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Sample records for brannerite

  1. Interim report task 2: performance testing - task 2.4: natural mineral analog studies physical and chemical characteristics of brannerite in natural systems to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract B345772

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    Lumpkin, G R; Colella, M; Leung, S H F

    2000-04-30

    To investigate the long-term alteration behavior of brannerite, we have undertaken a study of 13 natural samples from various geological environments, including granites, granitic pegmatites, quartz veins, and placer deposits. Literature data and U-Th-Pb chemical dating carried out in this work indicate that the samples range in age from approximately 20 Ma to 1580 Ma. Where independent age data or estimates are available for comparison, the U-Th-Pb chemical ages are in reasonable agreement for the younger samples, but the older samples tend to show evidence for Pb loss (up to about 80%), a common feature of metamict Nb, Ta, and Ti oxide minerals. Our results show that many of the samples exhibit only minor alteration, usually within small patches, microfractures, or around the rims of the brannerite crystals. Other samples consist of variable amounts of unaltered and altered brannerite. Heavily altered samples may contain anatase and thorite as fine-grained alteration products. Certain samples exhibited fracturing of the associated rock matrix or mineral phase in the immediate vicinity of the brannerite grains. These fractures contain U bearing material and indicate that some U migrated locally from the source brannerite.

  2. Electrochemical behavior of [(Mn(Bpy))(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.24} and [(Mn(Bpy){sub 0.5})(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.62} inorganic–organic Brannerites in lithium and sodium cells

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    Fernández de Luis, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.fernandez@ehu.es [Departamento de Mineralogía y Petrología, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Ponrouch, Alexandre, E-mail: aponrouch@icmab.es [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC) Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Rosa Palacín, M., E-mail: rosa.palacin@icmab.es [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC) Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Karmele Urtiaga, M., E-mail: karmele.urtiaga@ehu.es [Departamento de Mineralogía y Petrología, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Arriortua, María I., E-mail: maribel.arriortua@ehu.es [Departamento de Mineralogía y Petrología, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    The performance of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} (MnV) and its [(Mn(Bpy))(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.16} (MnBpy) and [(Mn(Bpy){sub 0.5})(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.62}(MnBpy0.5) hybrid derivative compounds was investigated against sodium and lithium counter electrodes. For MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} stable capacities of 850 mAh/g were achieved in lithium cells, the best value reported so far. The whole capacity is ascribed to a conversion reaction in which the amorphization of the compounds takes place. No significant differences in the capacities for the inorganic compound and the hybrid ones were observed. Interestingly, the potential hysteresis decreases in the hybrid compounds. The difference between Li and Na cell capacity most probably comes from the difference of standard potential of the two redox couples Li{sup +}/Li and Na{sup +}/Na of about ca. 0.3 V leading to an incomplete conversion reaction and thus lowers capacity in the case of Na cells. The Raman and IR ex-situ experiments after cycling indicate that the bipyridine organic ligands are completely decomposed during the electrochemical testing. The IR studies in MnV inorganic and MnBpy and MnBpy0.5 hybrid electrodes after the electrochemical cycling, suggest that the SEI formation and bipyridine degradation give rise to different aliphatic compounds. - Graphical abstract: The electrochemical performance of [(Mn(Bpy))(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.16} and [(Mn(Bpy){sub 0.5})(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.62} against sodium and lithium counter electrodes give rise to the structural collapse of the initial compounds. The IR and Raman studies show that the Bpy organic ligand is completely decomposed during the during the electrochemical testing. However, after the amorphization stable capacities as high as 850 mAh/g for lithium cells were achieved. - Highlights: • We test the lithium and sodium insertion in hybrid brannerites. • Capacities as large as 850 mAh/g were obtained

  3. Processing of Sierra Albarrana uranium ores; Tratamiento de los minerales de uranio de Sierra Albarrana

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    Gutierrez Jodra, L.; Perez Luina, A.; Perarnau, M.

    1960-07-01

    Uranium recovery by hydrometallurgy from brannerite, found in Hornachuelos (Cordoba) is described. It has been studied the acid and alkaline leaching and salt roasting, proving as more satisfactory the acid leaching. Besides the uranium solubilization by acid leaching, is described the further process to obtain pure uranyl nitrate. (Author)

  4. Process for Making a Ceramic Composition for Immobilization of Actinides

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    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Walls, Philip A.; Brummond, William Allen; Armantrout, Guy A.; Curtis, Paul G.; Hobson, Beverly F.; Farmer, Joseph; Herman, Connie Cicero; Herman, David Thomas

    1999-06-22

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  5. Geochronology of Precambrian granites and associated U-Ti-Th mineralization, northern Olary province, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. R.; Cooper, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Proterozoic granitoids and metamorphic rocks in the Olary province of the Willyama block of South Australia host ore-grade amounts of U-Th-Ti and U-Fe-Ti-Th minerals. U-Pb-Th isotope analyses on zircons from all granitoids associated with the Crocker Well brannerite deposit indicate that these granitoids were intruded within a short time span, close to the 1579.2??1.5 m.y. age of the brannerite-bearing host-rock. Though the early Paleozoic Delamerian orogeny was intense in this region, the zircon isotopic systems remained unaffected; rather, the best-defined zircon chords on concordia plots show a welldefined lower intercept of 43.8??6.5 Ma, which can only be associated with early Tertiary block faulting. Pb-U-Th isotope analyses on brannerite from the Crocker Well deposit and davidite from the Mt. Victoria deposit and the Radium Hill deposit yield badly scattered and discordant apparent ages that suggest a primary age at least as old as the age of the Crocker Well granitoids, followed by a severe disturbance in the early Paleozoic. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Investigation of the stability of glass-ceramic composites containing CeTi 2 O 6 and CaZrTi 2 O 7 after ion implantation

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    Paknahad, Elham; Grosvenor, Andrew P.

    2017-12-01

    Glass-ceramic composite materials have been investigated for nuclear waste sequestration applications due to their ability to incorporate large amounts of radioactive waste elements. A key property that needs to be understood when developing nuclear waste sequestration materials is how the structure of the material responds to radioactive decay of nuclear waste elements, which can be simulated by high energy ion implantation. Borosilicate glass-ceramic composites containing brannerite-type (CeTi2O6) or zirconolite-type (CaZrTi2O7) oxides were synthesized at different annealing temperatures and investigated after being implanted with high-energy Au ions to mimic radiation induced structural damage. Backscattered electron (BSE) images were collected to investigate the interaction of the brannerite crystallites with the glass matrix before and after implantation and showed that the morphology of the crystallites in the composite materials were not affected by radiation damage. Surface sensitive Ti K-edge glancing angle XANES spectra collected from the implanted composite materials showed that the structures of the CeTi2O6 and CaZrTi2O7 ceramics were damaged as a result of implantation; however, analysis of Si L2,3-edge XANES spectra indicated that the glass matrix was not affected by ion implantation.

  7. Investigation of the stability of glass-ceramic composites containing CeTi2O6 and CaZrTi2O7 after ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Elham; Grosvenor, Andrew P.

    2017-12-01

    Glass-ceramic composite materials have been investigated for nuclear waste sequestration applications due to their ability to incorporate large amounts of radioactive waste elements. A key property that needs to be understood when developing nuclear waste sequestration materials is how the structure of the material responds to radioactive decay of nuclear waste elements, which can be simulated by high energy ion implantation. Borosilicate glass-ceramic composites containing brannerite-type (CeTi2O6) or zirconolite-type (CaZrTi2O7) oxides were synthesized at different annealing temperatures and investigated after being implanted with high-energy Au ions to mimic radiation induced structural damage. Backscattered electron (BSE) images were collected to investigate the interaction of the brannerite crystallites with the glass matrix before and after implantation and showed that the morphology of the crystallites in the composite materials were not affected by radiation damage. Surface sensitive Ti K-edge glancing angle XANES spectra collected from the implanted composite materials showed that the structures of the CeTi2O6 and CaZrTi2O7 ceramics were damaged as a result of implantation; however, analysis of Si L2,3-edge XANES spectra indicated that the glass matrix was not affected by ion implantation.

  8. Lithium vanado(Vmolybdate(VI, Li[VMoO6

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    Safa Ezzine Yahmed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Brannerite-type Li[VMoO6] has been synthesized by a solid state reaction route. The V and Mo atoms statistically occupy the same site with mirror symmetry and are octahedrally surrounded by O atoms. The framework is two-dimensional and is built up from edge-sharing (V,MoO6 octahedra forming (VMoO6∞ layers that run parallel to the (001 plane. Li+ ions are situated in position with symmetry 2/m in the interlayer space. The bond-valence analysis reveals that the Li+ ionic conductivity is along the [010] and [110] directions, and shows that this material may have interesting conduction properties. This simulation proposes a model of the lithium conduction pathways.

  9. RELATION BETWEEN EXPLOITATION MINES – RADIOACTIVITY IN THE MASSIF POIANA RUSCĂ

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    Gh. Rogobete

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The underground exploitation of the ores established many waste dumps. The mineralization with pechblenda, the main uranium ore, exists in lenticular layers of small thickness. The rocks with uranium mineralization recover in the waste dumps, increasing the level to the ionizing radiation exposition. In Tincota the radiation levels found where between 50 and 600 c/s, with maximum levels 600-1200 c/s in the waste dump. The road DJ 680 Caraşova-Voislova are the levels 800-1200 c/s, that is 2-3 times more than the dose accepted in the Norms. The magnetite are from Boul Peak is associated with a radioactive ore (brannerit and the road Ruschiţa-Voislova was contaminated, the levels at the flotation base near the road reached times more than normally.

  10. Technical Progress Report on Single Pass Flow Through Tests of Ceramic Waste Forms for Plutonium Immobilization

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    Zhao, P; Roberts, S; Bourcier, W

    2000-12-01

    This report updates work on measurements of the dissolution rates of single-phase and multi-phase ceramic waste forms in flow-through reactors at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Previous results were reported in Bourcier (1999). Two types of tests are in progress: (1) tests of baseline pyrochlore-based multiphase ceramics; and (2) tests of single-phase pyrochlore, zirconolite, and brannerite (the three phases that will contain most of the actinides). Tests of the multi-phase material are all being run at 25 C. The single-phase tests are being run at 25, 50, and 75 C. All tests are being performed at ambient pressure. The as-made bulk compositions of the ceramics are given in Table 1. The single pass flow-through test procedure [Knauss, 1986 No.140] allows the powdered ceramic to react with pH buffer solutions traveling upward vertically through the powder. Gentle rocking during the course of the experiment keeps the powder suspended and avoids clumping, and allows the system to behave as a continuously stirred reactor. For each test, a cell is loaded with approximately one gram of the appropriate size fraction of powdered ceramic and reacted with a buffer solution of the desired pH. The buffer solution compositions are given in Table 2. All the ceramics tested were cold pressed and sintered at 1350 C in air, except brannerite, which was sintered at 1350 C in a CO/CO{sub 2} gas mixture. They were then crushed, sieved, rinsed repeatedly in alcohol and distilled water, and the desired particle size fraction collected for the single pass flow-through tests (SPFT). The surface area of the ceramics measured by BET ranged from 0.1-0.35 m{sup 2}/g. The measured surface area values, average particle size, and sample weights for each ceramic test are given in the Appendices.

  11. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.1)

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    Boytsov, A., E-mail: boytsov@armz.ru [Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    'Full text:' The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342 409 tonnes of in situ or 288 768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261 768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and

  12. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.2)

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    Boytsov, A., E-mail: boytsov@armz.ru [Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342,409 tonnes of in situ or 288,768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261,768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5,000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and achieving full capacity

  13. New french uranium mineral species; Nouvelles especes uraniferes francaises

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    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1952-07-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; {beta} uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the {alpha} uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [French] Dans ce travail, les auteurs etudient les nouveaux mineraux uraniferes francais: parsonsite et renardite, phosphates hydrates de plomb et d'uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrate d'uranium et de plomb uranopilite: sulfate d'uranium hydrate; bayleyite: carbonate d'uranium et de magnesium hydrate; {beta} uranolite: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate. Pour tous ces mineraux, les auteurs donnent les caracteres cristallographiques, optiques, et les analyses chimiques quantitatives. Par contre, les especes suivantes, tres rares dans les gites francais, n'ont pas permis d'effectuer d'analyses quantitatives. Ce sont: l'ianthinite: oxyde uraneux hydrate; l'{alpha} uranotile: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate; le bassetite: phosphate d'uranium et de fer hydrate; la hosphuranylite: phosphate duranium hydrate; la becquerelite: oxyde d'uranium hydrate; la curite: oxyde d

  14. Enrichment of U-Se-Mo-Re-V in coals preserved within marine carbonate successions: geochemical and mineralogical data from the Late Permian Guiding Coalfield, Guizhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shifeng; Seredin, Vladimir V.; Ward, Colin R.; Hower, James C.; Xing, Yunwei; Zhang, Weiguo; Song, Weijiao; Wang, Peipei

    2015-02-01

    We present multi-element data on the super-high-organic-sulfur (SHOS; 5.19 % on average) coals of Late Permian age from Guiding, in Guizhou Province, China. The coals, formed on restricted carbonate platforms, are all highly enriched in S, U, Se, Mo, Re, V, and Cr, and, to a lesser extent, Ni and Cd. Although the Guiding coals were subjected to seawater influence, boron is very low and mainly occurs in tourmaline and mixed-layer illite/smectite. Uranium, Mo, and V in the coal are mainly associated with the organic matter. In addition, a small proportion of the U occurs in coffinite and brannerite. The major carrier of Se is pyrite rather than marcasite. Rhenium probably occurs in secondary sulfate and carbonate minerals. The U-bearing coal deposits have the following characteristics: the formation age is limited to Late Permian; concentrations of sulfur and rare metals (U, Se, Mo, Re, V, and in some cases, rare earth elements and Y) are highly elevated; the U-bearing coal beds are intercalated with marine carbonate rocks; organic sulfur and rare metals are uniformly distributed within the coal seams; and the combustion products (e.g., fly and bottom ash) derived from the coal deposits may have potential economic significance for rare metals: U, Se, Mo, Re, V, rare earth elements, and Y.

  15. How temperature influences the stoichiometry of CeTi2O6

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    Huynh, Lana T.; Eger, Shaylin B.; Walker, James D. S.; Hayes, John R.; Gaultois, Michael W.; Grosvenor, Andrew P.

    2012-06-01

    Of the many materials examined for the sequestration of nuclear waste, Ti oxides have received considerable attention. Brannerite (UTi2O6), in particular, has been studied extensively for this application. The Ce analogue of this material (CeTi2O6) has been widely investigated instead of the actinide versions owing to the reduced safety hazards and because Ce has similar crystal chemistry to U and Pu. In this study, examination of Ti K-, Ce L3-, and Ce M4,5-edge XANES spectra lead to the conclusion that CeTi2O6 was O-deficient when synthesized at high temperature and then quench cooled, and that the degree of O-deficiency was reduced upon post-annealing at lower temperatures. These observations can be ascribed to a temperature-dependant Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple. This investigation suggests that Ce-containing materials may not properly simulate the actinide-bearing analogues; however, CeTi2O6 could be useful for other applications, such as catalysis.

  16. Redetermination of metarossite, CaV5+2O6·2H2O

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    Anaïs Kobsch

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of metarossite, ideally CaV2O6·2H2O [chemical name: calcium divanadium(V hexaoxide dihydrate], was first determined using precession photographs, with fixed isotropic displacement parameters and without locating the positions of the H atoms, leading to a reliability factor R = 0.11 [Kelsey & Barnes (1960. Can. Mineral. 6, 448–466]. This communication reports a structure redetermination of this mineral on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data of a natural sample from the Blue Cap mine, San Juan County, Utah, USA (R1 = 0.036. Our study not only confirms the structural topology reported in the previous study, but also makes possible the refinement of all non-H atoms with anisotropic displacement parameters and all H atoms located. The metarossite structure is characterized by chains of edge-sharing [CaO8] polyhedra parallel to [100] that are themselves connected by chains of alternating [VO5] trigonal bipyramids parallel to [010]. The two H2O molecules are bonded to Ca. Analysis of the displacement parameters show that the [VO5] chains librate around [010]. In addition, we measured the Raman spectrum of metarossite and compared it with IR and Raman data previously reported. Moreover, heating of metarossite led to a loss of water, which results in a transformation to the brannerite-type structure, CaV2O6, implying a possible dehydration pathway for the compounds M2+V2O6·xH2O, with M = Cu, Cd, Mg or Mn, and x = 2 or 4.

  17. Interim report on task 1.2: near equilibrium processing requirements - attrition milling part 1 of 2 to Lawrence Livermore National for contract b345772

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    Stewart, M W A; Vance, E R; Day, R A; Eddowes, T; Moricca, S

    2000-04-30

    The objective of Task 1.2 has only partly been achieved as the work on Pu/U-formulations and to a significant degree on Th/U-formulations has been performed under grinding/blending conditions that did not replicate plant-like fabrication processes, particularly in the case with the small glovebox attritor. Nevertheless the results do show that actinide-rich particles, not present in specimens made via the alkoxide-route (equilibrium conditions), occur when the grinding process is not efficient enough to ensure that high-fired PuO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} particles are below a critical size. Our current perception is that the critical size for specimens sintered at 1350 C for 4 hours is about 5 {micro}m in diameter. The critical size is difficult to estimate, as it is equal to the starting diameter of actinide oxides just visible within brannerite regions. Our larger scale attritor experiments as well as experience with wet and dry ball milling suggests that acceptable mineralogy and microstructure can be obtained by dry milling via attritor and ball mills. This is provided that appropriate attention is paid to the size and density of the grinding media, grinding additives that reduce caking of the powder, and in the case of attritors the grinding speed and pot setup. The ideal products for sintering are free flowing granules of {approx} 100 {micro}m containing constituents ground to about 1 {micro}m to ensure homogeneity and equilibrium mineralogy.

  18. Elemental imaging of organic matter and metal associations in ore deposits using micro-PIXE and micro-EBS

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    Fuchs, S., E-mail: sebastian.fuchs@mail.mcgill.ca [Earth and Planetary Science, McGill University, Montreal, (Canada); Przybylowicz, W.J., E-mail: przybylowicz@tlabs.ac.za [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation (South Africa)

    2013-07-01

    phases and the formation of new minerals (sericite, brannerite, pyrophyllite). The results give strong evidence that Au and U were transported by circulating aqueous and/or insoluble organic phases and precipitated in solidified bitumen seams and nodules. (author)

  19. Investigations on uranium sorption on bentonite and montmorillonite, respectively, and uranium in environmental samples; Untersuchungen zur Uransorption an Bentonit bzw. Montmorillonit sowie von Uran in Umweltproben

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    Azeroual, Mohamed

    2010-09-22

    uranium releases from tailings into the aquatic system. The results showed that uranium(VI) speciation in water samples is controlled by pH as well as bicarbonate and calcium concentrations and is dominated by the very stable aquatic complexes Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(OH){sub 3}{sup -} and UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-}. Influences of humic substances or phosphate ligands on uranium(VI) complexation were not detected. Uranium association with aquatic colloids in the studied samples as found to be negligible. With the help of a combination of the AREM-EDX method and batch experiments, uraninite (UO{sub 2}) and brannerite (UTi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) could be identified with an occurrence frequency of about 67 % and 33 %, respectively. This combination allowed the conclusion that uranium release from tailing materials is controlled by the dissolution of uraninite, which itself is governed by the dissolution of calcite. Furthermore, a mobilisation of uraninite colloids smaller than 200 nm from tailing material into the used model solutions was observed.