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Sample records for brannerite

  1. Heavy ion irradiation effects of brannerite-type ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, J.; Wang, L.M.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Ewing, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    Brannerite, UTi 2 O 6 , occurs in polyphase Ti-based, crystalline ceramics that are under development for plutonium immobilization. In order to investigate radiation effects caused by α-decay events of Pu, a 1 MeV Kr + irradiation on UTi 2 O 6 , ThTi 2 O 6 , CeTi 2 O 6 and a more complex material, composed of Ca-containing brannerite and pyrochlore, was performed over a temperature range of 25-1020 K. The ion irradiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transformation was observed in all brannerite samples. The critical amorphization temperatures of the different brannerite compositions are: 970 K, UTi 2 O 6 ; 990 K, ThTi 2 O 6 ; 1020 K, CeTi 2 O 6 . The systematic increase in radiation resistance from Ce-, Th- to U-brannerite is related to the difference of mean atomic mass of A-site cation in the structure. As compared with the pyrochlore structure-type, brannerite phases are more susceptible to ion irradiation-induced amorphization. The effects of structure and chemical compositions on radiation resistance of brannerite-type and pyrochlore-type ceramics are discussed

  2. Apatite-brannerite-pitchblende association in hydrothermal quartz veins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, B.V.; Mel'nikova, A.M.; Osipov, B.S.; Pavlov, E.G.

    1976-01-01

    A study into the vein quartz mineralization confined to the tectonic zones of crush and silicification in sedimentary-igneous rocks of the lower Paleozoic has been made. The physicochemical characteristics of minerals were studied by way of optical and electron microscopy, chemical, laser-microspectral and X-ray structural analyses, microprobing and alpha-microradiography. 3 mineral associations have been discriminated, representative of the sequence of hydrothermal mineralization. An unusual parogenesis of pitchblende and brannerite with apatite, xenotime and more recent goethite has been revealed. The results are indicative of a medium-low-temperature hydrothermal process occurring at the final stages of formation of uraniferrous quartz veins. By composition and mineralization sequence, the latters are close to low- and medium-temperature uranium-quartz-chlorite-hydromica formations with apatite, coffinite, brannerite and pitchblende. The weak initial metamictization of goethite in veins 80 to 100 million years old is due to the radioactive effect of the submicroscopic radioactive mineral impurity on the crystalline lattice

  3. A kinetic model of the oxidative dissolution of brannerite, UTi2O6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.S.; Zhang, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The aqueous dissolution of synthetic brannerite (UTi 2 O 6 ) in an open atmosphere has been investigated. Previous data in the literature have been combined with new experimental work, dealing with the release of uranium from brannerite as a function of solution pH and aqueous carbonate species, in oxygenated solutions. From these data we have developed a conceptual model for uranium release from brannerite consisting of two reaction steps: oxidation of surface uranium(IV) atoms, and subsequent detachment of U(VI) atoms into solution, which is catalysed by surface coordination with protons (acidic media) or carbonate species (alkaline media in equilibrium with the atmosphere). A kinetic rate law is derived for this simple reaction mechanism and fitted to experimental data. The resulting predictive equation for uranium release qualitatively describes the pH-dependent behaviour observed in experiment, and quantitatively gives an upper limit for uranium release from brannerite over a range of conditions and experiment types. (orig.)

  4. A scheme for the complete elemental characterisation of brannerite mineral using ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premadas, A.; Bose, Roopa

    2013-01-01

    Brannerite occurs along with other refractory minerals in pegmatite veins. Literature survey indicates lack of systematic and detailed chemical analysis procedure for brannerites. This paper report suitable sample decomposition procedures, yielding stable sample solution, suitable for the ICP-AES determination of major, minor and certain trace elements normally associated with brannerite mineral. Three different simple decomposition procedures such as (i) acid digestion (ii) fusion with lithium metaborate (iii) fusion with mixture of tetra sodium pyrophosphate and monosodium dihydrogen phosphate are used to obtain the sample solution for elemental analysis. In presence of higher concentrations of uranium and titanium, the major elements in brannerite mineral, a detailed study of the influence of uranium and titanium on ICP-AES determination of other elements, three commonly used emission lines of each element was carried out. The REEs, Y, Sc and Th have been determined after the removal of major matrix elements using oxalate precipitation. The accuracy of the proposed procedures is established by analyzing synthetic brannerite samples prepared by mixing high purity oxides or chlorides in a proportion similar to natural brannerite samples. The results indicate the method is accurate. The reproducibility studies carried out on one sample shows the % RSD varied from 2 to 5%. (author)

  5. A crystal-structure refinement of synthetic brannerite, UTi2O6, and its bearing on rate of alkaline-carbonate leaching of brannerite in ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanski, J.T.; Scott, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The crystal structure of synthetic, stoichiometric brannerite, UTi 2 O 6 , has been refined to R=2.23% from MoKα radiation. Monoclinic, with space group C2/m, a 9.8123(15), b 3.7697(6), c 6.9253(9) A, β 118.957(6) 0 , brannerite is isostructural with thoruitite, ThTi 2 O 6 (Ruh β Wadsley 1966). The co-ordination of U by O is distorted octahedral, the bond distances being 2 x 2.252(2), 4 x 2.296(1) A. There is an additional pair of short nonbonded U-O contacts, 2 x 2.824(2) A. The co-ordination around Ti is also distorted octahedral, with the Ti-O distance between 1.854(3) and 2.104(3) A. The depth of penetration of an alkaline-carbonate leaching solution into natural brannerite from Eldorado, Saskatchewan, has been found to vary nonuniformly with both time and crystallographic direction of leaching attack. The rate of dissolution for a free crystal is 1.33 cubic micrometers per second or, using the density calculated from the cell data, 8.5 x 10 -12 g/s

  6. Synthesis and characterization of brannerite wasteforms for the immobilization of mixed oxide fuel residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, D.J.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    A possible method for the reduction of civil Pu stockpiles is the reuse of Pu in mixed oxide fuel (MOX). During MOX fuel production, residues unsuitable for further recycle will be produced. Due to their high actinide content MOX residues require immobilization within a robust host matrix. Although it is possible to immobilize actinides in vitreous wasteforms; ceramic phases, such as brannerite (UTi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), are attractive due to their high waste loading capacity and relative insolubility. A range of uranium brannerite, formulated Gd{sub x}U{sub 1-x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6}, were prepared using a mixed oxide route. Charge compensation of divalent and trivalent cations was expected to occur via the oxidation of U{sup 4+} to higher valence states (U{sup 5+} or U{sup 6+}). Gd{sup 3+} was added to act as a neutron absorber in the final Pu bearing wasteform. X-ray powder diffraction of synthesised specimens found that phase distribution was strongly affected by processing atmosphere (air or Ar). In all cases prototypical brannerite was formed accompanied by different secondary phases dependent on processing atmosphere. Microstructural analysis (SEM) of the sintered samples confirmed the results of the X-ray powder diffraction. The preliminary results presented here indicate that brannerite is a promising host matrix for mixed oxide fuel residues. (authors)

  7. Use of emanation thermal analysis to characterize thermal reactivity of brannerite mineral

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balek, V.; Vance, E.R.; Zeleňák, V.; Málek, Z.; Šubrt, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 1 (2007), s. 93-98 ISSN 1388-6150 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LA 292; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 879 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : brannerite * emanation thermal analysis Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2007

  8. Mineralogy and geochemistry of phosphate minerals and brannerite from the Proterozoic Carbon Leader Reef gold and uranium placer deposit, Witwatersrand, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberthuer, T.

    1987-01-01

    Yttrium-phosphate, the most common phosphate phase, is closely associated with detrital uraninite. It is assumed having formed by the reaction of mobile phosphate with Y and HREE liberated from the lattice of detrital uraninite, during diagenesis and/or metamorphism of the sediments. Authigenic brannerite (UTi 2-3 O 6-8 ) is well-defined microscopically and geochemically. Textural relationships indicate that both titanium migrated to uraninite, forming brannerite, and mobile uranium caused the 'branneritization' of rutile/leucoxene. Microprobe analyses demonstrate that brannerite from the Carbon Leader Reef displays a distinct and small variation of UO 2 /TiO 2 ratios, which lie close to the theoretical value of 1.117 for UTi 3 O 8 , in contrast to uraniferous leucoxene/brannerite from other Witwatersrand-type deposits, the latter showing a wide scatter of UO 2 /TiO 2 ratios. (orig./HP)

  9. Uraninite, coffinite and brannerite from shear-zone hosted uranium deposits of the Bohemian Massif (Central European Variscan belt)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    René, Miloš; Dolníček, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 50. ISSN 2075-163X Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : uranium deposits * mineralogy * uraninite * coffinite * brannerite * Moldanubian Zone * Bohemian Massif Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 2.088, year: 2016 http://www.mdpi.com/2075-163X/7/4/50

  10. Uraninite, Coffinite and Brannerite from Shear-Zone Hosted Uranium Deposits of the Bohemian Massif (Central European Variscan Belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš René

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available New mineralogical data are presented for shear-zone hosted uranium mineralisation from selected uranium deposits that occur in the Bohemian Massif. The uranium mineralisation is in high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Moldanubian Zone and/or in granitic rocks of the Moldanubian batholith and Bor pluton as complex uraninite–coffinite and uraninite–coffinite–brannerite assemblages. For analysed coffinites and brannerites, anomalous enrichment of Y (up to 3.4 wt % Y2O3 and Zr (up to 13.8 wt % ZrO2 is significant. The microprobe data indicate that coffinites from the Rožná and Okrouhlá Radouň uranium deposits contain variable PbO (0–4.3 wt %, FeO (0–2.5 wt %, Al2O3 (0–3.5 wt %, P2O5 (0–1.8 wt %, and CaO (0.7–3.5 wt %. Brannerite is present in unaltered and altered grains with variable concentrations of U4+ (0–0.5 apfu, U6+ (0.06–0.49 apfu, Ti (0.90–2.63 apfu, Ca (0.09–0.41 apfu, and low concentrations of Al (0–0.19 apfu, Th (0–0.04 apfu, Y (0–0.08 apfu, Zr (0–0.13 apfu and REE (0–0.14 apfu.

  11. K-Ar age and tectonic setting of brannerite-mineralized Futagojima granodiorite, Koshiki Islands, Southern Kyushu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Shunso; Shibata, Ken; Terashima, Shigeru

    1984-01-01

    Futagojima granodiorite, which was previously thought to be a part of Cretaceous Ryoke granitoids, is turned out to be upper Miocene granitoids (7.5 Ma). The granodiorite contains magnetite and is depleted in lithophile components. This is characteristics of magnetite-series granitoids in the Green Tuff terrains. All the Miocene granitoids in Koshiki Islands are relatively mafic consisting of hornblende-bearing facies such as quartz diorite, tonalite and granodiorite; thus belonging to I-type magnetite series. These rocks are considered to have generated at depth and formed along a rift zone during Miocene time (13 - 7 Ma). Thus, Koshiki Islands may represent an aborted rift at margin of the Danjo basin. Miocene granitoids of Koshiki Islands are small stocks but magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits are only seen in Futagojima. This localization of mineralization is explained by a high degree of magmatic fractionation, which is only observed in Futagojima and by a low rate of erosion to preserve the mineralized horizons. Mineralization here is unique having brannerite-magnetite and chalcopyrite-molybdenite-quartz assemblages. No gold and silver were detected from the vein-type deposit. (author)

  12. Electrochemical behavior of [(Mn(Bpy))(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.24} and [(Mn(Bpy){sub 0.5})(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.62} inorganic–organic Brannerites in lithium and sodium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández de Luis, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.fernandez@ehu.es [Departamento de Mineralogía y Petrología, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Ponrouch, Alexandre, E-mail: aponrouch@icmab.es [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC) Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Rosa Palacín, M., E-mail: rosa.palacin@icmab.es [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC) Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Karmele Urtiaga, M., E-mail: karmele.urtiaga@ehu.es [Departamento de Mineralogía y Petrología, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Arriortua, María I., E-mail: maribel.arriortua@ehu.es [Departamento de Mineralogía y Petrología, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    The performance of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} (MnV) and its [(Mn(Bpy))(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.16} (MnBpy) and [(Mn(Bpy){sub 0.5})(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.62}(MnBpy0.5) hybrid derivative compounds was investigated against sodium and lithium counter electrodes. For MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} stable capacities of 850 mAh/g were achieved in lithium cells, the best value reported so far. The whole capacity is ascribed to a conversion reaction in which the amorphization of the compounds takes place. No significant differences in the capacities for the inorganic compound and the hybrid ones were observed. Interestingly, the potential hysteresis decreases in the hybrid compounds. The difference between Li and Na cell capacity most probably comes from the difference of standard potential of the two redox couples Li{sup +}/Li and Na{sup +}/Na of about ca. 0.3 V leading to an incomplete conversion reaction and thus lowers capacity in the case of Na cells. The Raman and IR ex-situ experiments after cycling indicate that the bipyridine organic ligands are completely decomposed during the electrochemical testing. The IR studies in MnV inorganic and MnBpy and MnBpy0.5 hybrid electrodes after the electrochemical cycling, suggest that the SEI formation and bipyridine degradation give rise to different aliphatic compounds. - Graphical abstract: The electrochemical performance of [(Mn(Bpy))(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.16} and [(Mn(Bpy){sub 0.5})(VO{sub 3}){sub 2}]≈(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.62} against sodium and lithium counter electrodes give rise to the structural collapse of the initial compounds. The IR and Raman studies show that the Bpy organic ligand is completely decomposed during the during the electrochemical testing. However, after the amorphization stable capacities as high as 850 mAh/g for lithium cells were achieved. - Highlights: • We test the lithium and sodium insertion in hybrid brannerites. • Capacities as large as 850 mAh/g were obtained

  13. Mineralogy, geologic and physico-chemical characteristics of uranotitanate formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, K.G.; Miguta, A.K.; Polyakova, V.M.; Rumyantseva, G.V.

    1979-01-01

    Results of experimental and field study of varieties of brannerite and davidite are described. Special attention is paid to medium-low temperature variety of brannerite, which is the component of the majority of known uranotitanate ores. Natural concentrations of uranium are characterized: geologic peculiarities of their localization, mineral paragenesis, periore alterations. Syntheses of brannerite and davidite have been realized for the first time under hydrothermal conditions. Complex multiphase products of uranium titanate transformation, decomposition reactions of brannerite into constituent oxides in particular. Peculiarities of uranium and titanium migration in aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures are discussed. The processes of brannerite and davidite formation in hydrothermal conditions and from the melts are considered. Application of thermodynamic calculations of equilibria to the reactions of solid phase formation out of diluted ( -6 M) solutions and to the solid dispersoids in general is found to be erroneous as the formation of the latters is connected with kinetic phenomena

  14. Uranium-bearing and associated minerals in their geochemical and sedimentological context, Elliot Lake, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    The depositional energy environment of the Rio Algom-Denison ore reef was investigated on a regional scale using several parameters including pebble size. Regional trends of decreasing pebble size coincide with the regional direction of sediment transport. Pebble size was also used to characterize the depositional energy environment at the sample level. Quartz-pebble size and pyrite-grain size as determined from the same samples have a correlation coefficient of 0.93 which indicates that the coarse granular pyrite is detrital. Bulk chemical analyses of selected elements (U, Th, Pb, Ti, Ce, La, Y and Zr) which were chosen to reflect specific minerals (uraninite, brannerite, monazite and zircon), showed strong correlation with quartz-pebble size of the respective samples. Electron microprobe analyses of uraninite and brannerite are reported. The uraninites have typical pegmatitic compositions. Several types of brannerite are described; the conclusion reached is that although some brannerite may be detrital, most of it formed by adsorption of uranium onto titania collectors. Redistribution of some of the uranium has not changed the placer nature of the ore reef. Genesis of individual minerals (pyrite, uraninite, brannerite, zircon and monazite) is discussed. It is concluded that the mineralogy and its geochemical expression have been controlled by processes of fluvial deposition. As a result of the regional patterns in depositional environment, the ore reef shows a broad mineralogical zoning. Fluctuations in depositional energy have also produced lithologically related mineral zoning on a smaller scale. (author)

  15. Mode of distribution of uranium mineralization and sequence of the formation of minerals in albitites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechishnikov, N.P.; Kramar, O.A.; Rapovich, F.I.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of analysis and generalization of factural material data on the distribution nature of accessory uranium mineralization in albitites permitting to judge of the role and textural-structural peculiarities of enclosing rocks in mineralization localization are given. It is shown that the uranium mineral formation is closely related with the albitite formation and proceeded during two stages. A main mass of primary uranium minerals (brannerites and uraninites) in the form of impregnated mineralization was formed during the first uraninite-brannerite-albitite stage. Uranium oxides, silicates and titanates in the shape of veines formed. During the second coffinite-pitchblende-chloritic stage the formation of uranium oxides, silicates and titanates occured. Uranium mineralization in albitites developes in zones of cataclasm, small jointing, mylonitization localizing in fine-grained aggregates. A main mass of primary uranium minerals in albitites (brannerite, uraninite relates to neogenic during metasomatosis dark-coloured minerals (riebenite, aegirine, chlorite)

  16. Alteration of granitoids and crystalline rocks and uranium mineralisation in the Bor pluton area, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    René, Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 81, Part 1 (2017), s. 188-200 ISSN 0169-1368 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Central European variscides * uranium mineralisation * aceite * brannerite Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 3.095, year: 2016

  17. Processing of Sierra Albarrana uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Jodra, L.; Perez Luina, A.; Perarnau, M.

    1960-01-01

    Uranium recovery by hydrometallurgy from brannerite, found in Hornachuelos (Cordoba) is described. It has been studied the acid and alkaline leaching and salt roasting, proving as more satisfactory the acid leaching. Besides the uranium solubilization by acid leaching, is described the further process to obtain pure uranyl nitrate. (Author)

  18. Processing of Sierra Albarrana uranium ores; Tratamiento de los minerales de uranio de Sierra Albarrana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Jodra, L; Perez Luina, A; Perarnau, M

    1960-07-01

    Uranium recovery by hydrometallurgy from brannerite, found in Hornachuelos (Cordoba) is described. It has been studied the acid and alkaline leaching and salt roasting, proving as more satisfactory the acid leaching. Besides the uranium solubilization by acid leaching, is described the further process to obtain pure uranyl nitrate. (Author)

  19. Uranium deposits of the Asian sector of Pacific ocean ore belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskij, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Brief description of three basic types of uranium ore deposits in the Asian sector of the Pacific Ocean ore belt, namely uranium-molybdenum vein deposits in the continental volcanic depressions, proper uranium-molybdenum vein deposits in the mesozoic granites and gold-brannerite deposits of the rejuvenated early-proterosoic fractures is given. Schemes of various deposits are presented, petrological and isotope data (K-Ar method) are considered and petro- and oregenesis are analyzed. refs., 9 figs

  20. Uranium behaviour in the process of tectonite formation in zones of abyssal factures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, V.I.; Berezina, L.A.; Sannikova, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The patterns of distribution, concentration and manifestation of uranium and thorium in tectonic formations of different ages, in deep fault zones, have been determined. It has been established that the stage of plastic deformations was not accompanied by a supply of U. The state of brittle deformations, accompanied by an intensive supply of U, is characterized by superimposed U concentrated, primarily, in melanocratic rock-forming minerals, as well as in fissures, in the form of brannerite and pitchblende

  1. Provenance of radioactive placers, Big Meadow area, Valley and Boise Counties, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truesdell, D.; Wegrzyn, R.; Dixon, M.

    1977-02-01

    For many years, radioactive black-sand placers have been known to be present in the Bear Valley area of west-central Idaho. The largest of these is in Big Meadow, near the head of Bear Valley Creek. Presence of these placers suggests that low-grade uranium deposits might occur in rocks of the Idaho Batholith, adjacent to Bear Valley. This study was undertaken to locate the provenance of the radioactive minerals and to identify problems that need to be solved before undertaking further investigations. The principal radioactive minerals in these placers are monazite and euxenite. Other minerals include columbite, samarskite, fergusonite, xenotime, zircon, allanite, sphene, and brannerite. Only brannerite is a uranium mineral; the others contain uranium as an impurity in crystal lattices. Radiometric determinations of the concentration of uranium in stream sediments strongly indicate that the radioactive materials originate in an area drained by Casner and Howard Creeks. Equivalent uranium levels in bedrock are highest on the divide between Casner and Howard Creeks. However, this area is not known to contain low-grade uranium occurrences. Euxenite, brannerite, columbite-tantalite, samarskite, and allanite are the principal radioactive minerals that were identified in rock samples. These minerals were found in granite pegmatites, granites, and quartz monzonites. Appreciably higher equivalent uranium concentrations were also found within these rock types. The major problem encountered in this study was the difficulty in mapping bedrock because of extensive soil and glacial mantle. A partial solution to this problem might be the application of radon emanometry so that radiometric measurements would not be limited to the sparse bedrock samples

  2. Preconcentration of low-grade uranium ores with environmentally acceptable tailings, part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, D.; Raicevic, M.; McCarthy, D.R.

    1979-08-01

    The low-grade ore sample used for this investigation originated from Agnew Lake Mines Limited, Espanola, Ontario. It contained about 1% pyrite and 0.057% uranium, mainly as uranothorite with a small amount of brannerite. Both of these minerals occur in the quartz-sericite matrix of a conglomerate. A preconcentration process has been developed to give a high uranium recovery, reject pyrite, radium and thorium from the ore and produce environmentally acceptable tailings. This process applies flotation in combination with high intensity magnetic separation and gravity concentration

  3. Les minéralisations Cu_(Ni_Bi_U_Au_Ag) d'Ifri (district du Haut Seksaoua, Maroc) : apport de l'étude texturale au débat syngenèse versus épigenèseThe Cu_(Ni_Bi_U_Au_Ag) mineralization of Ifri ('Haut Seksaoua' district, Morocco): contribution of a textural study to the discussion syngenetic versus epigenetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanson, Luc; Chauvet, Alain; Gaouzi, Aziz; Badra, Lakhifi; Mechiche, Mohamed; Touray, Jean Claude; Oukarou, Saı̈d

    2003-11-01

    The Cu ore of Ifri is a chalcopyrite stockwork hosted by Cambrian formations and was until now interpreted as a syngenetic massive sulphide deposit. Textural studies highlight two generations of pyrite early (Py I) and late (Py II) with respect to the regional deformation. The chalcopyrite stockwork overprinted Py II, outlining the epigenetic nature of the Cu mineralization. Regarding the origin of Cu-depositing fluids, the presence in the stockwork paragenesis of an U, W, Sn association and preliminary Pb/Pb dating of a brannerite belonging to this association suggest a contribution of the Tichka granite. To cite this article: L. Barbanson et al., C. R. Geoscience 335 (2003).

  4. Corrosion behavior of pyroclore-rich titanate ceramics for plutonium disposition; impurity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakel, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    The baseline ceramic contains Ti, U, Ca, Hf, Gd, and Ce, and is made up of only four phases, pyrochlore, zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite. The impurities present in the three other ceramics represent impurities expected in the feed, and result in different phase distributions. The results from 3 day, 90 C MCC-1 tests with impurity ceramics were significantly different than the results from tests with the baseline ceramic. Overall, the addition of impurities to these titanate ceramics alters the phase distributions, which in turn, affects the corrosion behavior

  5. Investigation of the stability of glass-ceramic composites containing CeTi2O6 and CaZrTi2O7 after ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Elham; Grosvenor, Andrew P.

    2017-12-01

    Glass-ceramic composite materials have been investigated for nuclear waste sequestration applications due to their ability to incorporate large amounts of radioactive waste elements. A key property that needs to be understood when developing nuclear waste sequestration materials is how the structure of the material responds to radioactive decay of nuclear waste elements, which can be simulated by high energy ion implantation. Borosilicate glass-ceramic composites containing brannerite-type (CeTi2O6) or zirconolite-type (CaZrTi2O7) oxides were synthesized at different annealing temperatures and investigated after being implanted with high-energy Au ions to mimic radiation induced structural damage. Backscattered electron (BSE) images were collected to investigate the interaction of the brannerite crystallites with the glass matrix before and after implantation and showed that the morphology of the crystallites in the composite materials were not affected by radiation damage. Surface sensitive Ti K-edge glancing angle XANES spectra collected from the implanted composite materials showed that the structures of the CeTi2O6 and CaZrTi2O7 ceramics were damaged as a result of implantation; however, analysis of Si L2,3-edge XANES spectra indicated that the glass matrix was not affected by ion implantation.

  6. Investigation of the stability of glass-ceramic composites containing CeTi 2 O 6 and CaZrTi 2 O 7 after ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paknahad, Elham; Grosvenor, Andrew P.

    2017-12-01

    Glass-ceramic composite materials have been investigated for nuclear waste sequestration applications due to their ability to incorporate large amounts of radioactive waste elements. A key property that needs to be understood when developing nuclear waste sequestration materials is how the structure of the material responds to radioactive decay of nuclear waste elements, which can be simulated by high energy ion implantation. Borosilicate glass-ceramic composites containing brannerite-type (CeTi2O6) or zirconolite-type (CaZrTi2O7) oxides were synthesized at different annealing temperatures and investigated after being implanted with high-energy Au ions to mimic radiation induced structural damage. Backscattered electron (BSE) images were collected to investigate the interaction of the brannerite crystallites with the glass matrix before and after implantation and showed that the morphology of the crystallites in the composite materials were not affected by radiation damage. Surface sensitive Ti K-edge glancing angle XANES spectra collected from the implanted composite materials showed that the structures of the CeTi2O6 and CaZrTi2O7 ceramics were damaged as a result of implantation; however, analysis of Si L2,3-edge XANES spectra indicated that the glass matrix was not affected by ion implantation.

  7. The origin of the Avram Iancu U-Ni-Co-Bi-As mineralization, Băiţa (Bihor) metallogenic district, Bihor Mts., Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajzon, Norbert; Szentpéteri, Krisztián; Szakáll, Sándor; Kristály, Ferenc

    2015-10-01

    The Băiţa metallogenic district in the Bihor Mountains is a historically important mining area in Romania. Uranium mining took place between 1952 and 1998 from various deposits, but very little is known about the geology and mineralogy of these deposits. In this paper, we describe geology and mineralogy of uranium mineralization of the Avram Iancu uranium mine from waste dump samples collected before complete remediation of the site. Texturally and mineralogically complex assemblages of nickeline, cobaltite-gersdorffite solid solution, native Bi, Bi-sulfosalts, molybdenite, and pyrite-chalcopyrite-sphalerite occur with uraninite, "pitchblende," and brannerite in most of the ore samples. The association of nickel, cobalt, and arsenic with uranium is reminiscent of five-element association of vein type U-Ni-Co-Bi-As deposits; however, the Avram Iancu ores appear to be more replacement-type stratiform/stratabound. Avram Iancu ore samples contain multistage complex, skarn, uranium sulfide, arsenide assemblages that can be interpreted to have been formed in the retrograde cooling stages of the skarn hydrothermal system. This mineralizing system may have built-up along Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene "Banatite" intrusions of diorite-to-granite composition. The intrusions crosscut the underlying uraniferous Permian formations in the stacked NW-verging Biharia Nappe System. The mineralization forms stacked, multilayer replacement horizons, along carbonate-rich lithologies within the metavolcanic (tuffaceous) Muncel Series. Mineral paragenesis and some mineral chemistry suggest moderate-to-high <450, i.e., 350-310 °C, formation temperatures for the uranium sulfide stage along stratigraphically controlled replacement zones and minor veins. Uranium minerals formed abundantly in this early stage and include botryoidal, sooty and euhedral uraninite, brannerite, and coffinite. Later and/or lower-temperature mineral assemblages include heterogeneous, complexly zoned arsenide

  8. RELATION BETWEEN EXPLOITATION MINES – RADIOACTIVITY IN THE MASSIF POIANA RUSCĂ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Rogobete

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The underground exploitation of the ores established many waste dumps. The mineralization with pechblenda, the main uranium ore, exists in lenticular layers of small thickness. The rocks with uranium mineralization recover in the waste dumps, increasing the level to the ionizing radiation exposition. In Tincota the radiation levels found where between 50 and 600 c/s, with maximum levels 600-1200 c/s in the waste dump. The road DJ 680 Caraşova-Voislova are the levels 800-1200 c/s, that is 2-3 times more than the dose accepted in the Norms. The magnetite are from Boul Peak is associated with a radioactive ore (brannerit and the road Ruschiţa-Voislova was contaminated, the levels at the flotation base near the road reached times more than normally.

  9. Uranium-Bearing Srilankite from High-Pressure Garnetites of the Southern Urals: First Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottman, I. A.; Pushkarev, E. V.; Khiller, V. V.

    2018-04-01

    This work presents the results of studying srilankite, a rare zirconium titanate (ZrTi2O6), associated with ilmenite, rutile, zircon, uraninite, and other minerals discovered in high-pressure garnetites of the lherzolite Mindyak massif (Southern Urals). Srilankite occurs as inclusions in ilmenite and rutile of up to several tens of microns in size. It was established for the first time that srilankite contains a significant UO2 admixture (up to 20%). The negative correlation between Zr and U is evidence of isomorphism in the srilankite-brannerite system. The association of srilankite with high-Zr rutile indicates that formation of these minerals occurred at T > 850°C.

  10. Rare earth mineralogy of the Olympic Dam Cu-U-Au-Ag deposit, South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lottermoser, B.G.; Day, A.

    1993-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) and yttrium accompany uranium and copper mineralisation within the polymetallic Olympic Dam deposit. The light and heavy rare earths tend to occur in different host minerals. Most of the light rare earths (LREE) are present as the essential structural constituents of LREE fluorocarbonates such bastnaesite and synchysite, or in phosphates such as florencite and monazite. Yttrium and the heavy rare earths (HREE) occur mostly as minor concentrations in the form of cation substitutions within uranium minerals such as uraninite and coffinite, as well as brannerite to a lesser extent. Selective dissolution of uraninite and coffinite during acid leaching leads to the liberation of yttrium and HREE from their host minerals, resulting in higher percentage extractions of HREE than LREE in uranium bearing leach liquors. LREE liberation is more restricted because only the synchysite dissolves to any significant extent, while bastnaesite is more difficult to dissolve. 9 refs., 2 figs

  11. New french uranium mineral species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C.

    1952-01-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; β uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the α uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [fr

  12. Mineralogical test as a preliminary step for metallurgical proses of Kalan ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affandi, K.

    1998-01-01

    Mineralogical tests as a preliminary step for hydrometallurgy of Kalan ores, including Eko Remaja and Rirang have been carried out to identify the elements and minerals content which affect the metallurgical process, especially the leaching and purification of uranium. Mineralogical tests have been done by means of radioactive and radioluxugraph tests to identify radioactive minerals; thin specimen analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to identify elements and morphology, EPMA to analyse qualitatively the elements, X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) to identify of minerals content; and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and chemical analyses to determine total elements qualitatively and quantitatively. The experimental results show that the Eko Remaja ores contain uraninite and brannerite, iron and titan oxides, sulfides, phosphates and silicates minerals, while the Rirang ores contain uraninite, monazite and molybdenite

  13. Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Ceramics for Plutonium Immobilization: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2004-01-01

    In this document, we summarize our study of the effects of radiation induced damage to the titanate ceramics that were to be the immobilization form for surplus weapons-grade Pu. In this study, we made five ceramic materials: pure-phase pyrochlore, pure-phase zirconolite, pyrochlore-rich baseline, zirconolite-rich baseline, and impurity baseline. Two-hundred specimens were made of which 130 contained approximately 10 mass% 238Pu and 70 contained 10 mass% 239Pu. The specimens containing 239Pu served as materials against which the behavior of the 238Pu-bearing specimens could be compared. In our studies, we measured the true density (density exclusive of surface connected porosity), bulk density, crystalline-phase composition with X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dissolution rates as radiation induced damage accumulated in the 238Pu-bearing specimens. We routinely took photographs of the specimens during each characterization period. From our studies, we determined that these materials swell less than 10% and generally less than 5%. As the material swells, some open porosity can be converted to closed porosity, often causing the true density to decrease more rapidly than the bulk density. In general, 3?1018 a/g of damage accumulation were required for the materials to become amorphous as determined with the XRD method. The order in which the phases became amorphous was brannerite, pyrochlore, and zirconolite with brannerite being the most susceptible to radiation induced damage. However, we also show that Pu is not evenly distributed amongst the phases when multiple phases are present. We were unsuccessful in making a pure brannerite to study. Therefore, the brannerite was always present with other phases. For a material containing about 10 mass% 239Pu, 3?1018 a/g represent about 500 years in the geologic repository. At no time in our studies was there evidence for microcracking in these materials, even upon close examination in a scanning-electron microscope . Upon

  14. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boytsov, A., E-mail: boytsov@armz.ru [Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342,409 tonnes of in situ or 288,768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261,768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5,000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and achieving full capacity

  15. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boytsov, A., E-mail: boytsov@armz.ru [Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    'Full text:' The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342 409 tonnes of in situ or 288 768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261 768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and

  16. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boytsov, A.

    2010-01-01

    'Full text:' The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342 409 tonnes of in situ or 288 768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261 768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and achieving

  17. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boytsov, A.

    2010-01-01

    The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342,409 tonnes of in situ or 288,768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261,768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5,000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and achieving full capacity

  18. New french uranium mineral species; Nouvelles especes uraniferes francaises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branche, G; Chervet, J; Guillemin, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1952-07-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; {beta} uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the {alpha} uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [French] Dans ce travail, les auteurs etudient les nouveaux mineraux uraniferes francais: parsonsite et renardite, phosphates hydrates de plomb et d'uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrate d'uranium et de plomb uranopilite: sulfate d'uranium hydrate; bayleyite: carbonate d'uranium et de magnesium hydrate; {beta} uranolite: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate. Pour tous ces mineraux, les auteurs donnent les caracteres cristallographiques, optiques, et les analyses chimiques quantitatives. Par contre, les especes suivantes, tres rares dans les gites francais, n'ont pas permis d'effectuer d'analyses quantitatives. Ce sont: l'ianthinite: oxyde uraneux hydrate; l'{alpha} uranotile: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate; le bassetite: phosphate d'uranium et de fer hydrate; la hosphuranylite: phosphate duranium hydrate; la becquerelite: oxyde d'uranium hydrate; la curite: oxyde d'uranium et de plomb hydrate. Enfin, les auteurs presentent a la fin de cette etude

  19. Cachoeira Uranium Deposit, Lagoa Real, Bahia, Brazil – Kinematic, compositional and fluid evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, F.; Miano, S.

    2014-01-01

    system, after main metamorphism/metasomatism occurred. Consequently hydrothermal process dominated the system, resulting in the formation of fluorite, calcite and an excess of silica as brown chalcedony. Uranium minerals also formed, as secondary phosphate, hydro-silicates, hydrated oxides and pechblende, under lower temperature conditions. In a still Ca-rich system sphene and brannerite, together with late calcite could form: FeOTiO_2 + Ca + UO_2 + SiO_2 = CaTiSiO_5 + (Ca,U)(Ti,Fe)_2O_6 (brannerite), marking destabilization of primary ilmenite and uraninite formed in metasomatic stage. Formation of fluorite and calcite corresponds to the next hydrothermal episode: UF_6 + CaTiSiO_5 = CaF_2 + TiO_2 + SiO_2 + pitchblende. Brannerite is also destabilized in favor of calcite, rutile, pitchblende and hematite under higher oxygen fugacity condition: (Ca,U)(Ti,Fe)_2O_2 + CO_2 + O_2 = CaCO_3 + TiO_2 + Fe_2O_3 + pitchblende, the excess of silica forming chalcedony. (author)

  20. Uranium and REE potential of the albitite-pyroxenite-microclinite belt of Rajasthan, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Govind; Sharma, D.K.; Yadav, O.P.; Jain, Rajan B.; Singh, Rajendra

    1998-01-01

    A number of radioactive albitite, pyroxenite and microclinite occurrences have been identified in north and central Rajasthan, along or in close proximity to major lineaments, from Dancholi - Mewara in the NE to Tal in the SW. With these new findings the total extent of Albitite belt of Rajasthan now stands at over 320 km. These occurrences have been evaluated on the basis of their U, Th and REE content to identify the potential areas for the second phase of uranium exploration programme. Further, based on the various characteristic features of radioactive host rocks, the Albitite Belt has been divided into five sectors. The U 3 O 8 content of albitites varies from 0.008 to 0.44% and of pyroxenites from 0.022 to 2.0% whereas ThO 2 varies from < 0.005 to 0.83% in albitites and <0.005 to 0.033% in pyroxenities. These albitites, microclinites and pyroxenites are also characterised by anomalous concentration of REEs. Uranium and REE bearing phases are represented by uraninite, brannerite, davidite, fergusonite, monazite, anatase, rutile, zircon, allanite and britholite. The data accrued so far suggest that U and REE potential of the Mewara-Maonda and Hurra Ki Dhani-Rohil sectors are very high and hence needs further detailed integrated exploration. (author)

  1. Evaluation and design of the uranium project “Tigre I – La Terraza”, Sierra Pintada, Mendoza, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansilla, M.; Dieguez, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Sierra Pintada uranium district in Mendoza Province, Argentina, was discovered by airborne survey. This deposit is associated with a volcanic caldera and occurs in the Lower Permian volcaniclastic sediments of the Cochico Group, in which aeolian and fluvial sandstones, inter-bedded with ignimbrites, were reworked by pyroclastic flows. The origin of the mineralization is interpreted as a product of the leaching of the inter-bedded rhyolitic tuff. The mineralization is lenticular and nearly concordant with the bedding. The deposit has been affected by a complex fault system, which is responsible for mineralization and disposition via spatial displacement. The primary uranium minerals are uraninite, brannerite and coffinite. Uranophane and low liebigite uranium are the products of the oxidative alteration of primary minerals. This study involves the technical and economical evaluation of the open pit uranium mining project Tigre I – La Terraza in Mendoza, Argentina, at prefeasibility level. Its development includes geological modeling through economic evaluation, and the incorporation of different mining-specific software.

  2. Comparison of the layer structure of vapor phase and leached SRL glass by use of AEM [analytical electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biwer, B.M.; Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Bradley, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Test samples of 131 type glass that have been reacted for extended time periods in water vapor atmospheres of different relative humidities and in static leaching solution have been examined to characterize the reaction products. Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) was used to characterize the leached samples, and a complicated layer structure was revealed, consisting of phases that precipitate from solution and also form within the residual glass layer. The precipitated phases include birnes-site, saponite, and an iron species, while the intralayer phases include the U-Ti containing phase brannerite distributed within a matrix consisting of bands of an Fe rich montmorillonite clay. Comparison is made between samples leached at 40 degrees C for 4 years with those leached at 90 degrees C for 3-1/2 years. The samples reacted in water vapor were examined with scanning electron microscopy and show increasing reaction as both the relative humidity and time of reaction increases. These samples also contain a layered structure with reaction products on the glass surface. 15 refs., 5 figs

  3. Determination of Quality, Quantity, and Geometry of Uranium Deposit at North Tanah Merah, Kalan, West Kalimantan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilik-Subiantoro; Widiyanta; Widito, P.

    2004-01-01

    The research based on 1997/1998 the systematic prospect ion result which was discovered a uranium mineralization zones indication with in the area of 11,733 m 2 at Tanah Merah. That mineralization were found with in favourable, rock of quartzite that intruded by granitic rock. Uranium minerals are uraninite and brannerite, fill in spots and incontinously WNW-ESE fractures. The aim of this research was to find information about sub surfaces uranium geology characteristic, geometric, and U resources available at North Tanah Merah using shallow geological exploration drilling. The result of drilling at 3 locations arising 60 m depth each, have found some uranium mineralization indications that was identified as in uranium ore lensis. The geometri of the lensis is 5 cm-3 m lenght, 15 cm maximum wide and 5-150 thick. The result of U reserve estimation around 3 drill holes with in 5.064 m 2 area and at 66 m depth, is contain 31.348 tons U with in inferred category. (author)

  4. Inventory of uranium potential sector at Tanah Merah (continuation), West Kalimantan, systematic prospection stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subiantoro, L.; Sudarmadi; Sularto, P.; Widito, P.; Marzuki, A.; Paimin

    2000-01-01

    The investigation based on the previous study by CEA-BATAN (1977) and PPBGN-BATAN (1992-1994/1996), which was found radiometric anomalies on several outcrops (> 15.000 c/s) and soil (> 200 c/s). In again to find information of distribution, geometry and characteristically of mineralization zones, the systematic prospection was done by radiometric and topographic mapping and uranium geology aspect identification. Zones of mineralization were identified in Tanah Merah had total area 5468.4 m 2 . The outcrops of quarzitic rocks in this zone are characterized by vein distribution which contain uraninite, brannerite, autunite, gummite and gutite. The dominantly associated of their minerals are monazite, tourmaline, molybdenite, pirhotite, pyrite, ilmenite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite and hematite. By chips sampling in quarsite rock to appear of a lowest value is 8.45 ppm, highest 15259.73 ppm and average value is 319.9 to 489.5 ppm. Elements group correlation matrices from each rocks sample shows that the uranium had relatively good correlation with Cu, Pb, Zn, Co and Ni. The mineralized zone are consist of localized mineralization in lateral and vertically distribution. Structurally the mineralization exist in intersection WNW - ESE, NNE - SSw and WNW - ESE (sub horizontal) fracture. The mineralization are identified as vein type, granite related sub type, perigranitic class and polymetallic veins type, type deposits in metamorphic rocks sub class. (author)

  5. Much improved capacity and cycling performance of LiVMoO6 cathode for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Liqun; Liang Yongguang; Hu Ling; Han Xiaoyan; Yi Zonghui; Sun Jutang; Yang Shuijin

    2008-01-01

    Spherical LiVMoO 6 nanocrystals as cathode for lithium ion batteries were synthesized using a solvothermal reaction method. Powder XRD data indicate that a single phase LiVMoO 6 with brannerite-type structure is obtained at 550 deg. C by the thermal treatment of the precursor for 6 h. SEM image shows that the particles are composed of loosely stacked spheres with a uniform particle size about 40 nm. The electrode properties of LiVMoO 6 have also been studied by galvanostatic cycling and ac impedance spectroscopy. LiVMoO 6 nanospheres delivered 172 mAh g -1 capacity in the initial discharge process with a reversible capacity retention of 94.4% after 100 cycles in the range of 3.6-1.80 V versus metallic Li at a current density of 100 mA g -1 . The microstructure developed in the electrodes give evidence that the particle size and morphological properties play an important role in the much improved capacity and cycling stability at large currents than ordinary samples

  6. Interim report on task 1.2: near equilibrium processing requirements part 2 of 2 appendices to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for contract b345772

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M W A; Vance, E R; Day, R A; Brownscombe, A

    1999-01-01

    Ten appendices are included: Appendix A - Copies of fabrication work instructions, consisting mostly of micrographs; Appendix B - X-ray diffraction results of the samples from task 2, which contains a list of the raw data files; Appendix C - Scanning electron micrographs and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry results for samples of composition B1-2 - Th/U-doped baseline ceramic; Appendix D - Scanning electron micrographs and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry results for samples of composition B1-4 - TH/U-doped baseline + impurities ceramic; Appendix E - Scanning electron micrographs and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry results for samples of composition B1-10 - Th/U-doped zirconolite-rich ceramic; Appendix F - Scanning electron micrographs and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry results for samples of composition B1-12 - Th/U-doped brannerite-rich ceramic; Appendix G - Scanning electron micrographs and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry results for samples of composition B1-14 - Th/U-doped, nominally ∼ 10 % perovskite ceramic; Appendix H - Scanning eleCtron micrographs and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry results for samples of composition B1-16 - Th/U-doped, nominally ∼ 10 % phosphate ceramic; Appendix I - Scanning electron micrographs and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry results for the plutonium-doped samples; and Appendix J - Scanning electron micrographs and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry results of samples sintered in 3.7 % hydrogen in argon

  7. Some metallogenic features of the Huronian and post-Huronian uraniferous conglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzicka, V.

    1981-01-01

    Uraniferous conglomerates with syngenetic mineralization are restricted to lower Proterozoic sediments. The depositional environment was near volcanic centres; excessive sulfur, a product a volcanic and postvolcanic activity, apparently caused sulfurization of some minerals and of hydrocarbon. The sedimentary syngenetic origin of uranium mineralization may be illustrated. The cycle starts with deposition of coarse grains of quartz, continues with the deposition of a mixture of finer grains of quartz and pyrite with distinct graded bedding, is followed by deposition of monazite and brannerite, and ends with deposition of fragmented fine grains of uraninite embedded in sulfur-rich hydrocarbon. This situation apparently testifies to the fact that the carbonaceous material is a product of algal mats that existed in quiet times between cycles of sedimentation. The succeeding cycle again starts with the deposition of coarse grains of quartz. Uraniferous conglomerates with epigenetic mineralization are localized in regions containing rocks with higher contents of uranium. Primary concentration of uranium minerals in these source rocks can also be syngenetic. Deposition of uranium took place by one or more epigenetic processes: adsorption, complexing, precipitation, or redox changes according to the degrees of solubility and stability of uranium compounds. Evidence of these mentioned features is based upon studies on the Huronian uraniferous conglomerate from Elliot Lake, Canada, and on the late Precambrian and Paleozoic radioactive conglomerates from the eastern Ural Mountains and Enisey Crest region, USSR

  8. U-Pb age for some base-metal sulfide deposits in Ireland: genetic implications for Mississippi Valley-type mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duane, M.J.; Welke, H.J.; Allsopp, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented that links the timing of vein-type (Cu-Ag(U)) to stratiform Mississippi Valley-type (MVT, Pb-Zn) ore events in Ireland. The rare occurrence of pitchblende, coffinite(?), and brannerite mineralization, which is regarded as a precursor component to the sulfide mineralization in the Gortdrum deposit (Ireland), provides the first direct radiometric dating tool for these carbonate-hosted deposits. The U-Pb (340 +25/-20 Ma) and Pb-Pb (359 +/- 26 Ma) whole-rock ages constrain the uranium and base-metal mineralizing events to the Early Carboniferous. The data support a model according to which MVT and earlier uranium mineralization stages of some major ore bodies resulted from fracturing coincident with large basin-dewatering events. The Pb-Pb and concordia data are consistent with an Early Carboniferous age for the mineralization at Gortdrum and agree closely with a previously published Rb-Sr age of 359 +/- 22 Ma, obtained for Missouri glauconites. Furthermore, other comparative geologic data from Ireland and from North American MVT mineral provinces support a model of Pb-Zn-Cu(U) mobilization on a regional scale that implicates the later closing stages of the proto-Atlantic. 40 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  9. Effects of PEG4000 template on sol-gel synthesis of porous cerium titanate photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjie; Tao, Yingjie; Li, Chuanguo

    2018-04-01

    Porous cerium titanate was synthesized by sol-gel method, using polyethylene glycol (PEG4000) as template agent. Brannerite structured CeTi2O6 in monoclinic system is the major substance formed in the materials. Formation of CeO2 and rutile TiO2 depends on the amount of PEG4000. The addition of PEG4000 leads to production of fine particles in the samples, but it does not apparently affect the band gap energy. Pore volume of the cerium titanate sample continuously increases with rising PEG4000 amount. The sample obtained using 3.5 g PEG4000 has BET surface area of 16.2 m2/g and pore volume of 0.0232 cm3/g. The addition of PEG4000 can obviously promote photocatalytic activity of cerium titanate, which can be proven by both enhanced production of hydroxyl radical and ofloxacin degradation efficiency. As much as 95.2% of the initial ofloxacin molecules are removed from the solution after 50 min of photocatalytic degradation on the cerium titanate obtained using 3.5 g PEG4000, while only 48.4% ofloxacin is removed on cerium titanate obtained without PEG4000.

  10. Synthesis of MnV{sup 2}O{sup 6} under autogenous hydrothermal conditions and its anodic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Michio; Morishita, Takahiro; Hirano, Masanori; Gupta, Vinay; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi [Faculty of Engineering, Aichi Institute of Technology, Yakusa, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Anhydrous crystalline powders of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} (brannerite) were successfully precipitated from mixed aqueous solution of Mn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with a metal ion concentration of 0.01-1.0 mol/l at 135-200 C under autogenous hydrothermal condition in a closed vessel. The characterization of MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} synthesized was carried out by XRD, TG, TEM and anodic performance measurement. In case of mixtures with a concentration of 0.1-1.0 mol/l, single phase anhydrous crystalline MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} with homogeneous thin rod-like particles were synthesized by autogenous hydrothermal process, though starting reagent V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was not fully dissolved. They showed high anodic performance in lithium ion batteries; high charge capacity as 600 mA h/g even after the 10th cycle and stable cyclic performance. MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} powders synthesized from relatively high concentration of metal ions showed an abrupt increase in charge capacity after third or fourth discharge/charge cycles, though the first cycle showed rather high irreversible capacity.

  11. Flotation of uranium from uranium ores in Canada. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthuswami, S.V.; Vijayan, S.; Woods, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements are reported for the equilibrium of cupferron from solutions by uranium oxide, quartz, illite, a mixture of these three, pitchblende, pyrite and brannerite ore. The cupferron concentration ranged from 1 to 6 g/L, and the pH was 7 and 8. Most isotherms followed the Langmuir model, although Freundlich behaviour was observed for illite and pitchblende. Most adsorption was pH independent except for illite and pitchblende. The adsorption isotherms for a mixture of uranium oxide, quartz and illite in the same proportions as in the naturally occurring ore agreed with the adsorption of the pyrite-free ore at pH 8 but not pH 7. We attribute the discrepancy to the use of illite as the model clay. The specific adsorption of cupferron on quartz and illite is lower by a factor of about 50 and 5, respectively, than the adsorption on uranium oxide. Specific adsorption less than 1 mg cupferron per gm of pyrite free ore does not float the mineral. The corresponding equilibrium concentration of cupferron is 0.5 g/L. A qualitative model is given, and the implications of this work for practical operations are presented

  12. Genesis of sandstone-type uranium deposits in the Sierra Pintada district, Mendoza, Argentina: a Moessbauer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labenski, F.; Saragovi-Badler, C.

    1982-01-01

    The genesis of sandstone-type uranium deposits in the Cochico Group (Permo-Triassic) of the Sierra Pintada district, San Rafael, Mendoza, has been studied. This is the most important uranium district in Argentina. Uranium sources, uranium transport and precipitation are discussed. Uraninite and brannerite, the main uranium minerals, occur within the matrix of sandstone. Several phenomena can be deduced regarding the depositional environment. Where oxygen was available, precipitation of hydrated ferric oxides occurred; γFe 2 O 3 .nH 2 O varieties (identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy) precipitated in the upper levels of the aquifer, where CO 2 partial pressure was lower, giving reddish or reddish-brown beds. The CO 2 partial pressure also determines the distribution of biogenic agents such as bacteria. Bacteria thus find a more favourable environment for their development and action in upper levels of an aquifer. In the corresponding horizons local reduction occurred where UO 2 precipitated; therefore the highest uranium concentrations correspond to sandstone levels with reddish or reddish-brown pigment. These pigments have been identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy. (Auth.)

  13. Preconcentration of a low-grade uranium ore yielding tailings of greatly reduced environmental concerns. Part V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, D.; Raicevic, M.

    1980-11-01

    The low-grade ore sample used for this investigation contained 0.057 percent uranium with uranothorite as the major uranium-bearing mineral and a small amount of brannerite, occurring in the quartz-sericite matrix of a conglomerate. The preconcentration procedures, consisting of pyrite flotation with or without flotation of radioactive minerals, followed by high intensity wet magnetic treatment of the sized flotation tailings, produced pyrite and radioactive concentrates of acceptable uranium grades ranging from 0.1 to 0.135 percent uranium. The combined concentrates comprised 37 to 49 percent of the ore by weight with the following combined recoveries: 95.6 to 97.9 percent of the uranium; 94.7 to 96.3 percent of the radium; 97.8 to 99.3 percent of the thorium over 98 percent of the pyrite. The preconcentration tailings produced comprised between 51 and 63 percent of the ore by weight and contained from: 0.0022 to 0.0037 percent U; 12 to 17 pCi/g Ra; 0.002 to 0.004 percent Th less than 0.03 percent S. Because these tailings are practically pyrite-free, they should not generate acidic conditions. Due to their low radium content, their radionuclide hazards are greatly reduced. These preconcentration tailings therefore, could be suitable for surface disposal, mine backfill, revegetation or other uses

  14. Regularities of the vertical distribution of uranium-molybdenum mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, V.M.; Kazantsev, V.V.; Protasov, V.N.

    1980-01-01

    The geological structure of one of ore fields of the uranium-molybdenum formation pertaining to the northern framing of a large volcano-tectonic depression is studied. The main uranium deposits are related to necks formed by neck facies of brown liparites. Three zones are singled out within the limits of the ore field. In the upper one there are small ore bodies with a low uranium content represented by phenolite-chlorite, pitchblende 3-coffinite 3-jordizite and calcinite-sulphide associations, in the middle one - the main ore bodies formed by pitchblende 1-chlorite, molybdenite 2 (jordizite)-pitchblende 2-hydromica, coffinite 2-pyrite associations; in the lower one-thin veinlets formed by coffinite-molybdenite 1-chlorite, brannerite-pyrite and pitchblende 1-chlorite associations. Dimensions of the ore deposits depend on the neck sizes: in small necks the middle zone and, rarely, the lower one are of the industrial interest; in the large ones - the upper middle and, probably, lower ones. The regularities found can be extended to other deposits of the uranium-molybdenum formation [ru

  15. Blind River uranium deposits: the ores and their setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    In the Blind River area, Proterozoic clastic sedimentary and minor volcanic rocks (Huronian Supergroup) unconformably overlie and transgress northward over dominantly granitic Archean terrane (2500 million years) and are intruded by Nipissing Diabase (2150 million years). Later deformations and metamorphic events are recognized. The Matinenda Formation (basal Huronian) comprises northward-derived arkose, quartzite, and pyritic, uraniferous oligomictic conglomerates, which contain 75 percent of Canada's uranium reserves. Historic grades approximate 2 pounds U 3 O 8 /ton (1 kilogram/metric ton), but lower grade material can be mined with increasing price. Some thorium and rare earths have been marketed. The conglomerate beds lie in southeasterly striking zones controlled by basement topography down-sedimentation from radioactive Archean granite. Distribution of monazite relative to uraninite and brannerite and the presence of uranium values in overlying polymictic conglomerates, which truncate the ore beds, indicate that the mineralization is syngenetic, probably placer. The role of penecontemporaneous mafic volcanics is problematical, but these could have been a source for sulphur in the pyrite. Drab-coloured rocks, uranium and sulphide mineralization, and a post-Archean regolith formed under reducing conditions all suggest a reducing environment. Sedimentary features indicate deposition in fast-flowing shallow water and possibly a cold climate. In the upper Huronian (Lorrain Formation), a monazite and iron oxide assemblage associated with red beds suggests a change to oxidizing conditions

  16. Investigations on the nature and physical concentration of Spanish uraniferous quartzites; Estudios de caracterizacion y concentracion fisica de cuarcitas uraniferas espanolas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lora, F de [Direccion de Plantas Piloto e Industriales, Junta de Energia Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)

    1967-06-15

    A study was made of a sample of radioactive material from Santa Elena (Jaen) containing 130 ppm U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, 300 ppm ThO{sub 2}, 4.96% ZrO{sub 2} and 14.29% TiO{sub 2}. Over 150 million tons of material were examined. In the light of the studies carried out the material can be defined as a rutilo-zirconiferous quartzite with a double radioactivity source due to the uranium enclosed in the zircon lattice structure and to the presence of monazite. The possibility of brannerite or davidite being present can be discarded. There is likewise no conclusive evidence of the presence of sphene, rutile being the most abundant titanium mineral. The author determined the features of the ore with a view to its physical concentration and applied magnetic and gravimetric separation and the flotation process. The use of oleic acid as collector has permitted good zircon recovery. (author) [Spanish] Se ha estudiado una muestra de material radiactivo procedente de Santa Elena (Jaen) con 130 ppm de U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, 600 ppm de ThO{sub 2}, 4,96% de ZrO{sub 2} y 14,29% de TiO{sub 2}. El material examinado es considerable: mas de 150 millones de toneladas. De acuerdo con los estudios realizados se puede definir como una cuarcita rutilo-circonifera con dos fuentes de radiactividad debidas al uranio englobado en la red del circon y a la presencia de monacita. Se descarta la posibilidad de existencia de brannerita o davidita. Tampoco existen pruebas concluyentes de que contenga esfena, siendo el ratilo el mineral de titanio mas abundante. Se han determinado las caracteristicas de la mena con vistas a su concentracion fisica. Se ha ensayado la separacion magnetica, gravimetrica y flotacion. El empleo de acido oleico, como colector, ha dado buenas recuperaciones de circon. (author)

  17. Discovery of the Sierra Pintada uranium district, Mendoza Province, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, F.; Belluco, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Since 1956, uranium-bearing minerals have been known to exist in Sierra Pintada, Mendoza Province, Argentina. Based on paragenetic considerations, a first radiometric prospection was carried out, leading to the discovery of two groups of anomalies (Puesto Agua del Toro and Cuesta de los Terneros), such as vein-type deposits, with uraninite and 'yellow minerals' and one sandstone-type deposit (Puesto La Josefa), related to sediments with carbon trash. Some recent geological research and surveys in the area, and a reduced drilling programme carried out on selected anomalies, led to reinterpretation of the potential of the area. Furthermore, and as a result of an airborne radiometric prospection performed in mid-1968, numerous anomalies have been discovered. The main constellation of anomalies, along the flanks of the El Tigre Brachyanticline, occurs in sandstones of Permian age. Explored by 80 000 m of drilling, they have shown the existence of several peneconcordant lens-shaped ore bodies of economic size, with uranophane on the surface and prevailing uraninite and some brannerite, coffinite and davidite below the water table. Reserves exceed 20 000 tonnes of U 3 O 8 . A new regional programme with a 4-km drill-grid initiated in 1978 led to the discovery of new ore bodies which are at present being evaluated. The alternatives and discontinuities during the development of the district, the prospecting and exploration techniques employed, and the results achieved in the different stages of the operation are discussed in detail. This case history attempts to illustrate the developing philosophy which was successfully applied in Sierra Pintada, with emphasis on the following points: (a) the need for adequate geological knowledge of the area; (b) the advantage of a massive survey (in this case, air survey); (c) the necessity for exploration (drilling) in order to define the anomalies and make their evaluation possible; and (d) the convenience of extending exploration

  18. The mobility of radioactive elements in a Uranium exploitation zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragea, M.; Toro, L.

    2002-01-01

    One of the purposes of this study is to gain knowledge on the possibilities of accumulations of the radioelements (2 38U , 2 32T h, 2 26R a) in a given ecosystem, and, particularly, the knowledge of the mechanisms implied in the transfer of these radioelements around the abandoned mining exploitations. The final purpose is the evaluation of the quantity of the radioelements susceptible to reach the man. The research is directed towards a quantitative evaluation of the transport rate of the contaminating element in the soil. There have been studied the surroundings of ore mines in the Boul Massif in Poiana Rusca Mountains in Romania. These exploitations had been closed and abandoned in 1990. From a geological point of view, the region is formed from crystalline schists, banat eruptive and sedimentary rocks. The iron deposit is totally situated in crystalline rocks in Poiana Rusca Mountains. The concentration of magnetite in the deposit is 25% with a relatively uniform dissemination in the ore. Brannerite (UCaThY)(TiFe) 2 O 6 , was also found in the same place. It is an ore should contain UO3 in proportion of up to about 33%. In 1963 there were stood out areas with radioactive minerals with gamma doses in the range of 500-9100 nGy/hour. In the same time, there were also identified a few points in which the concentration of thorium and uranium were significant. The areas with radioactive mineralizations were generally limited and strictly located in the limit of the iron ores deposit. By closing the mining activities huge quantities of waste rock stored in unprotected dump remained abandoned. As a result of the process of ore extraction, the waste rock and a very low percentage of metallic minerals were stored in tailing ponds, with a clay liner necessary to isolate the tailing from the reast of the aquifer

  19. Interim report task 3: immobilization process/equipment testing - task 3.4: non-destructive evaluation appendices part 2 of 2 to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract b345772

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M W A; Vance, E R; Day, R A; Lumpkin, G R

    2000-01-01

    Nine appendices are included: Appendix A - Scanning electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry image analysis and x-ray diffraction results for samples of composition B1-2 - Th/U-doped baseline ceramic; Appendix B - Scanning electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry image analysis and x-ray diffraction results for samples of composition B1-4 - Th/U-doped baseline + impurities ceramic; Appendix C - Scanning electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry image analysis and x-ray diffraction results for samples of composition B1-10 - Th/U-doped zirconolite-rich ceramic; Appendix D - Scanning electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry image analysis and x-ray diffraction results for samples of composition B1-12 - Th/U-doped brannerite-rich ceramic; Appendix E - Scanning electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry image analysis and x-ray diffraction results for samples of composition B1-14 - Th/U-doped nominally 10 % perovskite ceramic; Appendix F - Scanning electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry image analysis and x-ray diffraction results for samples of composition B1-16 - Th/U-doped ∼ 10 % phosphate-doped ceramic;Appendix G - Scanning electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry image analysis and x-ray diffraction results for samples of composition B1-1 - Pu/U-doped baseline ceramic ;Appendix H - Scanning electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry image analysis and x-ray diffraction results for samples of composition A-7 and B3-13 - Pu/U-doped baseline + impurities ceramics; and, Appendix I - Scanning electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry image analysis and x-ray diffraction results for samples of composition B1-13 - Pu/U-doped nominally 10% perovskite ceramic

  20. New Au-U deposit type in the weathering crust in tectonicmetasomatite zones of Pre-Cambrian shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkhanov, A.

    2014-01-01

    Au-U mineralization is widely distributed in the tectonic-metasomatite zones of Pre-Cambrian shields (Aldan Shield, Ukraine Shield and others). The industrial ores are located only in several areas at depths of more than 150-300 m. Uranium mineralization is represented by uranotitnates and the gold mineralization by auriferous pyrite. The zone of weathering is present to the depth of 100-150 m. The feldspars are replaced by the clay minerals, carbonates are dissovled, sulfides are oxidized and the secondary minerals of uranium replace uranotitanates.The golden mineralization in the envelope of weathering is represented by the fine-grained native gold. The particle size is 40-50 nm. Uranium mineralization is in the form of relict brannerite, tuyamunite, torbernite, carnotite. The gold content is 1-2 g/t, and uranium content 0.01- 0.05% U. Ore bodies of gold and uranium are located inside the tectonic-metasomatite zones. The zones of maximum concentration of these metals may not coincide. The gold ore bodies have the length of hundreds meters and a thickness of 1-5 m. The vertical extent of the secondary Au-U mineralization is 100-150 m. 20 laboratory samples of ore from the weathered zone were tested by the method of heap leaching. The first stage is the uranium leach by diluted sulfuric acid. The second stage is the cyanation of gold and silver. The experimental data indicates leach rate of uranium 75%, gold 80-97%, silver 50-60%. Gold resources in the continous zone is estimated to be 80 t. Gold resources of the several other zones inside the area of 100 km 2 are estimated as 220 t. The heap leach process can be used for profitable development of the low-grade deposits. This method helps to increase the resources of gold and uranium. (author)

  1. The South Greenland regional uranium exploration programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour-Brown, A.; Tukiainen, T.; Nyegaard, P.; Wallin, B.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the work and results of the last two field seasons (1080 and 1982) of the Syduran Project. The field work was concentrated in the Motzfeldt Centre and the Granite zone with a short reconnaissance of five uranium anomalies in the Migmatite Complex. The results from the Motzfeldt Centre show that it is composed of at least 6 syenite units which can be divided into two major phases of igneous activity. The radioactive mineralisation has been mapped by gamma-spectrometer and has proved to be very extensive. Uranium mineral occurrences found in the Granite Zone occur in the many faults and fractures, which dissect the area. A study of the fractures and fault movements in the zone makes it possible to suggest an overall structural framework in which to place the uranium occurrences in the zone. Field work on the Igaliko peninsula was confined to a small area known as Puissagtag where four pitchblende veins have been discovered. Numerous uraniferous showings, associated with fractures, have been located in the Vatnaverfi peninsula south of the Igaliko Fjord. Mineralogical studies have shown that 12 of these showings contain pitchblende, that 7 of them contain coffinite and that most of them contain brannerite. The most interesting find during the 1982 field season was in the Migmatite Complex. Five anomalously high uranium areas in the complex were explored briefly with the helicopter-borne scintillometer. Near a place called Igdlorssuit, where a particlarly high gamma-spectrometer anomaly was found during the reconnaissance gamma-spectrometer survey, a large raft of meta-sediments in rapakivi granite was found, in which radioactive mineralisation occurred. This proved to be due to fine disseminated uraninite which occurs over some 150 m of strike length with a width of 1-2 m. The results confirm that there is a good possibility of finding exploitable uranium mineral occurrences in South Greenland. (author)

  2. The distribution of radioelements in archaean granites of the Kaapvaal Craton, with implications for the source of uranium in the Witwatersrand Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, L.J.; Meyer, M.; Ferraz, M.F.; Drennan, G.R.

    1989-05-01

    Approximately 500 samples from the Archaean granitic basement of the southern Kaapvaal Craton have been analysed, for U and Th. When viewed in conjunction with geological relationships, the radioelement distribution patterns in the Archaean basement provide contraints regarding the origin of uranium in the Witwatersrand Basin. Granites in the Baberton region are sub-divided into three magnetic cycles, the earliest cycle comprising tonalite-trondhjemite gneisses, the intermediate cycle comprising literally extensive K-rich batholiths and the final stage consisting of discrete intrusive granitic plutons. Uranium and thorium contents vary as a function of age and rock type, an increase progressively from the first cycle through to the third cycle. Certain of the late granite plutons may have been S-type in origin, have relatively low Th/U ratios, high U contents, and are characterized by accessory minerals dominated by monazite-like phases. The late granite plutons with highest radioelement contents appear to have formed circa 2,8 Ga, an age which coincides with granulite facies metamorphism and uranium-thorium depletion in the lower crust, as recrorded in the Vredeford crustal profile. Uranium has been leached from portions of the regolith profile, but also concentrated into leucoxene-rich zones derived from the breakdown of pre-existing titanium-bearing phases. The widespread development of an uraniferous leucoxene protore in weathered source rocks of the Witwatersrand Basin has relevance to the genesis of authigenic U-Ti phases (brannerite) in the reefs themselves. The study of radioelement distribution in Archaean granites adjacent to the Witwatersrand Basin provides a framework within which considerations regarding the origin of the uranium deposits in the basin can be viewed. The secular evolution of the Archaean granitic basement, hydrothermal processes, and palaeoweathering all played a role in the formation of the Witwatersrand deposits

  3. The latest study on development of metallogenic mechanism of Baimianshi uranium field, Jiangxi Province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, H.; He, D.; Wang, F.

    2009-01-01

    It has been considered that deposits in Baimianshi uranium field have similar features and ore-forming type, it is the syngenetic sedimentation that caused some U-bearing minerals to concentrate, and as a result of the enrichment in the late lithogenetic stage the deposit formed which is separate genesis to sandstone type and volcanic hydrothermal sub-type. This paper takes Huangnihu deposit in Baimianshi field as an example, and regards Baimianshi field as hydrothermal type according to research on intergrowth assemblage, fluid inclusions, U-Pb isotopic dating and Nd-Sr isotopic tracing. Ore minerals are mainly uraninite, brannerite, coffinite, etc, while the assistant gangue minerals are mainly galena, hematite, marcasite, blende, etc. The materials for uranium mineralization are mainly crust-derived rocks. Continuous extraction of uranium from the upper crust and basement granite by mantle-derived fluids with little of ore-forming elements may be responsible for the remobilization and transformation of uranium. Mixing of ore-enriched fluid with groundwater in some enclosed places overlain by basalt leads to the precipitation of ore-forming materials from the mixed fluid. There are three episodes of uranium mineralization: The first one is 160.4±0.5Ma, related to double-peak type volcanism, with basalt lithogenetic age of 172.8±7.7Ma and rhyolite lithogenetic age of 164.8±0.57Ma (from Chen Peirong, etc., 1999). The second one is 128±0.8Ma, related to Yanshanian Magmatic activities, for example, Danguanzhang rock mass and several phases of complements. The third one is about 100Ma, related to sub-volcanic rocks and dykes, namely quartz porphyry (99Ma) and diabase (105Ma). The above achievements will play an important part in the guidance of future prospecting in the deeper in that area. (author)

  4. Fluid inclusion study of the uranium mineralised granite cataclasite/mylonite and quartz reef in the Mulapalle area, Cuddapah district, Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirupathi, P.V.; Tripathi, B.K.; Umamaheswar, K.; Dhana Raju, R.

    2004-01-01

    Granite cataclasite and mylonite in the basement fracture zones around Mulapalle in the southwestern environs of the Cuddapah basin are uraniferous with the presence of brannerite, U-Ti complex and uraninite. The ENE-WSW trending fracture zone is cut by NW-SE trending quartz reef. Fluid inclusion study carried out on quartz from the mineralized cataclasite and as well as from the quartz reef shows the presence of both primary [8-20 microns] and abundant secondary up to [6 microns] inclusions. Most of the inclusions are bi-phase (L+V) liquid rich having a degree of fill around 0.90 with constant liquid to vapour ratio. Few inclusions are liquid monophase and multiphase [S+L+V]. They behave as H 2 O-NaCl system and homogenize into liquid phase at low temperature range [125 to 200 degC] except some bi-phase inclusions in the barren quartz reef, which are found to behave as an impure H 2 O-NaCl system admixed with other salts. Wide variation of salinity in the range of 3-25 wt%e NaCl is recorded by the inclusions in both the mineralized cataclasite and the barren quartz reef. The trapping pressure [P T ] of the inclusions of barren quartz reef spreads between 200 to 600 bars while those of mineralized cataclasite restricts to upper end of that range. Some inclusions in mineralized cataclasite that homogenize at high temperatures [200 to 250 degC] show P T between 800 to 1000 bars. The presence of more than one population without any change in fluid composition indicate their origin at different stages of deformation modifying the primary inclusions of the granite and from fluids migrated through fractures at later stages. In the barren quartz reef, the distribution of inclusions of contrasting salinity implies the environment of mixing of connectively driven hydrothermal fluid of metamorphic origin and meteoric water. (author)

  5. The incorporation of neptunium and plutonium in thorutite (ThTi{sub 2}O{sub 6})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingjie, E-mail: yzx@ansto.gov.au; Gregg, Daniel J.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Begg, Bruce D.; Jovanovic, Miodrag

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •The incorporation of neptunium (Np) and plutonium (Pu) in thorutite (ThTi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) has been studied. •The effect of Np/Pu doping on the unit cell parameter changes has been discussed from the structure point of view. •The effect of Y as charge compensator to encourage the formation of higher valences of Np and Pu has been explored. •The resulting Np/Pu doped thorutite samples have been characterised by using XRD, SEM and DRS. -- Abstract: The incorporation of neptunium (Np) and plutonium (Pu) into the brannerite structured lattice was studied using thorutite (ThTi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) as host lattice and sintering in air. The uncompensated Np and Pu doped samples and the low Y-charge compensated Np and Pu doped samples showed main phases as designed together with trace amounts of rutile. Those samples with larger amounts of Y produced yttrium pyrochlores as an additional minor phase. XRD analyses reveal anisotropic changes of the cell parameters; the a-parameter contracts while b- and c-parameters expand with mean cationic radius. This is in reasonable agreement with previous experimental data on ThTi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and Ce{sub 0.975}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5.95}. Attempts to form Np or Pu valences >4+ by adding Y as a charge compensator were unsuccessful, suggesting that tetravalent Np and Pu ions are favoured in air-fired thorutite.

  6. Interim report on task 1.2: near equilibrium processing requirements - attrition milling part 1 of 2 to Lawrence Livermore National for contract b345772

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M W A; Vance, E R; Day, R A; Eddowes, T; Moricca, S

    2000-01-01

    The objective of Task 1.2 has only partly been achieved as the work on Pu/U-formulations and to a significant degree on Th/U-formulations has been performed under grinding/blending conditions that did not replicate plant-like fabrication processes, particularly in the case with the small glovebox attritor. Nevertheless the results do show that actinide-rich particles, not present in specimens made via the alkoxide-route (equilibrium conditions), occur when the grinding process is not efficient enough to ensure that high-fired PuO 2 , ThO 2 and UO 2 particles are below a critical size. Our current perception is that the critical size for specimens sintered at 1350 C for 4 hours is about 5 (micro)m in diameter. The critical size is difficult to estimate, as it is equal to the starting diameter of actinide oxides just visible within brannerite regions. Our larger scale attritor experiments as well as experience with wet and dry ball milling suggests that acceptable mineralogy and microstructure can be obtained by dry milling via attritor and ball mills. This is provided that appropriate attention is paid to the size and density of the grinding media, grinding additives that reduce caking of the powder, and in the case of attritors the grinding speed and pot setup. The ideal products for sintering are free flowing granules of ∼ 100 (micro)m containing constituents ground to about 1 (micro)m to ensure homogeneity and equilibrium mineralogy

  7. Geochemistry and mineralogy of the radioactive minerals associated with some pegmatite veins of the Ukma-Nawahatu Hursi sector, Purulia district, W.B., in the Precambrian Chhotanagpur Gneissic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baidya, Tapan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Some barite-bearing pegmatites in the Ukma-Nawahatu-Hursi sector (23° 25 min - 26 sec N, 86° 02 min - 04 sec E) in Purulia dist., West Bengal, have association of radioactive minerals in the form of coarse-grained pitchblack lumps and irregular patches. The present author and his associates first reported the occurrence of this radioactive belt along a ENE-WSW shearzone during their fieldwork in November, 1978. Groundborne radiometric survey and isorad mapping has established a radioactive high zone of about 15 km length running through Ukma, Nawahatu and Hursi areas. Mineralogical studies of the radioactive minerals have revealed the occurrence of Chevkinite, Aeschynite, Brannerite, Allanite, Uraninite, Tyuyamunite, Davidite, Euxenite, Samarskite, Thorutite, Autunite, Cerianite, in association with quartz, barite, microcline as the principal minerals and various minor minerals like biotite, vermiculite, hornblende, augite, orthoclase, celsian, muscovite, calcite, epidote, zoisite, ilmenite, sphene, rutile, hematite, magnetite, anatase, galena and sodic plagioclase. The barite-bearing pegmatites occur as lenses or lenticular veins hosted by garnetiferous sillimanite-biotite-quartz-schist or occasionally by migmatite. Near Nawahatu the radioactive barite-pegmatite vein occurs at or near the junction between the footwall amphibolite and hangingwall garnetiferous schist. The pegmatite veins have followed mainly schistosity of the host rock and dip at 70°-80° towards south. Chemical analyses of individual radioactive minerals by SEM-EDX and also of the bulk radioactive lumps by ICP-MS have shown significant concentration of U, Tb and Rare earths. Minor and trace element analyses also record notable contents of Zr, Ga, Sc, Pb, Zn, Nb, Cu, Ni, V, Cr, As, W, Pd, Ag and TI. Details of chemical analytical data are presented here. Chemically active fluids generated during metamorphism, metasomatism and granitic activity appear to have played a significant role in the

  8. Petrography, metasomatism and mineralization of uranium and other radioactive minerals in the Narigan Area (Central Iran) Islamic Republic of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazeli, A.; Azizaliabad, M.; Iranmanesh, J.

    2014-01-01

    , phyllic and propylitic alteration zones. Ni shows an adaptable increase in phlogopite-magnetite zone and hornfelsic, propylitic alterations. Uranium mineralization in this study area, is comparable with two uranium ore types: plutogenic and volcanogenic. These matters were indicated by various alteration types that observed in Narigan area. In plutonic-type uranium mineralization, uranium is present in sulphide-uraninite and arsenideuraninite types. In the Narigan Zone, the presence of sulphide is seen in minerals like pyrite, calcopyrite, and sphalerite. Existence of arsenide is indicated by a few minerals such as: arsenopyrite and glokodot and also relative enrichment of elements like Ag, Bi, Co, Ni and U in some veins. These are signatures for sulphide-uraninite and arsinide-uraninite mineralizing type. Presence of brannerite (davidite-branerite paragenesis) in thin sections is an index signature for volcanogenic uranium-titanium mineralizing type. The secondary titanium-bearing minerals are made by ilmenite and sphene alterations. Relative enrichment of elements like Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn is made by the effect of high temperature potassic phase on the Narigan volcanogenic rocks. With the consideration of sub-volcanic nature of Narigan zone, metasomatic processes and related hydrothermal phases have been active in shallow environment. On the basis of Bardina and Popov classification the different metasomatic processes at Narigan area have happened in basic to acidic circumstance, with pH 3-9 under temperature range of 150-600°C. (author)

  9. Mise en solution et précipitation de l'uranium et du thorium dans les conditions de moyenne et haute température (résumé Solution and Precipitation of Uranium and Thorium under Average and High-Temperature (Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau M.

    2006-11-01

    (France and different uranium deposits or anomalies (Quebec, Rössing, Madagascar, etc. . U and Th are precipitated in the katazone in the form of solid uranothorianite solids in silica-deficient media, and in the form of uranothorite in granites and syenites. Non-thoriferous uraninite precipitation in French leucogranites can be explained first of all by the low thorium concentration of aqueous solutions during the deuteric phase. During progressive metamorphism, a delay can be observed in uranium mobilization under relatively oxidïzing conditions when U is associated with Ti and OH. In the mesozonal realm, brannerite stabilizes uranium in the presence of titanium all the way to analexis. Beyond that it becomes dissociated by giving off non-thoriferous uraninite and rutile.

  10. Preparation and characterization of 238Pu-ceramics for radiation damage experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DM Strachan; RD Scheele; WC Buchmiller; JD Vienna; RL Sell; RJ Elovich

    2000-01-01

    As a result of treaty agreements between Russia and the US, portions of their respective plutonium and nuclear weapons stockpiles have been declared excess. In support of the US Department of Energy's 1998 decision to pursue immobilization of a portion of the remaining Pu in a titanate-based ceramic, the authors prepared nearly 200 radiation-damage test specimens of five Pu- and 238 Pu-ceramics containing 10 mass% Pu to determine the effects of irradiation from the contained Pu and U on the ceramic. The five Pu-ceramics were (1) phase-pure pyrochlore [ideally, Ca(U, Pu)Ti 2 O 7 ], (2) pyrochlore-rich baseline, (3) pyrochlore-rich baseline with impurities, (4) phase-pure zirconolite [ideally Ca(U, Pu)Ti 2 O 7 ], and (5) a zirconolite-rich baseline. These ceramics were prepared with either normal weapons-grade Pu, which is predominantly 239 Pu, or 238 Pu. The 238 Pu accelerates the radiation damage relative to the 239 Pu because of its much higher specific activity. The authors were unsuccessful in preparing phase-pure (Pu, U) brannerite, which is the third crystalline phase present in the baseline immobilization form. Since these materials will contain ∼10 mass% Pu and about 20 mass% U, radiation damage to the crystalline structure of these materials will occur overtime. As the material becomes damaged from the decay of the Pu and U, it is possible for the material to swell as both the alpha particles and recoiling atoms rupture chemical bonds within the solid. As the material changes density, cracking, perhaps in the form of microcracks, may occur. If cracking occurs in ceramic that has been placed in a repository, the calculated rate of radionuclide release if the can has corroded would increase proportionately to the increase in surface area. To investigate the effects of radiation damage on the five ceramics prepared, the authors are storing the specimens at 20, 125, and 250 C until the 238 Pu specimens become metamict and the damage saturates. They will

  11. Investigations on uranium sorption on bentonite and montmorillonite, respectively, and uranium in environmental samples; Untersuchungen zur Uransorption an Bentonit bzw. Montmorillonit sowie von Uran in Umweltproben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeroual, Mohamed

    2010-09-22

    uranium releases from tailings into the aquatic system. The results showed that uranium(VI) speciation in water samples is controlled by pH as well as bicarbonate and calcium concentrations and is dominated by the very stable aquatic complexes Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(OH){sub 3}{sup -} and UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-}. Influences of humic substances or phosphate ligands on uranium(VI) complexation were not detected. Uranium association with aquatic colloids in the studied samples as found to be negligible. With the help of a combination of the AREM-EDX method and batch experiments, uraninite (UO{sub 2}) and brannerite (UTi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) could be identified with an occurrence frequency of about 67 % and 33 %, respectively. This combination allowed the conclusion that uranium release from tailing materials is controlled by the dissolution of uraninite, which itself is governed by the dissolution of calcite. Furthermore, a mobilisation of uraninite colloids smaller than 200 nm from tailing material into the used model solutions was observed.