WorldWideScience

Sample records for branches subgroups groups

  1. Maximal subgroups of finite groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Srinivasan

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In finite groups maximal subgroups play a very important role. Results in the literature show that if the maximal subgroup has a very small index in the whole group then it influences the structure of the group itself. In this paper we study the case when the index of the maximal subgroups of the groups have a special type of relation with the Fitting subgroup of the group.

  2. Finite groups all of whose minimal subgroups are *-subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yonggang Li; Xianggui Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Let be a finite group. A subgroup of is called an -subgroup of if it satisfies $H^G \\cap N_{G}(H) = H$. A subgroup of is said to be a *-subgroup of if there exists a subnormal subgroup of such that = and $H \\cap T$ is a -subgroup of . In this article, we investigate the structure of under the assumption that subgroups of prime order are *-subgroups of . The finite groups, all of whose minimal subgroups of the generalized Fitting subgroup are *-subgroups are classified.

  3. Congruence Subgroups of Hecke Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo CHEN; Ping Zhi YUAN

    2009-01-01

    Hecke groups are an important tool in investigating functional equations, and congruence subgroups of Hecke groups play an important rule in research of the solutions of the Dirichlet series.When q, m are two primes, congruence subgroups and the principal congruence subgroups of level m of the Hecke group H(√q) have been investigated in many papers. In this paper, we generalize these results to the case where q is a positive integer with q ≥ 5, √q ¢ Z and m is a power of an odd prime.

  4. FINITE GROUPS WHOSE MINIMAL SUBGROUPS ARE WEAKLY H-SUBGROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.M.Al-Mosa Al-Shomrani; M.Ramadan; A.A.Heliel

    2012-01-01

    Let G be a finite group.A subgroup H of G is called an H-subgroup in G if NG(H) ∩H9 ≤ H for all g ∈ G.A subgroup H of G is called a weakly H-subgroup in G if there exists a normal subgroup K of G such that G =HK and H ∩ K is an H-subgroup in G.In this paper,we investigate the structure of the finite group G under the assumption that every subgroup of G of prime order or of order 4 is a weakly H-subgroup in G.Our results improve and generalize several recent results in the literature.

  5. Finite Groups with Some -Supplemented Subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Let be a subgroup of a finite group , a prime dividing the order of , and a Sylow -subgroup of for prime We say that is -supplemented in if there is a subgroup of such that and where denotes the subgroup of generated by all those subgroups of which are -quasinormally embedded in In this paper, we characterize -nilpotency and supersolvability of under the assumption that all maximal subgroups of are -supplemented in .

  6. ON COMPLEMENTED SUBGROUPS OF FINITE GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A subgroup H of a finite group G is said to be complemented in G if there exists a subgroup K of G such that G = HK and H ∩ K = 1. In this case, K is called a complement of H in G.In this note some results on complemented subgroups of finite groups are obtained.

  7. Maximal Subgroups of Skew Linear Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mahdavi-Hezavehi

    2002-01-01

    Let D be an infinite division algebra of finite dimension over its centre Z(D) = F, and n a positive integer. The structure of maximal subgroups of skew linear groups are investigated. In particular, assume N is a normal subgroup of GLn(D) and M is a maximal subgroup of N containing Z(N). It is shown that if M/Z(N) is finite, then N is central.

  8. Representations of Subgroups of Universal Triangle Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Xia

    2007-01-01

    Let G be a universal triangle group, and H a subgroup of G such that the chamber system △H is a tight triangle geometryThen H, which is canonically isomorphic to the topological fundamental group π1(△H) of △ H, is a finitely presented group.For some H we give their representations.

  9. Finite groups in which some particular subgroups are TI-subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2013-01-01

    We prove that G is a group in which all noncyclic subgroups are TI-subgroups if and only if all noncyclic subgroups of G are normal in G. Moreover, we classify groups in which all subgroups of even order are TI-subgroups....

  10. Finite Groups with Seminormal Sylow Subgroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Bin GUO

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we prove the following theorem:Let p be a prime number,P a Sylow psubgroup of a group G and π = π(G) \\ {p}.If P is seminormal in G,then the following statements hold:1) G is a p-soluble group and P' ≤Op(G); 2) lp(G) ≤ 2 and lπ(G) < 2; 3) if a π-Hall subgroup of G is q-supersoluble for some q ∈π,then G is q-supersoluble.

  11. A Note on TI-Subgroups of Finite Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jiakuan Lu; Linna Pang

    2012-02-01

    A subgroup of a finite group is called a TI-subgroup if $H\\cap H^x=1$ or for any $x\\in G$. In this short note, the finite groups all of whose nonabelian subgroups are TI-subgroups are classified.

  12. On c*-Normal Subgroups in Finite Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Quan WEI; Wei Ping GU; Hong Fei PAN

    2012-01-01

    A subgroup H of a finitegroup G is called a c*-normal subgroup of G if there exists a normal subgroup K of G such that G =HK and H ∩ K is an S-quasinormal embedded subgroup of G.In this paper,the structure of a finite group G with some c*-normal maximal subgroups of Sylow subgroups is characterized and some known related results are generalized.

  13. Class-Preserving Coleman Automorphisms of Finite Groups Whose Second Maximal Subgroups Are TI-Subgroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengxing LI; Jinke HAI

    2013-01-01

    Recall that a subgroup H of a finite group G is called a TI-subgroup if H ∩ Hg =1or H for each g ∈ G.Suppose that G is a finite group whose second maximal subgroups are TI-subgroups.It is shown that every class-preserving Coleman automorphism of G is an inner automorphism.As an immediate consequence of this result,we obtain that the normalizer property holds for G.

  14. Finite Groups with c-Supplemented Minimal Subgroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanming Wang; Yangming Li; Jingtong Wang

    2003-01-01

    A subgroup H is said to be c-supplemented in a finite group G if there exists a subgroup K of G such that HK = G and H∩K is contained in CoreG(H).We determine the structure of finite groups G with the minimal subgroup of the generalized Fitting subgroup of some normal subgroup of G c-supplemented in G.We also generalize some known results.

  15. Groups Satisfying the Maximal Condition on Non-modular Subgroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria De Falco; Carmela Musella

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, (generalized) soluble groups for which the set of non-modular subgroups verifies the maximal condition and groups for which the set of non-permutable subgroups satisfies the same property are classified.

  16. Constructing arithmetic subgroups of unipotent groups

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaf, Willem; Pavan, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Let G be a unipotent algebraic subgroup of some GL_m(C) defined over Q. We describe an algorithm for finding a finite set of generators of the subgroup G(Z) = G \\cap GL_m(Z). This is based on a new proof of the result (in more general form due to Borel and Harish-Chandra) that such a finite generating set exists.

  17. On -Semipermutable Subgroups of Finite Groups and -Nilpotency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Han Zhangjia

    2010-04-01

    A subgroup of a group is said to be -semipermutable in if it is permutable with every Sylow -subgroup of with $(p,|H|)=1$. Using the concept of -semipermutable subgroups, some new characterizations of -nilpotent groups are obtained and several results are generalized.

  18. On Certain Distributive Lattices of Subgroups of Finite Soluble Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.M.EZQUERRO; X. SOLER-ESCRIV(A)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we prove the following result. Let (S) be a saturated formation and ∑ a Hall system of a soluble group G. Let X be a w-solid set of maximal subgroups of G such that ∑ reduces into each element of X. Consider in G the following three subgroups: the (S)-normalizer D of G associated with ∑; the X-prefrattini subgroup W = W(G, X) of G; and a hypercentrally embedded subgroup T of G. Then the lattice (ε)(T, W, D) generated by T, D and W is a distributive lattice of pairwise permutable subgroups of G with the cover and avoidance property.This result remains true for the lattice (ε)(V, W, D), where V is a subgroup of G whose Sylow subgroups are also Sylow subgroups of hypercentrally embedded subgroups of G such that ∑ reduces into V.

  19. $\\mathcal M^\\ast$-supplemented subgroups of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jia Zhang; Long Miao; Juping Tang

    2016-05-01

    A subgroup $H$ of a group $G$ is said to be $\\mathcal M^\\ast$-supplemented in $G$ if there exists a subgroup $K$ of $G$ such that $G = HK$ and $H \\cap K$ is $\\mathcal M$-supplemented in $G$. In this paper, we prove as follows: Let $E$ be a normal subgroup of a group $G$. Suppose that every maximal subgroup of every non-cyclic Sylow subgroup $P$ of $F^\\ast (E)$ is $\\mathcal M^\\ast$-supplemented in $G$, then $E \\leq Z_{\\mathcal U\\Phi} (G)$.

  20. Subgroup s-commutativity degree of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Otera, Daniele Ettore

    2010-01-01

    In a recent contribution, Tarnauceanu has introduced the subgroup commutativity degree of a finite group, adapting to the context of the lattice theory some ideas and some techniques, which were known by the studies of Lescot on the commutativity degree. This new notion allows us to detect how a group is far from having all subgroups which are permutable. In the present paper we investigate a probability, which generalizes the subgroup commutativity degree, and find some numerical restrictions on groups which are rich in S-permutable subgroups in the sense of Kegel.

  1. BAYESIAN NETWORKS FOR SUB-GROUPS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this study, patients with multiple sclerosis "sub-groups" characteristics in relation to detection of a statistically (SPSS) and are provided in the Bayesian network. The main objective of this study, regarding the appearance of MRI lesions in patients with Multiple Sclerosis information and / or EDSS scores to investigate the possible attack of multiple sclerosis subgroups. Bayesian networks, reflects the level of sub-groups in multiple sclerosis patients. Analyzes were conducted...

  2. On discrete Zariski-dense subgroups of algebraic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Winkelmann, J

    1993-01-01

    We investigate for which linear-algebraic groups (over the complex numbers or any local field) there exists subgroups which are dense in the Zariski topology, but discrete in the Hausdorff topology. For instance, such subgroups exist for every non-solvable complex group.

  3. Finite Groups with Given Quantitative Non-Nilpotent Subgroups II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2014-01-01

    As an extension of Shi and Zhang's 2011 article [4], we prove that any finite group having at most 23 non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is solvable except for G ≅ A 5 or SL(2, 5), and any finite group having at most three conjugacy classes of non-normal non-nilpotent proper subgroups is s...

  4. On p-nilpotency and minimal subgroups of finite groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Xiuyun(郭秀云); K.P.Shum

    2003-01-01

    We call a subgroup H of a finite group G c-supplemented in G if there exists a subgroup K ofG such that G = HK and H ∩K ≤ core(H). In this paper it is proved that a finite group G is p-nilpotentif G is S4-free and every minimal subgroup of P ∩ GN is c-supplemented in NG(P), and when p = 2 P isquaternion-free, where p is the smallest prime number dividing the order of G, P a Sylow p-subgroup of G.As some applications of this result, some known results are generalized.

  5. The Demazure-Tits subgroup of a simple Lie group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, L.; Patera, J.; Sharp, R. T.

    1988-04-01

    The Demazure-Tits subgroup of a simple Lie group G is the group of invariance of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients tables (assuming an appropriate choice of basis). The structure of the Demazure-Tits subgroups of An, Bn, Cn, Dn, and G2 is described. Orbits of the permutation action of the DT group in any irreducible finite-dimensional representation space of A2, C2, and G2 are decomposed into the sum of irreducible representations of the DT group.

  6. On Maximal Subgroups of a Finite Solvable Group

    CERN Document Server

    Gritsuk, D V

    2011-01-01

    The following result is received: Let $H$ be a non-normal maximal subgroup of a finite solvable group $G$ and let $q \\in \\pi(F(H/\\mathrm{Core}_GH))$, then $G$ has a Sylow $q$-subgroup $Q$ such that $N_{G}(Q) \\subseteq H$.

  7. On Approximation of Lie Groups by Discrete Subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hatem Hamrouni; Salah Souissi

    2014-02-01

    A locally compact group is said to be approximated by discrete sub-groups (in the sense of Tôyama) if there is a sequence of discrete subgroups of that converges to in the Chabauty topology (or equivalently, in the Vietoris topology). The notion of approximation of Lie groups by discrete subgroups was introduced by Tôyama in Kodai Math. Sem. Rep. 1 (1949) 36–37 and investigated in detail by Kuranishi in Nagoya Math. J. 2 (1951) 63–71. It is known as a theorem of Tôyama that any connected Lie group approximated by discrete subgroups is nilpotent. The converse, in general, does not hold. For example, a connected simply connected nilpotent Lie group is approximated by discrete subgroups if and only if has a rational structure. On the other hand, if is a discrete uniform subgroup of a connected, simply connected nilpotent Lie group then is approximated by discrete subgroups $_n$ containing . The proof of the above result is by induction on the dimension of , and gives an algorithm for inductively determining $_n$. The purpose of this paper is to give another proof in which we present an explicit formula for the sequence $(_n)_{n≥ 0}$ in terms of . Several applications are given.

  8. On subgroups of saturated or totally bounded paratopological groups

    CERN Document Server

    Banakh, Taras

    2010-01-01

    A paratopological group $G$ is saturated if the inverse $U^{-1}$ of each non-empty set $U\\subset G$ has non-empty interior. It is shown that a [first-countable] paratopological group $H$ is a closed subgroup of a saturated (totally bounded) [abelian] paratopological group if and only if $H$ admits a continuous bijective homomorphism onto a (totally bounded) [abelian] topological group $G$ [such that for each neighborhood $U\\subset H$ of the unit $e$ there is a closed subset $F\\subset G$ with $e\\in h^{-1}(F)\\subset U$]. As an application we construct a paratopological group whose character exceeds its $\\pi$-weight as well as the character of its group reflexion. Also we present several examples of (para)topological groups which are subgroups of totally bounded paratopological groups but fail to be subgroups of regular totally bounded paratopological groups.

  9. On uc-Normal Subgroups of Finite Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Y. Alsheik Ahmad; J.J. Jaraden; Alexander N. Skiba

    2007-01-01

    Let G be a finite group. We say that a subgroup H of G is Uc-normal in G if G has a subnormal subgroup T such that TH = G and (H ∩ T)HG/HG is contained in the U-hypercenter Zu∞ (G/HG) of G/HG, where U is the class of the finite supersoluble groups. We study the structure of G under the assumption that some subgroups of G are Uc-normal in G.

  10. BAYESIAN NETWORKS FOR SUB-GROUPS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz KARACA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, patients with multiple sclerosis "sub-groups" characteristics in relation to detection of a statistically (SPSS and are provided in the Bayesian network. The main objective of this study, regarding the appearance of MRI lesions in patients with Multiple Sclerosis information and / or EDSS scores to investigate the possible attack of multiple sclerosis subgroups. Bayesian networks, reflects the level of sub-groups in multiple sclerosis patients. Analyzes were conducted to determine the change of these properties. MR images of the input data is discussed for the MS patients, the sub-groups of MS, "Remitting Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis", "Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis" with their patients' clinical brain MR images, brain stem, and the Upper Cervical Regions of the corpus callosum-periventricular lesions created in the information. Multiple Sclerosis is owned by the input data is created correctly identify disease subgroups of MS patients for the number of lesions in MR images and MR image of the three regions for the year for which the information used in the EDSS score. Of MS is RRMS, SPMS correctly identify sub-groups of the brain with Brain Stem, and upper cervical regions of the corpus callosum-periventricular lesions in these three points for the region and / or EDSS score information can be emphasized by using the Bayesian networks play an important role in the analysis.

  11. A conjugacy criterion for Hall subgroups in finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Revin, D O

    2010-01-01

    A finite group $G$ is said to satisfy $C_\\pi$ for a set of primes $\\pi$, if $G$ possesses exactly one class of conjugate $\\pi$-Hall subgroups. In the paper we obtain a criterion for a finite group $G$ to satisfy $C_\\pi$ in terms of a normal series of the group.

  12. Carter subgroups of singular classical groups over finite fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高有; 石新华

    2004-01-01

    Let Fq be a finite field with qelements whereq = pα. In the present paper, the authors study the existence and structure of Carter subgroups of singular symplectic group Sp (Fq), singular unitary group U ( Fq2 ) and singular orthogonal group O ( Fq ) ( n is even) over finite fields Fq.

  13. Some remarks on regular subgroups of the affine group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chiara Tamburini Bellani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Let $V$ be a vector space over a field $F$ of characteristic $pgeq 0$ and let $T$ be a regular subgroup of the affine group $AGL(V$. In the finite dimensional case we show that, if $T$ is abelian or $p>0$, then $T$ is unipotent. For $T$ abelian, pushing forward some ideas used in [A. Caranti, F. Dalla Volta and M. Sala, Abelian regular subgroups of the affine group and radical rings, Publ. Math. Debrecen {bf 69} (2006, 297--308.], we show that the set $left{t-Imid tin Tright}$ is a subalgebra of $End_F(Foplus V$, which is nilpotent when $V$ has finite dimension. This allows a rather systematic construction of abelian regular subgroups.

  14. On Isomorphism Testing of Groups with Normal Hall Subgroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Ming Qiao; Jayalal Sarma M.N.; Bang-Sheng Tang

    2012-01-01

    A normal Hall subgroup N of a group G is a normal subgroup with its order coprime with its index.Schur-Zassenhaus theorem states that every normal Hall subgroup has a complement subgroup,that is a set of coset representatives H which also forms a subgroup of G.In this paper,we present a framework to test isomorphism of groups with at least one normal Hall subgroup,when groups are given as multiplication tables.To establish the framework,we first observe that a proof of Schur-Zassenhaus theorem is constructive,and formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for testing isomorphism in terms of the associated actions of the semidirect products,and isomorphisms of the normal parts and complement parts.We then focus on the case when the normal subgroup is abelian.Utilizing basic facts of representation theory of finite groups and a technique by Le Gall (STACS 2009),we first get an efficient isomorphism testing algorithm when the complement has bounded number of generators.For the case when the complement subgroup is elementary abelian,which does not necessarily have bounded number of generators,we obtain a polynomial time isomorphism testing algorithm by reducing to generalized code isomorphism problem,which asks whether two linear subspaces are the same up to permutation of coordinates.A solution to the latter can be obtained by a mild extension of the singly exponential (in the number of coordinates) time algorithm for code isomorphism problem developed recently by Babai et al.(SODA 2011).Enroute to obtaining the above reduction,we study the following computational problem in representation theory of finite groups:given two representations ρ and τ of a group H over Zpd,p a prime,determine if there exists an automorphism φ:H → H,such that the induced representation ρφ =ρоφ and τ are equivalent,in time poly(ㄧHㄧ,pd).

  15. Characteristic Properties of Large Subgroups in Primary Abelian Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peter V Danchev

    2004-08-01

    Suppose is an arbitrary additively written primary abelian group with a fixed large subgroup . It is shown that is (a) summable; (b)$\\sum$-summable; (c) a $\\sum$-group; (d) $p^{+1}$-projective only when so is . These claims extend results of such a kind obtained by Benabdallah, Eisenstadt, Irwin and Poluianov, Acta Math. Acad. Sci. Hungaricae (1970) and Khan, Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. Sect. A (1978).

  16. Locally Transitive Graphs Admitting a Group with Cyclic Sylow Subgroups*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN SHANG-DI; FENG QING-LIN

    2010-01-01

    All graphs are finite simple undirected and of no isolated vertices in this paper. Using the theory of coset graphs and permutation groups, it is completed that a classification of locally transitive graphs admitting a non-Abelian group with cyclic Sylow subgroups. They are either the union of the family of arc-transitive graphs, or the union of the family of bipartite edge-transitive graphs.

  17. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gara, Alan; Cheng, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2016-02-02

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

  18. Combined group ECC protection and subgroup parity protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Alan G.; Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-06-18

    A method and system are disclosed for providing combined error code protection and subgroup parity protection for a given group of n bits. The method comprises the steps of identifying a number, m, of redundant bits for said error protection; and constructing a matrix P, wherein multiplying said given group of n bits with P produces m redundant error correction code (ECC) protection bits, and two columns of P provide parity protection for subgroups of said given group of n bits. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the matrix P is constructed by generating permutations of m bit wide vectors with three or more, but an odd number of, elements with value one and the other elements with value zero; and assigning said vectors to rows of the matrix P.

  19. Dehn twists and free subgroups of symplectic mapping class groups

    CERN Document Server

    Keating, Ailsa

    2012-01-01

    Given two Lagrangian spheres in an exact symplectic manifold, we find conditions under which the Dehn twists about them generate a free non-abelian subgroup of the symplectic mapping class group. This extends a result of Ishida for Riemann surfaces. The proof generalises the categorical version of Seidel's long exact sequence to arbitrary powers of a fixed Dehn twist. We also show that the Milnor fibre of any isolated degenerate hypersurface singularity contains such pairs of spheres.

  20. Ideal Class Groups and Subgroups of Real Quadratic Function Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we study the real quadratic function fields K=k(D), given a necessary and sufficient condition for the ideal class group H(K) of any real quadratic function field K to have a cyclic subgroup of order n, and obtained eight series of such fields. The ideal class numbers h(OK) of K in the series all have a factor n.

  1. The Influence of Primitive Subgroups on the Structure of Finite Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu-feng; Du Xian-kun(Communicated)

    2013-01-01

    A subgroup H of a group G is said to be primitive if it is a proper subgroup of the intersection of all subgroups of G containing H as its proper subgroup. The purpose of this note is to go further into the influence of primitive subgroups on the structure of finite groups. Some new results are obtained.

  2. Symmetry breaking, subgroup embeddings and the Weyl group

    CERN Document Server

    George, Damien P; Thompson, Jayne E; Volkas, Raymond R

    2013-01-01

    We present a systematic approach to writing adjoint Higgs vacuum expectation values (vevs), which break a symmetry G to differently embedded isomorphic copies of a subgroup belonging to the chain $G \\supset H_1 \\supset ... \\supset H_l $, as linear combinations of each other. Given an adjoint Higgs vacuum expectation value h breaking G \\rightarrow H, a full complement of vevs breaking G to different embeddings of the subgroup H can be generated through the Weyl group orbit of h. An explicit formula for recovering each vev is given. We focus on the case when H stabilizes the highest weight of the lowest dimensional fundamental representation, where the formula is exceedingly simple. We also discuss cases when the Higgs field is not in the adjoint representation and apply these techniques to current research problems, especially in domain-wall brane model building.

  3. On the relations between subgroups of a group and submodules of modules over group rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Mustafa

    2017-07-01

    Let R be a commutative ring and G a finite group. In [1], using a structure on an R-module M to make it an RG-module, we find some relations between RG-submodules and a subgroups. We also prove that for each normal subgroup H of G with an invertible |H| in R, there is a direct summand RG-submodule of M.

  4. Criteria for phytoplasma 16Sr group/subgroup delineation and the need of a platform for proper registration of new groups and subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    As more phytoplasmas are discovered in emerging and re-emerging plant diseases worldwide, the scheme for classification of phytoplasmas into 16S rRNA gene RFLP (16Sr) groups and subgroups is experiencing an ongoing rapid expansion. Improper delineation or designation of new groups and subgroups can...

  5. Representing and Counting the Subgroups of the Group Zm×Zn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Hampejs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We deduce a simple representation and the invariant factor decompositions of the subgroups of the group Zm×Zn, where m and n are arbitrary positive integers. We obtain formulas for the total number of subgroups and the number of subgroups of a given order.

  6. Developing the group mind through functional subgrouping: linking systems-centered training (SCT) and interpersonal neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Susan P; Agazarian, Yvonne M

    2010-10-01

    This article introduces the systems-centered concept of the "group mind" by linking systems-centered thinking and interpersonal neurobiology, building on Siegel's definition of mind as the process of regulating the flow of energy and information. Functional subgrouping, the systems-centered group method for resolving conflicts, discriminates and integrates the flow of energy and information within and between group members, subgroups, and the group-as-a-whole, thus potentiating survival, development, and transformation. This article uses the interpersonal neurobiological framework to discuss functional subgrouping as a tool for developing the group mind: considering how functional subgrouping facilitates emotional regulation, creates a secure relational context, and potentiates neural integration.

  7. Discrete Cocompact Subgroups of the Five-Dimensional Connected and Simply Connected Nilpotent Lie Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Ghorbel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The discrete cocompact subgroups of the five-dimensional connected, simply connected nilpotent Lie groups are determined up to isomorphism. Moreover, we prove if G = N × A is a connected, simply connected, nilpotent Lie group with an Abelian factor A, then every uniform subgroup of G is the direct product of a uniform subgroup of N and Z^r where r = dim A.

  8. On p-Nilpotency of Finite Groups with Some Subgroups c-Supplemented

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuyun Guo; K.P. Shum

    2003-01-01

    A subgroup H of a group G is said to be c-supplemented in G if there exists a subgroup K of G such that G = HK and H∩K is contained in coreG(H).In this paper we prove that a group G is p-nilpotent if every maximal subgroup of P is c-supplemented in G and (|G|, p - 1) = 1, where p is a prime factor of the order of G and P is a Sylow p-subgroup of We also give a condition for a group to be p-nilpotent by using the 2-maximal subgroups of the Sylow p-subgroups.

  9. On the number of classes of conjugate Hall subgroups in finite simple groups

    CERN Document Server

    Revin, D O

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we find the number of conjugate $\\pi$-Hall subgroups in all finite almost simple groups. We also complete the classification of $\\pi$-Hall subgroups in finite simple groups and correct some mistakes from our previous paper.

  10. Groups in Which 2-Generator Subgroups Are Nilpotent of Bounded Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Costantino Delizia

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we study some properties of groups in which subgroups with a fixed number of generators are nilpotent. In particular, we discuss nilpotency of torsion-free groups in which 2-generator subgroups are nilpotent of class at most 4.

  11. Finite p-groups all of whose maximal abelian subgroups are soft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A subgroup A of a p-group G is said to be soft in G if CG(A) = A and |NG(A)/A| = p. In this paper we determined finite p-groups all of whose maximal abelian subgroups are soft; see Theorem A and Proposition 2.4.

  12. Subgroups of ideal class groups of real quadratic algebraic function fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Kunpeng(王鲲鹏); ZHANG; Xianke(张贤科)

    2003-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient condition on real quadratic algebraic function fields K is given for theirideal class groups H(K) to contain cyclic subgroups of order n. And eight series of such real quadratic functionfields K are obtained whose ideal class groups contain cyclic subgroups of order n. In particular, the ideal classnumbers of these function fields are divisible by n.

  13. Life of Pizza Pie: The Implications of Sub-Group Comparisons in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tara N.

    2013-01-01

    Current educational statistics have pitted subgroups against one another without consideration of the actual population sizes of each group. This paper is intended to provided a clearer understanding of the current usage of sub-group comparisons in American education. (Contains 4 figures.)

  14. An Investigation on the Parabolic Subgroups of the General Linear Groups by Using GAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SaadABedaiwi; LIShang-zhi

    2004-01-01

    A typical example for the algebraic groups is the general linear groups G=GL(n,F), we have studied the structure of such groups and paid special attention to its important substructures, namely the Parabolic subgroups. For a given G we computed all the Parabolic subgroups and determined their number, depending on the fact that any finite group has a composition series and the composition factors of a composition series are simple groups which are completely classified, we report here some investigations on the computed Parabolic subgroups. This has been done with the utility of GAP.

  15. Malnormal subgroups of lattices and the Pukanszky invariant in group factors

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Guyan

    2009-01-01

    Let $G$ be a connected semisimple real algebraic group. Assume that $G(\\bb R)$ has no compact factors and let $\\Gamma$ be a torsion-free uniform lattice subgroup of $G(\\bb R)$. Then $\\Gamma$ contains a malnormal abelian subgroup $A$. This implies that the $\\tto$ factor $\\vn(\\Gamma)$ contains a masa $\\fk A$ with Puk\\'anszky invariant $\\{\\infty\\}$.

  16. Nilpotency and Theory of L-Subgroups of an L-Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Ajmal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the notion of commutator is modified and extended to L-setting. Also, the notion of descending central series is introduced which is used to formulate the important notion of nilpotent L-subgroup of an L-group. Moreover, the level subset characterization for the notion of nilpotent L-subgroup is provided.

  17. The influence of X-semipermutability of subgroups on the structure of finite groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Let A be a subgroup of a group G and X be a nonempty subset of G. A is said to be X-semipermutable in G if A has a supplement T in G such that A is X-permutable with every subgroup of T. In this paper, we investigate further the influence of X-semipermutability of some subgroups on the structure of finite groups. Some new criteria for a group G to be supersoluble or p-nilpotent are obtained.

  18. Modules over group rings of groups with restrictions on the system of all proper subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dashkova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the class M of R{modules where R is an associative ring. Let A be a module over a group ring RG, G be a group and let L(G be the set of all proper subgroups of G. We suppose that if H 2 L(G then A=CA(H belongs to M. We study an RG{module A such that G 6= G0, CG(A = 1. We consider the cases: 1 M is the class of all artinian R{modules, R is either the ring of integers or the ring of p{adic integers; 2 M is the class of all nite R{modules, R is an associative ring; 3 M is the class of all nite R{modules, R= F is a nite eld.

  19. Normal Subgroup Growth of Linear Groups: the (G2; F4;E8)-Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Let G be a finitely generated group and M_n(G) the number of its normal subgroup subgroups of index at most n. For linear groups G we show that M_n(G) can grow polynomially in n only if the semisimple part of the Zariski closure of G has simple components only of type G2, F4 or E8 (and in this case indeed this can happened!)

  20. On a finite group having a normal series whose factors have bicyclic Sylow subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Monakhov, V S

    2009-01-01

    We consider the structure of a finite groups having a normal series whose factors have bicyclic Sylow subgroups. In particular, we investigated groups of odd order and $A_4$-free groups with this property. Exact estimations of the derived length and nilpotent length of such groups are obtained.

  1. Divide and Conquer: Sub-Grouping of ASD Improves ASD Detection Based on Brain Morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuwal, Gajendra J; Baum, Stefi A; Cahill, Nathan D; Michael, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Low success (ASD) classification using brain morphometry from the large multi-site ABIDE dataset and inconsistent findings on brain morphometric abnormalities in ASD can be attributed to the ASD heterogeneity. In this study, we show that ASD brain morphometry is highly heterogeneous, and demonstrate that the heterogeneity can be mitigated and classification improved if autism severity (AS), verbal IQ (VIQ) and age are used with morphometric features. Morphometric features from structural MRIs (sMRIs) of 734 males (ASD: 361, controls: 373) of ABIDE were derived using FreeSurfer. Applying the Random Forest classifier, an AUC of 0.61 was achieved. Adding VIQ and age to morphometric features, AUC improved to 0.68. Sub-grouping the subjects by AS, VIQ and age improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.8 in the moderate-AS sub-group (AS = 7-8). Matching subjects on age and/or VIQ in each sub-group further improved the classification with the highest AUC of 0.92 in the low AS sub-group (AS = 4-5). AUC decreased with AS and VIQ, and was the lowest in the mid-age sub-group (13-18 years). The important features were mainly from the frontal, temporal, ventricular, right hippocampal and left amygdala regions. However, they highly varied with AS, VIQ and age. The curvature and folding index features from frontal, temporal, lingual and insular regions were dominant in younger subjects suggesting their importance for early detection. When the experiments were repeated using the Gradient Boosting classifier similar results were obtained. Our findings suggest that identifying brain biomarkers in sub-groups of ASD can yield more robust and insightful results than searching across the whole spectrum. Further, it may allow identification of sub-group specific brain biomarkers that are optimized for early detection and monitoring, increasing the utility of sMRI as an important tool for early detection of ASD.

  2. Some Sufficient Conditions on the Number of Non-abelian Subgroups of a Finite Group to be Solvable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Tao SHI; Cui ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Thompson's theorem indicates that a finite group with a nilpotent maximal subgroup of odd order is solvable. As an important application of Thompson's theorem, a finite group is solvable if it has an abelian .maximal subgroup. In this paper, we give some sufficient conditions on the number of non-abelian subgroups of a finite group to be solvable.

  3. Hyperbolically embedded subgroups and rotating families in groups acting on hyperbolic spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dahmani, F; Osin, D

    2017-01-01

    The authors introduce and study the notions of hyperbolically embedded and very rotating families of subgroups. The former notion can be thought of as a generalization of the peripheral structure of a relatively hyperbolic group, while the latter one provides a natural framework for developing a geometric version of small cancellation theory. Examples of such families naturally occur in groups acting on hyperbolic spaces including hyperbolic and relatively hyperbolic groups, mapping class groups, Out(F_n), and the Cremona group. Other examples can be found among groups acting geometrically on CAT(0) spaces, fundamental groups of graphs of groups, etc. The authors obtain a number of general results about rotating families and hyperbolically embedded subgroups; although their technique applies to a wide class of groups, it is capable of producing new results even for well-studied particular classes. For instance, the authors solve two open problems about mapping class groups, and obtain some results which are n...

  4. Metrization criteria for compact groups in terms of their dense subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Dikranjan, Dikran

    2011-01-01

    According to Comfort, Raczkowski and Trigos-Arrieta, a dense subgroup D of a compact abelian group G determines G if the restriction homomorphism hat{G}-->hat{D} of the dual groups is a topological isomorphism. We prove (in ZFC) that a compact abelian group determined by all its G_delta-dense subgroups is metrizable, thereby resolving Question 5.12(iii) from [S. Hernandez, S. Macario and F. J. Trigos-Arrieta, Uncountable products of determined groups need not be determined, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 348 (2008), 834--842]. (Under the additional assumption of the Continuum Hypothesis CH, the same statement was proved recently by Bruguera, Chasco, Dominguez, Tkachenko and Trigos-Arrieta.) Under CH, we prove a stronger version of this theorem saying that every compact abelian group determined by all its dense countably compact subgroups is metrizable. For every infinite cardinal kappa, we show that even a dense kappa-bounded minimal (=essential) subgroup of a compact abelian group need not determine it.

  5. The Hidden Subgroup Problem in Affine Groups Basis Selection in Fourier Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Cristopher; Russell, A; Schulman, L; Moore, Cristopher; Rockmore, Daniel; Russell, Alexander; Schulman, Leonard

    2002-01-01

    Some quantum algorithms, including Shor's celebrated factoring and discrete log algorithms, proceed by reduction to a hidden subgroup problem, in which a subgroup H of a group G must be determined from a quantum state uniformly supported on a left coset of H. These hidden subgroup problems are then solved by Fourier sampling: the quantum Fourier transform of the state is computed and measured. When the underlying group is non-Abelian, two important variants of the Fourier sampling paradigm have been identified: the weak standard method, where only representation names are measured, and the strong standard method, where full measurement occurs. It has remained open whether the strong standard method is indeed stronger, that is, whether there are hidden subgroups which can be reconstructed via the strong method by not by the weak, or any other known, method. In this article, we settle this question in the affirmative. We show that hidden subgroups of semidirect products of Z/p by Z/q, where q | (p-1) and q >= p...

  6. Strong Sperner property of the subgroup lattice of an Abelian p-group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军; 王毅

    2000-01-01

    Let n and k be arbitrary positive integers, p a prime number and L(kn)(p) the subgroup lattice of the Abelian p-group ( /pk )n. Then there is a positive integer N( n, k) such that when p > N( n, k), L(kn)(p) has the strong Sperner property.

  7. Strong Sperner property of the subgroup lattice of an Abelian p-group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Let n and k be arbitrary positive integers, p a prime number and L(kn)(p) the subgroup lattice of the Abelian p-group (Z/pkZ)n. Then there is a positive integer N(n,k) such that when p>N(n,k), L(kn)(p) has the strong Sperner property.

  8. Reflection subgroups and sub-root systems of the imprimitive complex reflection groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on a graph-theoretic analysis,we determine all the irreducible reflection subgroups of the imprimitive complex reflection groups G(m,p,n),and describe the irreducible subsystems of all possible types in the root system R(m,p,n) of G(m,p,n).

  9. Testing Measurement Invariance of the Students' Affective Characteristics Model across Gender Sub-Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ergül

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to construct a significant structural measurement model comparing students' affective characteristics with their mathematic achievement. According to this model, the aim was to test the measurement invariances between gender sub-groups hierarchically. This study was conducted as basic and descriptive research. Secondary…

  10. TP53 Polymorphisms allow for genetic sub-grouping of the canine transmissible venereal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Servín, Abel; Córdova-Alarcon, Emilio; Fajardo, Raúl

    2009-01-01

    The canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is found mainly in dogs' sexual organs. Currently, it is widely accepted that all samples of CTVT show similar histopathological characteristics and share common genetic alterations. Despite the common genetic origin of CTVT, mutations in the P53 gene have been reported. In this study, we proposed that tumor samples can be genetically grouped using this gene. The presence of different subgroups of CTVT was determined in Mexican dogs using the TP53 gene sequence in CTVT samples. Four new polymorphisms were found and therefore, the CTVT samples were classified in five subgroups. PMID:19934603

  11. Subexponential-Time Algorithms for Hidden Subgroup Problems Over Product Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Alagic, G; Russell, A; Alagic, Gorjan; Moore, Cristopher; Russell, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    We study the hidden subgroup problem (HSP) over groups of the form G^n where G is a group of constant size. While these groups are structurally simpler than the symmetric groups S_n, for which solving the HSP would yield a quantum algorithm for Graph Isomorphism, they share an important property with S_n: almost all of their irreducible representations are exponentially large. As a consequence, recent negative results show that any quantum algorithm that attempts to solve the HSP over these groups by measuring coset states must perform highly entangled measurements on \\Omega(n) registers. This distinguishes them from, say, the dihedral groups, whose representations are of constant size and where single-register Fourier sampling provides sufficient information to solve the HSP. Here we give quantum algorithms for many groups of this form, which distinguish an order-2 subgroup from the trivial subgroup in time 2^{O(\\sqrt{n \\log n})}. Our algorithm combines the general idea behind Kuperberg's sieve for dihedral ...

  12. On the Set of the Numbers of Conjugates of Noncyclic Proper Subgroups of Finite Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a finite group and (G) the set of the numbers of conjugates of noncyclic proper subgroups of G. We prove that (1) if |(G)| ≤ 2, then G is solvable, and (2) G is a nonsolvable group with |(G)| = 3 if and only if G≅PSL(2,5) or PSL(2,13) or SL(2,5) or SL(2,13)....

  13. Noether's problem for $p$-groups with an abelian subgroup of index $p$

    CERN Document Server

    Michailov, Ivo M

    2012-01-01

    Let $K$ be a field and $G$ be a finite group. Let $G$ act on the rational function field $K(x(g):g\\in G)$ by $K$ automorphisms defined by $g\\cdot x(h)=x(gh)$ for any $g,h\\in G$. Denote by $K(G)$ the fixed field $K(x(g):g\\in G)^G$. Noether's problem then asks whether $K(G)$ is rational over $K$. In this paper, we give a positive answer to the Noether's problem for all $p$-groups with an abelian subgroup of index $p$ and with a trivial $p$-th lower central subgroup, provided that $K$ contains sufficient roots of unity.

  14. Phenotypic sub-grouping in microtia using a statistical and a clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquetti, Daniela V; Saltzman, Babette S; Heike, Carrie L; Sie, Kathleen C; Birgfeld, Craig B; Evans, Kelly N; Leroux, Brian G

    2015-04-01

    The clinical presentation of microtia varies widely from minimal morphological abnormalities to complete absence of the ear. In this study we sought to identify and characterize sub-groups of microtia using a statistical and a clinical approach. Photographs of 86 ears were classified in relation to all the external ear components. We used cluster analysis and rater's clinical opinion to identify groups with similar phenotypes in two separate analyses. We used Cramer's Phi coefficient of association to assess the similarity among the clinician's groupings as well as among the statistical sub-phenotypic groups and each of the clinician's groupings. The cluster analysis initially divided the 86 ears into a more and a less severe group. The less severe group included two sub-groups that included ears classified as normal and a group that had very few anomalous components. The group of 48 more affected ears all had abnormalities of the helix crus; antihelix-stem, -superior crus and -inferior crus; and antitragus. These were further divided into 4 sub-phenotypes. There was a moderate degree of association among the raters' groupings (Cramer's Phi: 0.64 to 0.73). The statistical and clinical groupings had a lower degree of association (Cramer's Phi: 0.49 to 0.58). Using standardized characterization of structural abnormalities of the ear we identified six distinct phenotypic groups; correlations with clinicians' groupings were moderate. These clusters may represent groups of ear malformations associated with the same etiology, similar time of insult or target cell population during embryonic development. The results will help inform investigations on etiology.

  15. Increase in functional groups for POSS by introducing branched phenylglycidylether

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付强; 胡立江; 孙德智

    2004-01-01

    In the selected experimental conditions, firstly, the branched products with functional groups, N-(2-hydroxylpropylphenylether) (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APES-PGE, containing one hydroxyl group) and N- [ di (2-hydroxylpropylphenylether) ] (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane ( APES-PGE2, containing two hydroxyl groups), were synthesized by reacting 1 mole of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APES) with 2 mole of phenylglycidylether (PGE). Then the hydrolytic condensation of APES-PGE and APES-PGE2 was performed by dissolving 1 g of the corresponding silane in 1.5 ml tetrahydrofuran (THF), adding water and eventually a catalyst ( molar ratios: [ H2O ]/Si = 3, [ NaOH ]/Si = 0.05 ), and heating at 50 ℃ for 24 h, allowing continuous evaporation of volatiles. The final products with branches containing hydroxyl groups were polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS). The products from two reactions were characterized by standard spectroscopic techniques,gel partition chromatography (GPC), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI-TOF MS). Additionally, a narrow mass distribution of multifunctionalized POSS was shown by UV-MALDI-TOF MS and assignments of the MS peaks.

  16. The classification of the virtually cyclic subgroups of the sphere braid groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, Daciberg Lima

    2011-01-01

    We study the problem of determining the isomorphism classes of the virtually cyclic subgroups of the n-string braid groups B_n(S^2) of the 2-sphere S^2. If n is odd, or if n is even and sufficiently large, we obtain the complete classification. For small even values of n, the classification is complete up to an explicit finite number of open cases. In order to prove our main theorem, we obtain a number of other results of independent interest, notably the characterisation of the centralisers and normalisers of the finite cyclic and dicyclic subgroups of B_n(S^2), a result concerning conjugate powers of finite order elements, an analysis of the isomorphism classes of the amalgamated products that occur as subgroups of B_n(S^2), as well as an alternative proof of the fact that the universal covering space of the n-th configuration space of S^2 has the homotopy type of S^3 if n is greater than or equal to three.

  17. Functional FX-bar Projections of the (Romanian Verbal Group and Sub-Groups on the Syntactic-Semantic Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neculai Curteanu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the syntactic / semantic substructures (called subgroups of the Romanian verbal group (VG [12], or verbal complex [25], starting with the achievements in the literature, and melted into the device of direct and inverse functional projection within FX-bar theory [7]. The paper examines several problems and their solutions for the syntactic-semantic theories of VG, as discussed in some fundamental papers, and we offer our explanation on the involved syntactic phenomena, the emphasis falling on the VG substructures (verbal subgroups, VSGs, VSG boundaries and composition within VG, direct and inverse FX-bar projections of VG, VG parsing, lexical semantics and intensional~/ extensional logic representations of the Romanian (verbal or nominal predicate.

  18. Finite groups having at most 27 non-normal proper subgroups of non-prime-power order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2014-01-01

    We prove that any finite group having at most 27 non-normal proper subgroups of non-prime-power order is solvable except for G≅ A5, the alternating group of degree 5.......We prove that any finite group having at most 27 non-normal proper subgroups of non-prime-power order is solvable except for G≅ A5, the alternating group of degree 5....

  19. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnhammer Erik L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins.

  20. Right-angled Artin groups and a generalized isomorphism problem for finitely generated subgroups of mapping class groups

    CERN Document Server

    Koberda, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Consider the mapping class group $\\Mod_{g,n}$ of a surface of finite type and a finite collection $F$ of mapping classes. In this paper we prove that there are positive exponents such that after replacing the elements of $F$ by the corresponding powers, they generate a right-angled Artin group. Under some further suitable hypotheses, these mapping classes are the vertex generators of the underlying graph, or form a right-angled Artin system in the terminology which we shall develop. We prove an analogous result for a finite volume real and complex hyperbolic $n$-manifolds, thus establishing the primary result as a rank one type phenomenon for the mapping class group. We also show the unsolvability of the isomorphism problem for finitely generated subgroups of $\\Mod_{g,n}$, and prove a homological rigidity result for right-angled Artin groups which implies a solution to the isomorphism problem for right-angled Artin groups. We thus solve a generalized isomorphism problem for finitely generated subgroups of $\\M...

  1. On Locally Finite Group with CC-Subgroups%含有CC-子群的局部有限群

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛海波; 吕恒

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, it is proved that;Let G be a locally finite group with a CC-subgroup. If every proper infinite subgroup has no proper CC-subgroup, then G is an extension of divisible abelian P-subgroup of rank q-1 by cyclic group of order q, where p,q are different prime numbers, moreover, every proper infinite subgroup of G is abelian.%主要证明了:G是局部有限群,若G存在CC-子群,但是其每一个无限真子群都不含有CC-子群,则G是秩为q-1的可除阿贝尔p-群被q阶循环群的扩张,其中p,q是互不相同的素数,且G的每一个无限真子群都是阿贝尔群.

  2. An L-Point Characterization of Normality and Normalizer of an L-Subgroup of an L-Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Ajmal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the notion of normal L-subgroup of an L-group and provide its characterization by an L-point. We also provide a construction of the normalizer of an L-subgroup of a given L-group by using L-points. Moreover, we also discuss the product, homomorphic images and homomorphic preimages of normalizers.

  3. Conjugacy classes in Sylow p-subgroups of finite Chevalley groups in bad characteristic

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, John D

    2012-01-01

    Let $U = \\mathbf U(q)$ be a Sylow $p$-subgroup of a finite Chevalley group $G = \\mathbf G(q)$. In [GR}] R\\"ohrle and the second author determined a parameterization of the conjugacy classes of $U$, for $\\mathbf G$ of small rank when $q$ is a power of a good prime for $\\mathbf G$. As a consequence they verified that the number $k(U)$ of conjugacy classes of $U$ is given by a polynomial in $q$ with integer coefficients. In the present paper, we consider the case when $p$ is a bad prime for $\\mathbf G$. We obtain a parameterization of the conjugacy classes of $U$, when $\\mathbf G$ has rank less than or equal to 4, and $\\mathbf G$ is not of type $F_4$. In these cases we deduce that $k(U)$ is given by a polynomial in $q$ with integer coefficients; this polynomial is different from the polynomial for good primes.

  4. Drinfeld Doubles for Finite Subgroups of SU(2 and SU(3 Lie Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Coquereaux

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drinfeld doubles of finite subgroups of SU(2 and SU(3 are investigated in detail. Their modular data – S, T and fusion matrices – are computed explicitly, and illustrated by means of fusion graphs. This allows us to reexamine certain identities on these tensor product or fusion multiplicities under conjugation of representations that had been discussed in our recent paper [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 (2011, 295208, 26 pages], proved to hold for simple and affine Lie algebras, and found to be generally wrong for finite groups. It is shown here that these identities fail also in general for Drinfeld doubles, indicating that modularity of the fusion category is not the decisive feature. Along the way, we collect many data on these Drinfeld doubles which are interesting for their own sake and maybe also in a relation with the theory of orbifolds in conformal field theory.

  5. πnFrattini Subgroups and πcFrattini Subgroups of Amalgamated Free Products of Groups%群的融合自由积的πn-Frattini子群和πc-Frattini子群

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志让; 邓理平; 和佩佩

    2013-01-01

    Azarian M K将Tang C Y得到的关于两个群的带循环融合自由积的Frattini子群的一个定理推广到任意多个子群的带循环融合自由积的情况.通过考虑任意多个子群的带循环融合自由积的πnFrattini子群和πcFrattini子群,得到了类似的结果.%Azarian M K generalizes the theorem on Frattini subgroups of amalgamated free products of two subgroups proposed by Tang C Y to the case of the free product of any set of subgroups with amalgamated subgroup. We consider TrnFrattini subgroups and TrcFrattini subgroups of the free product of any set of subgroups with amalgmated subgroup being a cyclic group and obtain similar results.

  6. A new attitude coupled with fuzzy thinking to fuzzy group and subgroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Abbasi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we shall embark on the study of the algebraic object known as a fuzzy group which serves as one of the fundamental building blocks for the subject which is called fuzzy abstract algebra. In our opinion, the fuzzy algebraic systems are usually sets on whose elements we can operate algebraically by this we mean that we can combine two elements of the set, perhaps in several ways, to obtain a third element of the set and, in addition, we assume that these fuzzy algebraic operations are subject to certain rules, which are explicitly spelled out in what we call the axioms or postulates defining the system. In this abstract setting we then attempt to prove theorems about these very general structures. We should like to stress that these fuzzy algebraic systems and their axioms, must come from the experience of looking at many examples. Namely, they should be rich in meaningful results. Hence, the acceptable definition of fuzzy group and subgroup are presented with binary operations and on the basis of the specified parameter, called ambiguity rank, which fulfils the basic requirements. The properties of these fuzzy groups and their fundamental qualities are discussed and then, the several illustrative examples were given. The future prospect of this paper is a new attitude to fuzzy basic mathematics, which will be referred to in the end.

  7. Genetic Sequencing Analysis of A307 Subgroup of ABO Blood Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Lin, Jiajin; Zhu, Suiyong

    2015-09-18

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the serology and gene sequence characteristics of the A307 subgroup of the ABO blood group. MATERIAL AND METHODS Monoclonal anti-A and anti-B antibodies were used to detect the ABO antigens of a proband whose positive blood type was not consistent with the negative blood type of the ABO blood group. Standard A-, B-, and O-negative typing cells were used to test for ABO antibodies in the serum. Additionally, polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) was used to confirm the genotype, and subsequently, exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene were detected by gene sequencing. Samples from the wife and daughters of the proband were also used for serological and genetic testing. RESULTS Red blood cells of the proband showed weak agglutination reaction with anti-A antibody, while anti-B antibody was detected in the serum. Moreover, PCR-SSP detected A307 and O02 alleles, while gene sequencing revealed mutation of c.745C>T in exon 7, which produced a polypeptide chain p.R249W. The A307 gene of the proband was not inherited by his daughters. CONCLUSIONS A mutation (c.745 C>T) in exon 7 of the ABO blood group gene resulted in low activity of a-1,3-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl transferase, producing A3 phenotype.

  8. Genetic sequencing analysis of the A307 subgroup of ABO blood group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Lin, Jiajin; Zhu, Suiyong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the serology and gene sequence characteristics of the A307 subgroup of ABO blood group. Monoclonal anti-A and anti-B antibodies were used to detect the ABO antigens of a proband whose positive blood type was not consistent with the negative blood type of ABO blood group. Meanwhile, standard A-, B-, and O-negative typing cells were used to test for ABO antibodies in the serum. Additionally, polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) was used to confirm the genotype, and subsequently, exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene were detected by gene sequencing. Samples from the wife and daughters of the proband were also used for serological and genetic testing. Red blood cells of the proband showed weak agglutination reaction with anti-A antibody, while anti-B antibody was detected in the serum. Moreover, PCR-SSP detected A307 and O02 alleles, while gene sequencing revealed mutation of c.745C>T in exon 7, which produced a polypeptide chain p.R249W. Furthermore, the A307 gene of the proband was not inherited by his daughters. A mutation (c.745 C>T) in exon 7 of the ABO blood group gene resulted in low activity of α-1, 3-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl transferase, producing A3 phenotype.

  9. Expanded risk groups help determine which prostate radiotherapy sub-group may benefit from adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Scott G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess whether an expanded (five level risk stratification system can be used to identify the sub-group of intermediate risk patients with prostate cancer who benefit from combining androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Materials and methods Using a previously validated 5-risk group schema, a prospective non-randomized data set of 1423 men treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency was assessed for the primary end point of biochemical control (bNED with the RTOG-ASTRO "Phoenix" definition (lowest PSA to date + 2 ng/mL, both with and without adjuvant ADT. The median follow-up was 5 years. Results There was no bNED benefit for ADT in the low or low intermediate groups but there was a statistically significant bNED benefit in the high intermediate, high and extreme risk groups. The 5-year bNED rates with and without ADT were 70% and 73% respectively for the low intermediate group (p = non-significant and 72% and 58% respectively for the high intermediate group (p = 0.002. Conclusion There appears to be no advantage to ADT where the Gleason score is 6 or less and PSA is 15 or less. ADT is beneficial in patients treated to standard dose radiation with Gleason 6 disease and a PSA greater than 15 or where the Gleason score is 7 or higher.

  10. Cluster analysis for identifying sub-groups and selecting potential discriminatory variables in human encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowcroft Natasha S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitis is an acute clinical syndrome of the central nervous system (CNS, often associated with fatal outcome or permanent damage, including cognitive and behavioural impairment, affective disorders and epileptic seizures. Infection of the central nervous system is considered to be a major cause of encephalitis and more than 100 different pathogens have been recognized as causative agents. However, a large proportion of cases have unknown disease etiology. Methods We perform hierarchical cluster analysis on a multicenter England encephalitis data set with the aim of identifying sub-groups in human encephalitis. We use the simple matching similarity measure which is appropriate for binary data sets and performed variable selection using cluster heatmaps. We also use heatmaps to visually assess underlying patterns in the data, identify the main clinical and laboratory features and identify potential risk factors associated with encephalitis. Results Our results identified fever, personality and behavioural change, headache and lethargy as the main characteristics of encephalitis. Diagnostic variables such as brain scan and measurements from cerebrospinal fluids are also identified as main indicators of encephalitis. Our analysis revealed six major clusters in the England encephalitis data set. However, marked within-cluster heterogeneity is observed in some of the big clusters indicating possible sub-groups. Overall, the results show that patients are clustered according to symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents. Exposure variables such as recent infection, sick person contact and animal contact have been identified as potential risk factors. Conclusions It is in general assumed and is a common practice to group encephalitis cases according to disease etiology. However, our results indicate that patients are clustered with respect to mainly symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents

  11. Use of a fragment of the tuf gene for phytoplasma 16Sr group/subgroup differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contaldo, Nicoletta; Canel, Alessandro; Makarova, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The usefulness of RFLP analyses on a 435 bp fragment of the tuf gene for preliminary identification of phytoplasmas from a number of phytoplasma ribosomal groups and/or 'Candidatus. Phytoplasma' was verified. The strains employed belong to thirteen 16Sr DNA groups and 22 different subgroups and w...

  12. The Iwasava decomposition and intermediate subgroups of the Steinberg groups over the field of fractions of a principal ideal ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOISEENKOVA; T.; V.; NUZHIN; Ya.; N.

    2009-01-01

    The Iwasava decomposition is proved for the Steinberg groups of types 2A2l-1, 2Dl, 2E6, 3D4 over the field of fractions of a principal ideal ring. By using this decomposition, it is described that subgroups exist between the Steinberg groups over the rings D and K under some restrictions on the ring D.

  13. Assessing the relationship between the Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory: Revealing sub-groups of drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory are two of the most frequently used measures of self-reported driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to identify sub-groups of drivers that potentially act dangerously in traffic (as measured...... by frequency of aberrant driving behaviors and level of driving skills), as well as to test whether the sub-groups differ in characteristics such as age, gender, annual mileage and accident involvement. Furthermore, the joint analysis of the two instruments was used to test drivers’ assessment of their own...... self-reported driving skills and whether the reported skill level was reflected in the reported aberrant driving behaviors. 3908 drivers aged 18–84 participated in the survey. K-means cluster analysis revealed four distinct sub-groups that differed in driving skills and frequency of aberrant driving...

  14. "Finite Groups with Quasinormal Subgroups of Prime Power Order"一文的一点注记%A NOTE ON THE PAPER "Finite groups with quasinormal subgroups of prince power order"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱静萍

    2004-01-01

    用F*(G)代替F(G),将文"Finite Groups with Quasinormal Subgroups of Prime Power Order,Acta Math Hungar 89(4),2000,321-326"一文中的主要定理的可解性的假设去除,从而推广了该文的结论.

  15. 26 CFR 1.1502-92 - Ownership change of a loss group or a loss subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... parent, the common parent (which is treated as a loss corporation) may file the single statement... the common parent, the single statement must identify each loss subgroup parent and state which loss... change of a subsidiary. (b) Determination of an ownership change—(1) Parent change method—(i) Loss...

  16. On Pronormal Minimal Subgroups of Finite Groups%关于有限群的Pronormal极小子群

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王坤仁

    2004-01-01

    利用有限群G的pronormal极小子群和Sylow子群正规化子中的素数阶弱左Engel元素得到了G成为p-幂零群、幂零群和超可解群的一些充分条件,这些结果推广了已知结论.%By using pronormal minimal subgroups and weak left Engel elements of prime order of the normalizers of Sylow subgroups of a finite group G, we obtain some sufficient conditions for G to be p-nilpotent, nilpotent and supersolvable respectively,which generalize some known results.

  17. An illustrated key to adult males of neotropical Fannia Robineau-Desvoidy belonging to pusio sub-group (Diptera, Fanniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couri, M S

    2005-11-01

    The 11 neotropical species of Fannia belonging to the pusio sub-group (canicularis group), are keyed F. dodgei Seago; F. femoralis (Stein); F. pamplonae Couri & Araújo; F. parafemoralis Araújo & Couri; F. paraisensis Araújo & Couri; F. punctivervis Malloch; F. pusio (Wiedemann); F. sabroskyi Seago; F. snyderi Seago; F. trimaculata (Stein); F. trimaculatoides Couri & Pamplona. The key is addressed only to the males and the illustrations help in the visualization of the characters.

  18. Finite Groups with the Set of the Number of Subgroups of Possible Order Containing Exactly Two Elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanheng Chen; Guiyun Chen

    2013-11-01

    Let be a finite group, and $n(G)$ be the set of the number of subgroups of possible order of . We investigate the structure of satisfying that $n(G) = \\{1, m\\}$ for any positive integer > 1. At first, we prove that the nilpotent length of is less than 2. Secondly, we investigate nilpotent groups with $m = p + 1$ or $p^2 + p + 1$ ( is a prime), and we get the classification of such kinds of groups. At last, we investigate non-nilpotent groups with $m = p + 1$ and get the classification of the groups under consideration.

  19. On Finite Groups whose Every Proper Normal Subgroup is a Union of a Given Number of Conjugacy Classes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ali Reza Ashrafi; Geetha Venkataraman

    2004-08-01

    Let be a finite group and be a normal subgroup of . We denote by $ncc(A)$ the number of -conjugacy classes of and is called -decomposable, if $ncc(A)=n$. Set $\\mathcal{K}_G=\\{ncc(A)|A\\vartriangleleft G\\}$. Let be a non-empty subset of positive integers. A group is called -decomposable, if $\\mathcal{K}_G=X$. Ashrafi and his co-authors [1–5] have characterized the -decomposable non-perfect finite groups for $X=\\{1,n\\}$ and ≤ 10. In this paper, we continue this problem and investigate the structure of -decomposable non-perfect finite groups, for $X=\\{1, 2, 3\\}$. We prove that such a group is isomorphic to $Z_6, D_8, Q_8, S_4$, Small Group (20,3), Small Group (24,3), where Small Group (, ) denotes the $m^{\\mathrm{th}}$ group of order in the small group library of GAP [11].

  20. Differences in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and perceived risks regarding colorectal cancer screening among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese sub-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, T Domi; Carney, Patricia A; Lee-Lin, Frances; Mori, Motomi; Chen, Zunqiu; Leung, Holden; Lau, Christine; Lieberman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Asian ethnic subgroups are often treated as a single demographic group in studies looking at cancer screening and health disparities. To evaluate knowledge and health beliefs associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) and CRC screening among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese subgroups, a survey assessed participants' demographic characteristics, healthcare utilization, knowledge, beliefs, attitudes associated with CRC and CRC screening. Exploratory factor analysis identified six factors accounting >60 % of the total variance in beliefs and attitudes. Cronbach's alpha coefficients assessed internal consistency. Differences among Asian subgroups were assessed using a Chi square, Fisher's exact, or Kruskal-Wallis test. Pearson's correlation coefficient assessed an association among factors. 654 participants enrolled: 238 Chinese, 217 Korean, and 199 Vietnamese. Statistically significant differences existed in demographic and health care provider characteristics, knowledge, and attitude/belief variables regarding CRC. These included knowledge of CRC screening modalities, reluctance to discuss cancer, belief that cancer is preventable by diet and lifestyle, and intention to undergo CRC screening. Chinese subjects were more likely to use Eastern medicine (52 % Chinese, 25 % Korean, 27 % Vietnamese; p Vietnamese; p Vietnamese subjects were less likely to consider CRC screening (95 % Chinese, 95 % Korean, 80 % Vietnamese; p health beliefs among Asian subgroups. Understanding these differences will enable clinicians to deliver tailored, effective health messages to improve CRC screening and other health behaviors.

  1. Driver style and driver skill – Clustering sub-groups of drivers differing in their potential danger in traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    based on a combined use of the DBQ and the DSI. Moreover, the joint use of the two instruments was applied to identify sub-groups of drivers that differ in their potential danger in traffic (as measured by frequency of aberrant driving behaviors and level of driving skills), as well as to test whether...... the sub-groups of drivers differed in characteristics such as age, gender, annual mileage and accident involvement. 3908 drivers aged 18–84 participated in the survey. The results suggested that the drivers are consistent in their reporting of driving ability, as the self-reported driving skill level...... mirrored the self-reported frequency of aberrant driving behaviors. K-means cluster analysis revealed four distinct clusters that differed in the frequency of aberrant driving behavior and driving skills, as well as individual characteristics and driving related factors such as annual mileage, accident...

  2. Facilitating improved road safety based on increased knowledge about driving behaviour and profiling sub-groups of drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne

    with underlying mechanisms of lack of focus, emotional stress, recklessness and confusion, and hence it is highly important to further explore means to making drivers become more focused or attentive when driving, and to deal with emotional responses in traffic like impatience and frustration (Article 1). 2......The aim of the Ph.D. study presented in this thesis was to facilitate improved road safety through increased understanding of methods used to measure driving behaviour, and through increased knowledge about driving behaviour in sub-groups of drivers. More specifically, the usefulness of the Driver...... Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ) within a Danish context was explored, sub-groups of drivers differing in their potential danger in traffic were identified, and the relationship between implicit attitudes towards safe and risky driving and self-reported driving behaviour was explored. The methods applied were...

  3. 极小子群和有限群的结构%Minimal Subgroups and Structures of Finite Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王坤仁

    2006-01-01

    In terms of weak left Engel element and S-seminormal subgroup, some sufficient conditions are given for a finite group to be p-nilpotent or nilpotent or supersolvable.%利用弱左Engel元和S-半正规子群条件给出了有限群成p-幂零群、幂零群和超可解群的一些充分条件.

  4. The IAB Iron-Meteorite Complex: A Group, Five Subgroups, Numerous Grouplets, Closely Related, Mainly Formed by Crystal Segregation in Rapidly Cooling Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, J. T.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    2002-01-01

    We present new data or iron meteorites that are members of group IAB or are closely related to this large group, and we have also reevaluated some of our earlier data for these irons. In the past it was not possible to distinguish IAB and IIICD irons on the basis of their positions on element-Ni diagrams. We now find that plotting, the new and revised data yields six sets of compact fields on element-Au diagrams, each set corresponding to a compositional group. The largest set includes the majority (approximately equal to 70) of irons previously designated IA: We christened this set the IAB main group. The remaining five sets we designate subgroups within the IAB complex. Three of these subgroups have Au contents similar to the main group, and form parallel trends in most element-Ni diagrams. The groups originally designated IIIC and IIID are two of these subgroups: they are now well resolved from each other and from the main group. The other low-Au subgroup has Ni contents just above the main group. Two other IAB subgroups have appreciably higher Au contents than the main group and show weaker compositional links to it. We have named these five subgroups on the basis of their Au and Ni contents. The three subgroups having Au contents similar to the main group are the low-Au (L) subgroups the two others the high-Au (H) subgroups. The Ni contents are designated high (H), medium (M), or low (L). Thus the old group IIID is now the sLH subgroup. the old group IIIC is the sLM subgroup. In addition, eight irons assigned to two grouplets plot between sLL and sLM on most element-Au diagrams. A large number (27) of related irons plot outside these compact fields but nonetheless appear to be sufficiently related to also be included in the IAB complex.

  5. On Non-commuting Sets in a Finite p-group with Derived Subgroup of Prime Order

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yu-lei; Liu He-guo

    2016-01-01

    Let G be a finite group. A nonempty subset X of G is said to be non-commuting if xy = yx for any x, y ∈ X with x = y. If |X| ≥ |Y| for any other non-commuting set Y in G, then X is said to be a maximal non-commuting set. In this paper, we determine upper and lower bounds on the cardinality of a maximal non-commuting set in a finite p-group with derived subgroup of prime order.

  6. Assessing the relationship between the Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory: Revealing sub-groups of drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory are two of the most frequently used measures of self-reported driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to identify sub-groups of drivers that potentially act dangerously in traffic (as measured by...... driving behaviors, and vice versa. The present findings highlight the need to look into driver’s attitudes towards safety, and to devise differential interventions targeting specific problematic groups of the population in the attempt to improve road safety nationwide....

  7. Characterization of courtship sounds of species of the subgroup fasciola (Diptera, Drosophilidae, Drosophila repleta group: interspecific and interpopulational analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. A. COSTA

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the male courtship song pattern of various species of the fasciola subgroup and to determine the level of variation both within and among species. The parameters analyzed were intrapulse interval (PI, interpulse interval (IPI, and intrapulse frequency (IF. Six different species were analyzed: D. coroica (three populations, D. ellisoni, D. fascioloides, D. moju, D. onca, and D. rosinae (one population each. There were significant differences among the six species for these three courtship song parameters. The IPI was the most variable parameter among these species, suggesting that this parameter is important for female discrimination. Four different hypotheses could explain this variation: 1. different selection pressures with absence of flow gene; 2. intraspecific sexual selection; 3. sympatric effects on song evolution; and 4. genetic drift. The PI was the only parameter that was significantly different among the three population of D. coroica. Low variability among populations within the same species was already observed for other subgroups and could be explained by the following hypotheses: strong selection acting on the song parameters, gene flow, or recent colonization from a common source. Additional studies of the courtship song of other species of the fasciola subgroup, as well as for other subgroups of the repleta group, and studies, using molecular makers, that focus on the genetic basis of the differences among these species in courtship song would allow us to evaluate the association of courtship song and sexual isolation in these species, and would also help us to understand the evolution of these behavioural differences.

  8. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup and the Expert Regional Technical Group, Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2014 for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) and the Expert Regional Technical Group (ERTG). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the project for the Bonneville Power Administration. The EOS and ERTG are part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation and habitat restoration efforts, respectively, developed by the Action Agencies (BPA, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System and implemented under the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program.

  9. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  10. Noether's problem for the groups with a cyclic subgroup of index 4

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Ming-chang; Zhou, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Let $G$ be a finite group and $k$ be a field. Let $G$ act on the rational function field $k(x_g:g\\in G)$ by $k$-automorphisms defined by $g\\cdot x_h=x_{gh}$ for any $g,h\\in G$. Noether's problem asks whether the fixed field $k(G)=k(x_g:g\\in G)^G$ is rational (i.e. purely transcendental) over $k$. Theorem 1. If $G$ is a group of order $2^n$ ($n\\ge 4$) and of exponent $2^e$ such that (i) $e\\ge n-2$ and (ii) $\\zeta_{2^{e-1}} \\in k$, then $k(G)$ is $k$-rational. Theorem 2. Let $G$ be a group of order $4n$ where $n$ is any positive integer (it is unnecessary to assume that $n$ is a power of 2). Assume that {\\rm (i)} $\\fn{char}k \

  11. Investigation of the effects of lymphocyte sub-groups of the use of Maraş powder (Nicotiana rustica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriye İsmihan Ece Paköz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was to investigate theeffects of lymphocyte sub-groups of the use ofMaraş powder.Method: This study used healthy volunteers,and no smoking or Maras powder (control groupused healthy volunteers. The blood samples forlymphocyte subsets of the cellular immune systemlymphocyte subsets of antibodies were evaluatedwith Becton Dickinson kits using a flow-cytometrikmethod.Results: Case group averages of CD4+/CD8+ Tcell ratios, CD19+ (B lymphocytes and the meanpercentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes were significantlylower than the control group (p0.05.Conclusions: Maras powder increases thecellular immunity relative in the smoking addictivepeople, while humoral immunity declines.As a result, immune responses that is resultingwith any deviation, predisposing factor for avariety of diseases. Therefore, informing of themaras powder users should be considered for harming their health as smoking as well.

  12. Evaluation of Affirmative Action in the Context of Possible Unfair Discrimination Against Subgroups in the Designated Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrone Christopher Stoffels

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of affirmative action measures can give rise to unfair discrimination. In cases where members of the “designated groups” compete with one another for the same position, there can be allegations of unfair discrimination. The question arises as to how the employer needs to act in order to avoid unfair discrimination in cases where more than one person from the designated group applies for the same position. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the impact of unfair discrimination on the designated group, specifically with regard to the subgroup “black people” as well as how the employer can avoid unfair discrimination in the implementation of the affirmative action measures aimed at advancing “black people” by selecting the most suitably qualified person from the sub group black people based on the national and regional demographics.

  13. The geometry of right angled Artin subgroups of mapping class groups

    CERN Document Server

    Clay, Matt; Mangahas, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    We describe sufficient conditions which guarantee that a finite set of mapping classes generate a right-angled Artin group quasi-isometrically embedded in the mapping class group. Moreover, under these conditions, the orbit map to Teichmuller space is a quasi-isometric embedding for both of the standard metrics. As a consequence, we produce infinitely many genus h surfaces (for any h at least 2) in the moduli space of genus g surfaces (for any g at least 3) for which the universal covers are quasi-isometrically embedded in the Teichmuller space.

  14. The more, the merrier? Numerical strength versus subgroup distinctiveness in minority groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livingstone, Andrew G.; Spears, Russell; Manstead, Antony S. R.; Bruder, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Evidence attests to the efforts made by minority groups to defend and promote 'distinctive' attributes that potentially define the ingroup. However, these attributes are often only available to a prototypical minority within the minority category. In two studies we tested the hypothesis that, under

  15. Global dimensions for Lie groups at level k and their conformally exceptional quantum subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Coquereaux, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We obtain formulae giving global dimensions for fusion categories defined by Lie groups G at level k and for the associated module-categories obtained via conformal embeddings. The results can be expressed in terms of Lie quantum superfactorials of type G. The later are related, for the type Ar, to the quantum Barnes function.

  16. Catalytic co-pyrolysis of peat and polymeric wastes in the presence of iron sub-group metal chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulman, E.M.; Kosivtsov, Y.Y.; Lugovoy, Y.V. [Tver Technical University, Tver (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation is the study of activity of iron sub-group metal chlorides in co-processing of peat and polymeric wastes by low-temperature catalytic pyrolysis method. Iron sub-group metal chlorides in concentration varied from 1 to 10% (wt) were used as the catalysts of pyrolysis. The process was conducted in fixed bed reactor in inert gaseous atmosphere at the temperature interval of 350-550{sup o}C. All the investigated catalysts were found to promote the increase of liquid fraction mass and the decrease of solid carbon-containing residue mass up to 10-30%. Cobalt catalyst revealed the highest selectivity with respect to liquid products formation. The use of the catalysts in low-temperature peat and polymeric wastes pyrolysis process was found to favour the increase gaseous products volume up to 20-50% as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons volume in 1.2 folds in comparison to uncatalysed process. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Maximal Abelian subgroups of the isometry and conformal groups of Euclidean and Minkowski spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomova, Z.; Winternitz, P.

    1998-02-01

    The maximal Abelian subalgebras (MASAs) of the Euclidean 0305-4470/31/7/016/img1 and pseudo-euclidean 0305-4470/31/7/016/img2 Lie algebras are classified into conjugacy classes under the action of the corresponding Lie groups 0305-4470/31/7/016/img3 and 0305-4470/31/7/016/img4, and also under the conformal groups 0305-4470/31/7/016/img5 and 0305-4470/31/7/016/img6, respectively. The results are presented in terms of decomposition theorems. For 0305-4470/31/7/016/img1 orthogonally indecomposable MASAs exist only for p = 1 and p = 2. For 0305-4470/31/7/016/img2, on the other hand, orthogonally indecomposable MASAs exist for all values of p. The results are used to construct new coordinate systems in which wave equations and Hamilton-Jacobi equations allow the separation of variables.

  18. Devonian (Emsian-Eifelian) fish from the Lower Bokkeveld Group (Ceres Subgroup), South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. E.; Almond, J. E.; Evans, F. J.; Long, J. A.

    1999-07-01

    Four major groups of fish are represented by fragmentary remains from South Africa's Lower Bokkeveld Group of Early to Middle Devonian age: the Acanthodii, Chondrichthyes, Placodermi and Osteichthyes. These represent the oldest known occurrences of these groups in southern Africa, as well as an important addition to the very meagre record of earlier Devonian fish from the Malvinokaffric Province of southwestern Gondwana. Bokkeveld fish material comes from the Gydo (Late Emsian) and Tra Tra (Middle Eifelian) Formations of the Western Cape and Eastern Cape Provinces. The cosmopolitan marine acanthodian Machæracanthus is represented only by isolated fin spines which may belong to two different species on the basis of their external ornamentation, cross-sectional outline and internal histology. The elasmobranchs are represented by four elements: (1) a flattened chondrocranium which bears affinity to the Late Devonian-Carboniferous symmoriid (protacrodont) 'cladodont' sharks. It is probably the earliest known (Emsian) shark chondrocranium; (2) an isolated, primitive scapulocoracoid with a very short coracoidal ridge; (3) ankylosed and isolated radials, interpreted as parts of pterygial plates of a paired fin of an unknown chondrichthyan bearing affinity to the Middle Devonian Zamponiopteron from Bolivia; and (4) isolated barlike structures, perhaps gill arch or a jaw elements, thought to be from the same taxon as (3). The placoderms are represented by an incomplete trunk armour and fragmentary, finely ornamented plates of a primitive antiarch. The Osteichthyes are represented by a single large scale of an unidentified dipnoan from the Eifelian of the Cedarberg range, as well as a probable sarcopterygian dermal plate from the Emsian of the Prince Albert area. These are among the earliest sarcopterygian remains recorded from the Malvinokaffric Province.

  19. Determination of patellofemoral pain sub-groups and development of a method for predicting treatment outcome using running gait kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Ricky; Kobsar, Dylan; Phinyomark, Angkoon; Osis, Sean; Ferber, Reed

    2016-10-01

    Not all patients with patellofemoral pain exhibit successful outcomes following exercise therapy. Thus, the ability to identify patellofemoral pain subgroups related to treatment response is important for the development of optimal therapeutic strategies to improve rehabilitation outcomes. The purpose of this study was to use baseline running gait kinematic and clinical outcome variables to classify patellofemoral pain patients on treatment response retrospectively. Forty-one individuals with patellofemoral pain that underwent a 6-week exercise intervention program were sub-grouped as treatment Responders (n=28) and Non-responders (n=13) based on self-reported measures of pain and function. Baseline three-dimensional running kinematics, and self-reported measures underwent a linear discriminant analysis of the principal components of the variables to retrospectively classify participants based on treatment response. The significance of the discriminant function was verified with a Wilk's lambda test (α=0.05). The model selected 2 gait principal components and had a 78.1% classification accuracy. Overall, Non-responders exhibited greater ankle dorsiflexion, knee abduction and hip flexion during the swing phase and greater ankle inversion during the stance phase, compared to Responders. This is the first study to investigate an objective method to use baseline kinematic and self-report outcome variables to classify on patellofemoral pain treatment outcome. This study represents a significant first step towards a method to help clinicians make evidence-informed decisions regarding optimal treatment strategies for patients with patellofemoral pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Urban road traffic deaths: data linkage and identification of high-risk population sub-groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Maria Miana Mattos Paixão

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study analyzes the profile of deaths from road traffic accidents in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, by linking two public databases, the Information System of the Urban Transportation and Transit Company (BH10 and the Mortality Information System (SIM. The linked database (n = 306 identified a 24% under-recording rate for deaths and differed in the age distribution from the BH10 database and in roadway user category when compared to the mortality database. The mortality rate for road traffic accidents within the city limits was 10.2 per 100,000 thousand, and was higher among men, young adults, and the elderly. Poisson multivariate regression showed a higher mean death rate for motorcycle occupants (rate ratio – RR: 1.81; pedestrians (RR: 1.32; males (RR: 1.24; single/divorced (RR: 1.27; young adults 18-29 years of age (RR: 1.75; elderly (RR: 1.59; and deaths at the crash site (RR: 1.39 when compared to the reference categories. The study unveils the city’s traffic violence, expressed by the large proportion of deaths at the crash site and within the first 24 hours, and confirms the relevance of database linkage for characterizing vulnerable groups and traffic accident mortality in the urban setting.

  1. On functional bases of the first-order differential invariants for non-conjugate subgroups of the Poincaré group $P(1,4$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Fedorchuk

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available It is established which functional bases of the first-order differential invariants of the splitting and non-splitting subgroups of the Poincaré group $P(1,4$ are invariant under the subgroups of the extended Galilei group $widetilde G(1,3 subset P(1,4$. The obtained sets of functional bases are classified according to dimensions.

  2. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup and the Expert Regional Technical Group, Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.

    2013-10-30

    This project covers facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) for federal research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) and the Expert Regional Technical Group (ERTG) for estuary habitat restoration. The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The EOS is tasked by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Action Agencies (AAs) to design and coordinate implementation of the federal RME plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary, including the river’s plume in the ocean. Initiated in 2002, the EOS is composed of members from BPA, the Corps, NMFS, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL’s) Marine Sciences Laboratory, and other agencies as necessary.

  3. Fixed points subgroups by two involutive automorphisms $\\sigma, \\gamma$ of compact exceptional Lie groups $F_4, E_6$ and $E_7$

    OpenAIRE

    Miyashita, Toshikazu

    2010-01-01

    For simply connected compact exceptional Lie groups $G = F_4, E_6$ and $E_7$, we consider two involutions $\\sigma, \\gamma$ and determine the group structure of subgroups $G^{\\sigma,\\gamma}$ of $G$ which are the intersection $G^\\sigma \\cap G^{\\gamma}$ of the fixed points subgroups of $G^\\sigma$ and $G^{\\gamma}$. The motivation is as follows. In [1](see the References of this paper), we determine the group structure of $(F_4)^{\\sigma, \\sigma'}, (E_6)^{\\sigma, \\sigma'}$ and $(E_7)^{\\sigma, \\sigm...

  4. Multiple Deprivation, Severity and Latent Sub-Groups: Advantages of Factor Mixture Modelling for Analysing Material Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najera Catalan, Hector E

    2017-01-01

    Material deprivation is represented in different forms and manifestations. Two individuals with the same deprivation score (i.e. number of deprivations), for instance, are likely to be unable to afford or access entirely or partially different sets of goods and services, while one individual may fail to purchase clothes and consumer durables and another one may lack access to healthcare and be deprived of adequate housing . As such, the number of possible patterns or combinations of multiple deprivation become increasingly complex for a higher number of indicators. Given this difficulty, there is interest in poverty research in understanding multiple deprivation, as this analysis might lead to the identification of meaningful population sub-groups that could be the subjects of specific policies. This article applies a factor mixture model (FMM) to a real dataset and discusses its conceptual and empirical advantages and disadvantages with respect to other methods that have been used in poverty research . The exercise suggests that FMM is based on more sensible assumptions (i.e. deprivation covary within each class), provides valuable information with which to understand multiple deprivation and is useful to understand severity of deprivation and the additive properties of deprivation indicators.

  5. Volcanic Stratigraphy and Potential Hazards of the Chihsingshan Volcano Subgroup in the Tatun Volcano Group, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Tsai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chihsingshan Volcano Subgroup (CVSG is one of the most important landforms located within the Tatun Volcano Group in northern Taiwan. Based on a Digital Terrain Model, contour maps and field investigations, the CVSG can be divided into four types of volcanic landforms: (1 a strato- or composite volcano, Chihsingshan; (2 domes, the Shamaoshan and a hidden unit; (3 lava cones, the Baiyunshan and the Hsiaotsaoshan; and (4 a scoria cone, the Chikushan. Meanwhile, many small craters are distributed linearly along two northeast trending normal-fault systems. The occurrences are predominantly lava flows with subsidiary fall deposits, pyroclastic flows, and lahars in which at least twenty layers of lava flow in the CVSG can be recognized. Among them, 16 layers in the Chihsingshan volcano, named as C1 - C16, two in the Baiyunshan, B1 - B2, and two in the Hsiaotsaoshan, H1 - H2. Our study suggests that the potential volcanic hazards include lava and pyroclastic flows and simultaneous or subsequent lahars, if the Chihsingshan erupts in a similar manner as in the past. A volcanic hazard zonation map can be constructed for the purpose of mitigation assuming the future eruptive center and eruptive volume.

  6. Comparison of minimally invasive surgery and mini-incision technique for total hip arthroplasty: a sub-group meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiang; LIN Tiao; CAI Xun-zi; YAN Shi-gui

    2011-01-01

    Background It is well accepted that the minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for total hip arthroplasty (THA) should combine with less or no muscle damage and is different from mini-incision technique and MIS should have better outcomes than mini-incision surgery.The aim of current analysis was to apply an explicitly defined sub-group analysis to confirm whether this hypothesis is true.Methods A computerized literature search was applied to find any data concerning MIS or mini-incision THAs.A multistage screening was then performed to identify randomized studies fulfilling the inclusive criteria for the analysis.The data were extracted,and sub-group analyses of MIS or mini-incision surgery for different kinds of outcomes were carried out.The P(sub) value for difference between MIS sub-group and mini-incision sub-group was also calculated.Results Eleven studies that fulfilling the inclusion criteria were included,with 472 cases in the study group (MIS or mini-incision) and 492 cases in the conventional group.The overall analysis showed the study group would achieve less surgical duration (P=0.037),intraoperative blood (P <0.001) and incision length (P <0.001) than conventional group.The difference between sub-groups showed,the MIS would achieve shorter incision length (P(sub) <0.05) and bigger cup abduction angle (P(sub) <0.05),and cause more blood loss (P (sub) <0.05) than mini-incision technique.Other indexeswere comparable between the two sub-groups.Conclusions Though further high quality studies are still needed,the result of current analysis offered an initial conclusion that MIS THA failed to achieve a better clinical outcome than mini-incision technique.The exact definition of MIS still needs to be improved.

  7. Distribution of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 alleles in the Kensiu and Semai Orang Asli sub-groups in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnim, Abd Razak; Allia, Shahril; Edinur, Hisham Atan; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin; Norazmi, Mohd Nor

    2016-08-01

    The earliest settlers in Peninsular Malaysia are the Orang Asli population, namely Semang, Senoi and Proto Malays. In the present study, we typed the HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci of the Kensiu and Semai Orang Asli sub-groups. Sequence-based HLA typing was performed on 59 individuals from two Orang Asli sub-groups. A total of 11, 18 and 14 HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 alleles were identified, respectively. These data are available in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under the population name "Malaysia Kedah Kensiu" and "Malaysia Pahang Semai".

  8. Changing patterns among the subgroups of strains of Staphylococcus aureus of phage group II in Danish hospitals from 1961-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, N H; Hartzen, S H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1994-01-01

    During the period 1961-91 a total of 567,635 strains of Staphylococcus aureus from hospitalized patients in Denmark have been characterized according to their antibiotic resistance, site of isolation and phage type. Strains of phage group II (typed by the phages 3A, 3C, 55 and 71) have been...... analysed further. The occurrence of group II strains was relatively constant (approximately 16%) from 1961 until 1983. Since then the frequency of group II strains increased; in 1991 they accounted for 22.7% of all S. aureus strains isolated. Strains of group II can, on the basis of their phage types......, be divided in four subgroups: 3A, 71, 71+ and the 'rest of group II'. Furthermore, within these groups strains may differ from one another in respect to their sensitivity to phages. The increased isolation of group II strains during recent years was because of an increase in strains of subgroups 71...

  9. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup and the Expert Regional Technical Group, Annual Report for 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This document is the annual report for the period September 1, 2014 through August 31, 2015 for the project—Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) and the Expert Regional Technical Group (ERTG). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the project for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The EOS and ERTG are part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) and habitat restoration efforts, respectively, developed by the Action Agencies (BPA, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps or USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and implemented under the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). BPA/Corps (2015) explain the CEERP and the role of RME and the ERTG. For the purposes of this report, the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) includes the floodplain from Bonneville Dam down through the lower river and estuary into the river’s plume in the ocean. The main purpose of this project is to facilitate EOS and ERTG meetings and work products. Other purposes are to provide technical support for CEERP adaptive management, CEERP restoration design challenges, and tributary RME. From 2002 through 2008, the EOS worked to design the federal RME program for the estuary/ocean (Johnson et al. 2008). From 2009 to the present day, EOS activities have involved RME implementation; however, EOS activities were minimal during the current reporting period. PNNL provided technical support to CEERP’s adaptive management process by convening 1.2 meetings of the Action Agencies (AAs) and drafting material for the “CEERP 2015 Restoration and Monitoring Plan” (BPA/Corps 2015).

  10. Coulomb branches for rank 2 gauge groups in 3d N=4 gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hanany, Amihay

    2016-01-01

    The Coulomb branch of 3-dimensional N=4 gauge theories is the space of bare and dressed BPS monopole operators. We utilise the conformal dimension to define a fan which, upon intersection with the weight lattice of a GNO-dual group, gives rise to a collection of semi-groups. It turns out that the unique Hilbert bases of these semi-groups are a sufficient, finite set of monopole operators which generate the entire chiral ring. Moreover, the knowledge of the properties of the minimal generators is enough to compute the Hilbert series explicitly. The techniques of this paper allow an efficient evaluation of the Hilbert series for general rank gauge groups. As an application, we provide various examples for all rank two gauge groups to demonstrate the novel interpretation.

  11. The Fundamental Group of the Complement of the Branch Curve of CP1×T

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meirav AMRAM; Michael FRIEDMAN; Mina TEICHER

    2009-01-01

    Denoting by T the complex projective torus, we can embed the surface CP1×T in CP5. In this paper we compute the fundamental group of the complement of the branch curve of this surface. Since the embedding is not "ample enough", the embedded surface does not belong to the classes of surfaces where the fundamental group is virtually solvable: a property which holds for these groups for "ample enough" embeddings. On the other hand, as it is the first example of this computation for non simply-connected surfaces, the structure of this group (as shown in this paper) give rise to the extension of the conjecture regarding the structure of those fundamental groups of any surface.

  12. Coulomb branches for rank 2 gauge groups in 3dN=4 gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanany, Amihay [Theoretical Physics Group, Imperial College London,Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Sperling, Marcus [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leibniz Universität Hannover,Appelstraße 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2016-08-02

    The Coulomb branch of 3-dimensional N=4 gauge theories is the space of bare and dressed BPS monopole operators. We utilise the conformal dimension to define a fan which, upon intersection with the weight lattice of a GNO-dual group, gives rise to a collection of semi-groups. It turns out that the unique Hilbert bases of these semi-groups are a sufficient, finite set of monopole operators which generate the entire chiral ring. Moreover, the knowledge of the properties of the minimal generators is enough to compute the Hilbert series explicitly. The techniques of this paper allow an efficient evaluation of the Hilbert series for general rank gauge groups. As an application, we provide various examples for all rank two gauge groups to demonstrate the novel interpretation.

  13. Perioperative and continence outcomes of robotic radical prostatectomy in elderly Indian men (≥70 years: A sub-group analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many healthy elderly Indian men seek surgical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Quite often, radical surgery is not offered to the patients over 70 years of age due to the perception of increased side-effects and complications. We have previously reported our results of robotic radical prostatectomy in a study comprising 150 Indian patients, where almost a quarter of patients were elderly. This subgroup analysis was therefore focused on evaluating perioperative and continence outcomes in elderly men (≥70 years with localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between April 2010 and August 2013, 153 men had robot-assisted radical prostatectomy performed by two surgeons. Of the 150 men analyzed, 39 (26% were aged ≥70 years. All patients underwent robotic prostatectomy using a 4 arm da Vinci surgical system. Pre-operative, intraoperative and post-operative parameters were studied. Check cystogram was performed in all patients prior to catheter removal. Complications were categorized using the Clavien-Dindo classification system. Continence was defined as use of "no pad" or security liner only. All data were recorded prospectively and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: There were no significant intraoperative or perioperative complications in this group. Median blood loss during surgery was 150 mL. None of the patient required blood transfusion. There were two minor complications (5.1% within the first 30 days of surgery: Minimal anastomotic site leak (one patient requiring replacement and prolongation of Foley′s drainage by 1 week and ileus (one patient. No patient had any cardiopulmonary or vascular complications in the post-operative period. The median duration of hospital stay was 3 days. The median duration of catheterization was 7 days. No patient had problem of bladder neck stenosis in the follow-up period. At 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year of follow-up, 66.7% (n = 26, 74.3% (n = 29, 87.9% (n = 34

  14. The Congruence Subgroup Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Raghunathan

    2004-11-01

    This is a short survey of the progress on the congruence subgroup problem since the sixties when the first major results on the integral unimodular groups appeared. It is aimed at the non-specialists and avoids technical details.

  15. The Freedman group: a physical interpretation for the SU(3)-subgroup D(18, 1, 1; 2, 1, 1) of order 648

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levaillant, Claire

    2014-07-01

    We study a subgroup Fr(162 × 4) of SU(3) of order 648 which is an extension of D(9, 1, 1; 2, 1, 1) and whose generators arise from anyonic systems. We show that this group is isomorphic to a semi-direct product ( {Z}/18 {Z}\\times {Z}/6 {Z})\\rtimes S_3 with respect to conjugation and we give a presentation of the group. We show that the group D(18, 1, 1; 2, 1, 1) from the series (D) in the existing classification for finite SU(3)-subgroups is also isomorphic to a semi-direct product ( {Z}/18 {Z}\\times {Z}/6 {Z})\\rtimes S_3, with respect to conjugation. We next exhibit the isomorphism between both groups. We prove that Fr(162 × 4) is not isomorphic to the exceptional SU(3) subgroup Σ(216 × 3) of the same order 648. We further prove that the only SU(3) finite subgroups from the 1916 classification by Blichfeldt or its extended version, in which Fr(162 × 4) may be isomorphic, belong to the (D)-series. Finally, we show that Fr(162 × 4) and D(18, 1, 1; 2, 1, 1) are both conjugate under the orthogonal matrix which we provide.

  16. "具有幂零局部子群的有限群"一文的注记%Notes on "Finite Groups with Nilpotent Local Subgroups"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李样明

    2008-01-01

    A finite group G is called PN-group if G is not nilpotent and for every p-subgroup P of G, there holds that either P is normal in G or P C Z∞(G) or NG(P) is nilpotent, p ∈π(G).In this paper, we prove that PN-group is meta-nilpotent, especially, PN-group is solvable. In addition, we give an elementary, intuitionistie, compact proof of the structure theorem of PN-group.

  17. Microprocessing in European High Energy Physics Experiments - ECFA Working Group on Data Processing Standards - Report of the Microprocessor Subgroup May 1982

    CERN Document Server

    European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA)

    1982-01-01

    This document contains two reports on the use of microprocessors in European High-Energy Physics experiments. The first is a presentation of data collected by a sub-group of the ECFA working group on data procesing standards. The working group is organised by E. Lillestol, University of Bergen and E.M. Rimmer, CERN, DD Division; the Microprocessor sub-group organiser is L.O. Hertzberger, NIKHEF, Amsterdam. Data are given from projects numbered 81 - 194, and some CERN projects are included. Even though there is some duplication of information, a second report has been appended which covers a wider range of CERN projects. This was the result of a microprocessor survey made at CERN by P. Scharff-Hansen, DD Division, at the request of E. Gabthuler. The ECFA working group intends to have reports for all the sub-groups (10 in number) available in machine-readable form at the CERN computer centre. However, it was felt that the information herein is most valuable to designers and users of microprocessors, and that it...

  18. Splitting theorems for pro-$p$ groups acting on pro-$p$ trees and 2-generated subgroups of free pro-$p$ products with procyclic amalgamations

    CERN Document Server

    Herfort, Wolfgang; Zapata, Theo

    2011-01-01

    Let G be a finitely generated infinite pro-p group acting on a pro-p tree such that the restriction of the action to some open subgroup is free. Then we prove that G splits as a pro-p amalgamated product or as a pro-p HNN-extension over an edge stabilizer. Using this result we prove under certain conditions that free pro-p products with procyclic amalgamation inherit from its free factors the property of each 2-generated subgroup being free pro-p. This generalizes known pro-p results, as well as some pro-p analogs of classical results in abstract combinatorial group theory.

  19. Virtual Amalgamation of Relatively Quasiconvex Subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Pedroza, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    For relatively hyperbolic groups, we investigate conditions guaranteeing that the subgroup generated by two relatively quasiconvex subgroups $Q_1$ and $Q_2$ is relatively quasiconvex and isomorphic to $Q_1 \\ast_{Q_1 \\cap Q_2} Q_2$. The main theorem extends results for quasiconvex subgroups of word-hyperbolic groups, and results for discrete subgroups of isometries of hyperbolic spaces.

  20. Use of a fragment of the tuf gene for phytoplasma 16Sr group/subgroup differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contaldo, Nicoletta; Canel, Alessandro; Makarova, Olga

    2011-01-01

    and were obtained from both experimentally and naturally infected plants. The combined RFLP patterns obtained with the three restriction enzymes employed allow the distinction of a total of 18 different profiles, however no discrimination was provided for some of the ribosomal groups for which sequencing...

  1. Contextual factors and weight change over time: a comparison between U.S. Hispanics and other population sub-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, S Heidi; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R

    2013-08-01

    In recent decades there has been an increasing interest in understanding the role of social and physical contexts in influencing health behaviors and outcomes. This is especially true for weight, which is considered to be highly dependent on environmental factors. The evidence linking neighborhood characteristics to weight in the United States, however, is mixed. Many studies in this area are hampered by cross sectional designs and a limited scope, insofar as they investigate only one dimension of neighborhood context. It is also unclear to what extent neighborhood characteristics account for racial/ethnic disparities in weight. Using longitudinal data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A. FANS), we compare patterns of weight change between Hispanics and other racial and ethnic groups in order to evaluate whether we observe a pattern of unhealthy assimilation in weight among Hispanic immigrants and to identify differences in the rate at which different groups gain weight over time. We also explore the extent to which patterns of weight change are related to a wider range of community characteristics. We find that weight increases across all groups between the two study waves of L.A. FANS and that the increases are significant except for Asians/Pacific Islanders. With respect to differences in the pace of weight change, second and higher generation Hispanic women and black men gain weight more rapidly than their first generation Hispanic counterparts. Although the evidence presented indicates that first generation Hispanics gain weight, we do not find evidence for convergence in weight since the U.S.-born gain weight at a more rapid rate. The inclusion of community-level variables does not alter the relationships between the race, ethnicity, and immigrant generation categories and weight change. Of the six types of community characteristics considered, only collective efficacy is consistently and significantly associated with weight change

  2. Recruiting hard-to-reach United States population sub-groups via adaptations of snowball sampling strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; Lee, Hau-Chen; Seung-Hwan Lim, Rod; Fullerton, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Nurse researchers and educators often engage in outreach to narrowly defined populations. This article offers examples of how variations on the snowball sampling recruitment strategy can be applied in the creation of culturally appropriate, community-based information dissemination efforts related to recruitment to health education programs and research studies. Examples from the primary author’s program of research are provided to demonstrate how adaptations of snowball sampling can be effectively used in the recruitment of members of traditionally underserved or vulnerable populations. The adaptation of snowball sampling techniques, as described in this article, helped the authors to gain access to each of the more vulnerable population groups of interest. The use of culturally sensitive recruitment strategies is both appropriate and effective in enlisting the involvement of members of vulnerable populations. Adaptations of snowball sampling strategies should be considered when recruiting participants for education programs or subjects for research studies when recruitment of a population based sample is not essential. PMID:20727089

  3. On Complements of Normal Subgroups in Finite Groups Ⅱ%关于有限群的正规子群的补子群Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王坤仁

    2004-01-01

    研讨了关于有限群G的一个正规子群K的补子群之存在性与共轭性的更多一些的结果.主要结果如下:(1)假设K是Abel群并且K的每个Sylow子群S在G之含S的Sylow子群中有补子群.则有:(i)K在G中有补子群;(ii)若G有Hallπ-子群H,其中π=π(K),并且K在H中的所有补子群在H中是共轭的,则K在G中的所有补子群在G中是共轭的.(2)假设K是可解的并且对所有的S/K∈Syl(G/K),K是S的一个直因子.则有:(i)K在G中有补子群;(ii)若G有Hallπ-子群H,其中π=π(K),则K在G中的所有补子群在G中共轭的充要条件是K在H中的所有补子群在H中共轭.%In this paper, some more properties of the existence and conjugacy of complements of a normal subgroup K of a finite group G are studied. The main results are as follows. (1) Suppose that K is abelian and every Sylow subgrop S of K has a complement in a Sylow subgroup of G which contains S. Then: (i) K has a complement in G; (ii) If G has a Hall π- subgroup H with π = π(K), and all complements of K in H are conjugate in H, then all complements of K in G are conjugate in G. (2) Suppose that K is solvable and K is a direct factor of S for each S/K∈ Syl(G/K).Then: (i) K has a complement in G;(ii) If G has a Hall π-subgroup H with π = π(K), then all complements of K inG are conjugate in G ff and only if all complements of K in H are conjugate in H.

  4. Influence of the structure of Sylow p-subgroups on Coleman outer automorphism groups of finite groups%Sylow p-子群的结构对有限群的Coleman外自同构群的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海进科; 李正兴

    2013-01-01

    设G是一个有限群,通过考虑G的Sylow p-子群的结构,证明了如果G/F*(G)无主因子同构于Cp,则G的Coleman外自同构群是p’-群.%Let G be a finite group.It is proved that if G/F* (G) has no chief factor isomorphic to Cp,then the Coleman outer automorphism group of G is a p'-group by considering the structure of Sylow p-subgroups of G.

  5. Investigation of Sport Branches of a Group of Physical Education and Sports School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Sinan Aslan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is believed by the community that physical education and sports school (PES's students are always selected among successful athletes. However, especially in recent years, this belief has been losing value because of arrangements done by Higher Education Institutions (YÖK following Undergraduate Placement Examination (LYS scores and secondary school achievement scores affecting Physical Education and Sports entrance exam score nearly % 67. The purpose of this study was to determine the percentage of doing sport and their sport branches of students of PES in a university of Turkey. In this study, 285 (113 women and 172 man Physical Education students participated as volunteers. It was requested to fill out a questionnaire including demographic information as "age, gender, educational department, sport branches and training year" from the participants. For analysis of the obtained data, "Descriptive Statistics" section of SPSS (Ver.22 package program was used. Results showed that 62,1% (177 people have done sports but the 37,9% (108 people of all students have never done any sport competitive. Football was the highest preferred sport branch among students with the proportion of 25,3%, the lowest ones were karate, skiing, and cycling with 0,4%.

  6. Dynamical decimation renormalization-group technique: kinetic gaussian model on nonbranching, branching, and multibranching koch curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu; Yang

    2000-06-01

    A generalizing formulation of dynamical real-space renormalization that is appropriate for arbitrary spin systems is suggested. The alternative version replaces single-spin flipping Glauber dynamics with single-spin transition dynamics. As an application, in this paper we mainly investigate the critical slowing down of the Gaussian spin model on three fractal lattices, including nonbranching, branching, and multibranching Koch curves. The dynamical critical exponent z is calculated for these lattices using an exact decimation renormalization transformation in the assumption of the magneticlike perturbation, and a universal result z=1/nu is found.

  7. Singing together or apart: The effect of competitive and cooperative singing on social bonding within and between sub-groups of a university Fraternity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Eiluned; Launay, Jacques; van Duijn, Max; Rotkirch, Anna; David-Barrett, Tamas; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2016-11-01

    Singing together seems to facilitate social bonding, but it is unclear whether this is true in all contexts. Here we examine the social bonding outcomes of naturalistic singing behaviour in a European university Fraternity composed of exclusive 'Cliques': recognised sub-groups of 5-20 friends who adopt a special name and identity. Singing occurs frequently in this Fraternity, both 'competitively' (contests between Cliques) and 'cooperatively' (multiple Cliques singing together). Both situations were re-created experimentally in order to explore how competitive and cooperative singing affects feelings of closeness towards others. Participants were assigned to teams of four and were asked to sing together with another team either from the same Clique or from a different Clique. Participants (N = 88) felt significantly closer to teams from different Cliques after singing with them compared to before, regardless of whether they cooperated with (singing loudly together) or competed against (trying to singing louder than) the other team. In contrast, participants reported reduced closeness with other teams from their own Clique after competing with them. These results indicate that group singing can increase closeness to less familiar individuals regardless of whether they share a common motivation, but that singing competitively may reduce closeness within a very tight-knit group.

  8. Singing together or apart: The effect of competitive and cooperative singing on social bonding within and between sub-groups of a university Fraternity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Eiluned; Launay, Jacques; van Duijn, Max; Rotkirch, Anna; David-Barrett, Tamas; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2016-01-01

    Singing together seems to facilitate social bonding, but it is unclear whether this is true in all contexts. Here we examine the social bonding outcomes of naturalistic singing behaviour in a European university Fraternity composed of exclusive ‘Cliques’: recognised sub-groups of 5-20 friends who adopt a special name and identity. Singing occurs frequently in this Fraternity, both ‘competitively’ (contests between Cliques) and ‘cooperatively’ (multiple Cliques singing together). Both situations were re-created experimentally in order to explore how competitive and cooperative singing affects feelings of closeness towards others. Participants were assigned to teams of four and were asked to sing together with another team either from the same Clique or from a different Clique. Participants (N = 88) felt significantly closer to teams from different Cliques after singing with them compared to before, regardless of whether they cooperated with (singing loudly together) or competed against (trying to singing louder than) the other team. In contrast, participants reported reduced closeness with other teams from their own Clique after competing with them. These results indicate that group singing can increase closeness to less familiar individuals regardless of whether they share a common motivation, but that singing competitively may reduce closeness within a very tight-knit group. PMID:27777494

  9. Dosage Effects of Neuromuscular Training Intervention to Reduce Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Female Athletes: Meta-and Sub-group Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Dai; Myer, Gregory D.; Barber Foss, Kim D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a series of meta-analysis demonstrated neuromuscular training (NMT) is an effective intervention to reduce anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in female athletes, the potential existence of a dosage effect remains unknown. Objective To systematically review previously published clinical trials and evaluate potential dosage effects of NMT for ACL injury reduction in female athletes. Design Meta- and Sub-group analyses Setting The key words “knee”, “anterior cruciate ligament”, “ACL”, “prospective”, “neuromuscular”, “training”, “female”, and “prevention” were utilized in PubMed and EBSCO host for studies published between 1995 and May 2012. Participants Inclusion criteria set for studies in the current analysis were: 1) recruited female athletes as subjects, 2) documented the number of ACL injuries, 3) employed a NMT intervention aimed to reduce ACL injuries, 4) had a control group, 5) used a prospective control trial design and 6) provided NMT session duration and frequency information. Main outcome measures The number of ACL injuries and female athletes in each group (control and intervention) were compared based on duration, frequency, and volume of NMT through odds ratio (OR). Results A total of 14 studies were reviewed. Analyses that compared the number of ACL injuries with short versus long NMT duration showed greater ACL injury reduction in female athletes who were in the long NMT duration (OR:0.35, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.53, p=0.001) than the short NMT duration (OR: 0.61, 95%CI: 0.41, 0.90, p=0.013) group. Analysis that compared single versus multi NMT frequency indicated greater ACL injury reduction in multi NMT frequency (OR: 0.35, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.53, p=0.001) compared to single NMT frequency (OR: 0.62, 95%CI:0.41, 0.94, p=0.024). Combining the duration and frequency of NMT programs, an inverse dose-response association emerged among low (OR: 0.66, 95%CI: 0.43, 0.99, p=0.045), moderate (OR: 0.46, 95%CI: 0.21, 1

  10. Influence Of Chemicals Of Arbolin Group On Branching Of Maiden Trees Of Three Apple Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhalnerchyk Pavel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies realized in 2008 and 2009 proved that Neo Arbolin Extra (10 g GA4+7 and 50 g BA in 1 l of solution and Neo Arbolin (18 g GA4+7 and 18 g BA in 1 l of solution applied separately or with Algamino Plant (18% extract from seaweeds and 10% of potassium salt of amino acids stimulated the development of axillary buds on apple maiden trees of ‘Ligol’, ‘Golden Delicious’ and ‘Mutsu’ cultivars grafted on M.9 rootstock, thus enhancing the number of feathers longer than 10 cm. Preparations were applied twice, from the middle of June to July 9. Results differed between years, which may be related to different weather courses during the growing seasons. Neo Arbolin Extra at a concentration 30 ml·l−1 with adjuvant addition (Adpros 5 ml·l−1 gave the best results in branching of maiden trees of three examined cultivars. Trees treated with those preparations twice produced more than 10 feathers (> 10 cm in the year highly favoring maiden tree growth and more than 6 feathers in the less favorable year. Algamino Plant did not influence apple tree branching.

  11. Antitumor activities and interaction with DNA of oxaliplatin-type platinum complexes with linear or branched alkoxyacetates as leaving groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Runting; Gou, Shaohua; Liu, Xia; Lou, Liguang

    2011-08-01

    Five oxaliplatin-typed platinum complexes containing trans-1R, 2R-diaminocyclohexane chelating platinum cores, characteristic of linear or branched alkoxycarboxylates as leaving groups, were biologically evaluated. These compounds showed higher antitumor activity, lower toxicity in vivo than cisplatin or oxaliplatin. And the results revealed that the antitumor activity and interaction with DNA of these compounds were highly related to the nature of leaving groups. Among these complexes, 5a, cis-(trans-1R, 2R-diaminocyclohexane) bis (2-tert-butoxyacetate) platinum(II), showed the highest antitumor activity and the lowest toxicity.

  12. The Hidden Subgroup Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    We give an overview of the Hidden Subgroup Problem (HSP) as of July 2010, including new results discovered since the survey of arXiv:quant-ph/0411037v1. We recall how the problem provides a framework for efficient quantum algorithms and present the standard methods based on coset sampling. We study the Dihedral and Symmetric HSPs and how they relate to hard problems on lattices and graphs. Finally, we conclude with the known solutions and techniques, describe connections with efficient algorithms as well as miscellaneous variants of HSP. We also bring various contributions to the topic. We show that in theory, we can solve HSP over a given group inductively: the base case is solving HSP over its simple factor groups and the inductive step is building efficient oracles over a normal subgroup N and over the factor group G/N. We apply this analysis to the Dedekindian HSP to get an alternative abelian HSP algorithm based on a change of the underlying group. We also propose a quotient reduction by the normal group...

  13. Subgroup Balancing Propensity Score

    OpenAIRE

    DONG, JING; Zhang, Junni L; Li, Fan

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the estimation of subgroup treatment effects with observational data. Existing propensity score matching and weighting methods are mostly developed for estimating overall treatment effect. Although the true propensity score should balance covariates for the subgroup populations, the estimated propensity score may not balance covariates for the subgroup samples. We propose the subgroup balancing propensity score (SBPS) method, which selects, for each subgroup, to use either the ...

  14. Recombination in the evolution of enterovirus C species sub-group that contains types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Smura

    Full Text Available Genetic recombination is considered to be a very frequent phenomenon among enteroviruses (Family Picornaviridae, Genus Enterovirus. However, the recombination patterns may differ between enterovirus species and between types within species. Enterovirus C (EV-C species contains 21 types. In the capsid coding P1 region, the types of EV-C species cluster further into three sub-groups (designated here as A-C. In this study, the recombination pattern of EV-C species sub-group B that contains types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99 was determined using partial 5'UTR and VP1 sequences of enterovirus strains isolated during poliovirus surveillance and previously published complete genome sequences. Several inter-typic recombination events were detected. Furthermore, the analyses suggested that inter-typic recombination events have occurred mainly within the distinct sub-groups of EV-C species. Only sporadic recombination events between EV-C species sub-group B and other EV-C sub-groups were detected. In addition, strict recombination barriers were inferred for CVA-21 genotype C and CVA-24 variant strains. These results suggest that the frequency of inter-typic recombinations, even within species, may depend on the phylogenetic position of the given viruses.

  15. Recombination in the Evolution of Enterovirus C Species Sub-Group that Contains Types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smura, Teemu; Blomqvist, Soile; Vuorinen, Tytti; Ivanova, Olga; Samoilovich, Elena; Al-Hello, Haider; Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Hovi, Tapani; Roivainen, Merja

    2014-01-01

    Genetic recombination is considered to be a very frequent phenomenon among enteroviruses (Family Picornaviridae, Genus Enterovirus). However, the recombination patterns may differ between enterovirus species and between types within species. Enterovirus C (EV-C) species contains 21 types. In the capsid coding P1 region, the types of EV-C species cluster further into three sub-groups (designated here as A–C). In this study, the recombination pattern of EV-C species sub-group B that contains types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99 was determined using partial 5′UTR and VP1 sequences of enterovirus strains isolated during poliovirus surveillance and previously published complete genome sequences. Several inter-typic recombination events were detected. Furthermore, the analyses suggested that inter-typic recombination events have occurred mainly within the distinct sub-groups of EV-C species. Only sporadic recombination events between EV-C species sub-group B and other EV-C sub-groups were detected. In addition, strict recombination barriers were inferred for CVA-21 genotype C and CVA-24 variant strains. These results suggest that the frequency of inter-typic recombinations, even within species, may depend on the phylogenetic position of the given viruses. PMID:24722726

  16. On quantum algorithms for noncommutative hidden subgroups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettinger, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hoeyer, P. [Odense Univ. (Denmark)

    1998-12-01

    Quantum algorithms for factoring and discrete logarithm have previously been generalized to finding hidden subgroups of finite Abelian groups. This paper explores the possibility of extending this general viewpoint to finding hidden subgroups of noncommutative groups. The authors present a quantum algorithm for the special case of dihedral groups which determines the hidden subgroup in a linear number of calls to the input function. They also explore the difficulties of developing an algorithm to process the data to explicitly calculate a generating set for the subgroup. A general framework for the noncommutative hidden subgroup problem is discussed and they indicate future research directions.

  17. Use of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) to improve the nutrient adequacy of general food distribution rations for vulnerable sub-groups in emergency settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Camila M; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2010-01-01

    The term 'lipid-based nutrient supplements' (LNS) refers generically to a range of fortified, lipid-based products, including products like Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF) (a large daily ration with relatively low micronutrient concentration) as well as highly concentrated supplements (1-4 teaspoons/day, providing groups [e.g. infants and children between 6 and 24 months of age, and pregnant and lactating women (PLW)]. Currently, the main food and nutrition interventions in emergency settings include general food distribution (GFD) rations, which are provided to the affected population as a whole, and selective (or supplementary) feeding programs (SFP), which are to be provided to nutritionally vulnerable or malnourished individuals. In addition to logistical and operational challenges that may limit the intended effect of these programs, the nutritional quality of the food commodities provided may be insufficient to meet the needs of infants and young children and PLW. Because these subgroups have particularly high nutrient needs for growth and development, meeting these needs is challenging in settings where the ration is limited to a few food commodities, with little access to a diverse diet and bioavailable sources of micronutrients. In recent years, there has been increased attention to adding micronutrient interventions, on top of the other food-based interventions (such as GFDs and SFPs), to fill micronutrient gaps in diets in emergency settings. The focus of this document is the potential role of LNS in meeting the nutritional needs of these vulnerable subgroups, with the goal of preventing malnutrition in emergency-affected populations. The document addresses the desired nutritional formulation of LNS for these target groups, taking into account the expected bioavailability of relevant nutrients and toxicity concerns. It also discusses the recommended chemical forms of the fortificants in LNS; stability and shelf-life considerations; production

  18. Immunophenotyping of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) defines multiple sub-groups of germinal centre-like tumours displaying different survival characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John J; Fordham, Sarah; Overman, Lynne; Dignum, Helen; Wood, Katrina; Proctor, Stephen J; Crosier, Stephen; Angus, Brian; Culpin, Rachel E; Mainou-Fowler, Tryfonia

    2009-11-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) forms a heterogeneous collection of aggressive non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma in which three principle classes of neoplasia have been defined according to gene expression and immunophenotyping studies. The present investigation sought to examine the immunophenotype of proposed subgroups and relate these to patient survival. A series of 155 DLBCL treated uniformly with anthracycline therapy in clinical trials, were stratified upon the basis of common biomarker expression with combination immunophenotype being related to patient overall survival. Stratification of tumours with respect to combined expression profiles of the three biological markers (CD10, Bcl-6 and MUM-1) revealed six groups showing significant differences in survival (p=0.014). The greatest difference resided between distinct populations of germinal centre (GC) cell tumours; the first being CD10-, Bcl-6+, MUM-1- and the second CD10+ Bcl-6+ MUM-1+ (p=0.002). The former group displayed median survival time of 143 months, the latter only 11 months. A third population of GC tumours (CD10+ Bcl-6+ and MUM-1-) also displayed a relative short median survival (32 months). Of the three groups presenting a non-GC or activated B cell (NGC/ABC) phenotype, only one (CD10-, Bcl-6+ and MUM-1+) presented short-term median survival (27 months) comparable with poor prognosis GC sub-populations. Within the remaining ABC tumour groups (CD10- Bcl-6- MUM-1- and CD10- Bcl-6- MUM-1+) patients presented intermediate median survival times of 54 and 58 months, respectively. Thus, the GC phenotype did not act as a universal indicator of good clinical prognosis, but rather multiple groups of GC tumours were associated with distinct overall survival profiles. Ultimately, the data allowed definition of a predictive algorithm defining three groups predicting poor, intermediate and good clinical prognosis. The first of these comprised two patient sub-populations with GC-like tumours together with one sub

  19. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, HI 96822 (United States); Rizzi, Luca [W. M. Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Hwy, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Karachentsev, Igor D. [Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnij Arkhyz, Karachai-Cherkessian Republic 369167 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ∼5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub −0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub −0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub −0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  20. Infrared Tip of the Red Giant Branch and Distances to the Maffei/IC 342 Group

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Po-Feng; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E; Jacobs, Bradley A; Karachentsev, Igor D

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from previously-used $I$-band, using the \\textit{Hubble Space Telescope (HST)} Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of $\\sim 5%$ in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously-used ACS $F606W$ and $F814W$ filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45$^{+0.13}_{-0.13}$ Mpc for IC 342, 3.37$^{+0.32}_{-0.23}$ Mpc for Maffei 1 and 3.52$^{+0.32}_{-0.30}$ Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with t...

  1. Evaluation of Civil Engineering Work Group Characteristics Resulting from an Operations Branch Reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    material). 135. People in my work group are never afraid to speak their minds about issues and problems that affect them. 136. I can not wait until I get...things my own way. 139. I feel I am really part of my work group. 4. 140. My direct supervisor seeks the advice of our work group on important matters ...Volume 1. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1983. 3. ------- Small Groups and Social Interactin , Volume 2. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1983. 4. Cartwright

  2. Recombination in the Evolution of Enterovirus C Species Sub-Group that Contains Types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99

    OpenAIRE

    Teemu Smura; Soile Blomqvist; Tytti Vuorinen; Olga Ivanova; Elena Samoilovich; Haider Al-Hello; Carita Savolainen-Kopra; Tapani Hovi; Merja Roivainen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic recombination is considered to be a very frequent phenomenon among enteroviruses (Family Picornaviridae, Genus Enterovirus). However, the recombination patterns may differ between enterovirus species and between types within species. Enterovirus C (EV-C) species contains 21 types. In the capsid coding P1 region, the types of EV-C species cluster further into three sub-groups (designated here as A-C). In this study, the recombination pattern of EV-C species sub-group B that contains ty...

  3. Finite Nilpotent Groups with 5 Conjugacy Classes of Noncyclic Subgroups%非循环子群共轭类个数为5的有限幂零群

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭凯艳; 曹洪平; 陈贵云

    2012-01-01

    给出了非循环子群共轭类个数为5的有限幂零群的分类.由此,对非循环子群共轭类个数不大于5的有限幂零群进行了完全分类.%The finite nilpotent groups with 5 conjugacy classes of noncyclic subgroups are completely classified, from which one can give the structure of all finite nilpotent groups with the number of conjugacy classes of noncyclic subgroups at most 5.

  4. Branching laws for some unitary representations of SL(4,R)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Bent; Speh, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    in the last section some representations in the cuspidal spectrum of the symplectic and the complex general linear group. In addition to working directly with the cohmologically induced module to obtain the branching law, we also introduce the useful concept of pseudo dual pairs of subgroups in a reductive...

  5. Separation of two sub-groups with different DNA content after treatment of T-47D breast cancer cells with low dose-rate irradiation and intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikalsen, Stine Gyland; Jeppesen Edin, Nina; Sandvik, Joe Alexander; Pettersen, Erik Olai

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that combined treatment with internal ultra-low dose-rate irradiation selectively inactivated hypoxic T-47D breast cancer cells after three to five weeks of treatment. However, 2-3% of the hypoxic cells were found to survive and restart proliferation upon re-oxygenation. Purpose To investigate the metastatic potential and characteristics of radiosensitivity of these surviving cells, named T - 47 DS. Material and Methods The T - 47 DS cells were grown in ambient air without irradiation. A cloning experiment identified two sub-groups with different DNA content ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). Furthermore, radiosensitivity and presence of hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) was measured by Co-60 challenge irradiation and relative migration was determined by scratch assays. Results The two subpopulations of T - 47 DS had different DNA content; one had abnormally high DNA content ([Formula: see text]) and one had DNA content similar to wild-type T-47D cells ([Formula: see text]). HRS was surprisingly present in cells of the cloned population [Formula: see text], but was absent in cells of both [Formula: see text] and T - 47 DS. The radio response of T - 47 DS, [Formula: see text] at higher radiation doses were similar to that of T-47D cells, and neither subpopulation showed increased migration compared with wild-type T-47D. Conclusion No increase in the risk of metastasis was found and only slight changes in radiosensitivity in response to conventional clinical doses was observed. Thus, the data suggest that if ultra-low dose-rate irradiation is used for targeting the hypoxic tumor fraction, conventional high dose-rate irradiation can be used to eradicate eventual surviving cells as well as cells in the well oxygenated areas of the tumor.

  6. Safety and effectiveness of tadalafil in pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a sub-group analysis based on Japan post-marketing surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroyoshi; Kobayashi, Noriko; Taketsuna, Masanori; Tajima, Koyuki; Suzuki, Nahoko; Murakami, Masahiro

    2017-07-20

    To evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of tadalafil in pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in real-world clinical practice. This is an observational surveillance of PAH patients receiving tadalafil in the contracted sites. A sub-group analysis was performed of 391 pediatric PAH patients (events (AEs), and serious adverse drug reactions (SADRs). Effectiveness measurements included change in World Health Organization (WHO) functional classification of PAH, cardiac catheterization (pulmonary arterial pressure: PAP), and echocardiography (tricuspid regurgitation pressure gradient: TRPG). Survival rate was also measured. The mean patient age was 5.7 ± 5.34 years. Associated PAH (APAH) and idiopathic PAH (IPAH) accounted for 76.0% and 17.6%, respectively, of the PAH patients. Patients were followed for up to 2 years. Among 391 patients analyzed for safety, the overall incidence rate of ADRs was 16.6%. The common ADRs (≥ 1%) were headache (2.8%), hepatic function abnormal, platelet count decreased (1.3% each), and epistaxis, (1.0%). Eleven patients (2.8%) reported 16 SADRs. Three patients died secondary to SADRs. For the effectiveness analysis, the incidence of WHO functional class improvement at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the initiation of tadalafil and last observation in pediatric patients were 16.5%, 19.7%, and 16.3%, respectively. Both PAP and TRPG showed a statistically significant reduction at last observation. This manuscript reveals the use of tadalafil in the real-world pediatric population with an acceptable safety profile in Japan.

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopy and photochemistry of novel branched fluorescent nitro-stilbene derivatives with benzopheonone groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fang; Liu, Jian; Peng, Huayong; Hu, Nvdan; Li, Hongru; Zhang, Shengtao

    2010-05-01

    In this article, we presented novel nitro-stilbene derivatives with one or two benzophenone groups as photoinitiators via multi-steps synthesis. The ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy and the emission spectroscopy of the compounds were determined in various solvents. The results showed that the ultraviolet/visible absorption spectroscopy of the derivatives with benzophenone moiety displayed overlap effects of nitro-stilbene and benzophenone parts. In non-polar solvents, the derivatives exhibited strong emission, while they displayed weak emission in modest and strong polar solvents. Dyes-linked benzopheonone groups displayed stronger fluorescence emission than simple chromophore parent molecules. Visible-light photoinitiating effects of the derivatives were investigated extensively. Methyl methacrylate could be photoinitiated efficiently by the derivatives with benzophenone moieties at very low concentration, even at 1 x 10(-5) mol/L. While the photopolymerization efficiency of styrene initiated by the derivatives was lower than that of methyl methacrylate. Our results showed that the dye-linked photoinitators had more efficient photoinitiating than the simple mixture of dye and photoinitator. Furthermore, the derivative with two benzophenone groups displayed more excellent photoiniatiating effects than the derivative with one benzophenone group. Thermodynamics driving for the occurrence of visible-light photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer from chromophore part to benzophenone part was evaluated. Benzopinacol moiety produced in photoreaction was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonant spectroscopy. Thermal stability of the derivatives was analyzed.

  8. Advanced airway management in combat casualties by medics at the point of injury: a sub-group analysis of the reach study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Robert L; Frankfurt, Alan

    2011-01-01

    background: Optimal airway management protocols for the prehospital battlefield setting have not been defined. Airway management strategies in this environment must take into account the injury patterns, the environment and training requirements of military prehospital providers. This is a post-hoc, sub-group analysis of the Registry of Emergency Airways Arriving at Combat Hospitals or REACH database. This study examines only those patients who had advanced airways placed for trauma by an enlisted military medic at the point of injury. results: Twenty (100%) of the patients had a traumatic injury, 19 (95%) were male, and 13 (65%) had a gun shot wounds (GSWs) as the mechanism of injury. The majority, 12 (60%) patients had an esophageal-tracheal airway device placed. Of the remaining patients, four (20%) underwent endotracheal intubation, three (15%) had a surgical cricothyroidotomy performed, and one (5%) had a Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) placed. Seventeen (85%) of the twenty patients were dead on arrival or died shortly after arrival at the Combat Support Hospital (CSH). All of the patients that died had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of three upon arrival. The Glasgow Coma Scale provides a score in the range 3-15; patients with scores of 3-8 are usually said to be in a coma. Three patients in this group survived to transfer from the CSH. Two of the transfers were lost to follow up, one with a GSW to the head and GCS of three, the other with a GCS of five from injuries sustained in an explosion. The third patient had a surgical cricothyroidotomy (SC) performed in the field for an expanding neck hematoma and recovered fully following surgery. conclusions: Casualties that tolerate invasive airway management without sedation in the context of trauma prognosticates a very high mortality. Airway management algorithms for military providers should reflect the casualties encountered on the battlefield not patients in cardiac arrest which predominate in the civilian EMS airway

  9. Soft n-Ary Subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Prince Williams

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soft set theory plays a vital role in solving many complicated problems with inherited uncertainty. An n-ary algebraic systems is a generalization of algebraic structures and it is the most natural way for the further development, deeper understanding of their properties. In this paper, we apply soft set theory to an n-ary algebraic systems and introduce the notions of soft n-ary groups and soft n-ary subgroups. Further, some operations on soft sets are extended to the former. Finally, we provide the characterization of soft n-ary subgroups over an n-ary group (G,f and study their related properties.

  10. Evolutionary tree design: An exploratory study of the influence of linear versus branching format on visitors' interpretation and understanding across age groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Teresa Elise

    This exploratory study sought to investigate the influence of tree graphic design---specifically linear versus branching depictions of taxa---on visitors in three different age groups (aged 11-13, 14-18, adults) interpretation and understanding using a multiple-case study strategy. The findings from this research indicate that linear and branched depictions elicit qualitatively different narratives and explanations about the relationships between the taxa in all age groups. Branched tree graphics support scientifically appropriate explanations of evolutionary relationships, i.e. that taxa are related via shared or common ancestry; while linear representations reinforce intuitive interpretations of ancestor-descendant or anagenic relationships. Furthermore, differences in the language used for linear and branched trees suggests that there is a spectrum within an analogy of developmental change that is thought to serve as a transitional concept between intuitive and scientific understanding--with 'evolved from' for branched depictions of taxa representing a shift towards an interpretation of shared ancestry rather than an individual transformation from one thing into another. In addition, branched graphics appear to support the correct reading and interpretation of shared or common ancestry in tree diagrams. Mixed reasoning was common and overall reasoning patterns were broadly similar among participants in all age groups, however, older youth (aged 14 to 18) and adults often provided more detail in their explanations and sometimes included references to evolutionary ideas such as variation, inheritance and selection.

  11. The Fischer-Clifford Matrices of a Maximal Subgroup of the Sporadic Simple Group of Held(Dedicated to Professor Jamshid Moori on the occasion of his 60th birthday)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Faryad Ali

    2007-01-01

    The Held group He discovered by Held [10] is a sporadic simple group of order 4030387200 = 210.3a.52.73.17. The group He has 11 conjugacy classes of maximal subgroups as determined by Butler [5] and listed in the ATLAS. Held himself determined much of the local structure of He as well as the conjugacy classes of its elements. Thompson calculated the character table of He. In the present paper, we determine the Fischer Clifford matrices and hence compute the character table of the non-split extension 3.S7,which is a maximal subgroups of He of index 226560 using the technique of Fischer-Clifford matrices. Most of the computations were carried out with the aid of the computer algebra system GAP.

  12. Effect of the precise branching of polyethylene at each 21st CH2 group on its phase transitions, crystal structure, and morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qui, Wulin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sworen, John [University of Florida, Jackson Laboratory; Pyda, Marek {nmn} [ORNL; Nowak-Pyda, Elisabieta [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Habenschuss, Anton {Tony} [ORNL; Wagener, Kenneth [University of Florida; Wunderlich, Bernhard {nmn} [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Three linear polyethylenes with branches at every 21st backbone atom have been analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and quasi-isothermal, temperature-modulated DSC. The branches were methyl (PE1M), dimethyl (PE2M), and ethyl groups (PE1E). Linear polyethylene (HDPE) and atactic poly(octadecyl acrylate) (PODA) were also analyzed. All were compared to a random poly(ethylene-co-octene-1) of similar branch concentration (LLDPE) and poly(4,4'-phthaloimidobenzoyldoeicosyleneoxycarbonyl) (PEIM-22). The HDPE has the highest melting temperature and crystallinity with relatively large contributions of reversing melting when grown as folded-chain crystals. The precisely branched polyethylenes and copolymers have lower melting temperatures and heats of fusion. Of the branched samples, PE1M crystallizes more readily, followed by PE1E and PE2M, with PE2M showing cold crystallization. In contrast to paraffins of equal length which melt fully reversibly, the precisely designed, branched polymers melt largely irreversibly with small amounts of reversing melting, which is least for the best-grown crystals. The PE1M forms monoclinic, PE1E, pseudohexagonal, or triclinic crystals, and PE2M has a multitude of crystal structures.

  13. Comments on the sub-group reports of the EU Technical Expert Working Group on the revision of Directive 86/609/EEC on the protection of animals used for experimental and other scientific purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Robert; Balls, Michael

    2007-03-01

    A critical analysis is presented of the reports produced by four Technical Expert Working Group Sub-groups (SGs) on Ethical Review, Cost-Benefit, Authorisation and Scope, which were published on the EC website (http://ec.europa.eu/environment/chemicals/lab_animals/ia_info_en.htm), as part of the European Commission (EC)s review of EU Directive 86/609 EEC. This is in addition to our official response to the internet consultation questionnaire, submitted to the Commission on behalf of FRAME. Whilst the respective SG reports were extensive and detailed, we have identified several shortcomings, and in particular, a frequent lack of consensus among the SG members, resulting in a lack of clear guidance for the EC on what the revised Directive should contain, with reference to a number of crucial issues. Such indecisiveness could lead to wide discrepancies in the approaches of the EC, the European Parliament and the EU Member States concerning many issues of importance to animal welfare and the implementation of alternatives to animal experiments. These concerns range from logistical issues, such as requirements for named officers in authorised establishments, and the recording and publishing of statistics on animal use, to ethical and scientific problems, including the use of non-human primates, local ethical review, and education and training on the essential link between the Three Rs concept and best scientific practice. In each case, the basis for our concerns is explained, and suggestions for improvements to be incorporated into the revised Directive are made, in the hope that the harmonisation of approaches to laboratory animal experimentation and the use of alternative methods in the Member States can be maximised.

  14. On Residual Separability of Subgroups in Split Extensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Krjazheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1973, Allenby and Gregoras proved the following statement. Let G be a split extension of a finitely generated group A by the group B. 1 If in groups A and B all subgroups (all cyclic subgroups are finitely separable, then in group G all subgroups (all cyclic subgroups are finitely separable; 2 if in group A all subgroups are finitely separable, and in group B all finitely generated subgroups are finitely separable, then in group G all finitely generated subgroups are finitely separable. Recall that a group G is said to be a split extension of a group A by a group B, if the group A is a normal subgroup of G, B is a subgroup of G, G = AB and A ∩ B = 1. Recall also that the subgroup H of a group G is called finitely separable if for every element g of G, which does not belong to the subgroup H, there exists a homomorphism of G on a finite group in which the image of an element g does not belong to the image of the subgroup H. In this paper we obtained a generalization of the Allenby and Gregoras theorem by replacing the condition of the finitely generated group A by a more general one: for any natural number n the number of all subgroups of the group A of index n is finite. In fact, under this condition we managed to obtain a necessary and sufficient condition for finite separability of all subgroups (of all cyclic subgroups, of all finitely generated subgroups in the group G.

  15. Hidden Subgroup States are Almost Orthogonal

    CERN Document Server

    Ettinger, M; Knill, E H; Ettinger, Mark; Hoyer, Peter; Knill, Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that quantum computers can efficiently find a hidden subgroup $H$ of a finite Abelian group $G$. This implies that after only a polynomial (in $\\log |G|$) number of calls to the oracle function, the states corresponding to different candidate subgroups have exponentially small inner product. We show that this is true for noncommutative groups also. We present a quantum algorithm which identifies a hidden subgroup of an arbitrary finite group $G$ in only a linear (in $\\log |G|$) number of calls to the oracle function. This is exponentially better than the best classical algorithm. However our quantum algorithm requires an exponential amount of time, as in the classical case.

  16. Subgroups Among Opiate Addicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, Juris I.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The principal objective of the present investigation was to delineate homogeneous MMPI profile subgroups (types) through multivariate clustering procedures and to compare the derived (replicable) types on measures of the components of "sociopathy" as well as on other psychometric devices. (Author)

  17. Subgroups Among Opiate Addicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, Juris I.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The principal objective of the present investigation was to delineate homogeneous MMPI profile subgroups (types) through multivariate clustering procedures and to compare the derived (replicable) types on measures of the components of "sociopathy" as well as on other psychometric devices. (Author)

  18. Semi Cover-avoidance Properties of Subgroups and Solvability of Finite Groups%子群的半覆盖-远离性与有限群的可解性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦华全; 谷伟平; 黄杰山; 刘秀

    2009-01-01

    A subgroup H of a finite group G is said to have the semi cover-avoidance property in a group G if there is a chief series 1=G0subgroups,we present several sufficient conditions for a finite group to be solvable and π-solvable.Our results generlize some known theorems,including Schur-Zassenhaus theorem.%有限群G的子群H称为在G中具有半覆盖-远离性质,若存在G的一个主群列1=G0

  19. Factors associated with the prescription of inhaled corticosteroids in GOLD group A and B patients with COPD – subgroup analysis of the Taiwan obstructive lung disease cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei YF

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Feng Wei,1 Ping-Hung Kuo,2 Ying-Huang Tsai,3 Chi-Wei Tao,4 Shih-Lung Cheng,5,13 Chao-Hsien Lee,6 Yao-Kuang Wu,7 Ning-Hung Chen,8 Wu-Huei Hsu,9 Jeng-Yuan Hsu,10 Ming-Shian Lin,11 Chin-Chou Wang12 1Department of Internal Medicine, E-Da Hospital/I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Cheng-Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Division of Thoracic Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 8Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan; 9Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University and China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 10Division of Chest Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 11Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan; 12Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 13Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, Taiwan Background and objective: The overprescription of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS in the current Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD group A and B patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is not uncommon in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to explore the factors associated with the use of ICS in these patients. Methods: The Taiwan obstructive lung disease (TOLD study was a

  20. The solution to a conjecture of Tits on the subgroup generated by the squares of the generators of an Artin group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, John; Paris, Luis

    2001-07-01

    It was conjectured by Tits that the only relations amongst the squares of the standard generators of an Artin group are the obvious ones, namely that a^2 and b^2 commute if ab=ba appears as one of the Artin relations. In this paper we prove Tits' conjecture for all Artin groups. More generally, we show that, given a number m(s)>1 for each Artin generator s, the only relations amongst the powers s^m(s) of the generators are that a^m(a) and b^m(b) commute if ab=ba appears amongst the Artin relations.

  1. Changing patterns among the subgroups of strains of Staphylococcus aureus of phage group II in Danish hospitals from 1961-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, N H; Hartzen, S H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1994-01-01

    During the period 1961-91 a total of 567,635 strains of Staphylococcus aureus from hospitalized patients in Denmark have been characterized according to their antibiotic resistance, site of isolation and phage type. Strains of phage group II (typed by the phages 3A, 3C, 55 and 71) have been analy...

  2. 团队中子群形成的原因及影响--中国情境的实证研究%Causes and Effects of Subgroup Formation in Work Groups-An Empirical Study in the Chinese Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海珍; 邱林丹; 王香儿

    2016-01-01

    Group disruptions are very prevalent in practice,yet only little research examines them. We extend the literature on group disruptions by exploring their antecedents and consequents. We propose both perception of guanxi(a Chinese indige⁃nous variable)and perceived organizational politics(an external environmental factor)play a role in group disruptions phe⁃nomenon,suggest that group members with high-level perception of guanxi are apt to form subgroups,and so are those who perceive high-level organizational politics. We further prove the importance of subgroup formations by extending the positive effects of subgroup formation on perceived group conflicts,including relationship,task and process conflict. We test our mod⁃el using 209 individuals from a Chinese group company. The analytical results strongly support our propositions.%在实践中团队分裂十分普遍,然而却少有研究关注这一现象。文章通过探究其前因和后果,扩展了团队分裂的相关研究。一方面,文章提出关系感知(中国本土变量)和组织政治感知(外部环境因素)对团队分裂现象的影响,即高水平关系感知或高水平组织政治感知的团队成员更趋于形成子群。另一方面,建立子群形成与团队冲突(包括关系、任务和过程冲突)的正向关系,以证明子群形成是团队研究中不可忽视的现象。最后,通过来自中国本土公司209名员工数据检验了模型,数据分析结果支持了文章的观点。

  3. Expert-Guided Subgroup Discovery: Methodology and Application

    CERN Document Server

    Gamberger, D; 10.1613/jair.1089

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to expert-guided subgroup discovery. The main step of the subgroup discovery process, the induction of subgroup descriptions, is performed by a heuristic beam search algorithm, using a novel parametrized definition of rule quality which is analyzed in detail. The other important steps of the proposed subgroup discovery process are the detection of statistically significant properties of selected subgroups and subgroup visualization: statistically significant properties are used to enrich the descriptions of induced subgroups, while the visualization shows subgroup properties in the form of distributions of the numbers of examples in the subgroups. The approach is illustrated by the results obtained for a medical problem of early detection of patient risk groups.

  4. Developmentally regulated expression, alternative splicing and distinct sub-groupings in members of the Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like (SmVAL gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Ralf

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sperm-coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS domain is found across phyla and is a major structural feature of insect allergens, mammalian sperm proteins and parasitic nematode secreted molecules. Proteins containing this domain are implicated in diverse biological activities and may be important for chronic host/parasite interactions. Results We report the first description of an SCP/TAPS gene family (Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like (SmVALs in the medically important Platyhelminthes (class Trematoda and describe individual members' phylogenetic relationships, genomic organization and life cycle expression profiles. Twenty-eight SmVALs with complete SCP/TAPS domains were identified and comparison of their predicted protein features and gene structures indicated the presence of two distinct sub-families (group 1 & group 2. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this group 1/group 2 split is zoologically widespread as it exists across the metazoan sub-kingdom. Chromosomal localisation and PCR analysis, coupled to inspection of the current S. mansoni genomic assembly, revealed that many of the SmVAL genes are spatially linked throughout the genome. Quantitative lifecycle expression profiling demonstrated distinct SmVAL expression patterns, including transcripts specifically associated with lifestages involved in definitive host invasion, transcripts restricted to lifestages involved in the invasion of the intermediate host and transcripts ubiquitously expressed. Analysis of SmVAL6 transcript diversity demonstrated statistically significant, developmentally regulated, alternative splicing. Conclusion Our results highlight the existence of two distinct SCP/TAPS protein types within the Platyhelminthes and across taxa. The extensive lifecycle expression analysis indicates several SmVAL transcripts are upregulated in infective stages of the parasite, suggesting that these particular protein products may be linked

  5. Subgroup analysis in burnout : Relations between fatigue, anxiety, and depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, A.

    2016-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup

  6. Statistical Properties of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Spheroid: Detection of a Moving Group approximately 50 kpc from the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Harrigan, Matthew J; Newberg, Lee A; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C; Lee, Young Sun; Fiorentin, Paola Re

    2010-01-01

    A new moving group comprising at least four Blue Horizontal Branch (BHB) stars is identified at (l,b) = (65 deg, 48 deg). The horizontal branch at g0=18.9 magnitude implies a distance of 50 kpc from the Sun. The heliocentric radial velocity is RV = -157 +/- 4 km/s, corresponding to V(gsr) = -10 km/s; the dispersion in line-of-sight velocity is consistent with the instrumental errors for these stars. The mean metallicity of the moving group is [Fe/H] approximately -2.4, which is significantly more metal poor than the stellar spheroid. We estimate that the BHB stars in the outer halo have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.0, with a wide scatter and a distribution that does not change much as a function of distance from the Sun. We explore the systematics of SDSS DR7 surface gravity metallicity determinations for faint BHB stars, and present a technique for estimating the significance of clumps discovered in multidimensional data. This moving group cannot be distinguished in density, and highlights the need to c...

  7. Statistical Properties of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Spheroid: Detection of a Moving Group approximately 50 kpc from the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, Matthew J.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newberg, Lee A.; /Rensselaer Poly.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; /Michigan State U.; Fiorentin, Paola Re; /Ljubljana U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-02-01

    A new moving group comprising at least four Blue Horizontal Branch (BHB) stars is identified at (l; b) = (65{sup o}; 48{sup o}). The horizontal branch at g{sub 0} = 18.9 magnitude implies a distance of 50 kpc from the Sun. The heliocentric radial velocity is = -157 {+-} 4 km s{sup -1}, corresponding to V{sub gsr} = -10 km s{sup -1}; the dispersion in line-of-sight velocity is consistent with the instrumental errors for these stars. The mean metallicity of the moving group is [Fe/H] {approx} -2.4, which is significantly more metal poor than the stellar spheroid. We estimate that the BHB stars in the outer halo have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=-2.0, with a wide scatter and a distribution that does not change much as a function of distance from the Sun. We explore the systematics of SDSS DR7 surface gravity metallicity determinations for faint BHB stars, and present a technique for estimating the significance of clumps discovered in multidimensional data. This moving group cannot be distinguished in density, and highlights the need to collect many more spectra of Galactic stars to unravel the merger history of the Galaxy.

  8. 具有阿贝尔Sylow 2-子群的有限群的整群环的正规化子性质%The Normalizer Property for Integral Group Rings of Finite Groups with Abelian Sylow 2-Subgroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海进科; 李正兴

    2012-01-01

    Mazur conjectured that the normalizer property holds for finite groups with abelian Sylow 2-subgroups.Let G be a finite group and let N be a normal subgroup of G such that Z(G/N) has only trivial units.In this paper,a connection is established between the automorphisms of G induced by units in Z(G/N) and Coleman automorphisms of N.Based on this connection,we confirm that if G is a finite group with abelian Sylow 2-subgroups and Z(G/F^*(G)) has only trivial units then Mazur's conjecture holds for G.%Mazur猜想:具有阿贝尔Sylow 2-子群的有限群有正规化子性质.设G是一个有限群,N是G的一个正规子群且Z(G/N)仅有平凡单位,本文建立了由Z(G/N)中单位诱导的G的自同构与N的Coleman自同构之间的联系,在此基础上证明了若G是一个具有阿贝尔Sylow 2-子群的有限群且Z(G/F^*(G))仅有平凡单位,则Mazur猜想对G成立.

  9. A novel branched side-chain-type sulfonated polyimide membrane with flexible sulfoalkyl pendants and trifluoromethyl groups for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinchao; Liu, Suqin; He, Zhen; Zhou, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    A novel branched side-chain-type sulfonated polyimide (6F-s-bSPI) membrane with accessible branching agents of melamine, hydrophobic trifluoromethyl groups (sbnd CF3), and flexible sulfoalkyl pendants is prepared by a high-temperature polycondensation and post-sulfonation method for use in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The chemical structure of the 6F-s-bSPI membrane is confirmed by ATR-FTIR and 1H NMR spectra. The physico-chemical properties of the as-prepared 6F-s-bSPI membrane are systematically investigated and found to be strongly related to the specially designed structure. The 6F-s-bSPI membrane offers a reduced cost and possesses a significantly lowered vanadium ion permeability (1.18 × 10-7 cm2 min-1) compared to the linear SPI (2.25 × 10-7 cm2 min-1) and commercial Nafion 115 (1.36 × 10-6 cm2 min-1) membranes, prolonging the self-discharge duration of the VRFBs. In addition, the VRFB assembled with a 6F-s-bSPI membrane shows higher coulombic (98.3%-99.7%) and energy efficiencies (88.4%-66.12%) than that with a SPI or Nafion 115 membrane under current densities ranging from 20 to 100 mA cm-2. Moreover, the VRFB with a 6F-s-bSPI membrane delivers a stable cycling performance over 100 cycles with no decline in coulombic and energy efficiencies. These results show that the branched side-chain-type structure is a promising design to prepare excellent proton conductive membranes.

  10. Interpretation of Subgroup Effects in Published Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Mark J; Kjær, Per; Korsholm, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    that report on treatment effect modifiers (subgroups) for specific physical therapy interventions. The key messages are: (1) point estimates of treatment modifier effect size (interaction effect) and their confidence intervals can be calculated using group-level data when individual patient-level data...

  11. Attention Deficit Disorder (ADDH) and Delinquency Subgroups

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1988-01-01

    Two subgroups of hyperactive children (25 non-delinquent and 9 delinquent) and 1 group of 34 non-delinquent normal children were evaluated from childhood to adolescence at the National Center for Hyperactive Children, Encino, CA, using auditory evoked response potential (AERP) measures and EEG recordings.

  12. Cohesion group approach for evolutionary analysis of aspartokinase, an enzyme that feeds a branched network of many biochemical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chien-Chi; Bonner, Carol A; Xie, Gary; D'Souza, Mark; Jensen, Roy A

    2009-12-01

    Aspartokinase (Ask) exists within a variable network that supports the synthesis of 9 amino acids and a number of other important metabolites. Lysine, isoleucine, aromatic amino acids, and dipicolinate may arise from the ASK network or from alternative pathways. Ask proteins were subjected to cohesion group analysis, a methodology that sorts a given protein assemblage into groups in which evolutionary continuity is assured. Two subhomology divisions, ASK(alpha) and ASK(beta), have been recognized. The ASK(alpha) subhomology division is the most ancient, being widely distributed throughout the Archaea and Eukarya and in some Bacteria. Within an indel region of about 75 amino acids near the N terminus, ASK(beta) sequences differ from ASK(alpha) sequences by the possession of a proposed ancient deletion. ASK(beta) sequences are present in most Bacteria and usually exhibit an in-frame internal translational start site that can generate a small Ask subunit that is identical to the C-terminal portion of the larger subunit of a heterodimeric unit. Particularly novel are ask genes embedded in gene contexts that imply specialization for ectoine (osmotic agent) or aromatic amino acids. The cohesion group approach is well suited for the easy recognition of relatively recent lateral gene transfer (LGT) events, and many examples of these are described. Given the current density of genome representation for Proteobacteria, it is possible to reconstruct more ancient landmark LGT events. Thus, a plausible scenario in which the three well-studied and iconic Ask homologs of Escherichia coli are not within the vertical genealogy of Gammaproteobacteria, but rather originated via LGT from a Bacteroidetes donor, is supported.

  13. Three discrete groups with homogeneous chemistry along the red giant branch in the globular cluster NGC 2808

    CERN Document Server

    Carretta, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    We present the homogeneous reanalysis of Mg and Al abundances from high resolution UVES/FLAMES spectra for 31 red giants in the globular cluster NGC 2808. We found a well defined Mg-Al anticorrelation reaching a regime of subsolar Mg abundance ratios, with a spread of about 1.4 dex in [Al/Fe]. The main result from the improved statistics of our sample is that the distribution of stars is not continuous along the anticorrelation as they are neatly clustered into three distinct clumps each with different chemical composition. One group (P) shows the primordial composition of field stars of similar metallicity, and the other two (I and E) have increasing abundances of Al and decreasing abundances of Mg. The fraction of stars we found in the three components (P: 68%, I: 19%, E: 13%) is in excellent agreement with the number ratios computed for the three distinct main sequences in NGC 2808: for the first time there is a clear correspondence between discrete photometric sequences of dwarfs and distinct groups of gi...

  14. Structure refinement and magnetic properties of Ce{sub 2}RuAl{sub 3} and a group-subgroup scheme for Ce{sub 5}Ru{sub 3}Al{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Trinath; Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Schwickert, Christian; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2011-08-15

    The hexagonal Laves phase Ce{sub 2}RuAl{sub 3} ({identical_to} CeRu{sub 0.5}Al{sub 1.5}) was synthesized by high-frequence-melting of the elements in a sealed tantalum tube and subsequent annealing. The structure was refined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data: MgZn{sub 2} type, P6{sub 3}/mmc, Z = 2, a = 565.38(9), c = 888.3(1) pm, wR2 = 0.0231, 193 F{sup 2} values and 13 parameters. The 2a (0.824 Ru + 0.176 Al) and 6h (0.956 Al + 0.044 Ru) Wyckoff positions show mixed occupancies leading to the composition CeRu{sub 0.48}Al{sub 1.52} for the investigated crystal. The aluminum atoms build up Kagome networks at z = 1/4 and z = 3/4 which are connected to a three-dimensional network by the ruthenium atoms. The cerium atoms fill cavities of coordination number 16 (3 Ru + 9 Al + 4 Ce) within the [RuAl{sub 3}] network. The Ce{sub 2}RuAl{sub 3} sample orders ferromagnetically at T{sub C} = 8.0(1) K. The cerium-rich aluminide Ce{sub 5}Ru{sub 3}Al{sub 2} shows unusually short Ce-Ru distances of 253 and 260 pm for the Ce1 position as a result of intermediate cerium valence. The structural distortions are discussed on the basis of a group-subgroup scheme for Pr{sub 5}Ru{sub 3}Al{sub 2} (space group I2{sub 1}3) and the superstructure variant Ce{sub 5}Ru{sub 3}Al{sub 2} (space group R3). (orig.)

  15. 主理想环上子群Gr在线性群中的扩群%Extended Group of the Subgroup Gr in Linear Group Over the Principal Ideal Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫宗礼; 曲贺梅

    2008-01-01

    Suppose R is a principal ideal ring.R* is a multiplicative group which is composed of all reversible elements in R,and Mn(R),GL(n,R),SL(n,R)are denoted by,R*),SL(n,R)={g∈GL(n,R)|detg=1),SL(n,R)≤G≤GL(n,R)(n≥3),respectively,then basing on these facts,this paper mainly focus on discussing all extended groups of Gr={(AB OD)∈G|A∈GL(r,R),(1≤r<n)}in G when R is a principal ideal ring.

  16. The evolution of Vp1 gene in enterovirus C species sub-group that contains types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Smura

    Full Text Available Genus Enterovirus (Family Picornaviridae, consists of twelve species divided into genetically diverse types by their capsid protein VP1 coding sequences. Each enterovirus type can further be divided into intra-typic sub-clusters (genotypes. The aim of this study was to elucidate what leads to the emergence of novel enterovirus clades (types and genotypes. An evolutionary analysis was conducted for a sub-group of Enterovirus C species that contains types Coxsackievirus A21 (CVA-21, CVA-24, Enterovirus C95 (EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99. VP1 gene datasets were collected and analysed to infer the phylogeny, rate of evolution, nucleotide and amino acid substitution patterns and signs of selection. In VP1 coding gene, high intra-typic sequence diversities and robust grouping into distinct genotypes within each type were detected. Within each type the majority of nucleotide substitutions were synonymous and the non-synonymous substitutions tended to cluster in distinct highly polymorphic sites. Signs of positive selection were detected in some of these highly polymorphic sites, while strong negative selection was indicated in most of the codons. Despite robust clustering to intra-typic genotypes, only few genotype-specific 'signature' amino acids were detected. In contrast, when different enterovirus types were compared, there was a clear tendency towards fixation of type-specific 'signature' amino acids. The results suggest that permanent fixation of type-specific amino acids is a hallmark associated with evolution of different enterovirus types, whereas neutral evolution and/or (frequency-dependent positive selection in few highly polymorphic amino acid sites are the dominant forms of evolution when strains within an enterovirus type are compared.

  17. The Evolution of Vp1 Gene in Enterovirus C Species Sub-Group That Contains Types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smura, Teemu; Blomqvist, Soile; Vuorinen, Tytti; Ivanova, Olga; Samoilovich, Elena; Al-Hello, Haider; Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Hovi, Tapani; Roivainen, Merja

    2014-01-01

    Genus Enterovirus (Family Picornaviridae,) consists of twelve species divided into genetically diverse types by their capsid protein VP1 coding sequences. Each enterovirus type can further be divided into intra-typic sub-clusters (genotypes). The aim of this study was to elucidate what leads to the emergence of novel enterovirus clades (types and genotypes). An evolutionary analysis was conducted for a sub-group of Enterovirus C species that contains types Coxsackievirus A21 (CVA-21), CVA-24, Enterovirus C95 (EV-C95), EV-C96 and EV-C99. VP1 gene datasets were collected and analysed to infer the phylogeny, rate of evolution, nucleotide and amino acid substitution patterns and signs of selection. In VP1 coding gene, high intra-typic sequence diversities and robust grouping into distinct genotypes within each type were detected. Within each type the majority of nucleotide substitutions were synonymous and the non-synonymous substitutions tended to cluster in distinct highly polymorphic sites. Signs of positive selection were detected in some of these highly polymorphic sites, while strong negative selection was indicated in most of the codons. Despite robust clustering to intra-typic genotypes, only few genotype-specific ‘signature’ amino acids were detected. In contrast, when different enterovirus types were compared, there was a clear tendency towards fixation of type-specific ‘signature’ amino acids. The results suggest that permanent fixation of type-specific amino acids is a hallmark associated with evolution of different enterovirus types, whereas neutral evolution and/or (frequency-dependent) positive selection in few highly polymorphic amino acid sites are the dominant forms of evolution when strains within an enterovirus type are compared. PMID:24695547

  18. ABO血型系统B101-O02等位基因杂交导致的Bw亚型%Hybridization of B101 and O02 alleles responsible for Bw subgroup in ABO blood group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李育; 金红; 陈秉宇

    2010-01-01

    Objective Bw subgroup of ABO blood group system was investigated to reveal its molecular genetic basis in Chinese Han population.Methods The Abw subgroup of three relatives were identified by standard blood group serological techniques.The enhancer,promoter and exon 1 to exon 7including flanking intron sequences of ABO gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction.Direct sequencing was then performed on the gel-purified PCR products.Afterwards the exon 7 with polymorphic sites were cloned into pcDNA3.1(-)vector and transformed into DH5α to carry out a haploid analysis.Results According to the direct sequencing analysis,sequence characteristics of the 3 tested subjects were found specific to partial sequence of A102,B101 and O02 alleles,thought the genotypes could not be confirmed directly.The haploid analysis affirmed that one allele is A102 while the other is a B101-O02 hybrid,which harbored 646T>A,657T>C and 681G>A variants compared with B101 allele.This hybrid allele was not detected in a 110 randomly selected samples.Conclusion The B101-O02 hybrid allele may account for the Bw phenotype and its molecular genetic basis.%目的 研究中国汉族个体红细胞ABO血型Bw亚型的分子遗传背景.方法 通过标准血型血清学方法 鉴定了1个家庭3例ABw亚型,PCR扩增样本基因组DNA的ABO基因增强子、启动子和外显子1~7及侧翼内含子序列,PCR产物经割胶纯化后直接测序,并将含有多态性位点的外显子7克隆到pcDNA3.1(-)质粒,转化DH5α后进行单倍体序列分析.结果 3例ABw亚型的直接序列分析发现其ABO基因均有A102、B101和002等3种等位基因部分序列特征,但无法直接确定其基因型.单倍体序列分析表明,其中1个等位基因为A102,另1个为B101-O02杂交等位基因,表现为B101等位基因基础上的646T>A,657T>C和681G>A变异.在110份随机样本中未发现该杂交等位基因.结论 B101和O02等位基因杂交可能是导致该Bw亚型的分子机制.

  19. The ergodic theory of lattice subgroups

    CERN Document Server

    Gorodnik, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The results established in this book constitute a new departure in ergodic theory and a significant expansion of its scope. Traditional ergodic theorems focused on amenable groups, and relied on the existence of an asymptotically invariant sequence in the group, the resulting maximal inequalities based on covering arguments, and the transference principle. Here, Alexander Gorodnik and Amos Nevo develop a systematic general approach to the proof of ergodic theorems for a large class of non-amenable locally compact groups and their lattice subgroups. Simple general conditions on the spectral theory of the group and the regularity of the averaging sets are formulated, which suffice to guarantee convergence to the ergodic mean

  20. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids ), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 200 (FGE.200): 74 α , β -unsaturated aldehydes and precursors from subgroup 1.1.1 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    remains with respect to genotoxicity for the substances of this subgroup and their three representative substances. The Panel confirms, the need for an in vivo Comet assay performed in duodenum and liver for hex-2(trans)-enal [FL-no: 05.073]. For the two other representative substances of subgroup 1.......1.1 (nona-2(trans),6(cis)-dienal [FL-no: 05.058] and oct-2-enal [FL-no: 05.060]), a combined in vivo Comet assay and micronucleus assay would be required. For the latter, evidence of bone marrow exposure should be provided....

  1. On an equivalence of fuzzy subgroups III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Murali

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the third in a series of papers studying equivalence classes of fuzzy subgroups of a given group under a suitable equivalence relation. We introduce the notion of a pinned flag in order to study the operations sum, intersection and union, and their behavior with respect to the equivalence. Further, we investigate the extent to which a homomorphism preserves the equivalence. Whenever the equivalences are not preserved, we have provided suitable counterexamples.

  2. EFSA CEF Penal (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2014. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 212, Revision 2 (FGE.212Rev2): α,β-Unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 24 flavouring substances from subgroup 2.6 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 212, Revision 2. The Panel concluded in ...

  3. On (F)s-Quasinormality of 2-Maximal Subgroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yufeng LIU; Xiaolong YU; Lijun HUO

    2013-01-01

    Let (F) be a class of finite groups.A subgroup H of a finite group G is said to be (F)s-quasinormal in G if there exists a normal subgroup T of G such that HT is s-permutable in G and (H ∩ T)HG/HG is contained in the (F)-hypercenter Z(F)∞(G/HG) of G/HG.In this paper,we use (F)s-quasinormal subgroups to study the structure of finite groups.Some new results are obtained.

  4. Genetic markers for schizophrenic subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, V

    1982-01-01

    By the study of hereditary serum protein markers in psychotic patients and normal controls, a surplus of Gc 1-1 (p less than 0.01) and transferrin B variants (p less than 0.0027) has been established in schizophrenias. Affective psychoses are characterized by an excess of the haptoglobin (Hp) serum type 2-2 (p less than 0.001). These general statements have to be modified in regard to the clinical and psychopathological subdivision beyond the traditional classification into two major groups of endogenous mental disease. Using Leonhard's criteria, the prevalence of Gc 1-1 is restricted to the systematic schizophrenias reaching its highest value in hebephrenias, which are followed by paraphrenic and catatonic forms in this trait. In contrast to this, periodical catatonia and affective paraphrenia, classified as subgroups of the unsystematic schizophrenias, have Gc 1-1 frequencies like healthy controls. On the other hand, the Hp 2-2 value is not increased in the systematic schizophrenias, but it displays a relative overplus in the unsystematic forms. Concerning the Hp 2-2 and Gc 1-1 frequencies a certain similarity can be observed between affective paraphrenia and the paranoid psychoses with late onset, it they are characterized by a cyclic axis syndrome as described by the Vienna school. The cycloid psychoses are marked by an extreme surplus of Hp 2-2 (p less than 0.001) and an overweight of Gc 1-1 (p less than 0.05). Probably the Gc and Hp alleles play a role as risk factors or accidental effectors in the multifactorial genetic systems responsible for the biological background of psychoses. For both serum systems a selective interaction is discussed considering the vitamin D transport by the Gc proteins with the relation to neuronal consolidation and the possible influence of Hp 2-2 on transport and receptor functions.

  5. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  6. Tracheobronchial Branching Anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Min Ji; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick [Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, A Young [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    There are various congenital anomalies with respect to the number, length, diameter, and location of tracheobronchial branching patterns. The tracheobronchial anomalies are classified into two groups. The first one, anomalies of division, includes tracheal bronchus, cardiac bronchus, tracheal diverticulum, pulmonary isomerism, and minor variations. The second one, dysmorphic lung, includes lung agenesis-hypoplasia complex and lobar agenesis-aplasia complex

  7. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Yuxuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as “Lumped Parameter MOC”. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  8. Posttraumatic stress disorder post Iraq and Afghanistan: prevalence among military subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Lindsey A; Sundin, Josefin; Rona, Roberto J; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T

    2014-09-01

    A large body of research has been produced in recent years investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, resulting in apparent differences in PTSD prevalence. We compare prevalence estimates for current PTSD between military subgroups, providing insight into how groups may be differentially affected by deployment. Systematic literature searches using the terms PTSD, stress disorder, and acute stress, combined with terms relating to military personnel, identified 49 relevant papers. Studies with a sample size of less than 100 and studies based on data for treatment seeking or injured populations were excluded. Studies were categorized according to theatre of deployment (Iraq or Afghanistan), combat and noncombat deployed samples, sex, enlistment type (regular or reserve and [or] National Guard), and service branch (for example, army, navy, and air force). Meta-analysis was used to assess PTSD prevalence across subgroups. There was large variability in PTSD prevalence between studies, but, regardless of heterogeneity, prevalence rates of PTSD were higher among studies of Iraq-deployed personnel (12.9%; 95% CI 11.3% to 14.4%), compared with personnel deployed to Afghanistan (7.1%; 95% CI 4.6% to 9.6%), combat deployed personnel, and personnel serving in the Canadian, US, or UK army or the navy or marines (12.4%; 95% CI 10.9% to 13.4%), compared with the other services (4.9%; 95% CI 1.4% to 8.4%). Contrary to findings from within-study comparisons, we did not find a difference in PTSD prevalence for regular active-duty and reserve or National Guard personnel. Categorizing studies according to deployment location and branch of service identified differences among subgroups that provide further support for factors underlying the development of PTSD.

  9. Additive subgroups of topological vector spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Banaszczyk, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    The Pontryagin-van Kampen duality theorem and the Bochner theorem on positive-definite functions are known to be true for certain abelian topological groups that are not locally compact. The book sets out to present in a systematic way the existing material. It is based on the original notion of a nuclear group, which includes LCA groups and nuclear locally convex spaces together with their additive subgroups, quotient groups and products. For (metrizable, complete) nuclear groups one obtains analogues of the Pontryagin duality theorem, of the Bochner theorem and of the Lévy-Steinitz theorem on rearrangement of series (an answer to an old question of S. Ulam). The book is written in the language of functional analysis. The methods used are taken mainly from geometry of numbers, geometry of Banach spaces and topological algebra. The reader is expected only to know the basics of functional analysis and abstract harmonic analysis.

  10. Amphibolite of the Xinghuadukou group from the Xinlin-Xiguitu belt, NE China: new evidence for the NE branch of the Paleo-Asian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wenzhu

    2017-04-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean (PAO) witnessed the cycling of two supercontinents, Rodinia and Pangea, in Earth's geological history. This long-lasting paleo-ocean was initiated by the breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia during the Early Neoproterozoic (1,2) and terminated by the final collage of the supercontinent Pangea from Central to Eastern (current coordinates) Asia, likely lasting to the Late Permian or Early Triassic (3,4). Numerous continental and island arcs, seamounts, mid-ocean ridges and micro-blocks were amalgamated responding to the subduction and consumption of the oceanic crust of the PAO, to form the most complex and long-living Phanerozoic accretionary orogenic belt, the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) (5,6). Trapped by the collision and amalgamation of the eastern segment of CAOB, several rock suites of oceanic affinity were reported along the Xinlin-Xiguitu belt that connects the Erguna block to the northwest and the Xing'an block to the southeast in NE China, including the Toudaoqiao blueschist (7), Jifeng ophiolite (although the forming environment remains debatable, see 8 and 9), and Xinlin ophiolite (10,11). All these suites have been proposed to be the relics of the NE branch of the PAO. However, along the northeastern extension of this belt, outcropped the Xinghuadukou group that was previously thought Paleoproterozoic in age yet has been reconsidered to be Cambrian (12), the relationship of which and this belt remains unclear. In this study, a suite of amphibolite was collected from the Xinghuadukou group outcropped in the easternmost Xinlin-Xiguitu belt in NE China and conducted geochemical analysis to discuss their forming environment and tectonic implications. Samples display low SiO2 (45%-49%wt), low K2O (0.55%-1.07%wt) compositions, low in A/CNK, but high in A/NK and FeOt/MgO ratios. REE compositions are relative low (ΣREE=52-122ppm) showing a flat chondrite normative pattern with slight enrichment in LREE

  11. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 216, Revision 1 (FGE.216Rev1). Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated 2-Phenyl -2-Alkenals from Subgroup 3.3 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of five flavouring substances from subgroup 3.3 of FGE.19. In the Flavouring Group Evaluation 216 (FGE.216) additional genotoxicity...... of animals treated with 2-phenylcrotonaldehyde. Moreover, since the substance was genotoxic only without metabolic activation, it appears necessary to prove the absence of genotoxic effect locally in the gastro intestinal system using the Comet assay....

  12. Normal subgroup generated by a plane polynomial automorphism

    CERN Document Server

    Furter, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We study the normal subgroup generated by a non trivial element f in the group G of complex plane polynomial automorphisms having Jacobian determinant 1. On one hand if f has length at most 8 relatively to the classical amalgamated product structure of G, we prove that = G. On the other hand if f is a sufficiently generic element of even length at least 14, we prove that is a proper subgroup of G.

  13. Demonstration of Microbial Subgroups among Normal Vaginal Microbiota Data

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, M.-L. T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we identified subgroups of observations relating to the healthy vaginal microbiota. This microbiota resides in a dynamic environment that undergoes cyclic change during the menstrual cycle. Cluster analysis procedures were applied to divide a set of 226 normal microbiota observations into groups. Three subgroups containing 100, 65, and 61 observations were identified. Plots of principal components determined by canonical analysis were obtained to demonstrate graphically the clus...

  14. Self-Concept and Middle School Students with Learning Disabilities: A Comparison of Scholastic Competence Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagborg, Winston J.

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of middle-school-age students with learning disabilities, grouped according to their self-reported ratings of scholastic competence, found significant differences between the low subgroup and the medium/high subgroups on internal locus of control for positive events, school attitudes, and global self-worth. Subgroups did not differ in…

  15. Can the tinnitus spectrum identify tinnitus subgroups?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M Heijneman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tinnitus spectrum is a psycho-acoustic metric of tinnitus. Previous work found a tight relation between the spectrum and the tone audiogram. This suggests that the spectrum and the audiogram provide essentially the same information, and the added value of the spectrum is limited. In order to test whether the spectrum shows tinnitus characteristics that cannot be inferred from the audiogram, we re-examined the relation between the tinnitus spectrum and the tone audiogram, in a group of 80 tinnitus patients. We defined three subgroups of patients, using the shape of their tinnitus spectrum: (1 patients with a spectrum, monotonously increasing with frequency (2 patients with a distinct peak in their spectrum, (3 all other patients. Patients in group 3 typically showed low frequency tinnitus spectra. In all three groups, the largest hearing loss was at high frequencies (>2 kHz. The mean audiograms of group 1 and 2 were remarkably similar; group 3 had an additional hearing loss for the lower frequencies (<2 kHz. The three groups did not differ with respect to age, sex, or tinnitus questionnaire outcomes. In subgroups 2 and 3, the shape of the spectrum clearly differed from that of the tone audiogram. In other words, the spectrum technique provided information that could not have been obtained by tone audiometry alone. Therefore, the spectrum measurement may develop into a technique that can differentiate between classes of tinnitus. This may eventually contribute to the effective management of tinnitus, as various classes of tinnitus may require different therapeutic interventions.

  16. The impact of subgroup type and subgroup configurational properties on work team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, Andrew M; Cummings, Jonathon N

    2013-09-01

    Scholars have invoked subgroups in a number of theories related to teams, yet certain tensions in the literature remain unresolved. In this article, we address 2 of these tensions, both relating to how subgroups are configured in work teams: (a) whether teams perform better with a greater number of subgroups and (b) whether teams perform better when they have imbalanced subgroups (majorities and minorities are present) or balanced subgroups (subgroups are of equal size). We predict that the impact of the number and balance of subgroups depends on the type of subgroup-whether subgroups are formed according to social identity (i.e., identity-based subgroups) or information processing (i.e., knowledge-based subgroups). We first propose that teams are more adversely affected by 2 identity-based subgroups than by any other number, yet the uniquely negative impact of a 2-subgroup configuration is not apparent for knowledge-based subgroups. Instead, a larger number of knowledge-based subgroups is beneficial for performance, such that 2 subgroups is worse for performance when compared with 3 or more subgroups but better for performance when compared with no subgroups or 1 subgroup. Second, we argue that teams perform better when identity-based subgroups are imbalanced yet knowledge-based subgroups are balanced. We also suggest that there are interactive effects between the number and balance of subgroups-however, the nature of this interaction depends on the type of subgroup. To test these predictions, we developed and validated an algorithm that measures the configurational properties of subgroups in organizational work teams. Results of a field study of 326 work teams from a multinational organization support our predictions.

  17. Subgroup finding via Bayesian additive regression trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaganesan, Siva; Müller, Peter; Huang, Bin

    2017-03-09

    We provide a Bayesian decision theoretic approach to finding subgroups that have elevated treatment effects. Our approach separates the modeling of the response variable from the task of subgroup finding and allows a flexible modeling of the response variable irrespective of potential subgroups of interest. We use Bayesian additive regression trees to model the response variable and use a utility function defined in terms of a candidate subgroup and the predicted response for that subgroup. Subgroups are identified by maximizing the expected utility where the expectation is taken with respect to the posterior predictive distribution of the response, and the maximization is carried out over an a priori specified set of candidate subgroups. Our approach allows subgroups based on both quantitative and categorical covariates. We illustrate the approach using simulated data set study and a real data set. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Quantum Hidden Subgroup Problems A Mathematical Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Lomonaco, S J; Lomonaco, Samuel J.; Kauffman, Louis H.

    2002-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this paper is to create a stepping stone to the development of new quantum algorithms. The strategy chosen is to begin by focusing on the class of abelian quantum hidden subgroup algorithms, i.e., the class of abelian algorithms of the Shor/Simon genre. Our strategy is to make this class of algorithms as mathematically transparent as possible. By the phrase "mathematically transparent" we mean to expose, to bring to the surface, and to make explicit the concealed mathematical structures that are inherently and fundamentally a part of such algorithms. In so doing, we create symbolic abelian quantum hidden subgroup algorithms that are analogous to the those symbolic algorithms found within such software packages as Axiom, Cayley, Maple, Mathematica, and Magma. As a spin-off of this effort, we create three different generalizations of Shor's quantum factoring algorithm to free abelian groups of finite rank. We refer to these algorithms as wandering (or vintage Z_Q) Shor algorithms. They...

  19. Research methods for subgrouping low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Keating, Jennifer L; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    important distinctions in their treatment needs or prognoses. Due to a proliferation of research methods and variability in how subgrouping results are interpreted, it is timely to open discussion regarding a conceptual framework for the research designs and statistical methods available for subgrouping...... studies (a method framework). The aims of this debate article are: (1) to present a method framework to inform the design and evaluation of subgrouping research in low back pain, (2) to describe method options when investigating prognostic effects or subgroup treatment effects, and (3) to discuss...... the strengths and limitations of research methods suitable for the hypothesis-setting phase of subgroup studies....

  20. Identities on Maximal Subgroups of GLn(D)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Kiani; M. Mahdavi-Hezavehi

    2005-01-01

    Let D be a division ring with centre F. Assume that M is a maximal subgroup of GLn(D) (n ≥ 1) such that Z(M) is algebraic over F. Group identities on M and polynomial identities on the F-linear hull F[M] are investigated. It is shown that if F[M]is a PI-algebra, then [D: F] <∞. When D is non-commutative and F is infinite, it is also proved that if M satisfies a group identity and F[M] is algebraic over F, then we have either M = K* where K is a field and [D: F] <∞, or M is absolutely irreducible. For a finite dimensional division algebra D, assume that N is a subnormal subgroup of GLn(D)and M is a maximal subgroup of N. If M satisfies a group identity, it is shown that M is abelian-by-finite.

  1. Subgroup Analysis in Burnout: Relations Between Fatigue, Anxiety, and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup analysis may also help clarify whether burnout is a distinct entity and whether subgroups of burnout overlap with other disorders such as depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. In a group of 113 clinically diagnosed burned out patients, levels of fatigue, depression, and anxiety were assessed. In order to identify possible subgroups, we performed a two-step cluster analysis. The analysis revealed two clusters that differed from one another in terms of symptom severity on the three aforementioned measures. Depression appeared to be the strongest predictor of group membership. These results are considered in the light of the scientific debate on whether burnout can be distinguished from depression and whether burnout subtyping is useful. Finally, implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:26869983

  2. Subgroup analysis in burnout: relations between fatigue, anxiety and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno eVan Dam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have suggested that burned out patients do not form a homogeneous group and that subgroups should be considered. The identification of these subgroups may contribute to a better understanding of the burnout construct and lead to more specific therapeutic interventions. Subgroup analysis may also help clarify whether burnout is a distinct entity and whether subgroups of burnout overlap with other disorders such as depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. In a group of 113 clinically-diagnosed burned out patients, levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety were assessed. In order to identify possible subgroups, we performed a two-step cluster analysis. The analysis revealed two clusters that differed from one another in terms of symptom severity on the three aforementioned measures. Depression appeared to be the strongest predictor of group membership. These results are considered in the light of the scientific debate on whether burnout can be distinguished from depression and whether burnout subtyping is useful. Finally, implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of lymphocyte subgroups in children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, C; Yuca, S A; Yilmaz, N; Oner, A F; Caksen, H

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) remains to be fully elucidated, although it follows infection with a hypermutant defective M-protein measles virus. This study analysed peripheral blood lymphocyte subgroups to determine their role in the pathophysiology of SSPE. It included 22 children with SSPE aged 2 - 15 years (patient group) and 22 age- and gender-matched healthy children (control group). In children or= 6 years old, there were no significant differences in the lymphocyte subgroups. In conclusion, these findings suggest that a low CD4(+) lymphocyte count might be responsible for SSPE in younger children.

  4. Latent class analysis derived subgroups of low back pain patients - do they have prognostic capacity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard Nielsen, Anne; Hestbaek, Lise; Vach, Werner

    2017-01-01

    . Previously, we developed two novel suggestions for subgrouping patients with low back pain based on Latent Class Analysis of patient baseline characteristics (patient history and physical examination), which resulted in 7 subgroups when using a single-stage analysis, and 9 subgroups when using a two...... associated with these outcomes, and (iii) assessed the performance of the novel subgroupings as compared to the following variables: two existing subgrouping tools (STarT Back Tool and Quebec Task Force classification), four baseline characteristics and a group of previously identified domain...

  5. Clinical Subgroups in Bilateral Meniere Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejo, Lidia; Soto-Varela, Andres; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Aran, Ismael; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Perez-Guillen, Vanesa; Perez-Garrigues, Herminio; Fraile, Jesus; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Tapia, Maria C.; Trinidad, Gabriel; García-Arumi, Ana María; González-Aguado, Rocío; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Marques, Pedro; Perez, Paz; Benitez, Jesus; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Meniere disease (MD) is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, episodic vestibular symptoms, and tinnitus associated with several comorbidities, such as migraine or autoimmune disorders (AD). The frequency of bilateral involvement may range from 5 to 50%, and it depends on the duration of the disease. We have performed a two-step cluster analysis in 398 patients with bilateral MD (BMD) to identify the best predictors to define clinical subgroups with a potential different etiology to improve the phenotyping of BMD and to develop new treatments. We have defined five clinical variants in BMD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 46% of patients, and is defined by metachronic hearing loss without migraine and without AD. Group 2 is found in 17% of patients, and it is defined by synchronic hearing loss without migraine or AD. Group 3, with 13% of patients, is characterized by familial MD, while group 4, that includes 12% of patients, is associated by the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by AD. This approach can be helpful in selecting patients for genetic and clinical research. However, further studies will be required to improve the phenotyping in these clinical variants for a better understanding of the diverse etiological factors contributing to BMD. PMID:27822199

  6. Clinical subgroups in bilateral Meniere disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Frejo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Meniere disease (MD is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, episodic vestibular symptoms and tinnitus associated with several comorbidities such as migraine or autoimmune disorders (AD. The frequency of bilateral involvement may range from 5-50% and it depends on the duration of the disease. We have performed a two-step cluster analysis in 398 patients with bilateral MD to identify the best predictors to define clinical subgroups with a potential different etiology to improve the phenotyping of bilateral MD and to develop new treatments. We have defined five clinical variants in bilateral MD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 46% of patients, and is defined by metachronic hearing loss without migraine and without AD. Group 2 is found in 17% of patients, and it is defined by synchronic hearing loss without migraine or AD. Group 3, with 13% of patients, is characterized by familial MD, while group 4, that includes 12% of patients, is associated by the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by AD. This approach can be helpful in selecting patients for genetic and clinical research. However, further studies will be required to improve the phenotyping in these clinical variants for a better understanding of the diverse etiological factors contributing to bilateral MD.

  7. Factor analysis identifies subgroups of constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philip G Dinning; Mike Jones; Linda Hunt; Sergio E Fuentealba; Jamshid Kalanter; Denis W King; David Z Lubowski; Nicholas J Talley; Ian J Cook

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether distinct symptom groupings exist in a constipated population and whether such grouping might correlate with quantifiable pathophysiological measures of colonic dysfunction. METHODS: One hundred and ninety-one patients presenting to a Gastroenterology clinic with constipation and 32 constipated patients responding to a newspaper advertisement completed a 53-item, wide-ranging selfreport questionnaire. One hundred of these patients had colonic transit measured scintigraphically. Factor analysis determined whether constipation-related symptoms grouped into distinct aspects of symptomatology. Cluster analysis was used to determine whether individual patients naturally group into distinct subtypes. RESULTS: Cluster analysis yielded a 4 cluster solution with the presence or absence of pain and laxative unresponsiveness providing the main descriptors. Amongst all clusters there was a considerable proportion of patients with demonstrable delayed colon transit, irritable bowel syndrome positive criteria and regular stool frequency. The majority of patients with these characteristics also reported regular laxative use. CONCLUSION: Factor analysis identified four constipation subgroups, based on severity and laxative unresponsiveness, in a constipated population. However, clear stratification into clinically identifiable groups remains imprecise.

  8. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 203, Revision 1 (FGE.203Rev1: α,β-Unsaturated aliphatic aldehydes and precursors from chemical subgroup 1.1.4 of FGE.19 with two or more conjugated double-bonds and with or without additional non-conjugated double-bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of flavouring substances from subgroup 1.1.4 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 203, Revision 1 (FGE.203Rev1. The Flavour Industry has provided additional genotoxicity studies for one representative substance in FGE.203, namely 2,4-decadienal [FL-no: 05.140]. Based on the available data, on newly submitted studies and on the scientific evidence from the literature, the Panel concluded that the genotoxic potential cannot be ruled out for the flavouring substances in this FGE.

  9. Cluster analysis of clinical data identifies fibromyalgia subgroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Docampo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Fibromyalgia (FM is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. RESULTS: VARIABLES CLUSTERED INTO THREE INDEPENDENT DIMENSIONS: "symptomatology", "comorbidities" and "clinical scales". Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1, high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2, and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3, showing differences in measures of disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment.

  10. X-s-Permutable Subgroups%X-s-置换子群

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石磊; 郭文彬; 易小兰

    2008-01-01

    Let X be a nonempty subset of a group G.A subgroup H of G is said to be X-spermutable in G if,for every Sylow subgroup T of G,there exists an element x ∈X such that HTx=Tx H.In this paper,we obtain some results about the X-s-permutable subgroups and use them to determine the structure of some finite groups.

  11. Evaluation of allele frequencies of inherited disease genes in subgroups of American Quarter Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Robert C; Penedo, M Cecilia T; McCue, Molly E; Valberg, Stephanie J; Mickelson, James R; Famula, Thomas R; Wagner, Michelle L; Jackson, Mark; Hamilton, Michael J; Nooteboom, Sabine; Bannasch, Danika L

    2009-01-01

    To estimate allele frequencies of the hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis (HYPP), lethal white foal syndrome (LWFS), glycogen branching enzyme deficiency (GBED), hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA), and type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) genes in elite performance subgroups of American Quarter Horses (AQHs). Prospective genetic survey. 651 elite performance AQHs, 200 control AQHs, and 180 control American Paint Horses (APHs). Elite performance AQHs successful in 7 competitive disciplines (barrel racing, cutting, halter, racing, reining, western pleasure, and working cow horse) were geno- typed for 5 disease-causing alleles. Age-matched control AQHs and APHs were used to establish comparative whole-breed estimates of allele frequencies. Highest allele frequencies among control AQHs were for type 1 PSSM (0.055) and GBED (0.054), whereas HERDA (0.021) and HYPP (0.008) were less prevalent. Control APHs uniquely harbored LWFS (0.107) and had high prevalence of HYPP (0.025), relative to AQHs. Halter horse subgroups had significantly greater allele frequencies for HYPP (0.299) and PSSM (0.155). Glycogen branching enzyme deficiency, HERDA, and PSSM were found broadly throughout subgroups; cutting subgroups were distinct for HERDA (0.142), and western pleasure subgroups were distinct for GBED (0.132). Racing and barrel racing subgroups had the lowest frequencies of the 5 disease genes. Accurate estimates of disease-causing alleles in AQHs and APHs may guide use of diagnostic genetic testing, aid management of genetic diseases, and help minimize production of affected foals.

  12. Photovoltaic measurements and performance branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, S. E.; Dippo, P.

    1990-05-01

    The Photovoltaic (PV) Measurements and Performance Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) provides comprehensive PV materials, device and component characterization, measurement, fabrication, and modeling research and support for the international PV research community in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's PV m goals. The progress of the Branch is summarized. The seven technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups; Surface and Interface Analysis, Materials Characterization, Device Development, Electro-Optical Characterization, Cell Performance, Advanced Module Testing and Performance, and Surface and Interface Modification and Stability. The main research projects completed in FY 1989 are highlighted including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of the more than 80 branch-originated journal and conference publications which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 130 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  13. A complete classification of minimal non--groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pengfei Guo; Junxin Wang; Hailiang Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Let be a finite group. A subgroup of is called -permutable in if it permutes with every Sylow subgroup of , and is called a -group if all minimal subgroups and cyclic subgroups with order 4 of are -permutable in . In this paper, we give a complete classification of finite groups which are not -groups but their proper subgroups are all -groups.

  14. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 210 Revision 2 (FGE.210Rev2): Consideration of genotoxic potential for α,β-unsaturated alicyclic ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.4 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 14 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 210 (FGE.210). In FGE.210, the Panel concluded that the genotoxic potential could not be ruled out for any of the flavouring substances. In FGE.210 Revision1, the Panel co...

  15. Intronic deletions of tva receptor gene decrease the susceptibility to infection by subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A

    Science.gov (United States)

    The group of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) in chickens contains six highly related subgroups, A to E and J. Four genetic loci, tva, tvb, tvc and tvj, encode for corresponding receptors that determine the susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The prevalence of ASLV in hosts may have imposed...

  16. On the Normal Subgroup with Coprime -Conjugacy Class Sizes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xianhe Zhao; Guiyun Chen; Jiaoyun Shi

    2011-11-01

    Let be a normal subgroup of a group . The positive integers and are the two longest sizes of the non-central -conjugacy classes of with > and (,)=1. In this paper, the structure of is determined when divides $|N/N\\cap Z(G)|$. Some known results are generalized.

  17. Quiver Varieties and Branching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraku Nakajima

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Braverman and Finkelberg recently proposed the geometric Satake correspondence for the affine Kac-Moody group Gaff [Braverman A., Finkelberg M., arXiv:0711.2083]. They conjecture that intersection cohomology sheaves on the Uhlenbeck compactification of the framed moduli space of Gcpt-instantons on $R^4/Z_r$ correspond to weight spaces of representations of the Langlands dual group $G_{aff}^{vee}$ at level $r$. When $G = SL(l$, the Uhlenbeck compactification is the quiver variety of type $sl(r_{aff}$, and their conjecture follows from the author's earlier result and I. Frenkel's level-rank duality. They further introduce a convolution diagram which conjecturally gives the tensor product multiplicity [Braverman A., Finkelberg M., Private communication, 2008]. In this paper, we develop the theory for the branching in quiver varieties and check this conjecture for $G = SL(l$.

  18. Some open questions in the theory of generalized permutable subgroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A subgroup H of a group G is said to be weakly s-supplemented in G if H has a supplement T in G such that H ∩ T HsG, where HsG is the largest s-permutable subgroup of G contained in H. This paper constructs an example to show that the open questions 6.3 and 6.4 in J Algebra, 315: 192–209 (2007) have negative solutions, and shows that in many cases Question 6.4 is positive. A series of known results are unified and generalized.

  19. Existence of a dictatorial subgroup in social choice with independent subgroup utility scales, an alternative proof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna; van Deemen, Adrian; Rusinowska, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Social welfare orderings for different scales of individual utility measurement in distinct population subgroups are studied. In Khmelnitskaya (2000), employing the continuous version of Arrow’s impossibility theorem, it was shown that for combinations of independent subgroups scales every

  20. Internalin profiling and multilocus sequence typing suggest four Listeria innocua subgroups with different evolutionary distances from Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological, biochemical and genetic resemblance as well as clear differences of virulence between L. monocytogenes and L. innocua make this bacterial clade attractive as a model to examine evolution of pathogenicity. This study was attempted to examine the population structure of L. innocua and the microevolution in the L. innocua-L. monocytogenes clade via profiling of 37 internalin genes and multilocus sequence typing based on the sequences of 9 unlinked genes gyrB, sigB, dapE, hisJ, ribC, purM, gap, tuf and betL. Results L. innocua was genetically monophyletic compared to L. monocytogenes, and comprised four subgroups. Subgroups A and B correlated with internalin types 1 and 3 (except the strain 0063 belonging to subgroup C and internalin types 2 and 4 respectively. The majority of L. innocua strains belonged to these two subgroups. Subgroup A harbored a whole set of L. monocytogenes-L. innocua common and L. innocua-specific internalin genes, and displayed higher recombination rates than those of subgroup B, including the relative frequency of occurrence of recombination versus mutation (ρ/θ and the relative effect of recombination versus point mutation (r/m. Subgroup A also exhibited a significantly smaller exterior/interior branch length ratio than expected under the coalescent model, suggesting a recent expansion of its population size. The phylogram based on the analysis with correction for recombination revealed that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA of L. innocua subgroups A and B were similar. Additionally, subgroup D, which correlated with internalin type 5, branched off from the other three subgroups. All L. innocua strains lacked seventeen virulence genes found in L. monocytogenes (except for the subgroup D strain L43 harboring inlJ and two subgroup B strains bearing bsh and were nonpathogenic to mice. Conclusions L. innocua represents a young species descending from L. monocytogenes and

  1. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...

  2. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2002-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...

  3. Deriving the largest expected number of elementary particles in the standard model from the maximal compact subgroup H of the exceptional Lie group E{sub 7(-5)}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naschie, M.S. [King Abdullah Al Saud Institute of Nano and Advanced Technologies KSU, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Frankfurt Institute for the Advancement of Science, Frankfurt (Germany)], E-mail: Chaossf@aol.com

    2008-11-15

    The maximal number of elementary particles which could be expected to be found within a modestly extended energy scale of the standard model was found using various methods to be N = 69. In particular using E-infinity theory the present Author found the exact transfinite expectation value to be ={alpha}-bar{sub o}/2{approx_equal}69 where {alpha}-bar{sub o}=137.082039325 is the exact inverse fine structure constant. In the present work we show among other things how to derive the exact integer value 69 from the exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy. It is found that the relevant number is given by dim H = 69 where H is the maximal compact subspace of E{sub 7(-5)} so that N = dim H = 69 while dim E{sub 7} = 133.

  4. HPV status, cancer stem cell marker expression, hypoxia gene signatures and tumour volume identify good prognosis subgroups in patients with HNSCC after primary radiochemotherapy: A multicentre retrospective study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linge, Annett; Lohaus, Fabian; Löck, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    carcinoma (HNSCC), who received primary radiochemotherapy (RCTx). MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 158 patients with locally advanced HNSCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx or hypopharynx who were treated at six DKTK partner sites, the impact of tumour volume, HPV DNA, p16 overexpression, p53 expression, CSC marker...... expression and hypoxia-associated gene signatures on outcome of primary RCTx was retrospectively analyzed. The primary endpoint of this study was loco-regional control (LRC). RESULTS: Univariate Cox regression revealed a significant impact of tumour volume, p16 overexpression, and SLC3A2 and CD44 protein......-negative group). Logistic modelling showed that inclusion of CD44 protein expression and p16 overexpression significantly improved the performance to predict LRC at 2years compared to the model with tumour volume alone. CONCLUSIONS: Tumour volume, HPV status, CSC marker expression and hypoxia gene...

  5. Subgroup analyses in randomised controlled trials: cohort study on trial protocols and journal publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasenda, Benjamin; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; von Elm, Erik; You, John; Blümle, Anette; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; Lamontagne, Francois; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Raatz, Heike; Moja, Lorenzo; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ebrahim, Shanil; Vandvik, Per O; Johnston, Bradley C; Walter, Martin A; Burnand, Bernard; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Hemkens, Lars G; Bucher, Heiner C; Guyatt, Gordon H; Briel, Matthias

    2014-07-16

    To investigate the planning of subgroup analyses in protocols of randomised controlled trials and the agreement with corresponding full journal publications. Cohort of protocols of randomised controlled trial and subsequent full journal publications. Six research ethics committees in Switzerland, Germany, and Canada. 894 protocols of randomised controlled trial involving patients approved by participating research ethics committees between 2000 and 2003 and 515 subsequent full journal publications. Of 894 protocols of randomised controlled trials, 252 (28.2%) included one or more planned subgroup analyses. Of those, 17 (6.7%) provided a clear hypothesis for at least one subgroup analysis, 10 (4.0%) anticipated the direction of a subgroup effect, and 87 (34.5%) planned a statistical test for interaction. Industry sponsored trials more often planned subgroup analyses compared with investigator sponsored trials (195/551 (35.4%) v 57/343 (16.6%), P<0.001). Of 515 identified journal publications, 246 (47.8%) reported at least one subgroup analysis. In 81 (32.9%) of the 246 publications reporting subgroup analyses, authors stated that subgroup analyses were prespecified, but this was not supported by 28 (34.6%) corresponding protocols. In 86 publications, authors claimed a subgroup effect, but only 36 (41.9%) corresponding protocols reported a planned subgroup analysis. Subgroup analyses are insufficiently described in the protocols of randomised controlled trials submitted to research ethics committees, and investigators rarely specify the anticipated direction of subgroup effects. More than one third of statements in publications of randomised controlled trials about subgroup prespecification had no documentation in the corresponding protocols. Definitive judgments regarding credibility of claimed subgroup effects are not possible without access to protocols and analysis plans of randomised controlled trials. © The DISCO study group 2014.

  6. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 72, Revision 1 (FGE.72Rev1): Consideration of aliphatic, branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids, and related esters, evaluated by the JECFA (61st meeting) structurally related to branched- and straight-chain unsaturated carboxylic acids, esters of these and straight-chain aliphatic saturated alcohols evaluated by EFSA in FGE.05Rev2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 23 aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters, evaluated by the JECFA at their 61st meeting. This revision is made due...

  7. Widespread occurrence and phylogenetic placement of a soil clone group adds a prominant new branch to the fungal tree of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Terri M. [University of Toronto; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Rizvi, L [Royal Ontario Museum; Martin, Andrew P. [University of Colorado; Schmidt, Steven K. [University of Colorado; Scott-Denton, Laura [University of Colorado; Vilgalys, Rytas [Duke University; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc [University of Toronto

    2008-01-01

    Fungi are one of the most diverse groups of Eukarya and play essential roles in terrestrial ecosystems as decomposers, pathogens and mutualists. This study unifies disparate reports of unclassified fungal sequences from soils of diverse origins and anchors many of them in a well-supported clade of the Ascomycota equivalent to a subphylum. We refer to this clade as Soil Clone Group I (SCGI). We expand the breadth of environments surveyed and develop a taxon-specific primer to amplify 2.4 kbp rDNA fragments directly from soil. Our results also expand the known range of this group from North America to Europe and Australia. The ancient origin of SCGI implies that it may represent an important transitional form among the basal Ascomycota groups. SCGI is unusual because it currently represents the only major fungal lineage known only from sequence data. This is an important contribution towards building a more complete fungal phylogeny and highlights the need for further work to determine the function and biology of SCGI taxa.

  8. Subgroup effects despite homogeneous heterogeneity test results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubsen Jacobus

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical tests of heterogeneity are very popular in meta-analyses, as heterogeneity might indicate subgroup effects. Lack of demonstrable statistical heterogeneity, however, might obscure clinical heterogeneity, meaning clinically relevant subgroup effects. Methods A qualitative, visual method to explore the potential for subgroup effects was provided by a modification of the forest plot, i.e., adding a vertical axis indicating the proportion of a subgroup variable in the individual trials. Such a plot was used to assess the potential for clinically relevant subgroup effects and was illustrated by a clinical example on the effects of antibiotics in children with acute otitis media. Results Statistical tests did not indicate heterogeneity in the meta-analysis on the effects of amoxicillin on acute otitis media (Q = 3.29, p = 0.51; I2 = 0%; T2 = 0. Nevertheless, in a modified forest plot, in which the individual trials were ordered by the proportion of children with bilateral otitis, a clear relation between bilaterality and treatment effects was observed (which was also found in an individual patient data meta-analysis of the included trials: p-value for interaction 0.021. Conclusions A modification of the forest plot, by including an additional (vertical axis indicating the proportion of a certain subgroup variable, is a qualitative, visual, and easy-to-interpret method to explore potential subgroup effects in studies included in meta-analyses.

  9. Subgroup identification from randomized clinical trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jared C; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Ruberg, Stephen J

    2011-10-30

    We consider the problem of identifying a subgroup of patients who may have an enhanced treatment effect in a randomized clinical trial, and it is desirable that the subgroup be defined by a limited number of covariates. For this problem, the development of a standard, pre-determined strategy may help to avoid the well-known dangers of subgroup analysis. We present a method developed to find subgroups of enhanced treatment effect. This method, referred to as 'Virtual Twins', involves predicting response probabilities for treatment and control 'twins' for each subject. The difference in these probabilities is then used as the outcome in a classification or regression tree, which can potentially include any set of the covariates. We define a measure Q(Â) to be the difference between the treatment effect in estimated subgroup  and the marginal treatment effect. We present several methods developed to obtain an estimate of Q(Â), including estimation of Q(Â) using estimated probabilities in the original data, using estimated probabilities in newly simulated data, two cross-validation-based approaches, and a bootstrap-based bias-corrected approach. Results of a simulation study indicate that the Virtual Twins method noticeably outperforms logistic regression with forward selection when a true subgroup of enhanced treatment effect exists. Generally, large sample sizes or strong enhanced treatment effects are needed for subgroup estimation. As an illustration, we apply the proposed methods to data from a randomized clinical trial.

  10. Clinically relevant subgroups in COPD and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. Turner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As knowledge of airways disease has grown, it has become apparent that neither chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD nor asthma is a simple, easily defined disease. In the past, treatment options for both diseases were limited; thus, there was less need to define subgroups. As treatment options have grown, so has our need to predict who will respond to new drugs. To date, identifying subgroups has been largely reported by detailed clinical characterisation or differences in pathobiology. These subgroups are commonly called “phenotypes”; however, the problem of defining what constitutes a phenotype, whether this should include comorbid diseases and how to handle changes over time has led to the term being used loosely. In this review, we describe subgroups of COPD and asthma patients whose clinical characteristics we believe have therapeutic or major prognostic implications specific to the lung, and whether these subgroups are constant over time. Finally, we will discuss whether the subgroups we describe are common to both asthma and COPD, and give some examples of how treatment might be tailored in patients where the subgroup is clear, but the label of asthma or COPD is not.

  11. Phylogenomic analysis of proteins that are distinctive of Archaea and its main subgroups and the origin of methanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Radhey S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Archaea are highly diverse in terms of their physiology, metabolism and ecology. Presently, very few molecular characteristics are known that are uniquely shared by either all archaea or the different main groups within archaea. The evolutionary relationships among different groups within the Euryarchaeota branch are also not clearly understood. Results We have carried out comprehensive analyses on each open reading frame (ORFs in the genomes of 11 archaea (3 Crenarchaeota – Aeropyrum pernix, Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius; 8 Euryarchaeota – Pyrococcus abyssi, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanopyrus kandleri, Methanococcoides burtonii, Halobacterium sp. NCR-1, Haloquadratum walsbyi, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Picrophilus torridus to search for proteins that are unique to either all Archaea or for its main subgroups. These studies have identified 1448 proteins or ORFs that are distinctive characteristics of Archaea and its various subgroups and whose homologues are not found in other organisms. Six of these proteins are unique to all Archaea, 10 others are only missing in Nanoarchaeum equitans and a large number of other proteins are specific for various main groups within the Archaea (e.g. Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Sulfolobales and Desulfurococcales, Halobacteriales, Thermococci, Thermoplasmata, all methanogenic archaea or particular groups of methanogens. Of particular importance is the observation that 31 proteins are uniquely present in virtually all methanogens (including M. kandleri and 10 additional proteins are only found in different methanogens as well as A. fulgidus. In contrast, no protein was exclusively shared by various methanogen and any of the Halobacteriales or Thermoplasmatales. These results strongly indicate that all methanogenic archaea form a monophyletic group exclusive of other archaea and that this lineage likely evolved from Archaeoglobus. In addition, 15 proteins

  12. Identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chaleil

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some hypotheses concerning the identification of homogeneous subgroups among fibromyalgia (FM patients in order to improve the management of the disease. It also reviews the available literature about this subject. Three methods for subgrouping are discussed according to clinical features, biomarkers, and gait analysis. Clinical subgrouping based on cluster analysis has been used for the identification of homogeneous subgroups of patients and, more recently, homogeneous clinical features. So far, longitudinal studies using clinical subgroups to direct treatment and predict outcome are still required. Biomarkers in FM, which is a neurobiological disease, are of promising interest, nevertheless currently, none of them can be used to subgroup FM patients. Due to the fact that cortical and subcortical mechanisms of gait control share some cognitive functions which are involved in FM, gait markers have been proposed to evaluate and to subgroup FM patients, in clinical settings. Three out of 4 core FM symptoms are linked to gait markers. Kinesia measured by means of cranio-caudal power is correlated to pain, and could be proposed to assess pain behavior (kinesiophobia. Stride frequency, which is linked to physical component, allows the identification of a hyperkinetic subgroup. Moreover, SF has been correlated to fatigue during the 6 minute walking test. Stride regularity, which expresses the unsteadiness of gait, is correlated to cognitive dysfunction in FM. Decreased stride regularity allows the recognition of a homogeneous subgroup characterized by an increased anxiety and depression, and decreased cognitive functions. These results need further studies to be validated and so used in the daily clinical practice.

  13. Identification of subgroups among fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinet, B; Chaleil, D

    2012-09-28

    This paper presents some hypotheses concerning the identification of homogeneous subgroups among fibromyalgia (FM) patients in order to improve the management of the disease. It also reviews the available literature about this subject. Three methods for subgrouping are discussed according to clinical features, biomarkers, and gait analysis. Clinical subgrouping based on cluster analysis has been used for the identification of homogeneous subgroups of patients and, more recently, homogeneous clinical features. So far, longitudinal studies using clinical subgroups to direct treatment and predict outcome are still required. Biomarkers in FM, which is a neurobiological disease, are of promising interest, nevertheless currently, none of them can be used to subgroup FM patients. Due to the fact that cortical and subcortical mechanisms of gait control share some cognitive functions which are involved in FM, gait markers have been proposed to evaluate and to subgroup FM patients, in clinical settings. Three out of 4 core FM symptoms are linked to gait markers. Kinesia measured by means of cranio-caudal power is correlated to pain, and could be proposed to assess pain behavior (kinesiophobia). Stride frequency, which is linked to physical component, allows the identification of a hyperkinetic subgroup. Moreover, SF has been correlated to fatigue during the 6 minute walking test. Stride regularity, which expresses the unsteadiness of gait, is correlated to cognitive dysfunction in FM. Decreased stride regularity allows the recognition of a homogeneous subgroup characterized by an increased anxiety and depression, and decreased cognitive functions. These results need further studies to be validated and so used in the daily clinical practice.

  14. SUBGR: A Program to Generate Subgroup Data for the Subgroup Resonance Self-Shielding Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-06

    The Subgroup Data Generation (SUBGR) program generates subgroup data, including levels and weights from the resonance self-shielded cross section table as a function of background cross section. Depending on the nuclide and the energy range, these subgroup data can be generated by (a) narrow resonance approximation, (b) pointwise flux calculations for homogeneous media; and (c) pointwise flux calculations for heterogeneous lattice cells. The latter two options are performed by the AMPX module IRFFACTOR. These subgroup data are to be used in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) neutronic simulator MPACT, for which the primary resonance self-shielding method is the subgroup method.

  15. Psychopathic traits of Dutch adolescents in residential care: identifying subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Karin S; Vermulst, Ad; Scholte, Ron H J; van Dam, Coleta; Veerman, Jan Willem; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined whether a sample of 214 (52.8% male, M age = 15.76, SD = 1.29) institutionalized adolescents could be classified into subgroups based on psychopathic traits. Confirmatory Factor Analyses revealed a relationship between the subscales of the Youth Psychopathic traits Inventory (YPI) and the three latent constructs of the original model on which it is based. Latent Class Analyses showed that adolescents showing psychopathic traits could be classified into three subgroups. The first group showed low scores on the grandiose/manipulative dimension, the callous/unemotional dimension, and the impulsive/irresponsible dimension (normal group). The second group scored moderate on the grandiose/manipulative dimension and the callous/unemotional dimension and high on the impulsive/irresponsible dimension (impulsive, non-psychopathic-like group). The third group scored high on all three dimensions (psychopathy-like group). The findings revealed that the impulsive, non-psychopathic like group scored significantly higher on internalizing problem behavior compared to the normal group, while the psychopathy-like and the impulsive, non-psychopathic-like group both scored higher on externalizing problem behavior compared to the normal group. Based on a self-report delinquency measure, it appeared that the psychopathy-like group had the highest delinquency rates, except for vandalism. Both the impulsive and psychopathy-like group had the highest scores on the use of soft drugs.

  16. Current Activities of the ASME Subgroup NUPACK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald M. Foster; D. Keith Morton; Paul McConnell

    2007-10-01

    Current activities of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Section III Subgroup on Containment Systems for Spent Fuel High-Level Waste Transport Packagings (also known as Subgroup NUPACK) are reviewed with emphasis on the recent revision of Subsection WB. Also, brief insightson new proposals for the development of rules for internal support structures and for a strain-based acceptance criteria are provided.

  17. Detection of patient subgroups with differential expression in omics data: a comprehensive comparison of univariate measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Ahrens

    Full Text Available Detection of yet unknown subgroups showing differential gene or protein expression is a frequent goal in the analysis of modern molecular data. Applications range from cancer biology over developmental biology to toxicology. Often a control and an experimental group are compared, and subgroups can be characterized by differential expression for only a subgroup-specific set of genes or proteins. Finding such genes and corresponding patient subgroups can help in understanding pathological pathways, diagnosis and defining drug targets. The size of the subgroup and the type of differential expression determine the optimal strategy for subgroup identification. To date, commonly used software packages hardly provide statistical tests and methods for the detection of such subgroups. Different univariate methods for subgroup detection are characterized and compared, both on simulated and on real data. We present an advanced design for simulation studies: Data is simulated under different distributional assumptions for the expression of the subgroup, and performance results are compared against theoretical upper bounds. For each distribution, different degrees of deviation from the majority of observations are considered for the subgroup. We evaluate classical approaches as well as various new suggestions in the context of omics data, including outlier sum, PADGE, and kurtosis. We also propose the new FisherSum score. ROC curve analysis and AUC values are used to quantify the ability of the methods to distinguish between genes or proteins with and without certain subgroup patterns. In general, FisherSum for small subgroups and t-test for large subgroups achieve best results. We apply each method to a case-control study on Parkinson's disease and underline the biological benefit of the new method.

  18. Nonstabilizer Quantum Codes from Abelian Subgroups of the Error Group

    CERN Document Server

    Arvind, V; Parthasarathy, K R; Kurur, Piyush P

    2002-01-01

    This paper is motivated by the computer-generated nonadditive ((5,6,2)) code described in an article by Rains, Hardin, Shor and Sloane. We describe a theory of non-stabilizer codes of which the nonadditive code of Rains et al is an example. Furthermore, we give a general strategy of constructing good nonstabilizer codes from good stabilizer codes and give some explicit constructions and asymptotically good nonstabilizer codes. In fact, we explicitly construct a family of distance 2 non-stabilizer codes over all finite fields of which the ((5,6,2)) is an special example. More interestingly, using our theory, we are also able to explicitly construct examples of non-stablizer quantum codes of distance 3. Like in the case of stabilizer codes, we can design fairly efficient encoding and decoding procedures.

  19. Electricity market players subgroup report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borison, A.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine competition in the electric power industry from an ``industrial organization`` point of view. The remainder of this report is organized as follows. Chapter 2 describes the ``industrial organization`` approach used to analyze the electric power market. Industrial organization emphasizes specific market performance criteria, and the impact of market structure and behavior on performance. Chapter 3 identifies the participants in the electric power market, grouped primarily into regulated producers, unregulated producers, and consumers. Chapter 4 describes the varieties of electric power competition, organized along two dimensions: producer competition and consumer competition. Chapters 5 and 6 identify the issues raised by competition along the two dimensions. These issues include efficiency, equity, quality, and stability. Chapters 7 through 9 describe market structure, behavior and performance in three competitive scenarios: minimum competition, maximum competition, and moderate competition. Market structure, behavior and performance are discussed, and the issues raised in Chapters 5 and 6 are discussed in detail. Chapter 10 provides conclusions about ``winners and losers`` and identifies issues that require further study.

  20. Electricity market players subgroup report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borison, A.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine competition in the electric power industry from an industrial organization'' point of view. The remainder of this report is organized as follows. Chapter 2 describes the industrial organization'' approach used to analyze the electric power market. Industrial organization emphasizes specific market performance criteria, and the impact of market structure and behavior on performance. Chapter 3 identifies the participants in the electric power market, grouped primarily into regulated producers, unregulated producers, and consumers. Chapter 4 describes the varieties of electric power competition, organized along two dimensions: producer competition and consumer competition. Chapters 5 and 6 identify the issues raised by competition along the two dimensions. These issues include efficiency, equity, quality, and stability. Chapters 7 through 9 describe market structure, behavior and performance in three competitive scenarios: minimum competition, maximum competition, and moderate competition. Market structure, behavior and performance are discussed, and the issues raised in Chapters 5 and 6 are discussed in detail. Chapter 10 provides conclusions about winners and losers'' and identifies issues that require further study.

  1. Cluster Analysis of Clinical Data Identifies Fibromyalgia Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, Elisa; Collado, Antonio; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Carbonell, Jordi; Rivera, Javier; Vidal, Javier; Alegre, José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia (FM) is mainly characterized by widespread pain and multiple accompanying symptoms, which hinder FM assessment and management. In order to reduce FM heterogeneity we classified clinical data into simplified dimensions that were used to define FM subgroups. Material and Methods 48 variables were evaluated in 1,446 Spanish FM cases fulfilling 1990 ACR FM criteria. A partitioning analysis was performed to find groups of variables similar to each other. Similarities between variables were identified and the variables were grouped into dimensions. This was performed in a subset of 559 patients, and cross-validated in the remaining 887 patients. For each sample and dimension, a composite index was obtained based on the weights of the variables included in the dimension. Finally, a clustering procedure was applied to the indexes, resulting in FM subgroups. Results Variables clustered into three independent dimensions: “symptomatology”, “comorbidities” and “clinical scales”. Only the two first dimensions were considered for the construction of FM subgroups. Resulting scores classified FM samples into three subgroups: low symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 1), high symptomatology and comorbidities (Cluster 2), and high symptomatology but low comorbidities (Cluster 3), showing differences in measures of disease severity. Conclusions We have identified three subgroups of FM samples in a large cohort of FM by clustering clinical data. Our analysis stresses the importance of family and personal history of FM comorbidities. Also, the resulting patient clusters could indicate different forms of the disease, relevant to future research, and might have an impact on clinical assessment. PMID:24098674

  2. A short proof of the Khukhro-Makarenko theorem on large characteristic subgroups with laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyachko, Anton A.; Mel'nikova, Yuliya B.

    2009-06-01

    We give a short proof and a somewhat stronger version of the Khukhro-Makarenko theorem that each group which virtually satisfies an outer commutator identity contains a finite-index characteristic subgroup satisfying this identity. An estimate for the index of this characteristic subgroup is obtained. Bibliography: 3 titles.

  3. Subgroup conflicts? Try the psychodramatic "double triad method".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhofstadt-Denève, Leni M F

    2012-04-01

    The present article suggests the application of a psychodramatic action method for tackling subgroup conflicts in which the direct dialogue between representatives of two opposing subgroups is prepared step by step through an indirect dialogue strategy within two triads, a strategy known as the Double Triad Method (DTM). In order to achieve integration in the group as a whole, it is important that all the members of both subgroups participate actively during the entire process. The first part of the article briefly explores the theoretical background, with a special emphasis on the Phenomenological-Dialectical Personality Model (Phe-Di PModel). In the second part, the DTM procedure is systematically described through its five action stages, each accompanied with 1) a spatial representation of the consecutive actions, 2) some illustrative statements for each stage, and 3) a theoretical interpretation of the dialectically involved personality dimensions in both protagonists. The article concludes with a discussion and suggestions for more extensive applications of the DTM method, including the question of its relationships to Agazarian's functional subgrouping, psychodrama, and sociodrama.

  4. Melons are branched polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Gurau, Razvan

    2013-01-01

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  5. Coherent branching feature bisimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Belder

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the behavioral analysis of software product lines at the family level benefits from further development of the underlying semantical theory. Here, we propose a behavioral equivalence for feature transition systems (FTS generalizing branching bisimulation for labeled transition systems (LTS. We prove that branching feature bisimulation for an FTS of a family of products coincides with branching bisimulation for the LTS projection of each the individual products. For a restricted notion of coherent branching feature bisimulation we furthermore present a minimization algorithm and show its correctness. Although the minimization problem for coherent branching feature bisimulation is shown to be intractable, application of the algorithm in the setting of a small case study results in a significant speed-up of model checking of behavioral properties.

  6. Restriction of complementary series representations of O(1,N) to symmetric subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllers, Jan; Oshima, Yoshiki

    We find the complete branching law for the restriction of complementary series representations of O(1, n+1) to the symmetric subgroup O(1,m+1)× O(n − m), 0 m ... decomposition of a certain hypergeometric type ordinary differential operator. The main tool connecting this differential operator with the representations are second order Bessel operators which describe the Lie algebra action in this realization....

  7. Restriction of complementary series representations of $O(1,N)$ to symmetric subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllers, Jan; Oshima, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    We find the complete branching law for the restriction of complementary series representations of $O(1,n+1)$ to the symmetric subgroup $O(1,m+1)\\times O(n-m)$, $0\\leq m... the spectral decomposition of a certain hypergeometric type ordinary differential operator. The main tool connecting this differential operator with the representations are second order Bessel operators which describe the Lie algebra action in this realization....

  8. Electroencephalographic characterization of subgroups of children with learning disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Stappung, Milene; Fernández, Thalía; Bosch-Bayard, Jorge; Harmony, Thalía; Ricardo-Garcell, Josefina

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalographic alterations have been reported in subjects with learning disorders, but there is no consensus on what characterizes their electroencephalogram findings. Our objective was to determine if there were subgroups within a group of scholars with not otherwise specified learning disorders and if they had specific electroencephalographic patterns. Eighty-five subjects (31 female, 8-11 years) who scored low in at least two subscales -reading, writing and arithmetic- of the Infant Neuropsychological Evaluation were included. Electroencephalograms were recorded in 19 leads during rest with eyes closed; absolute power was obtained every 0.39 Hz. Three subgroups were formed according to children's performance: Group 1 (G1, higher scores than Group 2 in reading speed and reading and writing accuracy), Group 2 (G2, better performance than G1 in composition) and Group 3 (G3, lower scores than Groups 1 and 2 in the three subscales). G3 had higher absolute power in frequencies in the delta and theta range at left frontotemporal sites than G1 and G2. G2 had higher absolute power within alpha frequencies than G3 and G1 at the left occipital site. G3 had higher absolute power in frequencies in the beta range than G1 in parietotemporal areas and than G2 in left frontopolar and temporal sites. G1 had higher absolute power within beta frequencies than G2 in the left frontopolar site. G3 had lower gamma absolute power values than the other groups in the left hemisphere, and gamma activity was higher in G1 than in G2 in frontopolar and temporal areas. This group of children with learning disorders is very heterogeneous. Three subgroups were found with different cognitive profiles, as well as a different electroencephalographic pattern. It is important to consider these differences when planning interventions for children with learning disorders.

  9. Formación Anta (Mioceno Temprano/Medio, Subgrupo Metán (Grupo Orán, en el río Piedras, Pcia. de Salta: Datos palinológicos Anta Formation (Miocene, Metán Subgroup (Orán Group, in río Piedras, Salta Province: Palynological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Quattrocchio

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Aproximadamente en el Eoceno medio -Fase Incaica- culminó la acumulación del Grupo Salta (Cretácico-Paleógeno. A continuación y coincidente con el inicio de un ambiente tectónico compresivo en los Andes Centrales comenzó el depósito del Subgrupo Metán (Grupo Orán, constituído por las formaciones Río Seco, Anta y Jesús María. La Formación Anta en río Piedras de 300 m de espesor, consta de arcilitas, calizas oolíticas y tobas acumuladas en un ambiente de lago salino. Se presenta en este trabajo, un análisis palinológico comparativo entre la Formación Anta (Subgrupo Metán y el Subgrupo Santa Bárbara del Grupo Salta (Paleoceno-Eoceno. Regionalmente el espectro polínico reflejaría la presencia de la foresta sub-tropical húmeda (Verrustephanoporites simplex, en muy bajo porcentaje con respecto al Subgrupo Santa Bárbara. La relativa mayor representación de Rhoipites sp. A (Rutaceae, cf. Ruta asociado a Podocarpaceae y Anacardiaceae sugiere una paleocomunidad de mayor altitud (ambiente montano. Basado en estudios palinológicos y sedimentológicos el perfil analizado corresponde a un lago salino. Se registra la primera expansión de la estepa en el NO argentino asociado a condiciones relativamente áridas. Estas evidencias fueron corroboradas mediante el registro de hongos.Deposition of the Salta Group (Cretaceous-Paleogene terminated in the mid Eocene - Inca Diastrophic Phase. Following a compressive tectonic event in the Central Andes, this was succeeded by deposition of Metán Subgroup, divisible into Río Seco, Anta and Jesús María formations. The Anta Formation (300m thick in Río Piedras is characterised by claystone, oolitic limestone and tuff deposited in shallow lakes or on a muddy plain. A comparative palynological analysis between Santa Bárbara Subgroup and Anta Formation (Metán Subgroup shows that the transitional forest flora of the Anta Formation was more impoverished than that of the Santa Bárbara Subgroup

  10. Subgroup Discovery Algorithms:A Survey and Empirical Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumyea Helal

    2016-01-01

    Subgroup discovery is a data mining technique that discovers interesting associations among different variables with respect to a property of interest. Existing subgroup discovery methods employ different strategies for searching, pruning and ranking subgroups. It is very crucial to learn which features of a subgroup discovery algorithm should be considered for generating quality subgroups. In this regard, a number of reviews have been conducted on subgroup discovery. Although they provide a broad overview on some popular subgroup discovery methods, they employ few datasets and measures for subgroup evaluation. In the light of the existing measures, the subgroups cannot be appraised from all perspectives. Our work performs an extensive analysis on some popular subgroup discovery methods by using a wide range of datasets and by defining new measures for subgroup evaluation. The analysis result will help with understanding the major subgroup discovery methods, uncovering the gaps for further improvement and selecting the suitable category of algorithms for specific application domains.

  11. Groups of Prime Power Order v. 3

    CERN Document Server

    Berkovich, Yakov

    2011-01-01

    This is the third volume of a comprehensive and elementary treatment of finite p-group theory. Topics covered in this volume: (a) impact of minimal nonabelian subgroups on the structure of p-groups, (b) classification of groups all of whose nonnormal subgroups have the same order, (c) degrees of irreducible characters of p-groups associated with finite algebras, (d) groups covered by few proper subgroups, (e) p-groups of element breadth 2 and subgroup breadth 1, (f) exact number of subgroups of given order in a metacyclic p-group, (g) soft subgroups, (h) p-groups with a maximal elementary abel

  12. Rapid diagnosis of medulloblastoma molecular subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Ed C.; Lindsey, Janet C.; Straughton, Debbie; Hogg, Twala L.; Cole, Michael; Megahed, Hisham; Ryan, Sarra L.; Lusher, Meryl E.; Taylor, Michael D.; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Ellison, David W.; Bailey, Simon; Clifford, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Microarray studies indicate medulloblastoma comprises distinct molecular disease subgroups, which offer potential for improved clinical management. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Minimal mRNA expression signatures diagnostic for the Wnt/Wingless (WNT) and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) subgroups were developed, validated and used to assign subgroup affiliation in 173 tumours from four independent cohorts, alongside a systematic investigation of subgroup clinical and molecular characteristics. RESULTS WNT tumours (12% (21/173)) were diagnosed >5 years of age (peak, 10 years), displayed classic histology, CTNNB1 mutation (19/20), associated chromosome 6 loss and have previously been associated with favourable prognosis. SHH cases (24% (42/173)) predominated in infants (<3 years) and showed an age-dependent relationship to desmoplastic/nodular pathology; all infant desmoplastic/nodular cases (previously associated with a good outcome) were SHH-positive, but these relationships broke down in non-infants. PTCH1 mutations were common (34%; 11/32), but PTCH1 exon1c hypermethylation, chromosome 9q and REN (KCTD11) genetic loss were not SHH-associated, and SMO or SUFU mutation, PTCH1 exon1a or SUFU hypermethylation did not play a role, indicating novel activating mechanisms in the majority of SHH cases. SHH tumours were associated with an absence of COL1A2 methylation. WNT/SHH-independent medulloblastomas (64% (110/173)) showed all histologies, peaked at 3-6 years, and were exclusively associated with chromosome 17p loss. CONCLUSIONS Medulloblastoma subgroups are characterised by distinct genomic, epigenomic and clinico-pathological features, and clinical outcomes. Validated array-independent gene expression assays for the rapid assessment of subgroup affiliation in small biopsies, provide a basis for their routine clinical application, in strategies including molecular disease-risk stratification and delivery of targeted therapeutics. PMID:21325292

  13. Affiliative Subgroups in Preschool Classrooms: Integrating Constructs and Methods from Social Ethology and Sociometric Traditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António J Santos

    Full Text Available Recent studies of school-age children and adolescents have used social network analyses to characterize selection and socialization aspects of peer groups. Fewer network studies have been reported for preschool classrooms and many of those have focused on structural descriptions of peer networks, and/or, on selection processes rather than on social functions of subgroup membership. In this study we started by identifying and describing different types of affiliative subgroups (HMP- high mutual proximity, LMP- low mutual proximity, and ungrouped children in a sample of 240 Portuguese preschool children using nearest neighbor observations. Next, we used additional behavioral observations and sociometric data to show that HMP and LMP subgroups are functionally distinct: HMP subgroups appear to reflect friendship relations, whereas LMP subgroups appear to reflect common social goals, but without strong, within-subgroup dyadic ties. Finally, we examined the longitudinal implications of subgroup membership and show that children classified as HMP in consecutive years had more reciprocated friendships than did children whose subgroup classification changed from LMP or ungrouped to HMP. These results extend previous findings reported for North American peer groups.

  14. Existence of a dictatorial subgroup in social choice with independent subgroup utility scales, an alternative proof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna B.; Deemen, van Adrian; Rusinowska, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Social welfare orderings for different scales of individual utility measurement in distinct population subgroups are studied. In Khmelnitskaya (2000), employing the continuous version of Arrow’s impossibility theorem, it was shown that for combinations of independent subgroups scales every correspon

  15. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogner Per

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB; Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples. Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and/or dead of disease, p Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group's specific characteristics.

  16. For Distinguishing Conjugate Hidden Subgroups, the Pretty Good Measurement is as Good as it Gets

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Cristopher; Moore, Cristopher; Russell, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Recently Bacon, Childs and van Dam showed that the ``pretty good measurement'' (PGM) is optimal for the Hidden Subgroup Problem on the dihedral group D_n in the case where the hidden subgroup is chosen uniformly from the n involutions. We show that, for any group and any subgroup H, the PGM is the optimal one-register experiment in the case where the hidden subgroup is a uniformly random conjugate of H. We go on to show that when H forms a Gel'fand pair with its parent group, the PGM is the optimal measurement for any number of registers. In both cases we bound the probability that the optimal measurement succeeds. This generalizes the case of the dihedral group, and includes a number of other examples of interest.

  17. Computational approaches to Poisson traces associated to finite subgroups of Sp(2n,C)

    CERN Document Server

    Etingof, Pavel; Pacchiano, Aldo; Ren, Qingchun; Schedler, Travis

    2011-01-01

    We reduce the computation of Poisson traces on quotients of symplectic vector spaces by finite subgroups of symplectic automorphisms to a finite one, by proving several results which bound the degrees of such traces as well as the dimension in each degree. This applies more generally to traces on all polynomial functions which are invariant under invariant Hamiltonian flow. We implement these approaches by computer together with direct computation for infinite families of groups, focusing on complex reflection and abelian subgroups of GL(2,C) < Sp(4,C), Coxeter groups of rank <= 3 and A_4, B_4=C_4, and D_4, and subgroups of SL(2,C).

  18. Assessing Subgroup Differences in Item Response Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnipke, Deborah L.; Pashley, Peter J.

    Differences in test performance on time-limited tests may be due in part to differential response-time rates between subgroups, rather than real differences in the knowledge, skills, or developed abilities of interest. With computer-administered tests, response times are available and may be used to address this issue. This study investigates…

  19. Zero-Sum Problems with Subgroup Weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Adhikari; A A Ambily; B Sury

    2010-06-01

    In this note, we generalize some theorems on zero-sums with weights from [1], [4] and [5] in two directions. In particular, we consider $\\mathbb{Z}^d_p$ for a general and subgroups of $Z^∗_p$ as weights.

  20. Branching processes in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Kimmel, Marek

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical background of branching processes and discusses their biological applications. Branching processes are a well-developed and powerful set of tools in the field of applied probability. The range of applications considered includes molecular biology, cellular biology, human evolution and medicine. The branching processes discussed include Galton-Watson, Markov, Bellman-Harris, Multitype, and General Processes. As an aid to understanding specific examples, two introductory chapters, and two glossaries are included that provide background material in mathematics and in biology. The book will be of interest to scientists who work in quantitative modeling of biological systems, particularly probabilists, mathematical biologists, biostatisticians, cell biologists, molecular biologists, and bioinformaticians. The authors are a mathematician and cell biologist who have collaborated for more than a decade in the field of branching processes in biology for this new edition. This second ex...

  1. Coherent branching feature bisimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Belder (Tessa); M.H. ter Beek (Maurice); E.P. de Vink (Erik Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractProgress in the behavioral analysis of software product lines at the family level benefits from further development of the underlying semantical theory. Here, we propose a behavioral equivalence for feature transition systems (FTS) generalizing branching bisimulation for labeled

  2. Koenigs function and branching processes

    CERN Document Server

    Chikilev, O G

    2001-01-01

    An explicit solution of time-homogeneous pure birth branching processes is described. It gives alternative extensions for the negative binomial distribution (branching processes with immigration) and for the Furry-Yule distribution (branching processes without immigration).

  3. Branched Polymer Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, H; Kawai, H; Kitazawa, Y; Aoki, Hajime; Iso, Satoshi; Kawai, Hikaru; Kitazawa, Yoshihisa

    2000-01-01

    We show that correlation functions for branched polymers correspond to those for $\\phi^3$ theory with a single mass insertion, not those for the $\\phi^3$ theory themselves, as has been widely believed. In particular, the two-point function behaves as 1/p^4, not as 1/p^2. This behavior is consistent with the fact that the Hausdorff dimension of the branched polymer is four.

  4. Finite Symplectic Matrix Groups

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The finite subgroups of GL(m, Q) are those subgroups that fix a full lattice in Q^m together with some positive definite symmetric form. A subgroup of GL(m, Q) is called symplectic, if it fixes a nondegenerate skewsymmetric form. Such groups only exist if m is even. A symplectic subgroup of GL(2n, Q) is called maximal finite symplectic if it is not properly contained in some finite symplectic subgroup of GL(2n, Q). This thesis classifies all conjugacy classes of maximal finite symplectic subg...

  5. Male breast cancer: Looking for better prognostic subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Miguel Henriques; Afonso, Noémia; Abreu, Pedro Henriques; Menezes, Francisco; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Pereira, Deolinda; Lopes, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Male Breast Cancer (MBC) remains a poor understood disease. Prognostic factors are not well established and specific prognostic subgroups are warranted. Retrospectively revision of 111 cases treated in the same Cancer Center. Blinded-central pathological revision with immunohistochemical (IHQ) analysis for estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR) and androgen (AR) receptors, HER2, ki67 and p53 was done. Cox regression model was used for uni/multivariate survival analysis. Two classifications of Female Breast Cancer (FBC) subgroups (based in ER, PR, HER2, 2000 classification, and in ER, PR, HER2, ki67, 2013 classification) were used to achieve their prognostic value in MBC patients. Hierarchical clustering was performed to define subgroups based on the six-IHQ panel. According to FBC classifications, the majority of tumors were luminal: A (89.2%; 60.0%) and B (7.2%; 35.8%). Triple negative phenotype was infrequent (2.7%; 3.2%) and HER2 enriched, non-luminal, was rare (≤1% in both). In multivariate analysis the poor prognostic factors were: size >2 cm (HR:1.8; 95%CI:1.0-3.4 years, p = 0.049), absence of ER (HR:4.9; 95%CI:1.7-14.3 years, p = 0.004) and presence of distant metastasis (HR:5.3; 95%CI:2.2-3.1 years, p 0.20). Clustering defined different subgroups, that have prognostic value in multivariate analysis (p = 0.005), with better survival in ER/PR+, AR-, HER2-and ki67/p53 low group (median: 11.5 years; 95%CI: 6.2-16.8 years) and worst in PR-group (median:4.5 years; 95%CI: 1.6-7.8 years). FBC subtypes do not give the same prognostic information in MBC even in luminal groups. Two subgroups with distinct prognosis were identified in a common six-IHQ panel. Future studies must achieve their real prognostic value in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Measuring the Speed of Aging across Population Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    People in different subgroups age at different rates. Surveys containing biomarkers can be used to assess these subgroup differences. We illustrate this using hand-grip strength to produce an easily interpretable, physical-based measure that allows us to compare characteristic-based ages across educational subgroups in the United States. Hand-grip strength has been shown to be a good predictor of future mortality and morbidity, and therefore a useful indicator of population aging. Data from the Health and Retirement Survey (HRS) were used. Two education subgroups were distinguished, those with less than a high school diploma and those with more education. Regressions on hand-grip strength were run for each sex and race using age and education, their interactions and other covariates as independent variables. Ages of identical mean hand-grip strength across education groups were compared for people in the age range 60 to 80. The hand-grip strength of 65 year old white males with less education was the equivalent to that of 69.6 (68.2, 70.9) year old white men with more education, indicating that the more educated men had aged more slowly. This is a constant characteristic age, as defined in the Sanderson and Scherbov article “The characteristics approach to the measurement of population aging” published 2013 in Population and Development Review. Sixty-five year old white females with less education had the same average hand-grip strength as 69.4 (68.2, 70.7) year old white women with more education. African-American women at ages 60 and 65 with more education also aged more slowly than their less educated counterparts. African American men with more education aged at about the same rate as those with less education. This paper expands the toolkit of those interested in population aging by showing how survey data can be used to measure the differential extent of aging across subpopulations. PMID:24806337

  7. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 3, Revision 2 (FGE.03Rev2): Acetals of branched- and straight-chain aliphatic saturated primary alcohols and branched- and straight-chain saturated or unsaturated, aldehydes, an ester of a hemiacetal and an orthoester of formic acid, from chemical groups 1, 2 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate one flavouring substance, acetaldehyde ethyl isopropyl acetal [FL-no: 06.137], structurally related to the 58 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group...

  8. Clinical subgroups in bilateral Meniere disease

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Meniere disease (MD) is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, episodic vestibular symptoms and tinnitus associated with several comorbidities such as migraine or autoimmune disorders (AD). The frequency of bilateral involvement may range from 5-50% and it depends on the duration of the disease. We have performed a two-step cluster analysis in 398 patients with bilateral MD to identify the best predictors to define clinical subgroups with a potential d...

  9. First finding of subgroup-E avian leukosis virus from wild ducks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ruijun; Han, Chunyan; Liu, Lanlan; Zeng, Xiangwei

    2014-10-10

    To analyze the status of avian leukosis virus subgroup E (ALV-E) in wild ducks in China, we collected 276 wild ducks, including 12 species, from four provinces of China. The PCR detection for ALV-E identified four samples as positive samples and the detection rate was 1.45%. The env sequences of ALV-E were cloned and sequenced. In gp85, genes of the four ALV-E strains showed a high homology (98.1-99.5%) with ev-1, ev-3, and SD0501 and more than 90% homology with other subgroup-A and subgroup-B avian leukosis viruses. However, they showed a slightly lower identity with subgroup-J (NX0101 and HPRS103), from 47.5 to 48.1%. Simultaneously, a further comparison with ALV-E representative isolates indicated that the amino acid substitutions of the four wild duck strains were distributed throughout the gp85. In total, these results suggested that the subgroup-E avian leukosis virus has been found in wild ducks in China.

  10. Cluster Analysis to Identify Possible Subgroups in Tinnitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berge, Minke J C; Free, Rolien H; Arnold, Rosemarie; de Kleine, Emile; Hofman, Rutger; van Dijk, J Marc C; van Dijk, Pim

    2017-01-01

    In tinnitus treatment, there is a tendency to shift from a "one size fits all" to a more individual, patient-tailored approach. Insight in the heterogeneity of the tinnitus spectrum might improve the management of tinnitus patients in terms of choice of treatment and identification of patients with severe mental distress. The goal of this study was to identify subgroups in a large group of tinnitus patients. Data were collected from patients with severe tinnitus complaints visiting our tertiary referral tinnitus care group at the University Medical Center Groningen. Patient-reported and physician-reported variables were collected during their visit to our clinic. Cluster analyses were used to characterize subgroups. For the selection of the right variables to enter in the cluster analysis, two approaches were used: (1) variable reduction with principle component analysis and (2) variable selection based on expert opinion. Various variables of 1,783 tinnitus patients were included in the analyses. Cluster analysis (1) included 976 patients and resulted in a four-cluster solution. The effect of external influences was the most discriminative between the groups, or clusters, of patients. The "silhouette measure" of the cluster outcome was low (0.2), indicating a "no substantial" cluster structure. Cluster analysis (2) included 761 patients and resulted in a three-cluster solution, comparable to the first analysis. Again, a "no substantial" cluster structure was found (0.2). Two cluster analyses on a large database of tinnitus patients revealed that clusters of patients are mostly formed by a different response of external influences on their disease. However, both cluster outcomes based on this dataset showed a poor stability, suggesting that our tinnitus population comprises a continuum rather than a number of clearly defined subgroups.

  11. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abel, Frida

    2011-04-14

    Abstract Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB); Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA) and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples). Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA) in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples) using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA test). PCA clusters p1, p2, and p3 were found to correspond well to the postulated subtypes 1, 2A, and 2B, respectively. Remarkably, a fourth novel cluster was detected in all three independent data sets. This cluster comprised mainly 11q-deleted MNA-negative tumours with low expression of ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and\\/or dead of disease, p < 0.05, Fisher\\'s exact test). Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group\\'s specific characteristics.

  12. On SQ-supplemented Subgroups%关于SQ-补子群

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐娜; 黎先华

    2014-01-01

    假定Fitting子群F(G)或广义Fitting子群F*(G)的某些子群在G中SQ-补来研究包含超可解群的饱和群系(ξ),这里G∈(ξ).一些已知结果被推广.%In this paper,we study a saturated formation (ξ) containing supersoluble groups under the assumption that some subgroups of a Fitting subgroup F(G) or a generalized Fitting subgroup F*(G) are SQ-supplemented in G for G ∈ (ξ).Some known results are generalized.

  13. Algorithms for Quantum Branching Programs Based on Fingerprinting

    CERN Document Server

    Ablayev, Farid; 10.4204/EPTCS.9.1

    2009-01-01

    In the paper we develop a method for constructing quantum algorithms for computing Boolean functions by quantum ordered read-once branching programs (quantum OBDDs). Our method is based on fingerprinting technique and representation of Boolean functions by their characteristic polynomials. We use circuit notation for branching programs for desired algorithms presentation. For several known functions our approach provides optimal QOBDDs. Namely we consider such functions as Equality, Palindrome, and Permutation Matrix Test. We also propose a generalization of our method and apply it to the Boolean variant of the Hidden Subgroup Problem.

  14. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  15. Right bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussink, Barbara E; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jespersen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo determine the prevalence, predictors of newly acquired, and the prognostic value of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and incomplete RBBB (IRBBB) on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram in men and women from the general population.Methods and resultsWe followed 18 441 participants included.......5%/2.3% in women, P Right bundle branch block was associated with significantly...... increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in both genders with age-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of 1.31 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-1.54] and 1.87 (95% CI, 1.48-2.36) in the gender pooled analysis with little attenuation after multiple adjustment. Right bundle branch block was associated...

  16. Distribution of Elements of Cosets of Small Subgroups and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bourgain, Jean; Shparlinski, Igor E

    2011-01-01

    We obtain a series of estimates on the number of small integers and small order Farey fractions which belong to a given coset of a subgroup of order $t$ of the group of units of the residue ring modulo a prime $p$, in the case when $t$ is small compared to $p$. We give two applications of these results: to the simultaneous distribution of two high degree monomials $x^{k_1}$ and $x^{k_2}$ modulo $p$ and to a question of J.~Holden and P.~Moree on fixed points of the discrete logarithm.

  17. Distribution on elements of cosets of small subgroups and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bourgain, Jean; Shparlinski, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We obtain a series of estimates on the number of small integers and small order Farey fractions which belong to a given coset of a subgroup of order $t$ of the group of units of the residue ring modulo a prime $p$, in the case when $t$ is small compared to $p$. We give two applications of these results: to the simultaneous distribution of two high degree monomials $x^{k_1}$ and $x^{k_2}$ modulo $p$ and to a question of J.Holden and P.Moree on fixed points of the discrete logarithm.

  18. Subgrouping of Nisoic (Yi) Languages: A Study from the Perspectives of Shared Innovation and Phylogenetic Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Ziwo Qiu-Fuyuan

    2012-01-01

    In southwest China and neighboring countries, including Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, and Myanmar, there live over 100 ethnic groups who speak languages known as Nuosu, Naxi, Hani, Lisu, Lahu, etc. These languages belong to the "Nisoic Branch" or the "Loloish Branch" of Tibeto-Burman (TB) subfamily of Sino-Tibetan. Though the Nisoic…

  19. Multimode geodesic branching components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, D.; Voges, E.

    1983-01-01

    Geodesic branching components are investigated for multimode guided wave optics. Geodesic structures with particular properties, e.g. focussing star couplers, are derived by a synthesis technique based on a theorem of Toraldo di Francia. Experimentally, the geodesic surfaces are printed on acrylic glass and are spin-coated with organic film waveguides.

  20. Upgrading the safety toolkit: Initiatives of the accident analysis subgroup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Kula, K.R.; Chung, D.Y.

    1999-07-01

    Since its inception, the Accident Analysis Subgroup (AAS) of the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) has been a leading organization promoting development and application of appropriate methodologies for safety analysis of US Department of Energy (DOE) installations. The AAS, one of seven chartered by the EFCOG Safety Analysis Working Group, has performed an oversight function and provided direction to several technical groups. These efforts have been instrumental toward formal evaluation of computer models, improving the pedigree on high-use computer models, and development of the user-friendly Accident Analysis Guidebook (AAG). All of these improvements have improved the analytical toolkit for best complying with DOE orders and standards shaping safety analysis reports (SARs) and related documentation. Major support for these objectives has been through DOE/DP-45.

  1. Genomic compositions and phylogenetic analysis of Shigella boydii subgroup

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis was used to compare the genomic compositions of all eighteen Shigella boydii serotype representative strains. The results indicated the genomic "backbone" of this subgroup contained 2552 ORFs homologous to nonpathogenic E. coli K12. Compared with the genome of K12199 ORFs were found to be absent in all S. boydii serotype representatives, including mainly outer membrane protein genes and O-antigen biosynthesis genes. Yet the specific ORFs of S. boydii subgroup contained basically bacteriophage genes and the function unknown (FUN) genes. Some iron metabolism, transport and type II secretion system related genes were found in most representative strains. According to the CGH phylogenetic analysis, the eighteen S. boydii serotype representatives were divided into four groups, in which serotype C13 strain was remarkably distinguished from the other serotype strains. This grouping result corresponded to the distribution of some metabolism related genes. Furthermore, the analysis of genome backbone genes, specific genes, and the phylogenetic trees allowed us to discover the evolution laws of S. boydii and to find out important clues to pathogenesis research, vaccination and the therapeutic medicine development.

  2. Myasthenia gravis: subgroup classification and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhus, Nils Erik; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2015-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that is characterised by muscle weakness and fatigue, is B-cell mediated, and is associated with antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase (MUSK), lipoprotein-related protein 4 (LRP4), or agrin in the postsynaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction. Patients with myasthenia gravis should be classified into subgroups to help with therapeutic decisions and prognosis. Subgroups based on serum antibodies and clinical features include early-onset, late-onset, thymoma, MUSK, LRP4, antibody-negative, and ocular forms of myasthenia gravis. Agrin-associated myasthenia gravis might emerge as a new entity. The prognosis is good with optimum symptomatic, immunosuppressive, and supportive treatment. Pyridostigmine is the preferred symptomatic treatment, and for patients who do not adequately respond to symptomatic therapy, corticosteroids, azathioprine, and thymectomy are first-line immunosuppressive treatments. Additional immunomodulatory drugs are emerging, but therapeutic decisions are hampered by the scarcity of controlled studies. Long-term drug treatment is essential for most patients and must be tailored to the particular form of myasthenia gravis.

  3. Branching laws for small unitary representations of GL(n,C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllers, Jan; Schwarz, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    The unitary principal series representations of $G=GL(n,\\mathbb{C})$ induced from a character of the maximal parabolic subgroup $P=(GL(1,\\mathbb{C})\\times GL(n-1,\\mathbb{C}))\\ltimes\\mathbb{C}^{n-1}$ attain the minimal Gelfand--Kirillov dimension among all infinite-dimensional unitary representati...... representations of $G$. We find the explicit branching laws for the restriction of these representations to symmetric subgroups of $G$....

  4. Subgrouping the autism "spectrum": reflections on DSM-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Lai

    Full Text Available DSM-5 has moved autism from the level of subgroups ("apples and oranges" to the prototypical level ("fruit". But making progress in research, and ultimately improving clinical practice, will require identifying subgroups within the autism spectrum.

  5. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 201Rev1: 2-Alkylated, aliphatic, acyclic alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes and precursors, with or without additional double-bonds, from chemical subgroup 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    . The Panel therefore concluded that further data are required in order to clarify the genotoxic potential of this subgroup. The Panel considers the Comet assay with [FL-no: 05.095] as test material and performed on liver, blood and first site of contact, as a preferred option to further investigate...

  6. Team negotiation: social, epistemic, economic, and psychological consequences of subgroup conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Nir

    2008-12-01

    Large collectives (e.g., organizations, political parties, nations) are seldom unitary players. Rather, they consist of different subgroups that often have conflicting interests. Nonetheless, negotiation research consistently regards negotiating teams, who represent these collectives, as monolithic parties with uniform interests. This article integrates concepts from social psychology, management, political science, and behavioral game theory to explore the effects of subgroup conflict on team negotiation. Specifically, the present research introduced a conflict of interests within negotiating teams and investigated how this internal conflict affects the outcome of the negotiation between teams. An experiment with 80 four-person teams found that conflict between subgroups had a detrimental effect on the performance of negotiating teams. This research also employed a recent model of motivated information processing in groups to investigate possible processes underlying the effect of subgroup conflict on team negotiation.

  7. Discrete subgroups of adolescents diagnosed with borderline personality disorder: a latent class analysis of personality features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Vera; Canta, Guilherme; de Castro, Filipa; Leal, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    Research suggests that borderline personality disorder (BPD) can be diagnosed in adolescents and is marked by considerable heterogeneity. This study aimed to identify personality features characterizing adolescents with BPD and possible meaningful patterns of heterogeneity that could lead to personality subgroups. The authors analyzed data on 60 adolescents, ages 15 to 18 years, who met DSM criteria for a BPD diagnosis. The authors used latent class analysis (LCA) to identify subgroups based on the personality pattern scales from the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI). LCA indicated that the best-fitting solution was a two-class model, identifying two discrete subgroups of BPD adolescents that were described as internalizing and externalizing. The subgroups were then compared on clinical and sociodemographic variables, measures of personality dimensions, DSM BPD criteria, and perception of attachment styles. Adolescents with a BPD diagnosis constitute a heterogeneous group and vary meaningfully on personality features that can have clinical implications for treatment.

  8. Critical branching neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical branching and, in doing so, simulates observed scaling laws as pervasive to neural and behavioral activity. These scaling laws are related to neural and cognitive functions, in that critical branching is shown to yield spiking activity with maximal memory and encoding capacities when analyzed using reservoir computing techniques. The model is also shown to account for findings of pervasive 1/f scaling in speech and cued response behaviors that are difficult to explain by isolable causes. Issues and questions raised by the model and its results are discussed from the perspectives of physics, neuroscience, computer and information sciences, and psychological and cognitive sciences.

  9. Generalized Markov branching models

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Junping

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we first considered a modified Markov branching process incorporating both state-independent immigration and resurrection. After establishing the criteria for regularity and uniqueness, explicit expressions for the extinction probability and mean extinction time are presented. The criteria for recurrence and ergodicity are also established. In addition, an explicit expression for the equilibrium distribution is presented.\\ud \\ud We then moved on to investigate the basic proper...

  10. Generalized Markov branching models

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Junping

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we first considered a modified Markov branching process incorporating both state-independent immigration and resurrection. After establishing the criteria for regularity and uniqueness, explicit expressions for the extinction probability and mean extinction time are presented. The criteria for recurrence and ergodicity are also established. In addition, an explicit expression for the equilibrium distribution is presented. We then moved on to investigate the basic proper...

  11. Tau leptonic branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    A sample of 62249 \\tau-pair events is selected from data taken with the ALEPH detector in 1991, 1992 and 1993. The measurement of the branching fractions for \\tau decays into electrons and muons is presented with emphasis on the study of systematic effects from selection, particle identification and decay classification. Combined with the most recent ALEPH determination of the \\tau lifetime, these results provide a relative measurement of the leptonic couplings in the weak charged current for transverse W bosons.

  12. Electrochemical Energy Storage Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The activities of the Electrochemical Energy Storage Branch are highlighted, including the Technology Base Research and the Exploratory Technology Development and Testing projects within the Electrochemical Energy Storage Program for the 1984 fiscal year. General Headquarters activities are presented first; and then, a summary of the Director Controlled Milestones, followed by other major accomplishments. A listing of the workshops and seminars held during the year is also included.

  13. 78 FR 35956 - Utah Resource Advisory Council Subgroup Conference Call

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Utah Resource Advisory Council Subgroup Conference Call AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Conference Call. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and... Advisory Council (RAC) Subgroup will host a conference call. DATES: The Utah RAC Subgroup will host...

  14. Identifying Subgroups among Hardcore Smokers: a Latent Profile Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bommelé, J.; Kleinjan, M.; Schoenmakers, T.M.; Eijnden, R. van den; Mheen, D. van de

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hardcore smokers are smokers who have little to no intention to quit. Previous research suggests that there are distinct subgroups among hardcore smokers and that these subgroups vary in the perceived pros and cons of smoking and quitting. Identifying these subgroups could help to deve

  15. Application of the Subgroup Decomposition Method (SDM for Reactor Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roskoff Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the TITAN-SDM algorithm for solving a reactor pressure vessel dosimetry problem is evaluated. Douglass and Rahnema recently developed the he subgroup decomposition method (SDM; a methodology which directly couples a consistent coarse-group transport calculation with a set of “decomposition sweeps” to provide a fine-group flux spectrum. The SDM has been implemented into the TITAN three-dimensional transport code and has been shown to accurately solve core criticality problems while significantly reducing computation time. This paper addresses the use of SDM for fixed-source problems. The VENUS-2 dosimetry benchmark problem is selected with an emphasis on fast neutron analysis; therefore, material cross sections are generated from the BUGLE-96 library considering neutron energies greater than 0.1 MeV. The accuracy and efficiency of TITAN-SDM is evaluated by comparison with a standard TITAN multigroup calculation.

  16. Planar Algebra of the Subgroup-Subfactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ved Prakash Gupta

    2008-11-01

    We give an identification between the planar algebra of the subgroup-subfactor $R \\rtimes H \\subset R \\rtimes G$ and the -invariant planar subalgebra of the planar algebra of the bipartite graph $\\star_n$, where $n=[G:H]$. The crucial step in this identification is an exhibition of a model for the basic construction tower, and thereafter of the standard invariant of $R \\rtimes H \\subset R \\rtimes G$ in terms of operator matrices. We also obtain an identification between the planar algebra of the fixed algebra subfactor $R^G \\subset R^H$ and the -invariant planar subalgebra of the planar algebra of the `flip’ of $\\star_n$.

  17. Planar Algebra of the Subgroup-Subfactor

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ved Prakash

    2008-01-01

    We give an identification between the planar algebra of the subgroup-subfactor $R \\rtimes H \\subset R \\rtimes G$ and the $G$-invariant planar subalgebra of the planar algebra of the bipartite graph $\\star_n$, where $n = [G : H]$. The crucial step in this identification is an exhibition of a model for the basic construction tower, and thereafter of the standard invariant, of $R \\rtimes H \\subset R \\rtimes G$ in terms of operator matrices. We also obtain an identification between the planar algebra of the fixed algebra subfactor $R^G \\subset R^H$ and the $G$-invariant planar subalgebra of the planar algebra of the `flip' of $\\star_n $.

  18. A variable depth search branching

    OpenAIRE

    Cornillier, Fabien; Pécora, José Eduardo; Charles, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a variable depth search branching, an extension to the local branching for solving Mixed-Integer Programs. Two strategies are assessed, a best improvement strategy and a first improvement strategy. The extensive computational assessment evidences a significant improvement over the local branching for both strategies. This record was migrated from the OpenDepot repository service in June, 2017 before shutting down.

  19. Chiral methyl-branched pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tetsu; Yamakawa, Rei

    2015-07-01

    Insect pheromones are some of the most interesting natural products because they are utilized for interspecific communication between various insects, such as beetles, moths, ants, and cockroaches. A large number of compounds of many kinds have been identified as pheromone components, reflecting the diversity of insect species. While this review deals only with chiral methyl-branched pheromones, the chemical structures of more than one hundred non-terpene compounds have been determined by applying excellent analytical techniques. Furthermore, their stereoselective syntheses have been achieved by employing trustworthy chiral sources and ingenious enantioselective reactions. The information has been reviewed here not only to make them available for new research but also to understand the characteristic chemical structures of the chiral pheromones. Since biosynthetic studies are still limited, it might be meaningful to examine whether the structures, particularly the positions and configurations of the branched methyl groups, are correlated with the taxonomy of the pheromone producers and also with the function of the pheromones in communication systems.

  20. Full-length genome sequence analysis of four subgroup J avian leukosis virus strains isolated from chickens with clinical hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lulu; Wang, Peikun; Yang, Yongli; Li, Haijuan; Huang, Teng; Wei, Ping

    2017-07-17

    Since 2014, cases of hemangioma associated with avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) have been emerging in commercial chickens in Guangxi. In this study, four strains of the subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J), named GX14HG01, GX14HG04, GX14LT07, and GX14ZS14, were isolated from chickens with clinical hemangioma in 2014 by DF-1 cell culture and then identified with ELISA detection of ALV group specific antigen p27, the detection of subtype specific PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with ALV-J specific monoclonal antibody. The complete genomes of the isolates were sequenced and it was found that the gag and pol were relatively conservative, while env was variable especially the gp85 gene. Homology analysis of the env gene sequences showed that the env gene of all the four isolates had higher similarities with the hemangioma (HE)-type reference strains than that of the myeloid leukosis (ML)-type strains, and moreover, the HE-type strains' specific deletion of 205-bp sequence covering the rTM and DR1 in 3'UTR fragment was also found in the four isolates. Further analysis on the sequences of subunits of env gene revealed an interesting finding: the gp85 of isolates GX14ZS14 and GX14HG04 had a higher similarity with HPRS-103 and much lower similarity with the HE-type reference strains resulting in GX14ZS14, GX14HG04, and HPRS-103 being clustered in the same branch, while gp37 had higher similarities with the HE-type reference strains when compared to that of HPRS-103, resulted in GX14ZS14, GX14HG04, and HE-type reference strains being clustered in the same branch. The results suggested that isolates GX14ZS14 and GX14HG04 may be the recombinant strains of the foreign strain HPRS-103 with the local epidemic HE-type strains of ALV-J.

  1. Combustion Branch Website Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The NASA combustion branch is a leader in developing and applying combustion science to focused aerospace propulsion systems concepts. It is widely recognized for unique facilities, analytical tools, and personnel. In order to better communicate the outstanding research being done in this Branch to the public and other research organization, a more substantial website was desired. The objective of this project was to build an up-to-date site that reflects current research in a usable and attractive manner. In order to accomplish this, information was requested from all researchers in the Combustion branch, on their professional skills and on the current projects. This information was used to fill in the Personnel and Research sections of the website. A digital camera was used to photograph all personnel and these photographs were included in the personnel section as well. The design of the site was implemented using the latest web standards: xhtml and external css stylesheets. This implementation conforms to the guidelines recommended by the w3c. It also helps to ensure that the web site is accessible by disabled users, and complies with Section 508 Federal legislation (which mandates that all Federal websites be accessible). Graphics for the new site were generated using the gimp (www.gimp.org) an open-source graphics program similar to Adobe Photoshop. Also, all graphics on the site were of a reasonable size (less than 20k, most less than 2k) so that the page would load quickly. Technologies such as Macromedia Flash and Javascript were avoided, as these only function on some clients which have the proper software installed or enabled. The website was tested on different platforms with many different browsers to ensure there were no compatibility issues. The website was tested on windows with MS IE 6, MSIE 5 , Netscape 7, Mozilla and Opera. On a Mac, the site was tested with MS IE 5 , Netscape 7 and Safari.

  2. Decitabine versus best supportive care in older patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEBt) - results of a subgroup analysis of the randomized phase III study 06011 of the EORTC Leukemia Cooperative Group and German MDS Study Group (GMDSSG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heiko; Suciu, Stefan; Rüter, Björn Hans; Platzbecker, Uwe; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; Germing, Ulrich; Salih, Helmut R; Muus, Petra; Pflüger, Karl-Heinz; Hagemeijer, Anne; Schaefer, Hans-Eckart; Fiaccadori, Valeria; Baron, Frédéric; Ganser, Arnold; Aul, Carlo; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre W; Lübbert, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/GMDSSG phase III trial 06011, we compared decitabine (15 mg/m(2) every 8 h for 3 days) with best supportive care (BSC) in patients ≥60 years with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by French-American-British (FAB) criteria. Here, we reinvestigate trial 06011 for the activity and efficacy specifically in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEBt). Response rates in the decitabine arm (N = 40) were as follows: complete or partial remission, 15 %; hematologic improvement, 15 %; resistant disease, 30 %. RAEBt patients in the decitabine arm had longer progression-free survival (PFS; hazard ratio (HR) 0.30, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.18-0.51; median, 6.2 vs 2.8 months) and overall survival (OS; HR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.42-1.11; median, 8.0 vs 6.0 months) than in the BSC arm (N = 35). Censoring at allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the OS difference between the treatment groups increased, particularly among patients aged 60-74 years (HR 0.48, 95 % CI 0.26-0.89). After regrouping the study cohort according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (i.e., ≥20 % blasts) in the decitabine arm (N = 27) also had longer PFS than in the BSC arm (N = 23) (HR 0.46, 95 % CI 0.26-0.83; median, 6.2 vs 2.8 months). In conclusion, 3-day decitabine displays clinical activity and efficacy in MDS and/or AML with 5-30 % blood or 20-30 % marrow blasts.

  3. Branch formation during organ development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2010-01-01

    Invertebrates and vertebrates use branching morphogenesis to build epithelial trees to maximize the surface area of organs within a given volume. Several molecular regulators of branching have recently been discovered, a number of which are conserved across different organs and species. Signals that control branching at the cellular and tissue levels are also starting to emerge, and are rapidly unveiling the physical nature of branch development. Here we discuss the molecular, cellular and physical processes that govern branch formation and highlight the major outstanding questions in the field. PMID:20890968

  4. Cookie branching random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Bartsch, Christian; Kochler, Thomas; Müller, Sebastian; Popov, Serguei

    2011-01-01

    We consider a branching random walk on $\\Z$, where the particles behave differently in visited and unvisited sites. Informally, each site on the positive half-line contains initially a cookie. On the first visit of a site its cookie is removed and particles at positions with a cookie reproduce and move differently from particles on sites without cookies. Therefore, the movement and the reproduction of the particles depend on the previous behaviour of the population of particles. We study the question if the process is recurrent or transient, i.e., whether infinitely many particles visit the origin or not.

  5. The branch librarians' handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Rivers, Vickie

    2004-01-01

    ""Recommended""--Booklist; ""an excellent addition...highly recommended""--Public Libraries; ""clear...very sound advice...strongly recommend""--Catholic Library World; ""excellent resource...organized...well written""--Against the Grain; ""interesting...thoroughly practical...a very good book...well organized...clearly written""--ARBA. This handbook covers a wide variety of issues that the branch librarian must deal with every day. Chapters are devoted to mission statements (the Dallas Public Library and Dayton Metro Library mission statements are highlighted as examples), library systems,

  6. CERNA SEARCH METHOD IDENTIFIED A MET-ACTIVATED SUBGROUP AMONG EGFR DNA AMPLIFIED LUNG ADENOCARCINOMA PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Halla; Tunkle, Leo; Lee, Inhan

    2016-01-01

    previously, our result is the first to propose ceRNA as one of its underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, since MET amplification was seen in the case of resistance to EGFR-targeted therapy, the EGFR-MET up and miR-133b down subgroup may fall into the drug non-response group and thus preclude EGFR target therapy.

  7. Fuzzy Group Ideals and Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharatti Lal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This section define a level subring or level ideals obtain a set of necessary and sufficient condition for the equality of two ideals and characterizes field in terms of its fuzzy ideals. It also presents a procedure to construct a fuzzy subrings (fuzzy ideals from any given ascending chain of subring ideal. We prove that the lattice of fuzzy congruence of group G (respectively ring R is isomorphic to the lattice of fuzzy normal subgroup of G (respectively fuzzy ideals of R.In Yuan Boond Wu wangrning investigated the relationship between the fuzzy ideals and the fuzzy congruences on a distributive lattice and obtained that the lattice of fuzzy ideals is isomorphic to the lattice of fuzzy congruences on a generalized Boolean algebra. Fuzzy group theory can be used to describe, symmetries and permutation in nature and mathematics. The fuzzy group is one of the oldest branches of abstract algebra. For example group can be used is classify to all of the forms chemical crystal can take. Group can be used to count the number of non-equivalent objects and permutation or symmetries. For example, the number of different is switching functions of n, variable when permutation of the input are allowed. Beside crystallography and combinatory group have application of quantum mechanics.

  8. Quantum subgroups of the Haagerup fusion categories

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Pinhas

    2011-01-01

    We answer three related questions concerning the Haagerup subfactor and its even parts, the Haagerup fusion categories. Namely we find all simple module categories over each of the Haagerup fusion categories (in other words, we find the `"quantum subgroups" in the sense of Ocneanu), we find all subfactors whose principal even part is one of the Haagerup fusion categories, and we compute the Brauer-Picard groupoid of Morita equivalences of the Haagerup fusion categories. In addition to the two even parts of the Haagerup subfactor, there is exactly one more fusion category which is Morita equivalent to each of them. This third fusion category has six simple objects and the same fusion rules as one of the even parts of the Haagerup subfactor, but has not previously appeared in the literature. We also find the full lattice of intermediate subfactors for every subfactor whose even part is one of these three fusion categories, and we discuss how our results generalize to Izumi subfactors.

  9. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debajyoti Choudhury; Asesh K Datta; Anirban Kundu

    2009-01-01

    The activities of the working group took place under two broad subgroups: Collider Physics subgroup and Flavour Physics subgroup. Reports on some of the projects undertaken are included. Also, some of the leading discussions organized by the working group are summarized.

  10. Sedimentología y paleoambientes del Subgrupo Río Colorado (Cretácico Superior, Grupo Neuquén, en las bardas de la ciudad de Neuquén y alrededores Sedimentology and sedimentary paleoenvironments of Río Colorado Subgroup (Upper Cretaceous, Neuquén Group, in Neuquén city and surrounding areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Sánchez

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available En la ciudad de Neuquén y alrededores afloran depósitos del Cretácico superior asignados al Subgrupo Río Colorado. La presente contribución da a conocer los resultados del análisis sedimentológico y paleoambiental de las Formaciones Bajo de la Carpa (Santoniano y Anacleto (Campaniano inferior. Los estudios llevados a cabo permitieron definir cuatro litofacies conglomerádicas, nueve de areniscas y dos pelíticas, que fueron agrupadas en nueve asociaciones de litofacies, dos de ellas de origen eólico y siete fluviales. La Formación Bajo de la Carpa está representada en la base por un sistema fluvial efímero, y en el techo por depósitos de interacción fluvio- eólica. Los depósitos fluviales corresponden a flujos canalizados durante episodios de máxima descarga. Luego se identifica un campo de dunas transversales, afectado en el subambiente de interduna por corrientes fluviales efímeras, y dunas parabólicas producto de la removilización del sistema eólico infrayacente, asociadas con depósitos de flujos efímeros en manto. La extensión y geometría de los campos de dunas respondieron a variaciones climáticas de corto término, interferencia del sistema fluvial, oscilaciones del nivel freático, bajo suministro y/o disponibilidad de sedimentos y factores tectónicos. La Formación Anacleto presenta en su base sistemas fluviales de baja sinuosidad, alta energía y rápida agradación, controlados por un bajo espacio de acomodación y condiciones climáticas con marcada estacionalidad. Hacia el tope se identifica un sistema fluvial anastomosado que refleja variaciones climáticas y aumento de la tasa de subsidencia acompañada de un lento ascenso del nivel de base relacionado con la ingresión atlántica maastrichtiana.Upper Cretaceous deposits included in Río Colorado Subgroup crop out in Neuquén city and surrounding areas. This work shows the results of the sedimentogical and paleoenvironmental analysis of Bajo de la Carpa

  11. Path-valued branching processes and nonlocal branching superprocesses

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zenghu

    2012-01-01

    A family of continuous-state branching processes with immigration are constructed as the solution flow of a stochastic equation system driven by time-space noises. The family can be regarded as an inhomogeneous increasing path-valued branching process with immigration. Two nonlocal branching immigration superprocesses can be defined from the flow. We identify explicitly the branching and immigration mechanisms of those processes. The results provide new perspectives into the tree-valued Markov processes of Aldous and Pitman [Ann. Inst. H. Poincare Probab. Statist. 34 (1998), 637--686] and Abraham and Delmas [Ann. Probab. To appear].

  12. Integrating over Higgs branches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, G. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Nekrasov, N. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117259, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shatashvili, S. [Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    We develop some useful techniques for integrating over Higgs branches in supersymmetric theories with 4 and 8 supercharges. In particular, we define a regularized volume for hyperkaehler quotients. We evaluate this volume for certain ALE and ALF spaces in terms of the hyperkaehler periods. We also reduce these volumes for a large class of hyperkaehler quotients to simpler integrals. These quotients include complex coadjoint orbits, instanton moduli spaces on R{sup 4} and ALE manifolds, Hitchin spaces, and moduli spaces of (parabolic) Higgs bundles on Riemann surfaces. In the case of Hitchin spaces the evaluation of the volume reduces to a summation over solutions of Bethe ansatz equations for the non-linear Schroedinger system. We discuss some applications of our results. (orig.)

  13. Report of the Production and Delivery Subgroup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R; Zalesky, R

    2004-11-01

    The Production and Delivery Subgroup was tasked with evaluating the various options that could be used for hydrogen production and delivery in terms of availability/industry readiness, technical and economic barriers, and environmental considerations. Hydrogen can be produced using a variety of feedstocks and conversion technologies. The feedstock options include water, natural gas, coal, petroleum, methanol, ethanol, biomass, and organic waste streams. Ultimately, using these domestic resources we will be able to produce all the hydrogen we will need for the complete conversion of our transportation infrastructure. The various conversion technologies include electrolysis, reforming (principally of natural gas, but also ethanol and methanol), photobiological and photoelectrochemical, biofermentation, pyrolysis and gasification of biomass and coal, high temperature thermochemical, and catalytic membranes. All of these production technologies are being actively researched by DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT); and other offices within DOE support work that complements the HFCIT Program activities. In addition, private industry is also dedicating significant resources to these efforts. In establishing the California Hydrogen Highway Network (CA H2 Net) we must utilize both distributed (that is, hydrogen that is produced at the point of use) as well as centralized production of hydrogen. Because of technical and economic barriers, most of the technologies for hydrogen production listed above will not become practical for either mode of hydrogen production in large quantities until at least the 2015-2030 timeframe. In the near term, that is, the transitional period between now and 2010 when we will establish a widely available hydrogen fueling infrastructure in California, the distributed production options of reforming and electrolysis will play the dominant role. In addition, production of hydrogen at centralized plants

  14. Methods and Technologies Branch (MTB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Methods and Technologies Branch focuses on methods to address epidemiologic data collection, study design and analysis, and to modify technological approaches to better understand cancer susceptibility.

  15. The rationality problem for finite subgroups of GL_4(Q)

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Ming-chang

    2010-01-01

    Let $G$ be a finite subgroup of $GL_4(\\bm{Q})$. The group $G$ induces an action on $\\bm{Q}(x_1,x_2,x_3,x_4)$, the rational function field of four variables over $\\bm{Q}$. Theorem. The fixed subfield $\\bm{Q}(x_1,x_2,x_3,x_4)^G:=\\{f\\in\\bm{Q}(x_1,x_2,x_3,x_4):\\sigma \\cdot f=f$ for any $\\sigma\\in G\\}$ is rational (i.e.\\ purely transcendental) over $\\bm{Q}$, except for two groups which are images of faithful representations of $C_8$ and $C_3\\rtimes C_8$ into $GL_4(\\bm{Q})$ (both fixed fields for these two exceptional cases are not rational over $\\bm{Q}$). There are precisely 227 such groups in $GL_4(\\bm{Q})$ up to conjugation; the answers to the rationality problem for most of them were proved by Kitayama and Yamasaki \\cite{KY} except for four cases. We solve these four cases left unsettled by Kitayama and Yamasaki; thus the whole problem is solved completely.

  16. Weinberg Angle Derivation from Discrete Subgroups of SU(2 and All That

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Weinberg angle W of the Standard Model of leptons and quarks is derived from specific discrete (i.e., finite subgroups of the electroweak local gauge group SU(2 L U(1 Y . In addition, the cancellation of the triangle anomaly is achieved even when there are four quark families and three lepton families!

  17. Affine spherical homogeneous spaces with good quotient by a maximal unipotent subgroup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdeev, Roman S [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-30

    For an affine spherical homogeneous space G/H of a connected semisimple algebraic group G, we consider the factorization morphism by the action on G/H of a maximal unipotent subgroup of G. We prove that this morphism is equidimensional if and only if the weight semigroup of G/H satisfies a simple condition. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  18. Psychosocial and Friendship Characteristics of Bully/Victim Subgroups in Korean Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoolim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial and friendship characteristics of Korean children who engaged in bully/victim subgroups among their peer groups. The participants were 605 elementary school students in Bucheon City, Korea. The participants completed a peer nomination inventory as well as loneliness and social anxiety scales. Friendship quality…

  19. The AFCRL Lunar amd Planetary Research Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephan D.

    2011-07-01

    The Lunar and Planetary research program led by Dr John (Jack) Salisbury in the 1960s at the United States Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories (AFCRL) investigated the surface characteristics of Solar System bodies. The Branch was one of the first groups to measure the infrared spectra of likely surface materials in the laboratory under appropriate vacuum and temperature conditions. The spectral atlases created from the results were then compared to photometric and spectral measurements obtained from ground- and balloon-based telescopes to infer the mineral compositions and physical conditions of the regoliths of the Moon, Mars and asteroids. Starting from scratch, the Branch initially sponsored observations of other groups while its in-house facilities were being constructed. The earliest contracted efforts include the spatially-resolved mapping of the Moon in the first half of the 1960s by Richard W. Shorthill and John W. Saari of the Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories in Seattle. This effort ultimately produced isophotal and isothermal contour maps of the Moon during a lunation and time-resolved thermal images of the eclipsed Moon. The Branch also sponsored probe rocket-based experiments flown by Riccardo Giacconi and his group at American Science and Engineering Inc. that produced the first observations of X-ray stars in 1962 and later the first interferometric measurement of the ozone and C02 emission in the upper atmosphere. The Branch also made early use of balloon-based measurements. This was a singular set of experiments, as these observations are among the very few mid-infrared astronomical measurements obtained from a balloon platform. Notable results of the AFCRL balloon flights were the mid-infrared spectra of the spatially-resolved Moon obtained with the University of Denver mid-infrared spectrometer on the Branch's balloon-borne 61-cm telescope during a 1968 flight. These observations remain among the best available. Salisbury also funded

  20. Subgroup analysis of telehealthcare for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt Udsen, Flemming; Lilholt, Pernille H.; Hejlesen, Ole K.

    2017-01-01

    severities were analyzed. Second, five additional subgroup analyses were conducted, focusing on differences in cost-effectiveness across a set of comorbidities, age-groups, genders, resource patterns (resource use in the social care sector prior to randomization), and delivery sites. All subgroups were...... investigated post hoc. In analyzing cost-effectiveness, two separate linear mixed-effects models with treatment-by-covariate interactions were applied: one for quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gain and one for total healthcare and social sector costs. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used for each...

  1. Identifying subgroups of patients using latent class analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Mølgaard; Kent, Peter; Hestbæk, Lise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in patients with low back pain (LBP) is well recognised and different approaches to subgrouping have been proposed. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) is a statistical technique that is increasingly being used to identify subgroups based on patient characteristics. However, as ...

  2. Tau hadronic branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    From 64492 selected \\tau-pair events, produced at the Z^0 resonance, the measurement of the tau decays into hadrons from a global analysis using 1991, 1992 and 1993 ALEPH data is presented. Special emphasis is given to the reconstruction of photons and \\pi^0's, and the removal of fake photons. A detailed study of the systematics entering the \\pi^0 reconstruction is also given. A complete and consistent set of tau hadronic branching ratios is presented for 18 exclusive modes. Most measurements are more precise than the present world average. The new level of precision reached allows a stringent test of \\tau-\\mu universality in hadronic decays, g_\\tau/g_\\mu \\ = \\ 1.0013 \\ \\pm \\ 0.0095, and the first measurement of the vector and axial-vector contributions to the non-strange hadronic \\tau decay width: R_{\\tau ,V} \\ = \\ 1.788 \\ \\pm \\ 0.025 and R_{\\tau ,A} \\ = \\ 1.694 \\ \\pm \\ 0.027. The ratio (R_{\\tau ,V} - R_{\\tau ,A}) / (R_{\\tau ,V} + R_{\\tau ,A}), equal to (2.7 \\pm 1.3) \\ \\%, is a measure of the importance of Q...

  3. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Ravindra; Pankaj Agrawal; Rahul Basu; Satyaki Bhattacharya; J Blümlein; V Del Duca; R Harlander; D Kosower; Prakash Mathews; Anurag Tripathi

    2006-11-01

    This is the report of the subgroup QCD of Working Group-4 at WHEPP-9. We present the activities that had taken place in the subgroup and report some of the partial results arrived at following the discussion at the working group meetings.

  4. Biostatistics primer: what a clinician ought to know: subgroup analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Helen; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2010-05-01

    Large randomized phase III prospective studies continue to redefine the standard of therapy in medical practice. Often when studies do not meet the primary endpoint, it is common to explore possible benefits in specific subgroups of patients. In addition, these analyses may also be done, even in the case of a positive trial to find subsets of patients where the therapy is especially effective or ineffective. These unplanned subgroup analyses are justified to maximize the information that can be obtained from a study and to generate new hypotheses. Unfortunately, however, they are too often overinterpreted or misused in the hope of resurrecting a failed study. It is important to distinguish these overinterpreted, misused, and unplanned subgroup analyses from those prespecified and well-designed subgroup analyses. This overview provides a practical guide to the interpretation of subgroup analyses.

  5. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 208 Revision 1 (FGE.208Rev1): Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 10 alicyclic aldehydes with the a,b-unsaturation in ring / side-chain and precursors from chemical subgroup 2.2 of FGE.19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Nørby, Karin Kristiane

    genotoxicity studies on p-mentha-1,8-dien-7-al [FL-no: 05.117], the representative substance for FGE.19 subgroup 2.2. This substance was tested in vivo in a combined micronucleus assay in bone marrow and Comet assay in liver and duodenum. It did not induce any increase in micronucleated polychromatic...... erythrocytes of the bone marrow of male rats in the micronucleus test and it did not induce DNA damage in duodenum of the same animals as analysed by the Comet assay. The Comet assay performed in liver shows a positive result and therefore the Panel concluded that p-mentha-1,8-dien-7-al [FL-no: 05...

  6. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 220, Revision 1 (FGE.220Rev1): alpha,beta-Unsaturated ketones and precursors from chemical subgroup 4.4 of FGE.19: 3(2H)-Furanones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... genotoxic effects in germ cells, which theoretically may result in reduced reproductive capacity or in inheritable genetic damage. Reduced reproductive capacity and inheritable genetic damage are toxicological endpoints which differ from carcinogenicity and therefore, the negative results...... that the representative substance for subgroup 4.4b, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one [FL-no: 13.010], is unable to induce adverse effects both on male rat reproductive capacity and dominant lethality. On this basis, the Panel concludes that there is no concern for this substance to induce heritable genetic damage...

  7. Patient characteristics in low back pain subgroups based on an existing classification system. A descriptive cohort study in chiropractic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirikstoft, Heidi; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-02-01

    Sub-grouping of low back pain (LBP) is believed to improve prediction of prognosis and treatment effects. The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine whether chiropractic patients could be sub-grouped according to an existing pathoanatomically-based classification system, (2) to describe patient characteristics within each subgroup, and (3) to determine the proportion of patients in whom clinicians considered the classification to be unchanged after approximately 10 days. A cohort of 923 LBP patients was included during their first consultation. Patients completed an extensive questionnaire and were examined according to a standardised protocol. Based on the clinical examination, patients were classified into diagnostic subgroups. After approximately 10 days, chiropractors reported whether they considered the subgroup had changed. The most frequent subgroups were reducible and partly reducible disc syndromes followed by facet joint pain, dysfunction and sacroiliac (SI)-joint pain. Classification was inconclusive in 5% of the patients. Differences in pain, activity limitation, and psychological factors were small across subgroups. Within 10 days, 82% were reported to belong to the same subgroup as at the first visit. In conclusion, LBP patients could be classified according to a standardised protocol, and chiropractors considered most patient classifications to be unchanged within 10 days. Differences in patient characteristics between subgroups were very small, and the clinical relevance of the classification system should be investigated by testing its value as a prognostic factor or a treatment effect modifier. It is recommended that this classification system be combined with psychological and social factors if it is to be useful.

  8. A Convenient Method of Decomposing the Gini Index by Population Subgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogwang Tomson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a convenient method of estimating the within-group, between-group, and interaction components of the overall traditional Gini index from the estimated parameters of underlying “trick regression models” involving known forms of heteroscedasticity related to income. Two illustrative examples involving both real and artificial data are provided. The issue of appropriate standard error of the subgroup decomposition is also discussed.

  9. FY 1992 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dippo, P.C [ed.

    1993-03-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/NREL goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility that Is capable of providing information on the full range of PV components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of Pv technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. The Measurements and Characterization Branch encompasses seven coordinated research groups, providing integrated research and development that covers all aspects of photovoltaic materials/devices characterization.

  10. February 2014 Phoenix critical care journal club: subgroup analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Sun X, Ioannidis JP, Agoritsas T, Alba AC, Guyatt G. How to use a subgroup analysis: users' guide to the medical literature. JAMA. 2014;311(4:405-11. One of Dr. Raschke's pet peeves is unplanned subgroup analysis. In the September 2013 Banner Good Samaritan / Phoenix VA Critical Care Journal Club (1 he commented on an article by Hung et al. (2 that used a post hoc subgroup analysis. He felt strongly enough to write to the editor about why post hoc subgroup analysis should not be acceptable as a basis for scientific conclusions and his letter was published this month (3. Therefore, we have been on the lookout for a review article to discuss subgroup analysis and came across this timely publication in JAMA. The authors cite a number of examples and provide 5 criteria to use when assessing the validity of subgroup analyses: 1. Can chance explain the apparent subgroup effect ...

  11. Integrated multi-omics analysis of oligodendroglial tumours identifies three subgroups of 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Kamoun, Aurélie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Dehais, Caroline; Elarouci, Nabila; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Colin, Carole; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; de Reyniès, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    POLA Network; International audience; Oligodendroglial tumours (OT) are a heterogeneous group of gliomas. Three molecular subgroups are currently distinguished on the basis of the IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion. Here we present an integrated analysis of the transcriptome, genome and methylome of 156 OT. Not only does our multi-omics classification match the current classification but also reveals three subgroups within 1p/19q co-deleted tumours, associated with specific expression patter...

  12. PERSONALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF SPORTS STUDENTS BY SPORTS BRANCHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fethiye TOSUNOĞLU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed to analyze the personality traits of the athletes who are studying in secondary school according to the sport branches and the relations of personality traits with team sports. The study population consists of 331 athletes, 113 female athletes and 218 male athletes studying in Tokat province center and the sample in secondary school in Tokat province center. Research is in the survey model. "Eysenck Personality Inventory" was used in the research. Firstly, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to investigate whether the data correspond to normal distribution. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used in comparison of the subjects with more than two groups because it was found that the items in the scale had normal distribution. According to the results of the research; When the neurotic points according to the branches are examined, it is seen that the highest average score is in the sportsmen who are dealing with the football branch. The scores of the athletic students for the psychotic dimension were lower in the volleyball branch than the other branches and the neuroticism dimension was lower than the scores for the volleyball and handball branches, football and basketball branches. In the case of lie dimension, statistically significant difference was found between volleyball and handball branches. According to this; The highest average for the handball branch of the lowest average belongs to the volleyball branch, while no significant difference was found among the branches for the extraversion dimension. According to the results of the research, it can be said that team sports affect the personality traits of the neuroticism, psychoticism, lie and extraversion dimension.

  13. Oceanography Branch Hydrographic Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oceanography group maintains and provides Conductivity/Temperature/Depth (CTD) instruments to all Center cruises for measuring water column profiles of...

  14. Scaling Behaviors of Branched Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, H; Kawai, H; Kitazawa, Y; Aoki, Hajime; Iso, Satoshi; Kawai, Hikaru; Kitazawa, Yoshihisa

    2000-01-01

    We study the thermodynamic behavior of branched polymers. We first study random walks in order to clarify the thermodynamic relation between the canonical ensemble and the grand canonical ensemble. We then show that correlation functions for branched polymers are given by those for $\\phi^3$ theory with a single mass insertion, not those for the $\\phi^3$ theory themselves. In particular, the two-point function behaves as $1/p^4$, not as $1/p^2$, in the scaling region. This behavior is consistent with the fact that the Hausdorff dimension of the branched polymer is four.

  15. Continuous-state branching processes

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zenghu

    2012-01-01

    These notes were used in a short graduate course on branching processes the author gave in Beijing Normal University. The following main topics are covered: scaling limits of Galton--Watson processes, continuous-state branching processes, extinction probabilities, conditional limit theorems, decompositions of sample paths, martingale problems, stochastic equations, Lamperti's transformations, independent and dependent immigration processes. Some of the results are simplified versions of those in the author's book "Measure-valued branching Markov processes" (Springer, 2011). We hope these simplified results will set out the main ideas in an easy way and lead the reader to a quick access of the subject.

  16. Immediate Small Side Branch Occlusion after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ostovan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Small side branches, albeit less important than their larger counterparts, have not yet received due attention in the literature. Nor has there ever been a comparison between drug-eluting stents and bare metal stents apropos side branch occlusion. The aim of this study was to compare the patency of small (≥0.5 and ≤1.5 mm in diameter side branches with respect to bare metal vs. drug-eluting stents immediately after their deployment.Methods: This prospective bi-center study, conducted between June 2005 and January 2007, enrolled 82 patients treated with ≥1 of two stents (TAXUSTM LiberteTM or LiberteTM. Side branches ≥0.5 and <1.5 mm in diameter arising from the main vessel at the lesion site were evaluated. Results: Thirty-eight patients were treated with 42 LiberteTM stents (58 side branches and forty-four patients with 50 TAXUSTM LiberteTM (102 side branches. The rate of small side branch occlusion was 35.3% (36 in the TAXUSTM LiberteTM group compared to 29.31% (15 in the LiberteTM group (P-value= 0.7. The presence of type 1 side branch morphology (Lefevre classification was the most powerful predictor of small side branch occlusion (P-value=0.03. Conclusion: This study shows that drug-eluting stents are not inferior to bare metal stents as regards small side branch occlusion during coronary stenting

  17. Identification and Characterization of Unique Subgroups of Chronic Pain Individuals with Dispositional Personality Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The current study attempted to identify and characterize distinct CP subgroups based on their level of dispositional personality traits. The secondary objective was to compare the difference among the subgroups in mood, coping, and disability. Methods. Individuals with chronic pain were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted in order to identify distinct subgroups of patients based on their level of personality traits. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the multivariate analysis of variance based on cluster membership. Results. In 229 participants, three clusters were formed. No significant difference was seen among the clusters on patient demographic factors including age, sex, relationship status, duration of pain, and pain intensity. Those with high levels of dispositional personality traits had greater levels of mood impairment compared to the other two groups (p<0.05. Significant difference in disability was seen between the subgroups. Conclusions. The study identified a high risk group of CP individuals whose level of personality traits significantly correlated with impaired mood and coping. Use of pharmacological treatment alone may not be successful in improving clinical outcomes among these individuals. Instead, a more comprehensive treatment involving psychological treatments may be important in managing the personality traits that interfere with recovery.

  18. Identifying flavor preference subgroups. Genetic basis and related eating behavior traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnwall, Outi; Silventoinen, Karri; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Perola, Markus; Tuorila, Hely; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-04-01

    Subgroups based on flavor preferences were identified and their genetic and behavior related characteristics investigated using extensive data from 331 Finnish twins (21-25years, 146 men) including 47 monozygotic (MZ) and 93 dizygotic (DZ) pairs, and 51 twin individuals. The subgroup identification (hierarchical and K-means clustering) was based on liking responses to food names representing sour, umami, and spicy flavor qualities. Furthermore, sensory tests were conducted, a questionnaire on food likes completed, and various eating behavior related traits measured with validated scales. Sensory data included intensity ratings of PROP (6-n-propylthiouracil-impregnated filter paper), hedonic and intensity responses to sourness (orange juice with and without added citric acid, 0.42%), pungency (strawberry jelly with and without added capsaicin 0.00013%) and umami ('mouthfeel flavor' taste solution). Ratings of liking of 41 general food names were categorized into salty-and-fatty, sweet-and-fatty, fruits and vegetables and fish foods. Subgroup differences (complex samples procedure) and the genetics underlying the subgroups (structural equation modeling) were investigated. Of the resulting two groups (basic, n=140, adventurous n=152; non-grouped n=39), the adventurous expressed higher liking for sour and spicy foods, and had more tolerance for capsaicin burn in the sensory-hedonic test. The adventurous were also less food neophobic (25.9±9.1 vs. 32.5±10.6, respectively) and expressed higher liking for fruits and vegetables compared to the basic group. Genetic effects were shown to underlie the subgroups (heritability 72%, CI: 36-92%). Linkage analysis for 27 candidate gene regions revealed suggestively that being adventurous is linked to TAS1R1 and PKD1L3 genes. These results indicate that food neophobia and genetic differences may form a barrier through which individual flavor preferences are generated.

  19. Leading Causes of Death among Asian American Subgroups (2003-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Katherine G; Jose, Powell O; Kapphahn, Kristopher I; Frank, Ariel T H; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Thompson, Caroline A; Eggleston, Karen; Cullen, Mark R; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of Asian American mortality patterns has been distorted by the historical aggregation of diverse Asian subgroups on death certificates, masking important differences in the leading causes of death across subgroups. In this analysis, we aim to fill an important knowledge gap in Asian American health by reporting leading causes of mortality by disaggregated Asian American subgroups. We examined national mortality records for the six largest Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) from 2003-2011, and ranked the leading causes of death. We calculated all-cause and cause-specific age-adjusted rates, temporal trends with annual percent changes, and rate ratios by race/ethnicity and sex. Rankings revealed that as an aggregated group, cancer was the leading cause of death for Asian Americans. When disaggregated, there was notable heterogeneity. Among women, cancer was the leading cause of death for every group except Asian Indians. In men, cancer was the leading cause of death among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese men, while heart disease was the leading cause of death among Asian Indians, Filipino and Japanese men. The proportion of death due to heart disease for Asian Indian males was nearly double that of cancer (31% vs. 18%). Temporal trends showed increased mortality of cancer and diabetes in Asian Indians and Vietnamese; increased stroke mortality in Asian Indians; increased suicide mortality in Koreans; and increased mortality from Alzheimer's disease for all racial/ethnic groups from 2003-2011. All-cause rate ratios revealed that overall mortality is lower in Asian Americans compared to NHWs. Our findings show heterogeneity in the leading causes of death among Asian American subgroups. Additional research should focus on culturally competent and cost-effective approaches to prevent and treat specific diseases among these growing diverse populations.

  20. Application of Subgroup Method in TPFAP Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Ping

    2012-01-01

    <正>TPFAP is a transmission probability fuel assembly code package for burn-up calculations on BWR and PWR. The transport calculation is started with a number of energy group calculations in the TPFAP nuclear data library by using of collision probability method. The method of calculating resonance shielding effects in TPFAP library is equivalence theory which uses the intermediate resonance approximations to derive an effective background scatter cross section sigma-p. The equivalence theory is limited by the available algorithms for determining the so-called ’equivalent’ sigma-p value in complex geometries.

  1. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  2. Left bundle-branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  3. On -supersolvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Izabela Agata Malinowska

    2015-05-01

    A number of authors have studied the structure of a group under the assumption that some subgroups of are well located in . We will obtain some new criteria of -supersolvability and -nilpotency of groups.

  4. On the Defect Group of a 6D SCFT

    CERN Document Server

    Del Zotto, Michele; Park, Daniel S; Rudelius, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We use the F-theory realization of 6D superconformal field theories (SCFTs) to study the corresponding spectrum of stringlike, i.e. surface defects. On the tensor branch, all of the stringlike excitations pick up a finite tension, and there is a corresponding lattice of string charges, as well as a dual lattice of charges for the surface defects. The defect group is data intrinsic to the SCFT and measures the surface defect charges which are not screened by dynamical strings. When non-trivial, it indicates that the associated theory has a partition vector rather than a partition function. We compute the defect group for all known 6D SCFTs, and find that it is just the abelianization of the discrete subgroup of U(2) which appears in the classification of 6D SCFTs realized in F-theory. We also explain how the defect group specifies defining data in the compactification of a (1,0) SCFT.

  5. On the Defect Group of a 6D SCFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Zotto, Michele; Heckman, Jonathan J.; Park, Daniel S.; Rudelius, Tom

    2016-06-01

    We use the F-theory realization of 6D superconformal field theories (SCFTs) to study the corresponding spectrum of stringlike, i.e., surface defects. On the tensor branch, all of the stringlike excitations pick up a finite tension, and there is a corresponding lattice of string charges, as well as a dual lattice of charges for the surface defects. The defect group is data intrinsic to the SCFT and measures the surface defect charges which are not screened by dynamical strings. When non-trivial, it indicates that the associated theory has a partition vector rather than a partition function. We compute the defect group for all known 6D SCFTs, and find that it is just the abelianization of the discrete subgroup of U(2) which appears in the classification of 6D SCFTs realized in F-theory. We also explain how the defect group specifies defining data in the compactification of a (1, 0) SCFT.

  6. Novel side branch ostial stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Liang; Lv, Shu-Zheng; Kwan, Tak W

    2009-04-01

    Bifurcation lesions are technically challenging and plagued by a high incidence of restenosis, especially at the side branch orifice, which results in a more frequent need for revascularization during the follow-up period. This report discusses two clinical experiences with a novel side branch ostial stent, the BIGUARD stent, designed for the treatment of bifurcation lesions; procedural success with no in-hospital complications was observed in types IVb and Ia lesions.

  7. Equações de volume para galhos de espécies em diferentes grupos de valor econômico em uma Floresta Ombrófila Mista / Selection of mathematical equations to estimate the volume of branches for diferent groups of economic value in an Araucaria Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geedre Adriano Borsoi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ResumoO objetivo deste estudo foi testar equações matemáticas e estimar o volume de galhos para espécies de três grupos de valor econômico em uma área de Floresta Ombrófila Mista, situada na região nordeste do estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Foi realizada a cubagem rigorosa dos galhos de 287 árvores-amostra. Além dos galhos de cada árvore selecionada, o restante do fuste comercial (resíduo foi considerado na determinação do volume total de galhos. As árvores-amostra selecionadas foram separadas e classificadas em grupos de valor econômico. Dez modelos volumétricos foram testados, sendo que para a seleção do melhor modelo foram analisados o coeficiente de determinação ajustado, o coeficiente de variação; os desvios médios relativos, desvio absoluto relativo, o valor ponderado e a distribuição gráfica dos valores residuais. A divisão da floresta em grupos de valor comercial mostrou-se eficiente no ajuste de equações matemáticas. As equações selecionadas para estimar o volume de galhos foram: “1 de Meyer”, para o grupo de baixo valor; a “5 de Spurr”, para o grupo de médio valor, a “2 de Meyer – modificada”, para o grupo de alto valor comercial; e a “equação 3, de Naslund – modificada”, para a floresta.AbstractThe objective of this study was to test mathematical equations, and estimate the volume of branches for groups of three species of economic value in an area of Araucaria Forest, located in the northeast region of Rio Grande do Sul. Rigorous scaling of branches of 287 sample trees were performed. Besides considering the branches of each tree selected, the rest of the commercial tree trunks (residue were taken into account for the determination of the total amount of branches. The selected sample trees were separated and classified into groups of economic value. Ten volumetric models were tested. For selecting the best model, the analysis focused on the determination coefficient, the

  8. Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefko, George

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 annual report of the Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch reflects the majority of the work performed by the branch staff during the 2002 calendar year. Its purpose is to give a brief review of the branch s technical accomplishments. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch develops innovative computational tools, benchmark experimental data, and solutions to long-term barrier problems in the areas of propulsion aeroelasticity, active and passive damping, engine vibration control, rotor dynamics, magnetic suspension, structural mechanics, probabilistics, smart structures, engine system dynamics, and engine containment. Furthermore, the branch is developing a compact, nonpolluting, bearingless electric machine with electric power supplied by fuel cells for future "more electric" aircraft. An ultra-high-power-density machine that can generate projected power densities of 50 hp/lb or more, in comparison to conventional electric machines, which generate usually 0.2 hp/lb, is under development for application to electric drives for propulsive fans or propellers. In the future, propulsion and power systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures, and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance and economic viability. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch is working to achieve these complex, challenging goals.

  9. Radiation effects on branched polysilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, K.; Seki, S.; Tagawa, S. [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research; Shibata, H.; Iwai, T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology

    2000-03-01

    We observed crosslinking and scission caused by gamma radiation in linear and branched polysilanes which have from 5% to 33% of the branching points. The crosslinking reactions become predominant for the irradiation with branching density increasing. The cleavage did not take place exclusively at the branching points and branching polysilanes are sensitive to radiation extraordinary as compared with linear polysilane from a careful study of the radiolysis products of a series of polysilanes. This is due to the increasing Si {center_dot} contributing to the crosslinking reaction and that they are not resonance-stabilized by double bonds as the reaction mechanism in the irradiated polysilanes. However, the gelation curve in linear PMPS irradiated by 2 MeV He{sup +} is almost consistent with that in branching PMPS, indicating that the size of chemical track is responsible for the gel fraction. The crosslinking G value for high molecular weight PMPS irradiated by 2 MeV He{sup +} was drastically decreased as compared with that for low molecular weight. It suggests that there are a large number of intramolecular crosslinking points for high molecular weight PMPS. (author)

  10. Learning Clinical Workflows to Identify Subgroups of Heart Failure Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Chen, You; Li, Bo; Liebovitz, David; Malin, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is one of the most common indications for readmission to the hospital among elderly patients. This is due to the progressive nature of the disease, as well as its association with complex comorbidities (e.g., anemia, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hyper- and hypothyroidism), which contribute to increased morbidity and mortality, as well as a reduced quality of life. Healthcare organizations (HCOs) have established diverse treatment plans for HF patients, but such routines are not always formalized and may, in fact, arise organically as a patient’s management evolves over time. This investigation was motivated by the hypothesis that patients associated with a certain subgroup of HF should follow a similar workflow that, once made explicit, could be leveraged by an HCO to more effectively allocate resources and manage HF patients. Thus, in this paper, we introduce a method to identify subgroups of HF through a similarity analysis of event sequences documented in the clinical setting. Specifically, we 1) structure event sequences for HF patients based on the patterns of electronic medical record (EMR) system utilization, 2) identify subgroups of HF patients by applying a k-means clustering algorithm on utilization patterns, 3) learn clinical workflows for each subgroup, and 4) label each subgroup with diagnosis and procedure codes that are distinguishing in the set of all subgroups. To demonstrate its potential, we applied our method to EMR event logs for 785 HF inpatient stays over a 4 month period at a large academic medical center. Our method identified 8 subgroups of HF, each of which was found to associate with a canonical workflow inferred through an inductive mining algorithm. Each subgroup was further confirmed to be affiliated with specific comorbidities, such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. PMID:28269922

  11. Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0388 TITLE: Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients by Genetic and Immune Profiling ...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients By Genetic And Immune Profiling 5b. GRANT...studying the results. We have finished the DNA isolation and anticipate the HLA testing to be completed this upcoming year. We want to interrogate the

  12. Disproportionate sampling for population subgroups in telephone surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsbeek, William D; Boyle, Walter R; Agans, Robert P; White, John E

    2007-04-15

    Population studies often seek to examine phenomena in important population subgroups or to compare results among these and other subgroups. When subgroups of interest comprise a relatively small percentage of the population and acceptable subgroup member lists are not available to serve as sampling frames, it may be prohibitively expensive even by telephone to screen through a sample of the entire population. This paper considers some statistical effects of estimation from a class of two-stratum telephone sample designs where part of the frame with a higher subgroup concentration is disproportionately sampled compared to the rest of the frame. Using proportionate sampling as a reference, the relative impact of this disproportionate design is determined for nominal and effective sample sizes, where the latter are tied to the effect of variation in sample weights that occurs in disproportionately allocated samples. Findings are illustrated using two recent telephone surveys. Whereas nominal subgroup sample sizes may be improved by disproportionate sampling, we conclude that both the survey designer and analyst should use this type of design cautiously in telephone surveys.

  13. A Bayesian subgroup analysis using collections of ANOVA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinzhong; Sivaganesan, Siva; Laud, Purushottam W; Müller, Peter

    2017-03-20

    We develop a Bayesian approach to subgroup analysis using ANOVA models with multiple covariates, extending an earlier work. We assume a two-arm clinical trial with normally distributed response variable. We also assume that the covariates for subgroup finding are categorical and are a priori specified, and parsimonious easy-to-interpret subgroups are preferable. We represent the subgroups of interest by a collection of models and use a model selection approach to finding subgroups with heterogeneous effects. We develop suitable priors for the model space and use an objective Bayesian approach that yields multiplicity adjusted posterior probabilities for the models. We use a structured algorithm based on the posterior probabilities of the models to determine which subgroup effects to report. Frequentist operating characteristics of the approach are evaluated using simulation. While our approach is applicable in more general cases, we mainly focus on the 2 × 2 case of two covariates each at two levels for ease of presentation. The approach is illustrated using a real data example.

  14. Dispositional Affect in Unique Subgroups of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle B. Rice

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis may experience increased negative outcomes if they exhibit specific patterns of dispositional affect. Objective. To identify subgroups of patients with rheumatoid arthritis based on dispositional affect. The secondary objective was to compare mood, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, disability, and quality of life between subgroups. Methods. Outpatients from a rheumatology clinic were categorized into subgroups by a cluster analysis based on dispositional affect. Differences in outcomes were compared between clusters through multivariate analysis of covariance. Results. 227 patients were divided into two subgroups. Cluster 1 (n=85 included patients reporting significantly higher scores on all dispositional variables (experiential avoidance, anxiety sensitivity, worry, fear of pain, and perfectionism; all p<0.001 compared to patients in Cluster 2 (n=142. Patients in Cluster 1 also reported significantly greater mood impairment, pain anxiety sensitivity, and pain catastrophizing (all p<0.001. Clusters did not differ on quality of life or disability. Conclusions. The present study identifies a subgroup of rheumatoid arthritis patients who score significantly higher on dispositional affect and report increased mood impairment, pain anxiety sensitivity, and pain catastrophizing. Considering dispositional affect within subgroups of patients with RA may help health professionals tailor interventions for the specific stressors that these patients experience.

  15. Principles of branch formation and branch patterning in Hydrozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The freshwater polyp Hydra produces buds which separate from the parent. Other Hydrozoa produce branches which remain connected to the parent, thus forming a colony. Some Hydrozoa grow by means of an organ that is like a shoot apical meristem. Others display a sympodial type of growth. In this article, I propose that these different types of branches are organized by a common pattern-forming system. This system has self-organizing properties. It causes branch tip formation and is kept active in the tip when the tip finally differentiates into a hypostome of a polyp. The system does not cause structure formation directly but rather, determines a tissue property called positional value, in such a way that a gradient of values forms in the tissue of the bud or branch. The local value determines the local morphodynamic processes, including differentiation of the hypostome (highest positional value), tentacles and basal disc and of the exoskeleton pattern along the shoot. A high positional value favors the onset of a new self-organizing process and by lateral inhibition, such a process prevents the initiation of a further process in its surroundings. Small quantitative differences in the range of the signals involved determine whether a bud or a branch forms and whether monopodial and sympodial growth follows.

  16. Adaptive CRT in patients with normal AV conduction and left bundle branch block: Does QRS duration matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Hiro; Lustgarten, Daniel; Cerkvenik, Jeffrey; Birnie, David; Gasparini, Maurizio; Lee, Kathy Lia-Fun; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Varma, Niraj; Lemke, Bernd; Starling, Randall C; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2017-08-01

    Adaptive cardiac resynchronization therapy (aCRT) is a dynamic optimization algorithm which paces only the left ventricle (LV) when atrio-ventricular (AV) conduction is normal, thus reducing right ventricular (RV) pacing. However, the impact of QRS duration on aCRT efficacy remains uncertain. We examined whether QRS duration impacts aCRT effectiveness in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) and preserved AV conduction. Randomized patients in the Adaptive CRT trial, which enrolled NYHA III/IV patients, were used in this analysis. Patients were randomized to receive aCRT or echo-optimized bi-ventricular CRT (control arm). Endpoints for this analysis were clinical composite score (CCS) at 6months post-implant and time to first heart failure (HF) hospitalization or death. Among the 199 patients with LBBB and normal AV intervals at baseline, 80 patients (40%) had a baseline moderately wide QRS of 120-150ms. In this subgroup, a greater proportion of aCRT patients had an improved CCS (79% vs. 50%) at 6months compared to the control group (p=0.03). There was also a trend toward a lower risk of death or HF hospitalization (hazard ratio: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.24-1.15; p=0.10) in the moderately wide QRS subgroup with aCRT compared to the control arm. In the wide QRS subgroup, the efficacy was comparable in both treatment arms. Adaptive CRT was associated with improved patient outcomes over echo-optimized bi-ventricular CRT in patients with preserved AV conduction, LBBB, and moderately wide QRS. The adaptive cardiac resynchronization therapy trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00980057) was sponsored by Medtronic plc, Mounds View, MN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetically meaningful phenotypic subgroups in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, O J; Veenstra-Vanderweele, J; Potter, M; Pericak-Vance, M A; Haines, J L

    2014-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with strong evidence for genetic susceptibility. However, the effect sizes for implicated chromosomal loci are small, hard to replicate and current evidence does not explain the majority of the estimated heritability. Phenotypic heterogeneity could be one phenomenon complicating identification of genetic factors. We used data from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, head circumferences, and ages at exams as classifying variables to identify more clinically similar subgroups of individuals with ASD. We identified two distinct subgroups of cases within the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange dataset, primarily defined by the overall severity of evaluated traits. In addition, there was significant familial clustering within subgroups (odds ratio, OR ≈ 1.38-1.42, P Autism Genome Project, we similarly identified two distinct subgroups of cases and confirmed this severity-based dichotomy. We also observed evidence for genetic contributions to subgroups identified in the replication dataset. Our results provide more effective methods of phenotype definition that should increase power to detect genetic factors influencing risk for ASD.

  18. Multiple pathways regulate shoot branching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eRameau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoot branching patterns result from the spatio-temporal regulation of axillary bud outgrowth. Numerous endogenous, developmental and environmental factors are integrated at the bud and plant levels to determine numbers of growing shoots. Multiple pathways that converge to common integrators are most probably involved. We propose several pathways involving not only the classical hormones auxin, cytokinins and strigolactones, but also other signals with a strong influence on shoot branching such as gibberellins, sugars or molecular actors of plant phase transition. We also deal with recent findings about the molecular mechanisms and the pathway involved in the response to shade as an example of an environmental signal controlling branching. We propose the TCP transcription factor TB1/BRC1 and the polar auxin transport stream in the stem as possible integrators of these pathways. We finally discuss how modeling can help to represent this highly dynamic system by articulating knowledges and hypothesis and calculating the phenotype properties they imply.

  19. Warped branches of flux compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2012-01-01

    We consider Freund-Rubin-type compactifications which are described by (p+q)-dimensional Einstein gravity with a positive cosmological constant and a q-form flux. Using perturbative expansions of Kinoshita's ansatz for warped dS_pxS^q and AdS_pxS^q spacetimes, we obtain analytical solutions describing the warped branches and their respective phase spaces. These equations are given by inhomogeneous Gegenbauer differential equations which can be solved by the Green's function method. The requirement that the Green's functions are regular provides constraints which determine the structure of the phase space of the warped branches. We apply the perturbation results to calculate the thermodynamic variables for the warped dS_pxS^q branch. In particular, the first law of thermodynamics can be reproduced using this method.

  20. Research on Group Customer Marketing Management Strategy for China Mobile Limited,Anhui Branch%安徽移动公司集团客户营销管理策略研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄海波

    2014-01-01

    文章对安徽移动公司集团客户营销管理现状和存在的问题进行了分析,在此基础上指出建立移动公司分层分级集团客户营销管理工作的必要性。最后,从集团客户分类管理、强化组织管理和完善考核机制等方面提出具体的营销管理策略。%This paper Starts with analysis of the status quo and existing problems of the company’s group customer marketing management. Based on these analyses,this paper further points out the necessity of group customer hierarchical marketing management strategy. In the last part of this paper,specific marketing management strategies on hierarchical management of group customer,enhancement of organizational management and improvement of assessment mechanism are suggested.

  1. Identification of a novel subgroup of melanomas with KIT/cyclin-dependent kinase-4 overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Keiran S M; Contractor, Rooha; Nguyen, Thiennga K; Xiao, Min; Edwards, Robin; Muthusamy, Viswanathan; King, Alastair J; Flaherty, Keith T; Bosenberg, Marcus; Herlyn, Meenhard; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2008-07-15

    Although many melanomas harbor either activating mutations in BRAF or NRAS, there remains a substantial, yet little known, group of tumors without either mutation. Here, we used a genomic strategy to define a novel group of melanoma cell lines with co-overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and KIT. Although this subgroup lacked any known KIT mutations, they had high phospho-KIT receptor expression, indicating receptor activity. Quantitative PCR confirmed the existence of a similar KIT/CDK4 subgroup in human melanoma samples. Pharmacologic studies showed the KIT/CDK4-overexpressing subgroup to be resistant to BRAF inhibitors but sensitive to imatinib in both in vitro and in vivo melanoma models. Mechanistically, imatinib treatment led to increased apoptosis and G(1) phase cell cycle arrest associated with the inhibition of phospho-ERK and increased expression of p27(KIP). Other melanoma cell lines, which retained some KIT expression but lacked phospho-KIT, were not sensitive to imatinib, suggesting that KIT expression alone is not predictive of response. We suggest that co-overexpression of KIT/CDK4 is a potential mechanism of oncogenic transformation in some BRAF/NRAS wild-type melanomas. This group of melanomas may be a subpopulation for which imatinib or other KIT inhibitors may constitute optimal therapy.

  2. Can sibling species of the Drosophila willistoni subgroup be recognized through combined microscopy techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Zanini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In several arthropod groups, male genitalia is the most important feature for species identification, especially in cryptic species. Cryptic species are very common in the Drosophila genus, and the Neotropical Drosophila willistoni species group is a good example. This group currently includes 24 species divided into three subgroups: alagitans, bocainensis and willistoni. There are six sibling species in the willistoni subgroup – D. willistoni, D. insularis, D. tropicalis, D. equinoxialis, D. pavlovskiana and D. paulistorum, which is a species complex composed of six semispecies – Amazonian, Andean-Brazilian, Centroamerican, Interior, Orinocan and Transitional. The objective of this study was to characterize male genitalia of the willistoni subgroup, including the D. paulistorum species complex, using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. We also tried to contribute to the identification of these cryptic species and to add some comments about evolutionary history, based on male genitalia characters. Despite being cryptic species, some differences were found among the siblings, including the Drosophila paulistorum semispecies.

  3. Able but unintelligent: including positively stereotyped black subgroups in the stereotype content model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Amy S; Czopp, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    The stereotype content model (SCM) posits that warmth and competence are the key components underlying judgments about social groups. Because competence can encompass different components (e.g., intelligence, talent) different group members may be perceived to be competent for different reasons. Therefore, we believe it may be important to specify the type of competence being assessed when examining perceptions of groups that are positively stereotyped (i.e., Black athletes and musical Blacks). Consistent with the SCM, these subgroups were perceived as high in competence-talent but not in competence-intelligence and low in warmth. Both the intelligence and talent frame of competence fit in the SCM's social structural hypothesis.

  4. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik B.; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 chronic pain patients to assess pressure pain threshold (cPPT), pressure pain tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in c......PPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection (HDT) and heat pain thresholds (HPT) at clinical painful and non-painful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM four distinct groups were formed: Group 1 (n=85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 2 (n=148) had...... impaired CPM and normal TSP. Group 3 (n=45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 4 (n=122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions compared with the other three groups (PCPM and facilitated TSP plays an important role in widespread pain. Group 1...

  5. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 chronic pain patients to assess pressure pain threshold (cPPT), pressure pain tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in c......PPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection (HDT) and heat pain thresholds (HPT) at clinical painful and non-painful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM four distinct groups were formed: Group 1 (n=85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 2 (n=148) had...... impaired CPM and normal TSP. Group 3 (n=45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 4 (n=122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions compared with the other three groups (PCPM and facilitated TSP plays an important role in widespread pain. Group 1...

  6. Evidence for a Priori Existence of Attentional Bias Subgroups in Emotional Processing of Aversive Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper H. van Heck

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Little is known regarding inter-individual differences in attentional biases for pain-related information; more knowledge is crucial, since these biases have been associated with differences in pain processing as well as in predicting the risk of postoperative pain. The present study investigated EEG correlates of attentional bias patterns for pain-related information, with specific focus on avoidance- and vigilance-like behavior. Forty-one participants performed a dot-probe task, where neutral and pain-related words were used to create neutral, congruent, incongruent, and double (two pain-related words trials. EEG was recorded, which was used to generate ERP's of the word-processing phase and the post-dot phase. Participants were placed in two subgroups based on the direction of their attentional bias (either positive; toward the pain-related words, or negative; away from pain-related words. Using t-profiles, four latency windows were identified on which the two subgroups differed significantly. These latency windows yield areas which correspond with the P1-N1 domain and the P3b for the word-processing phase, while the post-dot phase latency windows cover the areas of the P200 and the P3b. The two subgroups show differences on congruent, incongruent, and the double trials, but interestingly also on the neutral trials. Most notably, the area in the word-phase associated with the P3b is diminished in the subgroup showing a negative bias. The deflections associated with both early and late attentional components, including the P3B, as well as a positive deflection in the timeframe of proposed response evaluation processes differ significantly between subgroups. In this study we demonstrated that different attentional biases exist in the healthy population, by showing differences in ERP's. We also show differences in processing neutral trials, which suggests there are fundamental differences between these groups in processing words in general.

  7. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used....

  8. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate...

  9. Tracking cohesive subgroups over time in inferred social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alvin; Chignell, Mark; Wang, Hao

    2010-04-01

    As a first step in the development of community trackers for large-scale online interaction, this paper shows how cohesive subgroup analysis using the Social Cohesion Analysis of Networks (SCAN; Chin and Chignell 2008) and Data-Intensive Socially Similar Evolving Community Tracker (DISSECT; Chin and Chignell 2010) methods can be applied to the problem of identifying cohesive subgroups and tracking them over time. Three case studies are reported, and the findings are used to evaluate how well the SCAN and DISSECT methods work for different types of data. In the largest of the case studies, variations in temporal cohesiveness are identified across a set of subgroups extracted from the inferred social network. Further modifications to the DISSECT methodology are suggested based on the results obtained. The paper concludes with recommendations concerning further research that would be beneficial in addressing the community tracking problem for online data.

  10. Discrete neurocognitive subgroups in fully or partially remitted bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johan Høy; Knorr, Ulla; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurocognitive impairment in remitted patients with bipolar disorder contributes to functional disabilities. However, the pattern and impact of these deficits are unclear. METHODS: We pooled data from 193 fully or partially remitted patients with bipolar disorder and 110 healthy...... controls. Hierarchical cluster analysis was conducted to determine whether there are discrete neurocognitive subgroups in bipolar disorder. The pattern of the cognitive deficits and the characteristics of patients in these neurocognitive subgroups were examined with analyses of covariance and least...... significance difference pairwise comparison. RESULTS: Three discrete neurocognitive subgroups were detected: one that was cognitively intact (46.1%), one that was selectively impaired with deficits in processing speed (32.6%), and one that was globally impaired across verbal learning, working memory...

  11. Young children with language difficulties: a dimensional approach to subgrouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rianne; Ceulemans, Eva; Grauwels, Jolien; Maljaars, Jarymke; Zink, Inge; Steyaert, Jean; Noens, Ilse

    2013-11-01

    A dimensional approach was used to create bottom-up constructed subgroups that captured the behavioral heterogeneity in 36 Dutch-speaking children with language difficulties. Four subgroups were delineated based upon differences in cognitive ability, symbol understanding, joint attention and autism spectrum disorder related characteristics. Children with a different developmental disorder were found within a single cluster. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that bottom-up constructed subgroups might capture the heterogeneous behavioral profiles of young children with developmental difficulties in a more meaningful way. Furthermore, joint attention and symbol understanding seem important skills to assess in young children presenting with language difficulties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical symptoms and symptom signatures of Alzheimer's disease subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Khalid; Flory, Michael; Soininen, Hilkka

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial disorder that involves several different mechanisms. Over 99% of AD patients suffer from the sporadic form of the disease. Based on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-β (Aβ)(1-42), total tau, and ubiquitin--the markers associated with the histopathological hallmarks of the disease (Aβ plaques and abnormally hyperphosphorylated neurofibrillary tangles)--previous studies identified five subgroups of AD. Here we report the potential diagnostic predictive value of hallucination, hypokinesia, paranoia, rigidity, and tremors in aged individuals for AD and differences in the prevalence of these symptoms in the CSF marker-based subgroups of the disease. Analysis of 196 clinically diagnosed AD or Alzheimer with Lewy body, and 75 non-AD neurological and non-neurological control cases, all from a single center, showed that the presence of hallucination, hypokinesia, paranoia, rigidity, or tremors individually, or the presence of any of these, could diagnose AD with sensitivities and specificities of 14% and 99%; 30% and 99%; 15% and 99%; 16% and 100%; 16% and 96%; and 47% and 92%, respectively. The pattern of the prevalence of the above symptoms varied from AD subgroup to subgroup. Presence of any of these symptoms, as well as presence of each individual symptom except tremors, significantly differentiated AD subgroups from the predominantly control cluster. These findings encourage the exploration of hallucination, hypokinesia, paranoia, rigidity, and tremors in identifying various subgroups of AD for stratification of patients for clinical trials to develop therapeutic drugs. This study is for the special issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease honoring Inge Grundke-Iqbal who made several seminal contributions in AD research.

  13. Patient characteristics in low back pain subgroups based on an existing classification system. A descriptive cohort study in chiropractic practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eirikstoft, Heidi; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Sub-grouping of low back pain (LBP) is believed to improve prediction of prognosis and treatment effects. The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine whether chiropractic patients could be sub-grouped according to an existing pathoanatomically-based classification system, (2) to describe...... relevance of the classification system should be investigated by testing its value as a prognostic factor or a treatment effect modifier. It is recommended that this classification system be combined with psychological and social factors if it is to be useful....

  14. Identifying subgroups of patients using latent class analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Mølgaard; Kent, Peter; Hestbæk, Lise

    2017-01-01

    (activity, contextual factors, pain, participation, physical impairment and psychology) (first stage) as the variables entered into the second stage of the two-stage LCA to identify patient subgroups. The description of the results of the single-stage and two-stage LCA was based on a combination...... identified similar, but not identical, patient subgroups characterised by (i) mild intermittent LBP, (ii) recent severe LBP and activity limitations, (iii) very recent severe LBP with both activity and participation limitations, (iv) work-related LBP, (v) LBP and several negative consequences and (vi) LBP...

  15. New characterizations of finite supersoluble groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander; N; SKIBA

    2008-01-01

    Let A be a subgroup of a group G and X a nonempty subset of G.A is called an X- semipermutable subgroup of G if A has a supplement T in G such that for every subgroup T1 of T there exists an clement x∈X such that ATix=TixA.On the basis of this concept we obtain some new characterizations of finite supersoluble groups.

  16. New characterizations of finite supersoluble groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BaoJun; Alexander N SKIBA

    2008-01-01

    Let A be a subgroup of a group G and X a nonempty subset of G. A is called an X-semipermutable subgroup of G if A has a supplement T in G such that for every subgroup T1 of T there exists an element x ∈ X such that AT1x=T1xA. On the basis of this concept we obtain some new characterizations of finite supersoluble groups.

  17. Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Roldan, M.V.; Fermas, S.; Brewer, P.B.; Puech-Pages, V.; Dun, E.A.; Pillot, J.P.; Letisse, F.; Matusova, R.; Danoun, S.; Portais, J.C.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Becard, G.; Beveridge, C.A.; Rameau, C.; Rochange, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    A carotenoid-derived hormonal signal that inhibits shoot branching in plants has long escaped identification. Strigolactones are compounds thought to be derived from carotenoids and are known to trigger the germination of parasitic plant seeds and stimulate symbiotic fungi. Here we present evidence

  18. Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Roldan, M.V.; Fermas, S.; Brewer, P.B.; Puech-Pages, V.; Dun, E.A.; Pillot, J.P.; Letisse, F.; Matusova, R.; Danoun, S.; Portais, J.C.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Becard, G.; Beveridge, C.A.; Rameau, C.; Rochange, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    A carotenoid-derived hormonal signal that inhibits shoot branching in plants has long escaped identification. Strigolactones are compounds thought to be derived from carotenoids and are known to trigger the germination of parasitic plant seeds and stimulate symbiotic fungi. Here we present evidence

  19. Cash efficiency for bank branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Julia García

    2013-01-01

    Bank liquidity management has become a major issue during the financial crisis as liquidity shortages have intensified and have put pressure on banks to diversity and improve their liquidity sources. While a significant strand of the literature concentrates on wholesale liquidity generation and on the alternative to deposit funding, the management of an inventory of cash holdings within the banks' branches is also a relevant issue as any significant improvement in cash management at the bank distribution channels may have a positive effect in reducing liquidity tensions. In this paper, we propose a simple programme of cash efficiency for the banks' branches, very easy to implement, which conform to a set of instructions to be imposed from the bank to their branches. This model proves to significantly reduce cash holdings at branches thereby providing efficiency improvements in liquidity management. The methodology we propose is based on the definition of some stochastic processes combined with renewal processes, which capture the random elements of the cash flow, before applying suitable optimization programmes to all the costs involved in cash movements. The classical issue of the Transaction Demand for the Cash and some aspects of Inventory Theory are also present. Mathematics Subject Classification (2000) C02, C60, E50.

  20. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation.

  1. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  2. Latino Male Ethnic Subgroups: Patterns in College Enrollment and Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponjuan, Luis; Palomin, Leticia; Calise, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines Latino male ethnic subgroups and their college enrollment and degree completion patterns. The chapter also offers recommendations to improve Latino male ethnic subgroups' educational achievement.

  3. PLA branching with anhydrides and tri-functional aziridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liangliang; Xu, Yuewen; Naredla, Rajasekhar; Hoye, Thomas; Macosko, Christopher

    Branched PLA was prepared by melt blending with tri-functional aziridine (T-Az) and pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA). 1HNMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and rheology were used to characterize the topological structures of branched PLA. Fast reaction between PLA carboxyl end group and T-Az resulted in 3-arm stars and increased the molecular weight. However, the 3-arm stars did not show strain hardening behavior under extensional flow. After modifying PLA hydroxyl end group with PMDA, PLA can react with T-Az on both chain ends and form long chain branched structure, which showed strain hardening in extension. It was found that that only 10% of the PLA hydroxyl end groups reacted with PMDA. This work is supported by Center for Sustainable Polymers.

  4. Patient characteristics in low back pain subgroups based on an existing classification system. A descriptive cohort study in chiropractic practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eirikstoft, Heidi; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-01-01

    reducible disc syndromes followed by facet joint pain, dysfunction and sacroiliac (SI)-joint pain. Classification was inconclusive in 5% of the patients. Differences in pain, activity limitation, and psychological factors were small across subgroups. Within 10 days, 82% were reported to belong to the same......Sub-grouping of low back pain (LBP) is believed to improve prediction of prognosis and treatment effects. The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine whether chiropractic patients could be sub-grouped according to an existing pathoanatomically-based classification system, (2) to describe...... patient characteristics within each subgroup, and (3) to determine the proportion of patients in whom clinicians considered the classification to be unchanged after approximately 10 days. A cohort of 923 LBP patients was included during their first consultation. Patients completed an extensive...

  5. Detection of Problem Gambler Subgroups Using Recursive Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Francis; Young, Martin; Doran, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The multivariate socio-demographic risk factors for problem gambling have been well documented. While this body of research is valuable in determining risk factors aggregated across various populations, the majority of studies tend not to specifically identify particular subgroups of problem gamblers based on the interaction between variables. The…

  6. Subgroup analyses of clinical effectiveness to support health technology assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Marie-Ange; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Fletcher, Christine; Reid, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Subgroup analysis is an integral part of access and reimbursement dossiers, in particular health technology assessment (HTA), and their HTA recommendations are often limited to subpopulations. HTA recommendations for subpopulations are not always clear and without controversies. In this paper, we review several HTA guidelines regarding subgroup analyses. We describe good statistical principles for subgroup analyses of clinical effectiveness to support HTAs and include case examples where HTA recommendations were given to subpopulations only. Unlike regulatory submissions, pharmaceutical statisticians in most companies have had limited involvement in the planning, design and preparation of HTA/payers submissions. We hope to change this by highlighting how pharmaceutical statisticians should contribute to payers' submissions. This includes early engagement in reimbursement strategy discussions to influence the design, analysis and interpretation of phase III randomized clinical trials as well as meta-analyses/network meta-analyses. The focus on this paper is on subgroup analyses relating to clinical effectiveness as we believe this is the first key step of statistical involvement and influence in the preparation of HTA and reimbursement submissions.

  7. Practical Algorithms for Subgroup Detection in Covert Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock; Qureshi, Pir Abdul Rasool

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present algorithms for subgroup detection and demonstrated them with a real-time case study of USS Cole bombing terrorist network. The algorithms are demonstrated in an application by a prototype system. The system finds associations between terrorist and terrorist organisations...

  8. Critical evaluation of branch polarity and apical dominance as dictators of colony astogeny in a branching coral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Shaish

    Full Text Available The high morphological resemblance between branching corals and trees, can lead to comparative studies on pattern formation traits, best exemplified in plants and in some cnidarians. Here, 81 branches of similar size of the hermatypic coral Stylophora pistillata were lopped of three different genets, their skeletons marked with alizarin red-S, and divided haphazardly into three morphometric treatment groups: (I upright position; (II horizontal position, intact tip; and (III horizontal position, cut tip. After 1 y of in-situ growth, the 45 surviving ramets were brought to the laboratory, their tissues removed and their architectures analyzed by 22 morphological parameters (MPs. We found that within 1 y, isolated branches developed into small coral colonies by growing new branches from all branch termini, in all directions. No architectural dissimilarity was assigned among the three studied genets of treatment I colonies. However, a major architectural disparity between treatment I colonies and colonies of treatments II and III was documented as the development of mirror structures from both sides of treatments II and III settings as compared to tip-borne architectures in treatment I colonies. We did not observe apical dominance since fragments grew equally from all branch sides without documented dominant polarity along branch axis. In treatment II colonies, no MP for new branches originating either from tips or from branch bases differed significantly. In treatment III colonies, growth from the cut tip areas was significantly lower compared to the base, again, suggesting lack of apical dominance in this species. Changes in branch polarity revealed genet associated plasticity, which in one of the studied genets, led to enhanced growth. Different genets exhibited canalization flexibility of growth patterns towards either lateral growth, or branch axis extension (skeletal weight and not porosity was measured. This study revealed that colony

  9. On w-maximal groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Sanchez, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Let $w = w(x_1,..., x_n)$ be a word, i.e. an element of the free group $F =$ on $n$ generators $x_1,..., x_n$. The verbal subgroup $w(G)$ of a group $G$ is the subgroup generated by the set $\\{w (g_1,...,g_n)^{\\pm 1} | g_i \\in G, 1\\leq i\\leq n \\}$ of all $w$-values in $G$. We say that a (finite) group $G$ is $w$-maximal if $|G:w(G)|> |H:w(H)|$ for all proper subgroups $H$ of $G$ and that $G$ is hereditarily $w$-maximal if every subgroup of $G$ is $w$-maximal. In this text we study $w$-maximal and hereditarily $w$-maximal (finite) groups.

  10. Axial length as a risk factor to branch retinal vein occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, EA; deLavalette, VWR; vandenBrom, HJB

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether axial length is a factor in branch retinal vein occlusion. Methods: Axial length measurements in a group of 24 patients with a unilateral branch retinal Vein occlusion were compared with the axial length measurements in a control group. axial length measurements were ta

  11. Differences in Psychosocial Predictors of Obesity Among LGBT Subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jacob C; Smalley, K Bryant; Barefoot, K Nikki

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the overall presence of and differences in rates of overweight/obesity among a large, nationally diverse sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT)-identified individuals (i.e., cisgender lesbians, cisgender gay men, cisgender bisexual women, cisgender bisexual men, transgender women, and transgender men) and to identify specific psychosocial predictors of obesity within each of the six LGBT subgroups. A total of 2702 LGBT-identified participants participated in the online study. Participants completed a series of demographic questions (including weight and height) and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21. The percentage of participants who were overweight/obese did not differ significantly across LGBT subgroups, with 61.1% of the total sample being overweight/obese. However, the percentage of participants who self-reported body mass indexes in the obese range differed significantly across the six LGBT subgroups, with the highest prevalence in transgender men (46.0%). In addition, the predictors of obesity varied by subgroup, with age a significant predictor for cisgender lesbians, cisgender gay men, and cisgender bisexual women, relationship status for cisgender bisexual women, employment status for both cisgender gay men and cisgender bisexual women, education level for cisgender lesbians, and depression, anxiety, and stress for cisgender gay men. None of the examined psychosocial factors emerged as predictors of obesity for cisgender bisexual men, transgender women, or transgender men. These findings suggest that there are substantial variations in the presence and predictors of obesity across LGBT subgroups that support the need for culturally tailored healthy weight promotion efforts within the LGBT community.

  12. Extended phenotype and clinical subgroups in unilateral Meniere disease: A cross-sectional study with cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejo, L; Martin-Sanz, E; Teggi, R; Trinidad, G; Soto-Varela, A; Santos-Perez, S; Manrique, R; Perez, N; Aran, I; Almeida-Branco, M S; Batuecas-Caletrio, A; Fraile, J; Espinosa-Sanchez, J M; Perez-Guillen, V; Perez-Garrigues, H; Oliva-Dominguez, M; Aleman, O; Benitez, J; Perez, P; Lopez-Escamez, J A

    2017-02-06

    To define clinical subgroups by cluster analysis in patients with unilateral Meniere disease (MD) and to compare them with the clinical subgroups found in bilateral MD. A cross-sectional study with a two-step cluster analysis. A tertiary referral multicenter study. Nine hundred and eighty-eight adult patients with unilateral MD. best predictors to define clinical subgroups with potential different aetiologies. We established five clusters in unilateral MD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 53% of patients, and it is defined as the sporadic, classic MD without migraine and without autoimmune disorder (AD). Group 2 is found in 8% of patients, and it is defined by hearing loss, which antedates the vertigo episodes by months or years (delayed MD), without migraine or AD in most of cases. Group 3 involves 13% of patients, and it is considered familial MD, while group 4, which includes 15% of patients, is linked to the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by a comorbid AD. We found significant differences in the distribution of AD in clusters 3, 4 and 5 between patients with uni- and bilateral MD. Cluster analysis defines clinical subgroups in MD, and it extends the phenotype beyond audiovestibular symptoms. This classification will help to improve the phenotyping in MD and facilitate the selection of patients for randomised clinical trials. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

    1992-11-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy`s Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  14. FY 1991 Measurements and Characterization Branch annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C.R.; Dippo, P.C. (eds.)

    1992-11-01

    The Measurements and Characterization Branch of the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) provides comprehensive photovoltaic (PV) materials, devices, characterization, measurement, fabrication, modeling research, and support for the international PV research community, in the context of the US Department of Energy's Photovoltaic Research Program goals. This report summarizes the progress of the Branch from 31 January 1991 through 31 January 1992. The eight technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups: Surface and interface Analysis; Materials Characterization; Device Development; Electro-optical Characterization; Advanced PV module Performance and Reliability Research; Cell Performance Characterization; Surface Interactions, Modification, and Stability; and FTIR Spectroscopic Research. The including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules, and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of 77 branch originated journal and conference publications, which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 135 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  15. A simple McGowan specific volume correction for branching in hydrocarbons and its consequences for some other solvation parameter values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, P.C.M.; Haftka, J.J.H.; Parsons, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Differences in molecular properties between linear and branched alkanes as well as between compounds with branched alkyl groups is of relevance due to the large number of branched isomers of environmentally relevant compounds (e.g. fuels, fuel additives, surfactants). For branched alkane vapor press

  16. Streamers in air splitting into three branches

    CERN Document Server

    Heijmans, L C J; van Veldhuizen, E M; Ebert, U

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the branching of positive streamers in air and present the first systematic investigation of splitting into more than two branches. We study discharges in 100 mbar artificial air that is exposed to voltage pulses of 10 kV applied to a needle electrode 160 mm above a grounded plate. By imaging the discharge with two cameras from three angles, we establish that about every 200th branching event is a branching into three. Branching into three occurs more frequently for the relatively thicker streamers. In fact, we find that the surface of the total streamer cross-sections before and after a branching event is roughly the same.

  17. Branching and annihilating random walks: exact results at low branching rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Federico; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2013-05-01

    We present some exact results on the behavior of branching and annihilating random walks, both in the directed percolation and parity conserving universality classes. Contrary to usual perturbation theory, we perform an expansion in the branching rate around the nontrivial pure annihilation (PA) model, whose correlation and response function we compute exactly. With this, the nonuniversal threshold value for having a phase transition in the simplest system belonging to the directed percolation universality class is found to coincide with previous nonperturbative renormalization group (RG) approximate results. We also show that the parity conserving universality class has an unexpected RG fixed point structure, with a PA fixed point which is unstable in all dimensions of physical interest.

  18. Psychopathology among young homeless people: longitudinal mental health outcomes for different subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kate J; Shelton, Katherine H; van den Bree, Marianne B M

    2015-09-01

    Homeless young people are recognized as a very vulnerable group in terms of mental health; however, few studies in the UK have examined this. Furthermore, homeless young people represent a heterogeneous group in terms of their mental health and greater characterization could improve intervention work. The aims of this study were to examine prevalence and subtypes of psychopathology among a British sample of young homeless people and to investigate potential associations between identified typologies and a priori specified current and past experiences. In addition, the study intended to explore physical health, mental health, and housing outcomes for the different mental health subgroups. A prospective longitudinal design was used. Structured interviews including a mental health assessment were conducted with 90 young homeless people aged 16-23 years. Follow-up interviews were conducted approximately 10 and 20 months later. Cluster analysis at baseline was used to identify groups based on lifetime mental health problems. The current and lifetime incidence of mental health problems was high (88% and 93%, respectively). Three subgroups of homeless young people were identified: (1) minimal mental health issues; (2) mood, substance, and conduct disorder; and (3) post-traumatic stress disorder, mood, and anxiety issues. These groups differed with respect to follow-up indicators of change and stability of mental health status, service use, and suicide risk, but not housing outcome. Other characteristics (gender ratio, past experiences) also distinguished the subgroups. Typologies of young homeless people based on psychopathology reveal differences in lifetime and future experiences including mental health at follow-up. Identified groups could be used to tailor interventions towards differing needs. Low mood, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and psychosis are common mental health issues among young homeless people in the UK. Subgroups of young homeless people with

  19. BDC 500 branch driver controller

    CERN Document Server

    Dijksman, A

    1981-01-01

    This processor has been designed for very fast data acquisition and date pre-processing. The dataway and branch highway speeds have been optimized for approximately 1.5 mu sec. The internal processor cycle is approximately 0.8 mu sec. The standard version contains the following functions (slots): crate controller type A1; branch highway driver including terminator; serial I/O port (TTY, VDU); 24 bit ALU and 24 bit program counter; 16 bit memory address counter and 4 word stack; 4k bit memory for program and/or data; battery backup for the memory; CNAFD and crate LAM display; request/grant logic for time- sharing operation of several BDCs. The free slots can be equipped with e.g. extra RAM, computer interfaces, hardware multiplier/dividers, etc. (0 refs).

  20. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  1. Branching processes and neutral evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Taïb, Ziad

    1992-01-01

    The Galton-Watson branching process has its roots in the problem of extinction of family names which was given a precise formulation by F. Galton as problem 4001 in the Educational Times (17, 1873). In 1875, an attempt to solve this problem was made by H. W. Watson but as it turned out, his conclusion was incorrect. Half a century later, R. A. Fisher made use of the Galton-Watson process to determine the extinction probability of the progeny of a mutant gene. However, it was J. B. S. Haldane who finally gave the first sketch of the correct conclusion. J. B. S. Haldane also predicted that mathematical genetics might some day develop into a "respectable branch of applied mathematics" (quoted in M. Kimura & T. Ohta, Theoretical Aspects of Population Genetics. Princeton, 1971). Since the time of Fisher and Haldane, the two fields of branching processes and mathematical genetics have attained a high degree of sophistication but in different directions. This monograph is a first attempt to apply the current sta...

  2. Residual $Z_2$ symmetries and leptonic mixing patterns from finite discrete subgroups of $U(3)$

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, Anjan S

    2016-01-01

    We study embedding of non-commuting $Z_2$ and $Z_m$, $m\\geq 3$ symmetries in discrete subgroups (DSG) of $U(3)$ and analytically work out the mixing patterns implied by the assumption that $Z_2$ and $Z_m$ describe the residual symmetries of the neutrino and the charged lepton mass matrices respectively. Both $Z_2$ and $Z_m$ are assumed to be subgroups of a larger discrete symmetry group $G_f$ possessing three dimensional faithful irreducible representation. The residual symmetries predict the magnitude of a column of the leptonic mixing matrix $U_{\\rm PMNS}$ which are studied here assuming $G_f$ as the DSG of $SU(3)$ designated as type C and D and large number of DSG of $U(3)$ which are not in $SU(3)$. These include the known group series $\\Sigma(3n^3)$, $T_n(m)$, $\\Delta(3n^2,m)$, $\\Delta(6n^2,m)$ and $\\Delta'(6n^2,j,k)$. It is shown that the predictions for a column of $|U_{\\rm PMNS}|$ in these group series and the C and D types of groups are all contained in the predictions of the $\\Delta(6N^2)$ groups for...

  3. Novel prognostic subgroups in childhood 11q23/MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia: results of an international retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgobind, Brian V; Raimondi, Susana C; Harbott, Jochen; Zimmermann, Martin; Alonzo, Todd A; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H Berna; Chang, Myron; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael N; Forestier, Erik; Gibson, Brenda; Hasle, Henrik; Harrison, Christine J; Heerema, Nyla A; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Leszl, Anna; Litvinko, Nathalia; Nigro, Luca Lo; Morimoto, Akira; Perot, Christine; Pieters, Rob; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Smith, Franklin O; Stary, Jan; Stasevich, Irina; Strehl, Sabine; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Webb, David; Zemanova, Zuzana; Zwaan, C Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2009-09-17

    Translocations involving chromosome 11q23 frequently occur in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor prognosis. In most cases, the MLL gene is involved, and more than 50 translocation partners have been described. Clinical outcome data of the 11q23-rearranged subgroups are scarce because most 11q23 series are too small for meaningful analysis of subgroups, although some studies suggest that patients with t(9;11)(p22;q23) have a more favorable prognosis. We retrospectively collected outcome data of 756 children with 11q23- or MLL-rearranged AML from 11 collaborative groups to identify differences in outcome based on translocation partners. All karyotypes were centrally reviewed before assigning patients to subgroups. The event-free survival of 11q23/MLL-rearranged pediatric AML at 5 years from diagnosis was 44% (+/- 5%), with large differences across subgroups (11% +/- 5% to 92% +/- 5%). Multivariate analysis identified the following subgroups as independent prognostic predictors: t(1;11)(q21;q23) (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.1, P = .004); t(6;11)(q27;q23) (HR = 2.2, P < .001); t(10;11)(p12;q23) (HR = 1.5, P = .005); and t(10;11)(p11.2;q23) (HR = 2.5, P = .005). We could not confirm the favorable prognosis of the t(9;11)(p22;q23) subgroup. We identified large differences in outcome within 11q23/MLL-rearranged pediatric AML and novel subgroups based on translocation partners that independently predict clinical outcome. Screening for these translocation partners is needed for accurate treatment stratification at diagnosis.

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 218, Revision 1 (FGE.218Rev1): alpha,beta-Unsaturated aldehydes and precursors from subgroup 4.2 of FGE.19: Furfural derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    .001], for which there was a request for genotoxicity data in FGE.218. Flavouring Group Evaluation 218 (FGE.218) consists of furfural [FL-no: 13.018] and seven substances structurally related to furfural, 5-methylfurfural [FL-no: 13.001], furfuryl alcohol [FL-no: 13.019] and five esters of furfuryl alcohol...... is expected to be oxidised to the alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde furfural. However, based on the data then available the Panel concluded that furfural is not of concern with respect to genotoxicity. Furthermore, the Panel concluded that not only furfural but also the structurally related furfuryl alcohol...... to 5-[(sulphoxy)methyl]furfural which shows genotoxic potential in vitro, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure. Accordingly, the Panel concluded that 5-methylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure either. Industry has submitted additional data on the 5...

  5. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY06 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2006-10-03

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2006 (FY06) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to the 2000 and 2004 Biological Opinions on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates implementation of the Estuary RME Plan. In FY06, EOS project accomplishments included: 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version May 2006) based on comments by EOS members, the Independent Scientific Review Panel, and other reviewers. In the context of uncertainty about the direction of the federal RME due to litigation on the FCRPS Biological Opinion, FY06 activities for the EOS project resulted in expanded substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, project tracking infrastructure, and a new version of the Estuary RME Plan.

  6. The Importance of Risk and Subgroup Analysis of Nonparticipants in a Geriatric Intervention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Rosted

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A major concern in intervention studies is the generalizability of the findings due to refusal of intended participants to actually take part. In studies including ill older people the number of those declining to participate may be large and the concern is therefore relevant. Objectives. To compare patients characteristics, rates of acute readmission, and mortality after one and six months among older persons who agreed and those who declined to participate in a randomized controlled trial and to describe subgroups of nonparticipants. Design. Comparative study based on a randomized controlled trial. Setting. University hospital in the Capital Region of Denmark. Participants. Patients ≥70 years discharged home after a short Emergency Department stay. 399 were requested to participate; 271 consented, whereas 128 refused. Results. Refusers were more likely to be readmitted (p<0.001 or die (p=0.006. The largest subgroup of refusers described as “too ill” had the highest risk of readmission (OR = 3.00, 95% CI = 1.61–5.47, p=0.001 and of mortality within six months (OR = 3.50, 95% CI = 1.64–7.49, p=0.002. However, this seems not to have affected the results of our randomized study. Conclusion. We recommend that intervention studies among older people or other fragile patient groups include analysis of relevant risk and subgroup analyses of refusers.

  7. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY07 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2007-10-10

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

  8. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring and Evaluation - FY07 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-10-10

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort of the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Unique Subgroups of Chronic Pain Individuals with Dispositional Personality Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S; Rice, D; McIntyre, A; Getty, H; Speechley, M; Sequeira, K; Shapiro, A P; Morley-Forster, P; Teasell, R W

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The current study attempted to identify and characterize distinct CP subgroups based on their level of dispositional personality traits. The secondary objective was to compare the difference among the subgroups in mood, coping, and disability. Methods. Individuals with chronic pain were assessed for demographic, psychosocial, and personality measures. A two-step cluster analysis was conducted in order to identify distinct subgroups of patients based on their level of personality traits. Differences in clinical outcomes were compared using the multivariate analysis of variance based on cluster membership. Results. In 229 participants, three clusters were formed. No significant difference was seen among the clusters on patient demographic factors including age, sex, relationship status, duration of pain, and pain intensity. Those with high levels of dispositional personality traits had greater levels of mood impairment compared to the other two groups (p personality traits significantly correlated with impaired mood and coping. Use of pharmacological treatment alone may not be successful in improving clinical outcomes among these individuals. Instead, a more comprehensive treatment involving psychological treatments may be important in managing the personality traits that interfere with recovery.

  10. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring and Evaluation - FY07 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-10-10

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort of the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

  11. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY07 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2007-10-10

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

  12. Summary of the activities of the subgroup on data acquisition and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, P.L.; Doughty, D.C.; Elias, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    A data acquisition and handling subgroup consisting of approximately 20 members met during the 1981 ISABELLE summer study. Discussions were led by members of the BNL ISABELLE Data Acquisition Group (DAG) with lively participation from outside users. Particularly large contributions were made by representatives of BNL experiments 734, 735, and the MPS, as well as the Fermilab Colliding Detector Facility and the SLAC LASS Facility. In contrast to the 1978 study, the subgroup did not divide its activities into investigations of various individual detectors, but instead attempted to review the current state-of-the-art in the data acquisition, trigger processing, and data handling fields. A series of meetings first reviewed individual pieces of the problem, including status of the Fastbus Project, the Nevis trigger processor, the SLAC 168/E and 3081/E emulators, and efforts within DAG. Additional meetings dealt with the question involving specifying and building complete data acquisition systems. For any given problem, a series of possible solutions was proposed by the members of the subgroup. In general, any given solution had both advantages and disadvantages, and there was never any consensus on which approach was best. However, there was agreement that certain problems could only be handled by systems of a given power or greater. what will be given here is a review of various solutions with associated powers, costs, advantages, and disadvantages.

  13. On subgroups of semi-abelian varieties defined by difference equations

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzidakis, Zoé

    2011-01-01

    Consider the algebraic dynamics on a torus $T=G_m^n$ given by a matrix $M$ in $GL_n(Z)$. Assume that the characteristic polynomial of $M$ is prime to all polynomials $X^m-1$. We show that any finite equivariant map from another algebraic dynamics onto $(T,M)$ arises from a finite isogeny $T \\to T$. A similar and more general statement is shown for Abelian and semi-abelian varieties. In model-theoretic terms, our result says: Working in an existentially closed difference field, we consider a definable subgroup $B$ of a semi-abelian variety $A$; assume $B$ does not have a subgroup isogenous to $A'(F)$ for some twisted fixed field $F$, and some semi-Abelian variety $A'$. Then B with the induced structure is stable and stably embedded. This implies in particular that for any $n>0$, any definable subset of $B^n$ is a Boolean combination of cosets of definable subgroups of $B^n$. This result was already known in characteristic 0 where indeed it holds for all commutative algebraic groups ([CH]). In positive characte...

  14. Differences in Math Performance Indicators within an Ethnicity Subgroup: An Investigation of an Urban District's High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Carol S.

    2016-01-01

    This study provides an illustration of the ways in which schools can use intra-group analysis to identify salient factors related to achievement and to raise questions for further analysis. Previous research has analyzed data between demographic subgroups. This study, however, analyzes differences within the Black student cohort of one school…

  15. Changes and significances of Th1/Th2, related cytokines and T cell subgroup in aplastic anemia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Zhang; Guang-Sheng Wu; Wei-Ling Guo

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the changes and significances of Th1/Th2, related cytokines and T cell subgroup in aplastic anemia(AA) patients.Methods:A total of 87 cases AA patients were chosen. They were set as observation group, and they were divided into acute group (n=21) and chronic group (n=66) according to the condition, chose another 30 cases healthy volunteers as control group, detected the Th1 cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and Th2 cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) with nzyme-linked immunosorbent method, detected the Th1/Th2 cells and T cells subgroup with flow cytometry instrument between groups.Results:The Th1 cells and Th1/Th2 cells in observation group were significantly higher than control group. Th1 cells and Th1/Th2 cells in acute group were significantly higher than chronic group; The IFN-γ, IL-4 and IFN-γ/IL-4 in observation group were significantly higher than that of control group, and the IFN-γ, IL-4 and IFN-γ/IL-4 in acute group were significantly higher than chronic group; The blood CD4+, CD4+/CD8+ in observation group were significantly lower than the control group, CD8+ was significantly higher than the control group, and the blood CD4+, CD4+/CD8+ in acute group were significantly lower than the chronic group, CD8+ was significantly higher than the chronic group, all the difference was statistically significant.Conclusion:T cell subgroup imbalances and Th1 migration plays the important role in the onset of AA, and may relate to a certain degree of disease state.

  16. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measur...

  17. Locally minimal topological groups

    OpenAIRE

    Außenhofer, Lydia; Chasco, María Jesús; Dikranjan, Dikran; Domínguez, Xabier

    2009-01-01

    A Hausdorff topological group $(G,\\tau)$ is called locally minimal if there exists a neighborhood $U$ of 0 in $\\tau$ such that $U$ fails to be a neighborhood of zero in any Hausdorff group topology on $G$ which is strictly coarser than $\\tau.$ Examples of locally minimal groups are all subgroups of Banach-Lie groups, all locally compact groups and all minimal groups. Motivated by the fact that locally compact NSS groups are Lie groups, we study the connection between local minimality and the ...

  18. Identification of Subgroups of Women with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Central Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Muñoz, Juan J; Navarro-Pardo, Esperanza; da-Silva-Pocinho, Ricardo F; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Pareja, Juan A

    2016-09-01

    Identification of subjects with different sensitization mechanisms can help to identify better therapeutic strategies for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The aim of the current study was to identify subgroups of women with CTS with different levels of sensitization. A total of 223 women with CTS were recruited. Self-reported variables included pain intensity, function, disability, and depression. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over median, ulnar, and radial nerves, C5-C6 joint, carpal tunnel, and tibialis anterior to assess widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia. Heat (HPT) and cold (CPT) pain thresholds were also bilaterally assessed over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence to determine thermal pain hyperalgesia. Pinch grip force between the thumb and the remaining fingers was calculated to determine motor assessment. Subgroups were determined according to the status on a previous clinical prediction rule: PPT over the affected C5-C6 joint 66 points. The ANOVA showed that women within group 1 (positive rule, n = 60) exhibited bilateral widespread pressure hyperalgesia (P < 0.001) and bilateral thermal thresholds (P < 0.001) than those within group 2 (negative rule, n = 162). Women in group 1 also exhibited higher depression than those in group 2 (P = 0.023). No differences in self-reported variables were observed. This study showed that a clinical prediction rule originally developed for identifying women with CTS who are likely to respond favorably to manual physical therapy was able to identify women exhibiting higher widespread pressure hyper-sensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. This subgroup of women with CTS exhibiting higher sensitization may need specific therapeutic programs. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Somatosensory profiles in subgroups of patients with myogenic temporomandibular disorders and Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Doreen B; Rolke, Roman; Nickel, Ralf; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Daublaender, Monika

    2009-12-15

    Some patients with myofascial pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) report pain in extra-trigeminal body regions. Our aim was to distinguish TMD as regional musculoskeletal pain syndrome (n=23) from a widespread pain syndrome (FMS; n=18) based on patients' tender point scores, pain drawings and quantitative sensory testing (QST) profiles. Referenced to 18 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects significant group differences for cold, pressure and pinprick pain thresholds, suprathreshold pinprick sensitivity and mechanical detection thresholds were found. Pain sensitivity in TMD patients ranged between those of FMS patients and healthy controls. The group of TMD patients was inhomogeneous with respect to their tender point count with an insensitive group (n=12) resembling healthy controls and a sensitive TMD group (n=9) resembling FMS patients. Nevertheless sensitive TMD patients did not fulfil diagnostic criteria for FMS in regard to widespread pain as shown by their pain drawings. TMD subgroups did not differ with respect to psychological parameters. The sensitive subgroup was more sensitive compared to healthy controls and to insensitive TMD patients in regard to their QST profile over all test areas as well as to their tenderness over orofacial muscles and trigeminal foramina. However, sensitive TMD patients had a short pain duration arguing against a transition from TMD to FMS over time. Data rather suggest an overlap in pathophysiology with FMS, e.g. a disturbance of central pain processing, in this subgroup of TMD patients. Those patients could be identified on the basis of their tender point count as an easy practicable screening tool.

  20. Explicit Representation of Roots on -Adic Solenoids and Non-Uniqueness of Embeddability into Rational One-Parameter Subgroups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peter Becker-Kern

    2007-11-01

    This note generalizes known results concerning the existence of roots and embedding one-parameter subgroups on -adic solenoids. An explicit representation of the roots leads to the construction of two distinct rational embedding one-parameter subgroups. The results contribute to enlighten the group structure of solenoids and to point out difficulties arising in the context of the embedding problem in probability theory. As a consequence, the uniqueness of embedding of infinitely divisible probability measures on -adic solenoids is solved under a certain natural condition.

  1. Identification of subgroups of inflammatory and degenerative MRI findings in the spine and sacroiliac joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnbak, Bodil; Jensen, Rikke Krüger; Manniche, Claus;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate subgroups of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for the spine and sacroiliac joints (SIJs) using latent class analysis (LCA), and to investigate whether these subgroups differ in their demographic and clinical characteristics. METHODS......: The sample included 1037 patients aged 18-40 years with persistent low back pain (LBP). LCA was applied to MRI findings of the spine and SIJs. The resulting subgroups were tested for differences in self-reported demographic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS: A five-class model was identified: Subgroup 1...... the subgroups with predominantly spinal findings (Subgroups 1-3), median age, prevalence of men, being overweight and previous LBP episodes were statistically significantly lower in Subgroup 1, higher in Subgroup 2 and highest in Subgroup 3. CONCLUSIONS: Five distinct subgroups of MRI findings in the spine...

  2. Soils of Walker Branch Watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lietzke, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The soil survey of Walker Branch Watershed (WBW) utilized the most up-to-date knowledge of soils, geology, and geohydrology in building the soils data base needed to reinterpret past research and to begin new research in the watershed. The soils of WBW were also compared with soils mapped elsewhere along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation to (1) establish whether knowledge obtained elsewhere could be used within the watershed, (2) determine whether there were any soils restricted to the watershed, and (3) evaluate geologic formation lateral variability. Soils, surficial geology, and geomorphology were mapped at a scale of 1:1200 using a paper base map having 2-ft contour intervals. Most of the contours seemed to reasonably represent actual landform configurations, except for dense wooded areas. For example, the very large dolines or sinkholes were shown on the contour base map, but numerous smaller ones were not. In addition, small drainageways and gullies were often not shown. These often small but important features were located approximately as soil mapping progressed. WBW is underlain by dolostones of the Knox Group, but only a very small part of the surface area contains outcroppings of rock and most outcrops were located in the lower part. Soil mapping revealed the presence of both ancient alluvium and ancient colluvium deposits, not recognized in previous soil surveys, that have been preserved in high-elevation stable portions of present-day landforms. An erosional geomorphic process of topographic inversion requiring several millions of years within the Pleistocene is necessary to bring about the degree of inversion that is expressed in the watershed. Indeed, some of these ancient alluvial and colluvial remnants may date back into the Tertiary. Also evident in the watershed, and preserved in the broad, nearly level bottoms of dolines, are multiple deposits of silty material either devoid or nearly devoid of coarse fragments. Recent research

  3. Practical Algorithms for Subgroup Detection in Covert Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock; Qureshi, Pir Abdul Rasool

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present algorithms for subgroup detection and demonstrated them with a real-time case study of USS Cole bombing terrorist network. The algorithms are demonstrated in an application by a prototype system. The system finds associations between terrorist and terrorist organisations...... and is capable of determining links between terrorism plots occurred in the past, their affiliation with terrorist camps, travel record, funds transfer, etc. The findings are represented by a network in the form of an Attributed Relational Graph (ARG). Paths from a node to any other node in the network indicate...... the relationships between individuals and organisations. The system also provides assistance to law enforcement agencies, indicating when the capture of a specific terrorist will more likely destabilise the terrorist network. In this paper, we discuss the important application area related to subgroups...

  4. Pathophysiology and immunological profile of myasthenia gravis and its subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romi, Fredrik; Hong, Yu; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2017-08-03

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune antibody-mediated disease characterized by muscle weakness and fatigability. It is believed that the initial steps triggering humoral immunity in MG take place inside thymic tissue and thymoma. The immune response against one or several epitopes expressed on thymic tissue cells spills over to neuromuscular junction components sharing the same epitope causing humoral autoimmunity and antibody production. The main cause of MG is acetylcholine receptor antibodies. However, many other neuromuscular junction membrane protein targets, intracellular and extracellular proteins are suggested to participate in MG pathophysiology. MG should be divided into subgroups based on clinical presentation and immunology. This includes onset age, clinical characteristics, thymic pathology and antibody profile. The immunological profile of these subgroups is determined by the antibodies present. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Equivariant Equipartitions: Ham Sandwich Theorems for Finite Subgroups of Spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Equivariant "Ham Sandwich" Theorems are obtained for the finite subgroups of the unit spheres S^{d-1}, d=1,2,4. Given any F-valued mass distributions on F^n and any non-zero finite subgroup G of the unit sphere S^{d-1} in F= R, C, or H, it is shown that there exists a collection of fundamental G-regions partitioning F^n which "G-Equipartition" each of the n measures, as realized by the simultaneous vanishing of the "G-averages" of the regions' measures. Equipartition results for real measures follow, among them that any n signed mass distributions on R^{(p-1)n} can be equipartitioned by a single regular p-fan for any prime number p.

  6. Multiple invasions of Gypsy and Micropia retroelements in genus Zaprionus and melanogaster subgroup of the genus Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carareto Claudia MA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Zaprionus genus shares evolutionary features with the melanogaster subgroup, such as space and time of origin. Although little information about the transposable element content in the Zaprionus genus had been accumulated, some of their elements appear to be more closely related with those of the melanogaster subgroup, indicating that these two groups of species were involved in horizontal transfer events during their evolution. Among these elements, the Gypsy and the Micropia retroelements were chosen for screening in seven species of the two Zaprionus subgenera, Anaprionus and Zaprionus. Results Screening allowed the identification of diverse Gypsy and Micropia retroelements only in species of the Zaprionus subgenus, showing that they are transcriptionally active in the sampled species. The sequences of each retroelement were closely related to those of the melanogaster species subgroup, and the most parsimonious hypothesis would be that 15 horizontal transfer events shaped their evolution. The Gypsy retroelement of the melanogaster subgroup probably invaded the Zaprionus genomes about 11 MYA. In contrast, the Micropia retroelement may have been introduced into the Zaprionus subgenus and the melanogaster subgroup from an unknown donor more recently (~3 MYA. Conclusion Gypsy and Micropia of Zaprionus and melanogaster species share similar evolutionary patterns. The sharing of evolutionary, ecological and ethological features probably allowed these species to pass through a permissive period of transposable element invasion, explaining the proposed waves of horizontal transfers.

  7. Notes on Discrete Subgroups of Möbius Transformations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hua Wang; Yueping Jiang; Wensheng Cao

    2013-05-01

    Jørgensen’s inequality gives a necessary condition for a nonelementary two generator subgroup of $SL(2,\\mathbb{C})$ to be discrete. By embedding $SL(2,\\mathbb{C})$ into $Û(1,1;\\mathbb{H})$, we obtain a new type of Jørgensen’s inequality, which is in terms of the coefficients of involved isometries. We provide an example to show that this result gives an improvement over the classical Jørgensen’s inequality.

  8. Molecular Subgroup of Primary Prostate Cancer Presenting with Metastatic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven M; Knight, Laura A; McCavigan, Andrena M; Logan, Gemma E; Berge, Viktor; Sherif, Amir; Pandha, Hardev; Warren, Anne Y; Davidson, Catherine; Uprichard, Adam; Blayney, Jaine K; Price, Bethanie; Jellema, Gera L; Steele, Christopher J; Svindland, Aud; McDade, Simon S; Eden, Christopher G; Foster, Chris; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E; Mason, Malcolm D; Kay, Elaine W; Waugh, David J; Harkin, D Paul; Watson, R William; Clarke, Noel W; Kennedy, Richard D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 4-25% of patients with early prostate cancer develop disease recurrence following radical prostatectomy. To identify a molecular subgroup of prostate cancers with metastatic potential at presentation resulting in a high risk of recurrence following radical prostatectomy. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was performed using gene expression data from 70 primary resections, 31 metastatic lymph nodes, and 25 normal prostate samples. Independent assay validation was performed using 322 radical prostatectomy samples from four sites with a mean follow-up of 50.3 months. Molecular subgroups were identified using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. A partial least squares approach was used to generate a gene expression assay. Relationships with outcome (time to biochemical and metastatic recurrence) were analysed using multivariable Cox regression and log-rank analysis. A molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancer with biology similar to metastatic disease was identified. A 70-transcript signature (metastatic assay) was developed and independently validated in the radical prostatectomy samples. Metastatic assay positive patients had increased risk of biochemical recurrence (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 1.62 [1.13-2.33]; p=0.0092) and metastatic recurrence (multivariable HR=3.20 [1.76-5.80]; p=0.0001). A combined model with Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment post surgical (CAPRA-S) identified patients at an increased risk of biochemical and metastatic recurrence superior to either model alone (HR=2.67 [1.90-3.75]; p<0.0001 and HR=7.53 [4.13-13.73]; p<0.0001, respectively). The retrospective nature of the study is acknowledged as a potential limitation. The metastatic assay may identify a molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancers with metastatic potential. The metastatic assay may improve the ability to detect patients at risk of metastatic recurrence following radical prostatectomy. The impact of adjuvant therapies should be assessed in

  9. Neurocognitive performance as an endophenotype for mood disorder subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikangas, Alison K; Cui, Lihong; Calkins, Monica E; Moore, Tyler M; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Merikangas, Kathleen R

    2017-06-01

    There is growing evidence that neurocognitive function may be an endophenotype for mood disorders. The goal of this study is to examine the specificity and familiality of neurocognitive functioning across the full range of mood disorder subgroups, including Bipolar I (BP-I), Bipolar II (BP-II), Major Depressive Disorders (MDD), and controls in a community-based family study. A total of 310 participants from 137 families with mood spectrum disorders (n=151) and controls (n=159) completed the University of Pennsylvania's Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB) that assessed the accuracy and speed of task performance across five domains. Mixed effects regression models tested association and familiality. Compared to those without mood disorders, participants with BP-I had increased accuracy in complex cognition, while participants with MDD were more accurate in emotion recognition. There was also a significant familial association for accuracy of complex cognition. Mood disorder subgroups did not differ in performance speed in any of the domains. The small number of BP-I cases, and family size limited the statistical power of these analyses, and the cross-sectional assessment of neurocognitive function precluded our ability to determine whether performance precedes or post dates onset of disorder. This is one of the few community-based family studies of potential neurocognitive endophenotypes that includes the full range of mood disorder subgroups. There were few differences in neurocognitive function except enhanced accuracy in specific domains among those with BP-I and MDD. The differential findings across specific mood disorder subgroups substantiate their heterogeneity in other biologic and endophenotypic domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The peculiar Horizontal Branch of NGC 2808

    CERN Document Server

    Dalessandro, E; Ferraro, F R; Cassisi, S; Lanzoni, B; Rood, R T; Pecci, F Fusi; Sabbi, E

    2010-01-01

    We present an accurate analysis of the peculiar Horizontal Branch (HB) of the massive Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808, based on high-resolution far-UV and optical images of the central region of the cluster obtained with HST. We confirm the multimodal distribution of stars along the HB: 4 sub-populations separated by gaps are distinguishable. The detailed comparison with suitable theoretical models showed that (i) it is not possible to reproduce the luminosity of the entire HB with a single helium abundance, while an appropriate modeling is possible for three HB groups by assuming different helium abundances in the range 0.24 < Y < 0.4 that are consistent with the multiple populations observed in the Main Sequence; (ii) canonical HB models are not able to properly match the observational properties of the stars populating the hottest end of the observed HB distribution, the so called "blue-hook region". These objects are probably "hot-flashers" , stars that peel off the red giant branch before reachi...

  11. Pathophysiological Abnormalities in Functional Dyspepsia Subgroups According to the Rome III Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheel, H; Carbone, F; Valvekens, L; Simren, M; Tornblom, H; Vanuytsel, T; Van Oudenhove, L; Tack, J

    2017-01-01

    The Rome III criteria proposed to subdivide functional dyspepsia (FD) into a postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) group, characterized by the presence of postprandial fullness and/or early satiety, and an epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) group, characterized by the presence of epigastric pain and/or epigastric burning. It has been suggested that different pathophysiological mechanisms underlie the symptom presentations in these subgroups that might determine treatment choices. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of gastric sensorimotor dysfunction in the PDS, EPS, and overlap groups and to evaluate potential differential associations with dyspeptic symptom scores. Consecutive FD patients fulfilling Rome III criteria were recruited and they scored frequency of dyspeptic symptoms (postprandial fullness, early satiety, nausea, bloating, epigastric pain, and epigastric burning) over the past 3 months (0-5; 1=once a month or less, 2=two or three times a month, 3=once a week, 4=several times a week, 5=every day). The cumulative symptom score was calculated by adding up the score of these dyspeptic symptoms. Based on these symptom scores, the patients were subdivided into subgroups according to the Rome III consensus: (i) PDS, characterized by postprandial fullness and/or early satiety at least several times a week, (ii) EPS, characterized by epigastric pain and/or epigastric burning at least once a week, and (iii) overlap, fulfilling the criteria for both PDS and EPS. Gastric sensitivity and gastric accommodation were measured using barostat testing, and solid gastric emptying was determined using the [(14)C]octanoate breath test. A total of 560 FD patients (165 men, age 41.8±0.7 years) were classified into PDS (n=131), EPS (n=50), and overlap (n=379) groups. The prevalence of gastric hypersensitivity, impaired gastric accommodation, and delayed gastric emptying were 37%, 37%, and 23%, respectively, without any differential distribution in Rome III

  12. Gene expression analyses of the spatio-temporal relationships of human medulloblastoma subgroups during early human neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia M Hooper

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common form of malignant paediatric brain tumour and is the leading cause of childhood cancer related mortality. The four molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma that have been identified - WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4 - have molecular and topographical characteristics suggestive of different cells of origin. Definitive identification of the cell(s of origin of the medulloblastoma subgroups, particularly the poorer prognosis Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma, is critical to understand the pathogenesis of the disease, and ultimately for the development of more effective treatment options. To address this issue, the gene expression profiles of normal human neural tissues and cell types representing a broad neuro-developmental continuum, were compared to those of two independent cohorts of primary human medulloblastoma specimens. Clustering, co-expression network, and gene expression analyses revealed that WNT and SHH medulloblastoma may be derived from distinct neural stem cell populations during early embryonic development, while the transcriptional profiles of Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma resemble cerebellar granule neuron precursors at weeks 10-15 and 20-30 of embryogenesis, respectively. Our data indicate that Group 3 medulloblastoma may arise through abnormal neuronal differentiation, whereas deregulation of synaptic pruning-associated apoptosis may be driving Group 4 tumorigenesis. Overall, these data provide significant new insight into the spatio-temporal relationships and molecular pathogenesis of the human medulloblastoma subgroups, and provide an important framework for the development of more refined model systems, and ultimately improved therapeutic strategies.

  13. Highly Branched Polyethylenes as Lubricant Viscosity and Friction Modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Qu, Jun; Bays, John T.; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-10-08

    A series of highly branched polyethylenes (BPE) were prepared and used in a Group I base oil as potential viscosity and friction modifiers. The lubricating performance of these BPEs supports the expected dual functionality. Changes in polarity, topology, and molecular weight of the BPEs showed significant effects on the lubricants’ performance, which provide scientific insights for polymer design in future lubricant development.

  14. Lipase-mediated resolution of branched chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinsman, N.W.J.T.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Padt, A. van der; Boom, R.M.; Riet, K. van 't; Groot, A.E. de

    2002-01-01

    Branched chain fatty acids (BCFAs) are fatty acids substituted with alkyl groups. Many of them are chiral and therefore occur in two enantiomeric forms. This review describes their occurrence in Nature, their biosynthesis, their properties as flavours, and their enzymatic kinetic resolution. Many li

  15. Lipase-mediated resolution of branched chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinsman, N.W.J.T.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Padt, A. van der; Boom, R.M.; Riet, K. van 't; Groot, A.E. de

    2002-01-01

    Branched chain fatty acids (BCFAs) are fatty acids substituted with alkyl groups. Many of them are chiral and therefore occur in two enantiomeric forms. This review describes their occurrence in Nature, their biosynthesis, their properties as flavours, and their enzymatic kinetic resolution. Many li

  16. A New Convergent Approach to Unsymmetrically Branched Polyether Dendrimers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiaoping; WANG Feng; WANG Xiaolong; ZHOU Zhaoli

    2001-01-01

    @@ Dendrimers are perfect monodisperse macromolecules with a regular and highly branched three-dimensional architecture. The combination of discrete numbers of functionality in one molecular and high densities of active groups, typical for dendritic molecules, has attracted a lot of attention in the fields of medicinal chenistry (e.g. in drug delivery system), host-guest chemistry and catalysis chemistry[1].

  17. S-duality, triangle groups and modular anomalies in N=2 SQCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ashok, S K; Lerda, A; Raman, M

    2016-01-01

    We study N = 2 superconformal theories with gauge group SU(N) and 2N fundamental flavours in a locus of the Coulomb branch with a Z_N symmetry. In this special vacuum, we calculate the prepotential, the dual periods and the period matrix using equivariant localization. In the conformal limit, we find that the period matrix is completely specified by [N/2] effective couplings. On each of these, we show that the S-duality group acts as a generalized triangle group and that its hauptmodul can be used to write a non-perturbatively exact relation between each effective coupling and the bare one. For N = 2, 3, 4 and 6, the generalized triangle group is an arithmetic Hecke group which contains a subgroup that is also a congruence subgroup of the modular group PSL(2,Z). For these cases, we introduce mass deformations that respect the symmetries of the special vacuum and show that the constraints arising from S-duality make it possible to resum the instanton contributions to the period matrix in terms of meromorphic m...

  18. When Do the Fibonacci Invertible Classes Modulo M Form a Subgroup?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    When do the Fibonacci invertible classes modulo M form a subgroup? Florian Lucaa, Pantelimon Stănicăb, Aynur Yalçinerc aInstituto de Matemáticas...aynuryalciner@gmail.com Abstract In this paper, we look at the invertible classes modulo M representable as Fibonacci numbers and we ask when these classes, say...FM , form a multi- plicative group. We show that if M itself is a Fibonacci number, then M ≤ 8; if M is a Lucas number, then M ≤ 7. We also show that

  19. Subgroup Analysis of Trials Is Rarely Easy (SATIRE: a study protocol for a systematic review to characterize the analysis, reporting, and claim of subgroup effects in randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaga German

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subgroup analyses in randomized trials examine whether effects of interventions differ between subgroups of study populations according to characteristics of patients or interventions. However, findings from subgroup analyses may be misleading, potentially resulting in suboptimal clinical and health decision making. Few studies have investigated the reporting and conduct of subgroup analyses and a number of important questions remain unanswered. The objectives of this study are: 1 to describe the reporting of subgroup analyses and claims of subgroup effects in randomized controlled trials, 2 to assess study characteristics associated with reporting of subgroup analyses and with claims of subgroup effects, and 3 to examine the analysis, and interpretation of subgroup effects for each study's primary outcome. Methods We will conduct a systematic review of 464 randomized controlled human trials published in 2007 in the 118 Core Clinical Journals defined by the National Library of Medicine. We will randomly select journal articles, stratified in a 1:1 ratio by higher impact versus lower impact journals. According to 2007 ISI total citations, we consider the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, and BMJ as higher impact journals. Teams of two reviewers will independently screen full texts of reports for eligibility, and abstract data, using standardized, pilot-tested extraction forms. We will conduct univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses to examine the association of pre-specified study characteristics with reporting of subgroup analyses and with claims of subgroup effects for the primary and any other outcomes. Discussion A clear understanding of subgroup analyses, as currently conducted and reported in published randomized controlled trials, will reveal both strengths and weaknesses of this practice. Our findings will contribute to a set of recommendations to optimize

  20. Unquenched flavor on the Higgs branch

    CERN Document Server

    Faedo, Anton F; Pantelidou, Christiana; Tarrio, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We construct the gravity duals of the Higgs branches of three-dimensional (four-dimensional) super Yang-Mills theories coupled to $N_\\textrm{f}$ quark flavors. The effect of the quarks on the color degrees of freedom is included, and corresponds on the gravity side to the backreaction of $N_\\textrm{f}$ flavor D6-branes (D7-branes) on the background of $N_\\textrm{c}$ color D2-branes (D3-branes). The Higgsing of the gauge group arises from the dissolution of some color branes inside the flavor branes. The dissolved color branes are represented by non-Abelian instantons whose backreaction is also included. The result is a cascading-like solution in which the effective number of color branes varies along the holographic direction. In the three-dimensional case the solution may include an arbitrary number of quasi-conformal (walking) regions.

  1. Multimodal Distributions along the Horizontal Branch

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Pecci, F F; Dorman, B; Rood, R T; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Paltrinieri, Barbara; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Dorman, Ben; Rood, Robert T.

    1997-01-01

    We report on HST/WFPC2 U,V and far-ultraviolet observations of two Galactic Globular Clusters (GGCs), NGC 6205 = M13 and NGC 6093 = M80. Both of these clusters have horizontal-branch (HB) tails that extend to the helium-burning main sequence, with the hottest stars reaching theoretical effective temperatures above 35,000 K. In both clusters, groups of stars are found to be separated by narrow gaps along the blue HB sequence. These gaps appear at similar locations in the color-magnitude diagrams of the two clusters. While stochastic effects may give rise to variations in the color distribution along the HB, the coincidence of gaps in different clusters effectively rules this out as the primary cause. The comparison among the clusters strongly suggests that there are separate physical processes operating during the earlier red-giant phase of evolution to produce mass loss.

  2. Unquenched flavor on the Higgs branch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faedo, Antón F. [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica & Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC),Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Mateos, David [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica & Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC),Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA),Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Pantelidou, Christiana [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica & Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC),Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Tarrío, Javier [Physique Théorique et Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles andInternational Solvay Institutes,ULB-Campus Plaine CP231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-11-04

    We construct the gravity duals of the Higgs branches of three-dimensional (four-dimensional) super Yang-Mills theories coupled to N{sub f} quark flavors. The effect of the quarks on the color degrees of freedom is included, and corresponds on the gravity side to the backreaction of N{sub f} flavor D6-branes (D7-branes) on the background of N{sub c} color D2-branes (D3-branes). The Higgsing of the gauge group arises from the dissolution of some color branes inside the flavor branes. The dissolved color branes are represented by non-Abelian instantons whose backreaction is also included. The result is a cascading-like solution in which the effective number of color branes varies along the holographic direction. In the three-dimensional case the solution may include an arbitrary number of quasi-conformal (walking) regions.

  3. Basic Sciences Branch annual report, FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Solid-State Spectroscopy. Each section of the report was written by the group leader principally in charge of the work. The task in each case was to explain the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  4. Basic Sciences Branch annual report, FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Solid-State Spectroscopy. Each section of the report was written by the group leader principally in charge of the work. The task in each case was to explain the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  5. “Real-life” inhaled corticosteroid withdrawal in COPD: a subgroup analysis of DACCORD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmeier, Claus; Worth, Heinrich; Buhl, Roland; Criée, Carl-Peter; Lossi, Nadine S; Mailänder, Claudia; Kardos, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) receive inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) without a clear indication, and thus, the impact of ICS withdrawal on disease control is of great interest. DACCORD is a prospective, noninterventional 2-year study in the primary and secondary care throughout Germany. A subgroup of patients were taking ICS prior to entry – 1,022 patients continued to receive ICS for 2 years; physicians withdrew ICS on entry in 236 patients. Data from these two subgroups were analyzed to evaluate the impact of ICS withdrawal. Patients aged ≥40 years with COPD, initiating or changing COPD maintenance medication were recruited, excluding patients with asthma. Demographic and disease characteristics, prescribed COPD medication, COPD Assessment Test, exacerbations, and lung function were recorded. There were few differences in baseline characteristics; ICS withdrawn patients had shorter disease duration and better lung function, with 74.2% of ICS withdrawn patients not exacerbating, compared with 70.7% ICS-continued patients. During Year 1, exacerbation rates were 0.414 in the withdrawn group and 0.433 in the continued group. COPD Assessment Test total score improved from baseline in both groups. These data suggest that ICS withdrawal is possible with no increased risk of exacerbations in patients with COPD managed in the primary and secondary care. PMID:28203072

  6. Isotropy in group cohomology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben David, Nir; Ginosar, Yuval; Meir, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    The analog of Lagrangians for symplectic forms over finite groups is studied, motivated by the fact that symplectic G  -forms with a normal Lagrangian N◃G  are in one-to-one correspondence, up to inflation, with bijective 1-cocycle data on the quotients G/N  . This yields a method to construct...... groups of central type from such quotients, known as Involutive Yang–Baxter groups. Another motivation for the search of normal Lagrangians comes from a non-commutative generalization of Heisenberg liftings that require normality. Although it is true that symplectic forms over finite nilpotent groups...... always admit Lagrangians, we exhibit an example where none of these subgroups is normal. However, we prove that symplectic forms over nilpotent groups always admit normal Lagrangians if all their p  -Sylow subgroups are of order less than p 8   ....

  7. Accounting for subgroup structure in line-transect abundance estimates of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens in Hawaiian waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Bradford

    Full Text Available For biological populations that form aggregations (or clusters of individuals, cluster size is an important parameter in line-transect abundance estimation and should be accurately measured. Cluster size in cetaceans has traditionally been represented as the total number of individuals in a group, but group size may be underestimated if group members are spatially diffuse. Groups of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens can comprise numerous subgroups that are dispersed over tens of kilometers, leading to a spatial mismatch between a detected group and the theoretical framework of line-transect analysis. Three stocks of false killer whales are found within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone of the Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiian EEZ: an insular main Hawaiian Islands stock, a pelagic stock, and a Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI stock. A ship-based line-transect survey of the Hawaiian EEZ was conducted in the summer and fall of 2010, resulting in six systematic-effort visual sightings of pelagic (n = 5 and NWHI (n = 1 false killer whale groups. The maximum number and spatial extent of subgroups per sighting was 18 subgroups and 35 km, respectively. These sightings were combined with data from similar previous surveys and analyzed within the conventional line-transect estimation framework. The detection function, mean cluster size, and encounter rate were estimated separately to appropriately incorporate data collected using different methods. Unlike previous line-transect analyses of cetaceans, subgroups were treated as the analytical cluster instead of groups because subgroups better conform to the specifications of line-transect theory. Bootstrap values (n = 5,000 of the line-transect parameters were randomly combined to estimate the variance of stock-specific abundance estimates. Hawai'i pelagic and NWHI false killer whales were estimated to number 1,552 (CV = 0.66; 95% CI = 479-5,030 and 552 (CV = 1.09; 95% CI = 97

  8. Fragrance Release from the Surface of Branched Poly (Amide S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Youngs

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes are powerful tools in organic synthesis that are able to catalyse a wide variety of selective chemical transformations under mild and environmentally friendly conditions. Enzymes such as the lipases have also found applications in the synthesis and degradation of polymeric materials. However, the use of these natural catalysts in the synthesis and the post-synthetic modification of dendrimers and hyperbranched molecules is an application of chemistry yet to be explored extensively. In this study the use of two hydrolytic enzymes, a lipase from Candida cylindracea and a cutinase from Fusarium solani pisii, were investigated in the selective cleavage of ester groups situated on the peripheral layer of two families of branched polyamides. These branched polyamides were conjugated to simple fragrances citronellol and L-menthol via ester linkages. Hydrolysis of the ester linkage between the fragrances and the branched polyamide support was carried out in aqueous buffered systems at slightly basic pH values under the optimum operative conditions for the enzymes used. These preliminary qualitative investigations revealed that partial cleavage of the ester functionalities from the branched polyamide support had occurred. However, the ability of the enzymes to interact with the substrates decreased considerably as the branching density, the rigidity of the structure and the bulkiness of the polyamide-fragrance conjugates increased.

  9. Distinct aetiopathogenesis in subgroups of functional dyspepsia according to the Rome III criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu-Jen; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Chen, Chieh-Chang; Lee, Ji-Yuh; Hsu, Yao-Chun; Chen, Mei-Jyh; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Chi-Yang; Yang, Tsung-Hua; Chang, Wen-Hsiung; Wu, Jeng-Yi; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Lin, Jaw-Town; Shun, Chia-Tung; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2015-10-01

    Whether there is distinct pathogenesis in subgroups of functional dyspepsia (FD), the postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) remains controversial. We aimed to identify the risk factors of FD and its subgroups in the Chinese population. Patients with dyspepsia and healthy subjects who underwent gastric cancer screening were enrolled in this multicentre study from 2010 to 2012. All patients were evaluated by questionnaire, oesophagoduodenoscopy, histological examination and Helicobacter pylori tests. Subgroups of FD were classified according to the Rome III criteria. Psychiatric stress was assessed by the short form Brief Symptom Rating Scale. CagA and VacA genotypes were determined by PCR. Of 2378 patients screened for eligibility, 771 and 491 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of uninvestigated dyspepsia and FD, respectively. 298 (60.7%) and 353 (71.9%) individuals were diagnosed with EPS and PDS, respectively, whereas 169 (34.4%) had the overlap syndrome. As compared with 1031 healthy controls, PDS and EPS shared some common risk factors, including younger age (OR 0.95; 99.5% CI 0.93 to 0.98), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (OR 6.60; 99.5% CI 3.13 to 13.90), anxiety (OR 3.41; 99.5% CI 2.01 to 5.77) and concomitant IBS (OR 6.89; 99.5% CI 3.41 to 13.94). By contrast, H. pylori (OR 1.86; 99.5% CI 1.01 to 3.45), unmarried status (OR 4.22; 99.5% CI 2.02 to 8.81), sleep disturbance (OR 2.56; 99.5% CI 1.29 to 5.07) and depression (OR 2.34; 99.5% CI 1.04 to 5.36) were associated with PDS. Moderate to severe antral atrophy and CagA positive strains were also more prevalent in PDS. Different risk factors exist among FD subgroups based on the Rome III criteria, indicating distinct aetiopathogenesis of the subdivisions that may necessitate different therapeutic strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Subgrouping of risky behaviors among Iranian college students: a latent class analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiri, Saeid; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Yunesian, Masud; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Shamsipour, Mansour; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background Risky behaviors may interrupt development or cause considerable morbidity or mortality. This study’s purpose was to determine subgroups of students based on risky behaviors and assess the prevalence of risky behaviors in each of the subgroups. Participants and methods This anonymous cross-sectional study was carried out in October 2015 and November 2015, with 1,777 students from Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, through multistage random sampling method. The data were analyzed by latent class analysis. Results The prevalence rates of cigarette smoking (more than or equal to ten cigarettes), hookah use (≥1 time/month), and alcohol consumption (≥1 time/month) during the last year were 12.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.9–14.0), 11.6% (95% CI: 10.0–13.1), and 4.9% (95% CI: 3.8–5.9), respectively. The prevalence rates of illicit opioids (1.8%, 95% CI: 1.2–2.5), cannabis (1.2%, 95% CI: 0.7–1.7), methamphetamine (1.1%, 95% CI: 0.6–1.6), methylphenidate (2.5%, 95% CI: 1.7–3.2), and extramarital sex (5.5%, 95% CI: 4.5–6.6) over the last year were also estimated. Three latent classes were determined: 1) low risk; 2) cigarette and hookah smoker; and 3) high risk. It is worth mentioning that 3.7% of males and 0.4% of females were in the high risk group. Conclusion Subgrouping of college students showed that a considerable percentage of them, especially males, were classified into the high risk and cigarette and hookah smoker groups. Appropriate preventive measures that consider multiple different risky behaviors simultaneously are needed for this part of the population. PMID:27524898

  11. Managing Time: A Study among Arab Open University Tutors in Kuwait Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Abdin M.; Ismail, Omer H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate how tutors at the Arab Open University (AOU) in Kuwait Branch manage their time given workloads they are assigned. Group interviews were conducted with a sample that was selected from AOU tutors in Kuwait branch. The findings showed that tutors do not ask for more time or cut down workloads; instead,…

  12. Identifying Subgroups of Adult Superutilizers in an Urban Safety-Net System Using Latent Class Analysis: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Deborah J; Oronce, Carlos; Durfee, Michael J; Ranby, Krista W; Batal, Holly A; Hanratty, Rebecca; Vogel, Jody; Johnson, Tracy L

    2016-09-14

    Patients with repeated hospitalizations represent a group with potentially avoidable utilization. Recent publications have begun to highlight the heterogeneity of this group. Latent class analysis provides a novel methodological approach to utilizing administrative data to identify clinically meaningful subgroups of patients to inform tailored intervention efforts. The objective of the study was to identify clinically distinct subgroups of adult superutilizers. Retrospective cohort analysis. Adult patients who had an admission at an urban safety-net hospital in 2014 and 2 or more admissions within the preceding 12 months. Patient-level medical, mental health (MH) and substance use diagnoses, social characteristics, demographics, utilization and charges were obtained from administrative data. Latent class analyses were used to determine the number and characteristics of latent subgroups that best represented these data. In this cohort (N=1515), a 5-class model was preferred based on model fit indices, clinical interpretability and class size: class 1 (16%) characterized by alcohol use disorder and homelessness; class 2 (14%) characterized by medical conditions, MH/substance use disorders and homelessness; class 3 (25%) characterized primarily by medical conditions; class 4 (13%) characterized by more serious MH disorders, drug use disorder and homelessness; and class 5 (32%) characterized by medical conditions with some MH and substance use. Patient demographics, utilization, charges and mortality also varied by class. The overall cohort had high rates of multiple chronic medical conditions, MH, substance use disorders, and homelessness. However, the patterns of these conditions were different between subgroups, providing important information for tailoring interventions.

  13. Identification of five chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subgroups with different prognoses in the ECLIPSE cohort using cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Locantore, Nicholas; Delafont, Bruno; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Silverman, Edwin K; Vestbo, Jørgen; Miller, Bruce E; Bakke, Per; Celli, Bartolomé; Calverley, Peter M A; Coxson, Harvey; Crim, Courtney; Edwards, Lisa D; Lomas, David A; MacNee, William; Wouters, Emiel F M; Yates, Julie C; Coca, Ignacio; Agustí, Alvar

    2015-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease that likely includes clinically relevant subgroups. To identify subgroups of COPD in ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints) subjects using cluster analysis and to assess clinically meaningful outcomes of the clusters during 3 years of longitudinal follow-up. Factor analysis was used to reduce 41 variables determined at recruitment in 2,164 patients with COPD to 13 main factors, and the variables with the highest loading were used for cluster analysis. Clusters were evaluated for their relationship with clinically meaningful outcomes during 3 years of follow-up. The relationships among clinical parameters were evaluated within clusters. Five subgroups were distinguished using cross-sectional clinical features. These groups differed regarding outcomes. Cluster A included patients with milder disease and had fewer deaths and hospitalizations. Cluster B had less systemic inflammation at baseline but had notable changes in health status and emphysema extent. Cluster C had many comorbidities, evidence of systemic inflammation, and the highest mortality. Cluster D had low FEV1, severe emphysema, and the highest exacerbation and COPD hospitalization rate. Cluster E was intermediate for most variables and may represent a mixed group that includes further clusters. The relationships among clinical variables within clusters differed from that in the entire COPD population. Cluster analysis using baseline data in ECLIPSE identified five COPD subgroups that differ in outcomes and inflammatory biomarkers and show different relationships between clinical parameters, suggesting the clusters represent clinically and biologically different subtypes of COPD.

  14. Analysis of HCV genotypes from blood donors shows three new HCV type 6 subgroups exist in Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV genotypes in Myanmar in comparison with the rest of Southeast Asia is not well known. Serum samples were obtained from 201 HCV antibody-positive volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Of these, the antibody titers of 101 samples were checked by serial dilution using HCV antibody PA test II and Terasaki microplate as a low-cost method. To compare antibody titers by this method and RNA identification, we also checked HCV-RNA using the Amplicor 2.0 test. Most high-titer groups were positive for HCV-RNA. Of the 201 samples, 110 were successfully polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplified. Among them, 35 (31.8% were of genotype 1, 52 (47.3% were of genotype 3, and 23 (20.9% were of type 6 variants, and phylogenetic analysis of these type 6 variants revealed that 3 new type 6 subgroups exist in Myanmar. We named the subgroups M6-1, M6-2, and M6-3. M6-1 and M6-2 were relatively close to types 8 and 9, respectively. M6-3, though only found in one sample, was a brand-new subgroup. These subtypes were not seen in Vietnam, where type 6 group variants are widely spread. These findings may be useful for analyzing how and when these subgroups were formed.

  15. Army Science Board Ad Hoc Sub-Group Report on Energy Needs of the Army,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    and solar. The goal for the year 2000 is to reduce the use of natural petroleum by 75 percent and to replace natural gas with synthetic gas ( syngas ...example, one * goal states that (by 2000) syngas will replace natural gas. The Army has therefore programed efforts to Implement syngas tech- nologies at...the reactor would run at full capacity to make up for shortages and to allow the Army to meet expanded needs. The AHSG notes that such systems resolve

  16. Association of intervention outcomes with practice capacity for change: Subgroup analysis from a group randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weyer Sharon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between health care practices' capacity for change and the results and sustainability of interventions to improve health care delivery is unclear. Methods In the setting of an intervention to increase preventive service delivery (PSD, we assessed practice capacity for change by rating motivation to change and instrumental ability to change on a one to four scale. After combining these ratings into a single score, random effects models tested its association with change in PSD rates from baseline to immediately after intervention completion and 12 months later. Results Our measure of practices' capacity for change varied widely at baseline (range 2–8; mean 4.8 ± 1.6. Practices with greater capacity for change delivered preventive services to eligible patients at higher rates after completion of the intervention (2.7% per unit increase in the combined effort score, p Conclusion Greater capacity for change is associated with a higher probability that a practice will attain and sustain desired outcomes. Future work to refine measures of this practice characteristic may be useful in planning and implementing interventions that result in sustained, evidence-based improvements in health care delivery.

  17. The Leading Role and the Exemplary Role of Communist Party Branch for Students in Universities in the Class Group Construction and the Construction of Academic Atmosphere%学生党支部在班团建设和校风学风建设中的引领作用和示范作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春英

    2016-01-01

    Construction of Communist Party for students in universities is an important part of college communist party construc-tion.The communist party branch for students in universities should be based on the students group and focus on class construc-tion and the training of active applicants for Communist Party of China membership,giving full play a leading role in the con-struction of academic atmosphere.We plan to carry on the work from the following aspects:conducting collectivism education, unifying thought and understanding,establishing harmonious interpersonal relationship building scientific management system, training student cadres.%高校学生党建工作是高校党建工作的重要组成部分,高校学生党支部应该立足于学生群体,以班集体建设和入党积极分子培养为支部工作的两个抓手,充分发挥学生党支部在班团建设和校风学风建设中的引领作用和示范作用。具体在集体主义教育、统一思想认识、和谐人际关系、科学管理制度、培养学生干部等几个方面开展工作。

  18. Cost differentials of dental outpatient care across clinical dentistry branches

    OpenAIRE

    Jovana Rančić; Nemanja Rančić; Nemanja Majstorović; Vladimir Biočanin; Marko Milosavljević; Mihajlo Jakovljević

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental care presents affordability issues in Central & Eastern European transitional economies due to lack of insurance coverage in most countries of the region and almost complete out-of-pocket payments by citizens.Objective: Real world estimates on cost differentials across clinical dentistry branches, ICD-10 diagnostic groups and groups of dental services.Methods: Prospective case-series cost analysis was conducted from the patient perspective. A six months time horizon was...

  19. Comparison of risk of malignancy in a subgroup with atypia of undetermined significance/follicular lesion of undetermined significance: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Kim, Seong Dong; Jeong, Woo-Jin

    2017-08-01

    As heterogeneous findings are included in the atypia of undetermined significance (AUS)/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (FLUS) category, differing risks of malignancy in subgroups have been reported in several articles. We performed a meta-analysis of full-text publications written in English found in the Embase and PubMed databases. The 4-tiered subgroup proportion meta-analysis showed that the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of the risk of malignancy in the cellular atypia group did not overlap with the other 3 subgroups and demonstrated a significant difference. Two-tiered analysis using the cytologic and architectural atypia groups showed that cytologic atypia group had a 2.64-fold increase in the risk of malignancy compared with the architectural atypia group. The cytologic atypia had a significantly higher risk of malignancy than the architectural atypia group, and it should be considered as a separate category. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Upper bounds for reversible circuits based on Young subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdessaied, Nabila; Soeken, Mathias; Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal;

    2014-01-01

    We present tighter upper bounds on the number of Toffoli gates needed in reversible circuits. Both multiple controlled Toffoli gates and mixed polarity Toffoli gates have been considered for this purpose. The calculation of the bounds is based on a synthesis approach based on Young subgroups that...... that results in circuits using a more generalized gate library. Starting from an upper bound for this library we derive new bounds which improve the existing bound by around 77%. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. Number of patients needed to discriminate between subgroups in patient reported outcome measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Aksel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patient reported outcome-measures (PROs) are increasingly used in orthopedics. Information on number of patients needed in different settings is warranted. Aim: To assess the number of patients needed for different PROs to discriminate between subgroups of age, gender, and diagnosis...... with sample size calculations or by power calculations and simulated ANOVA F tests, depending on the number of groups. Results: To discriminate between gender, the least number needed to find a statistically significant difference in mean sum score in each group was 298 (OHS) while HOOS QoL required the most....... Methods: 5777 primary THA patients, operated 1‐2, 5‐6, and 10‐11 years ago. SF‐12 Health Survey (SF-12), EQ-5D, Oxford 12‐item Hip Score (OHS), and Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) were included. The different PRO subscales abilities to discriminate between groups were studied using...

  2. Some Intersections and Identifications in Integral Group Rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Karan; Deepak Kumar

    2002-05-01

    Let be the integral group ring of a group and () its augmentation ideal. For a free group and a normal subgroup of , the intersection $I^{n+1}(F) \\cap I^n(R)$ is determined for all ≥ 1. The subgroups $F \\cap (1+ZFI(R)I(F)I(S))$ and $F \\cap (1+I(R)I^3(F))$ of are identified when and are arbitrary subgroups of .

  3. Branching diffusions in random environment

    CERN Document Server

    Böinghoff, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We consider the diffusion approximation of branching processes in random environment (BPREs). This diffusion approximation is similar to and mathematically more tractable than BPREs. We obtain the exact asymptotic behavior of the survival probability. As in the case of BPREs, there is a phase transition in the subcritical regime due to different survival opportunities. In addition, we characterize the process conditioned to never go extinct and establish a backbone construction. In the strongly subcritical regime, mean offspring numbers are increased but still subcritical in the process conditioned to never go extinct. Here survival is solely due to an immortal individual, whose offspring are the ancestors of additional families. In the weakly subcritical regime, the mean offspring number is supercritical in the process conditioned to never go extinct. Thus this process survives with positive probability even if there was no immortal individual.

  4. Branching process models of cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Durrett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This volume develops results on continuous time branching processes and applies them to study rate of tumor growth, extending classic work on the Luria-Delbruck distribution. As a consequence, the authors calculate the probability that mutations that confer resistance to treatment are present at detection and quantify the extent of tumor heterogeneity. As applications, the authors evaluate ovarian cancer screening strategies and give rigorous proofs for results of Heano and Michor concerning tumor metastasis. These notes should be accessible to students who are familiar with Poisson processes and continuous time. Richard Durrett is mathematics professor at Duke University, USA. He is the author of 8 books, over 200 journal articles, and has supervised more than 40 Ph.D. students. Most of his current research concerns the applications of probability to biology: ecology, genetics, and most recently cancer.

  5. Stabilization of Branching Queueing Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Brázdil, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Queueing networks are gaining attraction for the performance analysis of parallel computer systems. A Jackson network is a set of interconnected servers, where the completion of a job at server i may result in the creation of a new job for server j. We propose to extend Jackson networks by "branching" and by "control" features. Both extensions are new and substantially expand the modelling power of Jackson networks. On the other hand, the extensions raise computational questions, particularly concerning the stability of the networks, i.e, the ergodicity of the underlying Markov chain. We show for our extended model that it is decidable in polynomial time if there exists a controller that achieves stability. Moreover, if such a controller exists, one can efficiently compute a static randomized controller which stabilizes the network in a very strong sense; in particular, all moments of the queue sizes are finite.

  6. Identifying homogenous subgroups for individual patient meta-analysis based on Rough Set Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Herrera, Eleazar; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Kumar, Ambuj; Mhaskar, Rahul; Miladinovic, Branko; Yalcin, Ali; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Failure to detect and manage heterogeneity between clinical trials included in meta-analysis may lead to misinterpretation of summary effect estimates. This may ultimately compromise the validity of the results of the meta-analysis. Typically, when heterogeneity between trials is detected, researchers use sensitivity or subgroup analysis to manage it. However, both methods fail to explain why heterogeneity existed in the first place. Here we propose a novel methodology that relies on Rough Set Theory (RST) to detect, explain, and manage the sources of heterogeneity applicable to meta-analysis performed on individual patient data (IPD). The method exploits the RST relations of discernibility and indiscernibility to create homogeneous groups of patients. We applied our methodology on a dataset of 1,111 patients enrolled in 9 randomized controlled trials studying the effect of two transplantation procedures in the management of hematologic malignancies. Our method was able to create three subgroups of patients with remarkably low statistical heterogeneity values (16.8%, 0% and 0% respectively). The proposed methodology has the potential to automatize and standardize the process of detecting and managing heterogeneity in IPD meta-analysis. Future work involves investigating the applications of the proposed methodology in analyzing treatment effects in patients belonging to different risk groups, which will ultimately assist in personalized healthcare decision making.

  7. Transforming genes among three different oncogenic subgroups of human adenoviruses have similar replicative functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, J S; Chinnadurai, G

    1981-01-01

    We have examined the functional similarity of the transforming genes for replicative functions among three different subgroups of human adenoviruses (A, B, and C), using mutant complementation as an assay. A host range deletion mutant (dl201.2) of Ad2 (nononcogenic subgroup C) lacking about 5% of the viral DNA covering two early gene blocks (E1a and E1b) involved in cellular transformation was isolated and tested for its ability to replicate in nonpermissive KB cells in the presence of Ad7 (weakly oncogenic group B) or ad12 (highly oncogenic group A). The complementation of the mutant defect was demonstrated by cleaving the viral DNA extracted from mixed infected cells or the DNA extracted from purified virions from mixed infected cells with restriction endonuclease BamHI, which produces a different cleavage pattern with the DNA of each serotype. It was found that the defects in E1a plus E1b of dl201.2 could be complemented by Ad7 and Ad12, indicating that these genes in Ad2, Ad7, and Ad12 have similar functions during productive infection. Images PMID:7277578

  8. Elliptic curves and their torsion subgroups over number fields of type (2, 2,

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Suppose that E:y2=x(x+M)(x+N) is an elliptic curve, where Msubgroup E(K)tors of the K-rational points (Mordell group) of E is completely determined here. Explicitly given are the classification, criteria and parameterization, as well as the groups E(K)tors themselves. The order of E(K)tors is also proved to be a power of 2 for any n. Besides, for any elliptic curve E over any number field F, it is shown that E(L)tors=E(F)tors holds for almost all extensions L/F of degree p(a prime number). These results have remarkably developed the recent results by Kwon about torsion subgroups over quadratic fields.

  9. Prosodic problems in Swedish children with language impairment: towards a classification of subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, Christina; Nettelbladt, Ulrika

    2004-01-01

    Symptoms of prosodic problems have been found in Swedish children with language impairment at word and phrase level and possibly also at discourse level. The aim was twofold. First, to characterize a group of children with prosodic problems compared with children with normal language development. Second, to investigate the possibilities to classify subgroups of prosodic problems. A new Swedish assessment procedure for prosody that captures prosodic features at word, phrase and discourse level was used. Twenty-five children with prosodic problems and 25 children with typically developing language matched by age, gender and regional dialect participated in the study. Pretesting included tests of language comprehension, grammatical skills and oral motor skills. The difference between the experimental and control groups was highly significant in all parts of the procedure. The total score of the procedure significantly correlated with grammatical abilities measured in the pretesting procedure, but there was no correlation with the other linguistic abilities measured in the pretesting procedure. The results indicate a possible differentiation into two different subgroups, one with primarily phonetic and/or linguistic problems, the other with prosodic problems at discourse level possibly related to pragmatic problems.

  10. Commognitive analysis of undergraduate mathematics students' first encounter with the subgroup test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Marios

    2017-08-01

    This study analyses learning aspects of undergraduate mathematics students' first encounter with the subgroup test, using the commognitive theoretical framework. It focuses on students' difficulties as these are related to the object-level and metalevel mathematical learning in group theory, and, when possible, highlights any commognitive conflicts. In the data analysis, one can identify three types of difficulties, relevant to object-level learning: namely regarding the frequently observed confusion between groups and sets, the object-level rules of visual mediators, and the object-level rules of contextual notions, such as permutations, exponentials, sets and matrices. In addition, data analysis suggests two types of difficulties, relevant to metalevel learning. The first refers to the actual proof that the three conditions of subgroup test hold, and the second is related to syntactic inaccuracies, incomplete argumentation and problematic use of visual mediators. Finally, this study suggests that there are clear links between object-level and metalevel learning, mainly due to the fact that objectification of the various relevant mathematical notions influences the endorsement of the governing metarules.

  11. Energy additivity in branched and cyclic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, H.; Bader, R.F.W. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Cortes-Guzman, F. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, (Mexico). Dept. de Fisicoquimica

    2009-11-15

    This paper reported on a study of the energetic relationships between hydrocarbon molecules and the heats of formation. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) was used to investigate the degree to which branched hydrocarbons obey a group additivity scheme for energy and populations. The QTAIM defined the properties of the chemical groups. The experimental and theoretical transferability of the methyl and methylene groups of the linear hydrocarbons was also explored. The calculations were performed using a large basis set at the restricted Hartree-Fock and MP2(full) levels of theory. The study also investigated the deviations from additivity, noted for small ring hydrocarbons leading to the definition of strain energy. The QTAIM energies recovered the experimental values. The paper included details regarding the delocalization of the electron density over the surface of the cyclopropane ring, responsible for its homoaromatic properties. The calculations presented in this study satisfied the virial theorem for the atomic definition of energy. The paper discussed the problems associated with the use of the density functional theory (DFT) resulting from its failure to satisfy the virial theorem. 44 refs., 9 tabs., 2 figs.

  12. Comparative Genomics of the Listeria monocytogenes ST204 Subgroup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward M.; Allnutt, Theodore; Bradbury, Mark I.; Fanning, Séamus; Chandry, P. Scott

    2016-01-01

    The ST204 subgroup of Listeria monocytogenes is among the most frequently isolated in Australia from a range of environmental niches. In this study we provide a comparative genomics analysis of food and food environment isolates from geographically diverse sources. Analysis of the ST204 genomes showed a highly conserved core genome with the majority of variation seen in mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons and phage insertions. Most strains (13/15) harbored plasmids, which although varying in size contained highly conserved sequences. Interestingly 4 isolates contained a conserved plasmid of 91,396 bp. The strains examined were isolated over a period of 12 years and from different geographic locations suggesting plasmids are an important component of the genetic repertoire of this subgroup and may provide a range of stress tolerance mechanisms. In addition to this 4 phage insertion sites and 2 transposons were identified among isolates, including a novel transposon. These genetic elements were highly conserved across isolates that harbored them, and also contained a range of genetic markers linked to stress tolerance and virulence. The maintenance of conserved mobile genetic elements in the ST204 population suggests these elements may contribute to the diverse range of niches colonized by ST204 isolates. Environmental stress selection may contribute to maintaining these genetic features, which in turn may be co-selecting for virulence markers relevant to clinical infection with ST204 isolates. PMID:28066377

  13. Identifying and Assessing Interesting Subgroups in a Heterogeneous Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woojoo Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological heterogeneity is common in many diseases and it is often the reason for therapeutic failures. Thus, there is great interest in classifying a disease into subtypes that have clinical significance in terms of prognosis or therapy response. One of the most popular methods to uncover unrecognized subtypes is cluster analysis. However, classical clustering methods such as k-means clustering or hierarchical clustering are not guaranteed to produce clinically interesting subtypes. This could be because the main statistical variability—the basis of cluster generation—is dominated by genes not associated with the clinical phenotype of interest. Furthermore, a strong prognostic factor might be relevant for a certain subgroup but not for the whole population; thus an analysis of the whole sample may not reveal this prognostic factor. To address these problems we investigate methods to identify and assess clinically interesting subgroups in a heterogeneous population. The identification step uses a clustering algorithm and to assess significance we use a false discovery rate- (FDR- based measure. Under the heterogeneity condition the standard FDR estimate is shown to overestimate the true FDR value, but this is remedied by an improved FDR estimation procedure. As illustrations, two real data examples from gene expression studies of lung cancer are provided.

  14. Comparative Genomics of the Listeria monocytogenes ST204 Subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward M; Allnutt, Theodore; Bradbury, Mark I; Fanning, Séamus; Chandry, P Scott

    2016-01-01

    The ST204 subgroup of Listeria monocytogenes is among the most frequently isolated in Australia from a range of environmental niches. In this study we provide a comparative genomics analysis of food and food environment isolates from geographically diverse sources. Analysis of the ST204 genomes showed a highly conserved core genome with the majority of variation seen in mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons and phage insertions. Most strains (13/15) harbored plasmids, which although varying in size contained highly conserved sequences. Interestingly 4 isolates contained a conserved plasmid of 91,396 bp. The strains examined were isolated over a period of 12 years and from different geographic locations suggesting plasmids are an important component of the genetic repertoire of this subgroup and may provide a range of stress tolerance mechanisms. In addition to this 4 phage insertion sites and 2 transposons were identified among isolates, including a novel transposon. These genetic elements were highly conserved across isolates that harbored them, and also contained a range of genetic markers linked to stress tolerance and virulence. The maintenance of conserved mobile genetic elements in the ST204 population suggests these elements may contribute to the diverse range of niches colonized by ST204 isolates. Environmental stress selection may contribute to maintaining these genetic features, which in turn may be co-selecting for virulence markers relevant to clinical infection with ST204 isolates.

  15. Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

  16. Controlled Electronic Transport through Branched Molecular Conductors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The conductance through a branched conductor placed between two electrodes is analyzed using the Landauer transport formulation within the framework of the single electron, and the tight binding approximations. Terminal side chains are expressed as self energy terms which map the branched conductor onto an effective linear chain Hamiltonian. The effect of uniform side branches on resonant zero-bias conductance is shown to be analytically solvable and particularly simple, w...

  17. Intragroup conflicts and efficiency of production group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorenkov A.V.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysis results of relationships of three levels of the conflict (interpersonal, microgroup and group on two types (the job and subject with indicators of subjectively perceived performance and social effectiveness of small groups and informal subgroups are provided. On selection of 42 work groups (N=334 employees it is established that performance efficiency of group according to the experts has inverse relation from all levels and types of the conflict, and by estimates of members of group — from two types of the microgroup conflict. The same type of effectiveness of informal subgroups on one indicator has inverse relation from the group conflict, and on another — from the interpersonal and microgroup conflict. Social effectiveness of group is connected with the interpersonal and group conflict, and informal subgroups are connected with the interpersonal and microgroup conflict. Levels and types of the conflict cause efficiency of group and subgroup not only separately, but also in a combination with each other. Six regression models, four of which display relationships at the same time of several levels and types of the conflict with performance effectiveness of group, and two — with social effectiveness of subgroup are revealed. Mediated and direct relationships of levels and types of the conflict with efficiency of group and subgroup are established.

  18. Locally minimal topological groups

    CERN Document Server

    enhofer, Lydia Au\\ss; Dikranjan, Dikran; Domínguez, Xabier

    2009-01-01

    A Hausdorff topological group $(G,\\tau)$ is called locally minimal if there exists a neighborhood $U$ of 0 in $\\tau$ such that $U$ fails to be a neighborhood of zero in any Hausdorff group topology on $G$ which is strictly coarser than $\\tau.$ Examples of locally minimal groups are all subgroups of Banach-Lie groups, all locally compact groups and all minimal groups. Motivated by the fact that locally compact NSS groups are Lie groups, we study the connection between local minimality and the NSS property, establishing that under certain conditions, locally minimal NSS groups are metrizable. A symmetric subset of an abelian group containing zero is said to be a GTG set if it generates a group topology in an analogous way as convex and symmetric subsets are unit balls for pseudonorms on a vector space. We consider topological groups which have a neighborhood basis at zero consisting of GTG sets. Examples of these locally GTG groups are: locally pseudo--convex spaces, groups uniformly free from small subgroups (...

  19. Profinite graphs and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribes, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed introduction to graph theoretic methods in profinite groups and applications to abstract groups. It is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The author begins by carefully developing relevant notions in topology, profinite groups and homology, including free products of profinite groups, cohomological methods in profinite groups, and fixed points of automorphisms of free pro-p groups. The final part of the book is dedicated to applications of the profinite theory to abstract groups, with sections on finitely generated subgroups of free groups, separability conditions in free and amalgamated products, and algorithms in free groups and finite monoids. Profinite Graphs and Groups will appeal to students and researchers interested in profinite groups, geometric group theory, graphs and connections with the theory of formal languages. A complete reference on the subject, the book includes historical and bibliographical notes as well as a discussion of open quest...

  20. Diversity of Xiphinema americanum-group Species and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis of Morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, F; Ciancio, A

    1993-09-01

    Of the 39 species composing the Xiphinema americanum group, 14 were described originally from North America and two others have been reported from this region. Many species are very similar morphologically and can be distinguished only by a difficult comparison of various combinations of some morphometric characters. Study of morphometrics of 49 populations, including the type populations of the 39 species attributed to this group, by principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis placed the populations into five subgroups, proposed here as the X. brevicolle subgroup (seven species), the X. americanum subgroup (17 species), the X. taylori subgroup (two species), the X. pachtaicum subgroup (eight species), and the X. lambertii subgroup (five species).