. We recorded plant associated ecto- and endophagous herbivores, their natural enemies and pollinators on and in each aboveground plant organ, i.e. flowers, fruits, leaves and stems. Plant size (measured as height from the ground, the number of different plant organ entities and their biomass were assessed. Increasing plant size led to increased species richness of associated herbivores, natural enemies and pollinating insects. This pattern was found for ectophagous and endophagous herbivores, their natural enemies, as well as for herbivores associated with leaves and fruits and their natural enemies, independently of the additional positive effects of resource availability (i.e. organ biomass or number of entities and, regarding natural enemies, herbivore species richness. We found a lower R2 for pollinators compared to herbivores and natural enemies, probably caused by the high importance of flower characteristics for pollinator species richness besides plant size. Overall, the increase in plant height from 10 to 130 cm led to a 2.7-fold increase in predicted total arthropod species richness. In conclusion, plant size is a comprehensive driver of species richness of the plant associated arthropods, including pollinators, herbivores and their

  16. Flowering Locus C (FLC) Is a Potential Major Regulator of Glucosinolate Content across Developmental Stages of Aethionema arabicum (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadin, Setareh; Nguyen, Thu-Phuong; van Weij, Marco S; Reichelt, Michael; Schranz, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    The biochemical defense of plants can change during their life-cycle and impact herbivore feeding and plant fitness. The annual species Aethionema arabicum is part of the sister clade to all other Brassicaceae. Hence, it holds a phylogenetically important position for studying crucifer trait evolution. Glucosinolates (GS) are essentially Brassicales-specific metabolites involved in plant defense. Using two Ae. arabicum accessions (TUR and CYP) we identify substantial differences in glucosinolate profiles and quantities between lines, tissues and developmental stages. We find tissue specific side-chain modifications in aliphatic GS: methylthioalkyl in leaves, methylsulfinylalkyl in fruits, and methylsulfonylalkyl in seeds. We also find large differences in absolute glucosinolate content between the two accessions (up to 10-fold in fruits) that suggest a regulatory factor is involved that is not part of the quintessential glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. Consistent with this hypothesis, we identified a single major multi-trait quantitative trait locus controlling total GS concentration across tissues in a recombinant inbred line population derived from TUR and CYP. With fine-mapping, we narrowed the interval to a 58 kb region containing 15 genes, but lacking any known GS biosynthetic genes. The interval contains homologs of both the sulfate transporter SULTR2;1 and FLOWERING LOCUS C. Both loci have diverse functions controlling plant physiological and developmental processes and thus are potential candidates regulating glucosinolate variation across the life-cycle of Aethionema. Future work will investigate changes in gene expression of the candidates genes, the effects of GS variation on insect herbivores and the trade-offs between defense and reproduction.

  17. SEM observations of pollen grains, fruits and seeds of the Pieniny Mountains (South Poland endemic species Erysimum pieninicum (Zapał. Pawł. (Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmina Maciejewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Erysimum pieninicum (Zapał. Pawł. (Brassicaceae is an endemic species, growing only in Pieniny Mts. The aim of the presented work was to investigate its pollen morphology as well as its ultrastructural traits of pericarp and seed-coat. Pollen grains of this species were of small size, 3-zonocolpate with reticulate ornamentation. The external siliqua surface was of rugose sculpture, covered by numerous, stellate hairs. The internal surface of the fruit was naked and characterized by striate sculpture. The seed-coat ornamentation of E. pieninicum was of blister type.

  18. Mechanisms of differential pollen donor performance in wild radish, Raphanus sativus (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, D L; Diggle, P K

    2001-02-01

    In order to understand the characters on which sexual selection might operate in plants, it is critical to assess the mechanisms by which pollen competition and mate choice occur. To address this issue we measured a number of postpollination characters, ranging from pollen germination and pollen tube growth to final seed paternity, in wild radish. Crosses were performed using four pollen donors on a total of 16 maternal plants (four each from four families). Maternal plants were grown under two watering treatments to evaluate the effects of maternal tissue on the process of mating. The four pollen donors differed significantly in number of seeds sired and differed overall in the mating characters measured. However, it was difficult to associate particular mechanistic characters with ability to sire seeds, perhaps because of interactions among pollen donors within styles or among pollen donors and maternal plants. The process of pollen tube growth and fertilization differed substantially among maternal watering treatments, with many early events occurring more quickly in stressed plants. Seed paternity, however, was somewhat more even among pollen donors used on stressed maternal plants, suggesting that when maternal tissue is more competent, mating is slowed and is more selective.

  19. Cytotype diversity and genome size variation in eastern Asian polyploid Cardamine (Brassicaceae) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhold, Karol; Kudoh, Hiroshi; Pak, Jae-Hong; Watanabe, Kuniaki; Spaniel, Stanislav; Lihová, Judita

    2010-02-01

    Intraspecific ploidy-level variation is an important aspect of a species' genetic make-up, which may lend insight into its evolutionary history and future potential. The present study explores this phenomenon in a group of eastern Asian Cardamine species. Plant material was sampled from 59 localities in Japan and Korea, which were used in karyological (chromosome counting) and flow cytometric analyses. The absolute nuclear DNA content (in pg) was measured using propidium iodide and the relative nuclear DNA content (in arbitrary units) was measured using 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole fluorochrome. Substantial cytotype diversity was found, with strikingly different distribution patterns between the species. Two cytotypes were found in C. torrentis sensu lato (4x and 8x, in C. valida and C. torrentis sensu stricto, respectively), which displays a north-south geographical pattern in Japan. Hypotheses regarding their origin and colonization history in the Japanese archipelago are discussed. In Korean C. amaraeiformis, only tetraploids were found, and these populations may in fact belong to C. valida. C. yezoensis was found to harbour as many as six cytotypes in Japan, ranging from hexa- to dodecaploids. Ploidy levels do not show any obvious geographical pattern; populations with mixed ploidy levels, containing two to four cytotypes, are frequently observed throughout the range. C. schinziana, an endemic of Hokkaido, has hexa- and octoploid populations. Previous chromosome records are also revised, showing that they are largely based on misidentified material or misinterpreted names. Sampling of multiple populations and utilization of the efficient flow cytometric approach allowed the detection of large-scale variation in ploidy levels and genome size variation attributable to aneuploidy. These data will be essential in further phylogenetic and evolutionary studies.

  20. Four plant defensins from an indigenous South African Brassicaceae species display divergent activities against two test pathogens despite high sequence similarity in the encoding genes

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    de Beer Abré

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant defensins are an important component of the innate defence system of plants where they form protective antimicrobial barriers between tissue types of plant organs as well as around seeds. These peptides also have other activities that are important for agricultural applications as well as the medical sector. Amongst the numerous plant peptides isolated from a variety of plant species, a significant number of promising defensins have been isolated from Brassicaceae species. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of four defensins from Heliophila coronopifolia, a native South African Brassicaceae species. Results Four defensin genes (Hc-AFP1-4 were isolated with a homology based PCR strategy. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the peptides were 72% similar and grouped closest to defensins isolated from other Brassicaceae species. The Hc-AFP1 and 3 peptides shared high homology (94% and formed a unique grouping in the Brassicaceae defensins, whereas Hc-AFP2 and 4 formed a second homology grouping with defensins from Arabidopsis and Raphanus. Homology modelling showed that the few amino acids that differed between the four peptides had an effect on the surface properties of the defensins, specifically in the alpha-helix and the loop connecting the second and third beta-strands. These areas are implicated in determining differential activities of defensins. Comparing the activities after recombinant production of the peptides, Hc-AFP2 and 4 had IC50 values of 5-20 μg ml-1 against two test pathogens, whereas Hc-AFP1 and 3 were less active. The activity against Botrytis cinerea was associated with membrane permeabilization, hyper-branching, biomass reduction and even lytic activity. In contrast, only Hc-AFP2 and 4 caused membrane permeabilization and severe hyper-branching against the wilting pathogen Fusarium solani, while Hc-AFP1 and 3 had a mild morphogenetic effect on the fungus

  1. Emended description of the family Chromatiaceae, phylogenetic analyses of the genera Alishewanella, Rheinheimera and Arsukibacterium, transfer of Rheinheimera longhuensis LH2-2T to the genus Alishewanella and description of Alishewanella alkalitolerans sp. nov. from Lonar Lake, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisinthy, Shivaji; Chakraborty, Dwaipayan; Adicherla, Harikrishna; Gundlapally, Sathyanarayana Reddy

    2017-09-01

    Phylogenetic analyses were performed for members of the family Chromatiaceae, signature nucleotides deduced and the genus Alishewanella transferred to Chromatiaceae. Phylogenetic analyses were executed for the genera Alishewanella, Arsukibacterium and Rheinheimera and the genus Rheinheimera is proposed to be split, with the creation of the Pararheinheimera gen. nov. Furthermore, the species Rheinheimera longhuensis, is transferred to the genus Alishewanella as Alishewanella longhuensis comb. nov. Besides, the genera Alishewanella and Rheinheimera are also emended. Strain LNK-7.1T was isolated from a water sample from the Lonar Lake, India. Cells were Gram-negative, motile rods, positive for catalase, oxidase, phosphatase, contained C16:0, C17:1ω8c, summed feature3 (C16:1ω6c and/or C16:1ω7c) and summed feature 8 (C18:1ω7c) as major fatty acids, PE and PG as the major lipids and Q-8 as the sole respiratory quinone. Phylogenetic analyses using NJ, ME, ML and Maximum parsimony, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, identified Alishewanella tabrizica RCRI4T as the closely related species of strain LNK-7.1T with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 98.13%. The DNA-DNA similarity between LNK-7.1T and the closely related species (A. tabrizica) was only 12.0% and, therefore, strain LNK-7.1T was identified as a novel species of the genus Alishewanella with the proposed name Alishewanella alkalitolerans sp. nov. In addition phenotypic characteristics confirmed the species status to strain LNK-7.1T. The type strain of A. alkalitolerans is LNK-7.1T (LMG 29592T = KCTC 52279T), isolated from a water sample collected from the Lonar lake, India.

  2. A new case of late-acting self-incompatibility in Capparis L. (Brassicaceae: C. jacobinae Moric. ex Eichler, an endemic andromonoecious species of the Caatinga, Pernambuco State, Brazil Novo registro de auto-incompatibilidade de ação tardia em Capparis (Brassicaceae: C. jacobinae Moric. ex Eichler, uma espécie andromonóica endêmica da Caatinga, PE, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Primo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the reproductive system of Capparis jacobinae Moric ex Eichler (Brassicaceae, based on controlled hand-pollination and observation of pollen tube growth made in a fluorescence microscope. Of 105 self-pollinated flowers only one produced fruits (success = 0.95%, all the other flowers abscised at the same time, between the eighth and tenth day after anthesis. Nevertheless, self- and cross-pollinated pollen tubes reached the micropyle. The rate of penetrated ovules in self-pollinated flowers was lower during the first 24 h after pollination; thereafter this rate was similar between self- and cross-pollinated flowers for treatments of 48 h, 72 h and 96 h after pollination. In addition, we carried out two indirect estimates of the reproductive system, based on pollen/ovule and seed/ovule ratios, which resulted in typical features of xenogamous species. We concluded that C. jacobinae has a late-acting self-incompatibility system. This is the third record of this mechanism for the genus and the first for a species of Capparis endemic to the Caatinga. We suggest that this self-incompatibility system may occur in other species of the same genus and family.O sistema reprodutivo de Capparis jacobinae Moric. ex Eichler (Brassicaceae, uma espécie endêmica da Caatinga no Brasil, foi analisado através de polinizações controladas e observações do desenvolvimento dos tubos polínicos por meio de microscopia de fluorescência. De 105 flores autopolinizadas, apenas uma formou fruto (sucesso= 0,95%, ocorrendo a abscisão das demais em um intervalo de tempo uniforme, entre o oitavo e o décimo dia após a antese. Entretanto, tanto tubos polínicos procedentes de autopolinização quanto de polinização cruzada penetraram na micrópila, sendo a taxa de óvulos penetrados menor em flores autopolinizadas durante as 24 horas posteriores à polinização, igualando-se entre os dois tratamentos para 48, 72 e 96 horas posteriores à polinização. Al

  3. Genome-Wide Identification of Dicer-Like, Argonaute, and RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Gene Families in Brassica Species and Functional Analyses of Their Arabidopsis Homologs in Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jia-Yi; Xu, You-Ping; Li, Wen; Li, Shuang-Sheng; Rahman, Hafizur; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    RNA silencing is an important mechanism to regulate gene expression and antiviral defense in plants. Nevertheless, RNA silencing machinery in the important oil crop Brassica napus and function in resistance to the devastating fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are not well-understood. In this study, gene families of RNA silencing machinery in B. napus were identified and their role in resistance to S. sclerotiorum was revealed. Genome of the allopolyploid species B. napus possessed 8 Dicer-like (DCL), 27 Argonaute (AGO), and 16 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR) genes, which included almost all copies from its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea and three extra copies of RDR5 genes, indicating that the RDR5 group in B. napus appears to have undergone further expansion through duplication during evolution. Moreover, compared with Arabidopsis, some AGO and RDR genes such as AGO1, AGO4, AGO9, and RDR5 had significantly expanded in these Brassica species. Twenty-one out of 51 DCL, AGO, and RDR genes were predicted to contain calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTA)-binding site (CGCG box). S. sclerotiorum inoculation strongly induced the expression of BnCAMTA3 genes while significantly suppressed that of some CGCG-containing RNA silencing component genes, suggesting that RNA silencing machinery might be targeted by CAMTA3. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant analyses demonstrated that dcl4-2, ago9-1, rdr1-1, rdr6-11, and rdr6-15 mutants were more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum, while dcl1-9 was more resistant. Our results reveal the importance of RNA silencing in plant resistance to S. sclerotiorum and imply a new mechanism of CAMTA function as well as RNA silencing regulation.

  4. Genome-wide identification of Dicer-like, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene families in Brassica species and functional analyses of their Arabidopsis homologs in resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yi Cao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is an important mechanism to regulate gene expression and antiviral defense in plants. Nevertheless, RNA silencing machinery in the important oil crop Brassica napus and function in resistance to the devastating fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are not well understood. In this study, gene families of RNA silencing machinery in B. napus were identified and their role in resistance to S. sclerotiorum was revealed. Genome of the allopolyploid species B. napus possessed 8 Dicer-like (DCL, 27 Argonaute (AGO and 16 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR genes, which included almost all copies from its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea and three extra copies of RDR5 genes, indicating that the RDR5 group in B. napus appears to have undergone further expansion through duplication during evolution. Moreover, compared with Arabidopsis, some AGO and RDR genes such as AGO1, AGO4, AGO9 and RDR5 had significantly expanded in these Brassica species. Twenty-one out of 51 DCL, AGO and RDR genes were predicted to contain calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTA-binding site (CGCG box. S. sclerotiorum inoculation strongly induced the expression of BnCAMTA3 genes while significantly suppressed that of some CGCG-containing RNA silencing component genes, suggesting that RNA silencing machinery might be targeted by CAMTA3. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant analyses demonstrated that dcl4-2, ago9-1, rdr1-1, rdr6-11 and rdr6-15 mutants were more susceptible to S. sclerotiorum, while dcl1-9 was more resistant. Our results reveal the importance of RNA silencing in plant resistance to S. sclerotiorum and imply a new mechanism of CAMTA function as well as RNA silencing regulation.

  5. Evolution of the SPATULA/ALCATRAZ gene lineage and expression analyses in the basal eudicot, Bocconia frutescens L. (Papaveraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Zumajo-Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SPATULA (SPT and ALCATRAZ (ALC are recent paralogs that belong to the large bHLH transcription factor family. Orthologs of these genes have been found in all core eudicots, whereas pre-duplication genes, named paleoSPATULA/ALCATRAZ, have been found in basal eudicots, monocots, basal angiosperms and gymnosperms. Nevertheless, functional studies have only been performed in Arabidopsis thaliana, where SPT and ALC are partially redundant in carpel and valve margin development and ALC has a unique role in the dehiscence zone. Further analyses of pre-duplication genes are necessary to assess the functional evolution of this gene lineage. Results We isolated additional paleoSPT/ALC genes from Aristolochia fimbriata, Bocconia frutescens, Cattleya trianae and Hypoxis decumbens from our transcriptome libraries and performed phylogenetic analyses. We identified the previously described bHLH domain in all analyzed sequences and also new conserved motifs using the MEME suite. Finally, we analyzed the expression of three paleoSPT/ALC genes (BofrSPT1/2/3 from Bocconia frutescens, a basal eudicot in the Papaveraceae. To determine the developmental stages at which these genes were expressed, pre- and post-anthesis carpels and fruits of B. frutescens were collected, sectioned, stained, and examined using light microscopy. Using in situ hybridization we detected that BofrSPT1/2/3 genes are expressed in floral buds, early sepal initiation, stamens and carpel primordia and later during fruit development in the dehiscence zone of the opercular fruit. Conclusions Our expression results, in comparison with those available for core eudicots, suggest conserved roles of members of the SPT/ALC gene lineage across eudicots in the specification of carpel margins and the dehiscence zone of the mature fruits. Although there is some redundancy between ALC and SPT, these gene clades seem to have undergone some degree of sub-functionalization in the core

  6. Family Obligations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Nielsen, Inger

    How is the balance in obligations between the Family and the Danish Welfare State? Can we observe a trend to shift the responsibility back to the family? This booklet intends to sketch the legal framework around the division of responsibilities between the Family and the state and to analyse...... to what extent and where the unit of rights and obliagations is the individual and where it is the family or household....

  7. Seed Germination Ecology of the Cold Desert Annual Isatis violascens (Brassicaceae): Two Levels of Physiological Dormancy and Role of the Pericarp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan M; Lu, Juan J; Tan, Dun Y; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of various species of Brassicaceae with indehiscent fruits in the cold deserts of NW China suggests that there are adaptive advantages of this trait. We hypothesized that the pericarp of the single-seeded silicles of Isatis violascens restricts embryo expansion and thus prevents germination for 1 or more years. Thus, our aim was to investigate the role of the pericarp in seed dormancy and germination of this species. The effects of afterripening, treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3) and cold stratification on seed dormancy-break were tested using intact silicles and isolated seeds, and germination phenology was monitored in an experimental garden. The pericarp has a role in mechanically inhibiting germination of fresh seeds and promotes germination of nondormant seeds, but it does not facilitate formation of a persistent seed bank. Seeds in silicles in watered soil began to germinate earlier in autumn and germinated to higher percentages than isolated seeds. Sixty-two percent of seeds in the buried silicles germinated by the end of the first spring, and only 3% remained nongerminated and viable. Twenty to twenty-five percent of the seeds have nondeep physiological dormancy (PD) and 75-80% intermediate PD. Seeds with nondeep PD afterripen in summer and germinate inside the silicles in autumn if the soil is moist. Afterripening during summer significantly decreased the amount of cold stratification required to break intermediate PD. The presence of both nondeep and intermediate PD in the seed cohort may be a bet-hedging strategy.

  8. Seed Germination Ecology of the Cold Desert Annual Isatis violascens (Brassicaceae: Two Levels of Physiological Dormancy and Role of the Pericarp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan M Zhou

    Full Text Available The occurrence of various species of Brassicaceae with indehiscent fruits in the cold deserts of NW China suggests that there are adaptive advantages of this trait. We hypothesized that the pericarp of the single-seeded silicles of Isatis violascens restricts embryo expansion and thus prevents germination for 1 or more years. Thus, our aim was to investigate the role of the pericarp in seed dormancy and germination of this species. The effects of afterripening, treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3 and cold stratification on seed dormancy-break were tested using intact silicles and isolated seeds, and germination phenology was monitored in an experimental garden. The pericarp has a role in mechanically inhibiting germination of fresh seeds and promotes germination of nondormant seeds, but it does not facilitate formation of a persistent seed bank. Seeds in silicles in watered soil began to germinate earlier in autumn and germinated to higher percentages than isolated seeds. Sixty-two percent of seeds in the buried silicles germinated by the end of the first spring, and only 3% remained nongerminated and viable. Twenty to twenty-five percent of the seeds have nondeep physiological dormancy (PD and 75-80% intermediate PD. Seeds with nondeep PD afterripen in summer and germinate inside the silicles in autumn if the soil is moist. Afterripening during summer significantly decreased the amount of cold stratification required to break intermediate PD. The presence of both nondeep and intermediate PD in the seed cohort may be a bet-hedging strategy.

  9. Delayed dehiscence of the pericarp: role in germination and retention of viability of seeds of two cold desert annual Brassicaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J J; Tan, D Y; Baskin, C C; Baskin, J M

    2017-01-01

    Considerable variation occurs in post-maturity timing of dehiscence in fruits of Brassicaceae species, and several studies have shown that the pericarp plays an important role in seed germination and retention of viability in species with indehiscent fruits. However, little is known about the significance to seed biology of delay in pericarp dehiscence for seed germination and retention of seed viability. We compared dormancy-break via after-ripening in the laboratory and germination phenology and retention of seed viability in intact siliques and isolated seeds buried in an experimental garden. Seeds of both species have Type 6 non-deep physiological dormancy, which is enhanced by the pericarp. Seeds of both species after-ripened during summer 2013, and some of them germinated in autumn and some in the following spring in watered and non-watered soil. Germination percentages of seeds in siliques increased in soil in spring 2014, after the pericarps had opened. Most isolated seeds of L. filifolium and N. korolkovii had germinated or were dead by spring 2014 and summer 2015, respectively, whereas 60% of the seeds of both species in the (opened) pericarps were viable after 24 months. Thus, although the pericarp opened 9-10 months after burial, its presence had a significant effect on seed dormancy, germination phenology and retention of viability of seeds of L. filifolium and N. korolkovii. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  10. Characterization and structural features of a chalcone synthase mutation in a white-flowering line of Matthiola incana R. Br. (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemleben, Vera; Dressel, Angela; Epping, Bernhard; Lukacin, Richard; Martens, Stefan; Austin, Michael

    2004-05-01

    For Matthiola incana (Brassicaceae), used as a model system to study biochemical and genetical aspects of anthocyanin biosynthesis, several nearly isogenic colored wild type lines and white-flowering mutant lines are available, each with a specific defect in the genes responsible for anthocyanin production (genes e, f, and g). For gene f supposed to code for chalcone synthase (CHS; EC 2.3.1.74), the key enzyme of the flavonoid/anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway belonging to the group of type III polyketide synthases (PKS), the wild type genomic sequence of M. incana line 04 was determined in comparison to the white-flowering CHS mutant line 18. The type of mutation in the chs gene was characterized as a single nucleotide substitution in a triplet AGG coding for an evolutionary conserved arginine into AGT coding for serine (R72S). Northern blots and RT-PCR demonstrated that the mutated gene is expressed in flower petals. Heterologous expression of the wild type and mutated CHS cDNA in E. Scherichia coli, verified by Western blotting and enzyme assays with various starter molecules, revealed that the mutant protein had no detectable activity, indicating that the strictly conserved arginine residue is essential for the enzymatic reaction. This mutation, which previously was not detected by mutagenic screening, is discussed in the light of structural and functional information on alfalfa CHS and related type III PKS enzymes.

  11. Zn, Cd and Pb accumulation and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation of pennycress Thlaspi praecox Wulf. (Brassicaceae) from the vicinity of a lead mine and smelter in Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel-Mikus, Katarina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: katarina.vogel@uni-lj.si; Drobne, Damjana [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Regvar, Marjana [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Vecna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-01-01

    Significant hyperaccumulation of Zn, Cd and Pb in field samples of Thlaspi praecox Wulf. collected from a heavy metal polluted area in Slovenia was found, with maximal shoot concentrations of 14590 mg kg{sup -1} Zn, 5960 mg kg{sup -1} Cd and 3500 mg kg{sup -1} Pb. Shoot/root ratios of 9.6 for Zn and 5.6 for Cd show that the metals were preferentially transported to the shoots. Shoot bioaccumulation factors exceeded total soil Cd levels 75-fold and total soil Zn levels 20-fold, further supporting the hyperaccumulation of Cd and Zn. Eighty percent of Pb was retained in roots, thus indicating exclusion as a tolerance strategy for Pb. Low level colonisation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of a Paris type was observed at the polluted site, whereas at the non-polluted site Arum type colonisation was more common. To our knowledge this is the first report of Cd hyperaccumulation and AMF colonisation in metal hyperaccumulating T. praecox. - Thlaspi praecox Wulf. (Brassicaceae) is a newly discovered Cd, Zn and Pb hyperaccumulator able to form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

  12. Disrupted Refugee Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Ditte Krogh

    2017-01-01

    of family members in social historical contexts. Studying the multiple perspectives of family members shows how social support conceptualized as care practises is conflictual in the changing everyday family practices that are transformed by policy. The purpose of studying how families manage to flee civil......Fleeing civil war involves managing life threatening events and multiple disruptions of everyday life. The theoretical potentials of analysing the recreation of everyday family life among Syrian refugees in Denmark is explored based on conceptualizations that emphasize the collective agency...

  13. Family demands, social support and family functioning in Taiwanese families rearing children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, C-Y

    2014-06-01

    Down syndrome (DS) affects not only children but also their families. Much remains to be learned about factors that influence how families of children with DS function, especially families in non-Western populations. The purpose of this cross-sectional, correlational study was to examine how family demographics, family demands and social support relate to family functioning as well as the potential mediating effect of social support on the relationship between family demands and family functioning in Taiwanese families of children with DS. One hundred and fifty-five parents (80 mothers and 75 fathers) from 83 families independently completed mailed questionnaires. Data were analysed using a principal component analysis and mixed linear modelling. Families having older children with DS, greater parental education, higher family income, fewer family demands and greater social support contributed to healthier family functioning. Social support partially mediated the effects of family demands on family functioning. Family demographics, family demands and social support appear to be important factors that may play a critical role in how Taiwanese families respond to the birth of a child with DS. Care of children with DS and their families is likely to be more effective if professionals working with these families are aware of factors that contribute to healthy family functioning. © 2013 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. ASTEROID FAMILY IDENTIFICATIONS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a compilation of the family memberships of numbered asteroids in five different asteroid family analyses. These include the analyses of Zappala et al.,...

  15. Internationalization of Family Businesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Hollensen, Svend; Goto, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the international joint venture formation process of family businesses. The reasoning behind Danfoss’ decision to cooperate with two competing family businesses in Japan and China as well as two nonfamily businesses in Canada and Britain will be analysed. In-depth qualitat...

  16. Clinical, Cytogenetic, and Biochemical Analyses of a Family with a t(3;13(q26.2;p11.2: Further Delineation of 3q Duplication Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abreu-González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities that result in genomic imbalances are a major cause of congenital and developmental anomalies. Partial duplication of chromosome 3q syndrome is a well-described condition, and the phenotypic manifestations include a characteristic facies, microcephaly, hirsutism, synophrys, broad nasal bridge, congenital heart disease, genitourinary disorders, and mental retardation. Approximately 60%–75% of cases are derived from a balanced translocation. We describe a family with a pure typical partial trisomy 3q syndrome derived from a maternal balanced translocation t(3;13(q26.2;p11.2. As the chromosomal rearrangement involves the short arm of an acrocentric chromosome, the phenotype corresponds to a pure trisomy 3q26.2-qter syndrome. There are 4 affected individuals and several carriers among three generations. The report of this family is relevant because there are few cases of pure duplication 3q syndrome reported, and the cases described here contribute to define the phenotype associated with the syndrome. Furthermore, we confirmed that the survival until adulthood is possible. This report also identified the presence of glycosaminoglycans in urine in this family, not related to the chromosomal abnormality or the phenotype.

  17. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family therapy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided ...

  18. Dissolved families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The situation in the family preceding a family separation is studied here, to identify risk factors for family dissolution. Information registers covering prospective statistics about health aspects, demographic variables, family violence, self-destructive behaviour, unemployment, and the spousal...

  19. Role of cadmium and ultraviolet-B radiation in plants. Influence on photosynthesis and element content in two species of Brassicaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson Joensson, Helene

    2001-02-01

    Plants are exposed to many different stress factors during their lifetime. often more than one factor at a time. which highlights the importance of research regarding interaction among stress factors. Cadmium and ultraviolet-B radiation (MB, 280-315 mm) are two potential stress factors in the environment, which have gained increased interest due to atmospheric pollution. In this work the interaction between Cd and UV-B radiation was investigated in two species of Brassicaceae; Brassica napus and Arabidopsis thaliana, the latter including the wild type and phytochelatin-deficient cad1-3. In both species photosynthetic parameters and element content were studied after the plants were exposed to Cd and supplemental UV-B radiation for 14 days. A separate Cd uptake study was carried out on Arabidopsis thaliana to investigate the effect of different Cd pretreatments on Cd uptake. The experiments showed that Cd was the dominant factor, but in Brassica napus, Cd+UV-B showed some interaction effects on energy dissipation and chlorophyll ratios. Generally, Cd decreased the chlorophyll content and influenced photosynthesis by altering oxygen evolution, non-photochemical quenching and the quantum yield. Cadmium had large effects on the content of essential elements, particularly in roots, that may be due to competition during uptake. The Cd uptake study showed that the wild type contained much higher amounts of Cd than the phytochelatin-deficient cad1-3, although Cd uptake is expected to be independent of phytochelatin content. Phytochelatins chelate and transport Cd to the vacuole, thus removing Cd from the cytosol. This compartmentation may disrupt a possible feedback mechanism in the cytosol.

  20. Polymorphism of the S-locus glycoprotein gene (SLG) and the S-locus related gene (SLR1) in Raphanus sativus L. and self-incompatible ornamental plants in the Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, K; Kusaba, M; Nishio, T

    1998-05-01

    The S-locus glycoprotein gene, SLG, which participates in the pollen-stigma interaction of self-incompatibility, and its unlinked homologue, SLR1, were analyzed in Raphanus sativus and three self-incompatible ornamental plants in the Brassicaceae. Among twenty-nine inbred lines of R. sativus, eighteen S haplotypes were identified on the basis of DNA polymorphisms detected by genomic Southern analysis using Brassica SLG probes. DNA fragments of SLG alleles specifically amplified from eight S haplotypes by PCR with class I SLG-specific primers showed different profiles following polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, after digestion with a restriction endonuclease. The nucleotide sequences of the DNA fragments of these eight R. sativus SLG alleles were determined. Degrees of similarity of the nucleotide sequences to a Brassica SLG (S6SLG) ranged from 85.6% to 91.9%. Amino acid sequences deduced from these had the twelve conserved cysteine residues and the three hypervariable regions characteristic of Brassica SLGs. Phylogenetic analysis of the SLG sequences from Raphanus and Brassica revealed that the Raphanus SLGs did not form an independent cluster, but were dispersed in the tree, clustering together with Brassica SLGs. These results suggest that diversification of the SLG alleles of Raphanus and Brassica occurred before differentiation of these genera. Although SLR1 sequences from Orychophragmus violaceus were shown to be relatively closely related to Brassica and Raphanus SLR1 sequences, DNA fragments that are highly homologous to the Brassica SLG were not detected in this species. Two other ornamental plants in the Brassicaceae, which are related more distantly to Brassica than Orychophragmus, also lacked sequences highly homologous to Brassica SLG genes. The evolution of self-incompatibility in the Brassicaceae is discussed.

  1. Characterization of Zinc and Cadmium Hyperaccumulation in Three Noccaea (Brassicaceae) Populations from Non-metalliferous Sites in the Eastern Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Soledad; Gallego, Berta; Sáez, Llorenç; López-Alvarado, Javier; Cabot, Catalina; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The Southern slope of the Pyrenees is the meridional limit for the distribution of several Noccaea populations. However, the systematic description of these populations and their hyperaccumulation mechanisms are not well established. Morphological and genetic analysis (ITS and 3 chloroplast regions) were used to identify Noccaea populations localized on non-metallicolous soils during a survey in the Catalonian Pyrenees. Cd and Zn concentrations were analyzed in soils and plants both sampled in the field and grown hydroponically. The expression of selected metal transporter genes was assessed by quantitative PCR. The populations were identified as Noccaea brachypetala (Jord.) F.K. Mey by conspicuous morphological traits. Principal component analysis provided a clear separation among N. brachypetala, Noccaea caerulescens J. Presl & C. Presl and Noccaea occitanica (Jord.) F.K. Mey., three Noccaea species reported in the Pyrenees. Contrastingly, ITS and cpDNA analyses were unable to clearly differentiate these taxa. Differences in the expression of the metal transporter genes HMA3, HMA4, and MTP1 between N. caerulescens and N. brachypetala, and those amongst the N. brachypetala populations suggest differences in the strategies for handling enhanced Cd and Zn availability. This is the first report demonstrating Cd and Zn hyperaccumulation by N. brachypetala both in the field and in hydroponics. This comprehensive study based on taxonomic, molecular, and physiological data allows both the correct identification of this species and the characterization of population differences in hyperaccumulation and tolerance of Zn and Cd. PMID:26904085

  2. Family functioning in neglectful families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, J M; Polansky, N A; Kilpatrick, A C; Shilton, P

    1996-04-01

    Family functioning in 103 neglectful and 102 non-neglectful low-income families is examined using self-report and observational measures. Neglectful mothers reported their families as having more family conflict and less expression of feelings, but not less cohesive. Ratings of observed and videotaped family interactions indicated neglect families were less organized, more chaotic, less verbally expressive, showed less positive and more negative affect than comparison families. However, there were wide differences on measures of functioning among neglect families. Three distinct types of neglectful family functioning are identified and interventions for each type are suggested to improve parental-family functioning.

  3. Family Meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Late for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  4. Family Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and grandparents raise grandchildren. Some children live in foster families, adoptive families, or in stepfamilies. Families are much more than groups of people who share the same genes or the ...

  5. Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... treatment become as overwhelming for others in your life as they are for you. Understanding the potential ...

  6. Familial hypertriglyceridemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familial hypertriglyceridemia is a common disorder passed down through families. It causes a higher-than-normal level of ... Familial hypertriglyceridemia is caused by a genetic defect, which is passed on in an autosomal dominant fashion. This ...

  7. Nectar-carbohydrate production and composition vary in relation to nectary anatomy and location within individual flowers of several species of Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A R; Pylatuik, J D; Paradis, J C; Low, N H

    1998-06-01

    Nectar-carbohydrate production and composition were investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography and enzymology in nine species from five tribes of the Brassicaceae. In six species (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., Brassica napus L., B. rapa L., Lobularia maritima (L.) Desv., Raphanus sativus L., Sinapis arvensis L.) that produced nectar from both lateral nectaries (associated with the short stamens) and median nectaries (outside the long stamens), on average 95% of the total nectar carbohydrate was collected from the lateral ones. Nectar from these glands possessed a higher glucose/fructose ratio (usually 1.0-1.2) than that from the median nectaries (0.2-0.9) within the same flower. Comparatively little sucrose was detected in any nectar samples except from Matthiola bicornus (Sibth. et Sm.) DC., which possessed lateral nectaries only and produced a sucrose-dominant exudate. The anatomy of the nectarial tissue in nectar-secreting flowers of six species, Hesperis matronalis L., L. maritima, M. bicornus, R. sativus, S. arvensis, and Sisymbrium loeselii L., was studied by light and scanning-electron microscopy. Phloem alone supplied the nectaries. However, in accordance with their overall nectar-carbohydrate production, the lateral glands received relatively rich quantities of phloem that penetrated far into the glandular tissue, whereas median glands were supplied with phloem that often barely innervated them. All nectarial tissue possessed modified stomata (with the exception of the median glands of S. loeselii, which did not produce nectar); further evidence was gathered to indicate that these structures do not regulate nectar flow by guard-cell movements. The numbers of modified stomata per gland showed no relation to nectar-carbohydrate production. Taken together, the data on nectar biochemistry and nectary anatomy indicate the existence of two distinct nectary types in those Brassicacean species that possess both lateral and median nectaries

  8. Mitogenomic analyses of caniform relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Ulfur; Gullberg, Anette; Janke, Axel; Kullberg, Morgan

    2007-12-01

    Extant members of the order Carnivora split into two basal groups, Caniformia (dog-like carnivorans) and Feliformia (cat-like carnivorans). In this study we address phylogenetic relationships within Caniformia applying various methodological approaches to analyses of complete mitochondrial genomes. Pinnipeds are currently well represented with respect to mitogenomic data and here we add seven mt genomes to the non-pinniped caniform collection. The analyses identified a basal caniform divergence between Cynoidea and Arctoidea. Arctoidea split into three primary groups, Ursidae (including the giant panda), Pinnipedia, and a branch, Musteloidea, which encompassed Ailuridae (red panda), Mephitidae (skunks), Procyonidae (raccoons) and Mustelidae (mustelids). The analyses favored a basal arctoid split between Ursidae and a branch containing Pinnipedia and Musteloidea. Within the Musteloidea there was a preference for a basal divergence between Ailuridae and remaining families. Among the latter, the analyses identified a sister group relationship between Mephitidae and a branch that contained Procyonidae and Mustelidae. The mitogenomic distance between the wolf and the dog was shown to be at the same level as that of basal human divergences. The wolf and the dog are commonly considered as separate species in the popular literature. The mitogenomic result is inconsistent with that understanding at the same time as it provides insight into the time of the domestication of the dog relative to basal human mitogenomic divergences.

  9. Family Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  10. Work/Family Balancing and 24/7 Work Schedules: Network Analysis of Strategies in a Transport Company Cleaning Service: Concilier travail-famille et horaires 24/7: analyse réseau des stratégies au sein du service de nettoyage d'une compagnie de transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrançois, Mélanie; Saint-Charles, Johanne; Riel, Jessica

    2017-11-01

    Whether or not official work/family balance measures exist within an organization, scheduling accommodations often go through informal channels involving colleagues and superiors and are negotiated within interpersonal relationships. This study examines the relationship dimensions of the scheduling strategies of cleaners working atypical hours in the transport sector through the lenses of ergonomic activity, network, and gender analyses. Using semi-directed interviews, observation, and network analysis, we revealed the effect of gender on relationship dynamics and the influence of these dynamics on work/family balance strategies deployed by cleaners. One of the main contributions of this study is to demonstrate the decisive effect of relationships by revealing inequalities in access to organizational social networks. Creating spaces to discuss work/family balancing and a more equitable circulation of information could contribute to reducing inequalities associated with gender, social status, and family responsibilities and support the work/family strategies developed by workers dealing with restrictive work schedules. Résumé Les accommodements du temps de travail pour la conciliation travail-famille (CTF) passent souvent par des ententes informelles qui s'inscrivent dans les relations entre collègues ou avec des gestionnaires. Notre étude, intégrant l'ergonomie et la communication dans une perspective de genre, porte sur les dimensions relationnelles des stratégies de choix d'horaire d'agentes et agents de nettoyage devant composer avec des horaires atypiques dans le secteur des transports. À partir d'entretiens semi-dirigés, d'observations et d'analyse de réseaux, nous avons pu observer l'influence des dynamiques relationnelles, notamment de genre, sur les stratégies de CTF. Un apport central de cette étude est de montrer l'effet structurant des relations en révélant notamment des inégalités dans l'accès aux ressources facilitant le choix d

  11. Sproglig Metode og Analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    le Fevre Jakobsen, Bjarne

    Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011......Publikationen indeholder øvematerialer, tekster, powerpointpræsentationer og handouts til undervisningsfaget Sproglig Metode og Analyse på BA og tilvalg i Dansk/Nordisk 2010-2011...

  12. Éléments pour une analyse de la fraternité d’accueil dans un contexte de circulation des enfants Elements for an Analysis of Host Foster Families in a Context of Circulation of Children. An Illustration from the ‘île de La Réunion’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Le Gall

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Si la famille d’accueil apparaît bien comme un dispositif de protection de l’enfance, elle peut être aussi appréhendée comme une forme particulière de recomposition familiale : les enfants placés maintiennent des liens avec leur famille d’origine et tissent des liens avec l’assistante maternelle, son conjoint et ses enfants. Cette manière de “faire famille” diffère des recompositions à la suite d’une rupture d’union féconde, puisque ce sont des enfants qui s’adjoignent à une autre famille, et non un beau-parent. Il n’en reste pas moins que les enfants placés se trouvent, vis-à-vis des enfants de la famille d’accueil, dans une situation qui s’apparente à celle des quasi-frères et sœurs des familles recomposées en ce sens qu’ils ne partagent pas de sang commun. Il est dès lors possible d’analyser les liens qu’ils peuvent tisser comme relevant du fraternel, ce d’autant plus qu’ils co-résident ensemble au quotidien, ce qui est rarement le cas des quasi-frères et sœurs. S’adossant aux travaux récents sur la pluriparentalité et la fraternité recomposée, l’auteur se propose de porter un autre regard sur le placement familial en privilégiant l’angle de la fraternité d’accueil, et ce, dans un contexte qui présente la particularité d’avoir une tradition de circulation des enfants : la société réunionnaise.If the host family indeed seems to be a protective device for children, it can also be understood as a particular form of family recomposition: the children placed there maintain ties with their family of origin and establish ties with the maternal assistant, her spouse and his children. This way “of forming a family” differs from recompositions following the breakup of a fecund union, since it is the children who are joined to another family, and not an in-law. Vis-à-vis the host family, it nonetheless remains true that with respect to the host family’s children, the

  13. Familial gigantism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. de Herder (Wouter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractFamilial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  14. Familial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter W. de Herder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  15. Family Ties

    OpenAIRE

    Alesina, Alberto; Giuliano, Paola

    2009-01-01

    We study the role of the most primitive institution in society: the family. Its organization and relationship between generations shape values formation, economic outcomes and influences national institutions. We use a measure of family ties, constructed from the World Values Survey, to review and extend the literature on the effect of family ties on economic behavior and economic attitudes. We show that strong family ties are negatively correlated with generalized trust; they imply more hous...

  16. Exponential families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallin, M.; Piegorsch, W.; El Shaarawi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Exponential families of distributions are parametric dominated families in which the logarithm of probability densities take a simple bilinear form (bilinear in the parameter and a statistic). As a consequence of that special form, sampling models in those families admit a finite-dimensional

  17. Family Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Emphasizing the family as the center of political/policy debates is the result of the tradition of romanticizing family virtues and a set of events ("the sixities"). Author sees the family emerging as a symbol in communal social policy development. Warns of dangers inherent in seeking private solutions to collective problems. (Author/CSS)

  18. Community families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Groth; Lou, Stina; Aagaard, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Social interventions targeted at people with severe mental illness (SMI) often include volunteers. Volunteers' perspectives are important for these interventions to work. The present paper investigates the experiences of volunteer families who befriend a person with SMI. Material......: Qualitative interviews with members of volunteer families. Discussion: The families were motivated by helping a vulnerable person and to engaging in a rewarding relationship. However, the families often doubted their personal judgment and relied on mental health workers to act as safety net. Conclusion......: The volunteer involvement is meaningful but also challenging. The families value professional support....

  19. Comparative genomic and phylogenomic analyses of the Bifidobacteriaceae family

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lugli, G. A.; Milani, C.; Turroni, F.; Duranti, S.; Mancabelli, L.; Mangifesta, M.; Ferrario, C.; Modesto, M.; Mattarelli, P.; Killer, Jiří; van Sinderen, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 568. ISSN 1471-2164 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Bifidobacteriaceae * genomics * phlogenomics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.729, year: 2016

  20. Computational analyses and annotations of the Arabidopsis peroxidasegene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Jespersen, Hans M.

    1998-01-01

    Classical heme-containing plant peroxidases have been ascribed a wide variety of functional roles related to development, defense, lignification and hormonal signaling. More than 40 peroxidase genes are now known in Arabidopsis thaliana for which functional association is complicated by a general...... lack of peroxidase substrate specificity. Computational analysis was performed on 30 near full-length Arabidopsis peroxidase cDNAs for annotation of start codons and signal peptide cleavage sites. A compositional analysis revealed that 23 of the 30 peroxidase cDNAs have 5' untranslated regions...

  1. Molecular analyses of a tyrosinase-negative albino family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K.C.; Chintamaneni, C.D.; Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ., Indianapolis (United States)); Halaban, R. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)); Witkop, C.J. Jr. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Sequence analysis of the tyrosinase coding region from an individual with tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism revealed that the patient was a compound heterozygote. One allele carried a C[r arrow]A single-base substitution in codon 355 of exon 3, and the other carried a two-nucleotide deletion in exon 1. The nucleotide substitution caused a putative amino acid change from threonine (ACA) to lysine (AAA), abolishing a signal for N-glycosylation. The two base-pair deletion caused a frameshift, creating a putative premature termination signal at codon 226. The melanocytes from the proband and her affected brother were amelanotic and devoid of measurable tyrosinase activity. Moreover, gel electrophoretic analysis of the immunoprecipitated proband tyrosinase showed that the protein was no processed to the mature glycosylated form, confirming the predicted consequence of the amino acid change. The two-base deletion on the homologous allele was detected only by sequencing genomic DNA. The transcript of this allele was not represented in the cDNA library and could not be detected by PCR mRNA, and the putative truncated protein ([approximately]25 kDa) was not present in immunoprecipitates, suggesting that the allele with the missense mutation may be preferentially expressed. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The Family Startup Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trillingsgaard, Tea; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    . However, little is known about effect of universal approaches to parenting support during the transition to parenthood. This protocol describes and experimental evaluation of group based parenting support, the Family Startup Program (FSP), currently implemented large scale in Denmark. Methods....../design: Participants will be approximately 2500 pregnant women and partners. Inclusion criteria are parental age above 18 and the mother expecting first child. Families are recruited when attending routine pregnancy scans provided as a part of the publicly available prenatal care program at Aarhus University Hospital...... and community resources. The program consists of twelve group sessions, with nine families in each group, continuing from pregnancy until the child is 15 months old. TAU is the publicly available pre- and postnatal care available to families in both conditions. Analyses will employ survey data, administrative...

  3. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative description of laser beam characteristics is important for process implementation and optimisation. In particular, a need for quantitative characterisation of beam diameter was identified when using fibre lasers for micro manufacturing. Here the beam diameter limits...... the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...

  4. Family therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Altamash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Another major force not letting us succeed in the treatment of diabetes remains right inside the patients home, their family members. Hence, it is important to know the perception of the close family members about this simple and strong tool in diabetes, ′insulin′. The drug is nearing its century, it has not fully being accepted gracefully even in todays electronic savvy society. So, we need to strongly discover the reason for its non-acceptance, while trials are out inventing new drugs. One vital thing that can change this attitude is increasing the understanding of this drug, insulin in depth to close people around the patient, the ′family′. Underestimating family′s perception about disease and treatment for diabetes is detrimental to both diseased and the doctor. This consists of a biopsychosocial model; biological, psychological and social factors. Family forms the most important part of it. The strategies in family therapy include psychodynamic, structural, strategic, and cognitive-behavioral component. Diabetes has and will continue to rise, so will be the treatment options. From the clinicians side its to fix fasting first but from patients its fix family first. Family therapy demonstrates the importance of insulin initiation and maintenance in insulin naive patients, and continuation for others. The specific needs of such patients and their impact on family life are met with family therapy. Who needs family therapy? Benefits of family therapy and a case based approach is covered.

  5. Meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Maria A.; Luyten, Johannes W.; Scheerens, Jaap; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Scheerens, J

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter results of a research synthesis and quantitative meta-analyses of three facets of time effects in education are presented, namely time at school during regular lesson hours, homework, and extended learning time. The number of studies for these three facets of time that could be used

  6. Contesting Citizenship: Comparative Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Squires, Judith

    2007-01-01

    importance of particularized experiences and multiple ineequality agendas). These developments shape the way citizenship is both practiced and analysed. Mapping neat citizenship modles onto distinct nation-states and evaluating these in relation to formal equality is no longer an adequate approach...

  7. Analysing Access Control Specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2009-01-01

    . Recent events have revealed intimate knowledge of surveillance and control systems on the side of the attacker, making it often impossible to deduce the identity of an inside attacker from logged data. In this work we present an approach that analyses the access control configuration to identify the set...

  8. Chromosome analyses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H; Nolte, I

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetics is the study of normal and abnormal chromosomes. Every species is characterized by a given number of chromosomes that can be recognized by their specific shape. The chromosomes are arranged according to standard classification schemes for the respective species. While pre- and postnatal chromosome analyses investigate the constitutional karyotype, tumor cytogenetics is focused on the detection of clonal acquired, tumor-associated chromosome aberrations. Cytogenetic investigations in dogs are of great value especially for breeders dealing with fertility problems within their pedigrees, for veterinarians and last but not least for the dog owners. Dogs and humans share a variety of genetic diseases, including cancer. Thus, the dog has become an increasingly important model for genetic diseases. However, cytogenetic analyses of canine cells are complicated by the complex karyotype of the dog. Only just 15 years ago, a standard classification scheme for the complete canine karyotype was established. For chromosome analyses of canine cells the same steps of chromosome preparation are used as in human cytogenetics. There are few reports about cytogenetic changes in non-neoplastic cells, involving predominantly the sex chromosomes. Cytogenetic analyses of different entities of canine tumors revealed that, comparable to human tumors, tumors of the dog are often characterized by clonal chromosome aberrations, which might be used as diagnostic and prognostic markers. The integration of modern techniques (molecular genetic approaches, adaptive computer programs) will facilitate and complete conventional cytogenetic studies. However, conventional cytogenetics is still non-replaceable.

  9. Report sensory analyses veal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, M.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    On behalf of a client of Animal Sciences Group, different varieties of veal were analyzed by both instrumental and sensory analyses. The sensory evaluation was performed with a sensory analytical panel in the period of 13th of May and 31st of May, 2005. The three varieties of veal were: young bull,

  10. Filmstil - teori og analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    Filmstil påvirker på afgørende vis vores oplevelse af film. Men filmstil, måden, de levende billeder organiserer fortællingen på fylder noget mindre end filmens handling, når vi taler om film. Filmstil - teori og analyse er en rigt eksemplificeret præsentation, kritik og videreudvikling af...

  11. Family Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    safety and flexibility at the level of multi-object systems. We are granted the flexibility of using different families of kinds of objects, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. This paper highlights the inability of traditional polymorphism to handle multiple objects, and presents family...... polymorphism as a way to overcome this problem. Family polymorphism has been implemented in the programming language gbeta, a generalized version of Beta, and the source code of this implementation is available under GPL....

  12. Family literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    I Projekt familielæsning, der er et samarbejde mellem Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning og Hillerød Bibliotek, arbejder vi med at få kontakt til de familier, som biblioteket ellers aldrig ser som brugere og dermed også de børn, der vokser op i familier, for hvem bøger og oplæsningssituationer ikk...... er en selvfølgelig del af barndommen. Det, vi vil undersøge og ønsker at være med til at udvikle hos disse familier, er det, man kan kalde family literacy....

  13. Study of a family that overcomes poverty issues: family resilience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ángela Mattar Yunes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Generally, researches with families focus the difficulties and the negative aspects of family life by bringing up their maladjustments and failures. The interest in family resilience contributes to change this logic by demonstrating the healthy aspects of the family world. Nevertheless, the term resilience presents ideological controversies which are more severe when the discussion is about families and poverty. In order to diminish these contradictions this study adopted a systemic concept of resilience which refers to “those processes that make possible to overcome adversities”. A case study was realized with a low income family who lived in a “very poor” neighborhood in the deep south of Brazil. The methodological strategies to the formal investigation of the family were: life history of the family using the principles of reflexive interview, genograms and data analyses through the approach of the grounded theory. The results showed that the family lived a number of risk experiences such as adoption, privation of basic needs, migration and diseases. Among the indicators of their abilities of “overcoming adversities”, emerged the belief system as the core of the discourses. The family showed that they value the interpersonal relationships through intra and extra familiar interactions based in the patterns of help, learning, affection and solidarity. During the crisis the family gives meaning to the difficulties in order to maintaining the situation controlled through cohesion, open communication, mutual respect and getting support of the extended family/ social network. The pos-adversity period is perceived as benefic and transforming as the family feels stronger and with feelings of solidarity, which is a mark of this family. Their attitude in relation to the neighborhood is active in the sense of promoting the welfare of other families who live in the same social address. Would those above identified processes be adequate to

  14. Family History Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Catharine; Sen, Ananda; Ruffin, Mack T.; Nease, Donald E.; Gramling, Robert; Acheson, Louise S.; O’Neill, Suzanne M.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Family Healthware™, a tool developed by the CDC, is a self-administered web-based family history tool that assesses familial risk for six diseases (coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and colon, breast and ovarian cancers) and provides personalized prevention messages based on risk. The Family Healthware Impact Trial (FHITr) set out to examine the clinical utility of presenting personalized preventive messages tailored to family history risk for improving health behaviors. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of Family Healthware on modifying disease risk perceptions, particularly among those who initially underestimated their risk for certain diseases. Design A total of 3786 patients were enrolled in a cluster-randomized trial to evaluate the clinical utility of Family Healthware. Setting/participants Participants were recruited from 41 primary care practices among 13 states between 2005 and 2007. Main outcome measures Perceived risk for each disease was assessed at baseline and 6-month follow-up using a single-item comparative risk question. Analyses were completed in March 2012. Results Compared to controls, Family Healthware increased risk perceptions among those who underestimated their risk for heart disease (15% vs 9%, p<0.005); stroke (11% vs 8%, p<0.05); diabetes (18% vs 11%, p<0.05); and colon cancer (17% vs 10%, p=0.05); but not breast or ovarian cancers. The majority of underestimators did not shift in their disease risk perceptions. Conclusions Family Healthware was effective at increasing disease risk perceptions, particularly for metabolic conditions, among those who underestimated their risk. Results from this study also demonstrate the relatively resistant nature of risk perceptions. Trial registration This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov NCT00164658. PMID:22992357

  15. Analyse of Maintenance Cost in ST

    CERN Document Server

    Jenssen, B W

    2001-01-01

    An analyse has been carried out in ST concerning the total costs for the division. Even though the target was the maintenance costs in ST, the global budget over has been analysed. This has been done since there is close relation between investments & consolidation and the required level for maintenance. The purpose of the analyse was to focus on maintenance cost in ST as a ratio of total maintenance costs over the replacement value of the equipment, and to make some comparisons with other industries and laboratories. Families of equipment have been defined and their corresponding ratios calculated. This first approach gives us some "quantitative" measurements. This analyse should be combined with performance indicators (more "qualitative" measurements) that are telling us how well we are performing. This will help us in defending our budget, make better priorities, and we will satisfy the requirements from our external auditors.

  16. Dropped object protection analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsen, Ingve

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore structural engineering Impact from dropped object is a typical accident action (NOKSOK N-004, 2013). Hence, the DOP structure is to be analyzed in an accidental limit state (ALS) design practice, which means that a non-linear finite element analysis can be applied. The DOP structure will be based on a typical DOP structure. Several FEM analyses are performed for the DOP structure. Different shapes size and weights and various impact positions are used for si...

  17. This is My Family

    OpenAIRE

    Yeğen, Hale Nur; Çetin, Merve

    2017-01-01

    Me and my family, Families poem, Mother-Father, Brother-Sister, Grandparents, Uncle-Aunt, Cousin, Family, Family handgame, My family tree, Activities (Three In a Family), Digital Games, A family poem, Quiz

  18. Biomass feedstock analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The overall objectives of the project `Feasibility of electricity production from biomass by pressurized gasification systems` within the EC Research Programme JOULE II were to evaluate the potential of advanced power production systems based on biomass gasification and to study the technical and economic feasibility of these new processes with different type of biomass feed stocks. This report was prepared as part of this R and D project. The objectives of this task were to perform fuel analyses of potential woody and herbaceous biomasses with specific regard to the gasification properties of the selected feed stocks. The analyses of 15 Scandinavian and European biomass feed stock included density, proximate and ultimate analyses, trace compounds, ash composition and fusion behaviour in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The wood-derived fuels, such as whole-tree chips, forest residues, bark and to some extent willow, can be expected to have good gasification properties. Difficulties caused by ash fusion and sintering in straw combustion and gasification are generally known. The ash and alkali metal contents of the European biomasses harvested in Italy resembled those of the Nordic straws, and it is expected that they behave to a great extent as straw in gasification. Any direct relation between the ash fusion behavior (determined according to the standard method) and, for instance, the alkali metal content was not found in the laboratory determinations. A more profound characterisation of the fuels would require gasification experiments in a thermobalance and a PDU (Process development Unit) rig. (orig.) (10 refs.)

  19. The most important question in family approach: the potential of the resolve item of the family APGAR in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Hiroaki; Ban, Nobutaro

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to clarify what aspects of family function are measured by the Family APGAR by examining its correlations with the fourth edition of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale at Kwansei Gakuin (FACESKG IV). Furthermore, we sought to confirm the usefulness of the Family APGAR in general practice. We recruited 250 patients (aged 13-76 years) from the general medicine outpatient clinic in a Japanese hospital between July 1999 and February 2000. We employed a cross-sectional design and administered the Family APGAR and the FACESKG IV-16 (i.e., the short version). The scores on the questionnaires were compared using correlation and multiple regression analyses. We then analyzed relationships between the questionnaires and family issues measures using Chi square, Mann-Whitney U, and logistic regression analyses. The Family APGAR partially evaluates the Cohesion dimension of family functioning as measured by the FACESKG IV-16. Furthermore, we could measure family disengagement using the resolve and partnership items of the Family APGAR. Family dysfunction (excessive or impoverished Adaptability or Cohesion) was not related to the presence of family issues. Nevertheless, there was a significant relationship between scores on the Resolve item and the family issues measure (χ(2) = 6.305, p = 0.043). The Family APGAR, especially the Resolve item, has the potential for use in treating patients with family issues. Interventions could be developed according to the simple Family APGAR responses.

  20. Phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses of gypsy group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gypsy group retrotransposons in the Egyptian cotton, Gossypium barbadense, was examined by phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses. DNA sequences of gypsy group retrotransposons in two G. barbadense cultivars revealed that these sequences are heterogeneous and represent two distinct families.

  1. The Maria asteroid family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljbaae, S.; Carruba, V.; Masiero, J. R.; Domingos, R. C.; Huaman, M.

    2017-11-01

    The Maria asteroid family is a group of S-type asteroids. Its location adjacent to the left side of the 3J:-1A mean-motion resonances could be the reason for the absence of the left side of the `V' shape in the (a, 1/D) domain. This family can be considered as a likely source of ordinary chondrite-like material. In this work, we make use of the time dependence of the asymmetric coefficient AS describing the degree of asymmetry of the C distribution of a fictitious Maria family generated with the value of the ejection velocity parameter VEJ = 35 m s-1 to obtain an age estimate of 1750_{+537}^{-231} Myr, in good agreement with the family age found in the literature. Analysing the contribution to the near-Earth object (NEO) population, we found that about 7.6 per cent of presently known near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) have orbits similar to asteroids from the Maria family. Only ˜1.7 per cent of our simulated family can stay in NEO space for more than 10 Myr, while only five asteroids become NEOs in the last 500 Myr of the simulation.

  2. Family burden, family health and personal mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Edel; Bunting, Brendan P

    2013-03-21

    The economic and moral implications of family burden are well recognised. What is less understood is whether or how family health and family burden relate to personal mental health. This study examines family health and perceived family burden as predictors of personal mental health, taking personal and sociodemographic factors into consideration. Data used was from the National Comorbidity Study Replication (NCS-R), namely the random 30% of participants (N = 3192) to whom the family burden interview was administered. Measures of family burden and mental health were considered for analysis. Binary logistic regressions were used as means of analyses. Perception of family burden was associated with an increased vulnerability to personal mental health problems, as was the presence of mental health difficulties within the family health profile. Which member of the family (kinship) was ill bore no relation to prediction of personal mental health. Personal and socio-demographic factors of sex, age, marital status, education and household income were all predictive of increased vulnerability to mental health problems over the last 12 months. Certain elements of family health profile and its perceived burden on the individuals themselves appears related to risk of personal incidence of mental health problems within the individuals themselves. For moral and economic reasons, further research to understand the dynamics of these relationships is essential to aid developing initiatives to protect and support the mental health and wellbeing of relatives of ill individuals.

  3. Innovation in Family Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filser, Matthias; Brem, Alexander; Gast, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    , organizational culture and behaviour, resources, and innovation and strategy. Second, based on a thorough literature review the major research avenues are reflected. The comparison of the results of both analyses showed the following areas for future research on family firm innovation: members‘ individual human......Over the past decade, research on innovation in family firms has received growing attention by scholars and practitioners around the globe with a wide range of aspects explored within the current body of literature. Despite the constantly growing number of scientific publications, research lacks...... a comprehensive and critical review of past and present research achievements. First, conducting a bibliometric analysis with a focus on innovation in family firms, we identify five topical clusters that help to understand the foundations of recent findings: namely ownership and governance, structural settings...

  4. The sulfatase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, G; Meroni, G; Ballabio, A

    1997-06-01

    During the past few years, molecular analyses have provided important insights into the biochemistry and genetics of the sulfatase family of enzymes, identifying the molecular bases of inherited diseases caused by sulfatase deficiencies. New members of the sulfatase gene family have been identified in man and other species using a genomic approach. These include the gene encoding arylsulfatase E, which is involved in X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata, a disorder of cartilage and bone development. Another important breakthrough has been the discovery of the biochemical basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a severe of all sulfatase activities. These discoveries, together with the resolution of the crystallographic structure of sulfatases, have improved our understanding of the function and evolution of this fascinating family of enzymes.

  5. Family History

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your relatives about their health. Draw a family tree and add the health information. Having copies of medical records and death certificates is also helpful. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  6. Family matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieffer-Kristensen, Rikke; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2013-01-01

    brain injury participated. Family and brain injury characteristics were reported by the ill and healthy parents. Children self-reported post-traumatic stress symptoms (PSS) using the Child Impact of Events revised (CRIES). Emotional and behavioural problems among the children were also identified...... by the parents using the Achenbach’s Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). RESULTS: The family stress variables relating to the healthy spouse in all six comparisons were significant (p... scores for the children. For the adjusted associations, we again found the family stress variables in the healthy spouse to be related to the risk of emotional and behavioral problems in the children. CONCLUSIONS: The present results suggest that in ABI families, the children’s emotional functioning...

  7. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high. The condition begins at birth and can cause heart attacks at an early age. Related topics include: Familial ... does not respond well to treatment and may cause an early heart attack. Possible Complications Complications may include: Heart attack at ...

  8. FAMILY RHAGIONIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Charles Morphy D; Carmo, Daniel D D

    2016-06-14

    The family Rhagionidae is one of the oldest Brachyeran lineages. Its monophyly is still uncertain. There are four rhagionid genera distributed in Neotropical Region but only three species of Chrysopilus are found in Colombia.

  9. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  10. Analyse af elbilers forbrug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Torp, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Denne rapport undersøger GPS og CAN bus datagrundlaget opsamlet ved kørsel med elbiler og analysere på elbilers forbrug. Analyserne er baseret på godt 133 millioner GPS og CAN bus målinger opsamlet fra 164 elbiler (Citroen C-Zero, Mitsubishi iMiev og Peugeot Ion) i kalenderåret 2012....... For datagrundlaget kan det konstateres, at der er behov for væsentlige, men simple opstramninger for fremadrettet at gøre det nemmere at anvende GPS/CAN bus data fra elbiler i andre analyser. Brugen af elbiler er sammenlignet med brændstofbiler og konklusionen er, at elbiler generelt kører 10-15 km/t langsommere på...

  11. Family Satisfaction With Nursing Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippee, Tetyana P; Henning-Smith, Carrie; Gaugler, Joseph E; Held, Robert; Kane, Robert L

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the factor structure of a new family satisfaction with nursing home care instrument and determines the relationship of resident quality of life (QOL) and facility characteristics with family satisfaction. Data sources include (1) family satisfaction interviews ( n = 16,790 family members), (2) multidimensional survey of resident QOL ( n = 13,433 residents), and (3) facility characteristics ( n = 376 facilities). We used factor analysis to identify domains of family satisfaction and multivariate analyses to identify the role of facility-level characteristics and resident QOL on facility-mean values of family satisfaction. Four distinct domains were identified for family satisfaction: "care," "staff," "environment," and "food." Chain affiliation, higher resident acuity, more deficiencies, and large size were all associated with less family satisfaction, and resident QOL was a significant (albeit weak) predictor of family satisfaction. Results suggest that family member satisfaction is distinct from resident QOL but is associated with resident QOL and facility characteristics.

  12. "Connected Presence" in Distributed Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2009-01-01

    also analyses families’ use of the mobile phone in context of modern family life, emphasizing the importance of the temporal and spatial dispersion of family members in explaining the form and content of intra-familial mediated communication. Finally, the dual role of media technologies (including......Concurrently with the recent years’ explosive pervasion of information- and communication technologies, mediated communication has gained a strong position in the daily interaction between family members. Based on the results of qualitative interviews with families in Denmark, this article shows...... the mobile phone) in both integrating and dispersing families is discussed....

  13. [Evaluation of family function in home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamori, Tadashi; Sato, Masayuki; Nishi, Tomohiro; Yamagishi, Tadashi; Hattori, Yukari; Ishii, Nobuo; Saka, Shohei; Koyanagi, Junko; Murase, Jutaro; Nitoh, Noriko; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuo, Kyoko; Moriya, Akemi; Ikemizu, Ayumi; Arino, Kaoru; Mori, Mitsuko; Sato, Kyoko; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative and qualitative analyses of a caring family are needed to improve home care. We propose a three-dimensional quantitative evaluation of family functioning. The first dimension is food, clothing, and shelter; the second dimension is patient, medical, and caring conditions; and the third dimension is the caring family condition. We used the home care score and Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale at Kwansei Gakuin(FACESKG)IV for the quantitative evaluation of family functioning. Narrative medicine and ethnography are valuable for the qualitative evaluation of a caring family.

  14. Family Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livija Knaflič

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in child and adult literacy demonstrates that the achievement and the level of literacy that children attain at school is connected with the social and cultural characteristics and the level of literacy of the child's family. This intergenerational transfer of the level of literacy has motivated the search for different ways of improving the level of literacy.The concept of family literacy is based on the assumption that a higher level of parent literacy means that the children may achieve the same, and it also offers better schooling prospects. Family literacy programmes help fami­lies to develop different activities, in­cluding reading and writing skills, both in their community and in everyday life.

  15. Family Structure and Family Processes in Mexican American Families

    OpenAIRE

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2011-01-01

    Despite increases in single-parent families among Mexican Americans (MA), few studies have examined the association of family structure and family adjustment. Utilizing a diverse sample of 738 Mexican American families (21.7% single parent), the current study examined differences across family structure on early adolescent outcomes, family functioning, and parent-child relationship variables. Results revealed that early adolescents in single parent families reported greater school misconduct,...

  16. Family Hypnotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  17. Understanding Stakeholder Relationships amongst Punjabi-Indian Family Firm Members’

    OpenAIRE

    Woldesenbet, K.; Vershinina, Natalia; Kaur, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this paper is to explore family succession and continuity in Punjabi-Indian ethnic family firms in the UK using stakeholder approach. The research objectives are to analyse how household dynamics can shape activities within small family enterprises within a specific cultural and sociological context, and to examine whether these later generation family firms actively involve family members in developing family businesses, that can be sustained beyond the current generat...

  18. Family Crisis Intervention in War Contexts: A Case Study of a Traumatised Palestinian Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Guido; Said, Mahmud S.; Castiglioni, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the phases of an innovative in vivo exposure intervention in which all family members were present at the scene of a traumatic incident. Clinical practice has borne out the efficacy of family intervention and its benefits for traumatised individuals and family groups. The intervention discussed here was…

  19. Family structure and family processes in Mexican-American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiders, Katharine H; Roosa, Mark W; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2011-03-01

    Despite increases in single-parent families among Mexican Americans, few studies have examined the association of family structure and family adjustment. Utilizing a diverse sample of 738 Mexican-American families (21.7% single parent), the current study examined differences across family structure on early adolescent outcomes, family functioning, and parent-child relationship variables. Results revealed that early adolescents in single-parent families reported greater school misconduct, conduct disorder/oppositional deviant disorder, and major depressive disorder symptoms, and greater parent-child conflict than their counterparts in 2-parent families. Single-parent mothers reported greater economic hardship, depression, and family stress. Family stress and parent-child conflict emerged as significant mediators of the association between family structure and early adolescent outcomes, suggesting important processes linking Mexican-American single-parent families and adolescent adjustment. 2011 © FPI, Inc.

  20. Method of performing computational aeroelastic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computational aeroelastic analyses typically use a mathematical model for the structural modes of a flexible structure and a nonlinear aerodynamic model that can generate a plurality of unsteady aerodynamic responses based on the structural modes for conditions defining an aerodynamic condition of the flexible structure. In the present invention, a linear state-space model is generated using a single execution of the nonlinear aerodynamic model for all of the structural modes where a family of orthogonal functions is used as the inputs. Then, static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions are generated using computational interaction between the mathematical model and the linear state-space model for a plurality of periodic points in time.

  1. Comparison of growth inhibition profiles and mechanisms of apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cell lines by isothiocyanates and indoles from Brassicaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappa, Gerlinde [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lichtenberg, Maike [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Iori, Renato [Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Istituto Sperimentale Colture Industriali, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Barillari, Jessica [Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Istituto Sperimentale Colture Industriali, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Bartsch, Helmut [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gerhaeuser, Clarissa [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: c.gerhauser@dkfz.de

    2006-07-25

    The isothiocyanates sulforaphane and PEITC ({beta}-phenethyl isothiocyanate) as well as the indoles indole-3-carbinol and its condensation product 3,3'-diindolylmethane are known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. In this study, we compared the cell growth inhibitory potential of the four compounds on the p53 wild type human colon cancer cell line 40-16 (p53{sup +/+}) and its p53 knockout derivative 379.2 (p53{sup -/-}) (both derived from HCT116). Using sulforhodamin B staining to assess cell proliferation, we found that the isothiocyanates were strongly cytotoxic, whereas the indoles inhibited cell growth in a cytostatic manner. Half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of all four compounds in both cell lines ranged from 5-15 {mu}M after 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment. Apoptosis induction was analyzed by immunoblotting of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP). Treatment with sulforaphane (15 {mu}M), PEITC (10 {mu}M), indole-3-carbinol (10 {mu}M) and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (10 {mu}M) induced PARP cleavage after 24 and 48 h in both 40-16 and the 379.2 cell lines, suggestive of a p53-independent mechanism of apoptosis induction. In cultured 40-16 cells, activation of caspase-9 and -7 detected by Western blotting indicated involvement of the mitochondrial pathway. We detected time- and concentration-dependent changes in protein expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-x{sub L} as well as pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins. Of note is that for sulforaphane only, ratios of pro- to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein levels directly correlated with apoptosis induction measured by PARP cleavage. Taken together, we demonstrated that the glucosinolate breakdown products investigated in this study have distinct profiles of cell growth inhibition, potential to induce p53-independent apoptosis and to modulate Bcl-2 family protein expression in human colon cancer cell lines.

  2. Familial paragangliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lips CJM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Paragangliomas are rare tumours of the autonomic nervous system and occur in sporadic and hereditary forms. They are usually benign and have a low mortality. However, they cause significant morbidity related to their mass effect. Genetic predisposition can occur within the familial tumour syndromes multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2, von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1, or be due to mutations in genes specific to the development of paraganglioma only. Compared to sporadic forms, familial paragangliomas tend to present at a younger age and at multiple sites. Tumours should be diagnosed and resected as early as possible, as it has been shown that morbidity is related to tumour size. This article gives an overview of the current literature on the origin of the different forms of paragangliomas, DNA diagnosis, as well as biochemical and radiological screening guidelines.

  3. Family profiles in eating disorders: family functioning and psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerniglia L

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Luca Cerniglia,1 Silvia Cimino,2 Mimma Tafà,2 Eleonora Marzilli,2 Giulia Ballarotto,2 Fabrizia Bracaglia2 1Faculty of Psychology, International Telematic University UNINETTUNO, 2Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy Abstract: Research has studied family functioning in families of patients suffering from eating disorders (EDs, particularly investigating the associations between mothers’ and daughters’ psychopathological symptoms, but limited studies have examined whether there are specific maladaptive psychological profiles characterizing the family as a whole when it includes adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN, bulimia nervosa (BN, and binge eating disorder (BED. Through the collaboration of a network of public and private consultants, we recruited n=181 adolescents diagnosed for EDs (n=61 with AN, n=60 with BN, and n=60 with BEDs and their parents. Mothers, fathers, and youths were assessed through a self-report measure evaluating family functioning, and adolescents completed a self-report questionnaire assessing psychopathological symptoms. Results showed specific family functioning and psychopathological profiles based on adolescents’ diagnosis. Regression analyses also showed that family functioning characterized by rigidity predicted higher psychopathological symptoms. Our study underlines the importance of involving all members of the family in assessment and intervention programs when adolescent offspring suffer from EDs. Keywords: family functioning, eating disorders, adolescents, psychopathological risk

  4. Sub-proteome S-nitrosylation analysis in Brassica juncea hints at the regulation of Brassicaceae specific as well as other vital metabolic pathway(s) by nitric oxide and suggests post-translational modifications cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Deswal, Renu

    2014-12-01

    Abiotic stress affects the normal physiology of the plants and results in crop loss. Brassica juncea is an oil yielding crop affected by abiotic stress. In future, over 30% yield loss by abiotic stress is predicted in India. Understanding the mechanism of plant response to stress would help in developing stress tolerant crops. Nitric oxide (NO) is now viewed as a remarkably important signaling molecule, involved in regulating stress responses. S-Nitrosylation is a NO based post-translational modification (PTM), linked with the regulation of many physiologically relevant targets. In the last decade, over 700 functionally varied S-nitrosylated proteins were identified, which suggested broad-spectrum regulation. To understand the physiological significance of S-nitrosylation, it was analyzed in cold stress. Functional categorization and validation of some of the B. juncea S-nitrosylated targets, suggested that NO produced during stress regulates cellular detoxification by modulating enzymes of ascorbate glutathione cycle, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase and glyoxalase I by S-nitrosylation in crude, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) depleted and apoplastic fractions. Interestingly, S-nitrosylation of enzymes associated with glucosinolate hydrolysis pathway, suggests a novel regulation of this Brassicaceae specific pathway by NO. Moreover, identification of enzymes of Glycolysis and Calvin cycle in crude and RuBisCO depleted fractions showed the regulation of metabolic as well as photosynthetic pathways by S-nitrosylation. S-Nitrosylation of cell wall modifying and proteolytic enzymes in the apoplast suggested differential and spatial regulation by S-nitrosylation. To have an overview of physiological role(s) of NO, collective information on NO based signaling (mainly by S-nitrosylation) is presented in this review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of Parental Educational Background on the Family Values ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data was analysed with chi square test statistics using version 17 of SPSS. Results showed that fathers' educational background did not significantly influence family values among undergraduate students. However, mothers' educational background significantly influenced family values held by undergraduate students.

  6. Iron interference in arsenic absorption by different plant species, analysed by neutron activation, k{sub 0}-method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, George; Matos, Ludmila Vieira da Silva; Silva, Maria Aparecida da; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros Correia [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: george@cdtn.br, e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Thailand, United States of America and also in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities have been contributing to aggravate natural contamination. Among other elements, iron is capable to interfere with the arsenic absorption by plants; iron ore has been proposed to remediate areas contaminated by the mentioned metalloid. In order to verify if iron can interfere with arsenic absorption by different taxa of plants, specimens of Brassicacea and Equisetaceae were kept in a 1/4 Murashige and Skoog basal salt solution (M and S), with 10 {mu}gL{sup -1} of arsenic acid. And varying concentrations of iron. The specimens were analysed by neutron activation analysis, k{sub 0}-method, a routine technique in CDTN, and also very appropriate for arsenic studies. The preliminary results were quite surprising, showing that iron can interfere with arsenic absorption by plants, but in different ways, according to the species studied. (author)

  7. Development and Examination of a Family Triadic Measure to Examine Quality of Life Family Congruence in Nursing Home Residents and Two Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalgaard Kelly, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The overall purpose of this study was to propose and test a conceptual model and apply family analyses methods to understand quality of life family congruence in the nursing home setting. Method: Secondary data for this study were from a larger study, titled Measurement, Indicators and Improvement of the Quality of Life (QOL) in Nursing Homes. Research literature, family systems theory and human ecological assumptions, fostered the conceptual model empirically testing quality of life family congruence. Results: The study results supported a model examining nursing home residents and two family members on quality of life family congruence. Specifically, family intergenerational dynamic factors, resident personal and social-psychological factors, and nursing home family input factors were examined to identify differences in quality of life family congruence among triad families. Discussion: Formal family involvement and resident cognitive functioning were found as the two most influential factors to quality of life family congruence (QOLFC). PMID:28138474

  8. Family division in China's transitional economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feinian

    2009-03-01

    Using a longitudinal data-set (the China Health and Nutrition Survey) we explored the effect of various economic factors, including household wealth, employment sector, and involvement in a household business on the division of extended families in China's transitional economy. Results from event history analyses suggest that these economic factors act as either a dividing or a unifying force on the extended family. Household wealth reduces the risk of family division, but the effect is weaker for families in which parents have upper secondary education. In addition, an extended family is more likely to divide when married children work in the state sector. Further, the probability of family division is higher in families where daughters-in-law work in the state sector than in those with sons in this sector. Finally, involvement in a household business for married children increases family stability.

  9. Family Genericity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Type abstraction in object-oriented languages embody two techniques, each with its own strenghts and weaknesses. The first technique is extension, yielding abstraction mechanisms with good support for gradual specification. The prime example is inheritance. The second technique is functional...... abstraction, yielding more precise knowledge about the outcome. The prime example is type parameterized classes. This paper argues that these techniques should be clearly separated to work optimally, and also that current languages fail to do this. We have applied this design philosophy to a language based...... the result as family genericity. The presented language design has been implemented....

  10. Patient evaluation on family doctors' family orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalda, Ruth; Oona, Marje; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid; Lember, Margus

    2005-03-01

    Family orientation is one of basic features of family practice. The purpose of the study was to explore the patients' opinions about family physician involvement in family related issues, and to identify the factors that may influence the patients' opinions. Altogether 514 patients completed a questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was used to predict the factors which determine patient orientation to talk about family related issues. The results indicate that the patients' health and the family background influence their willingness to talk to family physicians about their family related problems. The findings of the study confirm that special attention should be paid to patients who definitely have family problems because of chronic illness, or an alcohol or drug using family member, or those who are widowed or divorced. Also, the ethnic origin was found to have an impact on patient opinions of family physicians' family involvement.

  11. From Family Therapy to Family Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Allan M

    2015-07-01

    For many, family therapy refers to sessions in which all family members are present. Yet in contemporary psychiatry there are many ways to work with families in addition to this classic concept. This article proposes family intervention as an encompassing term for a new family paradigm in child and adolescent psychiatry. Developmental psychopathology is a guiding principle of this paradigm. A full range of ways to work with families clinically is described with clinical examples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Family in Family Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Marianne Bertrand; Antoinette Schoar

    2006-01-01

    History is replete with examples of spectacular ascents of family businesses. Yet there are also numerous accounts of family businesses brought down by bitter feuds among family members, disappointed expectations between generations, and tragic sagas of later generations unable to manage their wealth. A large fraction of businesses throughout the world are organized around families. Why are family firms so prevalent? What are the implications of family control for the governance, financing an...

  13. HLA region excluded by linkage analyses of early onset periodontitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.; Wang, S.; Lopez, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that HLA genes may influence susceptibility to early-onset periodontitis (EOP). Segregation analyses indicate that EOP may be due to a single major gene. We conducted linkage analyses to assess possible HLA effects on EOP. Fifty families with two or more close relatives affected by EOP were ascertained in Virginia and Chile. A microsatellite polymorphism within the HLA region (at the tumor necrosis factor beta locus) was typed using PCR. Linkage analyses used a donimant model most strongly supported by previous studies. Assuming locus homogeneity, our results exclude a susceptibility gene within 10 cM on either side of our marker locus. This encompasses all of the HLA region. Analyses assuming alternative models gave qualitatively similar results. Allowing for locus heterogeneity, our data still provide no support for HLA-region involvement. However, our data do not statistically exclude (LOD <-2.0) hypotheses of disease-locus heterogeneity, including models where up to half of our families could contain an EOP disease gene located in the HLA region. This is due to the limited power of even our relatively large collection of families and the inherent difficulties of mapping genes for disorders that have complex and heterogeneous etiologies. Additional statistical analyses, recruitment of families, and typing of flanking DNA markers are planned to more conclusively address these issues with respect to the HLA region and other candidate locations in the human genome. Additional results for markers covering most of the human genome will also be presented.

  14. Family Relationships and Psychosocial Dysfunction among Family Caregivers of Patients with Advanced Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Kathrine Grovn; Trevino, Kelly; Lange, Theis

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Caring for a family member with advanced cancer strains family caregivers. Classification of family types has been shown to identify patients at risk of poor psychosocial function. However, little is known about how family relationships affect caregiver psychosocial function. OBJECTIVES......: To investigate family types identified by a cluster analysis and to examine the reproducibility of cluster analyses. We also sought to examine the relationship between family types and caregivers' psychosocial function. METHODS: Data from 622 caregivers of advanced cancer patients (part of the Coping with Cancer...... Study) were analyzed using Gaussian Mixture Modeling as the primary method to identify family types based on the Family Relationship Index questionnaire. We then examined the relationship between family type and caregiver quality of life (Medical Outcome Survey Short Form), social support (Interpersonal...

  15. Family and family therapy in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Karin; Baars, Jan

    2012-04-01

    This article describes how families are functioning in the Netherlands, and how family therapy is used in mental healthcare. In the open Dutch society, new ideas are easily incorporated, as exemplified by the rapid introduction and growth of family therapy in the 1980s. In recent decades, however, family therapy has lost ground to other treatment models that are more individually orientated, and adhere to stricter protocols. This decline of family therapy has been exacerbated by recent budget cuts in mental healthcare. In regular healthcare institutes family therapy now has a marginal position at best, although family treatment models are used in specific areas such as forensic treatments. In addition, the higher trained family therapists have found their own niches to work with couples and families. We argue that a stronger position of family therapy would be beneficial for patients and for families, in order to counteract the strong individualization of Dutch society.

  16. Familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versmissen, Jorie; Vongpromek, Ranitha; Yahya, Reyhana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD) risk inversely associates with levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The protective effect of HDL is thought to depend on its functionality, such as its ability to induce cholesterol efflux. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We compared plasma...... cholesterol efflux capacity between male familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) patients with and without CHD relative to their non-FH brothers, and examined HDL constituents including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its carrier apolipoprotein M (apoM). RESULTS: Seven FH patients were asymptomatic and six had...... experienced a cardiac event at a mean age of 39 years. Compared to their non-FH brothers, cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma from the FH patients without CHD was 16 ± 22% (mean ± SD) higher and to plasma from the FH patients with CHD was 7 ± 8% lower (P = 0·03, CHD vs. non-CHD). Compared...

  17. Roles within the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Text Size Email Print Share Roles Within the Family Page Content Article Body Families are not democracies. ...

  18. Excluding interlopers from asteroid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, B.; Radovic, V.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Asteroid families are believed to have originated from catastrophic collisions among asteroids. They are a very important subject of Solar System investigation, because practically any research topic carried out in asteroid-related science sooner or later encounters problems pertaining to asteroid families. One basic problem encountered when dealing with families is to determine reliably the list of its members, i.e. to reduce the number of interlopers as much as possible. This is an important problem, because many conclusions derived from analyses of the physical properties of family members must be necessarily based on firm and well established membership. However, as the number of known asteroids increases fast it becomes more and more difficult to obtain robust list of members of an asteroid family. To cope with these challenges we are proposing a new approach that may help to significantly reduce presence of interlopers among the family members. This method should be particularly useful once additional information become available, including primarily spectro-photometric data. This is exactly the kind of information that will be provided by Gaia. Metodology: Families (and their members) have been commonly identified by analysing the distribution of asteroids in the space of proper orbital elements, using the Hierarchical Clustering Method (HCM) [1]. A well-known drawback of the HCM based on the single linkage rule is the so-called chaining phenomenon: first concentrations naturally tend to incorporate nearby groups, forming a kind of 'chain'. Thus, any family membership obtained by the pure HCM must unavoidably include some interlopers. The method we are proposing here could be used to identify these interlopers, with its main advantage being an ability to significantly reduce the chaining effect. The method consists of three main steps. First we determine an asteroid family members by applying the HCM to the catalogue of proper elements obtained

  19. Family Agritourist Enterprises in Poland: Preliminary Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Dorocki

    2015-05-01

    Issues analysed in this study are relatively new and poorly covered by the literature in the field. It is a certain novelty to analyse family entrepreneurship in agritourism in addition to being an interesting area of scientific exploration.

  20. The Family Hero in Black Alcoholism Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbane, Francis L.

    1989-01-01

    Uses data from 20 case studies of Black adult female children of alcoholic parents to discuss Family Hero role often assumed by oldest or only female child in Black alcoholism families. Explains how female-dominated survival role of Family Hero in Black families is significantly more related to racial and cultural factors than numbers alone may…

  1. Family Law and Family Studies: Professor's Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Mary W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The results of a survey of family studies faculty concerning the inclusion of family law topics in family studies courses are discussed. The professor's needs for training and resources in the area of family and the law are identified and recommendations for meeting these needs are suggested. (Author)

  2. Measuring family food environments in diverse families with young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, Karen; Gorman, Kathleen S

    2010-06-01

    This study reports the development and validation of the 20 item Family Food Behavior Survey, a measure designed to assess broad components of the family food environment that may contribute to child overweight. In a diverse sample of 38 parents, factor analyses verified 4 domains: (1) maternal control of child eating behavior; (2) maternal presence during eating; (3) child choice, and (4) organization of eating environment. All domains achieved acceptable internal reliability (alphas= .73, -.83), and test-retest reliability. Mothers of overweight children scored significantly lower on maternal presence and somewhat higher on maternal control than mothers of normal weight children. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The powerful map of transnational families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2011-01-01

    Transnational families are, as the term suggests, social structures existing across national borders. Thus, individuals belonging to these families are in geographical terms separated by space. However, the practices of transnational families often provide a sense of proximity and emotional...... attachment. This article, by seeing space as inherently relational, discusses the fields within which families establish themselves and move transnationally. Transnational family spaces are, for example, arenas where young people meet and where marriages are arranged. This article includes the life...... and marriage stories of two individuals who have married transnationally, based on their family relationships, and further analyses how these marriages are element in the practices that families engage in to uphold a sense of closeness - an endeavour that is sometimes successful, sometimes not. Finally...

  4. Family Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel de Riquer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The scene is at the court of James I of Aragon in the mid-13th c., the place is the royal palace of Barcelona or any of the crown's other possessions, and the dramatis personae include the heir to the throne, prince Peire (future king Peire the Great, and the court's most famous troubadour, Cerverí de Girona (fl. 1259-85. Author of the largest corpus of any Occitan troubadour (114 poems, Cerverì distinguishes himself by the surprises and challenges he presents to his audience: an alba (the most openly erotic genre to the Virgin Mary, the Cobla in sis lengatges (Cobla in Six Languages, the apparently nonsensical Vers estrayn. Cerverì borrows equally from the folk-inspired Galician-Portuguese poetry and from the French tradition, including the chanson de malmariée, where a young woman bemoans being sold off by her family to an old man (gilos, "Jealous" and separated from her youthful doulz amis, some even praying for the death of their husband. Both within that tradition and among Cerverì's three chansons de malmariée, the Gelosesca stands out as "especially determined" to lose her husband, using every "solution" (prayer, black magic, potion or experimenta.

  5. Assessing family resources: validation of the Swedish version of the Family Hardiness Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Carina; Benzein, Eva; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2016-12-01

    All families face normative transitions. Some are perceived as stressful and calls for family resources to maintain or restore family well-being. In times of illness, families also need to develop strengths and capabilities to enhance family well-being. The way these are developed is related to family hardiness. Family hardiness is thus seen as a family resource, and the Family Hardiness Index (FHI) was developed to measure family stress resistance and adaptation resources. The index was not available in Swedish and no extensive international psychometric evaluation was found. Therefore, the aim was to translate and validate the Swedish version of the FHI. The study was approved by a Regional Ethical Review Board. Data from 174 Swedish participants, family members to persons with cognitive dysfunctions (n = 95) and nursing students (n = 79) were included. Family members were enrolled in outpatient clinics in primary care and rehabilitation, and nursing students at a nursing school. Psychometric properties were evaluated through calculations of missing data, distributions of item and scale scores, item correlations, Cronbach's alpha, confirmatory factor analyses and correlations with theoretically related constructs. Sample scores had acceptable data quality, internal consistency for the FHI total scale was satisfactory (α = 0.86), and construct validity was supported. Our findings cast some doubt on the intended interpretation since confirmatory factor analyses showed that a modified four-subscale version, excluding one subscale, showed best fit. The Control subscale lacked important psychometric properties in terms of homogeneity, internal consistency and construct validity. The sample size was probably sufficiently large for the factor analyses, but the subgroup analyses should be treated with caution. The conclusion is that the Swedish version of the FHI is a promising scale for assessing family hardiness, but more solid evidence for the factor structure in

  6. Conjoint-Analyse und Marktsegmentierung

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Winfried J.; Baumgartner, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Die Marktsegmentierung zählt neben der Neuproduktplanung und Preisgestaltung zu den wesentlichen Einsatzgebieten der Conjoint-Analyse. Neben traditionell eingesetzten zweistufigen Vorgehensweisen, bei denen Conjoint-Analyse und Segmentierung in zwei getrennten Schritten erfolgen, stehen heute mit Methoden wie der Clusterwise Regression oder Mixture-Modellen neuere Entwicklungen, die eine simultane Segmentierung und Präferenzschätzung ermöglichen, zur Verfügung. Der Beitrag gibt einen Überblic...

  7. Analyse des Organisations en Afrique

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    de celle-ci pourtenter d'identifier et d'élucider les dynamiques sociales qui s'y déroulent, puis de les examiner en rapport avec les stratégies d'acteurs et le contexte général (l'environnement) dans lequel évolue cette organisation, ... Et son Analyse. L'analyse des organisations est une démarche ancienne dont les ...

  8. Family doctors' involvement with families in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oona, Marje; Kalda, Ruth; Lember, Margus; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2004-10-25

    Family doctors should care for individuals in the context of their family. Family has a powerful influence on health and illness and family interventions have been shown to improve health outcomes for a variety of health problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the Estonian family doctors' (FD) attitudes to the patients' family-related issues in their work: to explore the degree of FDs involvement in family matters, their preparedness for management of family-related issues and their self-assessment of the ability to manage different family-related problems. A random sample (n = 236) of all FDs in Estonia was investigated using a postal questionnaire. Altogether 151 FDs responded to the questionnaire (response rate 64%), while five of them were excluded as they did not actually work as FDs. Of the respondents, 90% thought that in managing the health problems of patients FDs should communicate and cooperate with family members. Although most of the family doctors agreed that modifying of the health damaging risk factors (smoking, alcohol and drug abuse) of their patients and families is their task, one third of them felt that dealing with these problems is ineffective, or perceived themselves as poorly prepared or having too little time for such activities. Of the respondents, 58% (n = 83) were of the opinion that they could modify also relationship problems. Estonian family doctors are favourably disposed to involvement in family-related problems, however, they need some additional training, especially in the field of relationship management.

  9. The Contemporary Postmodern Family and the Division of Work Inside the Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonóra Mendelová

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with changes in social conditions, family life experiences its own development and as a result of it, the traditional family changed into the modern family and then to the postmodern family. The article presents descriptions of the current postmodern family, which form a basis for the analysis of the work division inside the family. The aim of the paper is to present the current state of patrimonial division of work inside the family and to detect the participation of men and women in everyday duties and work in the household and participation in child care, based on the empirical findings (with emphasis on Slovak and Czech research. The next aim is to analyse opinions and expectations of people in the area of parental roles and get an answer to the question, whether equal relationships exist in current families or there is a continuation of specific gender divisions of work in the household.

  10. Caregiver roles in families affected by Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2013-01-01

    AIM: The objective of this study was to explore family caregivers' experiences with the impact of Huntington's disease (HD) on the family structure and roles in the family. METHODOLOGY: We interviewed 15 family caregivers in families affected by HD, based on a semi-structured interview guide....... The participants were recruited through hospital departments and a lay organisation for HD in Norway. Data from the interviews were analysed with systematic text condensation. RESULTS: Huntington's disease could have a substantial impact on the family system, the shape of roles among family members......: Huntington's disease has a major impact on family systems. Caregiver roles are shaped by impairments in the affected family member and corresponding dynamic adoption and change in roles within the family. Making assessments of the family structure and roles, professionals may understand more about how...

  11. Competitiveness of Family Businesses

    OpenAIRE

    Leenders, Mark; Waarts, Eric

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study is to systematically examine the advantages and disadvantages of different types of family businesses. We distinguish four different types of family businesses based on their family and business orientation: (1) House of Business, (2) Family Money Machine, (3) Family Life Tradition, and (4) Hobby Salon. In our empirical research among family businesses (n=220), we find that all four different types co-exist. In addition, we find that differences in family...

  12. Family and family therapy in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebtschuk, Marina; Smirnova, Daria; Khayretdinov, Oleg

    2012-04-01

    This article represents the information about family and family therapy in the context of culture, traditions and contemporary changes of social situations in Russia. The legislation of family rights are mentioned within items about marriage and family in the Constitution, Civil Code and Family Code of the Russian Federation which has changed during recent years. The definition of family and description of family structure are given through the prism of the current demographic situation, dynamics of statistics of marriage and divorce rates, mental disorders, disabilities and such phenomena as social abandonment. The actual curriculum, teaching of family therapy and its disadvantages, system of continuous education, supervision and initiatives of the Institute of Integrative Family Therapy in improvement of preparing of specialists who can provide qualified psychosocial assistance for the family according to the actual needs of society are noted. The directions of state and private practice of family counselling and therapy both for psychiatric patients and medical patients, for adults and children in a family systemic approach are highlighted with an indication of the spectrum of techniques and methods used by Russian professionals. The main obstacles and perspectives of development of family therapy in Russia are summarized.

  13. Family Reading Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Darcy; Greenfeld, Marsha; Epstein, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    This book offers clear and practical guidelines to help engage families in student success. It shows families how to conduct a successful Family Reading Night at their school. Family Night themes include Scary Stories, Books We Love, Reading Olympics, Dr. Seuss, and other themes. Family reading nights invite parents to come to school with their…

  14. Finding Suitable Variability Abstractions for Family-Based Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimovski, Aleksandar; Brabrand, Claus; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    For program families (Software Product Lines), specially designed variability-aware static (dataflow) analyses allow analyzing all variants (products) of the family, simultaneously, in a single run without generating any of the variants explicitly. They are also known as lifted or family...

  15. The impact of migration on family solidarity types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baykara-Krumme, H.; Fokkema, T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to expand knowledge on the effects of international migration on parent-adult child relationships. We develop a typology of families, include non-migrant families in the country of origin for comparison, and consider transnational families. Analyses are based on the Turkish 2000

  16. Lepidium sativum Linn.: a current addition to the family of mucilage and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Maheriya, Pankaj M; Jani, Girish K; Patil, Prasant D; Patel, Bhumit N

    2014-04-01

    Mucilage from the last decades has been found to be very attractive, interesting and useful in development of desired pharmaceutical dosage forms. Various applications of plant based mucilage have a wide potentiality in drug formulations. Lepidium sativum Linn. (family: Brassicaceae) is one of the mucilage containing fast growing, edible annual herb. Its various parts (roots, leaves and seeds) have been used to treat various human ailments. It mainly contains alkaloids, saponins, anthracene glycosides, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, flavanoids, and sterols as chief phytochemical constituents. Its seed extracts have been screened for various biological activities like hypotensive, anti-microbial, bronchodilator, hypoglycemic and allelopathic, whereas its seed coat mucilage has been isolated using different methods to make it effective excipient of desired functionality as a part of pharmaceutical applications. Through keen references of reported work on Lepidium sativum Linn., in this review, we have focused on its seed coat mucilage isolation methods, chemical constituents, pharmacological profile and versatile application of Lepidium sativum Linn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Training of Practitioners and Beliefs about Family Skills in Family-Based Prevention Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orte, Carmen; Ballester, Lluís; Amer, Joan; Vives, Marga

    2017-01-01

    To ensure close adherence to the contents of a family-based cognitive-behavioural programme, and maintain a high standard of quality in its implementation, it is important that practitioners' attitudes and beliefs regarding family skills coincide with those of the programme. This paper describes and analyses (observed) potential changes in these…

  18. Mitogenomic analyses from ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paijmans, Johanna L. A.; Gilbert, Tom; Hofreiter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    analyses (whether using modern or ancient DNA) were largely restricted to the analysis of short fragments of the mitochondrial genome. However, due to many technological advances during the past decade, a growing number of studies have explored the power of complete mitochondrial genome sequences......The analysis of ancient DNA is playing an increasingly important role in conservation genetic, phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, as it allows incorporating extinct species into DNA sequence trees and adds time depth to population genetics studies. For many years, these types of DNA...... (mitogenomes). Such studies were initially limited to analyses of extant organisms, but developments in both DNA sequencing technologies and general methodological aspects related to working with degraded DNA have resulted in complete mitogenomes becoming increasingly popular for ancient DNA studies as well...

  19. Waste Stream Analyses for Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. R. Soelberg

    2010-08-01

    A high-level study was performed in Fiscal Year 2009 for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) to provide information for a range of nuclear fuel cycle options (Wigeland 2009). At that time, some fuel cycle options could not be adequately evaluated since they were not well defined and lacked sufficient information. As a result, five families of these fuel cycle options are being studied during Fiscal Year 2010 by the Systems Analysis Campaign for the DOE NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. The quality and completeness of data available to date for the fuel cycle options is insufficient to perform quantitative radioactive waste analyses using recommended metrics. This study has been limited thus far to qualitative analyses of waste streams from the candidate fuel cycle options, because quantitative data for wastes from the front end, fuel fabrication, reactor core structure, and used fuel for these options is generally not yet available.

  20. The fate of family farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade, Stefan Bastholm

    This study uses high quality register population data to analyse life trajectories for a generation of Danish self-dependent farmers born in 1960 to 1969. Farmers’ life trajectories are operationalised as four distinctive dimensions: family life trajectory, work trajectory, economic trajectory...... and production trajectory. By applying multiple sequence analysis, the analysis reveals four different strategies for reconversion in relation to the four dimensions of farmers’ life trajectories....

  1. Beskrivende analyse af mekaniske systemer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Hansen, Claus Thorp

    Descriptive analysis is the activity, where a given product is analysed for obtaining insight into different aspects, leading to an explicit description of each of these aspects. This textbook is worked out for course 72101 Produktanalyse (Analysis of products) given at DTU.......Descriptive analysis is the activity, where a given product is analysed for obtaining insight into different aspects, leading to an explicit description of each of these aspects. This textbook is worked out for course 72101 Produktanalyse (Analysis of products) given at DTU....

  2. An extensible analysable system model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2008-01-01

    , this does not hold for real physical systems. Approaches such as threat modelling try to target the formalisation of the real-world domain, but still are far from the rigid techniques available in security research. Many currently available approaches to assurance of critical infrastructure security......Analysing real-world systems for vulnerabilities with respect to security and safety threats is a difficult undertaking, not least due to a lack of availability of formalisations for those systems. While both formalisations and analyses can be found for artificial systems such as software...

  3. Family Therapy with Deaf Member Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloman, Leon; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines how family therapists can be more responsive to the unique needs and problems of deaf family members. Compares methods of training in communication for deaf children, addressing the conflicts that may accompany the adoption of a given method. Stresses the pivotal role of communication problems between hearing and deaf family members in…

  4. Family function over family form in the law on parentage? The legal position of children born in informal relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrama, Wendy M.

    2008-01-01

    The Dutch legal system is primarily based on formal family and partner relationships. There is, due to a number of social trends, a growing divergence between family form and family function. In this article the laws on parentage will be analysed with respect to the relationship between fathers and

  5. 'Connected presence' in distributed family life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2009-01-01

    ' use of the mobile phone in the context of modern family life, emphasizing the importance of the temporal and spatial dispersion of family members in explaining the form and content of intra-familial mediated communication. Finally, the dual role of media technologies (including the mobile phone......Concurrent with the explosive pervasion of information and communication technologies in recent years, mediated communication has gained a strong position in the daily interaction between family members. Based on the results of qualitative interviews with families in Denmark, this article shows how...... the mobile phone is used by parents and children to mediate a feeling of closeness while they are physically separated. This practice of `connected presence' is based on frequent calls and text messages between parents and children as well as between parents themselves. The article also analyses families...

  6. Improving Family Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Improving Family Communications Page Content Article Body How can I ...

  7. Normal Functioning Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  8. Psychology of family business

    OpenAIRE

    Taylyakova, Feruzahon

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the basic psychological characteristics of family businesses. The author describes the psychological properties that contribute to improve individual and family businesses. The article also discusses mental properties adversely affect the development of a family business.

  9. Family Activities for Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  10. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... more members within the same family have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) or any other form of Idiopathic Interstitial ...

  11. Family Reunion Health Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enter Family Reunion Health Guide Make Kidney Health a Family Reunion Affair NATIONAL KIDNEY DISEASE EDUCATION PROGRAM Table of Contents 3 Make Health a Family Reunion Affair 5 Approach 1: The 15- minute ...

  12. Revizija rodu diplotaxis (Brassicaceae) v Sloveniji

    OpenAIRE

    Fabijan, Tina

    2017-01-01

    V Sloveniji po podatkih Male flore Slovenije (Wraber, 2007) uspevajo štiri vrste rodu Diplotaxis, in sicer D. muralis, D. tenuifolia, D. erucoides in D. viminea. Njihovo razlikovanje je zahtevno, v določevalnem ključu pa ni dovolj zanesljivih določevalnih znakov. Iz literature, ki obravnava floro sosednjih držav, sem zbrala znake, po katerih omenjene vrste ločijo v tujini, in te znake preverila na herbarijskih polah herbarija LJU. V zbirki je bilo 48 herbarijskih pol. Ker je bil v nekaterih p...

  13. New Lepidium (Brassicaceae) from New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, P. J.; Heenan, P. B.; Houliston, G. J.; Rolfe, J. R.; Mitchell, A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A revision of the New Zealand endemic Lepidium oleraceum and allied species is presented. Sixteen species are recognised, 10 of these are new. The new species are segregated on the basis of morphological characters supported by molecular data obtained from three DNA markers (two rDNA and one cpDNA). One species, Lepidium castellanum sp. nov., is endemic to the Kermadec Islands where it is sympatric with Lepidium oleraceum. The North Island of New Zealand supports four species, with two of them, Lepidium amissum sp. nov. and Lepidium obtusatum, now extinct. The South Island supports six species, that, aside from Lepidium banksii, Lepidium flexicaule and Lepidium oleraceum, are all confined to the south-eastern half of the island (Lepidium aegrum sp. nov., Lepidium crassum sp. nov. and Lepidium juvencum sp. nov.). One of these, Lepidium juvencum sp. nov., extends to Stewart Island. The Chatham Islands support six species (Lepidium flexicaule, Lepidium oblitum sp. nov., Lepidium oleraceum, Lepidium oligodontum sp. nov., Lepidium panniforme sp. nov., and Lepidium rekohuense sp. nov.), one of which, Lepidium oligodontum sp. nov., extends to the Antipodes Islands group. The remote, subantarctic Bounty Islands group supports one endemic, Lepidium seditiosum sp. nov., which is the only vascular plant to be recorded from there. Lepidium limenophylax sp. nov. is known from islands off the south-western side of Stewart Island/Rakiura, The Snares and Auckland islands. Lepidium naufragorum, although not related to Lepidium oleraceum and its allies, is also treated because populations with entire leaves are now known. Typification is undertaken for Lepidium banksii, Lepidium oleraceum, Lepidium oleraceum var. acutidentatum, var. frondosum and var. serrulatum. PMID:23794938

  14. Genetic relationships among some Hesperis L. (Brassicaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... In this study the phylogenetic relations among infraspecific, specific and supraspecific categories of 6 taxa of the genus Hesperis collected from different parts of Turkey were investigated by RAPD analysis. The results of the RAPD analysis support the idea that H. bicuspidata (Sect. Hesperis), H. schischkinii.

  15. Mitogenomic analyses from ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijmans, Johanna L A; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Hofreiter, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The analysis of ancient DNA is playing an increasingly important role in conservation genetic, phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, as it allows incorporating extinct species into DNA sequence trees and adds time depth to population genetics studies. For many years, these types of DNA analyses (whether using modern or ancient DNA) were largely restricted to the analysis of short fragments of the mitochondrial genome. However, due to many technological advances during the past decade, a growing number of studies have explored the power of complete mitochondrial genome sequences (mitogenomes). Such studies were initially limited to analyses of extant organisms, but developments in both DNA sequencing technologies and general methodological aspects related to working with degraded DNA have resulted in complete mitogenomes becoming increasingly popular for ancient DNA studies as well. To date, at least 124 partially or fully assembled mitogenomes from more than 20 species have been obtained, and, given the rapid progress in sequencing technology, this number is likely to dramatically increase in the future. The increased information content offered by analysing full mitogenomes has yielded major progress with regard to both the phylogenetic positions of extinct species, as well as resolving population genetics questions in both extinct and extant species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Descriptive Analyses of Mechanical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Hansen, Claus Thorp

    2003-01-01

    Forord Produktanalyse og teknologianalyse kan gennmføres med et bredt socio-teknisk sigte med henblik på at forstå kulturelle, sociologiske, designmæssige, forretningsmæssige og mange andre forhold. Et delområde heri er systemisk analyse og beskrivelse af produkter og systemer. Nærværende kompend...

  17. Evaluation "Risk analyses of agroparks"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ge, L.

    2011-01-01

    Dit TransForum project richt zich op analyse van de onzekerheden en mogelijkheden van agroparken. Dit heeft geleid tot een risicomodel dat de kwalitatieve en/of kwantitatieve onzekerheden van een agropark project in kaart brengt. Daarmee kunnen maatregelen en managementstrategiën worden

  18. Substitute family care

    OpenAIRE

    Petrů, Jaroslava

    2015-01-01

    The bachelor thesis focuses on substitute family care in the Czech Republic and its importance for the child. The theoretical part defines the basic terms, describes history and the forms of substitute family care. It also deals with the process of placing a child in substitute family care, the preparation of foster parents and the legislation regulating substitute family care. The practical part is based on qualitative research in families with children in foster and tutelary care, in famili...

  19. Baby talk - analyse of the deaf child speech

    OpenAIRE

    Hronová, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This work throws light upon the communication in the sign language which is held in a deaf family. Theoretical part of the work is focused on description of the features of language acquisition. General psycholinguistic knowledge i s given parallely with the results of research of sign language acquisition of the the deaf children from deaf families. The largest part of this work i s analyse of a five years old deaf boy speech. The author based her research on the M.A.K. Halliday language acq...

  20. Family Health History and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes Diabetes Risk Test Family Health History Quiz Family Health History Quiz Family health history is an ... health problems. Four Questions You Should Ask Your Family About Diabetes & Family Health History Knowing your family ...

  1. Families and family therapy in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Samson; Ng, Roger M K; Tonsing, Kareen N; Ran, Maosheng

    2012-04-01

    Family therapy views humans not as separate entities, but as embedded in a network of relationships, highlighting the reciprocal influences of one's behaviours on one another. This article gives an overview of family demographics and the implementation of family therapy in Hong Kong. We start with a review of the family demographics in Hong Kong and brief notes on families in mainland China. Demographics show that the landscape has changed markedly in the past decade, with more cross-border marriages, an increased divorce rate, and an ageing overall population - all of which could mean that there is increasing demand for professional family therapy interventions. However, only a limited number of professionals are practising the systems-based approach in Hong Kong. Some possible reasons as to why family therapy is not well disseminated and practised are discussed. These reasons include a lack of mental health policy to support family therapy, a lack of systematic family therapy training, and a shortage of skilled professionals. Furthermore, challenges in applying the western model in Chinese culture are also outlined. We conclude that more future research is warranted to investigate how family therapy can be adapted for Chinese families.

  2. Family doctors' involvement with families in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lember Margus

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family doctors should care for individuals in the context of their family. Family has a powerful influence on health and illness and family interventions have been shown to improve health outcomes for a variety of health problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the Estonian family doctors' (FD attitudes to the patients' family-related issues in their work: to explore the degree of FDs involvement in family matters, their preparedness for management of family-related issues and their self-assessment of the ability to manage different family-related problems. Methods A random sample (n = 236 of all FDs in Estonia was investigated using a postal questionnaire. Altogether 151 FDs responded to the questionnaire (response rate 64%, while five of them were excluded as they did not actually work as FDs. Results Of the respondents, 90% thought that in managing the health problems of patients FDs should communicate and cooperate with family members. Although most of the family doctors agreed that modifying of the health damaging risk factors (smoking, alcohol and drug abuse of their patients and families is their task, one third of them felt that dealing with these problems is ineffective, or perceived themselves as poorly prepared or having too little time for such activities. Of the respondents, 58% (n = 83 were of the opinion that they could modify also relationship problems. Conclusions Estonian family doctors are favourably disposed to involvement in family-related problems, however, they need some additional training, especially in the field of relationship management.

  3. Radiological evaluation of familial osteopetrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Moo Chang; Kang, Shin Wha; Won, Jong Jin; Rhee, Song Joo; Choi, Ki Chul [School of Medicine, Jeonbug National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Authors found 16 patients with benign osteopetrosis out of 62 members of 4 families and analysed these patients clinically, radiologically, hematologically and biochemically at the Department of Radiology, Jeonbug National University Hospital from October 1977 to June 1980. The results are as follows; 1. We obtained that there is evidence of familial tendency in developing osteopetrosis because of the fact that 15 patients (94%) developed in 3 families and more than 2 patients in each family. In genetical point of view we suspected dominant trait of inheritance and could rule out recessive trait because patients were found in successive generations except for one family. There were no consangulneous marriages among the parents of these patients. 2. The majority of patients were adolescent or adult above 10 years of age when the disease was diagnosed. The incidence was identical in both sex. 3. No clinical symptoms and historical abnormalities were found in 11 patients (69%) and 5 patients (31%) showed only mild symptoms. Among 5 patients with clinical symptoms 3 patients showed pathologic fractures. In all 3 patients, fractures occurred only by mild trauma and affected sites were tubular bones and they were transverse type. 4. There were no specific relationship between ABO types and Rh reactions in developing osteopetrosis and no specific findings in hematological, biochemical and routine urinalysis. 5. The only diagnostic finding in most patients were the typical and specific radiological findings.

  4. Childhood family structure and schooling outcomes: evidence for Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Francesconi, Marco; Jenkins, Stephen P.; Siedler, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We analyse the impact on schooling outcomes of growing up in a family headed by a single mother. Growing up in a non-intact family in Germany is associated with worse outcomes in models that do not control for possible correlations between common unobserved determinants of family structure and educational performance. But once endogeneity is accounted for, whether by using sibling-difference estimators or two types of instrumental variable estimator, the evidence that family structure affects...

  5. Creating a family health history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family health history; Create a family health history; Family medical history ... include your: Genes Diet and exercise habits Environment Family members tend to share certain behaviors, genetic traits, ...

  6. The role of social support, family identification, and family constraints in predicting posttraumatic stress after cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzman, Samantha; Sani, Fabio; Munro, Alastair J

    2017-09-01

    We compared social support with other potential psychosocial predictors of posttraumatic stress after cancer. These included family identification, or a sense of belonging to and commonality with family members, and family constraints, or the extent to which family members are closed, judgmental, or unreceptive in conversations about cancer. We also tested the hypothesis that family constraints mediate the relationship between family identification and cancer-related posttraumatic stress. We used a cross-sectional design. Surveys were collected from 205 colorectal cancer survivors in Tayside, Scotland. Both family identification and family constraints were stronger independent predictors of posttraumatic stress than social support. In multivariate analyses, social support was not a significant independent predictor of posttraumatic stress. In addition, there was a significant indirect effect of family identification on posttraumatic stress through family constraints. Numerous studies demonstrate a link between social support and posttraumatic stress. However, experiences within the family may be more important in predicting posttraumatic stress after cancer. Furthermore, a sense of belonging to and commonality with the family may reduce the extent to which cancer survivors experience constraints on conversations about cancer; this may, in turn, reduce posttraumatic stress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Severe accident recriticality analyses (SARA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frid, W.; Højerup, C.F.; Lindholm, I.

    2001-01-01

    Recriticality in a BWR during reflooding of an overheated partly degraded core, i.e. with relocated control rods, has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management strategies...... three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto I plant in Finland...... with all three codes. The core initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality-both super-prompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power...

  8. The CAMAC logic state analyser

    CERN Document Server

    Centro, Sandro

    1981-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Large electronic experiments using distributed processors for parallel readout and data reduction need to analyse the data acquisition components status and monitor dead time constants of each active readout module and processor. For the UA1 experiment, a microprocessor-based CAMAC logic status analyser (CLSA) has been developed in order to implement these functions autonomously. CLSA is a single unit CAMAC module, able to record, up to 256 times, the logic status of 32 TTL inputs gated by a common clock, internal or external, with a maximum frequency of 2 MHz. The data stored in the internal CLSA memory can be read directly via CAMAC function or preprocessed by CLSA 6800 microprocessor. The 6800 resident firmware (4Kbyte) expands the module features to include an interactive monitor, data recording control, data reduction and histogram accumulation with statistics parameter evaluation. The microprocessor memory and the resident firmware can be externally extended using st...

  9. Understanding family dynasty: Nurturing the corporate identity across generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemilentsev, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyse the Ahlstrom annual reports. The content analysis contributes to family business corporate identity. According to the results family business corporate identity is based both on history and on the future. Human resource management, customer relationships, high quality, and also family ownership reflect corporate identity in large family corporations. Modern family business corporate identity is based on continuously developing the business concept and its core competency. Meeting the needs of customers and technical quality standards combined with upgrading and developing the business idea characterises family business corporate identity.

  10. Uncertainty in Operational Atmospheric Analyses and Re-Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langland, R.; Maue, R. N.

    2016-12-01

    This talk will describe uncertainty in atmospheric analyses of wind and temperature produced by operational forecast models and in re-analysis products. Because the "true" atmospheric state cannot be precisely quantified, there is necessarily error in every atmospheric analysis, and this error can be estimated by computing differences ( variance and bias) between analysis products produced at various centers (e.g., ECMWF, NCEP, U.S Navy, etc.) that use independent data assimilation procedures, somewhat different sets of atmospheric observations and forecast models with different resolutions, dynamical equations, and physical parameterizations. These estimates of analysis uncertainty provide a useful proxy to actual analysis error. For this study, we use a unique multi-year and multi-model data archive developed at NRL-Monterey. It will be shown that current uncertainty in atmospheric analyses is closely correlated with the geographic distribution of assimilated in-situ atmospheric observations, especially those provided by high-accuracy radiosonde and commercial aircraft observations. The lowest atmospheric analysis uncertainty is found over North America, Europe and Eastern Asia, which have the largest numbers of radiosonde and commercial aircraft observations. Analysis uncertainty is substantially larger (by factors of two to three times) in most of the Southern hemisphere, the North Pacific ocean, and under-developed nations of Africa and South America where there are few radiosonde or commercial aircraft data. It appears that in regions where atmospheric analyses depend primarily on satellite radiance observations, analysis uncertainty of both temperature and wind remains relatively high compared to values found over North America and Europe.

  11. Mitogenomic analyses of eutherian relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, U; Janke, A

    2002-01-01

    Reasonably correct phylogenies are fundamental to the testing of evolutionary hypotheses. Here, we present phylogenetic findings based on analyses of 67 complete mammalian mitochondrial (mt) genomes. The analyses, irrespective of whether they were performed at the amino acid (aa) level or on nucleotides (nt) of first and second codon positions, placed Erinaceomorpha (hedgehogs and their kin) as the sister group of remaining eutherians. Thus, the analyses separated Erinaceomorpha from other traditional lipotyphlans (e.g., tenrecs, moles, and shrews), making traditional Lipotyphla polyphyletic. Both the aa and nt data sets identified the two order-rich eutherian clades, the Cetferungulata (comprising Pholidota, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea) and the African clade (Tenrecomorpha, Macroscelidea, Tubulidentata, Hyracoidea, Proboscidea, and Sirenia). The study corroborated recent findings that have identified a sister-group relationship between Anthropoidea and Dermoptera (flying lemurs), thereby making our own order, Primates, a paraphyletic assembly. Molecular estimates using paleontologically well-established calibration points, placed the origin of most eutherian orders in Cretaceous times, 70-100 million years before present (MYBP). The same estimates place all primate divergences much earlier than traditionally believed. For example, the divergence between Homo and Pan is estimated to have taken place approximately 10 MYBP, a dating consistent with recent findings in primate paleontology. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Impact of Family History Assessment on Communication with Family Members and Health Care Providers: A report from the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial (FHITr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Catharine; Sen, Ananda; Plegue, Melissa; Ruffin, Mack T.; O'Neill, Suzanne M.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Acheson, Louise S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examines the impact of Family Healthware™ on communication behaviors; specifically, communication with family members and health care providers about family health history. Methods A total of 3786 participants were enrolled in the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial (FHITr) in the United States from 2005-7. The trial employed a two-arm cluster-randomized design, with primary care practices serving as the unit of randomization. Using generalized estimating equations (GEE), analyses focused on communication behaviors at 6 month follow-up, adjusting for age, site and practice clustering. Results A significant interaction was observed between study arm and baseline communication status for the family communication outcomes (pscommunicating at baseline and those who were not. Among participants who were not communicating at baseline, intervention participants had higher odds of communicating with family members about family history risk (OR=1.24, p=0.042) and actively collecting family history information at follow-up (OR=2.67, p=0.026). Family Healthware™ did not have a significant effect on family communication among those already communicating at baseline, or on provider communication, regardless of baseline communication status. Greater communication was observed among those at increased familial risk for a greater number of diseases. Conclusion Family Healthware™ prompted more communication about family history with family members, among those who were not previously communicating. Efforts are needed to identify approaches to encourage greater sharing of family history information, particularly with health care providers. PMID:25901453

  13. Providing traceability for neuroimaging analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchey, Richard; Branson, Andrew; Anjum, Ashiq; Bloodsworth, Peter; Habib, Irfan; Munir, Kamran; Shamdasani, Jetendr; Soomro, Kamran

    2013-09-01

    With the increasingly digital nature of biomedical data and as the complexity of analyses in medical research increases, the need for accurate information capture, traceability and accessibility has become crucial to medical researchers in the pursuance of their research goals. Grid- or Cloud-based technologies, often based on so-called Service Oriented Architectures (SOA), are increasingly being seen as viable solutions for managing distributed data and algorithms in the bio-medical domain. For neuroscientific analyses, especially those centred on complex image analysis, traceability of processes and datasets is essential but up to now this has not been captured in a manner that facilitates collaborative study. Few examples exist, of deployed medical systems based on Grids that provide the traceability of research data needed to facilitate complex analyses and none have been evaluated in practice. Over the past decade, we have been working with mammographers, paediatricians and neuroscientists in three generations of projects to provide the data management and provenance services now required for 21st century medical research. This paper outlines the finding of a requirements study and a resulting system architecture for the production of services to support neuroscientific studies of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. The paper proposes a software infrastructure and services that provide the foundation for such support. It introduces the use of the CRISTAL software to provide provenance management as one of a number of services delivered on a SOA, deployed to manage neuroimaging projects that have been studying biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. In the neuGRID and N4U projects a Provenance Service has been delivered that captures and reconstructs the workflow information needed to facilitate researchers in conducting neuroimaging analyses. The software enables neuroscientists to track the evolution of workflows and datasets. It also tracks the outcomes of

  14. VESPA: Very large-scale Evolutionary and Selective Pressure Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E. Webb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Large-scale molecular evolutionary analyses of protein coding sequences requires a number of preparatory inter-related steps from finding gene families, to generating alignments and phylogenetic trees and assessing selective pressure variation. Each phase of these analyses can represent significant challenges, particularly when working with entire proteomes (all protein coding sequences in a genome from a large number of species. Methods We present VESPA, software capable of automating a selective pressure analysis using codeML in addition to the preparatory analyses and summary statistics. VESPA is written in python and Perl and is designed to run within a UNIX environment. Results We have benchmarked VESPA and our results show that the method is consistent, performs well on both large scale and smaller scale datasets, and produces results in line with previously published datasets. Discussion Large-scale gene family identification, sequence alignment, and phylogeny reconstruction are all important aspects of large-scale molecular evolutionary analyses. VESPA provides flexible software for simplifying these processes along with downstream selective pressure variation analyses. The software automatically interprets results from codeML and produces simplified summary files to assist the user in better understanding the results. VESPA may be found at the following website: http://www.mol-evol.org/VESPA.

  15. Competitiveness of Family Businesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.A.M. Leenders (Mark); E. Waarts (Eric)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study is to systematically examine the advantages and disadvantages of different types of family businesses. We distinguish four different types of family businesses based on their family and business orientation: (1) House of Business, (2) Family Money Machine, (3)

  16. Families in Transition .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  17. [Teaching about Family Law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John Paul, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "Focus on Law Studies""contains a special emphasis on teaching about law and the family", in the form of the following three articles: "Teaching Family Law: Growing Pains and All" (Susan Frelich Appleton); "The Family Goes to Court: Including Law in a Sociological Perspective on the Family"…

  18. Systematic Derivation of Static Analyses for Software Product Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Jan; Brabrand, Claus; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    A recent line of work lifts particular verification and analysis methods to Software Product Lines (SPL). In an effort to generalize such case-by-case approaches, we develop a systematic methodology for lifting program analyses to SPLs using abstract interpretation. Abstract interpretation...... is a classical framework for deriving static analyses in a compositional, step-by-step manner. We show how to take an analysis expressed as an abstract interpretation and lift each of the abstract interpretation steps to a family of programs. This includes schemes for how to lift domain types, and combinators...

  19. Family Lives and Family Literacy Traditions

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Carole

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores literacy traditions within the lives of three families. The\\ud narrative accounts of family members from three generations provided a\\ud retrospective view. I drew on my experiences as a teacher working with young\\ud children and their parents. The narratives of grandparents, parents and of three\\ud children form the core of the study. The role of family literacy is described; it\\ud is positioned in sharp relief alongside schooled literacy.

  20. Methodological challenges in carbohydrate analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Hall

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates can provide up to 80% of the dry matter in animal diets, yet their specific evaluation for research and diet formulation is only now becoming a focus in the animal sciences. Partitioning of dietary carbohydrates for nutritional purposes should reflect differences in digestion and fermentation characteristics and effects on animal performance. Key challenges to designating nutritionally important carbohydrate fractions include classifying the carbohydrates in terms of nutritional characteristics, and selecting analytical methods that describe the desired fraction. The relative lack of information on digestion characteristics of various carbohydrates and their interactions with other fractions in diets means that fractions will not soon be perfectly established. Developing a system of carbohydrate analysis that could be used across animal species could enhance the utility of analyses and amount of data we can obtain on dietary effects of carbohydrates. Based on quantities present in diets and apparent effects on animal performance, some nutritionally important classes of carbohydrates that may be valuable to measure include sugars, starch, fructans, insoluble fiber, and soluble fiber. Essential to selection of methods for these fractions is agreement on precisely what carbohydrates should be included in each. Each of these fractions has analyses that could potentially be used to measure them, but most of the available methods have weaknesses that must be evaluated to see if they are fatal and the assay is unusable, or if the assay still may be made workable. Factors we must consider as we seek to analyze carbohydrates to describe diets: Does the assay accurately measure the desired fraction? Is the assay for research, regulatory, or field use (affects considerations of acceptable costs and throughput? What are acceptable accuracy and variability of measures? Is the assay robust (enhances accuracy of values? For some carbohydrates, we

  1. Blast sampling for structural and functional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Anne; Ripp, Raymond; Garnier, Nicolas; Bettler, Emmanuel; Deléage, Gilbert; Poch, Olivier; Moulinier, Luc

    2007-02-23

    The post-genomic era is characterised by a torrent of biological information flooding the public databases. As a direct consequence, similarity searches starting with a single query sequence frequently lead to the identification of hundreds, or even thousands of potential homologues. The huge volume of data renders the subsequent structural, functional and evolutionary analyses very difficult. It is therefore essential to develop new strategies for efficient sampling of this large sequence space, in order to reduce the number of sequences to be processed. At the same time, it is important to retain the most pertinent sequences for structural and functional studies. An exhaustive analysis on a large scale test set (284 protein families) was performed to compare the efficiency of four different sampling methods aimed at selecting the most pertinent sequences. These four methods sample the proteins detected by BlastP searches and can be divided into two categories: two customisable methods where the user defines either the maximal number or the percentage of sequences to be selected; two automatic methods in which the number of sequences selected is determined by the program. We focused our analysis on the potential information content of the sampled sets of sequences using multiple alignment of complete sequences as the main validation tool. The study considered two criteria: the total number of sequences in BlastP and their associated E-values. The subsequent analyses investigated the influence of the sampling methods on the E-value distributions, the sequence coverage, the final multiple alignment quality and the active site characterisation at various residue conservation thresholds as a function of these criteria. The comparative analysis of the four sampling methods allows us to propose a suitable sampling strategy that significantly reduces the number of homologous sequences required for alignment, while at the same time maintaining the relevant information

  2. Blast sampling for structural and functional analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Anne

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The post-genomic era is characterised by a torrent of biological information flooding the public databases. As a direct consequence, similarity searches starting with a single query sequence frequently lead to the identification of hundreds, or even thousands of potential homologues. The huge volume of data renders the subsequent structural, functional and evolutionary analyses very difficult. It is therefore essential to develop new strategies for efficient sampling of this large sequence space, in order to reduce the number of sequences to be processed. At the same time, it is important to retain the most pertinent sequences for structural and functional studies. Results An exhaustive analysis on a large scale test set (284 protein families was performed to compare the efficiency of four different sampling methods aimed at selecting the most pertinent sequences. These four methods sample the proteins detected by BlastP searches and can be divided into two categories: two customisable methods where the user defines either the maximal number or the percentage of sequences to be selected; two automatic methods in which the number of sequences selected is determined by the program. We focused our analysis on the potential information content of the sampled sets of sequences using multiple alignment of complete sequences as the main validation tool. The study considered two criteria: the total number of sequences in BlastP and their associated E-values. The subsequent analyses investigated the influence of the sampling methods on the E-value distributions, the sequence coverage, the final multiple alignment quality and the active site characterisation at various residue conservation thresholds as a function of these criteria. Conclusion The comparative analysis of the four sampling methods allows us to propose a suitable sampling strategy that significantly reduces the number of homologous sequences required for alignment, while

  3. Breaking out or Breaking in? Exploring family dynamics in planning for succession

    OpenAIRE

    Vershinina, Natalia; Woldesenbet, K.; Kaur, Kranjit; Trehan, K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore family succession and continuity in Punjabi-Indian ethnic family firms in the UK using stakeholder approach. The research objectives are to analyse how household dynamics can shape activities within small family enterprises within a specific cultural and sociological context, and to examine whether these later generation family firms actively involve family members in developing family businesses, that can be sustained beyond the current generation. The tra...

  4. Statistical Analyses of Digital Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Tove Faber; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    Using statistical methods to analyse digital material for patterns makes it possible to detect patterns in big data that we would otherwise not be able to detect. This paper seeks to exemplify this fact by statistically analysing a large corpus of references in systematic reviews. The aim...... of the analysis is to study the phenomenon of non-citation: Situations where just one (or some) document(s) are cited from a pool of otherwise equally citable documents. The study is based on more than 120,000 cited studies, and a total number of non-cited studies of more than 1.6 million. The number of cited...... 10 years. After 10 years the cited and non-cited studies tend to be more similar in terms of age. Separating the data set into different sub-disciplines reveals that the sub-disciplines vary in terms of age of cited vs. non-cited references. Some fields may be expanding and the number of published...

  5. Transforming Parent-Child Interaction in Family Routines: Longitudinal Analysis with Families of Children with Developmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucyshyn, Joseph M; Fossett, Brenda; Bakeman, Roger; Cheremshynski, Christy; Miller, Lynn; Lohrmann, Sharon; Binnendyk, Lauren; Khan, Sophia; Chinn, Stephen; Kwon, Samantha; Irvin, Larry K

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy and consequential validity of an ecological approach to behavioral intervention with families of children with developmental disabilities was examined. The approach aimed to transform coercive into constructive parent-child interaction in family routines. Ten families participated, including 10 mothers and fathers and 10 children 3-8 years old with developmental disabilities. Thirty-six family routines were selected (2 to 4 per family). Dependent measures included child problem behavior, routine steps completed, and coercive and constructive parent-child interaction. For each family, a single case, multiple baseline design was employed with three phases: baseline, intervention, and follow-up. Visual analysis evaluated the functional relation between intervention and improvements in child behavior and routine participation. Nonparametric tests across families evaluated the statistical significance of these improvements. Sequential analyses within families and univariate analyses across families examined changes from baseline to intervention in the percentage and odds ratio of coercive and constructive parent-child interaction. Multiple baseline results documented functional or basic effects for 8 of 10 families. Nonparametric tests showed these changes to be significant. Follow-up showed durability at 11 to 24 months postintervention. Sequential analyses documented the transformation of coercive into constructive processes for 9 of 10 families. Univariate analyses across families showed significant improvements in 2- and 4-step coercive and constructive processes but not in odds ratio. Results offer evidence of the efficacy of the approach and consequential validity of the ecological unit of analysis, parent-child interaction in family routines. Future studies should improve efficiency, and outcomes for families experiencing family systems challenges.

  6. Impact of family history assessment on communication with family members and health care providers: A report from the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial (FHITr).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Catharine; Sen, Ananda; Plegue, Melissa; Ruffin, Mack T; O'Neill, Suzanne M; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Acheson, Louise S

    2015-08-01

    This study examines the impact of Family Healthware™ on communication behaviors; specifically, communication with family members and health care providers about family health history. A total of 3786 participants were enrolled in the Family Healthware™ Impact Trial (FHITr) in the United States from 2005-7. The trial employed a two-arm cluster-randomized design, with primary care practices serving as the unit of randomization. Using generalized estimating equations (GEE), analyses focused on communication behaviors at 6month follow-up, adjusting for age, site and practice clustering. A significant interaction was observed between study arm and baseline communication status for the family communication outcomes (p'sfamily members about family history risk (OR=1.24, p=0.042) and actively collecting family history information at follow-up (OR=2.67, p=0.026). Family Healthware™ did not have a significant effect on family communication among those already communicating at baseline, or on provider communication, regardless of baseline communication status. Greater communication was observed among those at increased familial risk for a greater number of diseases. Family Healthware™ prompted more communication about family history with family members, among those who were not previously communicating. Efforts are needed to identify approaches to encourage greater sharing of family history information, particularly with health care providers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Congenital talipes equinovarus--family occurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołecka, Ewa; Niedzielski, Kryspin Ryszard; Cukras, Zbigniew; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata

    2011-01-01

    Although congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) is one of the most frequently occurring congenital defects of locomotor organs, its ethiopathogenesis is still not fully known. Amongst the others, the inheritance patterns of that defect are not fully known, and that restricts genetic therapeutics and development of new treatment technologies. The aim of this study was analysis of family lineages of 205 children with CTEV (298 feet) treated at our centre in the years 1998-2008. The family occurrence of CTEV was found in 16 cases (8% of analysed group). 6 lineages, in which CTEV occurred in successive generations, were analysed in detail. Particularly interesting is the lineage of the family 1, in which the defect occurred in three successive generations. In case of that family, an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern is possible. Previously that pattern of CTEV inheritance was described only for isolated populations of Polynesians. In own material the family occurrence of CTEV was found to be less frequent than in bibliographic references. The defect occurred twice as often in boys, while the severe form was more frequently observed in girls, and that is consisted with data in the available bibliography. The analysis of presented lineages of families with CTEV did not allow unambiguous defining of the inheritance pattern for that defect. To confirm the autosomal dominant pattern of CTEV inheritance in the family in which the defect occurred in three successive generations, genetic tests would be necessary.

  8. Class II members of the poly(A) binding protein family exhibit distinct functions during Arabidopsis growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    The poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) binds to the poly(A) tail of eukaryotic cellular mRNAs and contributes to their stability and translational efficiency. In plants, PABP is expressed from an unusually large gene family grouped into 3 classes that expanded during the evolution of land plants. Subsequent to expansion of the family, members diverged in their primary sequence and in expression. Further expansion of the family and divergence of its members in the Brassicaceae demonstrate the continued dynamic evolution of PABP in plants. In this study, the function of the widely-expressed class II PABP family members was examined to determine how individual class II members contribute to plant growth and development. Of the 3 class II PABP members, PAB2 and PAB4 contribute most to vegetative growth and vegetative-to-floral transition whereas PAB2, and the recently-evolved third class II member, PAB8, contribute to inflorescence and silique growth. Interestingly, although class I and class III PABP members are expressed specifically in reproductive organs, class II PABP members are also necessary for fertility in that the combinatorial loss of PAB2 and either PAB4 or PAB8 expression resulted in reduced fertility. Although all 3 class II members are required for protein expression, PAB4 contributes most to the steady-state level of a reporter mRNA and to protein expression. These findings suggest that class II PABP members are partially overlapping in function but also involved in distinct aspects of plant growth and development.

  9. Family functioning, health and social support assessed by aged home care clients and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautsalo, Katja; Rantanen, Anja; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe aged home care clients' and their family members' experiences of their family functioning, family health and social support received. An additional purpose was to determine which factors are connected with social support. Increasing life expectancy and ageing of the population require consideration of the adequacy of home care services and the role of family members as care providers. The older population is a very heterogeneous group because of their variable needs and several disabilities. To ensure the quality of home care, experimental information is needed from clients and their family members. A survey design with convenience sampling. The home care client and a family member of his/her answered a questionnaire together, including background questions, the Family Functioning, Health and Social Support instrument and an open question about support received from home care. Statistical methods were used to describe quantitative data, and content analysis was used in analysing the replies to the open question. Family health was noted as good, and family functioning and overall social support fairly good. An older person's higher basic education, higher age of the family member, better family health and male gender were connected with better social support received. The relationship of the older person and the family member as well as the duration of home care service use had an effect on social support received. The content analysis raised expectations related to time, planning of service, organisational factors and caring practise. Home care clients' and families' needs for support vary, and therefore, the assessment of needs, care planning and updating are important. The variable support needs of older people and their family members require flexible and adaptable home services. Cooperation between all participants involved in care would promote the well-being of the older person and the entire family. © 2012 Blackwell

  10. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9- to 12-year-old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted…

  11. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  12. Family Roles, Alcoholism, and Family Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Karola M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines family roles in college undergraduates (N=748). Comparing role identification found no differences between children of alcoholics (ACOA) and non-ACOAs. Differences were found in participants from dysfunctional families. Results suggest a need for clinicians to re-think the use of role conceptualization in therapeutic work with ACOAs, with…

  13. Analysing ESP Texts, but How?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borza Natalia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available English as a second language (ESL teachers instructing general English and English for specific purposes (ESP in bilingual secondary schools face various challenges when it comes to choosing the main linguistic foci of language preparatory courses enabling non-native students to study academic subjects in English. ESL teachers intending to analyse English language subject textbooks written for secondary school students with the aim of gaining information about what bilingual secondary school students need to know in terms of language to process academic textbooks cannot avoiding deal with a dilemma. It needs to be decided which way it is most appropriate to analyse the texts in question. Handbooks of English applied linguistics are not immensely helpful with regard to this problem as they tend not to give recommendation as to which major text analytical approaches are advisable to follow in a pre-college setting. The present theoretical research aims to address this lacuna. Respectively, the purpose of this pedagogically motivated theoretical paper is to investigate two major approaches of ESP text analysis, the register and the genre analysis, in order to find the more suitable one for exploring the language use of secondary school subject texts from the point of view of an English as a second language teacher. Comparing and contrasting the merits and limitations of the two contrastive approaches allows for a better understanding of the nature of the two different perspectives of text analysis. The study examines the goals, the scope of analysis, and the achievements of the register perspective and those of the genre approach alike. The paper also investigates and reviews in detail the starkly different methods of ESP text analysis applied by the two perspectives. Discovering text analysis from a theoretical and methodological angle supports a practical aspect of English teaching, namely making an informed choice when setting out to analyse

  14. The role of religious and existential well-being in families with Lynch syndrome: prevention, family communication, and psychosocial adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bronwyn A; Hadley, Donald W; Koehly, Laura M

    2013-08-01

    This study explored the role of religious (RWB) and existential well-being (EWB) on psychosocial factors, support network characteristics, and screening practices in families with Lynch syndrome, also referred to as hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC). Participants were individuals with Lynch syndrome associated cancers and their first-degree relatives at risk of inheriting an identified deleterious mutation. Analyses considered both family RWB and EWB norms and individual deviations from that norm. Analyses controlled for age, gender, cancer diagnosis, number of respondents, and network size. Higher family RWB was associated with increased depressive symptoms (p family EWB was related to decreased depression symptoms (p family EWB was associated with fecal occult blood testing (p family communication about genetic counselling and testing (p family-level effects. Individuals with lower EWB than their family had lower perceived risk for colorectal cancer (p communicated disease risk information to less family members (p family also had higher cancer worry (p family network and being aware of family characteristics which may impact individual adjustment to disease risk. Interventions considering family-level factors may provide efficient pathways to improving psychosocial factors, screening practices, communication about disease risk and genetic testing, and cancer prevention.

  15. Zamak samples analyses using EDXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis, J.T. de; Lima, I.; Monin, V., E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.b, E-mail: inaya@iprj.uerj.b, E-mail: monin@iprj.uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica e Energia; Anjos, M. dos; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Alves, H., E-mail: marcelin@uerj.b, E-mail: haimon.dlafis@gmail.co [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica

    2009-07-01

    Zamak is a family of alloys with a base metal of zinc and alloying elements of aluminium, magnesium and copper. Among all non-ferrous metal alloys, Zamak is one that has more applications, for their physical, mechanical properties and easy ability to electrodeposition. It has good resistance to corrosion, traction, shock and wear. Its low melting point (approximately 400 deg C) allows greater durability of the mold, allowing greater production of melted series parts. Zamak can be used in several kinds of areas, such as, to produce residential and industrial locks, construction and carpentry components, refrigerators hinges and so on. It is observed that in some cases the quality of these products is not very good. The problem should be the quality of Zamak alloy purchased by the industries. One possible technique that can be used to investigate the quality of these alloys is Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence. In this paper we present results of eight samples of Zamak alloy by this technique and it was possible to classify Zamak alloy and verify some irregularity on these alloys. (author)

  16. Familialization in Welfare State Arrangements: Foster Families in the Life Course of Foster Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Götzö

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently enforced discourses on the significance of familial resources as a precondition for education, employability and social mobility reveal aspects of the interplay between state and families in terms of social integration. Foster families are of special interest when studying the drifts in discourses toward a familialization of life course regimes. The research on foster family care highlights the ambiguous negotiations on responsibilities, competencies, expertise and professionalisation, as well as the call to not colonise the intimate familial context. The authors analyse the interplay of the involved persons in the everyday practices, such as local authorities, legal guardians, therapists, parents of origin, foster parents and foster children. In the article, the beginning and the end of the child protection measure is discussed to see how trajectories and transitions are shaped by those involved, and how their acting can be interpreted in terms of life course regimes

  17. Hmong Students’ Perceptions of Their Family Environment: A Consensual Qualitative Analysis of Family Photos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dung Mao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although various studies have examined the home environment of low-income families and its impact on children’s development, limited research has been done to investigate the impact of home environment on Hmong American families, especially those who live below the federal poverty line. The purpose of this study was to document from the students’ perspective what it is like to live and grow up in a poor family. Fifteen Hmong students in 5th through 8th grades tookpart in the photovoice project. The consensual qualitative analyses of the photos and interviews revealed two domains (family physical home environment and family activities, seven themes (crowded space, unkempt space, equipped with media, generational and gender separation, parental involvement, organization of daily life, and social connections and 38 core ideas. Some implications of the study are proposed for educators who work with Hmong families.

  18. HGCal Simulation Analyses for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Sarah Marie

    2015-01-01

    This summer, I approached the topic of fast-timing detection of photons from Higgs decays via simulation analyses, working under the supervision of Dr. Adolf Bornheim of the California Institute of Technology. My specific project focused on simulating the high granularity calorimeter for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. CMS detects particles using calorimeters. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal) is arranged cylindrically to form a barrel section and two “endcaps.” Previously, both the barrel and endcap have employed lead tungstate crystal detectors, known as the “shashlik” design. The crystal detectors, however, rapidly degrade from exposure to radiation. This effect is most pronounced in the endcaps. To avoid the high expense of frequently replacing degraded detectors, it was recently decided to eliminate the endcap crystals in favor of an arrangement of silicon detectors known as the “High Granularity Calorimeter” (HGCal), while leaving the barrel detector technology unchanged. T...

  19. Analysing performance through value creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TRIFAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws a parallel between measuring financial performance in 2 variants: the first one using data offered by accounting, which lays emphasis on maximizing profit, and the second one which aims to create value. The traditional approach to performance is based on some indicators from accounting data: ROI, ROE, EPS. The traditional management, based on analysing the data from accounting, has shown its limits, and a new approach is needed, based on creating value. The evaluation of value based performance tries to avoid the errors due to accounting data, by using other specific indicators: EVA, MVA, TSR, CVA. The main objective is shifted from maximizing the income to maximizing the value created for shareholders. The theoretical part is accompanied by a practical analysis regarding the creation of value and an analysis of the main indicators which evaluate this concept.

  20. Retorisk analyse af historiske tekster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Christian Erik J

    2014-01-01

    scholars who identify themselves as rhetoricians tend to define and conduct such an analysis. It is argued that while rhetoricians would sympathize with Skinner’s adoption of speech act theory in his reading of historical documents, they would generally extend their rhetorical readings of such documents......In recent years, rhetoric and the rhetorical tradition has attracted increasing interest from historians, such as, e.g., Quentin Skinner. The paper aims to explain and illustrate what may be understood by a rhetorical analysis (or “rhetorical criticism”) of historical documents, i.e., how those...... to many more features than just the key concepts invoked in them. The paper discusses examples of rhetorical analyses done by prominent contemporary rhetoricians, including Edwin Black, Kenneth Burke, Maurice Charland, and Michael Leff. It relates its view of rhetorical documents to trends in current...

  1. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

  2. Analysing the Wrongness of Killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an in-depth analysis of the wrongness of killing by comparing different versions of three influential views: the traditional view that killing is always wrong; the liberal view that killing is wrong if and only if the victim does not want to be killed; and Don Marquis‟ future...... of value account of the wrongness of killing. In particular, I illustrate the advantages that a basic version of the liberal view and a basic version of the future of value account have over competing alternatives. Still, ultimately none of the views analysed here are satisfactory; but the different...... reasons why those competing views fail provide important insights into the ethics of killing....

  3. Analysing Protocol Stacks for Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Han; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    We show an approach, CaPiTo, to model service-oriented applications using process algebras such that, on the one hand, we can achieve a certain level of abstraction without being overwhelmed by the underlying implementation details and, on the other hand, we respect the concrete industrial...... standards used for implementing the service-oriented applications. By doing so, we will be able to not only reason about applications at different levels of abstractions, but also to build a bridge between the views of researchers on formal methods and developers in industry. We apply our approach...... to the financial case study taken from Chapter 0-3. Finally, we develop a static analysis to analyse the security properties as they emerge at the level of concrete industrial protocols....

  4. THOR Turbulence Electron Analyser: TEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazakerley, Andrew; Samara, Marilia; Hancock, Barry; Wicks, Robert; Moore, Tom; Rust, Duncan; Jones, Jonathan; Saito, Yoshifumi; Pollock, Craig; Owen, Chris; Rae, Jonny

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Turbulence Electron Analyser (TEA) will measure the plasma electron populations in the mission's Regions of Interest. It will collect a 3D electron velocity distribution with cadences as short as 5 ms. The instrument will be capable of measuring energies up to 30 keV. TEA consists of multiple electrostatic analyser heads arranged so as to measure electrons arriving from look directions covering the full sky, i.e. 4 pi solid angle. The baseline concept is similar to the successful FPI-DES instrument currently operating on the MMS mission. TEA is intended to have a similar angular resolution, but a larger geometric factor. In comparison to earlier missions, TEA improves on the measurement cadence. For example, MMS FPI-DES routinely operates at 30 ms cadence. The objective of measuring distributions at rates as fast as 5 ms is driven by the mission's scientific requirements to resolve electron gyroscale size structures, where plasma heating and fluctuation dissipation is predicted to occur. TEA will therefore be capable of making measurements of the evolution of distribution functions across thin (a few km) current sheets travelling past the spacecraft at up to 600 km/s, of the Power Spectral Density of fluctuations of electron moments and of distributions fast enough to match frequencies with waves expected to be dissipating turbulence (e.g. with 100 Hz whistler waves). A novel capability to time tag individual electron events during short intervals for the purposes of ground analysis of wave-particle interactions is also planned.

  5. Analysis and comparison of energy standards based on a typical single-family house in terms of energy demand and costs over the entire life cycle; Analyse und Vergleich energetischer Standards anhand eines exemplarischen Einfamilienhauses bzgl. Energiebedarf und Kosten ueber den Lebenszyklus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogdt, Frank U.; Kochendoerfer, Bernd; Dittmar, Anika [Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany). Fakultaet VI Planen Bauen Umwelt, Institut fuer Bauingenieurwesen

    2010-10-15

    Over recent years significant progress has been made with regard to sustainable development, particularly for new buildings. Particularly noteworthy are the advancement of renewable energy technologies and new building materials with very low thermal conductivity. In parallel, solutions for lowenergy, passive and even surplus-energy homes were developed and implemented. These building standards are characterised by low heating energy consumption and therefore enable significant energy savings during the building utilisation phase. The question is whether the application of new technologies and building materials results in a partial shift of the total primary energy demand from the utilisation phase to the construction and maintenance phase. It is also questionable, however, what additional investments are required to achieve the savings in operating costs. In order to answer this question a number of different design and construction options for a free-standing single-family house were examined and subjected to a life cycle analysis using the LEGEP software tool. Based on this analysis a number of statements regarding the primary energy demand over the life cycle of the exemplary single-family house and also for the cost trend can be made. However, the results are not universally applicable. They indicate that a holistic analysis is required for each individual case in order to achieve sustainable resource use. [German] Im Kontext einer nachhaltigen Entwicklung konnten in den letzten Jahren vor allem im Neubaubereich eine Reihe von Fortschritten erzielt werden. Besonders hervorzuheben ist die Weiterentwicklung von Technologien zur Nutzung regenerativer Energien und neuer Baustoffe mit besonders geringer Waermeleitfaehigkeit. Parallel wurden Konzepte fuer Niedrigheizenergie- bis hin zu Passiv- und sogar Plusenergiehaeuser entwickelt und umgesetzt. Diese Gebaeudestandards weisen einen geringen Heizenergiebedarf auf und ermoeglichen so erhebliche Energieeinsparungen

  6. The Fungal Defensin Family Enlarged

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are an emerging source of peptide antibiotics. With the availability of a large number of model fungal genome sequences, we can expect that more and more fungal defensin-like peptides (fDLPs will be discovered by sequence similarity search. Here, we report a total of 69 new fDLPs encoded by 63 genes, in which a group of fDLPs derived from dermatophytes are defined as a new family (fDEF8 according to sequence and phylogenetic analyses. In the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpine, fDLPs have undergone extensive gene expansion. Our work further enlarges the fungal defensin family and will help characterize new peptide antibiotics with therapeutic potential.

  7. Genetic analyses of captive Alala (Corvus hawaiiensis) using AFLP analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, Susan I.; Bianchi, Kiara R.

    2006-01-01

    affected by the mutation rate at microsatellite loci, thus introducing a bias. Also, the number of loci that can be studied is frequently limited to fewer than 10. This theoretically represents a maximum of one marker for each of 10 chromosomes. Dominant markers like AFLP allow a larger fraction of the genome to be screened. Large numbers of loci can be screened by AFLP to resolve very small individual differences that can be used for identification of individuals, estimates of pairwise relatedness and, in some cases, for parentage analyses. Since AFLP is a dominant marker (can not distinguish between +/+ homozygote versus +/- heterozygote), it has limitations for parentage analyses. Only when both parents are homozygous for the absence of alleles (-/-) and offspring show a presence (+/+ or +/-) can the parents be excluded. In this case, microsatellites become preferable as they have the potential to exclude individual parents when the other parent is unknown. Another limitation of AFLP is that the loci are generally less polymorphic (only two alleles/locus) than microsatellite loci (often >10 alleles/locus). While generally fewer than 10 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci are enough to exclude and assign parentage, it might require up to 100 or more AFLP loci. While there are pros and cons to different methodologies, the total number of loci evaluated by AFLP generally offsets the limitations imposed due to the dominant nature of this approach and end results between methods are generally comparable. Overall objectives of this study were to evaluate the level of genetic diversity in the captive population of Alala, to compare genetic data with currently available pedigree information, and to determine the extent of relatedness of mating pairs and among founding individuals.

  8. Family Caregiver Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on your schedule. Look for our launch soon! FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ─ Click on Your State AL AK ... AiA18 Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance Learn more Caregiver Research Studies show ...

  9. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With a Genetic Counselor Collecting Your Family Cancer History Sharing Genetic Test Results with Your Family Additional Resources Colon Cancer Alliance www.ccalliance.org Fight Colorectal Cancer http:// ...

  10. Natural Family Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Natural Family Planning Share Print Natural family planning (NFP) is a form of pregnancy planning. It does not involve medicine or devices. NFP helps people know when to have sexual intercourse. ...

  11. MSUD Family Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Treatment Of MSUD The MSUD Family Support Group has provided funds to Buck Institute for its ... of the membership of the MSUD Family Support Group, research for improved treatments and potential cure was ...

  12. What's for dinner? Types of food served at family dinner differ across parent and family characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; MacLehose, Rich; Loth, Katie; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Eisenberg, Marla E; Berge, Jerica

    2014-01-01

    To examine the types of food served at family dinner in the homes of adolescents and correlations with parent and family sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors and meal-specific variables. A cross-sectional population-based survey completed by mail or telephone by parents participating in Project F-EAT (Families and Eating and Activity in Teens) in 2009-2010. Homes of families with adolescents in Minneapolis/St. Paul urban area, MN, USA. Participants included 1923 parents/guardians (90·8% female; 68·5% from ethnic/racial minorities) of adolescents who participated in EAT 2010. Less than a third (28%) of parents reported serving a green salad at family dinner on a regular basis, but 70% reported regularly serving vegetables (other than potatoes). About one-fifth (21%) of families had fast food at family dinners two or more times per week. Variables from within the sociodemographic domain (low educational attainment) psychosocial domain (high work-life stress, depressive symptoms, low family functioning) and meal-specific domain (low value of family meals, low enjoyment of cooking, low meal planning, high food purchasing barriers and fewer hours in food preparation) were associated with lower healthfulness of foods served at family dinners, in analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics. There is a need for interventions to improve the healthfulness of food served at family meals. Interventions need to be suitable for parents with low levels of education; take parent and family psychosocial factors into account; promote more positive attitudes toward family meals; and provide skills to make it easier to plan and prepare healthful family meals.

  13. Family Theory and Family Health Research: Understanding the family health and illness cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Different family theories can be applied to different aspects of how families experience health and illness. The family health and illness cycle describes the phases of a family's experience, beginning with health promotion and risk reduction, then family vulnerability and disease onset or relapse, family illness appraisal, family acute response, and finally family adaptation to illness and recovery. For each phase, specific family theories that are most appropriate for guiding family and hea...

  14. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, Sarah O.; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Friedman, Esther M.; Trail, Thomas E.; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M.; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study to study military family readiness. This article presents analyses on marital relationships, family environment, psychological and behavioral health, child well-being, and military integration.

  15. Family characteristics and adaptation in families with adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Miller-Bruce, Andrea E.

    1988-01-01

    Family characteristics, and their typologies were examined in relationship to family adaptation in 97 nonclinical families with adolescents. Cohesion, adaptability, and satisfaction were measured by Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales III. Quantity of family time and routines and value of family time and routines were assessed using an adapted version of the Family Time and Routines Index. The dependent variable, family adaptation, was obtained using the Family M...

  16. Family Customs and Traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  17. Importance of Family Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... although family time is essential, it is equally important for parents to set aside some time just for themselves, too. Additional Information from HealthyChildren.org: Turning Family Time into Active Time Bedtime Routines for School-Aged Children The Benefits & Tricks to Having a Family Dinner ​ ...

  18. Family Violence: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (DHHS/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    Family violence is a widespread problem; research has shown multiple factors are associated with family violence. Types of family violence include spouse abuse; elder abuse and neglect; child abuse and neglect; parent abuse; and sibling abuse. There are three types of spouse abuse: physical abuse, sexual violence, and psychological/emotional…

  19. National Military Family Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Take Action Volunteer Mark Your Calendar Donate Twitter Facebook Instagram Donate Appreciating Military Families: Meet the Wilsons This ... MilitaryFamily.org © 2017 - National Military Family Association Twitter Facebook Pinterest Instagram Charity Navigator Four Star Charity GuideStar Exchange Better ...

  20. Genetics of familial melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoude, Lauren G; Wadt, Karin A W; Pritchard, Antonia L

    2015-01-01

    Twenty years ago, the first familial melanoma susceptibility gene, CDKN2A, was identified. Two years later, another high-penetrance gene, CDK4, was found to be responsible for melanoma development in some families. Progress in identifying new familial melanoma genes was subsequently slow; however...

  1. 5. Natural Family Planning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    natural family planning by the Government. The Ministry of Health in collaboration with government through partnership should plan for training natural family planning teachers as they are the ones who can teach people on family planning in their communities. This will also improve on utilization as some clients cited that ...

  2. Focus on the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, James M.

    This research attempts to evaluate the YMCA's program in terms of its effect upon the family members it serves. The study was designed to: (1) classify, by descriptive types, the various kinds of YMCA operations which serve the family, identifying their characteristic differences; (2) examine and describe operating practices of family YMCAs…

  3. Familial correlates of sexually active pregnant and nonpregnant adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J K; Papini, D R; Gbur, E

    1991-01-01

    The relationship of familial, demographic, and individual characteristics to the probability of pregnancy was examined among 124 sexually active adolescent females. Logistic regression analyses revealed that adolescent pregnancy status was a function of a combination of demographic and familial variables. Adolescents who were pregnant at the time of the study perceived their families as having low levels of family strength, perceived communication with parents as closed, came from homes characterized by family fragmentation (i.e., only one parent or no parent living in the home), came from low-income households, were unlikely to use any method of birth control, and were more likely to be married than their nonpregnant counterparts.

  4. Work-family enrichment and psychological health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameeta Jaga

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This study examines the beneficial aspects of the interface between work and family and its relationships with psychological health from a positive psychology perspective.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate whether work-family enrichment helps to predict psychological health, specifically increased subjective well-being and decreased feelings of emotional exhaustion and depression.Motivation for the study: The burgeoning literature on the work-family interface contains little on the potentially positive benefits of maintaining work and family roles.Research approach, design and method: The authors used a descriptive research design. Employees in two national organisations in the financial retail and logistics industries completed a self-administered survey questionnaire. The authors analysed responses from those who reported both family and work responsibilities (N = 160.Main findings: Consistent with previous research, factor analysis revealed two distinct directions of work-family enrichment: from work to family (W2FE and from family to work (F2WE. Multiple regression analysis showed that F2WE explained a significant proportion of the variance in subjective wellbeing, whilst W2FE explained a significant proportion of the variance in depression and emotional exhaustion.Practical/managerial implications: The findings of this study revealed the individual and organisational benefits of fostering work-family enrichment. Contributions/value add: This study presents empirical evidence for the need to focus on the positive aspects of the work-family interface, provides further support for a positive organisational psychology perspective in organisations and hopefully will encourage further research on interventions in organisations and families.

  5. Parent involvement in school: English speaking versus Spanish speaking families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Min; Thorn, Antoinette; Bloomdahl, Susana Contreras; Ha, Jung Hee; Nam, Suk Kyung; Lee, Jayoung

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationships between three predictor variables (attitude toward school, parent-child communication, and school commitment action) and the criterion variable (parent involvement) in a representative sample and to examine if these relationships were consistent across three groups (English speaking Caucasian family, English speaking Latino family, and Spanish speaking Latino families). Using a national database (N = 9.841), multi-group SEM analyses were conducted to investigate the relationship between three predictor variables and the criterion variable in three family groups. While all three predictor variables significantly predicted parent involvement in English speaking Caucasian and Latino families, only two variables (parent-child communication and school commitment actions), significantly predicted parent involvement in Spanish speaking Latino families. The results of this study suggest that when administrators, teachers and counselors in school strive to share specific school-related information with Latino families, Spanish speaking families are more likely to become involved with schools.

  6. Family Factors in Small Family Business Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jim Cater; Marilyn Young

    2016-01-01

      Using a qualitative case study approach and grounded theory analysis, we examined the expansion patterns of small family businesses and explored why some of them grow across geographic areas and others...

  7. A Zinc-Finger-Family Transcription Factor, AbVf19, Is Required for the Induction of a Gene Subset Important for Virulence in Alternaria brassicicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Akhil [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Ohm, Robin A. [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Oxiles, Lindsay [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Brooks, Fred [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Lawrence, Christopher B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor V. [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cho, Yangrae [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States)

    2011-10-26

    Alternaria brassicicola is a successful saprophyte and necrotrophic plant pathogen with a broad host range within the family Brassicaceae. It produces secondary metabolites that marginally affect virulence. Cell wall degrading enzymes (CDWE) have been considered important for pathogenesis but none of them individually have been identified as significant virulence factors in A. brassicicola. In this study, knockout mutants of a gene, AbVf19, were created and produced considerably smaller lesions than the wild type on inoculated host plants. The presence of tandem zinc-finger domains in the predicted amino acid sequence and nuclear localization of AbVf19- reporter protein suggested that it was a transcription factor. Gene expression comparisons using RNA-seq identified 74 genes being downregulated in the mutant during a late stage of infection. Among the 74 downregulated genes, 28 were putative CWDE genes. These were hydrolytic enzyme genes that composed a small fraction of genes within each family of cellulases, pectinases, cutinases, and proteinases. The mutants grew slower than the wild type on an axenic medium with pectin as a major carbon source. This study demonstrated the existence and the importance of a transcription factor that regulates a suite of genes that are important for decomposing and utilizing plant material during the late stage of plant infection.

  8. Severe Accident Recriticality Analyses (SARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, W. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Hoejerup, F. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Lindholm, I.; Miettinen, J.; Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Nilsson, Lars [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Sjoevall, H. [Teoliisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    Recriticality in a BWR has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In a BWR, the B{sub 4}C control rods would melt and relocate from the core before the fuel during core uncovery and heat-up. If electric power returns during this time-window unborated water from ECCS systems will start to reflood the partly control rod free core. Recriticality might take place for which the only mitigating mechanisms are the Doppler effect and void formation. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management measures, the following issues have been investigated in the SARA project: 1. the energy deposition in the fuel during super-prompt power burst, 2. the quasi steady-state reactor power following the initial power burst and 3. containment response to elevated quasi steady-state reactor power. The approach was to use three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto 1 plant in Finland with all three codes. The core state initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality - both superprompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power generation - for the studied range of parameters, i. e. with core uncovery and heat-up to maximum core temperatures around 1800 K and water flow rates of 45 kg/s to 2000 kg/s injected into the downcomer. Since the recriticality takes place in a small fraction of the core the power densities are high which results in large energy deposition in the fuel during power burst in some accident scenarios. The highest value, 418 cal/g, was obtained with SIMULATE-3K for an Oskarshamn 3 case with reflooding

  9. Work Family Relations: Antecedents and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Rich, Yisrael

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated interrelations between conflict and facilitation in work and family domains, with spousal, managerial, and collegial social support serving as antecedents, and professional vigor and burnout as outcomes. Participants were 322 female, married teachers. Regression analyses revealed complex relations between conflict and…

  10. Transmigrant Families: Intercultural and Bilingual Competences Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Barea, Eva Ma.; Garcia-Cano Torrico, Maria; Marquez Lepe, Esther; Ruiz Garzon, Francisca; Pozo Llorente, Ma. Teresa; Dietz, Gunther

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a research project concerned with analysing and identifying the discourses and related strategies used by Spanish-German trans-migrant families to support and develop bilingual and intercultural competences stemming from their transmigratory experiences. Using the biographical-narrative approach, we reconstruct…

  11. Understanding quality of life in children with asthma and their parents: Family resources and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo, Carla; Carona, Carlos; Silva, Neuza; Canavarro, Maria Cristina; Dattilio, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The present research investigated the links between caregiver burden, family environment, and quality of life in 97 pairs of children with asthma and one of their parents (the primary family caregiver). Using structured equation modelling, within-participant analyses showed that family environment was positively linked to quality of life for both children and parents respectively. Across-participant analyses demonstrated that parents’ positive perceptions of family environment were associated...

  12. Ergonomic analyses of downhill skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarys, J P; Publie, J; Zinzen, E

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide electromyographic feedback for (1) pedagogical advice in motor learning, (2) the ergonomics of materials choice and (3) competition. For these purposes: (1) EMG data were collected for the Stem Christie, the Stem Turn and the Parallel Christie (three basic ski initiation drills) and verified for the complexity of patterns; (2) integrated EMG (iEMG) and linear envelopes (LEs) were analysed from standardized positions, motions and slopes using compact, soft and competition skis; (3) in a simulated 'parallel special slalom', the muscular activity pattern and intensity of excavated and flat snow conditions were compared. The EMG data from the three studies were collected on location in the French Alps (Tignes). The analog raw EMG was recorded on the slopes with a portable seven-channel FM recorder (TEAC MR30) and with pre-amplified bipolar surface electrodes supplied with a precision instrumentation amplifier (AD 524, Analog Devices, Norwood, USA). The raw signal was full-wave rectified and enveloped using a moving average principle. This linear envelope was normalized according to the highest peak amplitude procedure per subject and was integrated in order to obtain a reference of muscular intensity. In the three studies and for all subjects (elite skiers: n = 25 in studies 1 and 2, n = 6 in study 3), we found a high level of co-contractions in the lower limb extensors and flexors, especially during the extension phase of the ski movement. The Stem Christie and the Parallel Christie showed higher levels of rhythmic movement (92 and 84%, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The Flynn Effect in Families: Studies of Register Data on Norwegian Military Conscripts and Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Martin Sundet

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper published data and new analyses are presented and discussed in order to demonstrate the power of family data (siblings and parents to military conscripts with IQ data in the study of the Flynn effect (FE. In particular, it is shown how studies of the mean intelligence changes in sibships of different sizes and changing proportions of sibship sizes can enhance our understanding how these factors may influence FE. Some new analyses of correlations between intelligence and sibship sizes illustrate how family data can be used to investigate changes in the correlation pattern across generations. It is shown that comparison of the secular trends in the general population and in sibling pairs can be a powerful method in the exploration of the relative influence of between-families and within-families factors in the FE. Surprising connections between the birth order effect on intelligence and the FE are demonstrated.

  14. Intelligence, birth order, and family size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Satoshi

    2012-09-01

    The analysis of the National Child Development Study in the United Kingdom (n = 17,419) replicates some earlier findings and shows that genuine within-family data are not necessary to make the apparent birth-order effect on intelligence disappear. Birth order is not associated with intelligence in between-family data once the number of siblings is statistically controlled. The analyses support the admixture hypothesis, which avers that the apparent birth-order effect on intelligence is an artifact of family size, and cast doubt on the confluence and resource dilution models, both of which claim that birth order has a causal influence on children's cognitive development. The analyses suggest that birth order has no genuine causal effect on general intelligence.

  15. Suicidal thoughts and depressive feelings amongst Estonian schoolchildren: effect of family relationship and family structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samm, Algi; Tooding, Liina-Mai; Sisask, Merike; Kõlves, Kairi; Aasvee, Katrin; Värnik, Airi

    2010-05-01

    Depressive feelings and suicidal ideation in a non-clinical sample of adolescents in Estonia were analysed in the context of family structure, mutual relationships amongst family members and schoolchildren's preferences regarding intimate personal contacts with particular family members. Data from the WHO collaborative study 'Health Behaviour in School-aged Children 2005/2006' (HBSC) were used. A representative sample of schoolchildren aged 11, 13 and 15 years completed the semi-structured questionnaire. The analyses included only adolescents living in households with at least one birth parent. The subjects were 4,389 schoolchildren (2,178 boys and 2,211 girls), who were divided into three groups based on: (1) suicidal thoughts, with or without depressive feelings; (2) depressive feelings; and (3) neither suicidal thoughts nor depressive feelings. Multinomial logistic regression was used. The proportion of depressive feelings increased with age for both boys and girls. Girls expressed depressive feelings more frequently than boys from ages 13 and 15 years, and suicidal thoughts from age 15 years. Self-reported satisfaction with relationships in the family reduced the likelihood of depressive feelings and suicidal thoughts. Good communication with the parents reduced the likelihood of suicidal thoughts in all age groups. Adolescents who were satisfied with their family relationships suffered less frequently from depressive feelings and suicidal thoughts. The best environment for an adolescent was a family with both birth parents. Of the adolescents in 'non-intact' families, those with a step-parent in the family showed suicidal thoughts more frequently than those in single-parent families. Associations between family-related variables and suicidal thoughts were significant even after adjusting for family economic deprivation score.

  16. Family traditions and generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Gerald; Barrera, Maru

    2009-01-01

    Currently, traditional family values that have been passed down through generations appear to be at risk. This has significant implications for the stability and health of individuals, families, and communities. This article explores selected issues related to intergenerational transmission of family values and cultural beliefs, with particular reference to Western culture and values that are rooted in Jewish and Christian traditions. It also examines family values and parenting styles as they influence the developing perspective of children and the family's adaptation to a changing world.

  17. Automatic incrementalization of Prolog based static analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Michael; Kahl, Matthias; Saha, Diptikalyan

    2007-01-01

    Modem development environments integrate various static analyses into the build process. Analyses that analyze the whole project whenever the project changes are impractical in this context. We present an approach to automatic incrementalization of analyses that are specified as tabled logic...... incrementalizing a broad range of static analyses....

  18. Inside the Family Firm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Morten; Nielsen, Kasper; Pérez-González, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    This paper uses a unique dataset from Denmark to investigate (1) the role of family characteristics in corporate decision making, and (2) the consequences of these decisions on firm performance. We focus on the decision to appoint either a family or an external chief executive officer (CEO). We...... show that a departing CEO's family characteristics have a strong predictive power in explaining CEO succession decisions: family CEOs are more frequently selected the larger the size of the family, the higher the ratio of male children and when the departing CEOs had only had one spouse. We...... then analyze the impact of family successions on performance. We overcome endogeneity and omitted variables problems of previous papers in the literature by using the gender of a departing CEO's first-born child as an instrumental variable (IV) for family successions. This is a plausible IV as male first...

  19. Family, School and Immigration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Terrén

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The family is the main social arena where the relationship between the first and the second generation of immigrants takes place, and education is a corner stone in such a dialectic. Immigrant families undergo profound transformations that are often complicated by extended periods of separation –not only from extended family members, but also from the nuclear family. Though many families are involved in transnational separation and reunion processes of this kind, there has been little research on the impact of these forms of family transformations on the vision of education held by immigrants. However, the perspective developed in this paper relies on the idea that an accurate knowledge of the schooling experience of the children of immigrants has to be related to the set of projects and expectations which are constantly being redefined in the life of an immigrant family

  20. Linkage analysis in familial non-Lynch syndrome colorectal cancer families from Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaykumar Kontham

    Full Text Available Family history is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and many families segregate the disease as a seemingly monogenic trait. A minority of familial colorectal cancer could be explained by known monogenic genes and genetic loci. Familial polyposis and Lynch syndrome are two syndromes where the predisposing genes are known but numerous families have been tested without finding the predisposing gene. We performed a genome wide linkage analysis in 121 colorectal families with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The families were ascertained from the department of clinical genetics at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden and were considered negative for Familial Polyposis and Lynch syndrome. In total 600 subjects were genotyped using single nucleotide polymorphism array chips. Parametric- and non-parametric linkage analyses were computed using MERLIN in all and subsets of families. No statistically significant result was seen, however, there were suggestive positive HLODs above two in parametric linkage analysis. This was observed in a recessive model for high-risk families, at locus 9q31.1 (HLOD=2.2, rs1338121 and for moderate-risk families, at locus Xp22.33 (LOD=2.2 and HLOD=2.5, rs2306737. Using families with early-onset, recessive analysis suggested one locus on 4p16.3 (LOD=2.2, rs920683 and one on 17p13.2 (LOD/HLOD=2.0, rs884250. No NPL score above two was seen for any of the families. Our linkage study provided additional support for the previously suggested region on chromosome 9 and suggested additional loci to be involved in colorectal cancer risk. Sequencing of genes in the regions will be done in future studies.

  1. Linkage analysis in familial non-Lynch syndrome colorectal cancer families from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontham, Vinaykumar; von Holst, Susanna; Lindblom, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Family history is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and many families segregate the disease as a seemingly monogenic trait. A minority of familial colorectal cancer could be explained by known monogenic genes and genetic loci. Familial polyposis and Lynch syndrome are two syndromes where the predisposing genes are known but numerous families have been tested without finding the predisposing gene. We performed a genome wide linkage analysis in 121 colorectal families with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The families were ascertained from the department of clinical genetics at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden and were considered negative for Familial Polyposis and Lynch syndrome. In total 600 subjects were genotyped using single nucleotide polymorphism array chips. Parametric- and non-parametric linkage analyses were computed using MERLIN in all and subsets of families. No statistically significant result was seen, however, there were suggestive positive HLODs above two in parametric linkage analysis. This was observed in a recessive model for high-risk families, at locus 9q31.1 (HLOD=2.2, rs1338121) and for moderate-risk families, at locus Xp22.33 (LOD=2.2 and HLOD=2.5, rs2306737). Using families with early-onset, recessive analysis suggested one locus on 4p16.3 (LOD=2.2, rs920683) and one on 17p13.2 (LOD/HLOD=2.0, rs884250). No NPL score above two was seen for any of the families. Our linkage study provided additional support for the previously suggested region on chromosome 9 and suggested additional loci to be involved in colorectal cancer risk. Sequencing of genes in the regions will be done in future studies.

  2. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  3. Collection of Prostate Cancer Families and Mapping Additional Hereditary Prostate Cancer Genes (HPC2, HPC3..)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaacs, William

    2001-01-01

    Segregation analyses of familial prostate cancer have provided evidence for the existence of dominantly-acting prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, with such genes being estimated to be responsible...

  4. Collection of Prostate Cancer Families and Mapping Additional Hereditary Prostate Cancer Genes (HPC2, HPC3,...)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaacs, William

    2000-01-01

    Segregation analyses of familial prostate cancer have provided evidence for the existence of dominantly-acting prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, with such genes being estimated to be responsible...

  5. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-21

    Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor

  6. CONSTRUCTING SERVICE DISCOURSES IN LITHUANIAN FAMILY SOCIAL WORK

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Motiečienė; Merja Laitinen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, family social work is constructed through the analysis of social service discourses from the social workers’ perspective. Recent research shows how social workers are dealing with complex and fluid issues, as well as the societal uncertainty in their work with families (e.g., Spratt, 2009; Menéndez et al., 2015). Based on earlier studies, it is vital to analyse family social work in different contextual settings. Societal, political and organisational contexts affect the pre...

  7. Life Satisfaction and Family Structure among Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Ying-Keung

    2008-01-01

    Relationships between family structure and perceived life satisfaction in overall life and five domains of the Brief Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale, family life, friendships, school experience, myself, and where I live were examined among 4,502 Chinese adolescent secondary school students in Hong Kong. Bivariate analyses showed…

  8. Differences in Management accounting between family enterprises and non-family enterprises: A Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Duller

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Management accounting deals with the subject family enterprises rather little in spite ofits high economical relevance. This paper questions, weather general objectives of familyenterprises differ from those of non-family enterprises. Based on the hypothesis that familyenterprises aim at humane objectives to a greater extent and at financial objectives toa lesser extent than non-family enterprises the results of an empirical study for the regionUpper-Austria are presented. The conclusion is that apart from the extent of return onequity objectives of family enterprises do not differ much from those of non-family enterprises.The second point of interest is to analyse differences in objectives between mediumand large sized enterprises.

  9. Communication technologies and emotionality in transnational families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Guadalupe Ramírez Contreras

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It was estimated in 2009 that 11,500.0 millions Mexican immigrants were living in the United States (Pew Hispanic Center, 2009. However, such immigrants can’t take their families with them to the US breaking-up of the family unit. Therefore, immigrants and their families become members of a transnational family.  In order to cope with such family break-up, members of such families try to balance themselves through developing an emotional intimacy using communication technologies. However, what kind of emotional support is offered when one of the members of the transnational family is a senior citizen and chronically ill? What kind of emotions do these transnational families experience? Which communication technologies do they use to be in touch? How these communication technologies are related to the emotional support? In order to answer these research questions, I explored previous studies in which I found that they only included the immigrants’ point of view. To overcome this limitation in this study, I included the point of view of all members of transnational families. I conducted a qualitative study. It took place in Sahuayo, Michoacan. I interviewed members of 15 transnational families during 2012 and 2013. The results showed that emotional support was identified as: a contacting relatives in Mexico, initiated by immigrants, b exchanging daily life experiences; c solving issues and conflicts; and d immigrants supporting, participating or being virtually in special celebrations. Immigrants also used communication technologies in order to maintain emotional ties and give emotional support to their parents. The communication help immigrants to provide the emotional support to their parents and also to express their feelings. I recommend studying national migrants and rural populations, in order to analyse any differences between them and my sample.

  10. Family governance practices and teambuilding : Paradox of the enterprising family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berent-Braun, M.M.; Uhlaner, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between family governance practices and financial performance of the business and family assets of business-owning families. A business-owning family that shares a focus on preserving and growing wealth as a family is defined as the enterprising family. Results

  11. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner is...

  12. Analysing clinical practice guidelines. A method of documentary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, J V; Cowley, S

    1997-05-01

    This paper will describe a method of documentary analysis used in a study examining the validity of clinical guidelines issued to health visitors to assist them in identifying families requiring increased health visitor support. This forms the preliminary work for a wider study examining how health visitors decide to increase support to vulnerable families. Although a number of published research texts discuss the value of records and documents as important data sources for health service researchers, there is relatively little information available about the processes of documentary analysis. This paper offers one method for analysing clinical practice guidelines, it describes the development of a critique and analysis tool and explores the strengths and weaknesses of this particular analysis instrument.

  13. Extended family medicine training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  14. Reflexive convention: civil partnership, marriage and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Brian

    2017-09-14

    Drawing on an analysis of qualitative interview data from a study of formalized same-sex relationships (civil partnerships) this paper examines the enduring significance of marriage and family as social institutions. In doing so, it intervenes in current debates in the sociology of family and personal life about how such institutions are undermined by reflexivity or bolstered by convention. Against the backdrop of dominating sociological frames for understanding the links between the changing nature of marriage and family and same-sex relationship recognition, the paper analyses the diverse and overlapping ways (including the simple, relational, strategic, ambivalent and critical ways) in which same-sex partners reflexively constructed and engaged with marriage and family conventions. My analysis suggests that instead of viewing reflexivity and convention as mutually undermining, as some sociologists of family and personal life do, it is insightful to explore how diverse forms of reflexivity and convention interact in everyday life to reconfigure the social institutions of marriage and family, but do not undermine them as such. I argue the case for recognizing the ways in which 'reflexive convention', or reflexive investment in convention, contributes to the continuing significance of marriage and family as social institutions. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  15. Hereditary family signature of facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Gili; Katzir, Gadi; Peleg, Ofer; Kamara, Michal; Brodsky, Leonid; Hel-Or, Hagit; Keren, Daniel; Nevo, Eviatar

    2006-10-24

    Although facial expressions of emotion are universal, individual differences create a facial expression "signature" for each person; but, is there a unique family facial expression signature? Only a few family studies on the heredity of facial expressions have been performed, none of which compared the gestalt of movements in various emotional states; they compared only a few movements in one or two emotional states. No studies, to our knowledge, have compared movements of congenitally blind subjects with their relatives to our knowledge. Using two types of analyses, we show a correlation between movements of congenitally blind subjects with those of their relatives in think-concentrate, sadness, anger, disgust, joy, and surprise and provide evidence for a unique family facial expression signature. In the analysis "in-out family test," a particular movement was compared each time across subjects. Results show that the frequency of occurrence of a movement of a congenitally blind subject in his family is significantly higher than that outside of his family in think-concentrate, sadness, and anger. In the analysis "the classification test," in which congenitally blind subjects were classified to their families according to the gestalt of movements, results show 80% correct classification over the entire interview and 75% in anger. Analysis of the movements' frequencies in anger revealed a correlation between the movements' frequencies of congenitally blind individuals and those of their relatives. This study anticipates discovering genes that influence facial expressions, understanding their evolutionary significance, and elucidating repair mechanisms for syndromes lacking facial expression, such as autism.

  16. All in the family: times are changing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Wil; Bor, Hans; van Gerwen, Willem

    2008-01-01

    General practitioners are familiar with the fact that individual use of care is determined by the family. This paper describes to what extent patterns found in the 1970s can still be replicated in the early 21(st) century, analyzing the impact of the family on frequency of presenting minor illnesses in general practice. We used the data of the families in the CMR database during two five-year periods: 1971-1975 and 2001-2005. All episodes of minor illness were registered using the same classification criteria in both studies. The population under study was divided in low and medium/high social class. Pearson correlation coefficients and a hierarchical linear model were used to analyse the impact of family on the frequency of presenting minor illnesses. Correlations between parents (M/F) were stronger in 1971-1975 than in the 2001-2005 period. The influence of the family on presenting minor illness in general practice has decreased from 27.7 to 20.3%. Though the influence of the family on presenting minor illness in general practice has decreased, nowadays (2001-2005) still we found strong correlations between family members in presenting morbidity to the GP.

  17. Breakfast frequency among adolescents: associations with measures of family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Trine Pagh; Holstein, Bjørn E; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; Rasmussen, Mette

    2016-06-01

    To investigate (i) associations between adolescents' frequency of breakfast and family functioning (close relations to parents, quality of family communication and family support) and (ii) if any observed associations between breakfast frequency and family functioning vary by sociodemographic factors. School-based cross-sectional study. Students completed a web-based questionnaire. Associations were estimated by multilevel multivariate logistic regression. Danish arm of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study, 2014. Adolescents aged 13 and 15 years (n 3054) from a random sample of forty-one schools. Nearly one-quarter of the adolescents had low breakfast frequency. Low breakfast frequency was associated with low family functioning measured by three dimensions. The OR (95 % CI) of low breakfast frequency was 1·81 (1·40, 2·33) for adolescents who reported no close relations to parents, 2·28 (1·61, 3·22) for adolescents who reported low level of quality of family communication and 2·09 (1·39, 3·15) for adolescents who reported low level of family support. Joint effect analyses suggested that the odds of low breakfast frequency among adolescents with low family functioning compared with high family functioning were highest among adolescents being girls, immigrants and living in other than a traditional family structure. Low breakfast frequency was associated with low family functioning measured by close relations to parents, quality of family communication and family support. Further, analyses suggested that the associations were more pronounced among girls, immigrants and adolescents from other family structure than traditional. The study highlights the importance of the family setting in promoting regular breakfast frequency among adolescents.

  18. Family-centered prevention ameliorates the longitudinal association between risky family processes and epigenetic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H; Yu, Tianyi; Chen, Edith; Beach, Steven R H; Miller, Gregory E

    2016-05-01

    Research has suggested that 'risky' family processes have unforeseen negative consequences for health later in life. The purpose of this study was to further understanding of risky family environments and development of health vulnerabilities by (a) examining the likelihood that elevated levels of parental depressive symptoms when children are age 11 forecast accelerated epigenetic aging 9 years later at age 20; (b) determining whether participation in an efficacious family-centered prevention program focused on enhancing supportive parenting and strengthening family relationships will ameliorate this association; and (c) testing a moderation-mediation hypothesis that prevention-induced reductions in harsh parenting across adolescence will account for prevention effects in reducing accelerated epigenetic aging. In the rural southeastern United States, parents and 11-year-old children from 399 families participated in the Strong African American Families (SAAF) program or a control condition. Parents reported their own depressive symptoms when their children were 11, and both youths and parents reported youth exposure to harsh parenting at ages 11 and 16. Blood was drawn from youths at age 20 to measure accelerated epigenetic aging using a marker derived from the DNA methylation of cells. Elevated parental depressive symptoms forecast accelerated epigenetic aging among youths in the control condition, but not among SAAF participants. Moderated-mediation analyses confirmed that reductions in harsh parenting accounted for SAAF's protective effects on epigenetic aging. Subsequent exploratory analyses indicated that accelerated epigenetic aging forecast emotional distress among young adults in the control condition but not among those who participated in SAAF. This study is unique in using a randomized prevention trial to test hypotheses about the ways risky family processes contribute to accelerated epigenetic aging. The results suggest that developmentally

  19. The Development and Validation of the Inventory of Family Protective Factors: A Brief Assessment for Family Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Deborah L.; Huber, Charles H.; Steiner, Robert; Vazquez, Luis A.; Savage, Todd A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the three-stage protocol employed in development and validation of the Inventory of Family Protective Factors (IFPF), a brief-form formal instrument intended to assess the primary protective factors that contribute to family resilience. Following construction of the instrument, data collections and analyses of a total sample…

  20. Prospective relations between family conflict and adolescent maladjustment: security in the family system as a mediating process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, E Mark; Koss, Kalsea J; Davies, Patrick T

    2015-04-01

    Conflict in specific family systems (e.g., interparental, parent-child) has been implicated in the development of a host of adjustment problems in adolescence, but little is known about the impact of family conflict involving multiple family systems. Furthermore, questions remain about the effects of family conflict on symptoms of specific disorders and adjustment problems and the processes mediating these effects. The present study prospectively examines the impact of family conflict and emotional security about the family system on adolescent symptoms of specific disorders and adjustment problems, including the development of symptoms of anxiety, depression, conduct problems, and peer problems. Security in the family system was examined as a mediator of these relations. Participants included 295 mother-father-adolescent families (149 girls) participating across three annual time points (grades 7-9). Including auto-regressive controls for initial levels of emotional insecurity and multiple adjustment problems (T1), higher-order emotional insecurity about the family system (T2) mediated relations between T1 family conflict and T3 peer problems, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Further analyses supported specific patterns of emotional security/insecurity (i.e., security, disengagement, preoccupation) as mediators between family conflict and specific domains of adolescent adjustment. Family conflict was thus found to prospectively predict the development of symptoms of multiple specific adjustment problems, including symptoms of depression, anxiety, conduct problems, and peer problems, by elevating in in adolescent's emotional insecurity about the family system. The clinical implications of these findings are considered.

  1. Advancing family psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiese, Barbara H

    2016-02-01

    To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge sophisticated approaches to research design and data analysis; and (4) JFP imparts knowledge about effective therapy and prevention programs relevant to couples and families. The journal is also expanding its publication rate to eight issues per year. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Fighting for the family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Maj Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    ‘relational spaces’ that allow them to preserve intimate relationships despite geographical distances. Besides dealing with the practical responsibilities of everyday life, soldiers’ partners also fight to maintain the sense of closeness associated with normative ideals about family relations and a ‘good......’ family life. The emergence of relational spaces enables soldiers and their families to take part in each other’s everyday lives. However, when the lives of soldiers abroad and family members at home become entangled, these relational spaces also result in the normalization and legitimization......The article explores how military deployment affects the everyday lives of Danish soldiers’ families. By approaching the challenges faced by soldiers and their partners from an anthropological perspective of the family, the article provides new insights into the social consequences of military...

  3. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  4. Are Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families with Alcoholism Different from Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families without Alcoholism? A Look at Committed, Intimate Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Christine M.; Metzler, April E.

    1997-01-01

    Compared adult children from dysfunctional families (with and without alcoholism) and adult children of functional families to gauge current relationship satisfaction. No significant differences emerged between the two dysfunctional groups. Analyses connected dysfunction in the family of origin to global distress and to difficulties with…

  5. Classification and expression analyses of homeobox genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 40; Issue 2 ... Articles Volume 40 Issue 2 June 2015 pp 241-255 ... When individual homeobox genes were compared with members of known class or family, we could further classify them into 3 groups, namely, TALE, OTHER and NOVEL classes, but no HOX family was ...

  6. Familial incidence of urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Giovanni; Bergman, Jonathan; Dye, Timothy D

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether urinary incontinence is more common in family members of women with incontinence compared with continent individuals. Women who were examined at 2 different outpatient facilities over a 2-year period received a questionnaire that covered social, behavioral, and medical issues. They were also asked whether they had a family member who complained of urinary incontinence and, if so, the degree of the relationship. Subjects were excluded for the following reasons: not mentally competent, difficulty understanding the written English language, and a history of bladder cancer or of acquired or congenital neuropathy. Statistical analyses were conducted with chi-squared tests for differences between groups; a probability of incontinence in family members. These 667 women were divided into 3 groups: group I, 441 incontinent women from the first facility; group II, 112 continent women from the first facility; and group III, 114 continent women from the second facility. Women with at least 1 relative with urinary incontinence were 34.9% in group I, 16.1% in group II, and 5.3% in group III. This difference was statistically significant. In a comparison of group I and group II, the odds that an incontinent woman had at least 1 relative with incontinence were 2.6 times higher (95% CI, 1.50-4.48); comparing group I and group III, the odds were 9.6 times higher (95% CI, 4.17-22.25). In our study population, women with urinary incontinence were more likely to have at least 1 family member also with incontinence when compared with women who were continent.

  7. The DLGAP family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Andreas H; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2017-01-01

    downstream signalling in the neuron. The postsynaptic density, a highly specialized matrix, which is attached to the postsynaptic membrane, controls this downstream signalling. The postsynaptic density also resets the synapse after each synaptic firing. It is composed of numerous proteins including a family...... in the postsynapse, the DLGAP family seems to play a vital role in synaptic scaling by regulating the turnover of both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors in response to synaptic activity. DLGAP family has been directly linked to a variety of psychological and neurological disorders. In this review we...... focus on the direct and indirect role of DLGAP family on schizophrenia as well as other brain diseases....

  8. Communications and family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Information dissemination is part of the communication component of successful family planning program operation. Communication informs people about family planning, motivates them to practice it, and teaches them how to correctly use safe and reliable methods. Family planning communication is receiving renewed attention in the late 1980s in nearly all parts of the world. 1 of the most effective ways to reach policymakers and service providers is through newsletters. At the 1986 Family Health Research Centers Directors Conference, 4 of the 6 directors said they regularly publish newsletters. Workshops, conferences, and seminars are other forums for information dissemination. These forums present ideal opportunities for media coverage, 1 of the best ways to spread information about contraceptive research findings and family planning. Advice columns are a way to publicize family planning in print media on a regular basis. It may be necessary for leaders of family planning groups to make the 1st efforts to contact editors and broadcast personnel. While family planning is no longer a new topic in most countries, it remains true that important information needs to circulate and that family planners can help this process by helping the media cover it.

  9. Familial Transient Global Amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Rhys Davies

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Following an episode of typical transient global amnesia (TGA, a female patient reported similar clinical attacks in 2 maternal aunts. Prior reports of familial TGA are few, and no previous account of affected relatives more distant than siblings or parents was discovered in a literature survey. The aetiology of familial TGA is unknown. A pathophysiological mechanism akin to that in migraine attacks, comorbidity reported in a number of the examples of familial TGA, is one possibility. The study of familial TGA cases might facilitate the understanding of TGA aetiology.

  10. Family Report 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Freek Bucx

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Gezinsrapport 2011. Between 2007 and 2010 the Netherlands had its first ever Minister for Youth and Family. The position of the family in modern society is a subject of considerable debate, not just at political and policy level, but also in society itself. Voices are frequently heard in that debate expressing concern about the functioning of modern families and about the development of the children who grow up in them. But what are the facts when it comes to family life in th...

  11. Familie og arv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Linda

    1995-01-01

    Familie og arv, familie, arv, børn, ægteskab, ægtefælle, skilsmisse, formuefællesskab, forældremyndighed, fælleseje, særråden, særeje, død, uskiftet bo, underholdspligt, samliv, tvangsarv, deling......Familie og arv, familie, arv, børn, ægteskab, ægtefælle, skilsmisse, formuefællesskab, forældremyndighed, fælleseje, særråden, særeje, død, uskiftet bo, underholdspligt, samliv, tvangsarv, deling...

  12. Techniques for Analysing Problems in Engineering Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Uffe

    1998-01-01

    Description of how CPM network can be used for analysing complex problems in engineering projects.......Description of how CPM network can be used for analysing complex problems in engineering projects....

  13. The influence of family structure on breakfast habits among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Astrid; Pedersen, Trine Pagh; Meilstrup, Charlotte Riebeling; Rasmussen, Mette

    2011-05-01

    Regular breakfast habits are important for the health and well-being of young people. The family is an important setting for developing regular breakfast habits. The objectives of the present study are to study the association between family structure and the regularity of breakfast habits among children and adolescents, and to analyse whether such potential association is modified by gender. Data are from the Danish contribution to the international study entitled Health Behaviour in School aged Children, 2006. Participants are school children aged 11, 13 and 15 drawn from a random sample of Danish schools. The response rate was 88.8%, n = 6,269. Family structure was categorized into traditional family, single-parent family and reconstructed family. Irregular breakfast habits (IBH) were defined as having breakfast 0-1 times per week. Analyses of the total population show an increased, significant odds ratio (OR) of 1.56 for IBH among children from single-parent families. Among children from reconstructed families, an insignificant OR of 1.27 was observed. Further, the results suggest that girls living in a reconstructed family may also have an increased risk of IBH. The breakfast habits of adolescent boys and girls are influenced by family structure.

  14. 10 CFR 61.13 - Technical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Technical analyses. 61.13 Section 61.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.13 Technical analyses. The specific technical information must also include the following analyses...

  15. Family involvement in emergency department discharge education for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palonen, Mira; Kaunonen, Marja; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2016-11-01

    To report findings concerning family involvement in emergency department discharge education for older people. The current trend of population ageing in Western countries has caused an increase in emergency department visits. Due to the continuing improvement in the mental and physical status of older people, they are frequently discharged home. Proper discharge education enables older people and their families to better understand how they can cope with the medical issue at home. Given the lack of research, we know relatively little about the significance of family involvement in older people's emergency department discharge education. A descriptive qualitative design was used. Qualitative thematic interviews of seven older patients, five family members and fifteen nurses were conducted. Data were analysed using content analysis. Family involvement in discharge education was seen as turbulent. The experiences were twofold: family involvement was acknowledged, but there was also a feeling that family members were ostracised. Families were seen as a resource for nurses, but as obliged initiators of their own involvement. Our findings suggest that family members are not considered participants in emergency department care. For a family-friendly approach, actions should be taken on both individual and organisational levels. The findings support healthcare providers and organisation leaders in promoting family involvement in discharge education for older people. Families can be encouraged to be involved without feeling responsible for the interaction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Family presence during resuscitation: A descriptive study with Iranian nurses and patients' family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zali, Mahnaz; Hassankhani, Hadi; Powers, Kelly A; Dadashzadeh, Abbas; Rajaei Ghafouri, Rouzbeh

    2017-09-01

    Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) has advantages for the patients' family member to be present at the bedside. However, FPDR is not regularly practiced by nurses, especially in low to middle income countries. The purpose of this study was to determine Iranian nurses' and family members' attitudes towards FPDR. In a descriptive study, data was collected from the random sample of 178 nurses and 136 family members in four hospitals located in Iran. A 27-item questionnaire was used to collect data on attitudes towards FPDR, and descriptive and correlational analyses were conducted. Of family members, particularly the women, 57.2% (n=78) felt it is their right to experience FPDR and that it has many advantages for the family; including the ability to see that everything was done and worry less. However, 62.5% (n=111) of the nurses disagreed with an adult implementation of FPDR. Nurses perceived FPDR to have many disadvantages. Family members becoming distressed and interfering with the patient which may prolong the resuscitation effort. Nurses with prior education on FPDR were more willing to implement it. FPDR was desired by the majority of family members. To meet their needs, it is important to improve Iranian nurses' views about the advantages of the implementation of FPDR. Education on FPDR is recommended to improve Iranian nurses' views about the advantages of the implementation of FPDR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF STRATEGIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN FAMILY COMPANIES AND NON-FAMILY COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Arsić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a theoretical analysis of the strategic innovation attributes that are represented in family companies, and the paper cross examinates a significant number of references dealing with this topic. In the reviewed literature, one aspect is usually imposed as a basis for comparison and evaluation of innovation in family companies, and it is "strategic entrepreneurship" (functional link of strategy and idea generation from an individual or a team of people. The abovementioned aspect is not analyzed in detail in the case of intrapreneurship in non-family companies. The aim of this paper is in realization of high-quality supplements or conclusions from the literature dealing with strategic entrepreneurship. The originality of this work lies in the analysis and comparison of family and non-family companies, by amending the variables that define strategic enterpreneurship. Thus, it allows the applicability of the same variables in the case of analysing family and non-family companies, and also identifies variables unique to a family company.

  18. Preventing Adolescent Depression with the Family Check-Up: Examining Family Conflict as a Mechanism of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Connell, Arin M.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Family-centered prevention programs are understudied for their effects on adolescent depression, despite considerable evidence that supports their effectiveness for preventing escalation in youth problem behavior and substance use. This study was conducted with 2 overarching goals: (a) replicate previous work that has implicated the Family Check-Up (FCU), a multilevel, gated intervention model embedded in public middle schools, as an effective strategy for preventing growth in adolescent depressive symptoms and (b) test whether changes in family conflict may be an explanatory mechanism for the long-term, protective effects of the FCU with respect to adolescent depression. This trial was conducted with 593 ethnically diverse families who were randomized to intervention (offered the FCU) or middle school as usual. Complier average causal effect (CACE) analysis revealed that engagers in the FCU evidenced less growth in depressive symptoms and family conflict from 6th through 9th grade and post-hoc analyses indicated that the FCU is related to lower rates of Major Depressive Disorder. The second set of analyses examined family conflict as a mechanism of change for families who participated in the FCU. Families who reported short-term intervention benefits had significantly less escalation in family conflict over the middle school years; in turn, growth in family conflict explained risk for adolescent depressive symptoms. PMID:26414418

  19. Work-family conflict and enrichment in nurses: between job demands, perceived organisational support and work-family backlash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Gatti, Paola; Molino, Monica; Cortese, Claudio G

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how work relationships (perceived organisational support, supervisor and co-worker work-family backlash) and job demands (workload, emotional dissonance) can interact with work-family conflict and work-family enrichment. Despite the extensive literature on the work-family interface, few studies on the nursing profession have considered the role of job demands and work relationships, focusing on both the positive and negative side of the work-family interface. The study involved a sample of 500 nurses working in an Italian hospital. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to test hypotheses. Analyses showed that work-family conflict has a positive relationship with job demands and supervisor backlash, and a negative relationship with perceived organisational support. Work-family enrichment was found to have a negative relationship with job demands and a positive relationship with perceived organisational support. No significant relationships were found between work-family enrichment and both backlash dimensions. The study confirmed the importance of promoting a balance between job demands and resources in order to create favourable conditions for work-family enrichment and to prevent work-family conflict. The findings suggest that it may be advisable for health-care organisations to invest in measures at individual, team and organisational levels, specifically in training and counselling for nurses and supervisors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Choosing a Family Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history, and lifestyle. These help determine possible health risk factors.Research shows that people who have a family doctor have better overall health outcomes, lower death rates, and lower total costs of care.Things to considerFamily doctors know ...

  1. Behind Family Lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manon Daniëlle Andres

    2010-01-01

    Although more common in today‘s globalizing world, little is known about how work affects family life in the course of job-induced separation. The present study tests a model, simultaneously assessing the relations between work-family conflict, psychological distress, relationship satisfaction, and

  2. South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice(SAFP) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal, which strives to provide primary care physicians and researchers with a broad range of scholarly work in the disciplines of Family Medicine, Primary Health Care, Rural Medicine, District Health and other related fields. SAFP publishes original ...

  3. Familial hypercholesterolemia in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, J.; Vissers, M. N.; Wiegman, A.; Trip, M. D.; Bakker, H. D.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of this review This review provides an update on recent advances in the diagnosis and management of children with familial hypercholesterolemia. Recent findings A large cross-sectional cohort study of paediatric familial hypercholesterolemia demonstrated that affected children had a 5-fold

  4. Family Report 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freek Bucx

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Gezinsrapport 2011. Between 2007 and 2010 the Netherlands had its first ever Minister for Youth and Family. The position of the family in modern society is a subject of considerable debate, not just at political and policy level, but also in society itself. Voices are

  5. Families with sleepwalking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Michelle; Guilleminault, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Studies on families with sleepwalking are uncommonly published but can give further information on the phenotype of patients with chronic sleepwalking. Out of 51 individuals referred for chronic sleepwalking during a 5-year period, we obtained sufficient information on 7 families with direct relatives who reported sleepwalking with or without sleep terrors. Among 70 living direct family members, we obtained questionnaire responses from 50 subjects and identified 34 cases with a history of sleepwalking. Of the 50 subjects, 16 completed only questionnaires, while all the others also completed a clinical evaluation and nocturnal sleep recordings. There was a positive history of sleepwalking on either the paternal or maternal side of the family over several generations in our 7 families. Thirty-three clinically evaluated subjects had evidence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), with associated craniofacial risk factors for SDB (particularly maxillary and/or mandibular deficiencies). There was a complete overlap with the report of parasomnias and the presence of SDB. In cases with current sleepwalking, treatment of SDB coincided with clear improvement of the parasomnia. All of our subjects with parasomnias presented with familial traits considered as risk factors for SDB. These anatomical risk factors are present at birth and even subtle SDB can lead to sleep disruption and instability of NREM sleep. The question raised is: are factors leading to chronic sleep disruption the familial traits responsible for familial sleepwalking? Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Family Literacy in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Libraries, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Explains the need for family literacy programs in Illinois and describes efforts to improve adult and child literacy. Topics discussed include poverty; reading, writing, and computing instruction; interaction between parents and children; families and books; partnerships between state agencies, private organizations, and public libraries; and…

  7. Unique Family Living Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... important to everyone. If a stepparent joins the family because your child lost a parent to a death, don’t ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Emotional Well-Being, Family Health, Prevention and WellnessTags: child, Psychiatric and Psychologic, teenager January 2017 Copyright © American ...

  8. Why the Family?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferracioli, L.

    2015-01-01

    Among the most pressing philosophical questions occupying those interested in the ethics of the family is why should parents, as opposed to charity workers or state officials, raise children? In their recent Family Values, Brighouse and Swift have further articulated and strengthen their own

  9. Alcoholism and Family Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Theodore

    Historically, alcoholism has been defined as an individual problem, and as a result, family factors have received little attention. During the past decade, however, a new theoretical-methodological perspective has been introduced which draws upon general systems theory for rationale, family theory for substance, and behavioral psychology for…

  10. Narrative Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, William M.; Keenan, Robert

    1997-01-01

    States that narrative family therapy is informed by social constructionism and postmodern worldviews, and is a relatively significant departure from mainstream psychotherapy. Discusses the use of narrative family therapy. Uses the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden as an example. (MKA)

  11. Loosely coupled class families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    Families of mutually dependent classes that may be accessed polymor- phically provide an advanced tool for separation of concerns, in that it enables client code to use a group of instances of related classes safely without depending on the exact classes involved. However, class families which ar...

  12. Familial pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hruban, R. H.; Petersen, G. M.; Goggins, M.; Tersmette, A. C.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Falatko, F.; Yeo, C. J.; Kern, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    For many years anecdotal case reports have suggested that pancreatic cancer aggregates in some families. Two recent advances have established that this is in fact the case. First, large registries, such as the National Familial Pancreas Tumor Registry (NFPTR) at Johns Hopkins, have identified a

  13. Family Support and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lou Ann

    2013-01-01

    Family involvement is essential to the developmental outcome of infants born into Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In this article, evidence has been presented on the parent's perspective of having an infant in the NICU and the context of family. Key points to an educational assessment are also reviewed. Throughout, the parent's concerns and…

  14. The Great Family Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Betty L.

    1996-01-01

    Recognizing that religion can positively transform people's lives and that churches and synagogues have altruistic members with diverse abilities, the Escambia County (Florida) School District created church care teams to work with special-needs families and their schools over an extended time. Positive changes in target families are already…

  15. Helping Friends and Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chapter Join our online community Helping Friends and Family Part of living well with Alzheimer’s is adjusting to your “new normal” and helping family and friends do the same. Knowing what to ...

  16. The family Cyclobacteriaceae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AnilKumar, P.; Srinivas, T.N.R.

    , Rhodonellum, and Shivajiella Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences clearly clustered all the genera into the family Cyclobacteriaceae Members of the family are known to have a wide range of morphological properties like cell shape, size...

  17. Familial obesity and leanness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskarzewski, P M; Khoury, P; Morrison, J A; Kelly, K; Mellies, M J; Glueck, C J

    1983-01-01

    Using the Princeton School District Family Study cohort, our specific aim was to estimate the prevalence of suspected familial ponderosity and leanness, to provide empirical risk estimates for the proportion of probands' first-degree relatives who were similarly affected, and to estimate the contributions of diseases, drugs and caloric intake to relative obesity and leanness. We studied 379 probands, 125 whites and 52 blacks from a random recall group, 147 whites and 55 blacks from a hyperlipidemic recall group. Suspected familial obesity and leanness were arbitrarily identified in those kindreds with at least two first-degree relatives in the same Quetelet index decile as the proband, top or bottom respectively. Suspected familial obesity was observed in 2.4 percent and 6 percent respectively of random and hyperlipidemic recall group whites. Suspected familial leanness was identified in 2.4 percent and 1.4 percent of random and hyperlipidemic recall whites and in 3.8 percent of randomly recalled blacks. Approximately twice as many as expected white first-degree relatives of top Quetelet index decile probands themselves had top decile Quetelet indices; approximately three times as many as expected first-degree relatives of bottom decile Quetelet index probands themselves had bottom decile Quetelet indices. Nineteen percent and 31 percent of top decile Quetelet index white probands from random and hyperlipidemic recall groups came from families where at least two other first-degree relatives were similarly obese; 18 percent and 20 percent of white random and hyperlipidemic recall group probands with bottom decile Quetelet indices had suspected familial leanness. Nearly all subjects with familial obesity or leanness had no overt metabolic or pharmacological explanations for their body habitus. Within-family clustering of hypertension was common in kindreds with suspected familial obesity and was absent in kindreds with suspected familial leanness. Marked within-family

  18. Negotiating Family Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtslund, Anders; Bøge, Ask Risom; Sonne Damkjær, Maja

    This presentation explores the question: What motivates the use of tracking technologies in families, and how does the use transform the relations between parent and child? The purpose is to investigate why tracking technologies are used in families and how these technologies potentially change...... the relation between parents and children. The use of tracking technologies in families implicate negotiations about the boundaries of trust and intimacy in parent-child relations which can lead to strategies of resistance or modification (Fotel and Thomsen, 2004; Rooney, 2010; Steeves and Jones, 2010......). In the presentation, we report from a qualitative study that focuses on intergenerational relations. The study draws on empirical data from workshops with Danish families as well as individual and group interviews. We aim to gain insights about the sharing habits and negotiations in intimate family relations...

  19. Maintenance of family networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    marsico, giuseppina; Chaudhary, N; Valsiner, Jaan

    2015-01-01

    collective of persons linked with one another by a flexible social network. Within such networks, Peripheral Communication Patterns set the stage for direct everyday life activities within the family context. Peripheral Communication Patterns are conditions where one family network member (A) communicates...... relatives, ancestors’ spirits, etc.) in efforts that use Peripheral Communication Patterns creates a highly redundant social context for human development over life course which is the basis for family members’ resilience during critical life events. Examples from the social contexts of Greenland, Italy......Families are social units that expand in time (across generations) and space (as a geographically distributed sub-structures of wider kinship networks). Understanding of intergenerational family relations thus requires conceptualization of communication processes that take place within a small...

  20. Verbal communication of families with cancer patients at end of life: A questionnaire survey with bereaved family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazato, Kazuhiro; Shiozaki, Mariko; Hirai, Kei; Morita, Tatsuya; Tatara, Ryuhei; Ichihara, Kaori; Sato, Shinichi; Simizu, Megumi; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyasita, Mitsunori

    2018-01-01

    To clarify the verbal communication of feelings between families and patients in Japanese palliative care units from the perspective of bereaved family members by examining (1) proportions of families' and patients' verbalization of six feelings (gratitude, love, seeking forgiveness, giving forgiveness, wishes after death, and continuing bonds), (2) recognition of receiving these feelings through verbalization from the family's perspective, and (3) the specific attitudes of family members that influence their verbalizations. In 2010, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 968 bereaved families of cancer patients in palliative care units across Japan. Five hundred thirty-seven responses were analyzed. (1) "Gratitude" was verbalized most often (families: 47%; patients: 61%), and "expressing forgiveness" least often (families: 16%; patients: 11%). (2) Even if the words were not used, 81.2% to 88.2% of families answered that they had received the patient's feelings, and 71.8% to 85.4% of families felt the patient had received their feelings. (3) Multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that the strongest attitudes determining verbalizing were "not wanting to say farewell without conveying feelings," "a daily basis of expressing," and "heart-to-heart communication" (ishin-denshin). For both families and patients, verbalizing feelings was difficult. Our results showed that families' and patients' verbalizing and receiving of feelings must be aligned to understand their communication at the end of life in Japan. Future research is needed to verify how attitude helps promote or inhibit verbalization. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Comparing the Family Environments of Alcoholic and "Normal" Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filstead, William J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Comparing alcoholic and normal families indicated that alcoholic families perceived a higher level of conflict and a less cohesive family environment. In alcoholic families less emphasis was placed on independence, cultural and recreational activities, and organizational tasks. Results confirm speculation regarding the types of family dimensions…

  2. Family planning education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, M V

    1983-02-01

    17 days were spent devoted to the effort of learning about China's educational approach to family planning in the hope of discovering how they are achieving their remarkable success in reducing population growth. As a member of the 1981 New York University/SIECUS Colloquim in China, it was necessary to rely on the translation provided by the excellent guides. Discussions were focused on questions prepared in advance about the topics that concerned the group. These observations, based on a short and limited exposure, cover the following areas: marriage and family planning policies; the family planning program; school programs; adult education; family planning workers; and unique aspects of the program. China has an official position on marriage and family planning that continues to undergo revisions. The new marriage law sets the minimum ages of marriage at 22 for men and 20 for women. Almost everyone marries, and an unmarried person over age 28 is a rarity. The family planning program in China is carried out by an extensive organizational network at national, provincial, and local government levels. Officials termed it a "propaganda campaign." Hospitals, clinics, and factories invariably displayed posters; a popular set of four presents the advantages of the 1 child family as follows: late marriage is best, for it allows more time to work and study; 1 child is best for the health of the mother; one gets free medical care for his/her child if a family has only 1 child; and there is more time to teach 1 child. The state operated television regularly explains the 1 child policy utilizing special films. According to 1 family planning official, "before marriage there is little sex." There are few abortions for unmarried women. Education about sex is for adults, for those persons who are about to be married. There is little if any sex education in schools. Sexual teaching is not generally acceptable, especially in the rural areas. By contrast, in Shanghai the physiology

  3. Family intervention for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharoah, Fiona; Mari, Jair; Rathbone, John; Wong, Winson

    2014-01-01

    Background People with schizophrenia from families that express high levels of criticism, hostility, or over involvement, have more frequent relapses than people with similar problems from families that tend to be less expressive of emotions. Forms of psychosocial intervention, designed to reduce these levels of expressed emotions within families, are now widely used. Objectives To estimate the effects of family psychosocial interventions in community settings for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like conditions compared with standard care. Search strategy We updated previous searches by searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (September 2008). Selection criteria We selected randomised or quasi-randomised studies focusing primarily on families of people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder that compared community-orientated family-based psychosocial intervention with standard care. Data collection and analysis We independently extracted data and calculated fixed-effect relative risk (RR), the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for binary data, and, where appropriate, the number needed to treat (NNT) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD). Main results This 2009-10 update adds 21 additional studies, with a total of 53 randomised controlled trials included. Family intervention may decrease the frequency of relapse (n = 2981, 32 RCTs, RR 0.55 CI 0.5 to 0.6, NNT 7 CI 6 to 8), although some small but negative studies might not have been identified by the search. Family intervention may also reduce hospital admission (n = 481, 8 RCTs, RR 0.78 CI 0.6 to 1.0, NNT 8 CI 6 to 13) and encourage compliance with medication (n = 695, 10 RCTs, RR 0.60 CI 0.5 to 0.7, NNT 6 CI 5 to 9) but it does not obviously affect the tendency of individuals/families to leave care (n = 733, 10 RCTs, RR 0.74 CI 0.5 to 1.0). Family intervention also seems to improve general social impairment and the levels of

  4. A family quarrel? "Developmentalism" or family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, M

    1974-01-01

    The switch in emphasis in population policies from family planning to the development of socioeconomic policies that would encourage smaller families--summed up in the word "developmentalism"--is charted from a 1967 paper by Kinsley Davis to its culmination at the 1974 World Population Conference, when even as staunch a supporter of family planning as John D. Rockefeller came out in support of placing population policy in the context of economic and social development. The real question is, however: To what extent does developmentalism represent a true shift in policy and how much is simply a more sophisticated rhetoric designed to deflect the growing opposition to population control? On the one hand, the endorsement by a man of Rockefeller's stature indicates a significant change. On the other, the changes which the implementation of developmentalism would entail seem irreconcilable with the present political and economic structures of underdeveloped nations and of relations between them and the more developed countries. Further, developmentalism is neither as progressive as its advocates suggest, nor as threatening as its opponents cry. It is, in fact, a prescription for enhancing the effectiveness of family planning through a form of social engineering from the top; its details--more aid, investment, and trade--would involve an expanded Western role in the Third World. It is even suggested that developmentalism might be a cover for the creation of a more stratified society, where marginal members are restricted to their own quarters in an effort to secure political stability and economic growth. In the end, developmentalism might be shortlived, as pressure to step up birth control programs is felt from many quarters.

  5. Family planning and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Family planning and its association with women's health and the health of families, communities, and societies will be a central theme of the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo, Egypt, in September 1994. The conference will provide an opportunity to determine new directions for the development of family planning programs. Making family planning programs woman-friendly is to insure that they: are based on the principle of voluntary informed choice; are available to all; offer confidentiality in counseling and services; provide a broad choice of traditional and modern methods; make the user's safety a prime concern; encourage male involvement; are supportive of women with unwanted pregnancies; and provide protection from, as well as management of, sexually transmitted diseases. The need to encourage male involvement and sharing in responsibilities is essential. Although the bulk of contraceptive methods are for use by women, many require the active cooperation of men. With the spread of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS, barrier methods and cooperation between sex partners will gain importance. The responsibilities of men as partners, fathers, and family members should be emphasized in all family planning programs. Policy makers must insure that family planning programs offer high quality counseling, the prevention of unsafe abortion, and the management of genital infections, sexually transmitted diseases, infertility and diseases of the reproductive tract.

  6. Gender and family stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing trend of partnership disruption among families with children in recent decades has been accompanied by substantial changes in traditional gender roles in industrialized countries. Yet, relatively little is known about the effects of changing gender relations on family stability in the European context. In this paper, we study such gender influences at the familial and societal level in Sweden and Hungary between the mid-1960s and the early 1990s. We focus on the disruption of the first parental union (i.e. the union in which a couple's first child was born. Our analysis is based on data extracted from the Swedish and Hungarian Fertility and Family Surveys of 1992/93. We use the method of hazard regression. The results suggest (i that the establishment of the dual-earner family model influences family stability only if it is accompanied by some changes in traditional gender relations within the family, and (ii that women's and men's labor-market behavior have different effects in spite of the relatively long history of women's (also mothers' labor-force participation in both Sweden and Hungary.

  7. Family allowance and family planning in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, S J

    1978-10-01

    Family allowances designed to promote maternal and child health and welfare could be self-defeating if they stimulated otherwise unwanted births, as often assumed. That assumption, with its public health and demographic implications, needs testing. An attempt to test it was made in Chile in 1969--1970 through interviews with 945 wives receiving an allowance and 690 non-recipients. Recipients practiced contraception significantly more than did non-recipients. This was not explained by wives' educational attainment or employment, the couples' earnings, or number of living children, but was associated with a 50 per cent greater utilization of professional prenatal care by recipients during the most recent pregnancy; women with such care (regardless of allowance status) were 75 per cent more likely than others to control their fertility. Prenatal care was probably sought more by recipients in part because an additional stipend was provided as soon as pregnancy was confirmed, usually at clinics with integrated family planning. Greater family income, attributable to the allowance, probably also contributed to the recipients' better prenatal attention and to contraceptive practice. Noteworthy, too, was the finding that with the number of living children controlled, contraceptive practice was significantly greater amoung couples who had never lost a child.

  8. Genetic analyses of bolting in bulb onion (Allium cepa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Samantha; Revanna, Roopashree; Pither-Joyce, Meeghan; Shaw, Martin; Wright, Kathryn; Thomson, Susan; Moya, Leire; Lee, Robyn; Macknight, Richard; McCallum, John

    2014-03-01

    We present the first evidence for a QTL conditioning an adaptive trait in bulb onion, and the first linkage and population genetics analyses of candidate genes involved in photoperiod and vernalization physiology. Economic production of bulb onion (Allium cepa L.) requires adaptation to photoperiod and temperature such that a bulb is formed in the first year and a flowering umbel in the second. 'Bolting', or premature flowering before bulb maturation, is an undesirable trait strongly selected against by breeders during adaptation of germplasm. To identify genome regions associated with adaptive traits we conducted linkage mapping and population genetic analyses of candidate genes, and QTL analysis of bolting using a low-density linkage map. We performed tagged amplicon sequencing of ten candidate genes, including the FT-like gene family, in eight diverse populations to identify polymorphisms and seek evidence of differentiation. Low nucleotide diversity and negative estimates of Tajima's D were observed for most genes, consistent with purifying selection. Significant population differentiation was observed only in AcFT2 and AcSOC1. Selective genotyping in a large 'Nasik Red × CUDH2150' F2 family revealed genome regions on chromosomes 1, 3 and 6 associated (LOD > 3) with bolting. Validation genotyping of two F2 families grown in two environments confirmed that a QTL on chromosome 1, which we designate AcBlt1, consistently conditions bolting susceptibility in this cross. The chromosome 3 region, which coincides with a functionally characterised acid invertase, was not associated with bolting in other environments, but showed significant association with bulb sucrose content in this and other mapping pedigrees. These putative QTL and candidate genes were placed on the onion map, enabling future comparative studies of adaptive traits.

  9. The Family Saprospiraceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2014-01-01

    The Saprospiraceae, a family within the order Sphingobacteriales and the phylum Bacteroidetes, embrace the genera Saprospira, Lewinella, Haliscomenobacter, Aureispira, ‘‘Rubidimonas,’’ and ‘‘Portibacter.’’ The composition of the family, and delineation of genera and species, is largely defined...... associated with predation of other bacteria and algae. Family members are likely important in the breakdown of complex organic compounds in the environment. Such a role is at least demonstrated in situ for activated sludge wastewater treatment systems where these organisms are frequently observed...

  10. Family Background and Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Matthew J.; Sol, Joeri; Van Praag, Mirjam

    Vast amounts of money are currently being spent on policies aimed at promoting entrepreneurship. The success of such policies, however, rests in part on the assumption that individuals are not ‘born entrepreneurs’. In this paper, we assess the importance of family background and neighborhood...... treatment within families by gender and birth order does little to further increase our estimates of the importance of family-wide factors. We then go on to show that neighborhood effects, sibling peer effects, and parental income and education explain very little of these correlations. Parental...

  11. [Familial seroepidemiology of toxocariasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noemi, I; Rugiero, E; Viovy, A; Cortés, P P; Cerva, J L; González, M; Back, S; Gottlieb, B; Herrera, M E; Cordovez, J

    1994-01-01

    With the objective of defining the intrafamiliar distribution pattern of the infection and illness caused by Toxocara sp., 78 infected families (356 people) were studied for 30 months. At the same time 28 families free of infection were studied, as a control group (97 people). The socioeconomic level was analyzed according to a modified Graffar index. Contac with canine and feline pets, and antecedents of geophagia and onichophagia were found to be risk factors which would facilitate the infection. The average of persons infected, diagnosed by ELISA Toxocara test, was 2.8 per family. The importance of familiar distribution of the infection and its primary prevention is strongly stressed.

  12. Characteristics of Family Dynamics among Japanese Families in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Sekito, Yoshiko

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify family dynamics and their relationships to selected socio-demographic characteristics and mental status among Japanese families in Japan. The Family Dynamics Measure II (FDM II) and a socio-demographic questionnair

  13. Relationship between Family Meals and Depressive Symptoms in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Seok; Lee, Min-Ji; Suh, Young-Sung; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2013-05-01

    Recently, importance of family meals has been emphasized at home and abroad, and several journals reported that family meals had a big impact on children's development. In this paper, we would like to report the relationship between family meals and depressive symptoms in children. This study was based on questionnaires distributed to 162 5th and 6th graders of one elementary school in the area of Daegu, Korea, in July, 2010. The questionnaire was about general characteristics, family characteristics, and quantity/quality of family meals. Family functions and depressive symptoms in children were evaluated with Smilkstein's family APGAR (adaptability, partnership, growth, affection, and resolve) score (FAS) and Kovac's Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). In one-way analyses of variance, there was no significant difference in FAS and CDI according to general and family characteristics (P > 0.05). CDI was significantly lower in the group having more frequent family meals (P 0.05). The frequency of family meals, having more conversation and better atmosphere during family meals predicted less depressive symptoms in children.

  14. Quality of Family Context or Sibling Status? Influences on Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freijo, Enrique B. Arranz; Oliva, Alfredo; Olabarrieta, Fernando; Martin, Juan Luis; Manzano, Ainhoa; Richards, Martin P. M.

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzes the influence of socioeconomic status, quality of family context and sibling status on cognitive development in a sample of 551 five-year-old children. The regression analyses confirmed the predictive value of socioeconomic status and quality of family context on cognitive development. The quality of family context mediates the…

  15. Latino Families Becoming-Literate in Australia: Deleuze, Literacy and the Politics of Immigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines qualitative data from a two family case study in New South Wales. Both families are from South America and have recently moved to Australia. This study demonstrates that an understanding of the ways that the families are becoming literate in Australia necessitates moving beyond linguistic analyses of the changes that are…

  16. The assessment of the family vision generation process in small and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The objective of this study was to assess the family vision generation process in small and medium-sized family businesses. Data from. 489 questionnaires administered to 79 family businesses were collected and analysed. An Oblimin oblique rotation was performed on the principal components of the ...

  17. All in the (engineering) Family? - the Family Occupational Background of Men and Women Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuders, Paul D.; Mannon, Susan E.

    This article examines and compares the family occupational background of men and women engineering students. Analyses reveal that around half of the men and women in a sample of student engineers had at least one engineer in their family, with women significantly more likely to have an engineering parent. Women with an engineer in their family were significantly more likely to have decided to study engineering before college. We conclude that engineering family members are passing on engineering-related knowledge, interests, and aspirations to a segment of the student engineering population. This type of occupational inheritance is especially crucial for paving the way into engineering for women, who otherwise lack engineering role models.

  18. The confluence model: birth order as a within-family or between-family dynamic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajonc, R B; Sulloway, Frank J

    2007-09-01

    The confluence model explains birth-order differences in intellectual performance by quantifying the changing dynamics within the family. Wichman, Rodgers, and MacCallum (2006) claimed that these differences are a between-family phenomenon--and hence are not directly related to birth order itself. The study design and analyses presented by Wichman et al. nevertheless suffer from crucial shortcomings, including their use of unfocused tests, which cause statistically significant trends to be overlooked. In addition, Wichman et al. treated birth-order effects as a linear phenomenon thereby ignoring the confluence model's prediction that these two samples may manifest opposing results based on age. This article cites between- and within-family data that demonstrate systematic birth-order effects as predicted by the confluence model. The corpus of evidence invoked here offers strong support for the assumption of the confluence model that birth-order differences in intellectual performance are primarily a within-family phenomenon.

  19. Comparative integromics on Ephrin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-05-01

    EFNA1, EFNA2, EFNA3, EFNA4, EFNA5, EFNB1, EFNB2 and EFNB3 are EFN family ligands for EPH family receptors. EFN/EPH signaling pathway networks with the WNT signaling pathway during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. Comparative genomics analyses on EFNB1, EFNB2 and EFNB3 were performed by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (humint). EFNB1 mRNA was expressed in human embryonic stem (ES) cells, neural tissues, diffuse type gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, colon cancer, brain tumors and esophageal cancer, EFNB2 mRNA in human ES cells, neural tissues and colon cancer, EFNB3 mRNA in human ES cells, neural tissues, brain tumors, pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. Because triple TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human EFNB3 gene, comparative genomics analyses on EFNB3 orthologs were further performed. Chimpanzee EFNB3 gene, consisting of five exons, was identified within AC164921.3 genome sequence. AY421228.1 was not a correct coding sequence for chimpanzee EFNB3. Chimpanzee EFNB3 gene was found to encode a 340-amino-acid protein showing 99.4% and 96.6% total-amino-acid identity with human EFNB3 and mouse Efnb3, respectively. Three TCF/LEF-binding sites within human EFNB3 promoter were conserved in chimpanzee EFNB3 promoter, and the second TCF/LEF-binding site in rodent Efnb3 promoters. CpG hypermethylation of EFNB3 promoter with 63.2% GC content as well as deletion of EFNB3 gene closely linked to TP53 tumor suppressor gene at human chromosome 17p13.1 should be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of infrequent EFNB3 upregulation in human colorectal cancer. EFNB3, identified as potential transcriptional target of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway, is a pharmacogenomics target in the fields of regenerative medicine and oncology.

  20. [Clinicopathologic study of a family cherubism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xue-Mei; Yu, Shi-Feng; Wu, Yun-Tang

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the clinicopathologic features of familial cherubism and its differentiation from other giant cell lesions in jaws and the results of surgical treatments with a long-term follow-up. Four cases of familial cherubism were reviewed and their clinical and radiographic features, histopathologic appearance, biochemical markers and surgical treatments analysed. Clinically, cherubism was characterized by bilateral painless swelling of jaws, mandibular deformity was common. Radiographs showed multilocular radiolucencies with sclerotic thickening border. Histopathologically, numerous randomly distributed multinucleated giant cells and vascular spaces within a fibrous connective tissue stroma with or without eosinophilic collagen perivascular cuffing were shown. The lesion regressed without treatment in 1 cases. Curettage was performed in 3 cases with good results. Cherubism can be diagnosed according to its typical clinical and radiographical features with a positive family history. It might regress without treatment. But surgery intervention is suggested to improve physiological function and to solve the psychologic problem of the patients.

  1. Family Enterprise in Czech Civil Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janku Martin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For more than two decades the family business enterprises of the first generation (generation of founders are more and more dominating in the category of today’s small and medium–sized enterprises in the Czech Republic. The necessary legal background defining the legal relationships and rights of all participating persons was, however, limited to general provisions in the Commercial Code that has not solved many of the problems associated thereto. Only in 2012 the new Czech Civil Code, Act. No 89/2012 Coll., introduced the institute of family enterprise as completely new term in the Czech Civil law. The presented paper aims to analyse the key rules of this new legal regulation, focusing on significant aspects of the institute in the context of commercial law and family law, as well as, to highlight the potential weaknesses and gaps existing in the regulation.

  2. [Anne Arold. Kontrastive Analyse...] / Paul Alvre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alvre, Paul, 1921-2008

    2001-01-01

    Arvustus: Arold, Anne. Kontrastive analyse der Wortbildungsmuster im Deutschen und im Estnischen (am Beispiel der Aussehensadjektive). Tartu, 2000. (Dissertationes philologiae germanicae Universitatis Tartuensis)

  3. [Burnout syndrome among family physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cruz, Juan; Mugártegui-Sánchez, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    burnout syndrome is a state of physical and emotional exhaustion that can occur among workers who interact directly with others. This could affect job performance. The objective was to determine the prevalence of this syndrome and its associated factors among family physicians. a cross-sectional survey applying the Maslach Burnout Inventory was conducted in a selected convenience non-probability sampling of family physicians. Central tendency and dispersion measures were used in determining the prevalence of burnout syndrome; the associated factors were analysed by χ(2) test. there were 59 cases of burnout syndrome, 36 had involvement in a single component, 15 in 2 and 8 were affected in 3 components; we observed that 35 % of positive cases reported doing an average of 10 extra shifts a month (p = 0.013). Having a second job was associated with positive cases of burnout syndrome. the results are consistent with similar studies. Working extra shifts or having a second job were the related factors most associated to this syndrome.

  4. The modified self: family caregivers' experiences of caring for a dying family member at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlander, Ida; Sahlberg-Blom, Eva; Hellström, Ingrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore situations in daily life that challenge caregivers' self-image when caring for a dying family member at home. Background.  Caregiving affects the health and daily lives of family caregivers. Patterns of challenging situations may provide insight into the home caregiving experience, thus contributing to our understanding of the influence it has on the caregivers' self-image. Qualitative descriptive study. Ten family caregivers who cared for a dying family member at home with support from an advanced home care team were interviewed 6-12 months after the death of the family member. The interviews were analysed with interpretive description. Result.  Three patterns characterised the experiences of caregivers' daily lives in caring for a dying family member at home: challenged ideals, stretched limits and interdependency. These patterns formed the core theme, the modified self. Situations that challenged the caregivers' self-image were connected to experiences such as 'forbidden thoughts', intimacy and decreasing personal space. The caregivers met challenging situations in their daily lives that created a modified image of self. It is important to recognise the impact of caring for a dying family member at home. This study argues for supporting family caregivers to maximise their potential to handle the demanding everyday life with a dying family member at home. This study contributes to understanding situations in the home that may challenge caregivers' self-image and points out the importance of talking about caregiving experiences. From a clinical perspective, this study emphasises the significance of creating a climate, which allows family caregivers to express thoughts and feelings. Sharing experiences such as 'forbidden thoughts' can be one way of handling the profoundly changed every day life. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Family and non-family business differences in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maret Kirsipuu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to identify differences between family enterprises and non-family enterprises. The concepts of entrepreneurship, entrepreneur and enterprise/business are clarified. The paper contains the results of research conducted by the author among family entrepreneurs in 2007–2012 that can be compared to the research results reached by Wahl (2011. This research demonstrates that there are differences between family entrepreneurs and non-family entrepreneurs, which are primarily caused by that family entrepreneurs value first of all their family members, family traditions and only then profit earning.

  6. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fever usually begin during childhood. They occur in bouts called attacks that last one to three days. ... Mediterranean fever isn't treated. Complications can include: Abnormal protein in the blood. During attacks of familial ...

  7. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd. Minus strand RNA viruses. Rhabdovirus e.g. rabies. Paramyxovirus e.g. measles, mumps. Orthomyxovirus e.g. influenza. Retroviruses. RSV, HTLV, MMTV, HIV. Notes:

  8. Product Family Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Morten

    product this will in time lead to a patchwork of product variants, features, parts, and process technologies – i.e. a product family so complex that it becomes a burden in the companies’ daily operation. As a consequence there has been an increase in the number of companies that are beginning to change...... their focus from single products to entire product families and try to incorporate the development of product variety into a future product family. The key is to create fit between the product design and production setup. The challenge of understanding this fit and modelling dispositional relations between...... the existing product design and the production setup with an eye re-design the products and/or the production setup is the main topic for this research project. This research contributes with a visual modelling formalism which has its basis in the Product Family Master Plan (PFMP) presented in the work of Ulf...

  9. Asbestos: Protect Your Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Topics: Asbestos Contact Us Share Protect Your Family How to Identify Materials That May Contain Asbestos ... Improper removal may actually increase your and your family’s exposure to asbestos fibers. Top of Page Asbestos ...

  10. Learning about Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Familial Hypercholesterolemia Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  11. Family medicine in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Susana Bresca

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In Argentina, family medicine begins to appear in the sixties. It has followed along with the movement in favour of the specialty in Latin America and its existence in important areas is strongly related to men and women who have defended and promoted the specialty. It is present in many Ministry of Health programs; however, its development has depended and still depends on each jurisdiction and upon the coordination between the subsystems and political regions. The professional associations that bring together general practitioners and family doctors in Argentina.FAMG (General Medicine Federation of Argentina and FAMFYG (Argentina Federation of Family and General Medicine, have consolidated healthcare teams, elevated the scientific level of both family doctors in training as well as already certified practitioners, and have become acknowledged entities that certify the specialty and accreditation of teaching centers. Insertion in universities, provinces and private providers still poses challenges.

  12. FAMILIAL PAROXYSMAL KINESIGENIC CHOREOATHETOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rafiie

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year old boy was presented with Q rare form ofmovement-induced drop attacks, which was also present in his father. 17Jis case was, therefore, labeled as familial paroxysmal kinesigenic choreoathetosis.

  13. Everyday Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2010-01-01

    What are the implications of ongoing processes of modernization and individualization for social relations in everyday life? This overall research question is the pivotal point in empirical studies at the Centre of Childhood-, Youth- and Family Life Research at Roskilde University. One research...... project takes a social psychological approach, combining quantitative and qualitative methods in a longitudinal study of family life. The knowledge interest of the project is the constitution of communality and individuality in everyday family life. This article presents the theoretical framework...... and the conceptualization of everyday family life of the social psychological research agenda in this field. The main line of argument is that ongoing modernization is synonymous with accelerated processes of detraditionalization and individualization. This calls for a re-conceptualisation of ‘the family’ which enables...

  14. The Family Album

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtslund, Anders

    This article systematically analyzes emerging practices of sorting, sharing and storing photos in everyday family life. I report from a study of how Danish families and school children implement and negotiate the use of digital technologies. The purpose is to investigate why digital technologies...... are used and how they potentially change the relation between parents and children. The more general ambition of our study is to significantly improve our understanding of the motives and consequences of the deep infiltration of technology into contemporary family life in a networked world. Our study draws...... on empirical data from in-depth interviews with 15 Danish families and 50 school children aged 13-16 during six months in 2017. Both parents and children use their digital devices, particularly smartphones, as cameras to document their lives and to share photos with others. However, the interviews show...

  15. Family Weight School treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowicka, Paulina; Höglund, Peter; Pietrobelli, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a Family Weight School treatment based on family therapy in group meetings with adolescents with a high degree of obesity. METHODS: Seventy-two obese adolescents aged 12-19 years old were referred to a childhood obesity center by pediatricians...... and school nurses and offered a Family Weight School therapy program in group meetings given by a multidisciplinary team. Intervention was compared with an untreated waiting list control group. Body mass index (BMI) and BMI z-scores were calculated before and after intervention. RESULTS: Ninety percent...... group with initial BMI z-score 3.5. CONCLUSIONS: Family Weight School treatment model might be suitable for adolescents with BMI z...

  16. Families talen en algebra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asveld, P.R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Operaties op formele talen geven aanleiding tot bijbehorende operatoren op families talen. Bepaalde onderwerpen uit de algebra (universele algebra, tralies, partieel geordende monoiden) kunnen behulpzaam zijn in de studie van verzamelingen van dergelijke operatoren.

  17. Family Medicine Didactics Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Dennis J; Brocato, Joseph; Yeazel, Mark

    2017-11-01

    All family medicine programs are required to provide specialty-specific didactic conferences for residents. Since a baseline study of family medicine didactic formats was published in 2000, training requirements have changed, core content has evolved, and new teaching strategies have been recommended. The present study examines the characteristics of current family medicine didactics, compares current and past conference format data, and identifies factors affecting content selection. The survey used in the prior conference formats study was distributed to all US family medicine programs. All questions from the original survey were repeated, and items regarding factors affecting conference content and threats to conferences were added. The survey response rate was 66%. The majority of family medicine programs endorse block formats for structuring conferences. Compared to the original study, programs are devoting significantly more hours to didactics on fewer days. Family medicine faculty and residents are responsible for 70% of didactic offerings (also a significant shift), and 87% of programs use a core curriculum. In over 70% of programs, some residents are unavailable for conferences due to work restrictions or service demands. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education subcompetencies and Milestones have only a moderate impact on topic selection. Family medicine didactics have evolved in the past 15 years with a notable increase in reliance upon core faculty and residents to lead conferences. Reduced availability of residents prevents all residents from having full exposure to the didactic curriculum. Family medicine faculty who are taking greater responsibility for didactics are also faced with increased clinical and administrative duties.

  18. The changing American family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, A; Freedman, D

    1983-10-01

    This Bulletin documents recent changes in American family patterns resulting both from longterm trends in urbanization, industrialization, and economic growth and the disruption of the Great Depression and World War 2, as well as changed attitudes toward marriage, parenthood, divorce, and the roles of women. Following a postwar boom in the 1950s and 1960s, marriage rates have now fallen to levels observed in the early 20th century. Since 1970, the number of unmarried couples living together has more than tripled to 1.9 million in 1983. The divorce rate has now stabilized after more than doubling since 1960, but at the current level, 1/2 of all recent marriages will end in divorce. Most divorced persons remarry fairly quickly, often creating complex families of "step-relatives." With 19% of households with minor children now headed by a women with no husband present, up to 1/2 of all children will live for sometime in a fatherless family before age 18. Over 1/2 of all married women, including 49% of married mothers of preschool children, now hold a paid job outside the home. Working wives boost a family's income by an average 40% but still are expected to shoulder most responsiblility for home and childcare. White women now in their 20s say they expect to have an average of 2 children, but are delaying childbearing to such an extent that 29% could end up childless. Most of the elderly live on their own but usually near children whom they see frequently. Despite changes in traditional family patterns, Americans consistently report that a happy marriage and good family are the most important aspects of life. And though most Americans now live with few or no family members, they maintain active contact with a large network of family.

  19. Swedish Family Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrstrom, Staffan

    1986-01-01

    Family policy remains one of the leading issues of Swedish domestic politics. All parties are agreed that families with children must be given a better deal in the wake of the economic crisis. But how is this to be done and how quickly can it be achieved? Is the expansion of day nursery facilities to be speeded up, or are parents to be given a…

  20. Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majda Schmidt Krajnc

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main part of the article presents the results of most recent empirical study about the qualify of life for families in Slovenia that have a child with intellectual disabilities and other developmental disabilities. Using the FQOLS-2006 we analysed nine quality of life domains (Health, Financial Well-Being, Family Relationships, Support from Others, Support Services, Influence of Values, Careers, Leisure, Community Interaction from the perspective of six measurement dimensions. The study also examines the differences among the measurement dimensions in the nine domains. The sample consisted of 44 families. We used descriptive statistics and inferential statistics (Friedman test. The Family Relationships domain had the highest average rating of all measured domains regarding the quality of family life.The results in the domain of Support from Others are not encouraging, in particular the domain of Support from Services. Families require powerful support programs of qualified professional teams as well as societal and political attention.