WorldWideScience

Sample records for brake shoes

  1. Automated visual inspection of brake shoe wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shengfang; Liu, Zhen; Nan, Guo; Zhang, Guangjun

    2015-10-01

    With the rapid development of high-speed railway, the automated fault inspection is necessary to ensure train's operation safety. Visual technology is paid more attention in trouble detection and maintenance. For a linear CCD camera, Image alignment is the first step in fault detection. To increase the speed of image processing, an improved scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) method is presented. The image is divided into multiple levels of different resolution. Then, we do not stop to extract the feature from the lowest resolution to the highest level until we get sufficient SIFT key points. At that level, the image is registered and aligned quickly. In the stage of inspection, we devote our efforts to finding the trouble of brake shoe, which is one of the key components in brake system on electrical multiple units train (EMU). Its pre-warning on wear limitation is very important in fault detection. In this paper, we propose an automatic inspection approach to detect the fault of brake shoe. Firstly, we use multi-resolution pyramid template matching technology to fast locate the brake shoe. Then, we employ Hough transform to detect the circles of bolts in brake region. Due to the rigid characteristic of structure, we can identify whether the brake shoe has a fault. The experiments demonstrate that the way we propose has a good performance, and can meet the need of practical applications.

  2. Multivariate research in areas of phosphorus cast-iron brake shoes manufacturing using the statistical analysis and the multiple regression equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, I.; Cioată, V. G.; Alexa, V.; Raţiu, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    The braking system is one of the most important and complex subsystems of railway vehicles, especially when it comes for safety. Therefore, installing efficient safe brakes on the modern railway vehicles is essential. Nowadays is devoted attention to solving problems connected with using high performance brake materials and its impact on thermal and mechanical loading of railway wheels. The main factor that influences the selection of a friction material for railway applications is the performance criterion, due to the interaction between the brake block and the wheel produce complex thermos-mechanical phenomena. In this work, the investigated subjects are the cast-iron brake shoes, which are still widely used on freight wagons. Therefore, the cast-iron brake shoes - with lamellar graphite and with a high content of phosphorus (0.8-1.1%) - need a special investigation. In order to establish the optimal condition for the cast-iron brake shoes we proposed a mathematical modelling study by using the statistical analysis and multiple regression equations. Multivariate research is important in areas of cast-iron brake shoes manufacturing, because many variables interact with each other simultaneously. Multivariate visualization comes to the fore when researchers have difficulties in comprehending many dimensions at one time. Technological data (hardness and chemical composition) obtained from cast-iron brake shoes were used for this purpose. In order to settle the multiple correlation between the hardness of the cast-iron brake shoes, and the chemical compositions elements several model of regression equation types has been proposed. Because a three-dimensional surface with variables on three axes is a common way to illustrate multivariate data, in which the maximum and minimum values are easily highlighted, we plotted graphical representation of the regression equations in order to explain interaction of the variables and locate the optimal level of each variable for

  3. Statistical experiments using the multiple regression research for prediction of proper hardness in areas of phosphorus cast–iron brake shoes manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, I.; Cioată, V. G.; Ratiu, S. A.; Rackov, M.; Penčić, M.

    2018-01-01

    Multivariate research is important in areas of cast–iron brake shoes manufacturing, because many variables interact with each other simultaneously. This article focuses on expressing the multiple linear regression model related to the hardness assurance by the chemical composition of the phosphorous cast irons destined to the brake shoes, having in view that the regression coefficients will illustrate the unrelated contributions of each independent variable towards predicting the dependent variable. In order to settle the multiple correlations between the hardness of the cast–iron brake shoes, and their chemical compositions several regression equations has been proposed. Is searched a mathematical solution which can determine the optimum chemical composition for the hardness desirable values. Starting from the above–mentioned affirmations two new statistical experiments are effectuated related to the values of Phosphorus [P], Manganese [Mn] and Silicon [Si]. Therefore, the regression equations, which describe the mathematical dependency between the above–mentioned elements and the hardness, are determined. As result, several correlation charts will be revealed.

  4. Clutches and brakes design and selection

    CERN Document Server

    Orthwein, William C

    2004-01-01

    FRICTION MATERIALSFriction CodeWearBrake FadeFriction MaterialsNotationReferencesBAND BRAKESDerivation of EquationsApplicationLever-Actuated Band Brake: Backstop DesignExample: Design of a BackstopNotationFormula CollectionReferencesEXTERNALLY AND INTERNALLY PIVOTED SHOE BRAKESPivoted External Drum BrakesPivoted Internal Drum BrakesDesign of Dual-Anchor Twin-Shoe Drum BrakesDual-Anchor Twin-Shoe Drum Brake Design ExamplesDesign of Single-Anchor Twin-Shoe Drum BrakesSingle-Anchor Twin-Shoe Drum Brake Design Exam

  5. THE STUDY OF THE TEMPERATURE OF THE HEATING DISC BRAKES OF PASSENGER CAR DURING THE ADJUSTING THE BRAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. . Ya. Vodiannikov

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Results of research of the brake disk heating temperature under the brake shoe lining during the regulating braking of a passenger train are presented. It is established that the greatest temperature in the disk arises at an exit of a brake shoe lining on a direction of the wheel pair rotation, and its value depends on pressure in the brake cylinder (correlation factor 0.556 and braking time (correlation factor 0.331, the correlation factor for speed in the beginning of regulating braking was equal to 0.135.

  6. 49 CFR 238.313 - Class I brake test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... side of each car's brake system responds properly to application and release signals; (2) The brake... applied on each car in the train until a release of the brakes has been initiated on each car in response... operating two-way radio system meets this requirement; (5) Each brake shoe or pad is securely fastened and...

  7. Braking, Wheeled Vehicles. Test Operations Procedure (TOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-20

    are as follows: a. Micrometer calipers (inside, outside, and dial types). b. Surface finish gauges. c. Torque wrench. d. Brake shoe...HAZARDOUS CONDITION • The power assist unit fails to operate. 10. Front Drum Brakes Procedure: Equipment needed: Steel scale or Vernier ... Micrometer and dial indicator. Reject the vehicle if: • Rotors are broken or damaged, or cracks on the surface extend to the outer edges. • Two grooves

  8. 49 CFR 571.122 - Standard No. 122; Motorcycle brake systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and one-half times the total fluid displacement resulting when all the wheel cylinders or caliper... approximate center of the facing length and width of the most heavily loaded shoe or disc pad, one per brake... the distance measured from the start of one brake application to the start of the next brake...

  9. Gravity brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  10. How to Select Children's Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Select Children's Shoes How to Select Children's Shoes Page Content Most children learn to walk at ... or not properly fitted for your child's foot. Shoe Construction Shoes consist of four parts: the upper, ...

  11. Proper fitting shoes (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a shoe rubbing against the skin of their foot. Blisters and sores may then develop. In people with diabetes, feet ... a shoe rubbing against the skin of their foot. Blisters and sores may then develop. In people with diabetes, feet ...

  12. Wear Modalities and Mechanisms of the Mining Non-asbestos Composite Brake Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jiusheng; Yin, Yan; Zhu, Zhencai; Tong, Minming; Lu, Yuhao; Peng, Yuxing

    2013-08-01

    The mining brake material is generally made of composite materials and its wear has important influences on the braking performance of disc brakes. In order to improve the braking reliability of mine hoisters, this paper did some tribological investigations on the mining brake material to reveal its wear modalities and mechanisms. The mining non-asbestos brake shoe and 16Mn steel were selected as braking pairs and tested on a pad-on-disc friction tester. And a SEM was used to observe the worn surface of the brake shoe. It is shown that the non-asbestos brake material has mainly five wear modalities: adhesive wear, abrasive wear, cutting wear, fatigue wear and high heat wear. At the front period of a single braking the wear modality is mainly composed of some light mechanical wear such as abrasive, cutting and point adhesive. With the temperature rising at the back period it transforms to some heavy mechanical wear such as piece adhesive and fatigue. While in several repeated brakings once the surface temperature rises beyond the thermal-decomposition point of the bonding material, the strong destructive high heat wear takes leading roles on the surface. And a phenomenon called friction catastrophe (FC) occurs easily, which as a result causes a braking failure. It is considered that the friction heat has important influences on the wear modalities of the brake material. And the reduction of friction heat must be an effective technical method for decreasing wear and avoiding braking failures.

  13. Asbestos fibres in the lungs of an American mechanic who drilled, riveted, and ground brake linings: a case report and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Murray M

    2015-05-01

    In North America and Europe, the use of asbestos in friction products was discontinued before the end of the 20th century. In the developing world, the use of asbestos-containing friction products continues. In 2010, Cely-Garcia and colleagues (Cely-Garcia et al., 2012) sampled three brake repair shops located in Bogota, Colombia. Both asbestos and non-asbestos containing brake linings were sold separately or attached to a shoe. When brake linings are sold separated from the shoe, they must be manipulated to attach them to the shoe before installation. The process starts with the removal of the old brake shoe from the vehicle's brake drum. If the existing brake shoe is to be reused, the old lining needs to be removed and the old shoe must be ground to prepare it for a new lining. Riveting requires drilling holes in the linings and shoes and before installing rivets, the lining must be countersunk. The borders of the lining are bevelled. On some occasions, the entire exposed surface of the lining is ground to make it thinner. Once attached to the shoe, the edges of brake linings may extend beyond the shoe. In this case, it is necessary to cut or grind the edges to match the lining to the shoe before bevelling or grinding. The authors reported that 'the sampling results indicate that the brake mechanics sampled are exposed to extremely high asbestos concentrations (i.e. based on transmission electron microscopy counts), suggesting that this occupational group could be at excess risk of asbestos-related diseases'. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  14. Walking Shoes: Features and Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shoe is wide enough. The side-to-side fit of the shoe should be snug, not tight. If you're a woman with wide feet, consider men's or boys' shoes, which are cut a bit larger through the heel and the ball of the foot. Walk in the shoes before ...

  15. Effects of shoe characteristics on dynamic stability when walking on even and uneven surfaces in young and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menant, Jasmine C; Perry, Stephen D; Steele, Julie R; Menz, Hylton B; Munro, Bridget J; Lord, Stephen R

    2008-10-01

    To systematically investigate the effects of various shoe features (sole hardness, heel height, heel collar height, tread pattern) on dynamic balance control and perceptions of comfort and stability in young and older people walking over even and uneven surfaces. A mixed-design 3-way repeated measures with age as a between-subjects factor and surface and shoe conditions as within-subjects factors. Gait laboratory. Young adults (n=11) and community-dwelling older adults (n=15). Not applicable. Center of mass (COM)-base of support (BOS) margins, vertical and braking loading rates, and subjective ratings of perceived shoe comfort and stability. Overall, compared with the standard shoes, the soft sole shoes led to greater lateral COM-BOS margin (Pshoes caused reductions in posterior COM-BOS margin (P=.001) and in vertical and braking loading rates (both, Pshoes as significantly less comfortable (Pshoes. Only the young subjects perceived the soft-sole shoes to be less stable than the standard shoes (P=.003). Both young and older subjects adopted a conservative walking pattern in the elevated heel shoes and exhibited impaired mediolateral balance control in the soft-sole shoes. In contrast, increased sole hardness (above that found in a standard shoe), a tread sole, and a raised collar height did not improve walking stability in either group. It is concluded that shoes with elevated heels or soft soles should not be recommended for older people and that a standard laced shoe with a low collar and a sole of standard hardness with or without a tread provides optimal dynamic stability when walking on even and uneven surfaces.

  16. Emergency braking : research summary.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlösser, L.H.M.

    1976-01-01

    This report deals with an investigation concerning braking capacity of trucks if somewhere a failure occurs in the normal service brake. Purpose of research was to get an insight in various secondary braking systems for trucks. It is shown that with almost all of the secondary braking system it was

  17. GROUND REACTION FORCE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RUNNING SHOES, RACING FLATS, AND DISTANCE SPIKES IN RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanna Logan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Various shoes are worn by distance runners throughout a training season. This study measured the differences in ground reaction forces between running shoes, racing flats, and distance spikes in order to provide information about the potential effects of footwear on injury risk in highly competitive runners. Ten male and ten female intercollegiate distance runners ran across a force plate at 6.7 m·s-1 (for males and 5.7 m·s-1 (for females in each of the three types of shoes. To control for differences in foot strike, only subjects who exhibited a heel strike were included in the data analysis. Two repeated-measures ANOVAs with Tukey's post-hoc tests (p < 0.05 were used to detect differences in shoe types among males and females. For the males, loading rate, peak vertical impact force and peak braking forces were significantly greater in flats and spikes compared to running shoes. Vertical stiffness in spikes was also significantly greater than in running shoes. Females had significantly shorter stance times and greater maximum propulsion forces in racing flats compared to running shoes. Changing footwear between the shoes used in this study alters the loads placed on the body. Care should be taken as athletes enter different phases of training where different footwear is required. Injury risk may be increased since the body may not be accustomed to the differences in force, stance time, and vertical stiffness

  18. Rocker shoe, minimalist shoe, and standard running shoe : A comparison of running economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Bredeweg, Steven; Dekker, Rienk; Kluitenberg, Bas; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Hijmans, Juha; Postema, Klaas

    Objectives: Running with rocker shoes is believed to prevent lower limb injuries. However, it is not clear how running in these shoes affects the energy expenditure. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to assess the effects of rocker shoes on running economy in comparison with standard and

  19. Walking in My Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salia, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    The Walking in My Shoes curriculum at St. Thomas School in Medina, Washington, has been developed to deepen students' understanding of their own heritage and the cultural similarities and differences among their global peers. Exploring the rich diversity of the world's cultural heritage and the interactions of global migrations throughout history,…

  20. Do rotational shear-cushioning shoes influence horizontal ground reaction forces and perceived comfort during basketball cutting maneuvers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wing-Kai; Qu, Yi; Yang, Fan; Cheung, Roy T H

    2017-01-01

    Court shoe designs predominantly focus on reducing excessive vertical ground reaction force, but shear force cushioning has received little attention in the basketball population. We aimed to examine the effect of a novel shoe-cushioning design on both resultant horizontal ground reaction forces and comfort perception during two basketball-specific cutting movements. Fifteen university team basketball players performed lateral shuffling and 45-degree sidestep cutting at maximum effort in basketball shoes with and without the shear-cushioning system (SCS). Paired t-tests were used to examine the differences in kinetics and comfort perception between two shoes. SCS shoe allowed for larger rotational material deformation compared with control shoes, but no significant shoe differences were found in braking phase kinetics during both cutting movements (P = 0.35). Interestingly, a greater horizontal propulsion impulse was found with the SCS during 45-degree cutting (P shoes perceived better forefoot comfort (P = 0.012). During lateral shuffling, there were no significant differences in horizontal GRF and comfort perception between shoe conditions (P > 0.05). The application of a rotational shear-cushioning structure allowed for better forefoot comfort and enhanced propulsion performance in cutting, but did not influence the shear impact. Understanding horizontal ground reaction force information may be useful in designing footwear to prevent shear-related injuries in sport populations.

  1. TGV disc brake squeal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorang, X.; Foy-Margiocchi, F.; Nguyen, Q. S.; Gautier, P. E.

    2006-06-01

    The discomfort generated by the noise emission of braking systems in trains has aroused recently many studies on the mechanical modelling of brake noise in France. A theoretical and numerical discussion on the phenomenon of brake squeal is given in this paper in relation with some experimental data. This study is based upon a flutter instability analysis giving unstable modes of the brake system under the contact and Coulomb friction.

  2. Roller Locking Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Roller locking brake is normally braking rotary mechanism allowing free rotation when electromagnet in mechanism energized. Well suited to robots and other machinery which automatic braking upon removal of electrical power required. More compact and reliable. Requires little electrical power to maintain free rotation and exhibits minimal buildup of heat.

  3. Do Exercise Walkers Need Special Walking Shoes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Lan

    1987-01-01

    The emergence of exercise walking as a popular fitness activity has spurred sales of shoes designed and marketed specifically for walking. Consumers may find comfort and stability in these shoes--but certain other shoes may work as well. (Author)

  4. How to "Read" Your Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wear patterns to help you get a better fit as well as a style that will compensate for the stresses you place on shoes. What are your shoes trying to tell you? Here are the basic wear patterns: Wear on the ball of the foot: Your heel tendons may be ...

  5. The Athletic Shoe in Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastifer, James; Kent, Richard; Crandall, Jeff; Sherwood, Chris; Lessley, David; McCullough, Kirk A; Coughlin, Michael J; Anderson, Robert B

    Foot and ankle injuries are common in sports, particularly in cleated athletes. Traditionally, the athletic shoe has not been regarded as a piece of protective equipment but rather as a part of the uniform, with a primary focus on performance and subjective feedback measures of comfort. Changes in turf and shoe design have poorly understood implications on the health and safety of players. A literature search of the MEDLINE and PubMed databases was conducted. Keywords included athletic shoewear, cleated shoe, football shoes, and shoewear, and search parameters were between the years 2000 and 2016. Clinical review. Level 5. The athletic shoe is an important piece of protective sports equipment. There are several important structural considerations of shoe design, including biomechanical compliance, cleat and turf interaction, and shoe sizing/fit, that affect the way an athlete engages with the playing surface and carry important potential implications regarding player safety if not understood and addressed. Athletic footwear should be considered an integral piece of protective equipment rather than simply an extension of the uniform apparel. More research is needed to define optimal shoe sizing, the effect that design has on mechanical load, and how cleat properties, including pattern and structure, interact with the variety of playing surfaces.

  6. Wider Shoes for Wider Feet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mary C.

    2006-01-01

    From a very young age, shoes for boys tend to be wider than shoes for girls. Is this because boys have wider feet, or because it is assumed that girls are willing to sacrifice comfort for fashion, even in elementary school? To assess the former, a statistician measures kids' feet. (Contains 2 tables and 3 figures.)

  7. Compositions, Functions, and Testing of Friction Brake Materials and Their Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, PJ

    2001-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to present a survey of commercial brake materials and additives, and to indicate their typical properties and functions, especially as regards their use in heavy trucks. Most truck pad and shoe materials described here were designed to wear against cast iron. Brake material test methods are also briefly described. This report does not address issues associated with the fabrication and manufacturing of brake materials. Since there are literally thousands of brake material additives, and their combinations are nearly limitless, it is impractical to list them all here. Rather, an attempt has been made to capture the primary constituents and their functions. An Appendix contains thermo-physical properties of some current and potential brake materials.

  8. Braking System Modeling and Brake Temperature Response to Repeated Cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dalimus, Zaini

    2014-01-01

    .... If the braking system fails to work, road accident could happen and may result in death. This research aims to model braking system together with vehicle in Matlab/Simulink software and measure actual brake temperature...

  9. Wind Braking of Magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, H.; Xu, R. X.; Song, L. M.; Qiao, G. J.

    2013-05-01

    We explore the wind braking of magnetars considering recent observations challenging the traditional magnetar model. There is evidence for strong multipole magnetic fields in active magnetars, but the dipole field inferred from spin-down measurements may be strongly biased by particle wind. Recent observations challenging the traditional model of magnetars may be explained naturally by the wind braking scenario: (1) the supernova energies of magnetars are of normal value; (2) the non-detection in Fermi observations of magnetars; (3) the problem posed by low magnetic field soft gamma-ray repeaters; (4) the relation between magnetars and high magnetic field pulsars; and (5) a decreasing period derivative during magnetar outbursts. Transient magnetars with L_x{<}-\\dot{E}_rot may still be magnetic dipole braking. This may explain why low luminosity magnetars are more likely to have radio emissions. A strong reduction of the dipole magnetic field is possible only when the particle wind is very collimated at the star surface. A small reduction of the dipole magnetic field may result from detailed considerations of magnetar wind luminosity. In the wind braking scenario, magnetars are neutron stars with a strong multipole field. For some sources, a strong dipole field may no longer be needed. A magnetism-powered pulsar wind nebula will be one of the consequences of wind braking. For a magnetism-powered pulsar wind nebula, we should see a correlation between the nebula luminosity and the magnetar luminosity. Under the wind braking scenario, a braking index smaller than three is expected. Future braking index measurement of a magnetar may tell us whether magnetars are wind braking or magnetic dipole braking.

  10. Influence of dorsiflexion shoes on jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinero, Juan J; González-Millán, Cristina; Abián-Vicén, Javier; Del Coso Garrigós, Juan

    2014-04-01

    The goal of dorsiflexion sports shoes is to increase jumping capacity by means of a lower position of the heel in relation to the forefoot which results in additional stretching of the ankle plantar flexors. The aim of this study was to compare a dorsiflexion sports shoe model with two conventional sports shoe models in a countermovement jump test. The sample consisted of 35 participants who performed a countermovement jump test on a force platform wearing the three models of shoes. There were significant differences in the way force was manifested (Psports shoe model. The drop of the center of gravity was increased in CS1 in contrast to the dorsiflexion sports shoe model (Psports shoes were not effective for improving either peak power or jump height (P>.05). Although force manifestation and jump kinetics differ between dorsiflexion shoes and conventional sports shoes, jump performance was similar.

  11. Improved Electromagnetic Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Toby B.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed design for an electromagnetic brake would increase the reliability while reducing the number of parts and the weight, relative to a prior commercially available electromagnetic brake. The reductions of weight and the number of parts could also lead to a reduction of cost. A description of the commercial brake is prerequisite to a description of the proposed electromagnetic brake. The commercial brake (see upper part of figure) includes (1) a permanent magnet and an electromagnet coil on a stator and (2) a rotor that includes a steel contact plate mounted, with tension spring loading, on an aluminum hub. The stator is mounted securely on a stationary object, which would ordinarily be the housing of a gear drive or a motor. The rotor is mounted on the shaft of the gear drive or motor. The commercial brake nominally operates in a fail-safe (in the sense of normally braking) mode: In the absence of current in the electromagnet coil, the permanent magnet pulls the contact plate, against the spring tension, into contact with the stator. To release the brake, one excites the electromagnet with a current of the magnitude and polarity chosen to cancel the magnetic flux of the permanent magnet, thereby enabling the spring tension to pull the contact plate out of contact with the stator. The fail-safe operation of the commercial brake depends on careful mounting of the rotor in relation to the stator. The rotor/stator gap must be set with a tolerance between 10 and 15 mils (between about 0.25 and about 0.38 mm). If the gap or the contact pad is thicker than the maximum allowable value, then the permanent magnetic field will not be strong enough to pull the steel plate across the gap. (For this reason, any contact pad between the contact plate and the stator must also be correspondingly thin.) If the gap exceeds the maximum allowable value because of shaft end play, it becomes impossible to set the brake by turning off the electromagnet current. Although it may

  12. Do rotational shear-cushioning shoes influence horizontal ground reaction forces and perceived comfort during basketball cutting maneuvers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Kai Lam

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Court shoe designs predominantly focus on reducing excessive vertical ground reaction force, but shear force cushioning has received little attention in the basketball population. We aimed to examine the effect of a novel shoe-cushioning design on both resultant horizontal ground reaction forces and comfort perception during two basketball-specific cutting movements. Methods Fifteen university team basketball players performed lateral shuffling and 45-degree sidestep cutting at maximum effort in basketball shoes with and without the shear-cushioning system (SCS. Paired t-tests were used to examine the differences in kinetics and comfort perception between two shoes. Results SCS shoe allowed for larger rotational material deformation compared with control shoes, but no significant shoe differences were found in braking phase kinetics during both cutting movements (P = 0.35. Interestingly, a greater horizontal propulsion impulse was found with the SCS during 45-degree cutting (P  0.05. Discussion The application of a rotational shear-cushioning structure allowed for better forefoot comfort and enhanced propulsion performance in cutting, but did not influence the shear impact. Understanding horizontal ground reaction force information may be useful in designing footwear to prevent shear-related injuries in sport populations.

  13. Arming shoes of the fifteenth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volken Marquita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Military footwear for the fifteenth century includes arming shoes worn under sabatons. Written sources suggest arming shoes and footwear used for fighting were ordinary shoes adapted for the purpose. Archaeological footwear was examined for signs of such modifications. Medieval shoe technology is presented, showing the range of footwear and its uses and gait biomechanics. Based on experiences from re-enactors wearing armours, medieval shoe styles are discussed for appropriateness as arming shoes. The question of why medieval military footwear shows no purposed development is addressed.

  14. Braking System for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, J. E.; Webb, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Operating turbine stopped smoothly by fail-safe mechanism. Windturbine braking systems improved by system consisting of two large steel-alloy disks mounted on high-speed shaft of gear box, and brakepad assembly mounted on bracket fastened to top of gear box. Lever arms (with brake pads) actuated by spring-powered, pneumatic cylinders connected to these arms. Springs give specific spring-loading constant and exert predetermined load onto brake pads through lever arms. Pneumatic cylinders actuated positively to compress springs and disengage brake pads from disks. During power failure, brakes automatically lock onto disks, producing highly reliable, fail-safe stops. System doubles as stopping brake and "parking" brake.

  15. How to Select the Right Athletic Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a running shoe may help prevent shin splints, tendinitis, heel pain, stress fractures and other overuse syndromes. ... a running/sports shoe help prevent shin splints, tendinitis, heel pain, stress fractures and other overuse syndromes. ...

  16. Braking, Wheeled Vehicles. Test Operations Procedure (TOP)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    .... Major factors to be considered in the evaluation of vehicle braking systems are stopping and grade holding ability, vehicle stability and control during brake applications, and individual braking...

  17. Athletic shoes: finding a good match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D R

    1997-09-01

    When you walk into an athletic-shoe store, chances are you'll be overwhelmed by the selection and feel the marketing magnet of sports celebrities and their namesake shoes. Superstores may carry hundreds of different joggers from a dozen major brands. And the same goes for most other types of athletic shoes, from walkers and cross-trainers to basketball shoes and football cleats.

  18. How to Assess Your Shoe IQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 10. What is the best way to judge comfort in a shoe? Soft Material Cushioned Sole Walking Shoe IQ Quiz ... lead to pressure points. 10. Walking in the shoe helps you judge comfort, as walking allows you to wiggle your toes ...

  19. Comparison of Running Economy Values While Wearing No Shoes, Minimal Shoes, and Normal Running Shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrum, Robbie G; Connors, Ryan T; Coons, John M; Fuller, Dana K; Morgan, Don W; Caputo, Jennifer L

    2017-03-01

    Cochrum, RG, Connors, RT, Coons, JM, Fuller, DK, Morgan, DW, and Caputo, JL. Comparison of running economy values while wearing no shoes, minimal shoes, and normal running shoes. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 595-601, 2017-The purpose of this study was to quantify differences in running economy (RE) at 50 and 70% of each subject's velocity at V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max) across barefoot and 2 mass, stack height, and heel-to-toe-drop controlled footwear conditions (minimal shoes and normal running shoes) in 9 recreational distance runners (mean age 26.8 ± 6.8 years). Over 3 days, subjects ran in one of the footwear conditions while RE (oxygen consumption) and step frequency were measured at each speed with a 5-minute rest between each trial. A 2-way repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance (p ≤ 0.05) and Bonferroni-adjusted follow-up analyses revealed that RE was not significantly different across footwear conditions at either speed. However, those running barefoot exhibited a higher step frequency than when running in minimal (50%, p = 0.007; and 70%, p running in minimal versus standard footwear (70% only, p = 0.007). Thus, RE is not affected by footwear or running barefoot in those with experience running in minimal-type footwear. Significant adjustments in step frequency when alternative footwear was introduced may help explain why RE was statistically maintained during each footwear and speed condition across but not between subjects. Therefore, determination of footwear for the enhancement of RE should be based on individual physical characteristics and preferences rather than a global recommendation of an economical running shoe.

  20. Braking System Modeling and Brake Temperature Response to Repeated Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaini Dalimus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Braking safety is crucial while driving the passenger or commercial vehicles. Large amount of kinetic energy is absorbed by four brakes fitted in the vehicle. If the braking system fails to work, road accident could happen and may result in death. This research aims to model braking system together with vehicle in Matlab/Simulink software and measure actual brake temperature. First, brake characteristic and vehicle dynamic model were generated to estimate friction force and dissipated heat. Next, Arduino based prototype brake temperature monitoring was developed and tested on the road. From the experiment, it was found that brake temperature tends to increase steadily in long repeated deceleration and acceleration cycle.

  1. 49 CFR 393.52 - Brake performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brake performance. 393.52 Section 393.52... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.52 Brake performance. (a) Upon application of its service brakes... braking force is measured by a performance-based brake tester which meets the requirements of functional...

  2. In-shoe pressure distribution in "unstable" (MBT) shoes and flat-bottomed training shoes: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L; Gibson, J N A; Thomson, C E

    2007-04-01

    Footwear comfort in many clinical situations is dependent on the ability of the 'shoe' to redistribute plantar pressure. Offloading the metatarsal heads may be achieved by fitting an insole, but recently a new design of shoe with a curved under sole (Masai Barefoot Technology or "MBT shoe") has been advocated. The aim of this study was to directly assess the effect of such shoes on gait pattern. Normal subjects were recruited and asked to walk sequentially in (a) flat-soled training shoes and (b) midfoot bearing shoes (MBT shoe). Mean and peak pressures in four anatomically defined areas of the foot, and the total area of sole contact were measured electronically by an in-shoe system (Pedar Ltd., UK). Standing in the Masai shoes resulted in a 21% lesser peak pressure under the midfoot and an 11% lesser peak pressure under the heel in comparison to the figures found when patients wore their training shoes. There was a 76% compensatory increase in pressure under the toes. In essence there was a significant shift in pressure towards the front of the foot.

  3. Transnet regenerative braking concept definition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Giesler, Achmed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transnet has shown an interest in the concept of regenerative braking on their freight trains. Regenerative braking is the capturing, storing and re-using energy currently being wasted during regenerative braking. Currently all the energy is dumped...

  4. Cooperative Control of Regenerative Braking and Antilock Braking for a Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Guodong Yin; XianJian Jin

    2013-01-01

    A new cooperative braking control strategy (CBCS) is proposed for a parallel hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) with both a regenerative braking system and an antilock braking system (ABS) to achieve improved braking performance and energy regeneration. The braking system of the vehicle is based on a new method of HEV braking torque distribution that makes the antilock braking system work together with the regenerative braking system harmoniously. In the cooperative braking control strategy, a sli...

  5. Increased Athletic Performance in Lighter Basketball Shoes: Shoe or Psychology Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Maurice; Trudeau, Matthieu B; Nigg, Sandro R; Nigg, Benno M

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of shoe mass on performance in basketball-specific movements and how this affects changes if an athlete is aware or not of the shoe's mass relative to other shoes. In an experimental design, 22 male participants were assigned to 2 groups. In the "aware" group, differences in the mass of the shoes were disclosed, while participants in the other group were blinded to the mass of shoes. For both groups lateral shuffle-cut and vertical-jump performances were quantified in 3 different basketball-shoe conditions (light, 352 ± 18.4 g; medium, 510 ± 17 g; heavy, 637 ± 17.7 g). A mixed ANOVA compared mean shuffle-cut and vertical-jump performances across shoes and groups. For blinded participants, perceived shoe-weight ratings were collected and compared across shoe conditions using a Friedman 2-way ANOVA. In the aware group, performance in the light shoes was significantly increased by 2% (vertical jump 2%, P performance across shoes. Differences in performance of the aware participants were most likely due to psychological effects such as positive and negative expectancies toward the light and heavy shoes, respectively. These results underline the importance for coaches and shoe manufacturers to communicate the performance-enhancing benefits of products or other interventions to athletes to optimize their performance outcome.

  6. Research of Motorcycle Braking Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreta Levulytė

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available From a technical point of view, in dangerous or emergency situation is very important motorcycle driver reaction and vehicle braking time. Motor-cycle deceleration parameters depend not only on the motorcycle brake system, but also on the driving experience. A significant influence on decel-eration the motorcycle has aerodynamic parameters, pavement type and condition, as well as the technical condition of the motocycle, shock absorb-ers, tire type and their technical condition. This article provides an analysis of the motorcycle longitudinal deceleration, braking modes of the mo-torcycle on a dry asphalt road surface. Motorcycle stopping – deceleration – acceleration efficiency issue, stopping in different modes. First ana-lyzed the dynamics of a motorcycle deceleration braking only the front wheel, then braked front and rear wheels and complex – then braked the front and rear wheels at the same time. The goal of experimental study is to determine the influence of braking modes intense fir motorcycle brak-ing deceleration when braking on dry road pavement, at three different braking modes, and set the braking path of change. Motorcycle decelera-tion in the longitudinal direction is an important parameter for analysis traffic accidents, for accident reconstruction process and the examination of motorcyclists technical possibility to avoid an accident.

  7. Heat distribution in disc brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenda, Frantisek; Soukup, Josef; Kampo, Jan

    2016-06-01

    This article is deals by the thermal analysis of the disc brake with floating caliper. The issue is solved by numerically. The half 2D model is used for solution in program ADINA 8.8. Two brake discs without the ventilation are solved. One disc is made from cast iron and the second is made from stainless steel. Both materials are an isotropic. By acting the pressure force on the brake pads will be pressing the pads to the brake disc. Speed will be reduced (slowing down). On the contact surface generates the heat, which the disc and pads heats. In the next part of article is comparison the maximum temperature at the time of braking. The temperatures of both materials for brake disc (gray cast iron, stainless steel) are compares. The heat flux during braking for the both materials is shown.

  8. Effect of Wearing Socks, Stockings and Leather Shoe on Shoe Microclimate and Wear Comfort

    OpenAIRE

    三ツ井, 紀子; Michiko, Mitsui

    2001-01-01

    The effects of socks, stockings and leather shoe on wear comfort and microclimate between shoe and skin while exercising has been studied by seven women under laboratory conditions. Temperature and absolute humidity in wearing socks or stockings were higher than barefooted. Further under wearing shoes and socks or stockings they are increased. Temperature and absolute humidity at the measuring point were the highest between the first and the second toes. Inside socks or stockings with shoes a...

  9. In-shoe plantar tri-axial stress profiles during maximum-effort cutting maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Yan; Lam, Wing Kai; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Zhang, Ming

    2014-12-18

    Soft tissue injuries, such as anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ankle sprain and foot skin problems, frequently occur during cutting maneuvers. These injuries are often regarded as associated with abnormal joint torque and interfacial friction caused by excessive external and in-shoe shear forces. This study simultaneously investigated the dynamic in-shoe localized plantar pressure and shear stress during lateral shuffling and 45° sidestep cutting maneuvers. Tri-axial force transducers were affixed at the first and second metatarsal heads, lateral forefoot, and heel regions in the midsole of a basketball shoe. Seventeen basketball players executed both cutting maneuvers with maximum efforts. Lateral shuffling cutting had a larger mediolateral braking force than 45° sidestep cutting. This large braking force was concentrated at the first metatarsal head, as indicated by its maximum medial shear stress (312.2 ± 157.0 kPa). During propulsion phase, peak shear stress occurred at the second metatarsal head (271.3 ± 124.3 kPa). Compared with lateral shuffling cutting, 45° sidestep cutting produced larger peak propulsion shear stress (463.0 ± 272.6 kPa) but smaller peak braking shear stress (184.8 ± 181.7 kPa), of which both were found at the first metatarsal head. During both cutting maneuvers, maximum medial and posterior shear stress occurred at the first metatarsal head, whereas maximum pressure occurred at the second metatarsal head. The first and second metatarsal heads sustained relatively high pressure and shear stress and were expected to be susceptible to plantar tissue discomfort or injury. Due to different stress distribution, distinct pressure and shear cushioning mechanisms in basketball footwear might be considered over different foot regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fault Diagnosis for Constant Deceleration Braking System of Mine Hoist based on Principal Component Analysis and SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Juan-Juan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on AMESim simulation platform, the pressure-time curve of constant deceleration braking system is obtained in this paper firstly, by simulating three typical faults of brake, the spring stiffness decrease, the brake shoe friction coefficient decrease and brake leaking. Then pressure data on the curve for each time are seen as a variable and the curve is chosen as the fault sample, analysed by the method of Principal Component Analysis (PCA. Last, principal components or sum of variance contribution rates more than 95% are selected as sample eigenvalues and Support Vector Machine (SVM is used for fault diagnosis. Diagnosis results show that all testing faults can be identified accurately, which indicates SVM model has an extremely excellent ability to identify faults. To further verify the performance of SVM for fault identification, BP neural network is established to compare. The result shows that SVM model is more accurate than BP neural network in fault recognition.

  11. Hydraulic brake-system for a bicycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Frankenhuyzen, J.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a hydraulic brake system for a bicycle which may or may not be provided with an auxiliary motor, comprising a brake disc and brake claws cooperating with the brake disc, as well as fluid-containing channels (4,6) that extend between an operating organ (1) and the brake

  12. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake systems...

  13. Biomechanics of running with rocker shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Dekker, Rienk; Postema, Klaas; Kluitenberg, Bas; Bredeweg, Steef W; Hijmans, Juha M

    2017-01-01

    Load reduction is an important consideration in conservative management of tendon overuse injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy. Previous research has shown that the use of rocker shoes can reduce the positive ankle power and plantar flexion moment which might help in unloading the Achilles tendon. Despite this promising implication of rocker shoes, the effects on hip and knee biomechanics remain unclear. Moreover, the effect of wearing rocker shoes on different running strike types is unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanics of the ankle, knee and hip joints and the role of strike type on these outcomes. Randomized cross-over study. In this study, 16 female endurance runners underwent three-dimensional gait analysis wearing rocker shoes and standard shoes. We examined work, moments, and angles of the ankle, knee and hip during the stance phase of running. In comparison with standard shoes, running with rocker shoes significantly (pshoes significantly increased the positive work (14%), extension moment peak (6%), and extension moment impulse (12%). These findings indicate that although running with rocker shoes might lower mechanical load on the Achilles tendon, it could increase the risk of overuse injuries of the knee joint. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Patient compliance and effect of orthopaedic shoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, A B; Ellitsgaard, N; Krogsgaard, M R

    1999-01-01

    Orthopaedic shoes are individually handmade after a prescription from an orthopaedic surgeon, hence relatively expensive. Bad compliance is mentioned in the literature but not investigated. In order to evaluate patient compliance and the effect of orthopaedic shoes, 85 patients who were prescribed...

  15. Thermal Characterisation of Brake Pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramousse, Séverine; Høj, Jakob Weiland; Sørensen, O. T.

    2001-01-01

    The chemical-physical decomposition processes that occur in a brake pad heated to 1000degreesC have been studied. This temperature can be reached when a brake pad is applied. Thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis were used in combination with evolved gas analysis, and image analysis...... using a scanning electron microscope.A brake pad is essentially a mixture of iron, carbon and binder. Combined techniques have been used, because of chemical reaction overlap, to determine how and at what temperature the binder decomposes, the coal and graphite combust and the iron oxidises.This work...... enables the development of brake pads that are stable at high temperature....

  16. 14 CFR 25.735 - Brakes and braking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... constructed so that: (1) If any electrical, pneumatic, hydraulic, or mechanical connecting or transmitting element fails, or if any single source of hydraulic or other brake operating energy supply is lost, it is... hydraulic system following a failure in, or in the vicinity of, the brakes is insufficient to cause or...

  17. Contact allergens in shoe leather among patients with foot eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Coevorden, AM; Coenraads, PJ; Pas, HH; van der Valk, PGM

    Some patients with relapsing foot eczema and a shoe leather allergy, who fail to show positive results with standard series and shoe wear screening tray patch testing, do not respond to the use of hypoallergenic shoe leather. We assume that relevant allergens are present in hypoallergenic shoe

  18. Older people and ill fitting shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Suzanne L; Leese, G P; McMurdo, M E T

    2002-06-01

    Foot health is an important issue in older people. Inappropriate shoes increase the risk of callous and ulcer formation, as well as increasing the risk of falls. There are no data defining the size of this problem. The aim of the study was to investigate the proportion of elderly people on a general rehabilitation ward wearing incorrectly sized shoes and to look for the presence of complications. Sixty five consecutive patients (mental state questionnaire score >6) admitted to a rehabilitation ward had their foot length and width measured, and the size of their current footwear recorded. Sensation was tested with a standard 10 g monofilament. The presence of ulceration was noted. Foot pain was recorded by the patient on a visual analogue scale. Any history of diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, or peripheral neuropathy was noted. The median age of the subjects was 82 (range 64-93). Six (9%) had a history of diabetes, seven (11%) had symptomatic peripheral vascular disease, and 17 (26%) had sensory impairment. Ten patients (15%) had foot ulceration present, and 47 patients (72%) had ill fitting shoes (a discrepancy in length of more than half a British shoe size fitting or more than one British width fitting, 7 mm). Incorrect shoe length was significantly associated with the presence of ulceration (odds ratio (OR) = 10.04, p = 0.016). Presence of ulceration was significantly associated with a history of peripheral vascular disease (OR = 11.56, p = 0.008). Pain was significantly associated with incorrect shoe length (p = 0.0238) and with sensory impairment (p = 0.0314). Most older people on a rehabilitation ward wore ill fitting shoes. An association was found between ill fitting shoes and self reported pain, and between ill fitting shoes and ulcer formation. A straightforward assessment of footwear in older people could improve comfort and avoid preventable foot disorders.

  19. KINETIC ASSESSMENT OF GOLF SHOE OUTER SOLE DESIGN FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary J. Dyson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed human kinetics in relation to golf shoe outer sole design features during the golf swing using a driver club by measuring both within the shoe, and beneath the shoe at the natural grass interface. Three different shoes were assessed: metal 7- spike shoe, alternative 7-spike shoe, and a flat soled shoe. In-shoe plantar pressure data were recorded using Footscan RS International pressure insoles and sampling at 500 Hz. Simultaneously ground reaction force at the shoe outer sole was measured using 2 natural grass covered Kistler force platforms and 1000 Hz data acquisition. Video recording of the 18 right-handed golfers at 200 Hz was undertaken while the golfer performed 5 golf shots with his own driver in each type of shoe. Front foot (nearest to shot direction maximum vertical force and torque were greater than at the back foot, and there was no significant difference related to the shoe type. Wearing the metal spike shoe when using a driver was associated with more torque generation at the back foot (p < 0. 05 than when the flat soled shoe was worn. Within shoe regional pressures differed significantly with golf shoe outer sole design features (p < 0.05. Comparison of the metal spike and alternative spike shoe results provided indications of the quality of regional traction on the outer sole. Potential golf shoe outer sole design features and traction were presented in relation to phases of the golf swing movement. Application of two kinetic measurement methods identified that moderated (adapted muscular control of foot and body movement may be induced by golf shoe outer sole design features. Ground reaction force measures inform comparisons of overall shoe functional performance, and insole pressure measurements inform comparisons of the underfoot conditions induced by specific regions of the golf shoe outer sole

  20. Prescription Custom Orthotics and Shoe Inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cost more than shoe inserts purchased in a retail store, but the additional cost is usually well worth ... supports that you can order online or at retail stores. Unless the device has been prescribed by a ...

  1. The effectiveness of shoe modifications for intoeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, G; Staheli, L T

    1976-10-01

    Shoe wedges have no immediate clinically significant effect on the angle of gait in children. The circular Torqheel was found to be more effetive, but still corrected only a quarter of the apparent rotatory deformity during gait.

  2. 49 CFR 238.431 - Brake system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brake system. 238.431 Section 238.431... Equipment § 238.431 Brake system. (a) A passenger train's brake system shall be capable of stopping the... train is operating under worst-case adhesion conditions. (b) The brake system shall be designed to allow...

  3. Transient switching control strategy from regenerative braking to anti-lock braking with a semi-brake-by-wire system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Li, Xujian; Wang, Xiangyu; Liu, Yahui; Song, Jian; Ran, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Regenerative braking is an important technology in improving fuel economy of an electric vehicle (EV). However, additional motor braking will change the dynamic characteristics of the vehicle, leading to braking instability, especially when the anti-lock braking system (ABS) is triggered. In this paper, a novel semi-brake-by-wire system, without the use of a pedal simulator and fail-safe device, is proposed. In order to compensate for the hysteretic characteristics of the designed brake system while ensure braking reliability and fuel economy when the ABS is triggered, a novel switching compensation control strategy using sliding mode control is brought forward. The proposed strategy converts the complex coupling braking process into independent control of hydraulic braking and regenerative braking, through which a balance between braking performance, braking reliability, braking safety and fuel economy is achieved. Simulation results show that the proposed strategy is effective and adaptable in different road conditions while the large wheel slip rate is triggered during a regenerative braking course. The research provides a new possibility of low-cost equipment and better control performance for the regenerative braking in the EV and the hybrid EV.

  4. Influence of foot, leg and shoe characteristics on subjective comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J E; Nigg, B M; Liu, W; Stefanyshyn, D J; Nurse, M A

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between foot and leg characteristics, shoe characteristics, and the short-term subjective comfort of three different pairs of athletic shoes. Static measurements of foot dimension and leg angles were taken from eighteen subjects. Subjects rated the comfort of three different athletic shoes for standing, walking and running. The shoes were quantified by internal dimensions, hardness, flexibility and torsional stiffness. Average comfort ratings decreased from standing to walking to running. One shoe seemed suited for only a small group of subjects. In contrast, another shoe was generally comfortable for a large group. Skeletal alignment, specifically eversion angle, was related to comfort for one shoe. Therefore, fit of the shoe is not sufficient for comfort. Skeletal alignment, shoe torsional stiffness and cushioning seem to be mechanical variables which may be important for comfort.

  5. DO RUNNING SHOES PROTECT ALL RUNNERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E.J. Spurgeon

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Running is a prevalent physical activity in today's health-conscious society. Over the course of a 1-mile run an individual will make approximately 1600 footstrikes. At the time of contact between foot and ground, impact forces and pronation place large stresses on the structures of the lower extremity. Exposure to repeated impact loading is linked to the development of runners' injuries, including joint degeneration and osteoarthritis (Dekel and Weissman, 1978. Pronation increases the stress in joints, muscles and tendons and is also connected to runners' injuries (James et al., 1978; Denoth, 1986; Stacoff et al., 1988. To prevent injury, running shoes are designed to reduce both impact forces and pronation. However, these innovations in shoe design might not benefit all runners. There are two main groups of runners: rearfoot strikers and midfoot strikers. Rearfoot strikers make initial ground contact with their heel, whereas midfoot strikers make initial ground contact with the mid-region of their foot. Eighty percent of runners are rearfoot strikers with the remainder being midfoot strikers (Kerr et al., 1983. So far, running shoe research has been focused only on rearfoot strikers. Thus, there is a good understanding of the shoe design requirements for these runners. For example, research has shown that the hardness and geometry of shoe-soles can be modified to reduce impact forces and pronation in rearfoot strikers (Luethi and Stacoff, 1987; Nigg and Morlock, 1987. Conversely, midfoot strikers have received no attention from running shoe research. This suggests that there is little understanding of the available techniques to reduce impact forces and pronation in these runners. Indeed, research has shown more pronation in midfoot strikers than in rearfoot strikers for the same shoe (De Wit et al., 1995. Hence, midfoot strikers might be running in poorly designed shoes which predispose them to injury. Do running shoes protect all runners

  6. Mountain Braking Test Venue Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    FMVSS 105 Inertia Brake Dynamometer Test Procedure for vehicles above 4 540 kg GVWR; FMVSS Test Sequence, 2nd Fade Section,” November 2011.(15) Scope...Test Brake Temperature and Speed The U.S. Department of Defense Army Tank Purchase Description 2354A (ATPD-2354A) includes dynamometer test...11, March 1992. [12] "Performance Requirements for Determining Tow -Vehicle Gross Combination Weight Rating and Trailer Weight Rating", SAE Surface

  7. Nonlinear Coupling Characteristics Analysis of Integrated System of Electromagnetic Brake and Frictional Brake of Car

    OpenAIRE

    He, Ren; Hu, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    Since theoretical guidance is lacking in the design and control of the integrated system of electromagnetic brake and frictional brake, this paper aims to solve this problem and explores the nonlinear coupling characteristics and dynamic characteristics of the integrated system of electromagnetic brake and frictional brake. This paper uses the power bond graph method to establish nonlinear coupling mathematical model of the integrated system of electromagnetic brake and frictional brake and c...

  8. Effects of different shoe-lacing patterns on the biomechanics of running shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Marco; Hennig, Ewald M

    2009-02-01

    In the present study, we examined the influence of shoe lacing on foot biomechanics in running. Twenty experienced rearfoot runners ran in six different lacing conditions across a force platform at a speed of 3.3 m . s(-1). Foot pronation during contact, tibial acceleration, and plantar pressure distribution of the right leg were recorded. The test conditions differed in the number of laced eyelets (1, 2, 3, 6 or 7) and in lacing tightness (weak, regular or strong). The results show reduced loading rates (P comfort. The low lace shoe conditions resulted in lower impacts (P shoe. A firm foot-to-shoe coupling with higher lacing leads to a more effective use of running shoe features and is likely to reduce the risk of lower limb injury.

  9. Experimental Research on Brake Squeal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Daniel; Bernsteiner, Stefan

    Since many years experimental researches have been performed in order to get an insight into the issue of brake squeal. This work presents an innovative test setup for analyzing friction-excited vibrations and squeal triggering mechanisms. The investigated brake system showed brake squeal issues at certain operating points. The purpose was to analyse the brake system in detail on a test rig. Because the well-known methods of investigation such as laser vibrometer were not possible, the aim was to develop and generate new measuring points, which are close to the contact area of disc and pad. Therefore the brake calliper has been modified; hence the guide are replaced by modified ones. At these pins the friction force can be measured. Because of an optimized shape it is possible to measure the vibration of the friction force. The measured signal correlates with a parallel measured microphone signal. Next the brake disc will be assembled with triaxial accelerometers. Thus it is possible to determine the operating deflection shape of the disc. With the results of this work a new contact algorithm should be developed which can be used e.g. in Finite Element calculations.

  10. Shoes versus sneakers in toddler ambulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, N

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative values and differences between shoes and sneakers for young children just learning to walk. In phase 1 of the study, 79 toddlers (47 females and 32 males), ranging in age from 11 months to 3 years, were carefully measured for footwear. Only 15 toddlers (19%) could be properly fitted in the medium-width sneakers that are currently available on the market. The majority of the measured toddlers required widths greater than D, and to accommodate these wider feet, it was necessary to fit them with longer sneakers than they actually needed otherwise, thus making ambulation a bit more difficult and clumsy. In phase 2, eight toddlers, randomly selected except for sex (four male and four female), ranging in age from 11 to 16 months who had been ambulating 2 weeks to 5 months, were tagged with an identifying letter and videotaped in four walking situations: sneakers on tile, shoes on tile, sneakers on rugging, and shoes on rugging. Four hours of video taping was edited down to one-half hour. Twenty-three observers (orthopaedic surgeons, pediatricians, and shoe fitters) carefully reviewed the tape on multiple occasions and came to the following conclusions: better fit, stance, gait, cadence, and stability were noted with shoes in all the toddlers and in all situations. Falls were three times more frequent in sneakers as compared to shoes on tile surfaces and five times more frequent on rugging. It was concluded that the slight economic advantage of sneakers over shoes was not that great to warrant jeopardizing the capabilities of the toddler in the earliest stages of ambulation.

  11. THE EFFECT OF HEAT VARIATION ON DIFFERENT BRAKE DISK BRAKING FORCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut DÜZGÜN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different ventilated brake discs were manufactured and their braking force performances and heat generations were investigated experimentally together with a solid disc. Braking force outputs were examined in sudden and continuous braking conditions and disc temperatures were simply measured in continuous braking conditions. Fourteen pedal forces were used in sudden braking tests and eight periodic measurements were executed in continuous braking tests. Experiment results showed that ventilation applications not only increased the brake force outputs up to 42.6 %, but also reduced the heat formation on discs up to 31.5 % depending on test conditions.

  12. Thermal analysis on motorcycle disc brake geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. M. Zurin W., S.; Talib, R. J.; Ismail, N. I.

    2017-08-01

    Braking is a phase of slowing and stop the movement of motorcycle. During braking, the frictional heat was generated and the energy was ideally should be faster dissipated to surrounding to prevent the built up of the excessive temperature which may lead to brake fluid vaporization, thermoelastic deformation at the contact surface, material degradation and failure. In this paper, solid and ventilated type of motorcycle disc brake are being analyse using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) software. The main focus of the analysis is the thermal behaviour during braking for solid and ventilated disc brake. A comparison between both geometries is being discussed to determine the better braking performance in term of temperature distribution. It is found that ventilated disc brake is having better braking performance in terms of heat transfer compare to solid disc.

  13. Oxygen Consumption While Standing with Unstable Shoe Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasser Benedikt A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study explored the effects of unstable shoe design on oxygen consumption. Methods. Oxygen consumption (VO2 and heart rate (HR were measured in 16 individuals while barefoot, wearing unstable shoes (Masai Barefoot Technology and wearing conventional sport shoes while standing and walking on a treadmill and for 5 individuals while walking around a 400 m track. Results. When wearing the MBT shoes, a significant (p < 0.01 increase of 9.3 ± 5.2% in VO2 was measured while standing quietly for 6 min. No differences in VO2 and HR were observed between the MBT shoes or weight-adjusted conventional shoes (to match the weight of the MBT shoes while walking on a treadmill. However, significant increases (p < 0.01 in VO2 (4.4 ± 8.2% and HR (3.6 ± 7.3% were observed for the MBT shoes compared with being barefoot. No significant differences in VO2 and HR were recorded while walking around a 400 m track either with MBT shoes, weight-adjusted conventional shoes or barefoot. Nonetheless, a comparison of the MBT shoes with barefoot revealed a tendency for VO2 to be higher when wearing the MBT shoes (7.1 ± 6.5%, p < 0.1 although HR was not significantly affected. Conclusions. The unstable shoe design predominantly effects oxygen consumption while standing, most likely due to increased muscle activity of the lower extremities.

  14. Brake Performance Analysis of ABS for Eddy Current and Electrohydraulic Hybrid Brake System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an eddy current and electro-hydraulic hybrid brake system to solve problems such as wear, thermal failure, and slow response of traditional vehicle brake system. Mathematical model was built to calculate the torque of the eddy current brake system and hydraulic brake system and analyze the braking force distribution between two types of brake systems. A fuzzy controller on personal computer based on LabVIEW and Matlab was designed and a set of hardware in the loop system was constructed to validate and analyze the performance of the hybrid brake system. Through lots of experiments on dry and wet asphalt roads, the hybrid brake system achieves perfect performance on the experimental bench, the hybrid system reduces abrasion and temperature of the brake disk, response speed is enhanced obviously, fuzzy controller keeps high utilization coefficient due to the optimal slip ratio regulation, and the total brake time has a smaller decrease than traditional hydraulic brake system.

  15. Optimization of thrie beam terminal end shoe connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Terminal thrie end shoes connect nested thrie beams to parapets or other bridge rail structure to provide a robust connectivity between a transition section and a rigid railing section. When connecting terminal end shoe to thrie beam transitions, the...

  16. Isolation, purification and identification of bacteria from the shoes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... subtilis (5 subspecies), Bacillus spore (3 subspecies), Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus thuringiensis. The results may contribute to the selection of efficient antimicrobial agents for children's shoes and insole. Key words: Children's shoes, bacteria, isolation, identification.

  17. Tribological properties of nonasbestos brake pad material by using coconut fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, A. L.; Pinca-Bretotean, C.; Utu, D.; Josan, A.

    2017-01-01

    In automotive industry, the brake system is influenced by a large number of variables including geometry of components, materials of brakes, components interaction and many operating condition. Organic fiber reinforced metallic friction composites are increasingly being used in automotive brake shoes, disc and pads, linings, blocks, clutch facings, primarily because of awareness of health hazards of asbestos. Current trend in the research field of automotive industry is to utilization of different wastes as a source of raw materials for composite materials. This will provide more economical benefit and also environmental preservation by utilize the waste of natural fibre In this paper it has performed a tribological study to determine the characteristics of the friction product by using coconut natural fibred reinforced in aluminium composite. In this sense, two different laboratory formulation were prepared with 5% and 10% coconut fibre and other constitutes like binder, friction modifiers, abrasive material and solid lubrificant using powder mettallurgy. These dnew materials for brake pads are tested for tribological behaviour in a standard pin on disc tribometer. To know the wear behavior of composite materials will determine the parameters that characterize there tribological properties.

  18. Brake System Analysis, Reliability Testing And Control Using Bench Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Z.; Yang, B.

    1997-01-01

    In this project, the authors investigated the dynamics and reliability of a brake control system using a test bench which is a Lincoln Town Car brake system. The objectives of the project are to: 1) experimentally characterize the brake system; 2) obtain good nonlinear models of the brake system; 3) perform reliability analysis of the brake control system; and, 4) develop algorithms for brake malfunction detection and brake reliability enhancement. By using the brake test bench, the dynamic c...

  19. 49 CFR 229.79 - Third rail shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Third rail shoes. 229.79 Section 229.79....79 Third rail shoes. When locomotives are equipped with both third rail and overhead collectors, third-rail shoes shall be deenergized while in yards and at stations when current collection is...

  20. 7 CFR 58.225 - Clothing and shoe covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clothing and shoe covers. 58.225 Section 58.225 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....225 Clothing and shoe covers. Clean clothing and shoe covers shall be provided exclusively for the...

  1. Loss of conductivity in operating room shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, E; Newell, J C

    1978-01-01

    The effect of dirt encountered during normal use on the conductivity of operating room footwear has been studied. Booties, sneakers, and shoes having relatively larger conductive area remained conductive throughout the testing period. Shoes and clogs having relatively smaller conductive contact area were found to lose conductivity sooner, and, in more cases, than any other type of footwear tested. The size of the conductive contact area appears to correlate with the length of time that conductive footwear will remain within resistance specification during use.

  2. 49 CFR 393.41 - Parking brake system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.41 Parking brake system. (a) Hydraulic-braked vehicles... road (free of ice and snow). Hydraulic-braked vehicles which were not subject to the parking brake... spring action. If other energy is used to apply the parking brake, there must be an accumulation of that...

  3. THE STUDY OF BRAKE EFFECTIVENESS HOPPER SYSTEM WITH SEPARATE BRAKING TRUCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Je. Nishhenko

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of tests of the hopper brake systems for the pellets having typical system and separate braking per each bogie are presented. It is shown that the brake system with separate braking has several advantages as compared to the typical one.

  4. A Demonstration of Car Braking Instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Jack; Swinson, Derek

    1990-01-01

    Detailed are the construction of a demonstration car, apparatus and procedures used in the demonstration, and the analysis of the effects of car braking. The cases of rear-wheel and front-wheel braking are considered. (CW)

  5. Brakes, brake control and driver assistance systems function, regulation and components

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Braking systems have been continuously developed and improved throughout the last years. Major milestones were the introduction of antilock braking system (ABS) and electronic stability program. This reference book provides a detailed description of braking components and how they interact in electronic braking systems. Contents Motor vehicle safety.- Basic principles of vehicle dynamics.- Car braking systems.- Car braking-system components.- Wheel brakes.- Antilock breaking systems.- Traction control system.- Electronic stability program.- Automatic brake functions.- Hydraulic modulator.- Sensors for brake control.- Sensotronic brake control.- Active steering.- Occupant protection systems.- Driver assistance systems.- Adaptive cruise control.- Parking systems.- Instrumentation.- Orientation methods.- Navigation systems.- Workshop technology. The target groups Motor-vehicle technicians in education and vocational training Master-mechanics and technicians in garage-workshops Teachers and lecturers in vocation...

  6. BRAKING OF HIGH-SPEED PASSENGER TRAINS WITH REGARD TO THE OPERATION OF AN ELECTROMAGNETIC RAIL BRAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Je. Naumenko

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of the braking process of high-speed passenger train with the use of compressed-air, electropneumatic and electromagnetic track brakes is carried out. The dependences of braking distance on motion speed for vehicles equipped by block or disk brakes as well as for a case of electromagnetic track brakes used in addition to existing braking means.

  7. 49 CFR 238.231 - Brake system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brake system. 238.231 Section 238.231... Equipment § 238.231 Brake system. Except as otherwise provided in this section, on or after September 9... train's primary brake system shall be capable of stopping the train with a service application from its...

  8. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF DYNAMICS BRAKING BIAXIAL TROLLEYBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Mazanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the questions of braking of trolleybus by working braking system with connected and disconnected electric drive motor. Main constructive differences of trolleybuses are shown including characteristics of electric drive motor in the mode of braking. Methods of road test are given. Comparison of the theoretical and experimental  research has analyzed. 

  9. Biomechanics of running with rocker shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Dekker, Rienk; Postema, Klaas; Kluitenberg, Bas; Bredeweg, Steef W.; Hijmans, Juha M.

    Objectives: Load reduction is an important consideration in conservative management of tendon overuse injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy. Previous research has shown that the use of rocker shoes can reduce the positive ankle power and plantar flexion moment which might help in unloading the

  10. [Grading of the functional sport shoe parameter "cushioning" and "forefoot flexibility" on running shoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleindienst, F I; Krabbe, B; Walther, M; Brüggemann, G-P

    2006-03-01

    On nearly every running event a heterogeneous structure of participants regarding body height and body weight can be observed. This study should figure out whether the running shoe manufacturers will consider this anthropometric variability. Moreover it should be investigated the runners needs based on different anthropometrics regarding preferred cushioning and forefoot flexibility properties. In order to check whether the running shoe manufacturers will apply a grading pattern, a dynamic material study with conventional running shoes in different sizes was conducted. In a second step a field study in Middle Europe and North America with 244 female and 227 male runners was organized. Every subject had to run and evaluate 7 different shoe modifications. Based on the material study it is to state, that the running shoe manufacturers currently do not consider a systematic grading of cushioning and forefoot flexibility properties. In contrast to this, the field study reveals the necessity to grade these properties. A shoe size dependent and a geographic grading concept are suggested. It is supposed, that the application of these grading concepts do not only provide a comfort improvement, but they also contribute to a reduction of joint loads of the lower extremities and consequently to a prevention of overuse injuries.

  11. Sensotronic brake control. Braking with maximum efficiency; Die Sensotronic Brake Control. Bremsen auf hoechstem Niveau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischle, G.; Stoll, U.; Hinrichs, W.

    2002-05-01

    Sensotronic Brake Control (SBC) celebrated its world premiere when it was introduced into standard production along with the new SL in October 2001. This innovative brake system is also fitted as standard in the new E-Class. The design of the system components is identical to those used in the SL-Class. The software control parameters have been adapted to the conditions in the new saloon. (orig.) [German] Die Sensotronic Brake Control (SBC) wurde als Weltneuheit mit dem neuen SL im Oktober 2001 in Serie gebracht. Dieses innovative Bremssystem gehoert ebenfalls zur Serienausstattung der neuen E-Klasse. Die Systemkomponenten sind baugleich mit denen der SL-Klasse. Die Regelparameter der Software sind an die Verhaeltnisse der Limousine angepasst. (orig.)

  12. The effects of cycling shoe stiffness on forefoot pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, Nathan Edward; Quesada, Peter M

    2003-10-01

    Plantar pressure data were recorded in two different shoe types to determine the effect of cycling shoe stiffness on peak plantar forefoot pressure in cyclists. Two pairs of shoes of the same size and manufacturer, identical except for outsole material and stiffness, were tested. Shoe stiffness measurements were collected under controlled conditions and in two different configurations using a dynamic hydraulic tensile testing machine. Measurements of plantar pressure were done using Pedar capacitive-based sensor insoles while subjects pedaled in a seated position at a controlled power output. Power output was set at a constant value of 400 W across all subjects by a magnetic resistance trainer unit. The pressure distribution in carbon-fiber-composite shoes during cycling was compared to cycling shoes made with plastic soles. Carbon fiber shoes presented stiffness values 42% and 550% higher than plastic shoes in longitudinal bending and three-point bending, respectively. The shoes made with carbon fiber produced peak plantar pressures 18% higher than those of plastic design (121 kPa vs. 103 kPa, p = .005). Competitive or professional cyclists suffering from metatarsalgia or ischemia should be especially careful when using carbon fiber cycling shoes because the shoes increase peak plantar pressure, which may aggravate these foot conditions.

  13. Cooperative Control of Regenerative Braking and Antilock Braking for a Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new cooperative braking control strategy (CBCS is proposed for a parallel hybrid electric vehicle (HEV with both a regenerative braking system and an antilock braking system (ABS to achieve improved braking performance and energy regeneration. The braking system of the vehicle is based on a new method of HEV braking torque distribution that makes the antilock braking system work together with the regenerative braking system harmoniously. In the cooperative braking control strategy, a sliding mode controller (SMC for ABS is designed to maintain the wheel slip within an optimal range by adjusting the hydraulic braking torque continuously; to reduce the chattering in SMC, a boundary-layer method with moderate tuning of a saturation function is also investigated; based on the wheel slip ratio, battery state of charge (SOC, and the motor speed, a fuzzy logic control strategy (FLC is applied to adjust the regenerative braking torque dynamically. In order to evaluate the performance of the cooperative braking control strategy, the braking system model of a hybrid electric vehicle is built in MATLAB/SIMULINK. It is found from the simulation that the cooperative braking control strategy suggested in this paper provides satisfactory braking performance, passenger comfort, and high regenerative efficiency.

  14. Is it possible to sanitize athletes' shoes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Gabriele; Burgassi, Sandra; Russo, Carmela; Ceriale, Emma; Quercioli, Cecilia; Meniconi, Cosetta

    2015-02-01

    Footwear should be designed to avoid trauma and injury to the skin of the feet that can favor bacterial and fungal infections. Procedures and substances for sanitizing the interior of shoes are uncommon but are important aspects of primary prevention against foot infections and unpleasant odor. To evaluate the efficacy of a sanitizing technique for reducing bacterial and fungal contamination of footwear. Crossover study. Mens Sana basketball team. Twenty-seven male athletes and 4 coaches (62 shoes). The experimental protocol required a first sample (swab), 1/shoe, at time 0 from inside the shoes of all athletes before the sanitizing technique began and a second sample at time 1, after about 4 weeks, April 2012 to May 2012, of daily use of the sanitizing technique. The differences before and after use of the sanitizing technique for total bacterial count at 36 °C and 22 °C for Staphylococcus spp, yeasts, molds, Enterococcus spp, Pseudomonas spp, Escherichia coli , and total coliform bacteria were evaluated. Before use of the sanitizing technique, the total bacterial counts at 36 °C and 22 °C and for Staphylococcus spp were greater by a factor of 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.42, 9.84), 5.84 (95% CI = 3.45, 9.78), and 4.78 (95% CI = 2.84, 8.03), respectively. All the other comparisons showed a reduction in microbial loads, whereas E coli and coliforms were no longer detected. No statistically significant decrease in yeasts (P = .0841) or molds (P = .6913) was recorded probably because of low contamination. The sanitizing technique significantly reduced the bacterial presence in athletes' shoes.

  15. Distribution of plantar pressure during jogging barefoot or in minimalistic shoes in people who used to run in cushioned shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, Paweł; Waszak, Małgorzata; Bartkowiak, Michał; Bartkowiak, Piotr; Tomczak, Maciej; Boch-Kmieciak, Joanna; Cieślik, Krystyna

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of runners prefer jogging barefoot or in minimalistic shoes. The aim of this study was to compare the distribution of plantar pressure during jogging barefoot, in minimalistic shoes, or in shoes with cushioned soles, as these forces modulate the risk of injury. The study included nine men aged between 24 and 25 years, who engaged in long-distance running. The plantar pressure of three foot zones (forefoot, midfoot, and hindfoot) was examined with WIN-POD electronic podometer during running barefoot, in minimalistic shoes, or in shoes with cushioned soles. Individuals who ran barefoot showed the greatest forefoot pressure, followed by those running in minimalistic shoes and cushioned shoes. In contrast, the heel pressure in individuals running in cushioned shoes was significantly greater than in those using minimalistic shoes or running barefoot. Switching from running in cushioned shoes to jogging barefoot is associated with the accumulation of greatest pressure in the forefoot and midfoot. The accumulation of the greatest pressure at the insertion of plantar aponeurosis can lead to the injuries of musculoskeletal system, in particular plantar aponeurositis. Even distribution of pressure among various parts of the foot in persons running in minimalistic shoes is associated with lower risk of injury than in the case of running barefoot.

  16. Brake blending strategy for a hybrid vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boberg, Evan S.

    2000-12-05

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including a transmission for driving a pair of wheels of a vehicle and a heat engine and an electric motor/generator coupled to the transmission. A friction brake system is provided for applying a braking torque to said vehicle. A controller unit generates control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system for controllably braking the vehicle in response to a drivers brake command. The controller unit determines and amount of regenerative torque available and compares this value to a determined amount of brake torque requested for determining the control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system.

  17. Developing of a software for determining advanced brake failures in brakes test bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Köylü

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available At present time, the brake test bench conducts the braking and suspension tests of front or rear axles and the test results are evaluated through one axle. The purpose of the brake testing system is to determine braking force and damping coefficient dissymmetry of one axle. Thus, this test system evaluates the performance of service brake, hand brake and suspension systems by considering separately front and rear axle dissymmetry. For this reason, the effects of different braking and damping forces applied by right and left wheels of both axles on braking performance of all vehicle are not determined due to available algorithm of the test bench. Also, the other brake failures are not occurred due to the algorithm of brake test system. In this study, the interface has been developed to determine the other effects of dissymmetry and the other brake failures by using the one axle results of brake test bench. The interface has algorithm computing the parameters according to the interaction between front and rear axles by only using measured test results. Also, it gives the warnings by comparing changes in the parameters with braking performance rules. Braking and suspension tests of three different vehicles have been conducted by using brake test bench to determine the performance of the algorithm. Parameters based on the axle interaction have been calculated by transferring brake test results to the interface and the test results have been evaluated. As a result, the effects of brake and suspension failures on braking performance of both axle and vehicle have been determined thanks to the developed interface.

  18. STUDY OF TECHNICAL STATE IMPACT OF BRAKE RETARDERS AT THE PROCESSING ABILITY OF HUMPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kozachenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research aims development of methods for calculating the estimated capacity humps for the loss conditions of brake power retarders. Methodology. The operation of humps is connected with large number of random factors, such as the characteristics of cuts, environmental conditions, the value of braking power implemented by retardants and others. In this regard, to research the set tasks the methods of simulation modeling and mathematical statistics are used. Determination of speed and motion time of cuts on the routes is carried out on the basis of rolling down modeling of their rolling down from the humps. Findings. If the brake power of retarders of the rolling down part of humps is not enough to stop the cuts, it should be provided the intervals during break-up to release the rolling routes from the preliminary cuts. The dependencies allowing to set the duration of these intervals were determined using the methods of the probability theory If the brake power of retarders at the rolling down part of humps and at the classification tracks is not enough to meet the requirements of the aimed regulation of the cuts rolling speed, it is necessary the use the additional brake shoes. The work develops the methods that on the basis of simulation modeling of the humping process allow one to set the desired value of the break-up duration increase. They ensure the traffic safety at the given number of car motion speed regulators. Originality. Authors firstly proposed the improved methods for determining the estimated capacity of humps. Unlike the existing ones, allow taking into account the technological limitations caused by the requirements of the humping process safety and can be used to assess the performance of the humps in the conditions of parametric failures of the retarders. Practical value. The use of the proposed methods allows assessing the influence of the retarders’ disrepair on the performance degradation of humps for the

  19. Corrective shoes for children: a survey of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staheli, L T; Giffin, L

    1980-01-01

    A survey of shoe-prescribing practices for children was taken among pediatricians, orthopaedists, pediatric orthopaedists, and podiatrists. Opinions differed significantly regarding the usefulness of shoe modifications for common pediatric lower limb and foot problems. Parents' attitudes toward children's shoes were also surveyed. Pediatricians and pediatric orthopaedists tended to prescribe corrective shoes less often than did orthopaedists and podiatrists. High topped shoes are not necessary to promote normal foot development, in the opinion of 85% of those surveyed; however, high topped shoes were often recommended for infants because they slip off less easily. Preferences for Thomas heels, scaphoid pads, reverse lasts, straight lasts, wedges, torque heels, and shoe lifts for problems including flexible flat feet, metatarsus adductus, intoeing, bow legs, knock knees, and leg length inequalities were delineated among the four groups treating children's feet. The authors conclude that whereas studies show that shoe modifications are of questionable value in the problems discussed, corrective shoes are often prescribed when regular shoes would be more appropriate and economical.

  20. Stiffness Effects in Rocker-Soled Shoes: Biomechanical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pei-Fang; Chung, Chia-Hua; Hsia, Chi-Chun; Chang, Chih-Han

    2017-01-01

    Rocker-soled shoes provide a way to reduce the possible concentration of stress, as well as change movement patterns, during gait. This study attempts to examine how plantar force and spatio-temporal variables are affected by two rocker designs, one with softer and one with denser sole materials, by comparing them with the barefoot condition and with flat-soled shoes. Eleven subjects’ gait parameters during walking and jogging were recorded. Our results showed that compared with barefoot walking, plantar forces were higher for flat shoes while lower for both types of rocker shoes, the softer-material rocker being the lowest. The plantar force of flat shoes is greater than the vertical ground reaction force, while that of both rocker shoes is much less, 13.87–30.55% body weight. However, as locomotion speed increased to jogging, for all shoe types, except at the second peak plantar force of the denser sole material rocker shoes, plantar forces were greater than for bare feet. More interestingly, because the transmission of force was faster while jogging, greater plantar force was seen in the rocker-soled shoes with softer material than with denser material; results for higher-speed shock absorption in rocker-soled shoes with softer material were thus not as good. In general, the rolling phenomena along the bottom surface of the rocker shoes, as well as an increase in the duration of simultaneous curve rolling and ankle rotation, could contribute to the reduction of plantar force for both rocker designs. The possible mechanism is the conversion of vertical kinetic energy into rotational kinetic energy. To conclude, since plantar force is related to foot-ground interface and deceleration methods, rocker-design shoes could achieve desired plantar force reduction through certain rolling phenomena, shoe-sole stiffness levels, and locomotion speeds. PMID:28046009

  1. Stiffness Effects in Rocker-Soled Shoes: Biomechanical Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yun Lin

    Full Text Available Rocker-soled shoes provide a way to reduce the possible concentration of stress, as well as change movement patterns, during gait. This study attempts to examine how plantar force and spatio-temporal variables are affected by two rocker designs, one with softer and one with denser sole materials, by comparing them with the barefoot condition and with flat-soled shoes. Eleven subjects' gait parameters during walking and jogging were recorded. Our results showed that compared with barefoot walking, plantar forces were higher for flat shoes while lower for both types of rocker shoes, the softer-material rocker being the lowest. The plantar force of flat shoes is greater than the vertical ground reaction force, while that of both rocker shoes is much less, 13.87-30.55% body weight. However, as locomotion speed increased to jogging, for all shoe types, except at the second peak plantar force of the denser sole material rocker shoes, plantar forces were greater than for bare feet. More interestingly, because the transmission of force was faster while jogging, greater plantar force was seen in the rocker-soled shoes with softer material than with denser material; results for higher-speed shock absorption in rocker-soled shoes with softer material were thus not as good. In general, the rolling phenomena along the bottom surface of the rocker shoes, as well as an increase in the duration of simultaneous curve rolling and ankle rotation, could contribute to the reduction of plantar force for both rocker designs. The possible mechanism is the conversion of vertical kinetic energy into rotational kinetic energy. To conclude, since plantar force is related to foot-ground interface and deceleration methods, rocker-design shoes could achieve desired plantar force reduction through certain rolling phenomena, shoe-sole stiffness levels, and locomotion speeds.

  2. Stiffness Effects in Rocker-Soled Shoes: Biomechanical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yun; Su, Pei-Fang; Chung, Chia-Hua; Hsia, Chi-Chun; Chang, Chih-Han

    2017-01-01

    Rocker-soled shoes provide a way to reduce the possible concentration of stress, as well as change movement patterns, during gait. This study attempts to examine how plantar force and spatio-temporal variables are affected by two rocker designs, one with softer and one with denser sole materials, by comparing them with the barefoot condition and with flat-soled shoes. Eleven subjects' gait parameters during walking and jogging were recorded. Our results showed that compared with barefoot walking, plantar forces were higher for flat shoes while lower for both types of rocker shoes, the softer-material rocker being the lowest. The plantar force of flat shoes is greater than the vertical ground reaction force, while that of both rocker shoes is much less, 13.87-30.55% body weight. However, as locomotion speed increased to jogging, for all shoe types, except at the second peak plantar force of the denser sole material rocker shoes, plantar forces were greater than for bare feet. More interestingly, because the transmission of force was faster while jogging, greater plantar force was seen in the rocker-soled shoes with softer material than with denser material; results for higher-speed shock absorption in rocker-soled shoes with softer material were thus not as good. In general, the rolling phenomena along the bottom surface of the rocker shoes, as well as an increase in the duration of simultaneous curve rolling and ankle rotation, could contribute to the reduction of plantar force for both rocker designs. The possible mechanism is the conversion of vertical kinetic energy into rotational kinetic energy. To conclude, since plantar force is related to foot-ground interface and deceleration methods, rocker-design shoes could achieve desired plantar force reduction through certain rolling phenomena, shoe-sole stiffness levels, and locomotion speeds.

  3. Effect of motion control running shoes compared with neutral shoes on tibial rotation during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Alice; Birch, Ivan; Kuisma, Raija

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether a motion control running shoe reduces tibial rotation in the transverse plane during treadmill running. An experimental study measuring tibial rotation in volunteer participants using a repeated measures design. Human Movement Laboratory, School of Health Professions, University of Brighton. Twenty-four healthy participants were tested. The group comprised males and females with size 6, 7, 9 and 11 feet. The age range for participants was 19 to 31 years. The total range of proximal tibial rotation was measured using the Codamotion 3-D Movement Analysis System. A one-tailed paired t-test indicated a statistically significant decrease in the total range of proximal tibial rotation when a motion control shoe was worn (mean difference 1.38°, 95% confidence interval 0.03 to 2.73, P=0.04). There is a difference in tibial rotation in the transverse plane between a motion control running shoe and a neutral running shoe. The results from this study have implications for the use of supportive running shoes as a form of injury prevention. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Increasing reliability of braking systems in mine hoisting machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapovalov, N.I.; Kurchenko, E.M.

    1980-05-01

    This article reviews the braking systems used in hoisting machines in vertical and inclined shafts in coal mines. Braking systems used in hoisting machines can generally be divided into two groups: lack of pressure in the braking system cylinder turns on the brakes, or lack of pressure turns the brakes off. Manual operation of the braking system can sometimes create problems as sudden movement of the brake lever into position, i.e. braking, causes intensive braking with all its negative consequences for the installation. Therefore, an electric device is presented which can be included in the electric circuit of the braking system. A scheme of the apparatus is shown. When the proposed apparatus is included in the electric control system of the brakes, moving the lever into position i.e. braking, causes gradual changes in the flow of electric current, and therefore braking is smoother. (In Russian)

  5. [The shoe industry and the musculoskeletal system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzini, Giacomo; Capodaglio, Edda Maria; Mancin, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    Shoes factory workers are engaged in ripetitive tasks, often performed in constrained postures and in concomitance of force applied, which result in increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders. Risk assessment and ergonomic interventions are part of the on-site prevention program, which should pertain also to gender and age differences. Health and safety issues can be adequately faced by an active epidemiological surveillance complemented by ergonomics.

  6. 49 CFR 238.309 - Periodic brake equipment maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with other than an AB, ABD, ABDX, 26-C, or equivalent brake system. (e) Cab cars. The brake equipment... schedule: (1) Every 1,476 days for that portion of the cab car brake system using brake valves that are identical to the passenger coach 26-C brake system; (2) Every 1,104 days for that portion of the cab car...

  7. 49 CFR 393.40 - Required brake systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.40 Required brake systems. (a) Each commercial motor vehicle must have brakes adequate to stop and hold the vehicle or combination of motor vehicles. Each commercial..., and 393.52 of this subpart. (4) Electric brake systems. Motor vehicles equipped with electric brake...

  8. 49 CFR 230.77 - Foundation brake gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foundation brake gear. 230.77 Section 230.77... Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.77 Foundation brake gear. (a) Maintenance. Foundation brake gear...) Distance above the rails. No part of the foundation brake gear of the steam locomotive or tender shall be...

  9. 3D Tracking via Shoe Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangmin; Liu, Guo; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xiaochuang; Ma, Xiaolin

    2016-10-28

    Most location-based services are based on a global positioning system (GPS), which only works well in outdoor environments. Compared to outdoor environments, indoor localization has created more buzz in recent years as people spent most of their time indoors working at offices and shopping at malls, etc. Existing solutions mainly rely on inertial sensors (i.e., accelerometer and gyroscope) embedded in mobile devices, which are usually not accurate enough to be useful due to the mobile devices' random movements while people are walking. In this paper, we propose the use of shoe sensing (i.e., sensors attached to shoes) to achieve 3D indoor positioning. Specifically, a short-time energy-based approach is used to extract the gait pattern. Moreover, in order to improve the accuracy of vertical distance estimation while the person is climbing upstairs, a state classification is designed to distinguish the walking status including plane motion (i.e., normal walking and jogging horizontally), walking upstairs, and walking downstairs. Furthermore, we also provide a mechanism to reduce the vertical distance accumulation error. Experimental results show that we can achieve nearly 100% accuracy when extracting gait patterns from walking/jogging with a low-cost shoe sensor, and can also achieve 3D indoor real-time positioning with high accuracy.

  10. 3D Tracking via Shoe Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangmin Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most location-based services are based on a global positioning system (GPS, which only works well in outdoor environments. Compared to outdoor environments, indoor localization has created more buzz in recent years as people spent most of their time indoors working at offices and shopping at malls, etc. Existing solutions mainly rely on inertial sensors (i.e., accelerometer and gyroscope embedded in mobile devices, which are usually not accurate enough to be useful due to the mobile devices’ random movements while people are walking. In this paper, we propose the use of shoe sensing (i.e., sensors attached to shoes to achieve 3D indoor positioning. Specifically, a short-time energy-based approach is used to extract the gait pattern. Moreover, in order to improve the accuracy of vertical distance estimation while the person is climbing upstairs, a state classification is designed to distinguish the walking status including plane motion (i.e., normal walking and jogging horizontally, walking upstairs, and walking downstairs. Furthermore, we also provide a mechanism to reduce the vertical distance accumulation error. Experimental results show that we can achieve nearly 100% accuracy when extracting gait patterns from walking/jogging with a low-cost shoe sensor, and can also achieve 3D indoor real-time positioning with high accuracy.

  11. Creative Design of Double Safety Shoes Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong Yih

    This paper is to synthesize the double safety shoes mechanisms of elevators for prompting passenger's safety. A systematic design methodology including type synthesis and mechanism skeletons technology is also presented based on the design requirements and design constraints. The design requirements include to avoiding from collision between shoes, and shoe can be pulled out independently not to drag the door. The design constraints are proposed for assigning link types and kinematic relations. An existing mechanism, which is designed with six links and seven joints, is investigated by mechanism kinematics and structure sketch to establish the topological structure. According to the creative method, all of the possible kinematic chains with the numbers of the vertices and edges are enumerated. Then the linkage numbers are assigned skillfully to the edges, and one of the kinematic pairs, for example, revolute pair, prismatic pair, and rolling pair, is chosen for every vertices. So every kinematic chain can be stretched out several particularized chains. Several mechanism skeletons are also sketched.

  12. New material technologies for brakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haug, T.; Rebstock, K.

    2000-07-01

    Brake discs made of grey cast iron are produced today in large quantities in seconds clock pulse. In spite of less tolerance and greater quality demands, extremely small unit costs are realised. On the one hand, the reason for this may be found in the low prices of the raw materials, refined production technology and large production numbers. On the other hand, the technical potential of grey cast-iron has essentially been exhausted. For further technical innovations in the area of brakes, new materials such as Al-MMC and CMC play an important role. The potential has already been demonstrated. In part an assembly installation has already been successful (see rail traffic) or will be shortly (see SLR at the IAA 99). The main hindrance to further assembly installation of a large number of items is the high installation costs. Therefore, in the future, along with the reduction of raw material costs (for example, C-Fibre) the main direction that will need to be taken to further reduce production costs, wil have to be in the realisation of a production technology with reliable processes suitable for large volumes. Otherwise, alternative brake disc material will only have a reduced significance. (orig.)

  13. Injuries And Footwear (Part 2): Minimalist Running Shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Orr, Robin; Pope, Rodney; Grier, Tyson

    2016-01-01

    This article defines minimalist running shoes and examines physiological, biomechanical, and injury rate differences when running in conventional versus minimalist running shoes. A minimalist shoe is one that provides "minimal interference with the natural movement of the foot, because of its high flexibility, low heel to toe drop, weight and stack height, and the absence of motion control and stability devices." Most studies indicate that running in minimalist shoes results in a lower physiological energy cost than running in conventional shoes, likely because of the lower weight of the minimalist shoe. Most individuals running in conventional shoes impact the ground heel first (rearfoot strike pattern), whereas most people running in minimalist shoes tend to strike with the front of the foot (forefoot strike pattern). The rate at which force is developed on ground impact (i.e., the loading rate) is generally higher when running in conventional versus minimalist shoes. Findings from studies that have looked at associations between injuries and foot strike patterns or injuries and loading rates are conflicting, so it is not clear if these factors influence injury rates; more research is needed. Better-designed prospective studies indicate that bone stress injuries and the overall injury incidence are higher in minimalist shoes during the early weeks (10-12 weeks) of transition to this type of footwear. Longer-term studies are needed to define injury rates once runners are fully transitioned to minimalist shoes. At least one longer-term minimalist-shoe investigation is ongoing and, hopefully, will be published soon. 2016.

  14. A New Approach in CAD System for Designing Shoes

    OpenAIRE

    Guid, Nikola; Kolmanič, Simon

    2003-01-01

    The flattening of digitized surfaces is still very important in design of thin walled objects such as the airplane wings, parts of car bodies, textile products, and shoe uppers. Especially in shoe industry, the ability of quick respond to changing market needs is essential for successful competition. To give needed flexibility to a shoe designer, special CAD/CAM systems have been developed. Those systems are based on algorithms for surface reconstruction and surface flattening. In this articl...

  15. Current issues in the design of running and court shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinschmidt, C; Nigg, B M

    2000-09-01

    This review paper focuses on the three most important functional design factors for sport shoes: injury prevention, performance and comfort. Concepts for these design factors are discussed for running and court shoes. For running shoes, pronation control and cushioning are still considered to be the key concepts for injury prevention despite the fact that conclusive clinical and epidemiological evidence is missing to show the efficacy of these design strategies. Several design features have been proposed to be effective in controlling the amount of pronation. However, the kinematic effects of such features seem to be subject-specific and rather small especially when looking at the actual skeletal motion. Recent running shoe research suggests that cushioning may not or only marginally be related to injuries and that cushioning during the impact phase of running may be more related to aspects such as comfort, muscle tuning or fatigue. For court shoes, lateral stability, torsional flexibility, cushioning and traction control appear to be important design strategies to decrease the risk of injury. With respect to running performance, the shoe concepts of weight reduction, efficiency and energy return are discussed. The concept of energy return does not seem to be a feasible concept whereas concepts which aim to minimize energy loss appear to be more promising and successful, e.g. weight reduction, reduction of muscle energy required for stabilization. For court shoes, optimal traction seems to be the key factor for performance. Research in the area of shoe comfort is still sparse. Cushioning, fitting and climate concepts appear to improve the comfort of both running and court shoes. Many investigations in the area of sport shoe research have shown that subject-specific responses can be expected. Different groups of athletes may require different types of shoes. The definition of these grouping characteristics and their design needs seem to be the most important

  16. Design and Analysis of a Novel Centrifugal Braking Device for a Mechanical Antilock Braking System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Ping; Yang, Ming-Shien; Liu, Tyng

    2015-06-01

    A new concept for a mechanical antilock braking system (ABS) with a centrifugal braking device (CBD), termed a centrifugal ABS (C-ABS), is presented and developed in this paper. This new CBD functions as a brake in which the output braking torque adjusts itself depending on the speed of the output rotation. First, the structure and mechanical models of the entire braking system are introduced and established. Second, a numerical computer program for simulating the operation of the system is developed. The characteristics of the system can be easily identified and can be designed with better performance by using this program to studying the effects of different design parameters. Finally, the difference in the braking performance between the C-ABS and the braking system with or without a traditional ABS is discussed. The simulation results indicate that the C-ABS can prevent the wheel from locking even if excessive operating force is provided while still maintaining acceptable braking performance.

  17. Coefficient of Friction of a Brake Disc-Brake Pad Friction Couple

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A.W. Orłowicz; M. Mróz; G. Wnuk; O. Markowska; W. Homik; B. Kolbusz

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns evaluation of the coefficient of friction characterising a friction couple comprising a commercial brake disc cast of flake graphite grey iron and a typical brake pad for passenger motor car...

  18. [The functional sport shoe parameter "torsion" within running shoe research--a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F I; Kälin, X; Metzger, A; Westphal, K; Schweizer, F; Campe, S; Segesser, B

    2009-12-01

    Within the sport shoe area torsion is described as the twisting and decoupling of the rear-, mid- and forefoot along the longitudinal axis of the foot. Studies have shown that running shoes restrict the torsion of the foot and thus they increase the pronation of the foot. Based on the findings, it is recommended to design running shoes, which allow the natural freedom of movement of the foot. The market introduction of the first torsion concept through adidas(R) took place in 1989. Independently of the first market introduction, only one epidemiological study was conducted in the running shoe area. The study should investigate the occurrence of Achilles tendon problems of the athletes running in the new "adidas Torsion(R) shoes". However, further studies quantifying the optimal region of torsionability concerning the reduction of injury incidence are still missing. Newer studies reveal that the criterion torsion only plays a secondary roll regarding the buying decision. Moreover, athletes are not able to perceive torsionability as a discrete functional parameter. It is to register, that several workgroups are dealing intensively with the detailed analysis of the foot movement based on kinematic multi-segment-models. However, scientific as well as popular scientific contributions display that the original idea of the torsion concept is still not completely understood. Hence, the "inverse" characteristic is postulated. The present literature review leads to the deduction that the functional characteristics of the torsion concept are not fully implemented within the running shoe area. This implies the necessity of scientific studies, which investigate the relevance of a functional torsion concept regarding injury prevention based on basic and applied research. Besides, biomechanical studies should analyse systematically the mechanism and the effects of torsion relevant technologies and systems.

  19. Talking about the Automobile Braking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqiang

    2017-12-01

    With the continuous progress of society, the continuous development of the times, people’s living standards continue to improve, people continue to improve the pursuit. With the rapid development of automobile manufacturing, the car will be all over the tens of thousands of households, the increase in car traffic, a direct result of the incidence of traffic accidents. Brake system is the guarantee of the safety of the car, its technical condition is good or bad, directly affect the operational safety and transportation efficiency, so the brake system is absolutely reliable. The requirements of the car on the braking system is to have a certain braking force to ensure reliable work in all cases, light and flexible operation. Normal braking should be good performance, in addition to a foot sensitive, the emergency brake four rounds can not be too long, not partial, not ring.

  20. Purchasing infant shoes: attitudes of parents, pediatricians, and store managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J; De Jong, A; Packer, E; Bonanni, L

    1981-05-01

    Questionnaires designed to collect data about the purchase of shoes for normal infants were completed by 104 parents in a university ambulatory unit, 127 practicing pediatricians, and 36 shoe store managers. Infants received their first pair of walking shoes at an average age of 8.1 months (range: 4 to 12 months) and at an average cost of $14.56 (range: $2 to $43). Most of these shoes had laces (95%), high tops (87%), hard soles (74%), and special arch supports (50%). Of the 104 children, 73 had shoes before they were walking (average cost: $13.21) and 35 wore walking shoes before they were even standing (average cost: $12.68). Parents obtained much more information about shoes from friends and relatives than from physicians. Those parents who obtained most of their information from salespersons spent the most for shoes. The average cost of shoes recommended by store managers was $18.74. Although 77% of pediatricians felt that inexpensive canvas sneakers are adequate, only 28% of the salespersons and 37% of the parents believed that wearing sneakers is healthy.

  1. STUDY REGARDING THE CAR BRAKE DISC TEMPERATURE VARIATION DURING THE LENGTHY BRAKING

    OpenAIRE

    DRAGOMIR George; PANCU Rares; MITRAN Tudor Adrian; GEORGESCU Liviu; MOCA Sorin; CHIOREANU Catalin

    2015-01-01

    When a car descends a slope with a great length, the thermal stresses resulting from contact between the brake discs and brake pads, there is possible to exceed the maximal limits of the materials resistance, resulting the rapid wear, decreasing performance of braking or the loss control of movement and the road accidents are producing. The study refers to establishment the dependence between the braking intensity and time when the temperature achieves a maximum limit ...

  2. Impact of Brake Pad Structure on Temperature and Stress Fields of Brake Disc

    OpenAIRE

    Guoshun Wang; Rong Fu

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing ABAQUS finite element software, the study established the relationship between a brake pad structure and distributions of temperature and thermal stress on brake disc. By introducing radial structure factor and circular structure factor concepts, the research characterized the effect of friction block radial and circumferential arrangement on temperature field of the brake disc. A method was proposed for improving heat flow distribution of the brake disc through optimizing the posit...

  3. STUDY REGARDING THE CAR BRAKE DISC TEMPERATURE VARIATION DURING THE LENGTHY BRAKING

    OpenAIRE

    DRAGOMIR George; PANCU Rares; MITRAN Tudor Adrian; GEORGESCU Liviu

    2015-01-01

    When a car descends a slope with a great length, the thermal stresses resulting from contact between the brake discs and brake pads, there is possible to exceed the maximal limits of the materials resistance, resulting the rapid wear, decreasing the performance of braking or the loss control of movement and the road accidents are producing. The study refers to establishment the dependence between the braking intensity and time when the temperature achieves a the maximu...

  4. Dynamics of Braking Vehicles: From Coulomb Friction to Anti-Lock Braking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of braking of wheeled vehicles is studied using the Coulomb approximation for the friction between road and wheels. The dependence of the stopping distance on the mass of the vehicle, on the number of its wheels and on the intensity of the braking torque is established. It is shown that there are two regimes of braking, with and…

  5. Laboratory Scale Testing of Thermoelectric Regenerative Braking System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P Sevvel; I S Stephan Thangaiah; S Mars Mukesh; G Mohammed Anif

    2015-01-01

      Thermoelectric Regenerative Braking System (TERBS) employs an energy recovery mechanism by utilizing the energy conversion at the time of braking in an automobile to generate electricity accordingly...

  6. Safety of winder disc brakes - a structural approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodzinski, S.

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes reliability and safety of ASEA disc brakes installed in Polish mine hoist winding units. A theoretical assessment of disc brake safety is made; reliability diagrams for disc brake systems are established. A calculation example of safety assessment is also given, i.e. probability of brake failure of systems equipped with one or two pairs of brake discs. Furthermore, dangerous brake failures are explained as due to oil contaminations originating from hydraulic element leakage. Probability of failure of one-disk or two-disc brake systems is also determined. Schemes of the ASEA hydraulic disc brake system as well as working assembly and control assembly reliability diagrams are provided. 11 refs.

  7. Forecasting temperature fluctuations of brake discs on a hoisting machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barecki, Z.; Jankowski, A.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluates a method for forecasting temperature of brake discs on hoists used in underground coal mines. Formulae describing the following phenomena are derived: energy of mechanical braking, density of energy stream absorbed by the friction liners on disc brakes, temperature increase of a disc brake caused by braking, disc cooling intensity, disc temperature during repeated braking, minimum disc mass and surface. Use of the forecasting formulae is explained with the example of disc brake operation on 2 hoists. Temperature increase on disc surface and temperature increase of disc volume are treated as 2 basic indices characterizing disc brake operation. 11 refs.

  8. Research on Heat-Mechanical Coupling of Ventilated Disc Brakes under the Condition of Emergency Braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xuelong; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Wenxian; Zhang, Yang

    Taking the ventilated disc brake in some company as research object, and using UG to build 3D models of brake disc and pad, and making use of ABAQUS/Standard to set up two parts' finite element model, via the decelerated motion of actual simulation brake disc, which gets ventilated disc brake in the case of emergency breaking in time and space distribution of conditions of temperature and stress field, summarizes the distribution of temperature field and stress field, proves complex coupling between temperature, stress, and supplies the direct basis for brake's fatigue life analysis.

  9. Avoidance of brake squeal by a separation of the brake disc's eigenfrequencies: A structural optimization problem

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Brake squeal is a high-pitched noise in the frequency range between 1 kHz and 16 kHz originating from self-excited vibrations caused by the frictional contact between brake pads and brake disc. Since some decades, it has intensively been studied and many countermeasures have been proposed, including active and passive methods. It is known from experiments and has also been proved mathematically that splitting the eigenfrequencies of the brake rotor has a stabilizing effect and avoids brake sq...

  10. Impact of Brake Pad Structure on Temperature and Stress Fields of Brake Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoshun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing ABAQUS finite element software, the study established the relationship between a brake pad structure and distributions of temperature and thermal stress on brake disc. By introducing radial structure factor and circular structure factor concepts, the research characterized the effect of friction block radial and circumferential arrangement on temperature field of the brake disc. A method was proposed for improving heat flow distribution of the brake disc through optimizing the position of the friction block of the brake pad. Structure optimization was conducted on brake pads composed of 5 or 7 circular friction blocks. The result shows that, with the same overall contact area of friction pair, an appropriate brake pad structure can make the friction energy distribute evenly and therefore lowers peak temperature and stress of the brake disc. Compared with a brake pad of 7 friction blocks, an optimized brake pad of 5 friction blocks lowered the peak temperature of the corresponding brake disc by 4.9% and reduced the highest stress by 10.7%.

  11. SensorShoe: Mobile Gait Analysis for Parkinson's Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Paul J.M.; Kauw-A-Tjoe, R.G.; Kauw-A-Tjoe, R.G.; Marin Perianu, Mihai; Thalen, J.P.; Thalen, Jos

    We present the design and initial evaluation of a mobile gait analysis system, SensorShoe. The target user group is represented by Parkinson's Disease patients, which need continous assistance with the physical therapy in their home environment. SensorShoe analyses the gait by using a low-power

  12. SensorShoe: Mobile Gait Analysis for Parkinson's Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw-A-Tjoe, R.; Kauw-A-Tjoe, R.G.; Thalen, J.; Thalen, Jos; Marin Perianu, Mihai; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    We present the design and initial evaluation of a mobile gait analysis system, SensorShoe. The target user group is represented by Parkinson's Disease patients, which need continuous assistance with the physical therapy in their home environment. SensorShoe analyses the gait by using a low-power

  13. Shoes on the Highway: Discarded Footwear Inspires a Playwriting Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Maureen Brady

    2003-01-01

    Explains a drama assignment based on pictures of discarded shoes. Notes that through character creation, imaginative storytelling, and strong conflicting objectives, students write a 10-minute play about how the shoe got where it was. Outlines the final project, in which these plays would then be presented in a dramatic reading session. (PM)

  14. Use and usability of custom-made orthopedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the use of custom-made orthopedic shoes (OS) and the association between the use of OS and the most relevant aspects of their usability. Over a 6-month period, patients meeting the inclusion criteria were recruited by 12 orthopedic shoe companies scattered

  15. Identification of fungi from children's shoes and application of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... Key words: Children's shoes, identification, fungi, nano antimicrobial composite. INTRODUCTION ... inhibition ratio method (Gu et al., 2007). MATERIALS AND METHODS. Materials. 12 pairs of shoes worn by children aged 6 to 12 for more than half a .... dispersing emulsifier (T18 Basic, IKA Co., Germany).

  16. Purchasing preferences for sports shoes: An investigation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... University students' purchasing preferences for sports shoes. Several factors from literature such as comfort, advertising, brand, price, style and quality have been identified as influencing university students to purchase sports shoes. A sample (N=120) of University of Botswana sport marketing students participated in the ...

  17. New technical solutions of using rolling stock electrodynamical braking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonas Povilas LINGAITIS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers some theoretical and practical problems associated with the use of traction motor are operating in the generator mode (in braking. Mathematical and graphical relationships of electrodynamic braking, taking into account the requirements raised to braking systems in rail transport are presented. The latter include discontinuity of braking process, braking force regulation, depending on the locomotive speed, mass, type of railway and other parameters. Schematic diagrams of the locomotive braking and ways of controlling the braking force by varying electric circuit parameters are presented. The authors suggested contact-free regulation method of braking resistor for controlling braking force in rheostatic braking, and resistor parameters regulate with pulse regulation mode by semiconductor devices, such as new electrical components for rolling stock – IGBT transistors operating in the key mode. Presenting energy savings power systems, which are using regenerative braking-returning energy and diesel engine or any form of hybrid traction vehicles systems, circuit diagrams, electrical parameters curves.

  18. Method and apparatus for electromagnetically braking a motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electromagnetic braking system and method is provided for selectively braking a motor using an electromagnetic brake having an electromagnet, a permanent magnet, a rotor assembly, and a brake pad. The brake assembly applies when the electromagnet is de-energized and releases when the electromagnet is energized. When applied the permanent magnet moves the brake pad into frictional engagement with a housing, and when released the electromagnet cancels the flux of the permanent magnet to allow a leaf spring to move the brake pad away from the housing. A controller has a DC/DC converter for converting a main bus voltage to a lower braking voltage based on certain parameters. The converter utilizes pulse-width modulation (PWM) to regulate the braking voltage. A calibrated gap is defined between the brake pad and permanent magnet when the brake assembly is released, and may be dynamically modified via the controller.

  19. Design of an Ultrasonic Elliptic-Vibration Shoe and Its Performance in Ultrasonic Elliptic-Vibration-Shoe Centerless Grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yufeng; Wu, Yongbo; Kato, Masana; Tachibana, Toru; Syoji, Katsuo; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    We describe the design of an ultrasonic elliptic-vibration shoe and its performance in ultrasonic elliptic-vibration-shoe centerless grinding. First, the vibration modes of the shoe for the bending and longitudinal directions are discussed and determined from the point of view of fixing the support of the shoe. Then the structure and dimensions of the shoe are determined by FEM (Finite Element Method) analysis. In order to clarify the performance of the produced shoe, an evaluation apparatus is built. The elliptic motions under different applied voltages are investigated using laser vibrometers. Finally, workpiece rotational motion control tests and actual grinding operations are carried out. As a result, it is clarified that the workpiece rotational speed changes linearly with variation of the applied voltage. This indicates that the workpiece rotational motion can be precisely controlled by the elliptic motion of the shoe. In addition, the workpiece roundness was clearly improved from an initial value of 25µm to a final value of 0.64µm after grinding, indicating that the produced shoe performed well in actual grinding operations.

  20. Automotive brake wear: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Syed M S

    2018-01-01

    Road transport systems generate toxic particulate matter (PM) when in motion, that ultimately finds its way to the atmosphere. The PM produced by road transport systems can be broadly classified as exhaust and non-exhaust emissions. Exhaust emission is primarily due to product of combustion, as is the case of internal combustion engines and the PM is released to the atmosphere through the tail. Non-exhaust PM sources can be classified as sources such as emissions due to brake wear, tyre wear, road surface wear and resuspension. Both exhaust and non-exhaust sources generate PM of various sizes and shapes that has an impact on our health. Strict legislations by authorities have led to reduced exhaust emissions; however, due to the nature of complexity of PM generation by non-exhaust sources, effective control of non-exhaust emission still needs to be developed. Thus, as exhaust emissions are being controlled, non-exhaust is becoming a significant source of PM emission. The present paper reviews work done by previous researchers on non-exhaust PM and specifically, brake wear from road transport systems as this is one of the most important non-exhaust source of PM in the environment. The finding of the paper would be beneficial to policy makers and researchers.

  1. Energy harvesting with piezoelectric applied on shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilloni, Enrico; Carloni, Mirko; Giammarini, Marco; Conti, Massimo

    2013-05-01

    In the last few years the continuous demand of energy saving has brought continuous research on low-power devices, energy storage and new sources of energy. Energy harvesting is an interesting solution that captures the energy from the environment that would otherwise be wasted. This work presents an electric-mechanical model of a piezoelectric transducer in a cantilever configuration. The model has been characterized measuring the acceleration and the open circuit voltage of a piezoelectric cantilever subjected to a sinusoidal force with different values frequency and subject to an impulsive force. The model has been used to identify the optimal position in which the piezoelectric cantilever has to be placed on a shoe in order to obtain the maximum energy while walking or running. As a second step we designed the DC-DC converter with an hysteresis comparator. The circuit is able to give energy to switch on a microprocessor for the amount of time long enough to capture and store the information required. The complete system has been implemented, installed on a shoe and used in a 10 Km running competition.

  2. Frictional Performance and Temperature Rise of a Mining Nonasbestos Brake Material during Emergency Braking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiusheng Bao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By simulating emergency braking conditions of mine hoisters, tribological experiments of a mining nonasbestos brake material sliding on E355CC steel friction disc investigated a pad-on-disc friction tester. It is shown that, under combined influence of braking velocity and pressure, the lubricating film and micro-convex-apices on wear surface would have complex physicochemical reactions which make the instant friction coefficient rise gradually while the instant surface temperature rises first and then falls. With the antifriction effect from lubricating film and the desquamating of composite materials, the mean friction coefficient decreases first, then rises, and decreases again with the increasing of initial braking velocity. And with the existence of micro-convex-apices and variation from increment ratio of load and actual contacting area, it rises first and then falls with the increasing of braking pressure. However, the mean surface temperature rises obviously with the increasing of both initial braking velocity and braking pressure for growth of transformed kinetic energy. It is considered that the friction coefficient cannot be considered as a constant when designing brake devices for mine hoisters. And special attention should be paid to the serious influence of surface temperature on tribological performance of brake material during emergency braking.

  3. Contact allergy in Indonesian patients with foot eczema attributed to shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Febriana, S. A.; Soebono, H.; Coenraads, P. J.; Schuttelaar, M. L. A.

    BackgroundShoe dermatitis is a form of contact dermatitis resulting from exposure to shoes. Allergens and types of shoes responsible may vary depending on manufacturing techniques, climatic conditions and indigenous traditions. This study focuses primarily on as yet unexplored shoe dermatitis cases

  4. Plantar pressure relief in the diabetic foot using forefoot offloading shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; van Deursen, Robert W. M.; Kanade, Rajani V.; Wissink, Marieke; Manning, Erik A.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Harding, Keith G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Forefoot offloading shoes (FOS) are commonly used in clinical practice for treatment of plantar forefoot ulcers in the diabetic foot. The aim of this study was to assess the offloading efficacy of four different FOS models in comparison with a cast shoe and control shoe. Methods: In-shoe

  5. Effect of rocker shoes on plantar pressure pattern in healthy female runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Bredeweg, Steven; Kluitenberg, Bas; Postema, Klaas; Hijmans, Juha M.; Dekker, Rienk

    Rocker profile shoes (rocker shoes) are one of the treatment options of metatarsalgia and forefoot stress fractures. The efficacy of rocker shoes in unloading the forefoot pressure has been shown in walking. In running, however, the effect of rocker shoes on forefoot pressure is unknown. Eighteen

  6. Study on Braking Sensation Based on Urban Working Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abi Lanie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we researched the vehicle braking sense in three aspects of human, vehicle and environment and analysed their impacts on brake feeling. Through the real vehicle test we analysed the relationship among pedal force, pedal travel and deceleration. We used dynamometer test method to study the brake noise question. We designed a fixture which could imitate the suspension and made the test more close to the true level. Moreover we discussed how to establish the evaluation system of vehicle braking condition. Through real vehicle test of braking, we can test and record the brake system parameters in the braking process under urban working conditions. We recorded the brake frequency, the change of brake speed and brake disc temperature. Meanwhile, based on the analysis of braking condition, we put forward the index of brake load to reflect the city’s traffic conditions. Experiment show that the braking condition and brake feel are related, braking condition also provides theoretical support for the design of brake system.

  7. 49 CFR 232.305 - Single car air brake tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Single car air brake tests. 232.305 Section 232... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT AND OTHER NON-PASSENGER... car air brake tests. (a) Single car air brake tests shall be performed by a qualified person in...

  8. 49 CFR 393.44 - Front brake lines, protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Front brake lines, protection. 393.44 Section 393... ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.44 Front brake lines, protection. On every bus, if... any of the front wheels is broken, the driver can apply the brakes on the rear wheels despite such...

  9. PROVIDING STABLE FRICTION PROPERTIES OF DISC BRAKES FOR RAILWAY VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Y. OSENIN

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A new approach is developed to ensure the stability of the coefficient of friction at different braking modes for the entire speed range of braking high-speed ground transport. The new approach is a combination of friction materials with individual effort effects on the brake disc. A brake pad design and its performance are confirmed experimentally.

  10. Biodegradability of unused lubricating brake fluids in fresh and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olive oil was used as the positive control while sodium azide served as the negative control. The results obtained showed the following rate of biodegradability in fresh water and marine water; Total brake fluid (20, 2.3 percent), Allied brake fluid (40%, 1%), Oando brake fluid (44%, 2.5%), and Ate brake fluid (13.3%, 2.1%).

  11. Dynamic analysis of three autoventilated disc brakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A. García-León

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The braking system of a car must meet several requirements, among which safety is the most important. It is also composed of a set of mechanical parts such as springs, different types of materials (Metallic and Non Metallic, gases and liquids. The brakes must work safely and predictably in all circumstances, which means having a stable level of friction, in any condition of temperature, humidity and salinity of the environment. For a correct design and operation of brake discs, it is necessary to consider different aspects, such as geometry, type of material, mechanical strength, maximum temperature, thermal deformation, cracking resistance, among others. Therefore, the main objective of this work is to analyze the dynamics and kinetics of the brake system from the pedal as the beginning of mathematical calculations to simulate the behavior and Analysis of Finite Elements (FEA, with the help of SolidWorks Simulation Software. The results show that the third brake disc works best in relation to the other two discs in their different working conditions such as speed and displacement in braking, concluding that depending on the geometry of the brake and the cooling channels these systems can be optimized that are of great importance for the automotive industry.

  12. Statistical analysis of brake squeal noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2011-06-01

    Despite substantial research efforts applied to the prediction of brake squeal noise since the early 20th century, the mechanisms behind its generation are still not fully understood. Squealing brakes are of significant concern to the automobile industry, mainly because of the costs associated with warranty claims. In order to remedy the problems inherent in designing quieter brakes and, therefore, to understand the mechanisms, a design of experiments study, using a noise dynamometer, was performed by a brake system manufacturer to determine the influence of geometrical parameters (namely, the number and location of slots) of brake pads on brake squeal noise. The experimental results were evaluated with a noise index and ranked for warm and cold brake stops. These data are analysed here using statistical descriptors based on population distributions, and a correlation analysis, to gain greater insight into the functional dependency between the time-averaged friction coefficient as the input and the peak sound pressure level data as the output quantity. The correlation analysis between the time-averaged friction coefficient and peak sound pressure data is performed by applying a semblance analysis and a joint recurrence quantification analysis. Linear measures are compared with complexity measures (nonlinear) based on statistics from the underlying joint recurrence plots. Results show that linear measures cannot be used to rank the noise performance of the four test pad configurations. On the other hand, the ranking of the noise performance of the test pad configurations based on the noise index agrees with that based on nonlinear measures: the higher the nonlinearity between the time-averaged friction coefficient and peak sound pressure, the worse the squeal. These results highlight the nonlinear character of brake squeal and indicate the potential of using nonlinear statistical analysis tools to analyse disc brake squeal.

  13. Screw-released roller brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  14. Nonlinear Coupling Characteristics Analysis of Integrated System of Electromagnetic Brake and Frictional Brake of Car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since theoretical guidance is lacking in the design and control of the integrated system of electromagnetic brake and frictional brake, this paper aims to solve this problem and explores the nonlinear coupling characteristics and dynamic characteristics of the integrated system of electromagnetic brake and frictional brake. This paper uses the power bond graph method to establish nonlinear coupling mathematical model of the integrated system of electromagnetic brake and frictional brake and conducts the contrastive analysis on the dynamic characteristics based on this mathematical model. Meanwhile, the accuracy of the nonlinear coupling mathematical model proposed above is verified on the hardware in the loop simulation platform, and nonlinear coupling characteristics of the integrated system are also analyzed through experiments.

  15. Combined braking system for hybrid vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulekina, A. V.; Bakholdin, P. A.; Shchurov, N. I.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents an analysis of surface vehicle’s existing braking systems. The technical solution and brake-system design were developed for use of regenerative braking energy. A technical parameters comparison of energy storage devices of various types was made. Based on the comparative analysis, it was decided to use supercapacitor because of its applicability for an electric drive intermittent operation. The calculation methods of retarder key components were proposed. Therefrom, it was made a conclusion that rebuild gasoline-electric vehicles are more efficient than gasoline ones.

  16. Research on Reusable Design Information of Shoes Based on CBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Xia, Shi; Wen-Li, Peng; Wen-Ni, Zhang

    A way of reusing and retrieving design information of shoes using case based reasoning (CBR) in area of knowledge based engineering was presented, and a new system for reusing design information had been created. The system and CBR inference engine were introduced. It emphasized the knowledge expression of mold cases by level decomposition tree description, a way of measure similarity between the design cases and problem requirement by the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation, and the way of reusing and retrieving design information of shoes. This way was verified by the design case of casual shoes in the end.

  17. Structure Topology Optimization of Brake Pad in Large- megawatt Wind Turbine Brake Considering Thermal- structural Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. F.; Yin, J.; Liu, Y.; Sha, Z. H.; Ma, F. J.

    2016-11-01

    There always exists severe non-uniform wear of brake pad in large-megawatt wind turbine brake during the braking process, which has the brake pad worn out in advance and even threats the safety production of wind turbine. The root cause of this phenomenon is the non-uniform deformation caused by thermal-structural coupling effect between brake pad and disc while braking under the conditions of both high speed and heavy load. For this problem, mathematical model of thermal-structural coupling analysis is built. Based on the topology optimization method of Solid Isotropic Microstructures with Penalization, SIMP, structure topology optimization of brake pad is developed considering the deformation caused by thermal-structural coupling effect. The objective function is the minimum flexibility, and the structure topology optimization model of brake pad is established after indirect thermal- structural coupling analysis. Compared with the optimization result considering non-thermal- structural coupling, the conspicuous influence of thermal effect on brake pad wear and deformation is proven as well as the rationality of taking thermal-structural coupling effect as optimization condition. Reconstructed model is built according to the result, meanwhile analysis for verification is carried out with the same working condition. This study provides theoretical foundation for the design of high-speed and heavy-load brake pad. The new structure may provide design reference for improving the stress condition between brake pad and disc, enhancing the use ratio of friction material and increasing the working performance of large-megawatt wind turbine brake.

  18. Dynamics of braking vehicles: from Coulomb friction to anti-lock braking systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, J M [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro EmIdio Navarro 1, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: jtavares@dem.isel.ipl.pt

    2009-07-15

    The dynamics of braking of wheeled vehicles is studied using the Coulomb approximation for the friction between road and wheels. The dependence of the stopping distance on the mass of the vehicle, on the number of its wheels and on the intensity of the braking torque is established. It is shown that there are two regimes of braking, with and without sliding. The advantage of using an anti-lock braking system (ABS) is put in evidence, and a quantitative estimate of its efficiency is proposed and discussed.

  19. Validity of a device designed to measure braking power in bicycle disc brakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew C; Fink, Philip W; Macdermid, Paul William; Perry, Blake G; Stannard, Stephen R

    2017-07-21

    Real-world cycling performance depends not only on exercise capacities, but also on efficiently traversing the bicycle through the terrain. The aim of this study was to determine if it was possible to quantify the braking done by a cyclist in the field. One cyclist performed 408 braking trials (348 on a flat road; 60 on a flat dirt path) over 5 days on a bicycle fitted with brake torque and angular velocity sensors to measure brake power. Based on Newtonian physics, the sum of brake work, aerodynamic drag and rolling resistance was compared with the change in kinetic energy in each braking event. Strong linear relationships between the total energy removed from the bicycle-rider system through braking and the change in kinetic energy were observed on the tar-sealed road (r2 = 0.989; p torque and angular velocity sensors are valid for calculating brake power on the disc brakes of a bicycle in field conditions. Such a device may be useful for investigating cyclists' ability to traverse through various terrains.

  20. Optimal design and selection of magneto-rheological brake types based on braking torque and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Lang, V. T.; Choi, S. B.

    2015-06-01

    In developing magnetorheological brakes (MRBs), it is well known that the braking torque and the mass of the MRBs are important factors that should be considered in the product’s design. This research focuses on the optimal design of different types of MRBs, from which we identify an optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass. In the optimization, common types of MRBs such as disc-type, drum-type, hybrid-type, and T-shape types are considered. The optimization problem is to find an optimal MRB structure that can produce the required braking torque while minimizing its mass. After a brief description of the configuration of the MRBs, the MRBs’ braking torque is derived based on the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model of the magnetorheological fluid. Then, the optimal designs of the MRBs are analyzed. The optimization objective is to minimize the mass of the brake while the braking torque is constrained to be greater than a required value. In addition, the power consumption of the MRBs is also considered as a reference parameter in the optimization. A finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is used to obtain optimal solutions for the MRBs. Optimal solutions of MRBs with different required braking torque values are obtained based on the proposed optimization procedure. From the results, we discuss the optimal selection of MRB types, considering braking torque and mass.

  1. Thermal analysis and temperature characteristics of a braking resistor for high-speed trains for changes in the braking current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Dong; Kang, Hyun-Il; Shim, Jae-Myung

    2015-09-01

    Electric brake systems are used in high-speed trains to brake trains by converting the kinetic energy of a railway vehicle to electric energy. The electric brake system consists of a regenerative braking system and a dynamic braking system. When the electric energy generated during the dynamic braking process is changed to heat through the braking resistor, the braking resistor can overheat; thus, failures can occur to the motor block. In this paper, a braking resistor for a high-speed train was used to perform thermal analyses and tests, and the results were analyzed. The analyzed data were used to estimate the dependence of the brake currents and the temperature rises on speed changes up to 300 km/h, at which a test could not be performed.

  2. Differences in friction and torsional resistance in athletic shoe-turf surface interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, R S; Dormer, S G; Cawley, P W; Scranton, P E; Losse, G; Howard, M

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated the shoe-surface interaction of 15 football shoes made by 3 manufacturers in both anterior translation and rotation using a specially designed pneumatic testing system. The shoes included traditional cleated football shoes, "court" shoes (basketball-style shoes), molded-cleat shoes, and turf shoes. Under an 11.35-kg (25-pound) axial load, all shoes were tested on synthetic turf under wet and dry conditions and on natural stadium grass. Test-retest reliability, as calculated using the Pearson Product-Moment Correlation test, was 0.85 for force of translation and 0.55 for the moment of rotation. The wet versus dry surface values on translation were significantly different for rotation about the tibial axis. Spatting, which is protective taping of the ankle and heel applied on the outside of the shoe, resulted in a reduction of forces generated in both translation and rotation. No overall difference between shoes on grass versus AstroTurf was noted. However, there were significant differences for cleated and turf shoes. Shoes tested in conditions for which they were not designed exhibited reproducible excessive or extreme minimal friction characteristics that may have safety implications. On the basis of this study, we urge shoe manufacturers to display suggested indications and playing surface conditions for which their shoes are recommended.

  3. 30 CFR 57.14101 - Brakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... carrying hazardous loads, such as explosives. (ii) The approach shall be of sufficient length to allow the... upon other available evidence to determine whether the service brake system meets the performance...

  4. Hunting Plan Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for administration of hunting activity and for development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and guidelines on Morgan Brake...

  5. Method and apparatus for wind turbine braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, Corneliu [Laguna Hills, CA; Teichmann, Ralph [Nishkayuna, NY; Avagliano, Aaron [Houston, TX; Kammer, Leonardo Cesar [Niskayuna, NY; Pierce, Kirk Gee [Simpsonville, SC; Pesetsky, David Samuel [Greenville, SC; Gauchel, Peter [Muenster, DE

    2009-02-10

    A method for braking a wind turbine including at least one rotor blade coupled to a rotor. The method includes selectively controlling an angle of pitch of the at least one rotor blade with respect to a wind direction based on a design parameter of a component of the wind turbine to facilitate reducing a force induced into the wind turbine component as a result of braking.

  6. Parents: Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print | Share Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes Before you head to the store to ... College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights Reserved. Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Terms and Conditions | Site ...

  7. Design of high performance CMC brake discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krenkel, W.; Henke, T. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials based on 2D-carbon fibre preforms show high heat-absorption capacities and good tribological as well as thermomechanical properties. To take advantage of the full lightweight potential of these new materials in high performance automotive brake discs, the thermal conductivity transverse to the friction surface has to be high in order to reduce the surface temperature. Experimental tests showed, that lower surface temperatures prevent overheating of the brake`s periphery and stabilizes the friction behaviour. In this study different design approaches with improved transverse heat conductivity have been investigated by finite element analysis. C/C-SiC bolts as well as SiC coatings and combinations of them have been investigated and compared with an orthotropic brake disc, showing a reduction of temperature of up to 50%. Original sized brake discs with C/C-SiC have been manufactured and tested under real conditions which verified the calculations. Using only low-cost CMC materials and avoiding any additional processing steps, the potential of C/C-SiC brake discs are very attractive under tribological as well as under economical aspects. (orig.) 4 refs.

  8. Pattern of outsole shoe heel wear in infantry recruits

    OpenAIRE

    Finestone Aharon S; Petrov Kaloyan; Agar Gabriel; Honig Assaf; Tamir Eran; Milgrom Charles

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Excessive shoe heel abrasion is of concern to patients, parents and shoe manufacturers, but little scientific information is available. The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon in a group of infantry recruits performing similar physical activity, and search for biomechanical factors that might be related. Methods Seventy-six subjects (median age 19) enrolled. Pre-training parameters measured included height, weight, tibial length, foot arch height and foot ...

  9. Sensing creativity: the role of materials in shoe design

    OpenAIRE

    Braithwaite, N

    2017-01-01

    This essay is about designing and making shoes. Classical notions of design present it as a process whereby drawing is prefigured by a concept. This understanding overlooks the importance of materials, which through their particular technical, functional, and sensorial properties direct the nature of design (Kϋchler 2011). Materials such as leathers, suede, snakeskin and other textiles form the aesthetic characteristics of shoes. These materials are significant to creativity, not just in term...

  10. Rotational and peak torque stiffness of rugby shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Moez S; Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Montrasio, Umberto Alfieri; Molloy, Andy; La Barbera, Luigi; Villa, Tomaso; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Sports people always strive to avoid injury. Sports shoe designs in many sports have been shown to affect traction and injury rates. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the differing stiffness and torque in rugby boots that are designed for the same effect. Five different types of rugby shoes commonly worn by scrum forwards were laboratory tested for rotational stiffness and peak torque on a natural playing surface generating force patterns that would be consistent with a rugby scrum. The overall internal rotation peak torque was 57.75±6.26 Nm while that of external rotation was 56.55±4.36 Nm. The Peak internal and external rotational stiffness were 0.696±0.1 and 0.708±0.06 Nm/deg respectively. Our results, when compared to rotational stiffness and peak torques of football shoes published in the literature, show that shoes worn by rugby players exert higher rotational and peak torque stiffness compared to football shoes when tested on the same natural surfaces. There was significant difference between the tested rugby shoes brands. In our opinion, to maximize potential performance and lower the potential of non-contact injury, care should be taken in choosing boots with stiffness appropriate to the players main playing role. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pattern of outsole shoe heel wear in infantry recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finestone, Aharon S; Petrov, Kaloyan; Agar, Gabriel; Honig, Assaf; Tamir, Eran; Milgrom, Charles

    2012-10-25

    Excessive shoe heel abrasion is of concern to patients, parents and shoe manufacturers, but little scientific information is available. The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon in a group of infantry recruits performing similar physical activity, and search for biomechanical factors that might be related. Seventy-six subjects (median age 19) enrolled. Pre-training parameters measured included height, weight, tibial length, foot arch height and foot progression angle. Digital plantar pressure maps were taken to calculate arch indexes. Shoe heel abrasion was assessed manually after 14 weeks of training with different-sized clock transparencies and a calliper. Outsole abrasion was posterolateral, averaging 12 degrees on each shoe. The average heel volume that was eroded was almost 5 cm3. The angle of maximum wear was related to right foot progression angle (r = 0.27, p = 0.02). Recruits with lateral ankle sprains had higher angles of maximal abrasion (17° versus 10°, p = 0.26) and recruits with lateral heel abrasion had more lateral ankle sprains (14% versus 3%, p = 0.12). While shoe heel wear affects many people, very little has been done to measure it. In this study in healthy subjects, we found the main abrasion to be posterolateral. This seems to be related to foot progression angle. It was not related to hindfoot valgus/varus or other factors related to subtalar joint motion. These findings do not warrant modification of subtalar joint motion in order to limit shoe heel abrasion.

  12. Children sport shoes--a systematic review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Markus; Herold, Dirk; Sinderhauf, Angela; Morrison, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The child's foot is clearly distinct from the adult foot in its functional anatomy and ability to cope with pressure. This requires special considerations in the development of a children's sport shoe. Medical and sport science databases were thoroughly searched for studies pertaining to the anatomy and biomechanics of children's feet during their development. With the data found, a list of requirements for the children's shoe was compiled. Small children should have a sports shoe, which is as flexible as their own foot. The small impact forces during their sports activities make extra cushioning superfluous. During school age the connective tissue gains stability. The growing amount of sports activities, much of which is performed on hard indoor surfaces, enhances the need for cushioning. At the same time there is a growing necessity for adequate mechanical stimuli to help the muscles and bones develop. The strength of the connective tissue and the flexibility of the joints reach adult levels by the age of 15. In small shoes, the displacement of proportions can lead to improper positioning of the flex zone and thereby causing harmful stress on the foot. Cushioning elements are often oversized. Considering the wide range of anatomy in the child's foot, it is advisable to produce children's shoes in different widths. The child's foot differs in anatomy and function from the adult foot. Children sport shoes should meet the child specific requirement.

  13. Thermal/Mechanical Measurement and Modeling of Bicycle Disc Brakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Feier

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Brake induced heating has become more difficult to control as bicycle component mass has been reduced. High-power braking with insufficient cooling or thermal capacitance can create excessive temperatures, boiling brake fluid, performance degradation, and damage. To better understand component heating, a disc braking dynamometer has been constructed with a motor driven disc, hydraulic braking, and a miniature wind tunnel. Disc temperatures are studied for various braking scenarios using infrared techniques and thermocouples. A transient, numerical, MATLAB, lumped parameter thermal/mechanical model is created to predict the impact of key design parameters on braking performance and to understand the heat loss mechanisms from the brake system components. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations are used to estimate the disc surface convective cooling coefficients for the model. The final model provides transient temperature predictions based on bicycle velocity and braking power, and successfully matches dynamometer experimental data.

  14. FC TIP-BRAKE. Development of a novel aerodynamic brake for the FC-4000; FC TIP-BRAKE. Entwicklung einer neuartigen aerodynamischen brems fuer die FC-4000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grohs, C. von [Gesamthochschule Kassel, Universitaet, Kassel (Germany)

    1993-09-01

    A novel brake has been developed for the FC-4000 WindMotor. The FC Tip Brake has been tested on this wind turbine and a computer program for structural improvements has been introduced. A comparison of the previous tip brake construction and the new one is given. (EG)

  15. A qualitative study on the comfort and fit of ladies' dress shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Emily Yim Lee; Goonetilleke, Ravindra S

    2007-11-01

    The perceived differences between comfortable and uncomfortable shoes and the fit preferences in the different regions of ladies' shoes were explored. Twenty Hong Kong Chinese females participated in the study. Each participant wore and rated the different aspects of their own comfortable and uncomfortable shoes. The Wilcoxon signed rank tests showed significant differences in ten perceived characteristics between the comfortable and uncomfortable shoes. Among the ten were tactile, auditory and olfactory sensations. The ten items reliably (Cronbach alpha>0.9) distinguished between comfortable and uncomfortable shoes. There were no significant differences between comfortable and uncomfortable shoes for aesthetic-related characteristics. Further analysis on the fit ratings showed a significant impact on the fit preferences in the Toe region (pcomfortable shoes and also brings out the criteria that a comfortable shoe does not necessarily have the same perceived fit in every region of a shoe.

  16. Effect of rocker shoes on plantar pressure pattern in healthy female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Bredeweg, Steef; Kluitenberg, Bas; Postema, Klaas; Hijmans, Juha M; Dekker, Rienk

    2014-03-01

    Rocker profile shoes (rocker shoes) are one of the treatment options of metatarsalgia and forefoot stress fractures. The efficacy of rocker shoes in unloading the forefoot pressure has been shown in walking. In running, however, the effect of rocker shoes on forefoot pressure is unknown. Eighteen healthy female runners participated in this study. In-shoe plantar pressures were recorded during running with the standard running shoes and rocker shoes. Shoe comfort was assessed after each shoe measurement. Peak pressure (PP), maximum mean pressure (MMP) and force-time integral (FTI) were determined for seven foot areas. The effects of shoes on the different outcome variables were statistically analyzed using a linear mixed model. Running with the rocker shoes caused a significant reduction (pshoes. Running with rocker shoes resulted in a significant increase in all pressure parameters at the heel region (pshoes received a significant (pcomfort rate than running with standard running shoes. Rocker shoes might be beneficial for runners who are recovering from metatarsalgia or stress fractures of the forefoot region, as it reduces plantar pressure in the forefoot region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF BRAKE PADS THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY ON PASSANGER CAR BRAKE SYSTEM EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag D Milenković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In phase of vehicle braking system designing, besides of mechanical characteristics, it is also necessary to take under consideration the system's thermal features. This is because it is not enough just to achieve proper braking power, for the brake system to be effective but equally important thing is the dissipation of heat to the environment. Heat developed in the friction surfaces dissipate into the environment over the disk in one hand and through the brake linings and caliper, in the other. The striving is to make that greatest amount of heat to dissipate not threw the brake pads but threw disc. The experimental researching of heat transfer process taking place at vehicle brakes was made in the R&D Center of "Zastava automobili" car factory in order to increase the efficiency of brake system. The standard laboratory and road test procedures were used, according to factory quality regulations. The modern equipment such as thermo camera, thermo couples, torque transducers, signal amplifiers, optical speed measuring system and laptop computer were used. In this paper will be shown the part of the experimental researching, which refers to the thermal conductivity of brake pad friction linings.

  18. ABOUT WAVEFORM OF BRAKING CYLINDER FILLING IN FREIGHT CARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Ursuliak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. As part of the scientific paper it is necessary to study the waveform impact of the braking cylinders filling on longitudinal train dynamics at different modes of braking. At this one should estimate the level of maximum longitudinal forces and braking distance size in freight cars of various lengths. Methodology. In this paper we attempt to approximate the actual diagram of braking cylinders filling with rational functions of varying degrees. In selection of coefficients in the required functions the highest values of the longitudinal forces and braking distances were used as controlled parameters. They were compared with similar values obtained as a result of experimental rides. The level of longitudinal forces and braking distances amount were evaluated by means of mathematical modeling of train longitudinal vibrations, caused by different braking modes. Findings. At mathematical modeling was assumed that the train consists of 60 uniform four-axle gondola cars, weight of 80 tons, equipped with air dispenser No. 483 included in the median operation, composite braking blocks, and one locomotive VL-8. Train before braking has been pre-stretched. Various types of pneumatic braking (emergency, full service and adjusting braking of the freight train on the horizontal section of the track were simulated. As the calculation results were obtained values of the longitudinal forces, braking distances amounts and reduction time in speed at various braking modes. Originality. Waveform impact of the braking cylinders filling on the longitudinal forces level and braking distances amount in freight trains were investigated. Also the longitudinal loading of freight trains at various pneumatic braking was investigated. Practical value. Obtained results can be used to assess the level of largest longitudinal forces and braking distances in the freight trains of different lengths by mathematical modeling of different braking modes.

  19. Electromagnetic brake/clutch device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M.

    1994-01-01

    An electromagnetic brake/clutch device includes a drive shaft supported by at least one bearing for transmitting torque, a housing, affixed to prevent its rotation, surrounding the drive shaft, and an electromagnetically activated device within the housing to selectively prevent and allow rotation of the drive shaft. The electromagnetically activated device includes a plurality of cammed rollers to prevent counter-clockwise rotation of the drive shaft. The drive shaft includes a circumferential disk and the housing includes a reaction ring for engagement with the plurality of cammed rollers. The plurality of cammed rollers are released from engagement with the circumferential disk and the reaction ring by a plurality of tripping mechanisms within the housing. The tripping action uses the locking force to act as a release force merely by changing the boundary conditions of the roller interface angles. The tripping mechanisms include trippers for disengaging the plurality of cammed rollers and an anvil shaped portion for providing lateral movement of the trippers. The plurality of cammed rollers is preloaded to engagement with the circumferential disk and reaction ring by a spring, and is located with respect to an adjacent tripping mechanism with another spring.

  20. Backup Mechanical Brake System of the Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, E. A.; Solomin, E. V.; Gandzha, S. A.; Kirpichnikova, I. M.

    2018-01-01

    Paper clarifies the necessity of the emergency mechanical brake systems usage for wind turbines. We made a deep analysis of the wind turbine braking methods available on the market, identifying their strengths and weaknesses. The electromechanical braking appeared the most technically reasonable and economically attractive. We described the developed combined electromechanical brake system for vertical axis wind turbine driven from electric drive with variable torque enough to brake over the turbine even on the storm wind speed up to 45 m/s. The progress was made due to the development of specific kinematic brake system diagram and intelligent control system managed by special operation algorithm.

  1. Evaluation of Squeal Noise from the WMATA Transit Car Disc Brake System : A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) rail transit car design adopted the use of disc brakes as the primary friction braking system. Unfortunately, while disc brakes are more efficient than the traditional tread brake designs, th...

  2. A systematic review of the methodological quality and extent to which evaluation studies measure the usability of orthopaedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, MJA; van Dijk, H; de Vries, J; Groothoff, JW; Lankhorst, GJ

    Objective: To determine the methodological quality of studies evaluating orthopaedic shoes and orthopaedic shoe provisions. To what extent do studies evaluating orthopaedic shoes prescribed for patients with degenerative disorders of the foot, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus and neurological

  3. Mechanics of jazz shoes and their effect on pointing in child dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong Yan, Alycia; Smith, Richard; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Hiller, Claire

    2012-07-01

    There has been little scientific investigation of the impact of dance shoes on foot motion or dance injuries. The pointed (plantar-flexed) foot is a fundamental component of both the technical requirements and the traditional aesthetic of ballet and jazz dancing. The aims of this study were to quantify the externally observed angle of plantar flexion in various jazz shoes compared with barefoot and to compare the sagittal plane bending stiffness of the various jazz shoes. Sixteen female recreational child dancers were recruited for 3D motion analysis of active plantar flexion. The jazz shoes tested were a split-sole jazz shoe, full-sole jazz shoe, and jazz sneaker. A shoe dynamometer measured the stiffness of the jazz shoes. The shoes had a significant effect on ankle plantar flexion. All jazz shoes significantly restricted the midfoot plantar flexion angle compared with the barefoot condition. The split-sole jazz shoe demonstrated the least restriction, whereas the full-sole jazz shoe the most midfoot restriction. A small restriction in metartarsophalangeal plantar flexion and a greater restriction at the midfoot joint were demonstrated when wearing stiff jazz shoes. These restrictions will decrease the aesthetic of the pointed foot, may encourage incorrect muscle activation, and have an impact on dance performance.

  4. Electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikanek, Susan R.

    1995-01-01

    An antiskid braking and traction control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes one or more sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensors and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydrualic braking control, or requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs a control strategy based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control the operation of the electric traction motor and to a brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative antiskid braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

  5. Fully regenerative braking and improved acceleration for electrical vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Melis, Wim J.C.; Chishty, Owais

    2013-01-01

    Generally, car brake systems use hydraulic brake technology, which converts the excess of kinetic energy into heat, effectively resulting in an energy loss. Regenerative braking technology focuses on converting this kinetic energy of the decelerating vehicle back into electrical energy that can then be reused for example during acceleration. Current hybrid vehicles are equipped with such regenerative braking technology, which makes them particularly interesting for situations with frequent de...

  6. HEAT TRANSIENT TRANSFER ANALYSIS OF BRAKE DISC /PAD SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Thuppal Vedanta, Srivatsan; Kora, Naga Vamsi Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Braking is mainly controlled by the engine. Friction between a pair of pads and a rotating disc converts the kinetic energy of the vehicle into heat. High temperatures can be reached in the system which can be detrimental for both, components and passenger safety. Numerical techniques help simulate load cases and compute the temperatures field in brake disc and brake pads. The present work implements a Finite Element (FE) toolbox in Matlab/Simulink able to simulate different braking manoeuvre...

  7. Regenerative Intelligent Brake Control for Electric Motorcycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jesús Castillo Aguilar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle models whose propulsion system is based on electric motors are increasing in number within the automobile industry. They will soon become a reliable alternative to vehicles with conventional propulsion systems. The main advantages of this type of vehicles are the non-emission of polluting gases and noise and the effectiveness of electric motors compared to combustion engines. Some of the disadvantages that electric vehicle manufacturers still have to solve are their low autonomy due to inefficient energy storage systems, vehicle cost, which is still too high, and reducing the recharging time. Current regenerative systems in motorcycles are designed with a low fixed maximum regeneration rate in order not to cause the rear wheel to slip when braking with the regenerative brake no matter what the road condition is. These types of systems do not make use of all the available regeneration power, since more importance is placed on safety when braking. An optimized regenerative braking strategy for two-wheeled vehicles is described is this work. This system is designed to recover the maximum energy in braking processes while maintaining the vehicle’s stability. In order to develop the previously described regenerative control, tyre forces, vehicle speed and road adhesion are obtained by means of an estimation algorithm. A based-on-fuzzy-logic algorithm is programmed to carry out an optimized control with this information. This system recuperates maximum braking power without compromising the rear wheel slip and safety. Simulations show that the system optimizes energy regeneration on every surface compared to a constant regeneration strategy.

  8. Brake squeal: Linear and nonlinear numerical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, Francesco; Baillet, Laurent; Giannini, Oliviero; Sestieri, Aldo

    2007-08-01

    "Brake squeal" groups a large set of high-frequency sound emissions from brake systems. They are generated during the braking phase and are characterized by a harmonic spectrum. The onset of squeal is due to an unstable behaviour occurring in linear conditions during the braking phase, and a general approach used by several authors to determine the system instabilities is the complex eigenvalues analysis. When the brake begins to squeal, the response of the system reaches a new limit cycle where the linear models cannot be used anymore. This paper presents the integration of two different numerical procedures to identify the mechanism bringing to squeal instability and to analyse its dynamics. The first approach is a finite element modal analysis of the brake system and is used to identify its eigenvalues and to relate them to the squeal occurrence. The second one is a specific finite element programme, Plast3, appropriate for nonlinear dynamic analyses in the time domain and is particularly addressed to study contact problems with friction between deformable bodies. This programme computes the contact stresses and permits to determine the dynamics of the system along the contact surface, both in the linear and nonlinear fields. The two models are compared and the onset of squeal is predicted both in the frequency domain by the linear model and in the time domain by the nonlinear one. The instability predictions, obtained by the two models, are discussed. To simplify the dynamics of its components, the study is carried out on a simple model, made of a disc, a small friction pad and a beam supporting the pad. The geometry of the model is related to an experimental set-up used to validate the models and to compare the numerical results with the experiments.

  9. REGRESSIVE ANALYSIS OF BRAKING EFFICIENCY OF M1 CATEGORY VEHICLES WITH ANTI-BLOCKING BRAKE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Sarayev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The problematics of assessing the effectiveness of vehicle braking after road accidentoccurrence is considered. For the first time in relation to the modern models of vehicles equipped with anti-lock brakes there were obtained regression models describing the relationship between the coefficient of traction and a random variable of steady deceleration. This does not contradict the essence of the stochastic physical object, which is the process of vehicle braking, unlike the previously adopted method of formalizing this process, using a deterministic function.

  10. Patients’ expectations and actual use of custom-made orthopaedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Jannink, M.J.A.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Geertzen, Jan H.B.; Postema, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between patients’ expectations and the actual use of custom-made orthopaedic shoes. - Design: A prospective cohort study with internal comparison. - Setting: Twelve orthopaedic shoe companies. - Patients: During six months, consecutive patients who were

  11. Patients' expectations and actual use of custom-made orthopaedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between patients' expectations and the actual use of custom-made orthopaedic shoes. Design: A prospective cohort study with internal comparison. Setting: Twelve orthopaedic shoe companies. Patients: During six months, consecutive patients who were provided

  12. Effect of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and static balance during standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Park, Young-Soul; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on the foot pressure ratio and static balance during standing. [Subjects and Methods] A single-subject design was used, 15 healthy women wearing revised high-heeled shoes and general high-heeled shoes in a random order. The foot pressure ratio and static balance scores during standing were measured using a SpaceBalance 3D system. [Results] Forefoot and rearfoot pressures were significantly different between the 2 types of high-heeled shoes. Under the 3 conditions tested, the static balance score was higher for the revised high-heeled shoes than for the general high-heeled shoes, but this difference was not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Revised high-heeled shoes are preferable to general high-heeled shoes, as they result in normalization of normalized foot pressure and a positive effect on static balance.

  13. BRAKE DISC PRODUCTION IS OPTIMIZATION POSSIBLE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Colditz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article compares different aspects of brake disc production using vertically parted flaskless molding lines and horizontal parted tight flask molding lines. In the first section the vertical molding process demonstrates advantages in terms of investment costs. Furthermore, annual energy consumption of the molding lines in relation to castings produced is discussed, again demonstrating clear benefits from the Disamatic-technology. In the second section a comparison between two molding technologies for the production of brake discs is made on the basis of production data from the South Korean foundry Hyundai Sungwoo. The Disamatic molding process, however, offers advantages in terms of tooling costs and energy consumption.

  14. Automating friction-testing automotive brake pads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, R.; Schwarz, U.

    1984-06-01

    Friction-testing machines are used in the development of brake pad materials and for quality assurance. Automation was applied to three friction-testing machines operated in parallel in order to obtain evidence of consistent, reproducible test condition. The new system avoids lengthy manual evaluation periods coupled with the risk of errors. Other benefits are the ability to draw up test programs more easily and to implement modern evaluation techniques. One can expect friction-testing machines' area of application to be enlarged in the near future to include determination of the wet friction values and corrosion resistance of brake discs and pads.

  15. 49 CFR 393.48 - Brakes to be operative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brakes to be operative. 393.48 Section 393.48 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.48 Brakes to be operative. (a) General rule. Except as provided in...

  16. 49 CFR 570.59 - Service brake system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the following tests. (1) Roller-type or drive-on platform tests. The force applied by the brake on a... shall be tested on a drive-on platform, or a roller-type brake analyzer with the capability of measuring... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service brake system. 570.59 Section 570.59...

  17. 49 CFR 570.6 - Brake power unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brake power unit. 570.6 Section 570.6... Pounds or Less § 570.6 Brake power unit. (a) Vacuum hoses shall not be collapsed, abraded, broken... brake pedal, the pedal shall fall slightly when the engine is started, demonstrating integrity of the...

  18. 30 CFR 77.1401 - Automatic controls and brakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic controls and brakes. 77.1401 Section... MINES Personnel Hoisting § 77.1401 Automatic controls and brakes. Hoists and elevators shall be equipped with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop controls and with brakes capable of stopping the elevator...

  19. 30 CFR 56.14102 - Brakes for rail equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14102 Brakes for rail equipment. Braking systems on railroad cars and locomotives shall be maintained in functional condition. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brakes for rail equipment. 56.14102 Section 56...

  20. 49 CFR 232.215 - Transfer train brake tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... coupled between all freight cars; (2) After the brake system is charged to not less than 60 psi as... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT AND OTHER NON-PASSENGER... reduction shall be made; and (3) An inspection shall be made to determine that the brakes on each car apply...

  1. 30 CFR 57.14102 - Brakes for rail equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14102 Brakes for rail equipment. Braking systems on railroad cars and locomotives shall be maintained in functional condition. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brakes for rail equipment. 57.14102 Section 57...

  2. 49 CFR 238.315 - Class IA brake test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and release of the brakes on the last car in the train; and (6) The communicating signal system is... be used to verify the set and release on cars so equipped. However, the observation of the brake... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class IA brake test. 238.315 Section 238.315...

  3. 49 CFR 238.319 - Running brake test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Running brake test. 238.319 Section 238.319... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.319 Running brake test. (a) As soon as conditions safely permit, a running brake test shall be performed on each passenger train after the train has received, or...

  4. 49 CFR 229.57 - Foundation brake gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foundation brake gear. 229.57 Section 229.57 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Foundation brake gear. A lever, rod, brake beam, hanger, or pin may not be worn through more than 30 percent...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1404 - Automatic brakes; speed reduction gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic brakes; speed reduction gear. 75.1404... Automatic brakes; speed reduction gear. Each locomotive and haulage car used in an underground coal mine... brakes, locomotives and haulage cars shall be subject to speed reduction gear, or other similar devices...

  6. Pedobarographic and kinematic analysis in the functional evaluation of two post-operative forefoot offloading shoes

    OpenAIRE

    Caravaggi, Paolo; Giangrande, Alessia; Berti, Lisa; Lullini, Giada; Leardini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Background Forefoot offloading shoes are special orthopaedic footwear designed to protect and unload the injured part of the foot after surgery and for conservative treatments. The offloading action is often achieved by transferring plantar load to the rearfoot via rocker shoes with reduced contact area between shoe and ground. While these shoes are intended to be worn only for short periods, a compromise must be found between functionality and the risk of alterations in gait patterns at the ...

  7. Injury Reduction Effectiveness of Assigning Running Shoes Based on Plantar Shape in Marine Corps Basic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    Army Physical Training Footwear Studies Experimental Group Shoes Service Marine Corps Air Force Army Motion Control Shoe New Balance 587 New...AJSM PreView, publIshed on June 24, 2010 as doi:10.1177/0363546510369548 Injury Reduction Effectiveness of Assigning Running Shoes Based on Plantar...34Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Eastern Recruiting Region, Parris Island, South Carolina Background: Shoe manufacturers market motion control. stability

  8. Shoe heel abrasion and its possible biomechanical cause: a transversal study with infantry recruits

    OpenAIRE

    Baumfeld, Daniel; Raduan, Fernando C.; Macedo, Benjamim; Silva, Thiago Alexandre Alves; Baumfeld, Tiago; Favato, Danilo Fabrino; de Andrade, Marco Antonio Percope; Nery, Caio

    2015-01-01

    Background Excessive shoe heel abrasion is of concern to patients and shoe manufacturers, but little scientific information is available about this feature and its possible causes. The purpose of this study was to relate this phenomenon with biomechanical factors that could predispose to shoe heel abrasion. Methods Ninety-seven recruits (median age 25) were enrolled in this study. Shoe abrasion was assessed manually with a metric plastic tape on the posterior part of the heel that comes in co...

  9. [The shoe industry: from productive reality to risk individualization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saretto, Gianni; Dulio, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    This article describes in detail each stage of the shoe manufacturing process: design, cutting and shearing, sewing and trimming, assemblage, sole preparation, finishing, packaging and stocking, shoe manufacturing with synthetic materials. It will then discuss new technologies and their impact on the improvement of the worker's health, safety and convenience. A definition of the shoe parts and of the materials and machinery employed in its production will be provided, as well as a synthesis of the occupational hazards involved in each department. Although dealing with competitors who can take advantage of low-cost production and lack of concern for labour protection and environmental issues, the industry should always take great care of topics such as innovation and automation, but also workplace health and safety, while pushing the limits of that technological advance which companies have to face.

  10. A consensus definition and rating scale for minimalist shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esculier, Jean-Francois; Dubois, Blaise; Dionne, Clermont E; Leblond, Jean; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    While minimalist running shoes may have an influence on running biomechanics and on the incidence of overuse injuries, the term "minimalist" is currently used without standardisation. The objectives of this study were to reach a consensus on a standard definition of minimalist running shoes, and to develop and validate a rating scale that could be used to determine the degree of minimalism of running shoes, the Minimalist Index (MI). For this modified Delphi study, 42 experts from 11 countries completed four electronic questionnaires on an optimal definition of minimalist shoes and on elements to include within the MI. Once MI was developed following consensus, 85 participants subjectively ranked randomly assigned footwear models from the most to the least minimalist and rated their degree of minimalism using visual analog scales (VAS), before evaluating the same footwear models using MI. A subsample of thirty participants reassessed the same shoes on another occasion. Construct validity and inter- and intra-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC]; Gwet's AC1) of MI were evaluated. The following definition of minimalist shoes was agreed upon by 95 % of participants: "Footwear providing minimal interference with the natural movement of the foot due to its high flexibility, low heel to toe drop, weight and stack height, and the absence of motion control and stability devices". Characteristics to be included in MI were weight, flexibility, heel to toe drop, stack height and motion control/stability devices, each subscale carrying equal weighing (20 %) on final score. Total MI score was highly correlated with VAS (r = 0.91). A significant rank effect (p minimalism, and may help to decrease injuries related to footwear transition.

  11. Pattern of outsole shoe heel wear in infantry recruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finestone Aharon S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive shoe heel abrasion is of concern to patients, parents and shoe manufacturers, but little scientific information is available. The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon in a group of infantry recruits performing similar physical activity, and search for biomechanical factors that might be related. Methods Seventy-six subjects (median age 19 enrolled. Pre-training parameters measured included height, weight, tibial length, foot arch height and foot progression angle. Digital plantar pressure maps were taken to calculate arch indexes. Shoe heel abrasion was assessed manually after 14 weeks of training with different-sized clock transparencies and a calliper. Results Outsole abrasion was posterolateral, averaging 12 degrees on each shoe. The average heel volume that was eroded was almost 5 cm3. The angle of maximum wear was related to right foot progression angle (r = 0.27, p = 0.02. Recruits with lateral ankle sprains had higher angles of maximal abrasion (17° versus 10°, p = 0.26 and recruits with lateral heel abrasion had more lateral ankle sprains (14% versus 3%, p = 0.12. Conclusion While shoe heel wear affects many people, very little has been done to measure it. In this study in healthy subjects, we found the main abrasion to be posterolateral. This seems to be related to foot progression angle. It was not related to hindfoot valgus/varus or other factors related to subtalar joint motion. These findings do not warrant modification of subtalar joint motion in order to limit shoe heel abrasion.

  12. The effect of ambient temperature on the shoe-surface interface release coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torg, J S; Stilwell, G; Rogers, K

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies of the shoe-surface interface correlated foot fixation with cleat length, configuration, and material composition as well as turf type and surface conditions. Our study examined the effect of temperature on the rotational torsion resistance of artificial turf football shoes. Five football shoe models, a flat-soled basketball-style turf shoe, a natural grass soccer-style shoe, and three multistudded turf shoes, were studied on dry Astro Turf at five temperatures (range, 52 degrees F to 110 degrees F). An assay device, a prosthetic foot mounted on a loaded stainless steel shaft, was used to determine the force necessary to release a shoe from the turf's surface. We used a torque wrench to apply a rotational force so that each shoe was pivoted counterclockwise through an arc of 60 degrees. Our results indicated that release coefficients differ within and among the shoe models at various turf temperatures. We also found that an increase in turf temperature, in combination with cleat characteristics, affects shoe-surface interface friction and potentially places the athlete's knee and ankle at risk of injury. Based on an established risk criterion, which correlated shoe-surface interface combinations in the laboratory with documented clinical occurrences, only the flat-soled basketball-style turf shoe could be designated "safe" or "probably safe" at all five temperatures.

  13. Impact attenuation properties of jazz shoes alter lower limb joint stiffness during jump landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong Yan, Alycia; Smith, Richard M; Hiller, Claire E; Sinclair, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    To quantify the impact attenuation properties of the jazz shoes, and to investigate the in-vivo effect of four jazz shoe designs on lower limb joint stiffness during a dance-specific jump. Repeated measures. A custom-built mechanical shoe tester similar to that used by athletic shoe companies was used to vertically impact the forefoot and heel region of four different jazz shoe designs. Additionally, dancers performed eight sautés in second position in bare feet and the shoe conditions. Force platforms and 3D-motion capture were used to analyse the joint stiffness of the midfoot, ankle, knee and hip during the jump landings. Mechanical testing of the jazz shoes revealed significant differences in impact attenuation characteristics among each of the jazz shoe designs. Gross knee and midfoot joint stiffness were significantly affected by the jazz shoe designs in the dancers' jump landings. The tested jazz shoe designs altered the impact attenuating capacity of jump landing technique in dancers. The cushioned jazz shoes are recommended particularly for injured dancers to reduce impact on the lower limb. Jazz shoe design should consider the impact attenuation properties of the forefoot region, due to the toe-strike landing technique in dance movement. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The influence of soccer shoes on kicking velocity in full-instep kicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterzing, Thorsten; Hennig, Ewald M

    2008-04-01

    Soccer shoes enhance the traction required by the stance leg but decrease the quality of the ball contact during full-instep kicking. Shoe features that influence ball velocity include traction, foot protection, foot rigidity, and toe box height. Upper material and general comfort potentially affect ball velocity. In contrast, shoe weight and outsole stiffness do not influence ball velocity.

  15. REGRESSIVE ANALYSIS OF BRAKING EFFICIENCY OF M1 CATEGORY VEHICLES WITH ANTI-BLOCKING BRAKE SYSTEM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    О. Sarayev

    2015-01-01

    .... For the first time in relation to the modern models of vehicles equipped with anti-lock brakes there were obtained regression models describing the relationship between the coefficient of traction...

  16. Emergency Braking of a Mine Hoist in the Context of the Braking System Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, Stanisław

    2017-03-01

    The paper addresses the selected aspects of the dynamic behaviour of mine hoists during the emergency braking phase. Basing on the model of the hoist and supported by theoretical backgrounds provided by the author (Wolny, 2016), analytical formulas are derived to determine the parameters of the braking system such that during an emergency braking it should guarantee that: - the maximal loading of the hoisting ropes should not exceed the rope breaking force, - deceleration of the conveyances being stopped should not exceed the admissible levels Results of the dynamic analysis of the mine hoist behaviour during an emergency braking phase summarised in this study can be utilised to support the design of conveyance and rope attachments by the fatigue endurance methods, with an aim to adapt it to the specified operational parameters of the hoisting installation (Eurokod 3).

  17. Parametric Optimization Design of Brake Block Based on Reverse Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hua-wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the key part of automotive brake,the performance of brake block has a direct impact on the safety and comfort of cars. Modeling the brake block of disc brake in reverse parameterization by reverse engineering software, analyzing and optimizing the reconstructed model by CAE software. Processing the scanned point cloud by Geomagic Studio and reconstructing the CAD model of the brake block with the parametric surface function of the software, then analyzing and optimizing it by Wrokbench. The example shows that it is quick to reconstruct the CAD model of parts by using reverse parameterization method and reduce part re-design development cycle significantly.

  18. BRAKING PROCESS OF ENDURO AND HIGHWAY-TOURIST MOTORBIKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł SKRZYPCZYK

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the event of an emergency, head of the motorcycle has a split second to decide what to do defensive maneuver. The most common choice is the braking maneuver. Starting motorcycle braking is associated with the selection of additional brake, which uses a driver. It is here to choose to use the front brake, rear or both simultaneously. The paper presents the study of the effects of such decision on the braking process. Tests were carried out for enduro and highway-tourist motorbikes.

  19. BRAKING PROCESS OF ENDURO AND HIGHWAY-TOURIST MOTORBIKES

    OpenAIRE

    Paweł SKRZYPCZYK; Robert KAŁUŻA; Piotr CZECH

    2015-01-01

    In the event of an emergency, head of the motorcycle has a split second to decide what to do defensive maneuver. The most common choice is the braking maneuver. Starting motorcycle braking is associated with the selection of additional brake, which uses a driver. It is here to choose to use the front brake, rear or both simultaneously. The paper presents the study of the effects of such decision on the braking process. Tests were carried out for enduro and highway-tourist motorbikes.

  20. Research to longevity brake lines on the exploitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey TUJRIN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Brake lines are tested for strength and durability. However, tests of strength are short-term, but tests of durability are durable, since their aim is to assess the effectiveness of the brake linings during operation. Therefore, reduction of time evaluating the durability of brake linings exploitation is urgent. The article describes the results of the research on the longevity of the brake linings of different types of vehicles based on their controllable operation and the method of accelerated estimation of the longevity of brake linings based on the operation of their analogues

  1. Asbestos free friction composition for brake linings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An asbestos free friction material composite for brake linings is synthesized containing fibrous reinforcing constituents, friction imparting and controlling additives, elastomeric additives, fire retarding components and a thermosetting resin. The composite shows exemplary friction characteristics and has great resistance to ...

  2. Use of elastomers in regenerative braking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The storage of potential energy as strain energy in elastomers was investigated. The evolution of the preferred stressing scheme is described, and test results on full-size elastomeric energy storage units sized for an automotive regenerative braking system application are presented. The need for elastomeric material improvements is also discussed.

  3. A HIGH BRAKING INDEX FOR A PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, R. F.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S. P. [Department of Physics and McGill Space Institute, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montréal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Gotthelf, E. V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027-6601 (United States); Guillot, S. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Keane, E. F. [SKA Organization, Jodrell Bank Observatory, Cheshire SK11 9DL (United Kingdom); Pivovaroff, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550-9234 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tomsick, J. A. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We present a phase-coherent timing solution for PSR J1640–4631, a young 206 ms pulsar using X-ray timing observations taken with NuSTAR. Over this timing campaign, we have measured the braking index of PSR J1640–4631 to be n = 3.15 ± 0.03. Using a series of simulations, we argue that this unusually high braking index is not due to timing noise, but is intrinsic to the pulsar's spin-down. We cannot, however, rule out contamination due to an unseen glitch recovery, although the recovery timescale would have to be longer than most yet observed. If this braking index is eventually proven to be stable, it demonstrates that pulsar braking indices greater than three are allowed in nature; hence, other physical mechanisms such as mass or magnetic quadrupoles are important in pulsar spin-down. We also present a 3σ upper limit on the pulsed flux at 1.4 GHz of 0.018 mJy.

  4. Performance requirements for locomotive braking systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vermaak, P

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available of underground locomotives, excluding those used on high speed main haulages. In addition a survey was carried out on the most widely used types of locomotives and the braking systems. The survey gave an insight into the knowledge of the mine personnel...

  5. Braking Distance of Hoist Conveyances Required for Safe Stopping Under the Conditions of Emergency Braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, Stanisław

    2017-06-01

    This study investigates selected aspects of the dynamic behaviour of mine hoists during the emergency braking in an event of overtravel. Characteristics of the braking force that needs to be applied in the headgear and in the pit bottom to arrest the conveyance in the event of an overtravel are derived from laboratory and industrial test data and recalling the results reported in literature. The real hoist installation is replaced by a model whereby the equations of motion of rope elements are written as for elastic strings, taking into account the variable length of the hoisting rope section between the Koepe pulley and the conveyance being arrested in the head tower. Analytical formulas are provided whereby the displacement of the top conveyance with the payload for the constant elasticity coefficient of the hoisting rope section between the conveyance being arrested in the head tower and the Koepe pulley is expressed as the function of the braking force and of the operational parameters of the hoist gear. The hoist operation is investigated in the event of emergency braking, taking into account the two aspects of the cycle: - the time required for the conveyance to be stopped, - the distance travelled by the conveyance until it is stopped. The results of the dynamic analysis of the hoist installation in the conditions of emergency braking may be utilised in selection of the effective and adequate braking system guaranteeing the safety of the system operation.

  6. Comparative Frictional Analysis of Automobile Drum and Disc Brakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.P. Khairnar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a comparative frictional behaviour of drum brakes and disc brakes in automobiles has been investigated. The influential factors; contact force and friction radius were modeled for the estimation of the friction coefficient for drum as well as disc brakes. The effect of contact force and friction radius is studied with varying conditions of parameters; longitudinal force, caliper force and torque on piston side as well as non-piston side. The numerical results obtained have been compared with the similar obtained from virtual Matlab/Simulink models for drum and disc brakes. The results evidenced that friction radius predominantly affects brake pressure and thus the friction coefficient, also the increase in contact force resulted with decrease in friction coefficient both for drum and disc brakes. Further it has been found that disc brakes exhibit gradual decrease of friction coefficient due to the equitable distribution of braking effort while drum brake presents sudden variations in friction coefficient. It can be revealed that frictional behaviour of disc brake is more consistent than drum brake.

  7. The morphology of foot soft tissues is associated with running shoe type in healthy recreational runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianyi; Delabastita, Tijs; Lissens, Joselien; De Beenhouwer, Floor; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-11-22

    To determine the differences in the morphology of foot soft tissues between runners using different types of running shoes. Cross-sectional study. Thirty-eight recreational runners were divided into four groups based on running shoe type, namely, neutral shoes, motion control shoes, minimalistic shoes and neutral shoes with custom-made insoles. An arch height index and a relative arch deformation index were calculated for each participant. An ultrasound device was used to measure the cross-sectional area and/or the thickness of selected intrinsic foot muscles (abductor hallucis, flexor hallucis brevis and flexor digitorum brevis) and extrinsic foot muscles (flexor digitorum longus, tibialis anterior and the peroneus muscles), and the thickness of the plantar fascia, Achilles tendon and heel pad. Recreational runners using minimalistic shoes demonstrated stiffer foot arches than those using neutral shoes. Among the selected foot muscles, only abductor hallucis showed a significant morphological difference between shoe groups. Runners using minimalistic shoes had the thickest abductor hallucis. The minimalistic shoe runners also showed a thinner proximal plantar fascia and a thicker Achilles tendon than other runners. Insole runners had a thinner heel pad than neutral shoe runners. This study suggests that the morphology of foot soft tissues is associated with running shoe type in recreational runners. A sudden change in running shoe type without adjusting training volume should be undertaken with caution, since it may take time for foot soft tissues to adapt to a new shoe condition. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pedestrian injury mitigation by autonomous braking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, Erik; Källhammer, Jan-Erik; Eriksson, Dick; Nentwich, Matthias; Fredriksson, Rikard; Smith, Kip

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate the potential effectiveness of a pedestrian injury mitigation system that autonomously brakes the car prior to impact. The effectiveness was measured by the reduction of fatally and severely injured pedestrians. The database from the German In-Depth Accident Study (GIDAS) was queried for pedestrians hit by the front of cars from 1999 to 2007. Case by case information on vehicle and pedestrian velocities and trajectories were analysed to estimate the field of view needed for a vehicle-based sensor to detect the pedestrians one second prior to the crash. The pre-impact braking system was assumed to activate the brakes one second prior to crash and to provide a braking deceleration up to the limit of the road surface conditions, but never to exceed 0.6 g. New impact speeds were then calculated for pedestrians that would have been detected by the sensor. These calculations assumed that all pedestrians who were within a given field of view but not obstructed by surrounding objects would be detected. The changes in fatality and severe injury risks were quantified using risk curves derived by logistic regression of the accident data. Summing the risks for all pedestrians, relationships between mitigation effectiveness, sensor field of view, braking initiation time, and deceleration were established. The study documents that the effectiveness at reducing fatally (severely) injured pedestrians in frontal collisions with cars reached 40% (27%) at a field of view of 40 degrees. Increasing the field of view further led to only marginal improvements in effectiveness. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EVALUATION OF RESULTS OF ROAD RESEARCH OF LANOS CAR, EQUIPPED WITH AN ADVANCED HYDRAULIC BRAKE DRIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Nazarov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies of road emergency braking of the car, the brake system equipped with an improved hydraulic brake actuator according to the patent number 76189 Ukraine are analyzed. This drive provides more efficient emergency braking of cars under operating conditions by of installing in each of the contours of the rear brakes one brake-power, each of which provides distribution of braking forces between the wheels of the corresponding side.

  10. A Thermo-elastic Annular Plate Model for the Modeling of Brake Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes Perez, Jose Luis; Heckmann, Andreas; Kaiser, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    The friction forces generated during braking between brake pads and discs produce high thermal gradients on the rubbing surfaces. These thermal gradients may cause braking problems such as brake fade, premature wear or hot spotting and the associated hot judder phenomenon in the frequency range below 100 Hz. Further consequences are comfort reductions, a defective braking process, inhomogeneous wear, cutbacks of the brake performance and even damage of brake components. The presen...

  11. Influence of shoe midsole hardness on plantar pressure distribution in four basketball-related movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wing-Kai; Ng, Wei Xuan; Kong, Pui Wah

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how shoe midsole hardness influenced plantar pressure in basketball-related movements. Twenty male university basketball players wore customized shoes with hard and soft midsoles (60 and 50 Shore C) to perform four movements: running, maximal forward sprinting, maximal 45° cutting and lay-up. Plantar loading was recorded using an in-shoe pressure measuring system, with peak pressure (PP) and pressure time integral (PTI) extracted from 10 plantar regions. Compared with hard shoes, subjects exhibited lower PP in one or more plantar regions when wearing the soft shoes across all tested movements (Ps basketball players.

  12. Excitation Method of Linear-Motor-Type Rail Brake without Using Power Sources by Dynamic Braking with Zero Electrical Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yasuaki; Kashiwagi, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Sasakawa, Takashi; Fujii, Nobuo

    The eddy current rail brake is a type of braking system used in railway vehicles. Because of problems such as rail heating and problems associated with ensuring that power is supplied when the feeder malfunctions, this braking system has not been used for practical applications in Japan. Therefore, we proposed the use of linear induction motor (LIM) technology in eddy current rail brake systems. The LIM rail brake driven by dynamic braking can reduce rail heating and generate the energy required for self-excitation. In this paper, we present an excitation system and control method for the LIM rail brake driven by “dynamic braking with zero electrical output”. The proposed system is based on the concept that the LIM rail brake can be energized without using excitation power sources such as a feeder circuit and that high reliability can be realized by providing an independent excitation system. We have studied this system and conducted verification tests using a prototype LIM rail brake on a roller rig. The results show that the system performance is adequate for commercializing the proposed system, in which the LIM rail brake is driven without using any excitation power source.

  13. Modeling and design of cooperative braking in electric and hybrid vehicles using induction machine and hydraulic brake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaini Dalimus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In mixed-mode braking applications, the electric motor / generator (M/G and hydraulic pressure valve are controlled to meet the driver’s braking demand. Controlling these braking elements is achieved by modulating the current generated by the M/G and adjusting the fluid pressure to the wheel brake cylinders. This paper aims to model and design combined regenerative and hydraulic braking systems which, comprise an induction electric machine, inverter, NiMH battery, controller, a pressure source, pressure control unit, and brake calipers. A 15 kW 1500 rpm induction machine equipped with a reduction gear having a gear ratio of 4 is used. A hydraulic brake capable to produce fluid pressure up to 40 bar is used. Direct torque control and pressure control are chosen as the control criteria in the M/G and the hydraulic solenoid valve. The braking demands for the system are derived from the Federal Testing Procedure (FTP drive cycle. Two simulation models have been developed in Matlab®/Simulink® to analyze the performance of the control strategy in each braking system. The developed model is validated through experiment. It is concluded that the control system does introduce torque ripple and pressure oscillation in the braking system, but these effects do not affect vehicle braking performance due to the high frequency nature of pressure fluctuation and the damping effect of the vehicle inertia. Moreover, experiment results prove the effectiveness of the developed model.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of the Braking System of Wheeled Mainline Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Shumilov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The braking system of the landing gear wheels of a mainline aircraft has to meet mandatory requirements laid out in the Aviation Regulations AP-25 (Para 25.735. «Brakes and brake systems". These requirements are essential when creating the landing gear wheel brake control system (WBCS and are used as main initial data in its mathematical modeling. The WBCS is one of the most important systems to ensure the safe completion of the flight. It is a complex of devices, i.e. units (hydraulic, electrical, and mechanical, connected through piping, wiring, mechanical constraints. This complex should allow optimizing the braking process when a large number of parameters change. The most important of them are the following: runway friction coefficient (RFC, lifting force, weight and of the aircraft, etc. The main structural elements involved in braking the aircraft are: aircraft wheels with pneumatics (air tires and brake discs, WBCS, and cooling system of gear wheels when braking.To consider the aircraft deceleration on the landing run is of essence at the stage of design, development, and improvement of brakes and braking systems. Based on analysis of equation of the aircraft motion and energy balance can be determined energy loading and its basic design parameters, braking distances and braking time.As practice and analysis of energy loading show, they (brake + wheel absorb the aircraftpossessed kinetic energy at the start of braking as much as 60-70%, 70-80%, and 80-90%, respectively, under normal increased, and emergency operating conditions. The paper presents a procedure for the rapid calculation of energy loading of the brake wheel.Currently, the mainline aircrafts use mainly electrohydraulic brake systems in which there are the main, backup, and emergency-parking brake systems. All channels are equipped with automatic anti-skid systems. Their presence in the emergency (the third reserve channel significantly improves the reliability and safety of

  15. Comparative study of performance of shoe polishes formulated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyethylene pigment was generated from “pure water sachets” (one of the major environmental nuisance today) and used in the formulation of shoe polish using paraffin wax, white spirit, turpentine oil, and nitrocellulose. The polish was found to exhibit similar wrinkle resistance, inferior gloss, rub resistance; resistance to ...

  16. Effect Of Running Shoes on Foot Impact During Running

    CERN Document Server

    Nassif, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Running is part of almost every sport, and requires a great amount of stamina, endurance, mental toughness and overall strength. At every step, the foot experiences ground reaction forces necessary to support the motion of the body. With the advancements in shoe technology, running shoes have grown in popularity among runners, as well as non-runners, because they reduce the risk of injuries from the impact felt by the foot. The purpose of this report is to analyze the effect of running shoes on impact forces on the foot. This is achieved through the use of three force pads fixed at different locations on the foot The force measured by each sensor is then used to estimate the vertical ground reaction force, using the sensors' calibrations equations . Based on the ground reaction force, the effective mass corresponding to the momentum change occurring during the transient phase of the impact is estimated. The results show that running at 9 miles per hour without running shoes generates an effective mass of (14....

  17. Effect of shoe type on plantar pressure: a gender comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Queen, Robin M.; Abbey, Alicia N.; Wiegerinck, Johannes I.; Yoder, Jordan C.; Nunley, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the differences in materials, racing flats have begun to be used not only for racing, but also for daily training. As there are data suggesting a gender difference in overuse injuries in runners, shoe choice may affect loading patterns during running. The purpose was to determine differences

  18. Experimental Study of Heat Dissipation in Indoor Sports Shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessing, O.; Jansen, A.J.; Leihitu, C.; Overhage, D.

    2014-01-01

    As indoor sports shoes are intensively used in a warm and sweaty environment for periods of up to three consecutive hours, the built-up heat inside is insufficiently released causing warm and perspiring feet. This results in an increased chance of blisters and skin irritations. Experimental research

  19. Identification of fungi from children's shoes and application of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    13 strains of fungi were isolated from 12 shoes worn by children aged 6 to12 for a period of more than half a year consisting of 5 strains of yeasts and 8 strains of molds. Through morphological observation and 18SrDNA sequence analysis, the 5 strains of yeasts were identified as follows: Cryptococcus neoformans, ...

  20. Biomechanics of slow running and walking with a rocker shoe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Hijmans, Juha; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Zwerver, Johannes; Dekker, Rienk; Postema, Klaas

    Evidence suggests a link between the loading of the Achilles tendon and the magnitude of the ankle internal plantar flexion moment during late stance of gait, which is clinically relevant in the management of Achilles tendinopathy. Some studies showed that rocker shoes can reduce the ankle internal

  1. Comparative study of performance of shoe polishes formulated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GARZALI

    The Reagents used are paraffin wax, white spirit, turpentine oil, nitro cellulose and some commercial shoe polishes (labeled as X1 and X2). Sample Preparation. Pure water sachets (polyethylene) was washed and dried, then burnt in an electric furnace in limited supply of oxygen at 2500C. It was then grounded and sieved.

  2. Heel-region properties of prosthetic feet and shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klute, Glenn K; Berge, Jocelyn S; Segal, Ava D

    2004-07-01

    The properties of the prosthetic components prescribed to amputees have the potential to ameliorate or exacerbate their comfort, mobility, and health. To measure the difference in heel-region structural properties of currently available prosthetic feet and shoes, we simulated the period of initial heel-ground contact with a pendulum apparatus. The energy dissipation capacity of the various prosthetic feet ranged from 33.6% to 52.6% of the input energy. Donning a shoe had a large effect. Energy dissipation of a Seattle Lightfoot 2 prosthetic foot was 45.3%, while addition of a walking, running, and orthopedic shoe increased energy dissipation to 63.0%, 73.0%, and 82.4%, respectively. The force versus deformation response to impact was modeled as a hardening spring in parallel with a position-dependent damping element. A nonlinear least-squares curve fit produced model coefficients useful for predicting the heel-region impact response of both prosthetic feet and shoes.

  3. Shoe preference based on subjective comfort for walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Pui Wah; Bagdon, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Subjective comfort of footwear is important for shoe and orthosis design. This study compared shoe preferences between walking and running, using subjective comfort as an outcome tool. Forty-one participants walked and ran 20 times each along a runway in three types of footwear (cushioning, lightweight, and stability) and chose the model that they preferred most for walking and running separately based on subjective comfort. More participants preferred the cushioning model (walking, 34%; running, 41%) or the lightweight model (walking, 44%; running, 41%) over the stability model (walking, 22%; running, 17%). χ² tests revealed no differences between walking and running, runners and nonrunners, and lighter and heavier individuals. Women were more likely (odds ratio = 4.09) to prefer the lightweight model, whereas men preferred the cushioning (odds ratio = 2.05) and stability (odds ratio = 3.19) models. Most participants (71%) chose the same model for both activities. Shoe preference varies among individuals and is influenced by sex. Most people feel comfortable walking and running in the same shoe model.

  4. Impact characteristics of female children running in adult versus youth shoes of the same size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Dana; Dufek, Janet S; Mercer, John A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if ground reaction forces were influenced by shoe design (adult vs. youth) for female children when running. Subjects (n = 10, 12.0 ± 1.1 years old; 154 ± 4.9 cm; 46.2 ± 14.3 kg; shoe size 3.5-7 youth) were fit with a shoe model available in youth and adult sizes. Subjects ran 10 trials per shoe condition across a force platform placed in the middle of a 9-m runway. Impact force, second maximum force, loading rate, stance time and average vertical ground reaction forces were recorded for each trial. Shoes underwent a mechanical impact test with peak force, peak acceleration, and percent energy returned recorded. Each variable was compared between shoe conditions. From the impact testing, it was determined that peak force, peak acceleration and percent energy return were 7.1%, 7.1%, and 18.9% greater, respectively, for the youth vs. adult shoe (p shoe conditions whereas impact force, second maximum force, average force and stance time were not different between shoes (p > .01). Young girls had a greater loading rate when running in youth vs. adult shoes even though the shoe size was the same.

  5. Assessment of plantar pressure in hindfoot relief shoes of different designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Thomas; Carl, Hans-Dieter; Jendrissek, Andreas; Brem, Matthias; Swoboda, Bernd; Rummel, Philipp; Pauser, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Although there are several different concepts of hindfoot relief footwear, there are no studies on the extent of pressure reduction to be achieved by this footwear. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the reduction in plantar pressure to be achieved with two different hindfoot relief shoes. Ten healthy volunteers performed three trials at a self-selected speed. Peak pressure values in mass-produced shoes (normal gait) were considered as 100% and were compared with measurements in two differently designed hindfoot relief shoes. Foot portions were defined as heel (0%-15% of total insole length), hindfoot (16%-30%), midfoot (31%-60%), and forefoot (61%-100%). Heel and hindfoot peak pressures were significantly reduced in both shoes compared with normal gait (P shoes. Midfoot peak pressure was not significantly reduced in tested shoes compared with baseline (P > .05) but differed significantly between the two shoes. Forefoot peak pressure was significantly reduced with one of the tested shoes (to a median 73% baseline; P = .004) but not with the other (median, 88% baseline). Hindfoot relief shoes leave a considerable amount of peak pressure, predominantly under the hindfoot. The extent of peak pressure reduction for the heel and the hindfoot varies between different hindfoot relief shoes. Depending on the affected foot area, the kind of hindfoot relief shoe should be carefully chosen.

  6. Changes in running mechanics using conventional shoelace versus elastic shoe cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Youlian; Wang, Lin; Li, Jing Xian; Zhou, Ji He

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the perceived comfort, plantar pressure, and rearfoot motion between laced running shoes and elastic-covered running shoes. Fifteen male amateur runners participated in the study. Each participant was assigned laced running shoes and elastic-covered running shoes for use during the study. The perceived comfort, plantar loading, and rearfoot motion control of each type of shoes during running were recorded. When the laced running shoes and elastic-covered running shoes were compared, the elastic-covered running shoes were given a lower perceived comfort rating in terms of shoe length, width, heel cup fitting, and forefoot cushioning. The elastic-covered running shoes also recorded higher peak plantar pressure in the lateral side of the forefoot, as well as larger maximum rearfoot pronation. Overall, shoelaces can help runners obtain better foot-shoe fit. They increase the perceived comfort, and decrease the maximum pronation and plantar pressure. Moreover, shoelaces may help prevent injury in running by allowing better control of the aforementioned factors.

  7. Men's shoes and knee joint torques relevant to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, D Casey; Karvosky, Mark E; Lelas, Jennifer L; Riley, Patrick O

    2003-03-01

    To determine if men's dress shoes and sneakers increase knee joint torques and play the same role in the development and/or progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA) as women's high-heeled dress shoes. Three-dimensional data regarding lower extremity torques and motion were collected during walking in 22 healthy men while (1) wearing dress shoes, (2) wearing sneakers, and (3) barefoot. Data were plotted and qualitatively compared; major peak values were statistically compared between conditions. The external knee varus torque in early stance was slightly greater with the dress shoes and sneakers, but this slight increase can be explained by the faster walking speed with shoes. No significant increases were found in any other of the sagittal, coronal, or transverse knee torques when walking with dress shoes and sneakers compared to barefoot. Men's dress shoes and sneakers do not significantly affect knee joint torques that may have relevance to the development and/or progression of knee OA.

  8. The influence of soccer shoe design on player performance and injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Ewald M

    2011-01-01

    Although soccer is the most popular sport in the world, little research has been published in the field of soccer biomechanics, particularly on the importance of footwear for the game. The traction properties of soccer shoes on natural and artificial turf have been speculated to be responsible for acute and chronic injuries in soccer. This article reviewed the current knowledge on how soccer shoes influence the risk of injuries and how they may serve to improve player performance. Comfort is the highest priority that players want from their shoes, followed by traction and stability. Cleat design and arrangement are important shoe features that allow for fast accelerations and stops, rapid cuts, and turns. Soccer shoe design can influence shooting speed and, even more important for the game of soccer, kicking accuracy. To combine shoe characteristics for injury prevention and better performance will be a challenge for future research on optimizing soccer shoes.

  9. The effect of running shoes on lower extremity joint torques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, D Casey; Franz, Jason R; Keenan, Geoffrey S; Dicharry, Jay; Della Croce, Ugo; Wilder, Robert P

    2009-12-01

    To determine the effect of modern-day running shoes on lower extremity joint torques during running. Two-condition experimental comparison. A 3-dimensional motion analysis laboratory. A total of 68 healthy young adult runners (37 women) who typically run in running shoes. All subjects ran barefoot and in the same type of stability running footwear at a controlled running speed. Three-dimensional motion capture data were collected in synchrony with ground reaction force data from an instrumented treadmill for each of the 2 conditions. Peak 3-dimensional external joint torques at the hip, knee, and ankle as calculated through a full inverse dynamic model. Increased joint torques at the hip, knee, and ankle were observed with running shoes compared with running barefoot. Disproportionately large increases were observed in the hip internal rotation torque and in the knee flexion and knee varus torques. An average 54% increase in the hip internal rotation torque, a 36% increase in knee flexion torque, and a 38% increase in knee varus torque were measured when running in running shoes compared with barefoot. The findings at the knee suggest relatively greater pressures at anatomical sites that are typically more prone to knee osteoarthritis, the medial and patellofemoral compartments. It is important to note the limitations of these findings and of current 3-dimensional gait analysis in general, that only resultant joint torques were assessed. It is unknown to what extent actual joint contact forces could be affected by compliance that a shoe might provide, a potentially valuable design characteristic that may offset the observed increases in joint torques.

  10. Changes in Plantar Loading Based on Shoe Type and Sex During a Jump-Landing Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBiasio, Justin C.; Russell, Mary E.; Butler, Robert J.; Nunley, James A.; Queen, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Metatarsal stress fractures are common in cleated-sport athletes. Previous authors have shown that plantar loading varies with footwear, sex, and the athletic task. Objective: To examine the effects of shoe type and sex on plantar loading in the medial midfoot (MMF), lateral midfoot (LMF), medial forefoot (MFF), middle forefoot (MidFF), and lateral forefoot (LFF) during a jump-landing task. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-seven recreational athletes (14 men, 13 women) with no history of lower extremity injury in the last 6 months and no history of foot or ankle surgery. Main Outcome Measure(s): The athletes completed 7 jumping trials while wearing bladed-cleat, turf-cleat, and running shoes. Maximum force, contact area, contact time, and the force-time integral were analyzed in each foot region. We calculated 2 × 3 analyses of variance (α = .05) to identify shoe-condition and sex differences. Results: We found no shoe × sex interactions, but the MMF, LMF, MFF, and LFF force-time integrals were greater in men (P shoes (P = .02). Total foot and MidFF maximum force was less with the running shoes (P shoe conditions (P shoes (P = .01). The MMF contact area was greatest in the running shoes (P shoes (P = .03). The MFF and LFF force-time integrals were greater with the bladed-cleat shoes (P shoes (P shoe, men and women loaded the foot differently during a jump landing. The bladed cleat increased forefoot loading, which may increase the risk for forefoot injury. The type of shoe should be considered when choosing footwear for athletes returning to activity after metatarsal stress fractures. PMID:24067149

  11. An Intelligent Regenerative Braking Strategy for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Song

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative braking is an effective approach for electric vehicles (EVs to extend their driving range. A fuzzy-logic-based regenerative braking strategy (RBS integrated with series regenerative braking is developed in this paper to advance the level of energy-savings. From the viewpoint of securing car stability in braking operations, the braking force distribution between the front and rear wheels so as to accord with the ideal distribution curve are considered to prevent vehicles from experiencing wheel lock and slip phenomena during braking. Then, a fuzzy RBS using the driver’s braking force command, vehicle speed, battery SOC, battery temperature are designed to determine the distribution between friction braking force and regenerative braking force to improve the energy recuperation efficiency. The experimental results on an “LF620” prototype EV validated the feasibility and effectiveness of regenerative braking and showed that the proposed fuzzy RBS was endowed with good control performance. The maximum driving range of LF620 EV was improved by 25.7% compared with non-RBS conditions.

  12. Thermal analysis of disc brakes using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenudin, Jamari, J.; Tauviqirrahman, M.

    2017-01-01

    Disc brakes are components of a vehicle that serve to slow or stop the rotation of the wheel. This paper discusses the phenomenon of heat distribution on the brake disc during braking. Heat distribution on the brake disc is caused by kinetic energy changing into mechanical energy. Energy changes occur during the braking process due to friction between the surface of the disc and a disc pad. The temperature resulting from this friction rises high. This thermal analysis on brake discs is aimed to evaluate the performance of an electric car in the braking process. The aim of this study is to analyze the thermal behavior of the brake discs using the Finite Element Method (FEM) through examining the heat distribution on the brake disc using 3-D modeling. Results obtained from the FEM reflect the effects of high heat due to the friction between the disc pad with the disc rotor. Results of the simulation study are used to identify the effect of the heat distribution that occurred during the braking process.

  13. Pengaruh Intensitas Mengakses Media Sosial Adidas dan Citra Merek terhadap Keputusan Pembelian Sport Shoes Adidas di Kalangan Remaja Wanita

    OpenAIRE

    Purnama, Ayu Sri; Herieningsih, Sri Widowati; Pradekso, Tandiyo; Rakhmad, Wiwid Noor

    2016-01-01

    Sport shoes merupakan salah satu jenis sepatu yang di minati oleh masyarakat saat ini, Selain itu akhir-akhir ini salah satu jenis sport shoes yakni running shoes menjadi fashion baru dikalangan remaja di Indonesia. Namun salah satu produsen sports shoes yaitu adidas saat ini kurang diminati bila dibandingkan dengan kompetitornya hasil survey mengenai sport shoes yang digunakan dan diminati oleh remaja wanita di Indonesia menunjukkan bahwa Adidas menempati urutan ke- tiga setelah nike dan con...

  14. A Transient Dynamic Model of Brake Corner and Subsystems for Brake Creep Groan Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejian Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the understanding of brake creep groan, both experimental and numerical studies are conducted in this paper. Based on a vehicle road test under the condition of downhill, complicated stick-slip type motion of caliper and its correlation with the interior noise were analyzed. In order to duplicate these brake creep groan phenomena, a transient dynamic model including brake corner and subsystems was established using finite element method. In the model, brake components were considered to be flexible body, and the subsystems including driveline, suspension, tire, and vehicle body were considered to be rigid body. Simulation and experimental results of caliper vibration in time and frequency domains were compared. It was demonstrated that the new model is effective for the prediction and analysis of brake creep groan, and it has higher accuracy compared to the previous model without the subsystems. It is also found that the lining and caliper not only have stick-slip motion in each coordinate direction but also have translational and torsional movements in plane, which relate to the microscopic sticking and slipping, friction coefficient, and forces, as well as the contact status at the friction interface.

  15. 49 CFR 232.609 - Handling of defective equipment with ECP brake systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) A freight car equipped with an ECP brake system that is known to have arrived with ineffective or... in a train operating in ECP brake mode. (f) A freight car equipped with an ECP brake system that is... pneumatic brakes shall not operate with freight cars equipped with stand-alone ECP brake systems unless: (1...

  16. Wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliore, P G [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Miller, L S [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Quandt, G A

    1995-04-01

    Five trailing-edge devices were investigated to determine their potential as wind-turbine aerodynamic brakes, and for power modulation and load alleviation. Several promising configurations were identified. A new device, called the spoiler-flap, appears to be the best alternative. It is a simple device that is effective at all angles of attack. It is not structurally intrusive, and it has the potential for small actuating loads. It is shown that simultaneous achievement of a low lift/drag ratio and high drag is the determinant of device effectiveness, and that these attributes must persist up to an angle of attack of 45{degree}. It is also argued that aerodynamic brakes must be designed for a wind speed of at least 45 m/s (100 mph).

  17. NAC Off-Vehicle Brake Testing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Project Officer ( TIPO ) US Army National Automotive Center (NAC) Warren, MI Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The original document contains color images. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...May 2007 FinalR1 UNCLAS: Dist A. Approved for public release Leo Miller, Technology Insertion Project Officer ( TIPO ) NAC Off-vehicle Brake Testing

  18. Simulating pneumatic brake systems with AMESIM

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Sebastian;Anton, T.

    2017-01-01

    AMESim is successfully used for the design of braking systems and components by a large number of manufacturers and OEMs. The motivation and the main goals for the research project between the Institute of Product Development and the Knorr-Bremse SfS are to show a tool for the project planning of the systems and to present guidelines for systems, which can support the product developers.

  19. Longitudinal wheel slip during ABS braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartikainen, Lassi; Petry, Frank; Westermann, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Anti-lock braking system (ABS) braking tests with two subcompact passenger cars were performed on dry and wet asphalt, as well as on snow and ice surfaces. The operating conditions of the tyres in terms of wheel slip were evaluated using histograms of the wheel slip data. The results showed different average slip levels for different road surfaces. It was also found that changes in the tyre tread stiffness affected the slip operating range through a modification of the slip value at which the maximum longitudinal force is achieved. Variation of the tyre footprint length through modifications in the inflation pressure affected the slip operating range as well. Differences in the slip distribution between vehicles with different brake controllers were also observed. The changes in slip operating range in turn modified the relative local sliding speeds between the tyre and the road. The results highlight the importance of the ABS controller's ability to adapt to changing slip-force characteristics of tyres and provide estimates of the magnitude of the effects of different tyre and road operating conditions.

  20. Squeal noise in simple numerical brake models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2015-09-01

    Since the early 1920s, automotive disc brake squeal has caused warranty issues and customer dissatisfaction. Despite a good deal of progress achieved, predicting brake squeal propensity is as difficult as ever as not all mechanisms and interactions are known owing to their highly fugitive complex nature. In recent years, research has been focused on the prediction of unstable vibration modes by the complex eigenvalue analysis (CEA) for the mode-coupling type of instability. There has been very limited consideration given to the calculation of the acoustic radiation properties due to friction contact between a pad and a rotor. Recent analyses using a forced response analysis with harmonic contact pressure excitation indicates negative dissipated energy at some pad eigenfrequencies predicted to be stable by the CEA. A transient nonlinear time domain analysis with no external excitation indicates that squeal could develop at these eigenfrequencies. Here, the acoustic radiation characteristics of those pad modes are determined by analysing the acoustic power levels and radiation efficiencies of simplified brake models in the form of a pad rubbing on a plate or on a disc using the acoustic boundary element method based on velocities extracted from the forced response analysis. Results show that unstable pad modes trigger unstable disc vibrations resulting in instantaneous mode squeal similar to those observed experimentally. Changes in the radiation efficiency with pressure variations are smaller than those with friction coefficient variations and are caused by the phase difference of the velocities out-of-plane vibration between the pad and the disc.

  1. Rotational stiffness of football shoes influences talus motion during external rotation of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feng; Meyer, Eric G; Braman, Jerrod E; Powell, John W; Haut, Roger C

    2012-04-01

    Shoe-surface interface characteristics have been implicated in the high incidence of ankle injuries suffered by athletes. Yet, the differences in rotational stiffness among shoes may also influence injury risk. It was hypothesized that shoes with different rotational stiffness will generate different patterns of ankle ligament strain. Four football shoe designs were tested and compared in terms of rotational stiffness. Twelve (six pairs) male cadaveric lower extremity limbs were externally rotated 30 deg using two selected football shoe designs, i.e., a flexible shoe and a rigid shoe. Motion capture was performed to track the movement of the talus with a reflective marker array screwed into the bone. A computational ankle model was utilized to input talus motions for the estimation of ankle ligament strains. At 30 deg of rotation, the rigid shoe generated higher ankle joint torque at 46.2 ± 9.3 Nm than the flexible shoe at 35.4 ± 5.7 Nm. While talus rotation was greater in the rigid shoe (15.9 ± 1.6 deg versus 12.1 ± 1.0 deg), the flexible shoe generated more talus eversion (5.6 ± 1.5 deg versus 1.2± 0.8 deg). While these talus motions resulted in the same level of anterior deltoid ligament strain (approxiamtely 5%) between shoes, there was a significant increase of anterior tibiofibular ligament strain (4.5± 0.4% versus 2.3 ± 0.3%) for the flexible versus more rigid shoe design. The flexible shoe may provide less restraint to the subtalar and transverse tarsal joints, resulting in more eversion but less axial rotation of the talus during foot∕shoe rotation. The increase of strain in the anterior tibiofibular ligament may have been largely due to the increased level of talus eversion documented for the flexible shoe. There may be a direct correlation of ankle joint torque with axial talus rotation, and an inverse relationship between torque and talus eversion. The study may provide some insight into relationships between shoe

  2. In-depth analysis of bicycle hydraulic disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Oliver; Györfi, Benedikt; Wrede, Jürgen; Arnold, Timo; Moia, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Hydraulic Disc Brakes (HDBs) represent the most recent and innovative bicycle braking system. Especially Electric Bicycles (EBs), which are becoming more and more popular, are equipped with this powerful, unaffected by environmental influences, and low-wear type of brakes. As a consequence of the high braking performance, typical bicycle braking errors lead to more serious accidents. This is the starting point for the development of a Braking Dynamics Assistance system (BDA) to prevent front wheel lockup and nose-over (falling over the handlebars). One of the essential prerequisites for the system design is a better understanding of bicycle HDBs' characteristics. A physical simulation model and a test bench have been built for this purpose. The results of the virtual and real experiments conducted show a high correlation and allow valuable insights into HDBs on bicycles, which have not been studied scientifically in any depth so far.

  3. Practical Use of the Braking Attributes Measurements Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondruš Ján

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with issues of braking the passenger car. The measurement of braking deceleration of the vehicle Kia Cee´d 1,6 16 V was carried out by an optical device Correvit system. The measurement was carried out on the airport of the village of Rosina located close to Zilina. 10 drivers of different age, praxis, and kilometers driven participated in the measurement. The measured process was the vehicle full braking with the service brake of the initial speed of approximately 50 km.h-1. Each of the drivers had 10 attempts. In the closure of this contribution the results of the performed measurements, their evaluation and comparison are presented. Practical result from the contribution is mainly the measurement set of braking deceleration of the respective vehicle during intensive braking.

  4. A high performance pneumatic braking system for heavy vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan I.; Cebon, David

    2010-12-01

    Current research into reducing actuator delays in pneumatic brake systems is opening the door for advanced anti-lock braking algorithms to be used on heavy goods vehicles. However, these algorithms require the knowledge of variables that are impractical to measure directly. This paper introduces a sliding mode braking force observer to support a sliding mode controller for air-braked heavy vehicles. The performance of the observer is examined through simulations and field testing of an articulated heavy vehicle. The observer operated robustly during single-wheel vehicle simulations, and provided reasonable estimates of surface friction from test data. The effect of brake gain errors on the controller and observer are illustrated, and a recursive least squares estimator is derived for the brake gain. The estimator converged within 0.3 s in simulations and vehicle trials.

  5. Elastoplastic finite element analysis for wet multidisc brake during lasting braking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhanling

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressed to serious heat degradation problem of the braking continuously performed in the drag brake application for a long time, finite element analysis for bidirectional thermal-structure coupling is adopted to investigate temperature and stress when material properties are temperature-dependent. Based on the constitutive relations of heat transfer and strain-stress, three-dimensional transient finite element equilibrium equations with many kinds of boundary conditions for bidirectional thermal-structure coupling were derived. And it was originally presented that start time, location, severity and evolution laws of plastic deformation were depicted using dimensionless stress distribution contour with the yield limit related to temperature. The change laws of plastic element number and contact area versus braking time were expressed by plasticity ratio and contact ratio curves, respectively. The laws revealed by the numerical calculation results are in accordance with the objective perception and reasoning.

  6. Investigation of the coatings applied onto brake discs on disc-brake pad pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kiliçaslan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available While braking, according to the severity of it, thermal, metallurgical, constructive and tribological occurrences emerge on the brake disc-pad interface. In this study, NiCr was sprayed as bonding layer onto the discs, one ofwhich was coated with Al2O3-TiO2 by plasma spray and the other was coated with NiCr-Cr3C2 by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF. In addition, the discs were tested with inertia dynamometer according to SAE’s J2522 testing procedure. The measurements showed that although the pads of the coated discs were exposed to higher braking temperatures, friction coefficient of the disc coated with NiCr- Cr3C2 was obtained 6 % higher compared to the original disc.

  7. Effects of 'navicular' shoeing on equine distal forelimb kinematics on different track surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, C J; Back, W

    2001-11-01

    Orthopaedic shoeing applied for disorders such as navicular disease is mostly evaluated on hard track surfaces, but very often horses are ridden only on soft tracks. To compare the effects of normal shoes, eggbar shoes, and shoes with heel wedges (5 degrees) on the kinematics of the distal forelimb on hard and soft track surfaces, eleven sound Dutch Warmblood horses were led across three different tracks (an asphalt, a fibre/sand mix (= Agterberg), and a pure sand track) with three different shoe types (a normal shoe, an eggbar shoe, and a shoe with heel wedges). The hoof rotation and the maximal extension of the fetlock joint at midstance period were recorded by an infrared-light based gait analysis system (ProReflex) at walk and at trot. Statistical analysis revealed significant effects of track and shoe type, and a shoe-track interaction (pfetlock extension was less on a soft surface, in particular on the sand track (pfetlock extension and thus unloading of the fetlock joint. The extra forward rotation of the hoof induced by heel wedges on hard tracks was almost the same on soft track surfaces. Eggbars and fibre/sand mix tracks have intermediate effects on unloading of the distal forelimb.

  8. Influence of prolonged wearing of unstable shoes on upright standing postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Andreia S P; Macedo, Rui; Santos, Rubim; Sousa, Filipa; Silva, Andreia; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-02-01

    To study the influence of prolonged wearing of unstable shoes on standing postural control in prolonged standing workers. The participants were divided into two groups: one wore unstable shoes while the other wore conventional shoes for 8weeks. Stabilometry parameters related to centre of pressure (CoP), rambling (RM) and trembling (TR) as well as the total agonist/antagonist muscle activity, antagonist co-activation and reciprocal activation were evaluated during upright standing, before and after the 8weeks period. In both moments, the subjects were evaluated wearing the unstable shoes and in barefoot. The unstable shoe condition presented increased CoP displacement related variables and decreased co-activation command compared to barefoot before and after the intervention. The prolonged wearing of unstable shoes led to: (1) reduction of medial-lateral CoP root mean square and area; (2) decreased anteroposterior RM displacement; (3) increased anteroposterior RM mean velocity and mediolateral RM displacement; (4) decreased anteroposterior TR RMS; and (5) increased thigh antagonist co-activation in the unstable shoe condition. The unstable shoe condition is associated to a higher destabilising effect that leads to a selection of more efficient and accurate postural commands compared to barefoot. Prolonged wearing of unstable shoes provides increased effectiveness and performance of the postural control system, while wearing of unstable shoes in upright standing, that are reflected by changes in CoP related variables and by a reorganisation of postural control commands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of sports flooring and shoes on impact forces and performance during jump tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhausen, Axel; Bomfim, Joao

    2017-01-01

    We aim to determine the influence of sports floorings and sports shoes on impact mechanics and performance during standardised jump tasks. Twenty-one male volunteers performed ankle jumps (four consecutive maximal bounds with very dynamic ankle movements) and multi-jumps (two consecutive maximal counter-movement jumps) on force plates using minimalist and cushioned shoes under 5 sports flooring (SF) conditions. The shock absorption properties of the SF, defined as the proportion of peak impact force absorbed by the tested flooring when compared with a concrete hard surface, were: SF0 = 0% (no flooring), SF1 = 19%, SF2 = 26%, SF3 = 37% and SF4 = 45%. Shoe and flooring effects were compared using 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni-corrected comparisons. A significant interaction between SF and shoe conditions was found for VILR only (p = 0.003). In minimalist shoes, SF influenced Vertical Instantaneous Loading Rate (VILR) during ankle jumps (p = 0.006) and multi-jumps (pjumps only (pjumps in minimalist shoes (p = 0.037). Cushioned shoes induced lower VILR (pjumps and multi-jumps compared to minimalist shoes. During ankle jumps, cushioned shoes induced greater Peak Vertical Ground Reaction Force (PVGRF, p = 0.002), greater Vertical Average Loading Rate (pjumps, PVGRF was lower (pjump height was higher (pjump tasks, whether it was provided by the shoes or the sports flooring. VILR is the variable that was the most affected. PMID:29020108

  10. Effects of shoe sole hardness on plantar pressure and comfort in older people with forefoot pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Tamara J; Landorf, Karl B; Bonanno, Daniel R; Raspovic, Anita; Menz, Hylton B

    2014-01-01

    Plantar forefoot pain is common in older people and is related to increased peak pressures under the foot during gait. Variations in the hardness of the shoe sole may therefore influence both the magnitude of loading under the foot and the perceived comfort of the shoe in this population. The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of varying shoe sole hardness on plantar pressures and comfort in older people with forefoot pain. In-shoe plantar pressures under the forefoot, midfoot and rearfoot were recorded from 35 older people (mean age 73.2, SD 4.5 years) with current or previous forefoot pain using the pedar-X(®) system. Participants walked at their normal comfortable speed along an 8m walkway in shoes with three different levels of sole hardness: soft (Shore A25), medium (Shore A40) and hard (Shore A58). Shoe comfort was measured on a 100mm visual analogue scale. There were statistically significant differences in peak pressure of between 5% and 23% across the forefoot, midfoot and rearfoot (pshoe registered the highest peak pressures and the soft-soled shoe the lowest peak pressures. However, no differences in comfort scores across the three shoe conditions were observed. These findings demonstrate that as shoe sole hardness increases, plantar pressure increases, however this does not appear to have a significant effect on shoe comfort. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effect of Training in Minimalist Running Shoes on Running Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah T. Ridge, Tyler Standifird, Jessica Rivera, A. Wayne Johnson, Ulrike Mitchell, Iain Hunter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of minimalist running shoes on oxygen uptake during running before and after a 10-week transition from traditional to minimalist running shoes. Twenty-five recreational runners (no previous experience in minimalist running shoes participated in submaximal VO2 testing at a self-selected pace while wearing traditional and minimalist running shoes. Ten of the 25 runners gradually transitioned to minimalist running shoes over 10 weeks (experimental group, while the other 15 maintained their typical training regimen (control group. All participants repeated submaximal VO2 testing at the end of 10 weeks. Testing included a 3 minute warm-up, 3 minutes of running in the first pair of shoes, and 3 minutes of running in the second pair of shoes. Shoe order was randomized. Average oxygen uptake was calculated during the last minute of running in each condition. The average change from pre- to post-training for the control group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 3.1 ± 15.2% and 2.8 ± 16.2%, respectively. The average change from pre- to post-training for the experimental group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 8.4 ± 7.2% and 10.4 ± 6.9%, respectively. Data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. There were no significant interaction effects, but the overall improvement in running economy across time (6.15% was significant (p = 0.015. Running in minimalist running shoes improves running economy in experienced, traditionally shod runners, but not significantly more than when running in traditional running shoes. Improvement in running economy in both groups, regardless of shoe type, may have been due to compliance with training over the 10-week study period and/or familiarity with testing procedures.

  12. Development of Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) for Vehicles Braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Vu Trieu; Oamen, Godwin; Vassiljeva, Kristina; Teder, Leo

    2016-11-01

    This paper develops a real laboratory of anti-lock braking system (ABS) for vehicle and conducts real experiments to verify the ability of this ABS to prevent the vehicle wheel from being locked while braking. Two controllers of PID and fuzzy logic are tested for analysis and comparison. This ABS laboratory is designed for bachelor and master students to simulate and analyze performances of ABS with different control techniques on various roads and load conditions. This paper provides educational theories and practices on the design of control for system dynamics.

  13. Modernised DC traction substation recuperating energy of braking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdowski Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traction substation composed of the 3-phase transformer and the output diode rectifier is still the fundamental device for DC traction supply. In this paper two technical solutions (power electronic converters allowing for braking energy recuperation to the AC mains are discussed. This has been thought as the modernisation of the existing traction substations allowing for high speed trains regenerative braking and braking of heavy train hollers. Such a solution brings some profits: energy recuperation, mechanical brakes saving and enhanced quality of traction vehicle control. For the proposed converters technical and economical advantages and drawbacks are indicated.

  14. Modeling thermal effects in braking systems of railway vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Miloš S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of thermal effects has become increasingly important in product design in different transport means, road vehicles, airplanes, railway vehicles, and so forth. The thermal analysis is a very important stage in the study of braking systems, especially of railway vehicles, where it is necessary to brake huge masses, because the thermal load of a braked railway wheel prevails compared to other types of loads. In the braking phase, kinetic energy transforms into thermal energy resulting in intense heating and high temperature states of railway wheels. Thus induced thermal loads determine thermomechanical behavior of the structure of railway wheels. In cases of thermal overloads, which mainly occur as a result of long-term braking on down-grade railroads, the generation of stresses and deformations occurs, whose consequences are the appearance of cracks on the rim of a wheel and the final total wheel defect. The importance to precisely determine the temperature distribution caused by the transfer process of the heat generated during braking due to the friction on contact surfaces of the braking system makes it a challenging research task. Therefore, the thermal analysis of a block-braked solid railway wheel of a 444 class locomotive of the national railway operator Serbian Railways is processed in detail in this paper, using analytical and numerical modeling of thermal effects during long-term braking for maintaining a constant speed on a down-grade railroad.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of the Braking System of Wheeled Mainline Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    I. S. Shumilov

    2016-01-01

    The braking system of the landing gear wheels of a mainline aircraft has to meet mandatory requirements laid out in the Aviation Regulations AP-25 (Para 25.735. «Brakes and brake systems"). These requirements are essential when creating the landing gear wheel brake control system (WBCS) and are used as main initial data in its mathematical modeling. The WBCS is one of the most important systems to ensure the safe completion of the flight. It is a complex of devices, i.e. units (hydraulic, ele...

  16. Hierarchical Control Strategy for the Cooperative Braking System of Electric Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiankun; He, Hongwen; Liu, Wei; Guo, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a hierarchical control strategy for cooperative braking system of an electric vehicle with separated driven axles. Two layers are defined: the top layer is used to optimize the braking stability based on two sliding mode control strategies, namely, the interaxle control mode and signal-axle control strategies; the interaxle control strategy generates the ideal braking force distribution in general braking condition, and the single-axle control strategy can ensure braking safety in emergency braking condition; the bottom layer is used to maximize the regenerative braking energy recovery efficiency with a reallocated braking torque strategy; the reallocated braking torque strategy can recovery braking energy as much as possible in the premise of meeting battery charging power. The simulation results show that the proposed hierarchical control strategy is reasonable and can adapt to different typical road surfaces and load cases; the vehicle braking stability and safety can be guaranteed; furthermore, the regenerative braking energy recovery efficiency can be improved.

  17. ESTIMATION OF DRIVER’S POWER EXPENSES OF CAR BRAKE MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    A. Turenko; S. Shuklinov

    2010-01-01

    The estimation method of driver’s power expenses for the brake management is offered. The estimation method takes into account power expenses at driving in action of the brake system and power expenses at holding the pressed brake pedal

  18. Female high heel shoes: a study of comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broega, A. C.; Righetto, M.; Ribeiro, R.

    2017-10-01

    Protection was the basic principle underlying the creation of footwear, once humankind felt the need to protect feet from direct contact with soil, heat, cold and sharp objects. However, this accessory soon acquired cultural, aesthetic, symbolic significance, and apparently it was not related to comfort. This work aims to analyze comfort in women footwear, especially high heels shoe. We intended to understand the emotional relationship of consumers with this type of accessory, as well as to understand to what extent women are willing to give up comfort in favor of aesthetics. For this purpose, a questionnaire was designed, aimed at the female audience in order to understand the relevance of women’s footwear, their daily relationship with shoes, the specificity of heels and the problems caused by it.

  19. A Randomized Comparison of the Biomechanical Effect of Two Commercially Available Rocker Bottom Shoes to a Conventional Athletic Shoe During Walking in Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaty, Mukul; Patel, Sona; Esquenazi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Rocker bottom shoes have recently gained considerable popularity, likely in part because of the many purported benefits, including reducing joint loading and toning muscles. Scientific inquiry about these benefits has not kept pace with the increased usage of this shoe type. A fundamental premise of rocker bottom shoes is that they transform hard, flat, level surfaces into more uneven ones. Published studies have described a variety of such shoes-all having a somewhat rounded bottom and a cut heel region or a cut forefoot region, or both (double rocker). Despite the fundamentally similar shoe geometries, the reported effects of rocker bottom shoes on gait biomechanics have varied considerably. Ten healthy subjects agreed to participate in the present study and were given appropriately sized Masai Barefoot Technology (St. Louis, MO), Skechers(™) (Manhattan Beach, CA), and New Balance (Boston, MA) conventional walking shoes. After a 12-day accommodation period, the subjects walked wearing each shoe while 3-dimensional motion and force data were collected in the gait laboratory. The key findings included (1) increased trunk flexion, decreased ankle plantarflexion range, and reduced plantarflexion moment in the early stance; (2) increased ankle dorsiflexion and knee flexor moment in the midstance; (3) decreased peak ankle plantarflexion in the late stance; and (4) decreased ankle plantarflexion and decreased hip flexor and knee extensor moments in the pre-swing and into swing phase. The walking speed was unconstrained and was maintained across all shoe types. A biomechanical explanation is suggested for the observed changes. Suggestions for cautions are provided for using rocker bottom shoes in patients with neuromuscular insufficiency. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Research on Modeling and Control of Regenerative Braking for Brushless DC Machines Driven Electric Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-ping Wen; Chuan-wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve energy utilization rate of battery-powered electric vehicle (EV) using brushless DC machine (BLDCM), the model of braking current generated by regenerative braking and control method are discussed. On the basis of the equivalent circuit of BLDCM during the generative braking period, the mathematic model of braking current is established. By using an extended state observer (ESO) to observe actual braking current and the unknown disturbances of regenerative braking system, ...

  1. Research for Electric Brake Using NTC Thermistors on Micro Wind Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara, Akira; Yamamoto, Kenichi; Yoshimi, Takeshi; Sato, Shingo; Tsurumaki, Akira; Ito, Tsuguru

    2006-01-01

    As a brake system for small wind turbine, mechanical brake and electric brake by the short circuit of 3-phase permanent magnet generator are used. However, an electric braking method may damage the rotor and/or blades by rapid stop of the generator revolution. Moreover, generator winding may also be damaged by large short-circuit current. In this paper, the electric braking method using NTC thermistors (negative temperature coefficient resistors) is proposed as a braking system for a cheaper ...

  2. [Technical aspects in the provision of orthopedic shoes for athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, M; Volkering, C; Röser, A

    2013-03-01

    From the technical point of view different groups must be distinguished in the provision of orthopedic shoes for athletes. The one group encompasses athletes who are provided with insoles in the hope of improved comfort or better performance. The other group includes athletes with diseases or injuries of the lower limbs for whom the provision of appropriate shoes and insoles makes it possible for them to participate again actively in their chosen sport. In such cases one has to differentiate between the purely physical disorder of the foot and biomechanical disorders. For the first group the correct fitting of the shoe is the most important factor whereas in the second group attempts are made to correct and/or compensate for the deficit by means of insoles and wedges as well as supporting or bedding elements. The particular challenge for all such measures is to achieve an as small as possible impairment on the sport activity or, in the ideal cases, even to support it. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Effect of shoe type on descending a curb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Juff; Heller, Michelle; Kuzel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of shoe type on the performance of women during curb descent. Performance during curb stepping may be explained by biomechanical research that has evaluated the kinematics of overground walking and stair ascent and descent. Studies have reported that women exhibit performance differences when wearing high heels, flip flops and sneakers during overground walking and stair ascent and descent. Thus, in addition to features of the curb, the type of shoe being worn may also affect performance. Although several studies have investigated curb stepping, no known studies have investigated the effects of different types of footwear on curb descent performance. This research was conducted in a real-world environment where participants wore three different types of shoes and performed a series of activities that involved curb stepping. The subjects were videotaped while descending a curb, allowing for observation of changes in gait parameters. Results of this study indicate that wearing high heels leads to performance differences as compared to wearing flip flops or sneakers.

  4. Effects of unstable shoes on trunk muscle activity and lumbar spine kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisón, Juan F; Pérez-Soriano, Padro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; Salvador-Coloma, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    In patients with neuromuscular disease and a forced vital capacity (FVC) of spine kinematics and trunk muscle activity during gait. To compare trunk muscle activity and lumbar spine range of motion (ROM) during gait using an unstable shoe and a conventional stable control shoe. Cross-sectional study. A Biomechanics laboratory. Forty-eight healthy voluntary participants (24.5±5.6 years and 22.7±6.8 kg/m2). Subjects underwent gait analysis while simultaneously collecting surface EMG data of erector spinae (ES) and rectus abdominis (RA) and lumbar spine sagittal plane ROM while treadmill walking wearing regular shoes and unstable shoes. The results showed that the unstable shoes resulted in significantly higher ES and RA EMG muscle activity levels in all gait phases compared to control shoes (Pspine extension values (Pspine tissue health, particularly in strengthening trunk muscles in healthy population or in low back pain treatment.

  5. CAD-based intelligent robot system integrated with 3D scanning for shoe roughing and cementing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Cheng-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Roughing and cementing are very essential to the process of bonding shoe uppers and the corresponding soles; however, for shoes with complicated design, such as sport shoes, roughing and cementing greatly relied on manual operation. Recently, shoe industry is progressing to 3D design, thus 3D model of the shoe upper and sole will be created before launching into mass production. Taking advantage of the 3D model, this study developed a plug-in program on Rhino 3D CAD platform, which realized the complicated roughing and cementing route planning to be performed by the plug-in program, integrated with real-time 3D scanning information to compensate the planned route, and then converted to working trajectory of robot arm to implement roughing and cementing. The proposed 3D CAD-based intelligent robot arm system integrated with 3D scanning for shoe roughing and cementing is realized and proved to be feasible.

  6. Indonesian commercial bus drum brake system temperature model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibowo, D. B., E-mail: rmt.bowo@gmail.com; Haryanto, I., E-mail: ismoyo2001@yahoo.de; Laksono, N. P., E-mail: priyolaksono89@gmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Diponegoro University (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Brake system is the most significant aspect of an automobile safety. It must be able to slow the vehicle, quickly intervening and reliable under varying conditions. Commercial bus in Indonesia, which often stops suddenly and has a high initial velocity, will raise the temperature of braking significantly. From the thermal analysis it is observed that for the bus with the vehicle laden mass of 15 tons and initial velocity of 80 km/h the temperature is increasing with time and reaches the highest temperature of 270.1 °C when stops on a flat road and reaches 311.2 °C on a declination road angle, ø, 20°. These temperatures exceeded evaporation temperature of brake oil DOT 3 and DOT 4. Besides that, the magnitude of the braking temperature also potentially lowers the friction coefficient of more than 30%. The brakes are pressed repeatedly and high-g decelerations also causes brake lining wear out quickly and must be replaced every 1 month as well as the emergence of a large thermal stress which can lead to thermal cracking or thermal fatigue crack. Brake fade phenomenon that could be the cause of many buses accident in Indonesia because of the failure of the braking function. The chances of accidents will be even greater when the brake is worn and not immediately replaced which could cause hot spots as rivets attached to the brake drum and brake oil is not changed for more than 2 years that could potentially lower the evaporation temperature because of the effect hygroscopic.

  7. Optical classification for quality and defect analysis of train brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glock, Stefan; Hausmann, Stefan; Gerke, Sebastian; Warok, Alexander; Spiess, Peter; Witte, Stefan; Lohweg, Volker

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we present an optical measurement system approach for quality analysis of brakes which are used in high-speed trains. The brakes consist of the so called brake discs and pads. In a deceleration process the discs will be heated up to 500°C. The quality measure is based on the fact that the heated brake discs should not generate hot spots inside the brake material. Instead, the brake disc should be heated homogeneously by the deceleration. Therefore, it makes sense to analyze the number of hot spots and their relative gradients to create a quality measure for train brakes. In this contribution we present a new approach for a quality measurement system which is based on an image analysis and classification of infra-red based heat images. Brake images which are represented in pseudo-color are first transformed in a linear grayscale space by a hue-saturation-intensity (HSI) space. This transform is necessary for the following gradient analysis which is based on gray scale gradient filters. Furthermore, different features based on Haralick's measures are generated from the gray scale and gradient images. A following Fuzzy-Pattern-Classifier is used for the classification of good and bad brakes. It has to be pointed out that the classifier returns a score value for each brake which is between 0 and 100% good quality. This fact guarantees that not only good and bad bakes can be distinguished, but also their quality can be labeled. The results show that all critical thermal patterns of train brakes can be sensed and verified.

  8. The effect of shoe type on gait in forefoot strike runners during a 50-km run

    OpenAIRE

    Kasmer, Mark E.; Ketchum, Nicholas C.; Liu, Xue-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the relative change in foot-strike pattern, pressure characteristics, surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings, and stride characteristics in forefoot strike runners wearing both minimalist and traditional shoes during a 50-km run. Methods: Four experienced minimalist runners were enrolled in this study. Each runner ran a 50-km simulated run in both minimalist shoes and traditional shoes. Pressure data, sEMG recordings, and limited 3D motion capture data were collecte...

  9. Running with a minimalist shoe increases plantar pressure in the forefoot region of healthy female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstra, S A; Kluitenberg, B; Dekker, R; Bredeweg, S W; Postema, K; Van den Heuvel, E R; Hijmans, J M; Sobhani, S

    2015-07-01

    Minimalist running shoes have been proposed as an alternative to barefoot running. However, several studies have reported cases of forefoot stress fractures after switching from standard to minimalist shoes. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the differences in plantar pressure in the forefoot region between running with a minimalist shoe and running with a standard shoe in healthy female runners during overground running. Randomized crossover design. In-shoe plantar pressure measurements were recorded from eighteen healthy female runners. Peak pressure, maximum mean pressure, pressure time integral and instant of peak pressure were assessed for seven foot areas. Force time integral, stride time, stance time, swing time, shoe comfort and landing type were assessed for both shoe types. A linear mixed model was used to analyze the data. Peak pressure and maximum mean pressure were higher in the medial forefoot (respectively 13.5% and 7.46%), central forefoot (respectively 37.5% and 29.2%) and lateral forefoot (respectively 37.9% and 20.4%) for the minimalist shoe condition. Stance time was reduced with 3.81%. No relevant differences in shoe comfort or landing strategy were found. Running with a minimalist shoe increased plantar pressure without a change in landing pattern. This increased pressure in the forefoot region might play a role in the occurrence of metatarsal stress fractures in runners who switched to minimalist shoes and warrants a cautious approach to transitioning to minimalist shoe use. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mercedes-Benz`s new Brake Assist active driver support in emergency braking situations; Der neue Brake Assist von Mercedes-Benz - aktive Fahrerunterstuetzung in Notsituationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesewetter, W. [Mercedes-Benz AG, Stuttgart (Germany); Klinkner, W. [Mercedes-Benz AG, Stuttgart (Germany); Reichelt, W. [Daimler Benz, Stuttgart (Germany); Steiner, M. [Mercedes-Benz AG, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-06-01

    Mercedes-Benz is the first automobile manufacturer in the world to develop an electronically controlled system for reducing stopping distance in emergency situations. It is called Brake Assist (BAS). This system has been standard in S-class and SL-class models since December 1996 and will be available in other Mercedes automobiles by the middle of 1997 - standardly, at no extra cost. The development of Brake Assist is based on the results of research carried out by Daimler-Benz which reveals that in critical situations, car drivers tend to put their foot down fast enough, but not firmly enough, on the brake pedal. In the initial stages of braking, the electronic Brake-Assist system automatically builds up maximum braking pressure within a fraction of a second, thereby considerably reducing the car`s stopping distance. After anti-lock brakes (ABS), airbag, acceleration skid control (ASR) and Electronic Stability Program (ESP), Mercedes-Benz is therefore making a further contribution towards improving road safety and reducing accident figures. (orig.) [Deutsch] Als weltweit erster Automobilhersteller hat Mercedes-Benz ein elektronisch gesteuertes System zur Verkuerzung des Bremsweges in Notsituationen entwickelt. Sein Name: Brake-Assist (BAS). Seit Dezember 1996 gehoert diese Technik bereits zur Serienausstattung der S- und SL-Klasse. Bis Mitte 1997 ist sie auch in den anderen Mercedes-Personenwagen serienmaessig vorhanden. Die Entwicklung des Brake Assist basiert auf Erkenntnissen der Daimler Benz Forschung, wonach Autofahrer in kritischen Situationen zwar schnell aber nicht kraeftig genug aufs Bremspedal treten. Der elektronische Bremsassistent baut schon am Beginn der Bremsung binnen Sekundenbruchteilen automatisch die maximale Bremskraftverstaerkung auf und verkuerzt dadurch den Anhalteweg erheblich. Damit leistet Mercedes-Benz nach Antiblockiersystem (ABS), Airbag, Antriebsschlupfregelung (ASR) und Electronic Stability Program (ESP) einen weiteren Beitrag zur

  11. 49 CFR 570.5 - Service brake system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... body or chassis. Hoses shall not be cracked, chafed, or flattened. Protective devices, such as “rub... height of rubbing surface of lining over rivet heads. Measure bonded lining thickness over shoe surface...

  12. Quality control of cast brake discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stawarz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The largest industrial application so far have the gray cast irons which are characterized by low tensile and bending strength, while at the same time they have good ultimate comprehensive strength. Additionally, the fatigue strength of gray cast irons is comparatively low and they are only to some extend sensitive for the surface waters effects. Cast iron is the material, which is comparatively easy to be processed, and for this reason – it is not expensive. Brake discs are exploited in particularly hard conditions. They must be resistant both against the thermal fatigue and abrasion wearing (at dry friction as well as against seizing, corrosion and mechanical load [1-3]. The gray cast iron, better than other materials, fulfills all the requirements necessary for making the material for the casts resistant against such tough conditions. This work reflects the researches aiming to define the quality of cast brake discs (ventilated and non-ventilated ones upon a period of their exploitation in real conditions. The following researches were performed: evaluations of the disc surface condition, measurement of disc thickness, examination of run – out flank and metallographic analysis. In order to more detailed recognition of mechanisms and reasons of brake discs wearing in real conditions, one should conduct additional examinations: computer analysis of the microstructure, chemical composition analysis, etc., as well as study of the technology of their production in foundries, where they are manufactured [4]. By obtaining the full set of the mentioned above data one can draw final conclusions and remove causes of possible defects.

  13. Effects of an unstable shoe construction on balance in women aged over 50 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn; Thuesen, Anna Helena; Nielsen, Dennis Brandborg

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Shoes with an unstable sole construction are commonly used as a therapeutic tool by physiotherapists and are widely available from shoe and sporting goods retailers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of using an unstable shoe (Masai Barefoot Technology) on standing...... balance, reactive balance and stability limits. METHODS: Thirty-one subjects agreed to participate in the study and underwent balance tests on three different occasions. After test occasion one (baseline) 20 subjects received Masai Barefoot Technology shoes and were requested to wear them as much...

  14. Pedobarographic and kinematic analysis in the functional evaluation of two post-operative forefoot offloading shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggi, Paolo; Giangrande, Alessia; Berti, Lisa; Lullini, Giada; Leardini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Forefoot offloading shoes are special orthopaedic footwear designed to protect and unload the injured part of the foot after surgery and for conservative treatments. The offloading action is often achieved by transferring plantar load to the rearfoot via rocker shoes with reduced contact area between shoe and ground. While these shoes are intended to be worn only for short periods, a compromise must be found between functionality and the risk of alterations in gait patterns at the lower limb joints. In this study, the pedobarographic, kinematic and kinetic effects of a traditional half-shoe and a double-rocker full-outsole shoe were compared to those of a comfortable shoe (control). Ten healthy female participants (28.2 ± 10.0 years) were asked to walk in three different footwear conditions for the left/right foot: control/half-shoe, control/full-outsole, and control/control. Full gait analysis was obtained in three walking trials for each participant in each condition. Simultaneously a sensor insole system recorded plantar pressure in different foot regions. Normalized root-mean-square error, coefficient of determination, and frame-by-frame statistical analysis were used to assess differences in time-histories of kinematic and kinetic parameters between shoes. The half -shoe group showed the slowest walking speed and the shortest stride length. Forefoot plantar load was significantly reduced in the half-shoe (maximum force as % of Body Weight: half-shoe = 62.1; full-outsole = 86.9; control = 93.5; p outsole shoe. At the ankle, sagittal-plane kinematics in the full-outsole shoe had a pattern more similar to control. The half-shoe appears significantly more effective in reducing plantar load at the forefoot than a double-rocker full-outsole shoe, which is designed to reduce forefoot loading by using an insole with a thicker profile anteriorly as to maintain the foot in slight dorsiflexion. However, the half-shoe is also associated with altered

  15. Effect of shoe flexibility on plantar loading in children learning to walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillstrom, Howard J; Buckland, Melanie A; Slevin, Corinne M; Hafer, Jocelyn F; Root, Leon M; Backus, Sherry I; Kraszewski, Andrew P; Whitney, Kendrick A; Scher, David M; Song, Jinsup; Furmato, James; Choate, Cherri S; Scherer, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    In a previous pilot study of "cruisers" (nonindependent ambulation), "early walkers" (independent ambulation for 0-5 months), and "experienced walkers" (independent ambulation for 6-12 months), developmental age significantly affected the children's stability when walking and performing functional activities. We sought to examine how shoe structural characteristics affect plantar pressure distribution in early walkers. Torsional flexibility was evaluated in four shoe designs (UltraFlex, MedFlex, LowFlex, and Stiff based on decreasing relative flexibility) with a structural testing machine. Plantar pressures were recorded in 25 early walkers while barefoot and shod at self-selected walking speeds. Peak pressure was calculated over ten masked regions for the barefoot and shod conditions. Torsional flexibility, the angular rotation divided by the applied moment about the long axis of the shoe, was different across the four shoe designs. As expected, UltraFlex was the most flexible and Stiff was the least flexible. As applied moment increased, torsional flexibility decreased in all footwear. When evaluating early walkers during gait, peak pressure was significantly different across shoe conditions for all of the masked regions. The stiffest shoe had the lowest peak pressures and the most flexible shoe had the highest. It is likely that increased shoe flexibility promoted greater plantar loading. Plantar pressures while wearing the most flexible shoe are similar to those while barefoot. This mechanical feedback may enhance proprioception, which is a desirable attribute for children learning to walk.

  16. Theatre Shoes — A Link in the Common Pathway of Postoperative Wound Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirfeyz, Rouin; Tasker, Andrew; Ali, Sami; Bowker, Karen; Blom, Ashley

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Operating department staff are usually required to wear dedicated theatre shoes whilst in the theatre area but there is little evidence to support the beneficial use of theatre shoes. PATIENTS AND METHODS We performed a study to assess the level of bacterial contamination of theatre shoes at the beginning and end of a working day, and compared the results with outdoor footwear. RESULTS We found the presence of pathogenic bacterial species responsible for postoperative wound infection on all shoe groups, with outdoor shoes being the most heavily contaminated. Samples taken from theatre shoes at the end of duty were less contaminated than those taken at the beginning of the day with the greatest reduction being in the number of coagulase-negative staphylococcal species grown. Studies have demonstrated that floor bacteria may contribute up to 15% of airborne bacterial colony forming units in operating rooms. The pathogenic bacteria we isolated have also been demonstrated as contaminants in water droplets spilt onto sterile gloves after surgical scrubbing. CONCLUSIONS Theatre shoes and floors present a potential source for postoperative infection. A combination of dedicated theatre shoe use and a good floor washing protocol controls the level of shoe contamination by coagulase-negative staphylococci in particular. This finding is significant given the importance of staphylococcal species in postoperative wound infection. PMID:18201476

  17. The effects of different shoes on plantar forces in Irish dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trégouët, Paul; Merland, François

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of different footwear on plantar loading in Irish dance. Participants were 12 open class dancers (the highest level) who were actively engaged in Irish dance competition. Subjects had a mean of 9.2 ± 2.1 years of experience in Irish dance. All dancers completed one bar of a set phrase in each of three shoes: Irish dance soft shoe, hard shoe, and a dance trainer. The order in which the shoes were tested was counterbalanced with a Latin square design. The variables compared were maximum force, maximum pressure, and impulse. Data were collected at 100 Hz using a Pedar insole pressure sensor system. Values were analyzed for the whole foot, forefoot, and rearfoot. Significant differences between shoe types were observed in impulse (p shoes. Differences were also found between shoes in loading on regions of the foot (p shoe. The footwear choice had a significant effect on the measured kinetics of the dancers. The trainer displayed significantly lower values for kinetics than did the soft shoe. Thus, it may be a safer (less injurious) choice for daily training.

  18. Unloading shoes for osteoarthritis of the knee: protocol for the SHARK randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hunter, David J; Campbell, Penny; Paterson, Kade; Staples, Margaret P; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-02-21

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and disabling condition. Abnormalities in knee loading play an important role in disease pathogenesis, yet there are few non-surgical treatments for knee OA capable of reducing knee load. This two-arm randomised controlled trial is investigating the efficacy of specially-designed unloading shoes for the treatment of symptoms in people with knee OA. 164 people with symptomatic medial tibiofemoral joint OA will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated to receive either unloading shoes or control shoes. Unloading shoes have a specially-designed triple-density midsole where the medial side is softer than normal and the lateral side harder as well as a lateral wedge between the sole and sock-liner. Control shoes are standard athletic shoes and do not contain these features. Participants will be blinded to shoe allocation and will be instructed to wear the shoes as much as possible every day for 6 months, for a minimum of 4 hours per day. The primary outcomes are knee pain (numerical rating scale) and self-reported physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) measured at baseline and 6 months. Secondary outcomes include additional measures of knee pain, knee stiffness, participant global ratings of change in symptoms, quality-of-life and physical activity. The findings from this study will help determine whether specially-designed unloading shoes are efficacious in the management of knee OA. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12613000851763.

  19. 49 CFR 238.317 - Class II brake test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....315(a)(1); (3) When previously tested units (i.e., cars that received a Class I brake test within the... hours) are added to the train; (4) When cars or equipment are removed from the train; and (5) When an... locomotives that utilize an electric signal to communicate a service brake application and only a pneumatic...

  20. DC torque motor actuated anti-lock brake controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P.D.; Kade, A.

    1989-02-21

    A wheel lock control system is described for limiting the brake pressure applied to the brake of a vehicle wheel traveling over a road surface, the system comprising: an actuator for controlling the brake pressure to the brake of the wheel, the actuator including a torque motor for generating a motor torque in response to motor current to control the applied brake pressure in accordance with the value of the motor torque, the motor torque having a value proportional to the value of the motor current; means for determining the tire torque tending to accelerate the wheel during the application of brake pressure; means for storing the value of motor current corresponding to the maximum determined value of tire torque; means for detecting an incipient wheel lockup condition; and means for establishing the motor current following a detected incipient wheel lockup condition at a value having a predetermined relationship to the stored value of motor current to control the brake pressure at a predetermined braking condition.

  1. Ileal brake activation: Macronutrient-specific effects on eating behavior?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avesaat, M. van; Troost, F.J.; Ripken, D.; Hendriks, H.F.; Aam, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation of the ileal brake, by infusing lipid directly into the distal part of the small intestine, alters gastrointestinal (GI) motility and inhibits food intake. The ileal brake effect on eating behavior of the other macronutrients is currently unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objective of

  2. 14 CFR 23.493 - Braked roll conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and ground contacts must be those described in § 23.479 for level landings. (c) A drag reaction equal... at the ground contact point of each wheel with brakes, except that the drag reaction need not exceed the maximum value based on limiting brake torque. ...

  3. Perancangan Fixture Proses Gurdi untuk Produksi Komponen Brake Pads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suci Rahmawati

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Brake pads is used to stop the rapid of vehicle while braking process is done. In making process if brake pads is needed a tool to make a operator work easier and can produce the brake pads component more precision, especially in making a hole process. A tool which is designed in drilling process in production of brake pads component use locator 3-2-1 principt in a placement the locator, using clamping to grip the component, and construction of jig dan fixture that is designed must be suitable with needs of making a hole process this brake pads component. To produce this tool, the cost must be calculated, such as direct cost, indirect cost and fixed cost to cover the 1200 lot sizes of this brake pads component. Based on design of this tool, it can be concluded that a tool which design of the drilling process can give benefit because it can help the operator in their work and it can produce the brake pads component more precision, and the rejected product can be minimized presisi. In addition, the set up time can be decreased and the cost be reduced.

  4. 49 CFR 393.55 - Antilock brake systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... March 1, 1998 (except commercial motor vehicles engaged in driveaway-towaway operations), shall be... vehicle, and shall have the means for connection of the electrical circuit to the towed vehicle. The ABS... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.55 Antilock brake systems. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR...

  5. Development of Asbestos - Free Brake Pad Using Bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Aigbodion

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of asbestos-free brake pad using bagasse was investigated with a view to replace the use of asbestos whose dust is carcinogenic. The bagasse were sieve into sieve grades of 100, 150, 250, 350 and 710µm. the sieve bagasse was used in production of brake pad in ratio of 70%bagasse-30%resin using compression moulding. The properties examined are microstructure analysis, hardness, compressive strength, density, flame resistance, water and oil absorption. The microstructure reveals uniform distribution of resin in the bagasse. The results obtained showed that the finer the sieve size the better the properties. The results obtained in this work were compared with that of commercial brake pad (asbestos based and optimum formulation laboratory brake pad Palm Kernel Shell based (PKS, the results are in close agreement. Hence bagasse can be used in production of asbestos-free brake pad.

  6. A Comparative Study on Automotive Brake Testing Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, Bhau Kashinath; Patil, Satyajit Ramchandra; Sawant, Suresh Maruti

    2017-08-01

    Performance testing of automotive brakes involves determination of stopping time, distance and deceleration level. Braking performance of an automobile is required to be ensured for various surfaces like dry, wet, concrete, bitumen etc. as well as for prolonged applications. Various brake testing standards are used worldwide to assure vehicle and pedestrian safety. This article presents methodologies used for automotive service brake testing for two wheelers. The main contribution of this work lies in comparative study of three main brake testing standards; viz. Indian Standards, Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards and European Economic Commission Standards. This study shall help the policy makers to choose the best criteria out of these three while formulating newer edition of testing standards.

  7. Numerical Investigation of Aerodynamic Braking for a Ground Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanuri, Jaya Krishna

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to observe the effect of an air brake on the aerodynamics of a ground vehicle and also to study the influence of change in the parameters like the velocity of the vehicle, the angle of inclination, height, and position of the air brake on the aerodynamics of the vehicle body. The test subject used is an Ahmed body which is a generic 3D car body as it retains all the aerodynamic characteristics of a ground vehicle. Numerical investigation has been carried out by RNG k-ɛ turbulence model. Results are presented in terms of streamlines and drag coefficient to understand the influence of pertinent parameters on flow physics. It is found that with the use of an air brake, though the drag coefficient remains more or less constant with velocity, it increases with the increase in height and angle of inclination of the air brake. But the effect of position of air brake on the coefficient of drag is surprising since for certain heights of the air brake the drag coefficient is maximum at the foremost point and as the air brake moves towards the rear it is first observed to decrease and then increase. It is also observed that with the increase in height of the air brake the drag coefficient monotonically decreases as the position of the air brake is moved towards the rear. Taguchi method has been employed with L16 orthogonal array to obtain the optimal configuration for the air brake. For each of the selected parameters, four different levels have been chosen to obtain the maximum drag coefficient value. The study could provide an invaluable database for the optimal design of an airbrake for a ground vehicle.

  8. Emergency braking is affected by the use of cruise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammes, Yves; Behr, Michel; Llari, Maxime; Bonicel, Sarah; Weber, Jean Paul; Berdah, Stephane

    2017-08-18

    We compared the differences in the braking response to vehicle collision between an active human emergency braking (control condition) and cruise control (CC) or adaptive cruise control (ACC). In 11 male subjects, age 22 to 67 years, we measured the active emergency braking response during manual driving using the accelerator pedal (control condition) or in condition mimicking CC or ACC. In both conditions, we measured the brake reaction time (BRT), delay to produce the peak braking force (PBD), total emergency braking response (BRT + PBD), and peak braking force (PBF). Electromyograms of leg and thigh muscles were recorded during braking. The tonic vibratory response (TVR), Hoffman reflex (HR), and M-waves were recorded in leg muscles to explore the change in sensorimotor control. No difference in PBF, TVR amplitude, HR latency, and H max /M max ratio were found between the control and CC/ACC conditions. On the other hand, BRT and PBD were significantly lengthened in the CC/ACC condition (240 ± 13 ms and 704 ± 70 ms, respectively) compared to control (183 ± 7 ms and 568 ± 36 ms, respectively). BRT increased with the age of participants and the driving experience shortened PBD and increased PBF. In male subjects, driving in a CC/ACC condition significantly delays the active emergency braking response to vehicle collision. This could result from higher amplitude of leg motion in the CC/ACC condition and/or by the age-related changes in motor control. Car and truck drivers must take account of the significant increase in the braking distance in a CC/ACC condition.

  9. The Effect of Training in Minimalist Running Shoes on Running Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Sarah T.; Standifird, Tyler; Rivera, Jessica; Johnson, A. Wayne; Mitchell, Ulrike; Hunter, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of minimalist running shoes on oxygen uptake during running before and after a 10-week transition from traditional to minimalist running shoes. Twenty-five recreational runners (no previous experience in minimalist running shoes) participated in submaximal VO2 testing at a self-selected pace while wearing traditional and minimalist running shoes. Ten of the 25 runners gradually transitioned to minimalist running shoes over 10 weeks (experimental group), while the other 15 maintained their typical training regimen (control group). All participants repeated submaximal VO2 testing at the end of 10 weeks. Testing included a 3 minute warm-up, 3 minutes of running in the first pair of shoes, and 3 minutes of running in the second pair of shoes. Shoe order was randomized. Average oxygen uptake was calculated during the last minute of running in each condition. The average change from pre- to post-training for the control group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 3.1 ± 15.2% and 2.8 ± 16.2%, respectively. The average change from pre- to post-training for the experimental group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 8.4 ± 7.2% and 10.4 ± 6.9%, respectively. Data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. There were no significant interaction effects, but the overall improvement in running economy across time (6.15%) was significant (p = 0.015). Running in minimalist running shoes improves running economy in experienced, traditionally shod runners, but not significantly more than when running in traditional running shoes. Improvement in running economy in both groups, regardless of shoe type, may have been due to compliance with training over the 10-week study period and/or familiarity with testing procedures. Key points Running in minimalist footwear did not result in a change in running economy compared to running in traditional footwear

  10. The Effect of Training in Minimalist Running Shoes on Running Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Sarah T; Standifird, Tyler; Rivera, Jessica; Johnson, A Wayne; Mitchell, Ulrike; Hunter, Iain

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of minimalist running shoes on oxygen uptake during running before and after a 10-week transition from traditional to minimalist running shoes. Twenty-five recreational runners (no previous experience in minimalist running shoes) participated in submaximal VO2 testing at a self-selected pace while wearing traditional and minimalist running shoes. Ten of the 25 runners gradually transitioned to minimalist running shoes over 10 weeks (experimental group), while the other 15 maintained their typical training regimen (control group). All participants repeated submaximal VO2 testing at the end of 10 weeks. Testing included a 3 minute warm-up, 3 minutes of running in the first pair of shoes, and 3 minutes of running in the second pair of shoes. Shoe order was randomized. Average oxygen uptake was calculated during the last minute of running in each condition. The average change from pre- to post-training for the control group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 3.1 ± 15.2% and 2.8 ± 16.2%, respectively. The average change from pre- to post-training for the experimental group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 8.4 ± 7.2% and 10.4 ± 6.9%, respectively. Data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. There were no significant interaction effects, but the overall improvement in running economy across time (6.15%) was significant (p = 0.015). Running in minimalist running shoes improves running economy in experienced, traditionally shod runners, but not significantly more than when running in traditional running shoes. Improvement in running economy in both groups, regardless of shoe type, may have been due to compliance with training over the 10-week study period and/or familiarity with testing procedures. Key pointsRunning in minimalist footwear did not result in a change in running economy compared to running in traditional footwear

  11. Study on Abrasive Wear of Brake Pad in the Large-megawatt Wind Turbine Brake Based on Deform Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengfang; Hao, Qiang; Sha, Zhihua; Yin, Jian; Ma, Fujian; Liu, Yu

    2017-12-01

    For the friction and wear issues of brake pads in the large-megawatt wind turbine brake during braking, this paper established the micro finite element model of abrasive wear by using Deform-2D software. Based on abrasive wear theory and considered the variation of the velocity and load in the micro friction and wear process, the Archard wear calculation model is developed. The influence rules of relative sliding velocity and friction coefficient in the brake pad and disc is analysed. The simulation results showed that as the relative sliding velocity increases, the wear will be more serious, while the larger friction coefficient lowered the contact pressure which released the wear of the brake pad.

  12. The effect of shoe design and lateral wedges on knee load and neuromuscular control in healthy subjects during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten; Kersting, Uwe G.

    2014-01-01

    design/type on the effectiveness of lateral wedging has not been investigated so far. The Purpose of the present study was to explore alterations in knee loading due to lateral foot wedges in three different shoes. Methods: Thirteen healthy participants with no history of knee pain were tested using...... wedging is effective regardless of shoe design. Differences between the three neutral walking conditions underline the importance of footwear choice in individuals. It is safe to apply lateral wedges without jeopardising muscular control during walking regardless of shoe type. Possible effects of altering...... three-dimensional gait analysis. Barefoot walking, walking in a running shoe, an Oxford-type leather shoe, and a rocker shoe were analysed. The shoes were tested both with and without a 10-degree full-length laterally wedged insole. Results: There were significant shoe wedge interactions on the first...

  13. Effect of Shoes on Stiffness and Energy Efficiency of Ankle-Foot Orthosis: Bench Testing Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Gao, Fan; LeCursi, Nicholas; Foreman, K Bo; Orendurff, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) is important to maximize their benefit for those with movement disorders during gait. Though mechanical properties such as stiffness and/or energy efficiency of AFOs have been extensively studied, it remains unknown how and to what extent shoes influence their properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shoes on stiffness and energy efficiency of an AFO using a custom mechanical testing device. Stiffness and energy efficiency of the AFO were measured in the plantar flexion and dorsiflexion range, respectively, under AFO-alone and AFO-Shoe combination conditions. The results of this study demonstrated that the stiffness of the AFO-Shoe combination was significantly decreased compared to the AFO-alone condition, but no significant differences were found in energy efficiency. From the results, we recommend that shoes used with AFOs should be carefully selected not only based on their effect on alignment of the lower limb, but also their effects on overall mechanical properties of the AFO-Shoe combination. Further study is needed to clarify the effects of differences in shoe designs on AFO-Shoe combination mechanical properties.

  14. Running in new and worn shoes: a comparison of three types of cushioning footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, P W; Candelaria, N G; Smith, D R

    2009-10-01

    In this study, the effect of shoe degradation on running biomechanics by comparing the kinetics and kinematics of running in new and worn shoes was investigated. Three types of footwear using different cushioning technologies were compared. Longitudinal study. Pre- and post-tests on overground running at 4.5 m s(-1) on a 20-m laboratory runway; performance measured using a force platform and a motion capture system. 24 runners (14 men and 10 women) 200 miles of road running in the same pair of shoes. Within-group factor: shoe condition (new/worn); between-group factor: footwear type (air/gel/spring). Stance time was calculated from force data. External loads were measured by maximum vertical force and loading rate. Kinematic changes were indicated by sagittal plane angles of the torso, hip, knee and ankle at critical events during the stance phase. Stance time increased (p=0.035) in worn shoes. The torso displayed less maximum forward lean (pshoes. No changes in the hip and knee angles. No between-group difference among the three footwear groups or condition by type interaction was found in any measured variables. As shoe cushioning capability decreases, runners modify their patterns to maintain constant external loads. The adaptation strategies to shoe degradation were unaffected by different cushioning technologies, suggesting runners should choose shoes for reasons other than cushioning technology.

  15. Influence of basketball shoe mass, outsole traction, and forefoot bending stiffness on three athletic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worobets, Jay; Wannop, John William

    2015-09-01

    Prior research has shown that footwear can enhance athletic performance. However, public information is not available on what basketball shoe properties should be selected to maximise movement performance. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of basketball shoe mass, outsole traction, and forefoot bending stiffness on sprinting, jumping, and cutting performance. Each of these three basketball shoe properties was systematically varied by ± 20% to produce three shoe conditions of varying mass, three conditions of varying traction, and three conditions of varying bending stiffness. Each shoe was tested by 20 recreational basketball players completing maximal effort sprints, vertical jumps, and a cutting drill. Outsole traction had the largest influence on performance, as the participants performed significantly worse in all tests when traction was decreased by 20% (p < 0.001), and performed significantly better in the cutting drill when traction was increased by 20% (p = 0.005). Forefoot bending stiffness had a moderate effect on sprint and cutting performance (p = 0.013 and p = 0.016 respectively) and shoe mass was found to have no effect on performance. Therefore, choosing a shoe with relatively high outsole traction and forefoot bending stiffness should be prioritised, and less concern should be focused on selecting the lightest shoe.

  16. Effect of shoes containing nanosilica particles on knee valgus in active females during landing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Bassiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The effect of silica nanoparticles (SNPs in sport shoes outsoles on the  parameters related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL Injury has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shoes outsole containing a composite of thermoplastic elastomer based on styrene-butadiene and silica nanoparticles (TPEN shoe on Knee Valgus Angle (KVA as a risk factor of ACL injuries during landing Materials and Methods: Fourteen active healthy women without knee injuries and disorders performed bilateral drop jump (DJ and single leg drop landing (SLL tasks in barefoot, wearing shoes fabricated with polyvinyl chloride outsole (PVC shoe and TPEN shoes conditions , randomly. The knee valgus angle values of right and left legs were calculated in the landing conditions. Two factors repeated measures ANOVA were used to investigate the effect of landing and footwear conditions on KVA of right and left legs.  Results: For both left and right limbs, the KVA was at maximum and minimum values during landing with barefoot and TPEN shoes, respectively. PVC shoe significantly reduced the knee valgus by 3.84% in left and 4.18% in right knee (P

  17. Aging of running shoes and its effect on mechanical and biomechanical variables: implications for runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, Nicolas; Sevrez, Violaine; Ly, Quoc Hung; Guéguen, Nils; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of running shoes' aging on mechanical and biomechanical parameters as a function of midsole materials (viscous, intermediate, elastic) and ground inclination. To this aim, heel area of the shoe (under calcaneal tuberosity) was first mechanically aged at realistic frequency and impact magnitudes based on a 660 km training plan. Stiffness (ST) and viscosity were then measured on both aged and matching new shoes, and repercussions on biomechanical variables (joint kinematics, muscular pre-activation, vertical ground reaction force and tibial acceleration) were assessed during a leg-extended stepping-down task designed to mimic the characteristics of running impacts. Shoes' aging led to increased ST (means: from 127 to 154 N ∙ mm(-1)) and decreased energy dissipation (viscosity) (means: from 2.19 to 1.88 J). The effects induced by mechanical changes on body kinematics were very small. However, they led with the elastic shoe to increased vastus lateralis pre-activation, tibial acceleration peak (means: from 4.5 g to 5.2 g) and rate. Among the three shoes tested, the shoe with intermediate midsole foam provided the best compromise between viscosity and elasticity. The optimum balance remains to be found for the design of shoes regarding at once cushioning, durability and injury prevention.

  18. The effect of shoe design and lateral wedging on knee loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten; Kersting, Uwe G.

    wedges were observed in all three types of shoes. However, differences between shoe design were of similar magnitude as the effect of laterally wedged insoles. Only marginal changes in muscle activity for lateral hamstrings during barefoot toe-out walking and gastrocnemius when using the Oxford wedged...

  19. Do you get value for money when you buy an expensive pair of running shoes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinghan, R; Arnold, G P; Drew, T S; Cochrane, L A; Abboud, R J

    2008-03-01

    This investigation aims to determine if more expensive running shoes provide better cushioning of plantar pressure and are more comfortable than low-cost alternatives from the same brand. Three pairs of running shoes were purchased from three different manufacturers at three different price ranges: low (40-45 pounds), medium (60-65 pounds) and high (70-75 pounds). Plantar pressure was recorded with the Pedar in-shoe pressure measurement system. Comfort was assessed with a 100 mm visual analogue scale. A follow-on study was conducted to ascertain if shoe cushioning and comfort were comparable to walking while running on a treadmill. Forty-three and 9 male subjects participated in the main and follow-on studies, respectively. The main outcome measure was the evaluation of plantar pressure and comfort. Plantar pressure measurements were recorded from under the heel, across the forefoot and under the great toe. Differences in plantar pressure were recorded between models and between brands in relation to cost. Shoe performance was comparable between walking and running trials on a treadmill. No significant difference was observed between shoes and test occasions in terms of comfort. Low- and medium-cost running shoes in each of the three brands tested provided the same (if not better) cushioning of plantar pressure as high-cost running shoes. Cushioning was comparable when walking and running on a treadmill. Comfort is a subjective sensation based on individual preferences and was not related to either the distribution of plantar pressure or cost.

  20. Modified track shoes and their effect on the EMG activity of calf muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensword, Marlon; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Al-Qaisi, Saif

    2012-01-01

    Although track and field spike shoes are crafted for runners, these shoes are not designed for regular walking. With such shoes, runners may eventually encounter serious chronic injuries such as plantar fasciitis, shin splints, achilles tendinitis, chondromalacia, and iliotibial band syndrome. To address this problem, a modified spike shoe was tested and compared to a regular spike shoe. The modification consists of adding a removable heel to the shoe sole in order to reduce the flexion of the foot and properly level the foot for walking. Nine healthy participants performed walking drills at 2 and 3 mph, using the original and the modified shoes. Electromyography (EMG) measurements were used to evaluate muscle activities. Participants also rated their discomfort on a 0-10 scale. Results show that the use of modified shoes resulted in a reduction of 22% and 24.25% EMG activity for the tibialis and gastrocnemius muscles, respectively. Comfort ratings increased by an average of 2.7, 2.6, 3.9, and 4.2 points at the knees, calves, ankles, and feet, respectively.

  1. Plantar pressure relief in the diabetic foot using forefoot offloading shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A; van Deursen, Robert W M; Kanade, Rajani V; Wissink, Marieke; Manning, Erik A; van Baal, Jeff G; Harding, Keith G

    2009-06-01

    Forefoot offloading shoes (FOS) are commonly used in clinical practice for treatment of plantar forefoot ulcers in the diabetic foot. The aim of this study was to assess the offloading efficacy of four different FOS models in comparison with a cast shoe and control shoe. In-shoe plantar pressures were measured during walking in each of the six footwear conditions in 24 neuropathic diabetic patients at high risk for plantar foot ulceration. For each of six foot regions, peak pressure, pressure-time integral, and force-time integral were calculated. Load transfer diagrams were developed to assess the footwear mechanisms of action. Perceived walking comfort was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). All comparisons between conditions were tested at Pshoe. The FOS also relieved metatarsal head peak pressure to a significantly larger extent than the cast shoe (approximately 20%). The load transfer diagrams showed a major transfer of approximately 40% of forefoot load to the midfoot explaining the offloading efficacy of the FOS. Perceived walking comfort was significantly lower in the FOS (VAS score 2.7-5.9) when compared with the control shoe (VAS 8.2) and cast shoe (VAS 6.8). The data showed that all FOS models were effective in their primary goal, relieving forefoot pressure in at-risk neuropathic diabetic patients. Therefore, these shoes may be effective in offloading and healing plantar forefoot ulcers, although the low comfort scores should be considered as this may potentially affect adherence to treatment.

  2. Running with a minimalist shoe increases plantar pressure in the forefoot region of healthy female runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, S. A.; Kluitenberg, B.; Dekker, R.; Bredeweg, S. W.; Postema, K.; Van den Heuvel, E. R.; Hijmans, J. M.; Sobhani, S.

    OBJECTIVES: Minimalist running shoes have been proposed as an alternative to barefoot running. However, several studies have reported cases of forefoot stress fractures after switching from standard to minimalist shoes. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the differences in

  3. 75 FR 51521 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Air Brake Systems; Technical Report on the Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... Expenses for the Anti-Lock Brake System and Underride Guard for Tractors and Trailers (74 FR 18803...; Technical Report on the Effectiveness of Antilock Braking Systems in Heavy Truck Tractors and Trailers... antilock braking systems (ABS) on all new air-braked vehicles with a GVWR of 10,000 pounds or greater. ABS...

  4. 49 CFR 232.205 - Class I brake test-initial terminal inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of the brake system on each car in order to make the determinations and inspections required by this... of the brake system; (7) All parts of the brake equipment shall be properly secured. On cars where...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT...

  5. 76 FR 34801 - Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures In... locomotives in ``work'' trains, where the friction brakes operate in conjunction with the RT2 system of straight air brake employed on PATH cars. The single car air brake test described in Association of...

  6. Optimal design of a hybrid MR brake for haptic wrist application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Nguyen, Phuong Bac; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2011-03-01

    In this work, a new configuration of a magnetorheological (MR) brake is proposed and an optimal design of the proposed MR brake for haptic wrist application is performed considering the required braking torque, the zero-field friction torque, the size and mass of the brake. The proposed MR brake configuration is a combination of disc-type and drum-type which is referred as a hybrid configuration in this study. After the MR brake with the hybrid configuration is proposed, braking torque of the brake is analyzed based on Bingham rheological model of the MR fluid. The zero-field friction torque of the MR brake is also obtained. An optimization procedure based on finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is developed for the MR brake. The purpose of the optimal design is to find the optimal geometric dimensions of the MR brake structure that can produce the required braking torque and minimize the uncontrollable torque (passive torque) of the haptic wrist. Based on developed optimization procedure, optimal solution of the proposed MR brake is achieved. The proposed optimized hybrid brake is then compared with conventional types of MR brake and discussions on working performance of the proposed MR brake are described.

  7. An appraisal of safety of tractor-trailer braking system | Ogunjirin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tractor-traller braking system was appraised considering the effect of braking the tractor or trailer alone and also braking the combination of tractor and trailer simultaneously. The study became Imperative considering the Influx of trailers that are not equipped with the braking system and the danger It poses to the ...

  8. 49 CFR 393.47 - Brake actuators, slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY REGULATIONS PARTS AND ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Brakes § 393.47 Brake actuators... physical characteristics must provide for safe and reliable stopping of the commercial motor vehicle. (b....6 mm (1/16 inch) or less for hydraulic disc, drum and electric brakes. (2) Non-steering axle brakes...

  9. Vehicle Hybrid Braking Control Using Sliding Mode Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Misawa; Kanai, Yuki; Shiraki, Ryoko; Mori, Yasuchika

    Anti-lock brake system and brake-by-wire are proposed in the vehicle control using a brake, and the braking power is expected to be improved more than ever. The researches such as an application to the ABS of Siliding mode control which considered a actuator dynamics and a hybrid control of the brake using model reference adaptive control are done so far. However, in the former case, speed following that becomes a target exists physically impossible situation by saturation of tire frictional force because only speed following is done. In the latter, the model error is caused because the simulation model and the controller design model are different. Therefore, there is a problem that an accurate follow cannot be done. In this paper, the braking control is performed using the sliding mode control which has high robustness for disturbance that fulfils matching conditions. In so doing, it aims at the achievement of optimal braking control to switch wheel speed following to slip ratio following.

  10. EEG potentials predict upcoming emergency brakings during simulated driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haufe, Stefan; Treder, Matthias S.; Gugler, Manfred F.; Sagebaum, Max; Curio, Gabriel; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    Emergency braking assistance has the potential to prevent a large number of car crashes. State-of-the-art systems operate in two stages. Basic safety measures are adopted once external sensors indicate a potential upcoming crash. If further activity at the brake pedal is detected, the system automatically performs emergency braking. Here, we present the results of a driving simulator study indicating that the driver's intention to perform emergency braking can be detected based on muscle activation and cerebral activity prior to the behavioural response. Identical levels of predictive accuracy were attained using electroencephalography (EEG), which worked more quickly than electromyography (EMG), and using EMG, which worked more quickly than pedal dynamics. A simulated assistance system using EEG and EMG was found to detect emergency brakings 130 ms earlier than a system relying only on pedal responses. At 100 km h-1 driving speed, this amounts to reducing the braking distance by 3.66 m. This result motivates a neuroergonomic approach to driving assistance. Our EEG analysis yielded a characteristic event-related potential signature that comprised components related to the sensory registration of a critical traffic situation, mental evaluation of the sensory percept and motor preparation. While all these components should occur often during normal driving, we conjecture that it is their characteristic spatio-temporal superposition in emergency braking situations that leads to the considerable prediction performance we observed.

  11. Development of asbestos free brake pads using corn husks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisdom ASOTAH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of asbestos free brake pads using corn husks as alternative filler was studied with a view to replacing asbestos, which has been known to be carcinogenic. Corn husks was sourced and milled, before been sieved into sieve grades of 100 and 200 μm. The varying proportions of the as-screened corn husk fibres and silicon carbide were mixed with fixed proportions of graphite, steel dust and resin to produce brake pads by using compressional moulding. The hardness, compressive strength, density, flame resistance, wear rate and porosity of the products were then determined. The result obtained showed that the brake pad produced with the corn husk passing the finer 100 μm screen gave better compressive strength, higher hardness, lower porosity and lower rate of wear, consequent on the finer distribution of the corn husks particles in the matrix. The results obtained for the brake pads were then compared with that of commercial brake pad (asbestos based and optimum formulation laboratory brake pad, corn husk based. The results were found to be in close agreement suggesting that corn husk can be used in the production of asbestos-free brake pads.

  12. Evaluation of the accuracy of shoe fitting in older people using three-dimensional foot scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Auhl, Maria; Ristevski, Sonja; Frescos, Nicoletta; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2014-01-23

    Ill-fitting footwear is a common problem in older people. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of shoe fitting in older people by comparing the dimensions of allocated shoes to foot dimensions obtained with a three-dimensional (3D) scanner. The shoe sizes of 56 older people were determined with the Brannock device®, and weightbearing foot scans were obtained with the FotoScan 3D scanner (Precision 3D Ltd, Weston-super-mare, UK). Participants were provided with a pair of shoes (Dr Comfort®, Vista, CA, USA), available in three width fittings (medium, wide and extra wide). The dimensions (length, ball width and ball girth) of the allocated shoes were documented according to the last measurements provided by the manufacturer. Mean differences between last dimensions and foot dimensions obtained with the 3D scanner were calculated to provide an indication of shoe fitting accuracy. Participants were also asked to report their perception of shoe fit and comfort, using 100 mm visual analogue scales (VAS). Shoe size ranged from US size 7 to 14 for men and 5.5 to 11 for women. The allocated shoes were significantly longer than the foot (mean 23.6 mm, 95% confidence interval [CI] 22.1 to 25.2; t55 = 30.3, p ball width (mean 1.4 mm, 95% CI -0.1 to 2.9 mm; t55 = 1.9, p = 0.066) or ball girth (mean -0.7 mm, 95% CI -6.1 to 4.8 mm; t55 = -0.2, p = 0.810). Participants reported favourable perceptions of shoe fit (mean VAS = 90.7 mm, 95% CI 88.4 to 93.1 mm) and comfort (mean VAS = 88.4 mm, 95% CI 85.0 to 91.8 mm). Shoe size selection using the Brannock device® resulted in the allocation of shoes with last dimensions that were well matched to the dimensions of the foot. Participants also considered the shoes to be well fitted and comfortable. Older people with disabling foot pain can therefore be dispensed with appropriately-fitted shoes using this technique, provided that the style and materials used are suitable and

  13. Lower-extremity dynamics of walking in neuropathic diabetic patients who wear a forefoot-offloading shoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A; Maas, Josina C; Otterman, Nicoline M

    2017-10-02

    A forefoot-offloading shoes has a negative-heel rocker outsole and is used to treat diabetic plantar forefoot ulcers, but its mechanisms of action and their association with offloading and gait stability are not sufficiently clear. Ten neuropathic diabetic patients were tested in a forefoot-offloading shoe and subsequently in a control shoe with no specific offloading construction, both worn on the right foot (control shoe on left), while walking at 1.2m/s. 3D-instrumented gait analysis and simultaneous in-shoe plantar pressure measurements were used to explain the shoe's offloading efficacy and to define centre-of-pressure profiles and left-to-right symmetry in ankle joint dynamics (0-1, 1:maximum symmetry), as indicators for gait stability. Compared to the control shoe, peak forefoot pressures, vertical ground reaction force, plantar flexion angle, and ankle joint moment, all in terminal stance, and the proximal-to-distal centre-of-pressure trajectory were significantly reduced in the forefoot-offloading shoe (Poutsole design, forefoot-offloading shoes significantly alter a neuropathic diabetic patient's gait towards a reduced push-off power that explains the shoe's offloading efficacy. However, gait symmetry and stability are compromised, and may be factors in the low perceived walking discomfort and limited use of these shoes in clinical practice. Shoe modifications (e.g. less negative heel, a more cushioning insole) may resolve this trade-off between efficacy and usability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Effects of footwear on plantar foot sensitivity: a study with Formula 1 shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Günther; Sterzing, Thorsten; Milani, Thomas L

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Formula 1 footwear on the ability of the plantar foot to detect vibration stimuli. Twenty-five male subjects participated in the study. Five foot/shoe conditions were analysed (barefoot and four shoe conditions). Vibration thresholds were measured at three anatomical locations of the plantar foot (heel, first metatarsal head and hallux) at two frequencies (30 and 200 Hz). The results show a frequency-dependent influence of footwear on foot sensitivity. The comparison between barefoot and shod conditions showed lower thresholds (P shoe conditions at 200 Hz compared to barefoot. Lower thresholds (P shoe outsole material seems to facilitate the transmission of high-frequent vibration stimuli to the skin, resulting in better vibration sensitivity at 200 Hz when wearing Formula 1 shoes compared to barefoot.

  15. Mi Piacce – how to measure the pleasures provided by shoe design to physical disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rachel Roncoletta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is presenting Mi Piacce Methodology, which can be applied by shoe wearers to measure the pleasures provided by shoe design for women with lower limb dysmetria. Qualitative methodology was applied with mix techniques, such as comparative analysis of secondary sources, semi-structured interviews with five health professionals, and a phenomenological methodology with nine wearers. After this, it was develop Mi Piacce Methodology, and it was applied in forty-two wearers’ shoes design; eight are presenting in this paper. It can be concluded that the inconsistency in the degree of pleasures provided by the same style of shoes underlines the importance of conducting a holistic analysis to detect the strong and weak points of each shoe design for the wearer.

  16. A Comparative Study Between ABS and Disc Brake System Using Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Mobasseri, Saleh; Mobasseri, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This paper, refers to the history of the rise of brake system and describe its importance in passenger's lives. The Anti-lock Braking system (ABS), is the safety of vehicle systems to achieve maximum braking and decelerating in terms of increasing the stability and balance of the car and reduces the braking distance is designed. The performance of disc brake system and the Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) are also compared with each other by the kinetic analysis of the braking system and evalua...

  17. Research on Modeling and Control of Regenerative Braking for Brushless DC Machines Driven Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-ping Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve energy utilization rate of battery-powered electric vehicle (EV using brushless DC machine (BLDCM, the model of braking current generated by regenerative braking and control method are discussed. On the basis of the equivalent circuit of BLDCM during the generative braking period, the mathematic model of braking current is established. By using an extended state observer (ESO to observe actual braking current and the unknown disturbances of regenerative braking system, the autodisturbances rejection controller (ADRC for controlling the braking current is developed. Experimental results show that the proposed method gives better recovery efficiency and is robust to disturbances.

  18. Coefficient of Friction of a Brake Disc-Brake Pad Friction Couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orłowicz A.W.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns evaluation of the coefficient of friction characterising a friction couple comprising a commercial brake disc cast of flake graphite grey iron and a typical brake pad for passenger motor car. For the applied interaction conditions, the brake pressure of 0.53 MPa and the linear velocity measured on the pad-disc trace axis equalling 15 km/h, evolution of the friction coefficient μ values were observed. It turned out that after a period of 50 minutes, temperature reached the value 270°C and got stabilised. After this time interval, the friction coefficient value also got stabilised on the level of μ = 0.38. In case of a block in its original state, stabilisation of the friction coefficient value occurred after a stage in the course of which a continuous growth of its value was observed up to the level μ = 0.41 and then a decrease to the value μ = 0.38. It can be assumed that occurrence of this stage was an effect of an initial running-in of the friction couple. In consecutive abrasion tests on the same friction couple, the friction coefficient value stabilisation occurred after the stage of a steady increase of its value. It can be stated that the stage corresponded to a secondary running-in of the friction couple. The observed stages lasted for similar periods of time and ended with reaching the stabile level of temperature of the disc-pad contact surface.

  19. Finite element analysis of advanced bicycle precision brake disk forming technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dyi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the bicycle has become an environmentally friendly transportation. The bicycle can be divided into mountain bicycle and highway bicycle. Safe driving is the prior consideration. The bicycle braking system can be divided into oil pressure disk brakes and mechanical disk brakes. The brake disk system is one indispensable component of the safe system. In accordance to overall weight consideration of the bike, the brake disk should also focus on the lightweight design. This paper discussed an innovative brake disk forming technology for 6061 aluminum alloy by the rigid-plastic finite element analysis. The simulation parameters include geometric shapes of the brake disk and mold, die temperature, and friction factors. The stress and strain in forming, brake deformation and vibration modal analysis of brake disk in riding were studied. The paper is expected to offer some precision bicycle brake disk manufacture knowledge for industry.

  20. XXVI. International {mu} symposium - brake conference; XXVI. Internationales {mu}-Symposium - Bremsen-Fachtagung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, B. (ed.)

    2006-07-01

    The progress of brake technology contributes consistently and considerably to the safety of vehicle occupants, but also to the prevention of vehicle collisions with pedestrians and bikers. The symposia of the {mu} club have for 25 years informed the attendees about the latest findings, methods, developments and products in the field of brakes and promoted the exchange of information and the personal interaction between the experts in many brake related disciplines. Topics of the XXVI{sup th} {mu} symposium are innovation and processes in the field of brake rotors, methods to assess their irregular wear, the determination of the value of friction between brake pads and brakes, an innovative self reinforced disc brake with electronic control, regenerative braking in hybrid vehicles and the fascination of innovation. This year's papers are presented by four brake manufacturers, one brake linings manufacturer and one university. (orig.)

  1. Electronics and braking systems; Elektronik in Bremssystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaupp, W. [Rheinisch-Westfaelischer Technischer Ueberwachungs-Verein e.V., Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Fahrzeugtechnik

    2000-02-01

    In addition to the anti-lock braking system ABS, which is now fitted to almost every new passenger car, an increasing number of other control systems which intervene in the vehicle's driving dynamics, such as ASR, DSC or ESP, are being introduced. This article gives an overview of such systems, from their beginnings up to the present-day, and describes future developments. (orig.) [German] Neben das Antiblockiersystem ABS, mit dem heute fast jeder neue Pkw ausgestattet ist, treten zunehmend weitere Regelsysteme, die in die Fahrdynamik des Fahrzeugs eingreifen, wie zum Beispiel ASR, DSC oder ESP. Dieser Beitrag gibt einen Ueberblick von den Anfaengen dieser Systeme bis hin zu zukuenftigen Entwicklungen. (orig.)

  2. Comparisonal Analysis of Manuevering and Braking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artūras Žukas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article covers the possibility of avoiding a traffic accident considering a car driver who is fallen in a dangerous situation. In such a case, the driver can choose one of the following ways: hard braking or one of the types of maneuvering, including turning off, turning with straightening or changing a line regarding road surface type (dry asphalt, wet asphalt or snowy asphalt. The article also proposes formulas for calculating road distance the car travels till dead stop. Moreover, the tables display theoretical values taking into account various car speeds and road surfaces. The pictures help with determining the most suitable type of action in light of road and weather conditions as well as car speed. The pictures clearly show the dependence of road length on movement speed. At the end of the article, conclusions are proposed.Article in Lithuanian

  3. Gravitational waves from pulsars with measured braking index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jose C.N. de; Coelho, Jaziel G.; Costa, Cesar A. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Astrofisica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    We study the putative emission of gravitational waves (GWs) in particular for pulsars with measured braking index. We show that the appropriate combination of both GW emission and magnetic dipole brakes can naturally explain the measured braking index, when the surface magnetic field and the angle between the magnetic dipole and rotation axes are time dependent. Then we discuss the detectability of these very pulsars by aLIGO and the Einstein Telescope. We call attention to the realistic possibility that aLIGO can detect the GWs generated by at least some of these pulsars, such as Vela, for example. (orig.)

  4. CARS WEAVE IN THE BRAKING POSITION OF A HUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Serheiev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The work contains a theoretical study of freight car vibrations while a group of the freight cars are under braking by retarder. The purpose is to discover possible causes of derailment. The corresponding analytical description is presented. The solution of the differential equations for the groups of carriages confirms an assumption, according to which a contact between the carriage wheel of and the rail can be lost due to the oscillations induced by braking. The results allow to present recommendation for choosing the safe regime of braking in order to avoid the derailment.

  5. Adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes: a systematic review and reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarl G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gustav Jarl,1,2 Lars-Olov Lundqvist2 1Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, 2University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden Introduction: Therapeutic shoes are prescribed to prevent diabetic foot ulcers, but adherence to wearing the shoes is often poor.  Aim: The aim of this study was to review the literature on factors that are associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes and construct a model of adherence to aid future research and development in the field. Methods: We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for quantitative studies on factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes among people with diabetes. Results: Six studies were included in the review. The studies focused mainly on patient-, therapy-, and condition-related adherence factors. There is some evidence (three to five studies that sex, diabetes duration, and ulcer history are not associated with adherence. The evidence for or against the other factors was weak (only one or two studies or conflicting. Conclusion: There is no conclusive evidence for using any factor to predict adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, but there is some evidence against using certain factors for predicting adherence. Future studies should include a broader range of factors, including health system and social/economic factors, and they should investigate perceived costs and benefits of wearing therapeutic shoes in comparison with other shoes or no shoes. A seesaw model is presented illustrating the complex phenomenon of adherence. Further research is needed to identify factors associated with adherence to wearing therapeutic shoes, to enable the development of interventions to improve adherence and thereby reduce ulceration rates among people with diabetic foot complications.Keywords: Patient compliance, shoes, foot ulcer, diabetic foot, diabetes

  6. Asbestos exposure during routine brake lining manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakooei, Hossein; Sameti, Mahmod; Kakooei, Ali Akbar

    2007-12-01

    Occupational exposure to asbestos fiber and total dust of workers of a major brake lining manufacture plant in a developing country were examined and compared with those in developed countries. Time weighted average of total dust and asbestos fiber concentration in the potential sources of exposure were monitored. All personal air sampling were collected on membrane filters and analyzed by phase contrast optical microscopy (PCM) for comparison with the occupational safety and health administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 0.1 f/cc, 8-h time--weighted average. This study demonstrates that routine mixing, polishing and beveling process in the brake lining production can result in elevated levels of airborne asbestos. Greater releases of airborne asbestos were observed during mixing process and mixer machine. The results also showed that the employees working in the process had the exposure to total dust concentrations ranging from 2.08 to 16.32 mg/m(3) that is higher than OSHA, recommendation. According to OSHA definition of fibers, it has been indicated that from 3,000 counted particles, 90% of particles are in the form of non-fiber and reaming have fiber-shaped. The particle analyze gives the geometric mean diameter as 6.02 mum, and also indicated that the arithmetic mean of the number distribution for the particle population was 8.4 mum. Approximately 60.4% of the counted fibers were lower than 10 mum in length, from which only 8% consists of fibers (>5 mum in length). In conclusion, the analysis showed a presence in the air of only chrysotile asbestos and an absence of other types of asbestos. During an 8-h shift, the average asbestos fiber exposure (0.78 f/cc) were 7.8 time in excess of OSHA PEL. Additional studies in occupational exposure to asbestos are needed.

  7. Arthritis, Foot Pain & Shoe Wear: Current Musculoskeletal Research on Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Jody; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Both arthritis and foot pain are major public health problems. Approximately 24% of adults have foot ailments, and the prevalence increases with age. Foot pain, particularly related to shoes, footwear and rheumatic disorders, may be an important modifiable factor. Surprisingly, this topic has received little attention in the rheumatology community. Recent findings Despite the major focus of structure and alignment in arthritis, remarkably little work has focused on the foot and non-surgical foot interventions that might affect lower extremity joint alignment, structure and pain in rheumatic diseases. Emerging research suggests that there may be a significant role for foot orthotics and footwear in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and foot. This review highlights the current understanding on the topic of foot orthotics and footwear in adults with rheumatic diseases. Summary Biomechanical evidence indicates that foot orthotics and specialized footwear may change muscle activation and gait patterns to reduce joint loading. Emerging evidence suggests that orthotics, specific shoe types and footwear interventions may provide an effective non-surgical intervention in rheumatic diseases. Yet good data are sparse, and it is premature to recommend guidelines. As there are a limited number of studies that underpin the foot’s role in arthritis etiology and progression, clinical trials and prospective studies are of utmost importance to unravel the links between foot pain, foot conditions and interventions that lessen the impact of rheumatic diseases. PMID:21150623

  8. A Shoe-Embedded Piezoelectric Energy Harvester for Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Harvesting mechanical energy from human motion is an attractive approach for obtaining clean and sustainable electric energy to power wearable sensors, which are widely used for health monitoring, activity recognition, gait analysis and so on. This paper studies a piezoelectric energy harvester for the parasitic mechanical energy in shoes originated from human motion. The harvester is based on a specially designed sandwich structure with a thin thickness, which makes it readily compatible with a shoe. Besides, consideration is given to both high performance and excellent durability. The harvester provides an average output power of 1 mW during a walk at a frequency of roughly 1 Hz. Furthermore, a direct current (DC power supply is built through integrating the harvester with a power management circuit. The DC power supply is tested by driving a simulated wireless transmitter, which can be activated once every 2–3 steps with an active period lasting 5 ms and a mean power of 50 mW. This work demonstrates the feasibility of applying piezoelectric energy harvesters to power wearable sensors.

  9. Hierarchical Control Strategy for the Cooperative Braking System of Electric Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Jiankun Peng; Hongwen He; Wei Liu; Hongqiang Guo

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a hierarchical control strategy for cooperative braking system of an electric vehicle with separated driven axles. Two layers are defined: the top layer is used to optimize the braking stability based on two sliding mode control strategies, namely, the interaxle control mode and signal-axle control strategies; the interaxle control strategy generates the ideal braking force distribution in general braking condition, and the single-axle control strategy can ensure braking s...

  10. Finite element analysis of advanced bicycle precision brake disk forming technology

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Dyi-Cheng; Kang Jing-Hao; Lai Chia-Chun

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the bicycle has become an environmentally friendly transportation. The bicycle can be divided into mountain bicycle and highway bicycle. Safe driving is the prior consideration. The bicycle braking system can be divided into oil pressure disk brakes and mechanical disk brakes. The brake disk system is one indispensable component of the safe system. In accordance to overall weight consideration of the bike, the brake disk should also focus on the lightweight design. This paper...

  11. The Theoretical Analysis of Test Result’s Errors for the Roller Type Automobile Brake Tester

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun; Zha, Xiaojing; Wu, Dongsheng

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The main testing parameter of the roller brake tester is the braking force. Actually, there are some differences in results even if the same vehicle is tested on the same tester. So it will bring trouble to evaluate the braking performance accurately. Based on force analysis, the mathematical model of the roller opposite force type automobile brake tester is built in this article. And then the factors of influencing braking force value will be analyzed by theoretical c...

  12. Driver Behavioral Changes through Interactions with an Automatic Brake System for Collision Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Makoto; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Inagaki, Toshiyuki

    This paper discusses driver's behavioral changes as a result of driver's use of an automatic brake system for preventing a rear-end collision from occurring. Three types of automatic brake systems are investigated in this study. Type 1 brake system applies a strong automatic brake when a collision is very imminent. Type 2 brake system initiates brake operation softly when a rear-end crash may be anticipated. Types 1 and 2 are for avoidance of a collision. Type 3 brake system, on the other hand, applies a strong automatic brake to reduce the damage when a collision can not be avoided. An experiment was conducted with a driving simulator in order to analyze the driver's possible behavioral changes. The results showed that the time headway (THW) during car following phase was reduced by use of an automatic brake system of any type. The inverse of time to collision (TTC), which is an index of the driver's brake timing, increased by use of Type 1 brake system when the deceleration rate of the lead vehicle was relatively low. However, the brake timing did not change when the drivers used Type 2 or 3 brake system. As a whole, dangerous behavioral changes, such as overreliance on a brake system, were not observed for either type of brake system.

  13. Foot-to-shoe mismatch and rates of referral in Special Olympics athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David W; Cooper, Kimbal; O'Connor, Rachel; Watanabe, Liane

    2012-01-01

    Improperly fitted shoes are frequently seen in athletes participating in Special Olympics competitions. This foot-to-shoe mismatch may result in deformities as well as discomfort and reduced performance or injuries in competitions. A primary purpose for providing medical screenings is to identify conditions unknown and to promptly refer to an appropriate provider for evaluation and care. This study attempts to determine the prevalence of improperly fitted shoes and the rate of referral for Special Olympics athletes screened at Fit Feet venues. To evaluate the foot-to-shoe mismatch and rate of referral, 4,094 Fit Feet screenings of Special Olympics athletes participating in US competitions in 2005 to 2009 were analyzed. The participants were 58.5% male and 41.5% female, with a median age of 25.6 years. A power analysis and the χ(2) test were used. The athletes voluntarily underwent a foot screening that followed the standardized Special Olympics Fit Feet protocol. The Brannock Device for measuring feet was used to assess proper fit. A proper fit was found in 58.56% of the athletes, with 28.60% wearing shoes too big and 12.84% wearing shoes too small. Unrelated to shoe fit, 20% of the athletes required referrals for professional follow-up based on abnormal clinical findings. There is a significant (41.44%) mismatch of foot to shoe in Special Olympics athletes. The most common mismatch is a shoe too big, with a much smaller number of athletes having shoes too small. Awareness of this foot-to-shoe incompatibility may be useful for the development of shoes better designed for athletes with a foot structure not consistent with conventional shoes. Because 20% of the athletes required a referral for professional follow-up, Fit Feet examinations are important for identifying athletes with conditions that can be more readily evaluated and treated, thus improving the athletes' comfort and performance. Beyond knowing the rate of referral, future studies can determine the

  14. Numerical Modeling of Disc Brake System in Frictional Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Belhocine

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Safety aspect in automotive engineering has been considered as a number one priority in development of new vehicle. Each single system has been studied and developed in order to meet safety requirement. Instead of having air bag, good suspension systems, good handling and safe cornering, there is one most critical system in the vehicle which is brake systems. The objective of this work is to investigate and analyse the temperature distribution of rotor disc during braking operation using ANSYS Multiphysics. The work uses the finite element analysis techniques to predict the temperature distribution on the full and ventilated brake disc and to identify the critical temperature of the rotor by holding account certain parameters such as; the material used, the geometric design of the disc and the mode of braking. The analysis also gives us, the heat flux distribution for the two discs.

  15. Research to longevity brake lines on the exploitations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergey TUJRIN; Grigory BOYKO; Alexander REVIN; Vitaliy FEDOTOV

    2015-01-01

    .... The article describes the results of the research on the longevity of the brake linings of different types of vehicles based on their controllable operation and the method of accelerated estimation...

  16. Brake System Design Optimization : Volume 2. Supplemental Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Existing freight car braking systems, components, and subsystems are characterized both physically and functionally, and life-cycle costs are examined. Potential improvements to existing systems previously proposed or available are identified and des...

  17. Brake System Design Optimization. Volume II : Supplemental Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    Existing freight car braking systems, components, and subsystems are characterized both physically and functionally, and life-cycle costs are examined. Potential improvements to existing systems previously proposed or available are identified and des...

  18. Brake System Design Optimization : Volume 1. A Survey and Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-01

    Existing freight car braking systems, components, and subsystems are characterized both physically and functionally, and life-cycle costs are examined. Potential improvements to existing systems previously proposed or available are identified and des...

  19. AIRCRAFT BRAKE TEMPERATURE FROM A SAFETY POINT OF VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján PIĽA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Safety is critical throughout all stages of aircraft operation, from air mission to ground operation. One of the most important airframe systems that influences the efficacy of ground safety is a wheel brake system. Aircraft ground speed deceleration requires the dissipation of kinetic energy, which depends on aircraft weight and speed. Significant levels of aircraft kinetic energy must be dissipated in the form of heat energy. The brakes of heavy aircraft are especially prone to overheating during landing and taxiing on the ground. The aim of this paper is to focus on the dangers caused by aircraft brakes when overheating and ways in which to eliminate brake overheating problems from a safety perspective.

  20. Fishery Management Plan for Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge - 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This management plan was prepared by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service for Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge. Data was provided by the Refuge and Area Office...

  1. Fishery Management Plan for Mathews Brake National Wildlife Refuge - 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This management plan was prepared by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for Mathew's Brake National Wildlife Refuge. Data was provided by the refuge and area office...

  2. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc, proposes an SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane mechanism to switch...

  3. Crayfish survey at Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Crayfish sampling on Morgan Brake NWR for vernal crawfish and other species was done for 3 days at five sites. Data are present on species of crawfish and amphibians...

  4. Fishing Plan for Mathews Brake National Wildlife Refuge - 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal calls for the opening of Mathews Brake NWR to sport fishing. General regulations pertaining to licenses, creel limits, and methods of taking fish will...

  5. Deployable Engine Air-Brake for Drag Management Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ATA Engineering, Inc., (ATA) proposes a Phase II SBIR program to demonstrate an innovative engine air-brake (EAB) technology that uses a deployable swirl vane...

  6. Fracture Analysis and Material Improvement of Brake Discs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SAKAMOTO, Haruo; HIRAKAWA, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    .... This new brake disc, which proved to be satisfactory for Shinkansen vehicles, is capable of running at high speeds of more than 270km/h and therefore suitable for current vehicles such as the Nozomi and Tsubasa.

  7. RETROFIT OF A ROLLER BRAKE TESTER AT FAMENA

    OpenAIRE

    Božić, Mladen; Vučetić, Ante; Ilinčić, Petar; Lulić, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    The vehicle brake tester described in this paper is placed in the Laboratory for IC Engines and Motor Vehicles at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FAMENA) in Zagreb. As the device, built in 1983, was inoperative, a decision was made for retrofit rather than repair. The retrofit included a reconstruction of some parts and modification of the braking force measurement. Adaptation of monitoring and control was made on electronic components that control the roller set...

  8. Modeling Hydraulic Components for Automated FMEA of a Braking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    to be reusable and, on the other hand, powerful enough to deliver the predictions relevant to FMEA of braking systems. In this paper, we present...context-independent,  analyze how a stimulus in terms of a local pressure change (e.g. pushing a brake pedal ) propagates through the system...mechanical components and the electronic control unit (ECU) and its software. It contains a tandem pedal actuation unit (with two pistons and two

  9. How Drivers Respond to Alarms Adapted to Their Braking Behaviour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Genya; Itoh, Makoto

    Determining appropriate alarm timing for Forward Collision Warning Systems (FCWS) may play an important role in enhancing system acceptance by drivers. It is not always true that a common alarm trigger logic is suitable for all drivers, because presented alarms may be differently viewed for each driver, i.e., paying attention or requiring appropriate actions. The current study focused on adaptive alarm timing which was adjusted in response to braking behaviour for collision avoidance for the individual. In Experiment I, the braking performance of individual driver was measured repeatedly to assess the variation of each performance. We utilised the following two indices: elapsed time from the deceleration of the lead car to release of the accelerator (accelerator release time) and elapsed time to application of the brakes (braking response time). Two alarm timings were then determined based on these two indices: (i) the median of the accelerator release time of the driver and (ii) the median of the braking response time of the driver. Experiment II compared the two alarm timings for each driver in order to investigate which timing is more appropriate for enhancing driver trust in the driver-adaptive FCWS and the system effectiveness. The results showed that the timing of the accelerator release time increased the trust ratings more than the timing of braking response. The timing of the braking response time induced a longer response time to application of the brakes. Moreover, the degree to which the response time was longer depended on alarm timing preference of the driver. The possible benefit and drawback of driver-adaptive alarm timing are discussed.

  10. Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D.A. [R. Lynette & amp; Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

  11. Influence of different safety shoes on gait and plantar pressure: a standardized examination of workers in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsmann, Elke; Noll, Ulrike; Ellegast, Rolf; Hermanns, Ingo; Kraus, Thomas

    2016-09-30

    Working conditions, such as walking and standing on hard surfaces, can increase the development of musculoskeletal complaints. At the interface between flooring and musculoskeletal system, safety shoes may play an important role in the well-being of employees. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different safety shoes on gait and plantar pressure distributions on industrial flooring. Twenty automotive workers were individually fitted out with three different pairs of safety shoes ( "normal" shoes, cushioned shoes, and midfoot bearing shoes). They walked at a given speed of 1.5 m/s. The CUELA measuring system and shoe insoles were used for gait analysis and plantar pressure measurements, respectively. Statistical analysis was conducted by ANOVA analysis for repeated measures. Walking with cushioned safety shoes or a midfoot bearing safety shoe led to a significant decrease of the average trunk inclination (pindustrial accident, but in addition, safety shoes could be a long-term preventive instrument for maintaining health of the employees' musculoskeletal system, as they are able to affect gait parameters. Further research needs to focus on safety shoes in working situations.

  12. Does shoe heel design influence ground reaction forces and knee moments during maximum lunges in elite and intermediate badminton players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wing-Kai; Ryue, Jaejin; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Park, Sang-Kyoon; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Ryu, Jiseon

    2017-01-01

    Lunge is one frequently executed movement in badminton and involves a unique sagittal footstrike angle of more than 40 degrees at initial ground contact compared with other manoeuvres. This study examined if the shoe heel curvature design of a badminton shoe would influence shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments during lunge. Eleven elite and fifteen intermediate players performed five left-forward maximum lunge trials with Rounded Heel Shoe (RHS), Flattened Heel Shoe (FHS), and Standard Heel Shoes (SHS). Shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments were measured by using synchronized force platform and motion analysis system. A 2 (Group) x 3 (Shoe) ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to determine the effects of different shoes and different playing levels, as well as the interaction of two factors on all variables. Shoe effect indicated that players demonstrated lower maximum vertical loading rate in RHS than the other two shoes (P badminton lunge. The differences in impact loads and knee moments between elite and intermediate players may be useful in optimizing footwear design and training strategy to minimize the potential risks for impact related injuries in badminton.

  13. Effect of rocker shoe design features on forefoot plantar pressures in people with and without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J D; Preece, S; Braunstein, B; Höhne, A; Nester, C J; Brueggemann, P; Hutchins, S

    2013-07-01

    There is no consensus on the precise rocker shoe outsole design that will optimally reduce plantar pressure in people with diabetes. This study aimed to understand how peak plantar pressure is influenced by systematically varying three design features which characterise a curved rocker shoe: apex angle, apex position and rocker angle. A total of 12 different rocker shoe designs, spanning a range of each of the three design features, were tested in 24 people with diabetes and 24 healthy participants. Each subject also wore a flexible control shoe. Peak plantar pressure, in four anatomical regions, was recorded for each of the 13 shoes during walking at a controlled speed. There were a number of significant main effects for each of the three design features, however, the precise effect of each feature varied between the different regions. The results demonstrated maximum pressure reduction in the 2nd-4th metatarsal regions (39%) but that lower rocker angles (60% shoe length) should be avoided for this region. The effect of apex angle was most pronounced in the 1st metatarsophalangeal region with a clear decrease in pressure as the apex angle was increased to 100°. We suggest that an outsole design with a 95° apex angle, apex position at 60% of shoe length and 20° rocker angle may achieve an optimal balance for offloading different regions of the forefoot. However, future studies incorporating additional design feature combinations, on high risk patients, are required to make definitive recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of a forefoot off-loading postoperative shoe on muscle activity, posture, and static balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Joanne S; Thomason, Katherine; Trimble, Karl; Metcalfe, James E; Marsden, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether a forefoot off-loading postoperative shoe (FOPS) alters standing posture, ankle muscle activity, and static postural sway and whether any effects are altered by wearing a shoe raise on the contralateral side. Posture, ankle muscle activity, and postural sway were compared in 14 healthy participants wearing either a FOPS or a control shoe with or without a contralateral shoe raise. Participants were tested under different sensory and support surface conditions. Additionally, reductions in peak pressure under the forefoot while walking were assessed with and without a contralateral shoe raise to determine whether the FOPS continued to achieve its primary off-loading function. Compared with the control condition, wearing a FOPS moved the center of pressure posteriorly, increased tibialis anterior muscle activity, and reduced ankle plantarflexor activity. These changes decreased when a contralateral shoe raise was added. No difference in postural sway was found between footwear conditions. Forefoot peak pressure was always reduced when wearing the FOPS. The posterior shift in center of pressure toward and behind the ankle joint axis is believed to result in the increase in tibialis anterior muscle activity that now acts as the primary stabilizer around the ankle. Instability may, therefore, increase in patients with weak tibialis anterior muscles (eg, diabetic neuropathy) who need to wear offloading devices for ulcer management. We suggest that the addition of a contralateral shoe raise fitted with a FOPS may potentially be beneficial in maintaining stability while off-loading the forefoot in this patient group.

  15. Shoe Orthotics for the Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Dexheimer, Jennifer M; Duarte, Manuel; Freels, Sally

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of shoe orthotics with and without chiropractic treatment for chronic low back pain compared with no treatment. Randomized controlled trial. Integrative medicine teaching clinic at a university. Adult subjects (N=225) with symptomatic low back pain of ≥3 months were recruited from a volunteer sample. Subjects were randomized into 1 of 3 treatment groups (shoe orthotic, plus, and waitlist groups). The shoe orthotic group received custom-made shoe orthotics. The plus group received custom-made orthotics plus chiropractic manipulation, hot or cold packs, and manual soft tissue massage. The waitlist group received no care. The primary outcome measures were change in perceived back pain (numerical pain rating scale) and functional health status (Oswestry Disability Index) after 6 weeks of study participation. Outcomes were also assessed after 12 weeks and then after an additional 3, 6, and 12 months. After 6 weeks, all 3 groups demonstrated significant within-group improvement in average back pain, but only the shoe orthotic and plus groups had significant within-group improvement in function. When compared with the waitlist group, the shoe orthotic group demonstrated significantly greater improvements in pain (Ppain (P=.3431). Group differences at 12 weeks and later were not significant. Six weeks of prescription shoe orthotics significantly improved back pain and dysfunction compared with no treatment. The addition of chiropractic care led to higher improvements in function. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomechanic effects of a contralateral shoe-lift on walking with an immobilized knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, D C; Abdulhadi, H M; Ribaudo, T A; Della Croce, U

    1997-10-01

    A previous study demonstrated that when one knee is artificially immobilized, a contralateral shoe-lift improves the oxygen cost of walking. This study was undertaken to evaluate the kinematic and kinetic effects associated with this shoe-lift. Motion analysis and force platform data were collected in subjects walking (1) normally, (2) with one knee immobilized, (3) with one knee immobilized and with a one-half-inch shoe-lift applied to the contralateral, nonimmobilized shoe, and (4) with a one-inch shoe-lift similarly applied. Kinematic and kinetic data from three trials of each condition were compared graphically and statistically using a repeated measures analysis of variance. A gait laboratory. Eight able-bodied subjects without known neurologic or musculoskeletal problems. Fifty-two peak kinematic and kinetic variables during various phases of the gait cycle. Statistically significant differences (p biomechanic effect from the shoe-lift was noted except for a slightly increased peak knee extension moment on the immobilized side found for the 1" but not the 1"/2 shoe-lift.

  17. Effect of environmental temperature on shock absorption properties of running shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Mansour Y; Smith, Jay; Bernhardt, Kathie A; Kaufman, Kenton R; Miles, Kevin A

    2005-05-01

    To determine the effect of temperature changes on the shock attenuation of 4 running shoe shock absorption systems. Prospective. Motion analysis laboratory. The shock attenuation of 4 different running shoes representing common shock absorption systems (Nike Air Triax, Asics Gel Nimbus IV, Adidas a3 cushioning, Adidas Supernova cushion) was measured at ambient temperatures of -20 degrees C, -10 degrees C, 0 degrees C, +10 degrees C, +20 degrees C, +30 degrees C, +40 degrees C, and +50 degrees C. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine differences between shoes. Shock attenuation as indicated by peak deceleration (g) measured by a mechanical impactor following ASTM Standard F1614-99. Shock attenuation decreased significantly with reduced temperature for each shoe tested. The Adidas a3 shoe exhibited significantly higher peak decelerations (lower shock attenuation) at cold temperatures compared with the other shoes. Cold ambient temperatures significantly reduce the shock attenuation of commonly used running shoes. These findings have important clinical implications for individuals training in extreme weather environments, particularly those with a history of lower limb overuse injuries.

  18. A novel shoe scanner using an open-access quadrupole resonance and metal sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, C.; Petrov, T.; Mitchell, O.; Shelby, R.; Ficke, L.; Kumar, S.; Prado, P.

    2007-04-01

    Airport security and efficiency are both compromised by the process of requiring passengers to remove their shoe. A novel shoe scanner developed at the GE Security San Diego Center of Excellence uses both Quadrupole Resonance (QR) and configuration-sensitive metal detection to identify threats hidden in shoes. The shoe scanner was developed with an open-access chassis and scanning chamber that allows passengers to stand in the system in a natural position during the scanning process. More traditional magnetic resonance systems are closed or partially closed and cannot be used for screening personnel because the scanning chambers confine the object in question. The shoe scanner's novelty lies in a particular chassis geometry that allows both QR and metal screening. The resulting scanning system achieves the same level of performance as a more confining system. The shoe scanner is small enough to allow integration with other sensors such as the GE Itemizer FX TM trace detection system. In fact, the first application of the novel shoe scanner is expected to be as a component in a multi-sensor verification and security system known as the Secure Registered Traveler (SRT) Kiosk. The SRT kiosk is designed to be used as part of the TSA's Registered Traveler Program.

  19. Effect of rocker shoes on pain, disability and activity limitation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh Cham, Masumeh; Ghasemi, Mohammad Sadegh; Forogh, Bijan; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali; Zabihi Yeganeh, Mozdeh; Eshraghi, Arezoo

    2014-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which affects the joints and soft tissues of the foot and ankle. Rocker shoes may be prescribed for the symptomatic foot in rheumatoid arthritis; however, there is a limited evidence base to support the use of rocker shoes in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of heel-to-toe rocker shoes on pain, disability, and activity limitation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical trial. Seventeen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis of 1 year or more duration, disease activity score of less than 2.6, and foot and ankle pain were recruited. Heel-to-toe rocker shoe was made according to each patient's foot size. All the patients were evaluated immediately, 7 and 30 days after their first visit. Foot Function Index values were recorded at each appointment. With the use of rocker shoes, Foot Function Index values decreased in all subscales. This reduction was noted in the first visit and was maintained throughout the trials. Rocker shoe can improve pain, disability, and activity limitation in patients with rheumatoid foot pain. All the subjects reported improved comfort levels. The results of this study showed that high-top, heel-to-toe rocker shoe with wide toe box was effective at reducing foot and ankle pain. It was also regarded as comfortable and acceptable footwear by the patients with rheumatoid foot problems. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  20. Estimation of personal exposure to asbestos of brake repair workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cely-García, María Fernanda; Curriero, Frank C; Sánchez-Silva, Mauricio; Breysse, Patrick N; Giraldo, Margarita; Méndez, Lorena; Torres-Duque, Carlos; Durán, Mauricio; González-García, Mauricio; Parada, Patricia; Ramos-Bonilla, Juan Pablo

    2017-07-01

    Exposure assessments are key tools to conduct epidemiological studies. Since 2010, 28 riveters from 18 brake repair shops with different characteristics and workloads were sampled for asbestos exposure in Bogotá, Colombia. Short-term personal samples collected during manipulation activities of brake products, and personal samples collected during non-manipulation activities were used to calculate 103 8-h TWA PCM-equivalent personal asbestos concentrations. The aims of this study are to identify exposure determinant variables associated with the 8-h TWA personal asbestos concentrations among brake mechanics, and propose different models to estimate potential asbestos exposure of brake mechanics in an 8-h work-shift. Longitudinal-based multivariate linear regression models were used to determine the association between personal asbestos concentrations in a work-shift with different variables related to work tasks and workload of the mechanics, and some characteristics of the shops. Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate the 8-h TWA PCM-Eq personal asbestos concentration in work-shifts that had manipulations of brake products or cleaning activities of the manipulation area, using the results of the sampling campaigns. The simulations proposed could be applied for both current and retrospective studies to determine personal asbestos exposures of brake mechanics, without the need of sampling campaigns or historical data of air asbestos concentrations.

  1. Development of automobile brake lining using pulverized cow hooves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsina C. BALA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Asbestos has been used for so long as automobile brake lining material because of its good physical and chemical properties. However, due to the health hazard associated with its handling, it has lost favour and several alternative materials are being increasingly used. Asbestos-free brake lining was developed in this work using pulverized cow hooves along with epoxy resin, barium sulphate, graphite and aluminium oxide. This was with a view to exploiting the characteristics of cow hooves, which are largely discarded as waste materials to replace asbestos which has been found to be carcinogenic. Samples of brake linings were produced using compressive moulding in which the physical and mechanical properties of the samples were studied. The results obtained showed that proper bonding was achieved as the percentage by weight of epoxy resin increased and percentage by weight of pulverized cow hooves decreased. The hardness, compressive strength, coefficient of friction, water and oil absorption, relative density and wear rate of the brake linings were determined and compared with existing brake lining properties. The result indicates that pulverized cow hooves can be used as brake lining material for automobiles.

  2. Development and production of brake pad from sawdust composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiq Sius LAWAL

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research work on new alternative materials for brake pad. A new asbestos free brake pad was developed using an agro waste material of sawdust along with other ingredients. This was with a view to exploiting the characteristics of sawdust which are largely deposited as waste around sawmills in replacing asbestos which has been found to be carcinogenic. A brake pad was produced using sawdust as a base material following the standard procedure employed by the manufacturers. The sawdust was sieved into sieve grades of 100μm, 355μm and 710μm. The sieved sawdust was used in production of brake pad in ratio of 55% sawdust, 15% steel dust, 5% graphite, 10% silicon carbide and 15% epoxy resin using compression moulding. The properties examined are microstructure analysis, hardness, compressive strength, density, ash content, wear rate and water absorption. The results obtained showed that the finer the sieve size the better the properties. The results obtained in this work were compared with that of commercial brake pad (asbestos based and showed a close correlation. Hence sawdust can be used in production of asbestos-free brake pad.

  3. Braking distance algorithm for autonomous cars using road surface recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, C.; Ashok, B.; Nanthagopal, K.; Desai, Rohan; Rastogi, Nisha; Shetty, Siddhanth

    2017-11-01

    India is yet to accept semi/fully – autonomous cars and one of the reasons, was loss of control on bad roads. For a better handling on these roads we require advanced braking and that can be done by adapting electronics into the conventional type of braking. In Recent years, the automation in braking system led us to various benefits like traction control system, anti-lock braking system etc. This research work describes and experiments the method for recognizing road surface profile and calculating braking distance. An ultra-sonic surface recognition sensor, mounted underneath the car will send a high frequency wave on to the road surface, which is received by a receiver with in the sensor, it calculates the time taken for the wave to rebound and thus calculates the distance from the point where sensor is mounted. A displacement graph will be plotted based on the output of the sensor. A relationship can be derived between the displacement plot and roughness index through which the friction coefficient can be derived in Matlab for continuous calculation throughout the distance travelled. Since it is a non-contact type of profiling, it is non-destructive. The friction coefficient values received in real-time is used to calculate optimum braking distance. This system, when installed on normal cars can also be used to create a database of road surfaces, especially in cities, which can be shared with other cars. This will help in navigation as well as making the cars more efficient.

  4. Materials used for braking; Materiaux pour le freinage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bricout, J.P.; Guerin, J.D.; Bartys, H.; Watremez, M. [Universite de Valenciennes et du Hainaut-Cambresis, UMR CNRS 8530, Lab. d' Automatique et de Mecanique Industrielles et Humaines, 59 - Valenciennes (France)

    2001-10-01

    The optimization of disc brakes used in the rail industry induces an increase of the capacity to dissipate energy, a significant lightening of the braking device as well as an improvement of the tribological performance under humidity. Two research studies have then been carried out: 1)the disc brakes with a weak thermal diffusivity and 2)the disc brakes with a high thermal diffusivity. For the systems having a weak thermal diffusivity, the NiCr-Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} cermet coatings and the aluminium titanate brake pads are particularly interesting: stability of the friction coefficient, good wear resistance and low sensitivity to humidity. Meanwhile, the relative reliability of the coating having only a mechanical bond have oriented the researches towards coatings having metallurgical bonds as stellite. The tribological results obtained with 'nirec 6' and 'corec 6' stellite are very encouraging and even superiors to those of NiCr-Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} cermet. The discs with high diffusivity coupled with organic brake pads have also interesting tribological performance as well as at dry than under humidity, with the advantage of a lightening of 50% to the steel disc having the same thermal capacity. With an equal dissipated power, the friction temperature is inferior to those of the conventional system and of the 'NiCr-Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}/aluminium titanate cermet' system. (O.M.)

  5. Infrared characterization of thermal gradients on disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panier, Stephane; Dufrenoy, Philippe; Bremond, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    The heat generated in frictional organs like brakes and clutches induces thermal distortions which may lead to localized contact areas and hot spots developments. Hot spots are high thermal gradients on the rubbing surface. They count among the most dangerous phenomena in frictional organs leading to damage, early failure and unacceptable braking performances such as brake fade or undesirable low frequency vibrations called hot judder. In this paper, an experimental study of hot spots occurrence in railway disc brakes is reported on. The aim of this study was to better classify and to explain the thermal gradients appearance on the surface of the disc. Thermograph measurements with an infrared camera have been carried out on the rubbing surface of brake discs on a full-scale test bench. The infrared system was set to take temperature readings in snap shot mode precisely synchronized with the rotation of the disc. Very short integration time allows reducing drastically haziness of thermal images. Based on thermographs, a classification of hot-spots observed in disc brakes is proposed. A detailed investigation of the most damaging thermal gradients, called macroscopic hot spots (MHS) is given. From these experimental researches, a scenario of hot spots occurrence is suggested step by step. Thanks to infrared measurements at high frequency with high resolution, observations give new highlights on the conditions of hot spots appearance. Comparison of the experimental observations with the theoretical approaches is finally discussed.

  6. Control performance of an electrorheological valve based vehicle anti-lock brake system, considering the braking force distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. B.; Lee, T. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents the braking control performance of a vehicle anti-lock brake system featuring an electrorheological (ER) fluid. As a first step, a cylindrical type of ER valve is devised and its pressure controllability is experimentally confirmed. Then, a hydraulic booster for amplifying the field-dependent pressure drop obtained from the ER valve is constructed and its pressure amplification is demonstrated by presenting the pressure tracking control performance. Subsequently, the governing equation of the rear wheel model is derived by considering the braking force distribution, and a sliding mode controller for achieving the desired slip rate is designed. The controller is then realized through the hardware-in-the-loop simulation method and controlled responses are presented in the time domain. In addition, computer animations for the braking performance under unladen and laden conditions are presented, and a comparison of the proportioning valve and the proposed ER valve pressure modulator is made.

  7. Shoe inserts and orthotics for sport and physical activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, B M; Nurse, M A; Stefanyshyn, D J

    1999-07-01

    The purposes of this paper were to discuss the perceived benefits of inserts and orthotics for sport activities and to propose a new concept for inserts and orthotics. There is evidence that inserts or orthotics reduce or prevent movement-related injuries. However, there is limited knowledge about the specific functioning an orthotic or insert provides. The same orthotic or insert is often proposed for different problems. Changes in skeletal movement due to inserts or orthotics seem to be small and not systematic. Based on the results of a study using bone pins, one may question the idea that a major function of orthotics or inserts consists in aligning the skeleton. Impact cushioning with shoe inserts or orthotics is typically below 10%. Such small reductions might not be important for injury reduction. It has been suggested that changes in material properties might produce adjustments in the muscular response of the locomotor system. The foot has various sensors to detect input signals with subject specific thresholds. Subjects with similar sensitivity threshold levels seem to respond in their movement pattern in a similar way. Comfort is an important variable. From a biomechanical point of view, comfort may be related to fit, additional stabilizing muscle work, fatigue, and damping of soft tissue vibrations. Based on the presented evidence, the concept of minimizing muscle work is proposed when using orthotics or inserts. A force signal acts as an input variable on the shoe. The shoe sole acts as a first filter, the insert or orthotic as a second filter, the plantar surface of the foot as a third filter for the force input signal. The filtered information is transferred to the central nervous system that provides a subject specific dynamic response. The subject performs the movement for the task at hand. For a given movement task, the skeleton has a preferred path. If an intervention supports/counteracts the preferred movement path, muscle activity can/must be

  8. Rocker shoes reduce Achilles tendon load in running and walking in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Postema, Klaas; Dekker, Rienk; Hijmans, Juha M

    2015-03-01

    Relative rest and pain relief play an important role in the management of Achilles tendinopathy, and might be achieved by reducing the load on the Achilles tendon. Previous studies have provided evidence that rocker shoes are able to decrease the ankle internal plantar flexion moment in healthy runners during walking and running. Since plantar flexion moment is related to the Achilles tendon loading, rocker shoes might be considered in the conservative management of Achilles tendinopathy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of running and walking in a group of patients with Achilles tendinopathy wearing standard shoes versus rocker shoes. Cross-over. Thirteen Achilles tendinopathy patients (mean age 48 ± 14.5 years) underwent three-dimensional gait analysis wearing standard running shoes and rocker shoes during running and walking. Surface electromyography of triceps surae and tibialis anterior was recorded simultaneously. Patients had symptoms for an average of 22.5 months (median 11.5 months) and VISA-A scores were 54 ± 16. With the rocker shoes, the peak plantar flexion moment was reduced by 13% in both running (0.28 N m/kg, pshoes in walking. There was no difference between electromyography peak amplitudes of triceps surae between two shoe sessions in both activities. When used by patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy, rocker shoes cause a significant reduction in plantar flexion moment in the late stance phase of running and walking without substantial adaptations in triceps surae muscular activity. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A COMPARISON OF GOLF SHOE DESIGNS HIGHLIGHTS GREATER GROUND REACTION FORCES WITH SHORTER IRONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Worsfold

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to reduce golf turf damage the traditional metal spike golf shoe has been redesigned, but shoe-ground biomechanical evaluations have utilised artificial grass surfaces. Twenty-four golfers wore three different golf shoe traction designs (traditional metal spikes, alternative spikes, and a flat-soled shoe with no additional traction when performing shots with a driver, 3 iron and 7 iron. Ground action forces were measured beneath the feet by two natural grass covered force platforms. The maximum vertical force recorded at the back foot with the 3 iron and 7 iron was 0.82 BW (body weight and at the front foot 1.1 BW approximately in both the metal spike and alternative spike golf shoe designs. When using the driver these maximal vertical values were 0.49 BW at the back foot and 0.84 BW at the front foot. Furthermore, as performance of the backswing and then downswing necessitates a change in movement direction the range of force generated during the complete swing was calculated. In the metal spike shoe the vertical force generated at the back foot with both irons was 0.67 BW and at the front foot 0.96 BW with the 3 iron and 0.92 BW with the 7 iron. The back foot vertical force generated with the driver was 0.33 BW and at the front foot 0.83 BW wearing the metal spike shoe. Results indicated the greater force generation with the irons. When using the driver the more horizontal swing plane associated with the longer club reduced vertical forces at the back and front foot. However, the mediolateral force generated across each foot in the metal and alternative spike shoes when using the driver was greater than when the irons were used. The coefficient of friction was 0. 62 at the back and front foot whichever shoe was worn or club used

  10. Does shoe heel design influence ground reaction forces and knee moments during maximum lunges in elite and intermediate badminton players?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Kai Lam

    Full Text Available Lunge is one frequently executed movement in badminton and involves a unique sagittal footstrike angle of more than 40 degrees at initial ground contact compared with other manoeuvres. This study examined if the shoe heel curvature design of a badminton shoe would influence shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments during lunge.Eleven elite and fifteen intermediate players performed five left-forward maximum lunge trials with Rounded Heel Shoe (RHS, Flattened Heel Shoe (FHS, and Standard Heel Shoes (SHS. Shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments were measured by using synchronized force platform and motion analysis system. A 2 (Group x 3 (Shoe ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to determine the effects of different shoes and different playing levels, as well as the interaction of two factors on all variables.Shoe effect indicated that players demonstrated lower maximum vertical loading rate in RHS than the other two shoes (P < 0.05. Group effect revealed that elite players exhibited larger footstrike angle, faster approaching speed, lower peak horizontal force and horizontal loading rates but higher vertical loading rates and larger peak knee flexion and extension moments (P < 0.05. Analysis of Interactions of Group x Shoe for maximum and mean vertical loading rates (P < 0.05 indicated that elite players exhibited lower left maximum and mean vertical loading rates in RHS compared to FHS (P < 0.01, while the intermediate group did not show any Shoe effect on vertical loading rates.These findings indicate that shoe heel curvature would play some role in altering ground reaction force impact during badminton lunge. The differences in impact loads and knee moments between elite and intermediate players may be useful in optimizing footwear design and training strategy to minimize the potential risks for impact related injuries in badminton.

  11. Torque Coordination Control during Braking Mode Switch for a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid vehicles usually have several braking systems, and braking mode switches are significant events during braking. It is difficult to coordinate torque fluctuations caused by mode switches because the dynamic characteristics of braking systems are different. In this study, a new type of plug-in hybrid vehicle is taken as the research object, and braking mode switches are divided into two types. The control strategy of type one is achieved by controlling the change rates of clutch hold-down and motor braking forces. The control strategy of type two is achieved by simultaneously changing the target braking torque during different mode switch stages and controlling the motor to participate in active coordination control. Finally, the torque coordination control strategy is modeled in MATLAB/Simulink, and the results show that the proposed control strategy has a good effect in reducing the braking torque fluctuation and vehicle shocks during braking mode switches.

  12. Development of nondestructive system for detecting the cracks in KTX brake disk using Rayleigh wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Ho Yong [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Yun Taek; Park, Jin Hyun; Song, Sung Jing; Kim, Hak Joon [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Sung Duck [Dept. of Physics, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Recently, KTX (Korean Train Express) train stoppage accidents were mainly caused by malfunctioning equipment, aging and cracking of railway vehicles, crack breakages of brake disks, and breakages of brake disks. Breakage of brake disk can cause large-scale casualties such as high-speed collision and concern about derailment by hitting lower axle and wheel. Therefore, in this study, a brake disk with solid and ventilation type, which is the brake disk of a KTX train was modeled, and a dynamometer system was constructed to operate the disk. A Rayleigh wave was used to inspect the surface of the brake disk. An ultrasonic inspection module was developed for the brake disk by using a local immersion method due to the difficulty involved in ultrasonic inspection using an existing immersion method. In addition, the surface defects of the brake disk were evaluated using a dynamometer mock-up system and an ultrasonic inspection module of the brake disk.

  13. The effect of shoe type on gait in forefoot strike runners during a 50-km run

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Kasmer

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: More runners adopted a more posterior initial contact area after the 50-km run in the traditional shoe type than in the minimalist shoe type. The runners who adopted a more posterior initial contact area were more closely associated with an increased median frequency of the medial gastrocnemius, which suggests there may be a change in motor unit recruitment pattern during long-distance, sustained velocity running. The increased peak pressures observed in the medial forefoot in the minimalist shoe type may predispose to metatarsal stress fractures in the setting of improper training.

  14. Effect of Finishing on Heat and Moisture Transfer Properties of Lining Leather for Shoes

    OpenAIRE

    角田, 由美子

    2016-01-01

      Leather lining for shoes was made from unfinished and pigment-finished glutaraldehyde-tanned leather and chrome-tanned leather prepared from pig skin. The effect of the different treatments on the heat and moisture transfer properties of the lining leather was investigated at 20℃ and 65% RH using an apparatus that simulates the microclimate of the shoes. The apparatus was developed by modeling the conditions expected during actual shoe wearing.  1. The water absorption, water vapour permeab...

  15. Influence of sports flooring and shoes on impact forces and performance during jump tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Malisoux

    Full Text Available We aim to determine the influence of sports floorings and sports shoes on impact mechanics and performance during standardised jump tasks. Twenty-one male volunteers performed ankle jumps (four consecutive maximal bounds with very dynamic ankle movements and multi-jumps (two consecutive maximal counter-movement jumps on force plates using minimalist and cushioned shoes under 5 sports flooring (SF conditions. The shock absorption properties of the SF, defined as the proportion of peak impact force absorbed by the tested flooring when compared with a concrete hard surface, were: SF0 = 0% (no flooring, SF1 = 19%, SF2 = 26%, SF3 = 37% and SF4 = 45%. Shoe and flooring effects were compared using 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni-corrected comparisons. A significant interaction between SF and shoe conditions was found for VILR only (p = 0.003. In minimalist shoes, SF influenced Vertical Instantaneous Loading Rate (VILR during ankle jumps (p = 0.006 and multi-jumps (p<0.001, in accordance with shock absorption properties. However, in cushioned shoes, SF influenced VILR during ankle jumps only (p<0.001. Contact Time was the only additional variable affected by SF, but only during multi-jumps in minimalist shoes (p = 0.037. Cushioned shoes induced lower VILR (p<0.001 and lower Contact Time (p≤0.002 during ankle jumps and multi-jumps compared to minimalist shoes. During ankle jumps, cushioned shoes induced greater Peak Vertical Ground Reaction Force (PVGRF, p = 0.002, greater Vertical Average Loading Rate (p<0.001, and lower eccentric (p = 0.008 and concentric (p = 0.004 work. During multi-jumps, PVGRF was lower (p<0.001 and jump height was higher (p<0.001 in cushioned compared to minimalist shoes. In conclusion, cushioning influenced impact forces during standardised jump tasks, whether it was provided by the shoes or the sports flooring. VILR is the variable that was the most affected.

  16. Evaluation of the accuracy of shoe fitting in older people using three-dimensional foot scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Menz, Hylton B; Auhl, Maria; Ristevski, Sonja; Frescos, Nicoletta; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2014-01-01

    Background Ill-fitting footwear is a common problem in older people. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of shoe fitting in older people by comparing the dimensions of allocated shoes to foot dimensions obtained with a three-dimensional (3D) scanner. Methods The shoe sizes of 56 older people were determined with the Brannock device®, and weightbearing foot scans were obtained with the FotoScan 3D scanner (Precision 3D Ltd, Weston-super-mare, UK). Participants were provid...

  17. Women's musculoskeletal foot conditions exacerbated by shoe wear: an imaging perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goud, Ajay; Khurana, Bharti; Chiodo, Christopher; Weissman, Barbara N

    2011-04-01

    The predominance of several musculoskeletal foot conditions in women are largely the result of biomechanical alterations caused by ill-fitting shoes. In particular, the altered biomechanics (associated with high-heeled shoes and shoes with a narrowed toe box) has been linked to the genesis of hallux valgus, hammer toe deformity, Haglund syndrome, metatarsal stress fracture, Freiberg infraction, and Morton neuroma. In reviewing the imaging findings of several of these conditions, we emphasize the role of radiographs, special radiographic views, and the utility of more costly studies, such as magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. The braking performance of a vehicle anti-lock brake system featuring an electro-rheological valve pressure modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Bok; Sung, Kum-Gil; Cho, Myung-Soo; Lee, Yang-Sub

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents the braking performances of a vehicle anti-lock brake system (ABS) featuring an electro-rheological (ER) valve pressure modulator. As a first step, the principal design parameters of the ER valve and hydraulic booster are appropriately determined by considering the Bingham property of the ER fluid and the braking pressure variation during the ABS operation. An ER fluid composed of chemically treated starch particles and silicone oil is used. An electrically controllable pressure modulator is then constructed and its pressure controllability is empirically evaluated. Subsequently, a quarter-car wheel slip model is established and integrated with the governing equation of the pressure modulator. A sliding mode controller for slip rate control is designed and implemented via the hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS). In order to demonstrate the superior braking performance of the proposed ABS, a full car model is derived and a sliding mode controller is formulated to achieve the desired yaw rate. The braking performances in terms of braking distance and step input steering are evaluated and presented in time domain through full car simulations.

  19. Characterization of ground SBR scraps from shoe industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinês Massarotto

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Expanded poly(butadiene-co-styrene (SBR, a residue of the shoe industry of Rio Grande do Sul, is a crosslinked material. For further utilization in recycling and reclaiming processes this residue was ground under ambient conditions. The obtained powder (SBR-r was physically, thermally and chemically characterized and the results were analyzed as for its suitability for reuse methods. This characterization provides a better understanding of the SBR residue components, which may lead to economic and environmental advantages. The SBR-r (3548 mesh is composed by 22.2% of SBR and 77.8% of filler. The elastomeric fraction has 71.4% of crosslinked material. The results demonstrate that SBR can be recycled for use in microcellular composites.

  20. Low Power Shoe Integrated Intelligent Wireless Gait Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.; Bakar, N. A.; Anuar, A. F.; Zainol, M. Z.; Hamzah, F.

    2014-04-01

    Gait analysis measurement is a method to assess and identify gait events and the measurements of dynamic, motion and pressure parameters involving the lowest part of the body. This significant analysis is widely used in sports, rehabilitation as well as other health diagnostic towards improving the quality of life. This paper presents a new system empowered by Inertia Measurement Unit (IMU), ultrasonic sensors, piezoceramic sensors array, XBee wireless modules and Arduino processing unit. This research focuses on the design and development of a low power ultra-portable shoe integrated wireless intelligent gait measurement using MEMS and recent microelectronic devices for foot clearance, orientation, error correction, gait events and pressure measurement system. It is developed to be cheap, low power, wireless, real time and suitable for real life in-door and out-door environment.

  1. Intelligently Controllable Walker with Magnetorheological Fluid Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takehito; Tanida, Sosuke; Tanaka, Toshimasa; Kobayashi, Keigo; Mitobe, Kazuhisa

    Caster walkers are supporting frames with casters and wheels. These tools are regularly utilized as life support tools or walking rehabilitation tools in hospitals, nursing homes and individual residences. Users of the walkers can easily move it thanks to its wheels and casters. However falling accidents often happen when it moves without users. The falling accident is very serious problem and one of leading causes of secondary injuries. In the other case, it is hard to move to desired directions if users have imbalance in their motor functions or sensory functions, e.g., hemiplegic patients. To improve safeness and operability of the walkers, we installed compact MR fluid brakes on the wheels and controlled walking speed and direction of the walker. We named this intelligently controllable walker, “i-Walker” and discussed on the control methods and experimental results in this paper. Preliminary trials for direction control of the first-generation of the i-Walker (i-Walker1) are presented. On the basis of the results, we improved the control method and hardware of the i-Walker1, and developed the second-generation (i-Walker2). System description and experimental results of the i-Walker2 are also described. The i-Walker2 has better operability and lower energy consumption than that of the i-Walker1. The line-tracing controller of the i-Walker2 well controls human motions during walking experiments on the target straight line.

  2. An integrated control strategy for the composite braking system of an electric vehicle with independently driven axles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fengchun; Liu, Wei; He, Hongwen; Guo, Hongqiang

    2016-08-01

    For an electric vehicle with independently driven axles, an integrated braking control strategy was proposed to coordinate the regenerative braking and the hydraulic braking. The integrated strategy includes three modes, namely the hybrid composite mode, the parallel composite mode and the pure hydraulic mode. For the hybrid composite mode and the parallel composite mode, the coefficients of distributing the braking force between the hydraulic braking and the two motors' regenerative braking were optimised offline, and the response surfaces related to the driving state parameters were established. Meanwhile, the six-sigma method was applied to deal with the uncertainty problems for reliability. Additionally, the pure hydraulic mode is activated to ensure the braking safety and stability when the predictive failure of the response surfaces occurs. Experimental results under given braking conditions showed that the braking requirements could be well met with high braking stability and energy regeneration rate, and the reliability of the braking strategy was guaranteed on general braking conditions.

  3. Antropometric parameters problem solving of shoe lasts by deforming membranes with medium weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, A. V.; Anghel Drugarin, C. V.; Barla, E. M.; Porav, V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents research results into getting a virtual model of shoe last and anthropometric parameters change. The most important change occurs in the fingers region. Alternatives CAD-CAM technology for next generation is based on DELCAM software for the CAM procedure and simulation of MATLAB software. This research has led to the virtual changes of the last, anthropometric parameter - the width of the fingers (ld) and shoe last length - (Lp) and images have been achieved with the representation in section of the shoe last changed from the original shoe lasts by FEM method (Finite element method) in MATLAB environment. The results are applied in the textile industry and in the elaboration of linings consumption or in the development of leather substitutes on fabric, knitted or woven material type.

  4. Use of orthopedic shoes in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, Michiel J.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Karin; Stewart, Roy E.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.

    Objectives: To study the actual use of orthopedic shoes by patients with degenerative foot disorders and to identify factors associated with use and nonuse, based on the parameters of the International Organization for Standardization definition of usability: effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction,

  5. The effects of high custom made shoes on gait characteristics and patient satisfaction in hemiplegic gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckhardt, Martine M.; Mulder, Mascha C. Borgerhoff; Horemans, Herwin L.; van der Woude, Luc H.; Ribbers, Gerard M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of a temporary high custom made orthopaedic shoe on functional mobility, walking speed, and gait characteristics in hemiplegic stroke patients. In addition, interference of attentional demands and patient satisfaction were studied. Design: Clinical experimental

  6. The effects of high custom made shoes on gait characteristics and patient satisfaction in hemiplegic gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckhardt, Martine M; Mulder, Mascha C Borgerhoff; Horemans, Herwin L; van der Woude, Lucas; Ribbers, Gerard M

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a temporary high custom made orthopaedic shoe on functional mobility, walking speed, and gait characteristics in hemiplegic stroke patients. In addition, interference of attentional demands and patient satisfaction were studied. DESIGN: Clinical experimental

  7. Injuries and Footwear (Part 1): Athletic Shoe History and Injuries in Relation to Foot Arch Height and Training in Boots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Pope, Rodney; Orr, Robin; Grier, Tyson

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the history of the athletic shoe, examines whether selecting running shoes based on foot arch height influences injuries, and examines historical data on injury rates when physical training (PT) is performed in boots versus running shoes. In the 1980s and into the 2000s, running shoe companies were advertising specialized shoes with "motion control," "stability," and "cushioning," designed for individuals with low, normal, and high arches, respectively. Despite marketing claims that these shoes would reduce injury rates, coordinated studies in Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps basic training showed that assigning or selecting shoes on this basis had no effect on injury rates. Consistent with this finding, biomechanical studies have shown that the relationships between arch height, foot joint mobility, and rear-foot motion are complex, variable, and frequently not as strong as often assumed. In 1982, the US Army switched from PT in boots to PT in running shoes because of the belief that boots were causing injuries and that running shoes would reduce injury rates. However, a historical comparison of injury rates before and after the switch to running shoes showed virtually no difference in injury risk between the two periods. It is not clear at this point if the type of footwear effects injury incidence. 2015.

  8. The Changes of COP and Foot Pressure after One Hour's Walking Wearing High-heeled and Flat Shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Dong Yeol; Lee, Han Suk

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the most appropriate height for shoe heels by measuring the displacement of the COP (center of pressure) and changes in the distribution of foot pressure after walking in flat (0.5 cm), middle-heeled (4 cm), and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for 1 hour. [Methods] A single-subject design was used, with 15 healthy women wearing shoes with heels of each height in a random order. The foot pressure and displacement of COP before and after walking in an ordinary environment for 1 hour were measured using an FDM-S (zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). [Results] The distribution of foot pressure did not change significantly after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but did change significantly after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. Similarly, the COP was not significantly displaced after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but was significantly displaced after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. [Conclusion] Both flat and high-heeled shoes had adverse effects on the body. Middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes are preferable to both flat (0.5 cm) and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for the health and comfort of the feet.

  9. Optimal design of an automotive magnetorheological brake considering geometric dimensions and zero-field friction heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents an optimal design of a magnetorheological (MR) brake for a middle-sized passenger car which can replace a conventional hydraulic disc-type brake. In the optimization, the required braking torque, the temperature due to zero-field friction of MR fluid, the mass of the brake system and all significant geometric dimensions are considered. After describing the configuration, the braking torque of the proposed MR brake is derived on the basis of the field-dependent Bingham and Herschel-Bulkley rheological model of the MR fluid. The optimal design of the MR brake is then analyzed taking into account available space, mass, braking torque and steady heat generated by zero-field friction torque of the MR brake. The optimization procedure based on the finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is proposed to obtain optimal geometric dimensions of the MR brake. Based on the proposed procedure, optimal solutions of single and multiple disc-type MR brakes featuring different types of MR fluid are achieved. From the results, the most effective MR brake for the middle-sized passenger car is identified and some discussions on the performance improvement of the optimized MR brake are described.

  10. Injury Reduction Effectiveness of Prescribing Running Shoes Based on Foot Shape in Basic Combat Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Karim A, Pandit H, Murray J, Wandless F, and Thomas NP (2006). Smoking and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament Journal of Bone and Joint...a physical therapy clinic before and after the shoe program was initiated. The current study controlled for known injury risk factors. In the past...retrospective examination of medical visits to a physical therapy clinic before and after the shoe program was initiated. A number of temporal factors

  11. Effect of soil adhesion on tractive performance of single grouser shoe

    OpenAIRE

    葛, 俊

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the semi-empirical method was adopted for conducting the prediction of vehicle performance. The main parts of this study are similar to the bevameter technique. It is consists of two major parts: direct shearing test and penetration test. Furthermore, in order to predict the vehicle performance, three aspects must be known: the single grouser shoe model including the dimensions and the acted pressure; the shearing model (or the failure type of the soil beneath the grouser shoe)...

  12. On the interaction between structure and oil film of a guide shoe bearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vølund, Anders

    2001-01-01

    A solution procedure for the determination of the oil film thickness of a guide shoe bearing for a large two stroke marine diesel engine is presented. Based on a previous study considering oil film thickness of a guide shoe bearing with rigid structural parts a model for the interaction between...... of the structure is a 3D finite element model and the oil film description is made using a 2D finite difference mesh....

  13. Muscle-Activation Onset Times With Shoes and Foot Orthoses in Participants With Chronic Ankle Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingenen, Bart; Peeraer, Louis; Deschamps, Kevin; Fieuws, Steffen; Janssens, Luc; Staes, Filip

    2015-07-01

    Participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI) use an altered neuromuscular strategy to shift weight from double-legged to single-legged stance. Shoes and foot orthoses may influence these muscle-activation patterns. To evaluate the influence of shoes and foot orthoses on onset times of lower extremity muscle activity in participants with CAI during the transition from double-legged to single-legged stance. Cross-sectional study. Musculoskeletal laboratory. A total of 15 people (9 men, 6 women; age = 21.8 ± 3.0 years, height = 177.7 ± 9.6 cm, mass = 72.0 ± 14.6 kg) who had CAI and wore foot orthoses were recruited. A transition task from double-legged to single-legged stance was performed with eyes open and with eyes closed. Both limbs were tested in 4 experimental conditions: (1) barefoot (BF), (2) shoes only, (3) shoes with standard foot orthoses, and (4) shoes with custom foot orthoses (SCFO). The onset of activity of 9 lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography and a single force plate. Based on a full-factorial (condition, region, limb, vision) linear model for repeated measures, we found a condition effect (F(3,91.8) = 9.39, P shoes-only (P = .02) and shoes-with-standard-foot-orthoses (P = .03) conditions than in the BF condition. No differences were observed for the hip muscles. Earlier onset of muscle activity was most apparent in the SCFO condition for ankle and knee muscles but not for hip muscles during the transition from double-legged to single-legged stance. These findings might help clinicians understand how shoes and foot orthoses can influence neuromuscular control in participants with CAI.

  14. The influence of motion control shoes on the running gait of mature and young females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Kim; Stiles, Vicky; Dixon, Sharon

    2013-03-01

    This study compared the running gait of mature and young females, and investigated the effect of a motion control shoe. First, it was hypothesised that in a neutral shoe, mature females would display significantly greater rearfoot eversion, knee internal rotation and external adductor moments when compared to a younger group. Secondly, the motion control shoe would reduce rearfoot eversion and knee internal rotation in both groups. Thirdly it was hypothesised that the motion control shoe would increase knee external adductor moment, through an increase in knee varus and moment arm. 15 mature (40-60 years) and 15 young (18-25 years) females performed 10 running trials at 3.5ms(-1)±5% over a force platform. Two shoes were tested, the Adidas Supernova Glide (neutral), and the Adidas Supernova Sequence (motion control). Ankle and knee joint dynamics were analysed for the right leg, and the mean of ten trials was calculated. Joint moments were calculated using inverse dynamics. In the neutral condition, mature females presented greater peak rearfoot eversion, knee internal rotation, and external adductor moments than young females (p<0.05). A motion control shoe significantly reduced peak rearfoot eversion and knee internal rotation among both groups (p<0.05). No between shoe differences in knee external adductor moment were observed. A motion control shoe is recommended to reduce risk of injury associated with rearfoot eversion and knee internal rotation in mature females. However since the knee external adductor moment is a variable commonly associated with medial knee loading it is suggested that alternative design features are required to influence this moment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution between three different shoes and three common movements in futsal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymouri, Meghdad; Halabchi, Farzin; Mirshahi, Maryam; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Mousavi Ahranjani, Ali; Sadeghi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of in-shoe pressure distribution during sport-specific movements may provide a clue to improve shoe design and prevent injuries. This study compared the mean and the peak pressures over the whole foot and ten separate areas of the foot, wearing different shoes during specific movements. Nine male adult recreational futsal players performed three trials of three sport-specific movements (shuffle, sprint and penalty kick), while they were wearing three brands of futsal shoes (Adidas, Lotto and Tiger). Plantar pressures on dominant feet were collected using the F-SCAN system. Peak and mean pressures for whole foot and each separate area were extracted. For statistical analysis, the mean differences in outcome variables between different shoes and movements were estimated using random-effects regression model using STATA ver.10. In the average calculation of the three movements, the peak pressure on the whole foot in Adidas shoe was less than Lotto [8.8% (CI95%: 4.1-13.6%)] and Tiger shoes [11.8% (CI95%:7-16.7%)], (P<0.001). Also, the recorded peak pressure on the whole foot in penalty kick was 61.1% (CI95%: 56.3-65.9%) and 57.6% (CI95%: 52.8-62.3%) less than Shuffle and Sprint tests, respectively (P<0.001). Areas with the highest peak pressure during all 3 movements were not different between all shoes. This area was medial forefoot in cases of shuffle and sprint movements and medial heel in case of penalty kick.

  16. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution between three different shoes and three common movements in futsal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghdad Teymouri

    Full Text Available Analysis of in-shoe pressure distribution during sport-specific movements may provide a clue to improve shoe design and prevent injuries. This study compared the mean and the peak pressures over the whole foot and ten separate areas of the foot, wearing different shoes during specific movements.Nine male adult recreational futsal players performed three trials of three sport-specific movements (shuffle, sprint and penalty kick, while they were wearing three brands of futsal shoes (Adidas, Lotto and Tiger. Plantar pressures on dominant feet were collected using the F-SCAN system. Peak and mean pressures for whole foot and each separate area were extracted. For statistical analysis, the mean differences in outcome variables between different shoes and movements were estimated using random-effects regression model using STATA ver.10.In the average calculation of the three movements, the peak pressure on the whole foot in Adidas shoe was less than Lotto [8.8% (CI95%: 4.1-13.6%] and Tiger shoes [11.8% (CI95%:7-16.7%], (P<0.001. Also, the recorded peak pressure on the whole foot in penalty kick was 61.1% (CI95%: 56.3-65.9% and 57.6% (CI95%: 52.8-62.3% less than Shuffle and Sprint tests, respectively (P<0.001.Areas with the highest peak pressure during all 3 movements were not different between all shoes. This area was medial forefoot in cases of shuffle and sprint movements and medial heel in case of penalty kick.

  17. The Relationship of Foot Shape and Sensitivity to Comfort of Shoe-Inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-30

    E., and Juntunen, J.: Effect of unilateral sensory impairment of the sole of the foot on potural control in man: hnplications for the role of...failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 JUL 1998 2. REPORT TYPE...constructed shoe insert can provide not only shock attenuation, but also appropriate arch support, better fit of the shoe and better control of

  18. A farewell to brake reaction times? Kinematics-dependent brake response in naturalistic rear-end emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markkula, Gustav; Engström, Johan; Lodin, Johan; Bärgman, Jonas; Victor, Trent

    2016-10-01

    Driver braking behavior was analyzed using time-series recordings from naturalistic rear-end conflicts (116 crashes and 241 near-crashes), including events with and without visual distraction among drivers of cars, heavy trucks, and buses. A simple piecewise linear model could be successfully fitted, per event, to the observed driver decelerations, allowing a detailed elucidation of when drivers initiated braking and how they controlled it. Most notably, it was found that, across vehicle types, driver braking behavior was strongly dependent on the urgency of the given rear-end scenario's kinematics, quantified in terms of visual looming of the lead vehicle on the driver's retina. In contrast with previous suggestions of brake reaction times (BRTs) of 1.5s or more after onset of an unexpected hazard (e.g., brake light onset), it was found here that braking could be described as typically starting less than a second after the kinematic urgency reached certain threshold levels, with even faster reactions at higher urgencies. The rate at which drivers then increased their deceleration (towards a maximum) was also highly dependent on urgency. Probability distributions are provided that quantitatively capture these various patterns of kinematics-dependent behavioral response. Possible underlying mechanisms are suggested, including looming response thresholds and neural evidence accumulation. These accounts argue that a naturalistic braking response should not be thought of as a slow reaction to some single, researcher-defined "hazard onset", but instead as a relatively fast response to the visual looming cues that build up later on in the evolving traffic scenario. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Research on anti crack mechanism of bionic coupling brake disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lifeng; Yang, Xiao; Zheng, Lingnan; Wu, Can; Ni, Jing

    2017-09-01

    According to the biological function of fatigue resistance possessed by biology, this study designed a Bionic Coupling Brake Disc (BCBD) which can inhibit crack propagation as the result of improving fatigue property. Thermal stress field of brake disc was calculated under emergency working condition, and circumferential and radial stress field which lead to fatigue failure of brake disc were investigated simultaneously. Results showed that the maximum temperature of surface reached 890°C and the maximum residual tensile stress was 207 Mpa when the initial velocity of vehicle was 200 km/h. Based on the theory of elastic plastic fracture mechanics, the crack opening displacement and the crack front J integrals of the BCBD and traditional brake disc (TBD) with pre-cracking were calculated, and the strength of crack front was compared. Results revealed the growth behavior of fatigue crack located on surface of brake disc, and proved the anti fatigue resistance of BCBD was better, and the strength of crack resistance of BCBD was much stronger than that of TBD. This simulation research provided significant references for optimization and manufacturing of BCBD.

  20. Research on HILS Technology Applied on Aircraft Electric Braking System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suying Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of analyzing the real-time feature of hardware-in-the-loop simulation of aircraft braking system, a new simulation method based on MATLAB/RTW (Real-Time Workshop and DSP is introduced. The purpose of this research is to develop a digital control unit with antilock brake system control algorithm for aircraft braking system using HILS. DSP is used as simulator. Using this method, a detailed mathematical modeling of system is proposed first. Studies on reducing sampling time with model simplification and modeling for applying to I/O interface of DSP and HILS are conducted. Compared with other methods, this method is low cost and convenient to implement. By using these methods, we can complete HIL simulation of aircraft braking under various experimental conditions, modify its control laws, and test its braking performance. The results have demonstrated that this platform has high reliability. The algorithm is verified by real-time closed loop test with HILS system and the results are presented.

  1. Charging valve of the full hydraulic braking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinshi Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the full hydraulic braking system has excellent braking performance. As the key component of the full hydraulic braking system, the parameters of the accumulator charging valve have a significant effect on the braking performance. In this article, the key parameters of the charging valve are analyzed through the static theoretical and an Advanced Modeling Environment for performing Simulation of engineering systems (AMESim simulation model of the dual-circuit accumulator charging valve is established based on the real structure parameters first. Second, according to the results of the dynamic simulation, the dynamic characteristics of the charging pressure, the flow rate, and the frequency of the charging valve are studied. The key parameters affecting the serial production are proposed and some technical advices for improving the performance of the full hydraulic system are provided. Finally, the theoretical analysis is validated by the simulation results. The comparison between the simulation results and the experimental results indicates that the simulated AMESim model of the charging valve is accurate and credible with the error rate inside 0.5% compared with the experimental result. Hence, the performance of the charging valve meets the request of the full hydraulic braking system exactly.

  2. Simulation and Robust Contol of Antilock Braking System ABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jordan DELICHRISTOV

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with simulation and robust control of Antilock Braking System ABS. The briefly are described the main parts of ABS hydraulic system and control algorithm of ABS. Hydraulic system described here is BOSCH ABS 5.x series. The goal of ABS system is vehicle stability and vehicle steering response when braking. If during the braking occurred slip at one or more wheels from any reason, ABS evaluates this by “brake slip” controller. At this moment ABS is trying to use maximal limits of adhesion between tire and road. It means that is necessary control the differences between braking torque and friction torque , which reacts to the wheel via friction reaction tire-road surface. This is realized through the solenoid valves, which are controls (triggered by on the base of PID controller described further in chapter 4. Presented concept is more or less standard for most of the existing ABS systems. The issue should be applied concept of robust ABS control algorithm, which is specific for every type of ABS.

  3. The contribution of stereo vision to the control of braking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijtgat, Pieter; Mazyn, Liesbeth; De Laey, Christophe; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2008-03-01

    In this study the contribution of stereo vision to the control of braking in front of a stationary target vehicle was investigated. Participants with normal (StereoN) and weak (StereoW) stereo vision drove a go-cart along a linear track towards a stationary vehicle. They could start braking from a distance of 4, 7, or 10m from the vehicle. Deceleration patterns were measured by means of a laser. A lack of stereo vision was associated with an earlier onset of braking, but the duration of the braking manoeuvre was similar. During the deceleration, the time of peak deceleration occurred earlier in drivers with weak stereo vision. Stopping distance was greater in those lacking in stereo vision. A lack of stereo vision was associated with a more prudent brake behaviour, in which the driver took into account a larger safety margin. This compensation might be caused either by an unconscious adaptation of the human perceptuo-motor system, or by a systematic underestimation of distance remaining due to the lack of stereo vision. In general, a lack of stereo vision did not seem to increase the risk of rear-end collisions.

  4. Effect of a five-toed minimal protection shoe on static and dynamic ankle position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squadrone, R; Gallozzi, C

    2011-09-01

    The main aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the VibramFivefingers model, with its minimal structure, cushioning and finger separation, allows a more accurate estimate of static and dynamic foot position compared to wearing a standard cushioned running shoe. Static ankle joint position sense was assessed in the sagittal and frontal plane by asking fourteen healthy experienced amateur runners to estimate the perceived direction and amplitude of a support slope surface board placed under their right foot while standing. The dynamic measures were performed with the subjects running on a treadmill at 12 km/h and asking them to evaluate the treadmill surface slope. Two footwear (Fivefingers and a cushioned protective running shoe) and the barefoot condition were compared. Plantarflexion, dorsiflexion, eversion and inversion movements were underestimated in all the experimental conditions. In the static trials there was significantly more angle error underestimation (P<0.05) with the running shoe, while no significant differences were found between Fivefingers and barefoot condition. While running, the treadmill surface slope was significantly better estimated with Fivefingers than in the other two conditions (P<0.05). The data support the assumption that with Fivefingers is more likely to get a more correct estimation of the surface slope while standing and running compared to using a standard cushioned running shoe. The finding that the cushioned shoes significantly impair foot position awareness compared to less structured shoes is consistent with the results of some previous studies on healthy and unhealthy subjects.

  5. Effects of a minimalist shoe on running economy and 5-km running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Joel T; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if minimalist shoes improve time trial performance of trained distance runners and if changes in running economy, shoe mass, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were related to any difference in performance. Twenty-six trained runners performed three 6-min sub-maximal treadmill runs at 11, 13 and 15 km·h(-1) in minimalist and conventional shoes while running economy, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were assessed. They then performed a 5-km time trial. In the minimalist shoe, runners completed the trial in less time (effect size 0.20 ± 0.12), were more economical during sub-maximal running (effect size 0.33 ± 0.14) and decreased stride length (effect size 0.22 ± 0.10) and increased stride rate (effect size 0.22 ± 0.11). All but one runner ran with a rearfoot footfall in the minimalist shoe. Improvements in time trial performance were associated with improvements in running economy at 15 km·h(-1) (r = 0.58), with 79% of the improved economy accounted for by reduced shoe mass (P economy and 5-km running performance.

  6. The effect of field condition and shoe type on lower extremity injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovelli, Jaclyn Nicole; Yang, Jingzhen; Thomas, Geb; Wu, Hongqian; Schiltz, Trisha; Foster, Danny T

    2013-08-01

    Considerable improvement has been made in football field surfaces and types of shoe, yet relatively few epidemiological studies have investigated their roles in the risk of football injuries. This study examined the effects of field surface, surface condition and shoe type on the likelihood of lower extremity football injuries. Deidentified data from 188 players from one division I university football team during the 2007-2010 seasons were analysed. Lower extremity injury rate and rate ratio, along with 95% confidence limits, were calculated by football activity, playing surface condition and shoe type. A total of 130 lower extremity injuries were sustained, with an overall lower extremity injury rate of 33.5/10 000 athlete-sessions. The lower extremity injury rate was 2.61 times higher when the surface condition was abnormal compared with when the surface condition was normal. During games, the risk for lower extremity injury was 3.34 times higher (95% CI 1.70 to 6.56) on artificial turf compared with natural grass. However, this trend was not statistically significant in practice sessions. Furthermore, neither the number of shoe cleats nor the height of the shoe top was statistically associated with risk of lower extremity injuries. Football players who played on artificial turf or when the surface condition was abnormal were susceptible to lower extremity injuries. Evidence from this study suggests that further research into playing surfaces and shoe types may provide fruitful opportunities to reduce injuries to collegiate football players.

  7. A case of contact dermatitis to dimethylfumarate in shoes identified in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Davanzo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes a case of shoe contact dermatitis from DMF identified by the Poison Control Centre of Milan (PCCM, Italy, in 2009. A 35 year old woman was affected by irritant reactions while wearing shoes contaminated with DMF. Exposure to these shoes was limited to a 8 hour period and was not repeated. In the following days the patient suffered feet blistering and swelling limited to the area in contact with shoe vamp. Topical application of cortisone did not prevent development of bullous eczema. After 20 days from exposure, the lesions were healed but the skin remained red, dry and very sensitive. Chemical analyses of shoes quantified an average concentration of DMF of 383 mg/kg. The patient refused to be patch tested. The observation here reported confirm that DMF should be considered a possible causal agent in shoe contact dermatitis. Documentation of cases exposed to this chemical provide a relevant support to characterize clinical manifestations and to identifying contaminated articles.

  8. Contact dermatitis caused by a new rubber compound detected in canvas shoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulstaert, Eva; Bergendorff, Ola; Persson, Christina; Goossens, An; Gilissen, Liesbeth; Engfeldt, Malin; Bruze, Magnus; Schuttelaar, Marie L; Meijer, Joost M; Lapeere, Hilde

    2017-10-17

    In 2015 and 2016, female patients in Flanders consulted a dermatologist because they developed skin lesions after wearing a specific brand of canvas shoes. To identify the culprit allergen in the shoes. Eighteen young females aged 14-22 years presented with itching and erythematous to purple-coloured eczematous lesions on both feet. They were patch tested by 10 dermatologists with the European baseline series. Some patients underwent testing with additional series. Pieces of the shoe fabrics were tested in 11 of 18 patients. Chemical analysis of the shoe materials was performed. Finally, patients were tested with a thin-layer chromatogram of the shoe extracts and dilutions of the suspected rubber compound. All 18 patients showed positive reactions to thiuram mix. Ten of 11 patients reacted to a piece of shoe fabric. Chemical analysis showed the presence of dimethylthiocarbamylbenzothiazole sulfide (DMTBS). No thiurams were detected. Four patients tested with the chromatogram developed positive reactions to DMTBS. Positive reactions to low concentrations were observed in the 4 patients tested with a DMTBS dilution series; one patient reacted to 0.00001% in acetone. DMTBS, the culprit allergen, is a component formed during rubber vulcanization that probably cross-reacts with the thiuram mix. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. In-shoe center of pressure: indirect force plate vs. direct insole measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbi, Eytan M; Wolf, Alon; Goryachev, Yulia; Yizhar, Ziva; Luger, Elhanan; Debi, Ronen; Haim, Amir

    2012-12-01

    In-shoe center of pressure (COP) measurement is essential in biomechanics. COP can be measured directly utilizing pressure-sensitive insoles, or calculated indirectly via force plate-generated data. While the latter does not require the use of additional measurement hardware (shoe insoles), its precision at calculating in-shoe COP has not been determined. Our purpose was to ascertain the precision of force plate in-shoe COP calculations and enhance their accuracy through a mathematical algorithm. Twelve male students participated in the study. In-shoe COP was measured synchronously via the Pedar-X insole system and AMTI force plates, comparing the measurements of both systems. A mathematical algorithm was created to improve agreement between the systems and comparisons were recalculated. The two methods showed different measurements of in-shoe COP. The medio-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) Pearson correlation coefficients between systems were 0.44 ± 0.35 and 0.99 ± 0.01, and the ML and AP RMS errors were 6.3 ± 3.0 mm and 43.0 ± 12.5 mm, respectively. Using a mathematical algorithm, the differences between the measurements of each system could be reduced significantly (all Pplates give an approximate location of the COP. Using an adjustment model greatly improves the accuracy of the COP trajectory during stance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomechanics of postoperative shoes: plantar pressure distribution, wearing characteristics and design criteria: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Reinhard; Trnka, Hans-Joerg; Sabo, Anton; Reichel, Martin; Kristen, Karl-Heinz

    2011-02-01

    Modern concepts in the postoperative treatment of first metatarsal osteotomies include special shoes that should decrease stress in the forefoot region. The purpose of this study was to determine plantar pressure distribution, wearing characteristics and stress-reducing effectiveness of five different types of commonly used postoperative shoes. Additionally, we wanted to modify the shoe that revealed the most favourable results in a way that improves forefoot relief as well as provides comfort to the patients. Eight persons consented to participate in the study. Plantar pressure distribution in five different types of postoperative shoes (Rathgeber(®) normal, Rathgeber(®) modified, 4. Darco(®) flat, Darco(®) VFE, Wocker(®)) was assessed using Mediologic(®) insoles. Also, subjective criteria considering wearing comfort, stability and rolling characteristics were evaluated. Based on the postoperative shoe revealing the most favourable results, further prototypes were developed. Each new model was targeted to meet the given requirements, minimal forefoot pressure, in a different way. The Rathgeber(®) modified model revealed the most favourable results concerning plantar pressure distribution as well as subjective wearing characteristics. Therefore, it was chosen for further modifications. After adding an extra layer of high elastic and springy material for shock absorption at the hallux region, forefoot relief and wearing characteristics showed improved results. The results of the present study indicate that damping material in the hallux region of postoperative shoes minimises stress in this region and improves patient's comfort.

  11. Improvement of Response and Efficiency of Railway Air Brake System by Modifying Software for Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NAKAZAWA, Shin-ichi; HIJIKATA, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Air brake systems are essential for the safety operation of railway vehicles. However, a certain amount of time is required to distribute compressed air through the pipe so that the brake cylinders fill...

  12. Fuzzy logic electric vehicle regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikanek, Susan R.

    1994-01-01

    An regenerative antiskid braking and traction control system using fuzzy logic for an electric or hybrid vehicle having a regenerative braking system operatively connected to an electric traction motor, and a separate hydraulic braking system includes sensors for monitoring present vehicle parameters and a processor, responsive to the sensors, for calculating vehicle parameters defining the vehicle behavior not directly measurable by the sensor and determining if regenerative antiskid braking control, requiring hydraulic braking control, and requiring traction control are required. The processor then employs fuzzy logic based on the determined vehicle state and provides command signals to a motor controller to control operation of the electric traction motor and to the brake controller to control fluid pressure applied at each vehicle wheel to provide the appropriate regenerative braking control, hydraulic braking control, and traction control.

  13. Performance of Linear Motor Type Rail Brake Using Roller Rig Test Bench

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SAKAMOTO, Yasuaki; KASHIWAGI, Takayuki; HASEGAWA, Hitoshi; SASAKAWA, Takashi; KARINO, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    .... It is necessary however to install this brake between front and rear wheels of the bogie. A prototype rail brake system was designed and built and its electromagnetic characteristics were examined on a test bench with a roller rig...

  14. Development of a Cooperative Braking System for Front-Wheel Drive Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Most electric vehicles adopt cooperative braking systems that can blend friction braking torque with regenerative braking torque to achieve higher energy efficiency while maintaining a certain braking performance and driving safety. This paper presented a new cooperative regenerative braking system that contained a fully-decoupled hydraulic braking mechanism based on a modified electric stability control system. The pressure control algorithm and brake force distribution strategy were also discussed. Dynamic models of a front wheel drive electric car equipped with this system and a simulation platform with a driver model and driving cycles were established. Tests to evaluate the braking performance and energy regeneration were simulated and analyzed on this platform and the simulation results showed the feasibility and effectiveness of this system.

  15. Research on motor braking-based DYC strategy for distributed electric vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingming; Liao, Weijie; Chen, Lei; Cui, Shumei

    2017-08-01

    In order to bring into full play the advantages of motor braking and enhance the handling stability of distributed electric vehicle, a motor braking-based direct yaw moment control (DYC) strategy was proposed. This strategy could identify whether a vehicle has under-steered or overs-steered, to calculate the direct yaw moment required for vehicle steering correction by taking the corrected yaw velocity deviation and slip-angle deviation as control variables, and exert motor braking moment on the target wheels to perform correction in the manner of differential braking. For validation of the results, a combined simulation platform was set up finally to simulate the motor braking control strategy proposed. As shown by the results, the motor braking-based DYC strategy timely adjusted the motor braking moment and hydraulic braking moment on the target wheels, and corrected the steering deviation and sideslip of the vehicle in unstable state, improving the handling stability.

  16. Stability Control of Vehicle Emergency Braking with Tire Blowout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the stability control and slowing down the vehicle to a safe speed after tire failure, an emergency automatic braking system with independent intellectual property is developed. After the system has received a signal of tire blowout, the automatic braking mode of the vehicle is determined according to the position of the failure tire and the motion state of vehicle, and a control strategy for resisting tire blowout additional yaw torque and deceleration is designed to slow down vehicle to a safe speed in an expected trajectory. The simulating test system is also designed, and the testing results show that the vehicle can be quickly stabilized and kept in the original track after tire blowout with the emergency braking system described in the paper.

  17. Contact Thermal Analysis and Wear Simulation of a Brake Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nándor Békési

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes an experimental test and a coupled contact-thermal-wear analysis of a railway wheel/brake block system through the braking process. During the test, the friction, the generated heat, and the wear were evaluated. It was found that the contact between the brake block and the wheel occurs in relatively small and slowly moving hot spots, caused by the wear and the thermal effects. A coupled simulation method was developed including numerical frictional contact, transient thermal and incremental wear calculations. In the 3D simulation, the effects of the friction, the thermal expansion, the wear, and the temperature-dependent material properties were also considered. A good agreement was found between the results of the test and the calculations, both for the thermal and wear results. The proposed method is suitable for modelling the slowly oscillating wear caused by the thermal expansions in the contact area.

  18. Double pulsed holography used to investigate noisy brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldhouse, J. D.; Newcomb, T. P.

    1996-12-01

    The vibrational characteristics of a noisy passenger car disc brake have been studied using the double pulsed holographic technique which has been developed to allow three orthogonal visual images of a vibrating brake system to be recorded simultaneously. These images show the disc to be vibrating in a bending mode whereas the pad is seen to be excited in a variety of modes such as bending, torsion, and often a combination of both. The development of the technique includes alternative ways of triggering the laser and typical results from the application of these differing methods are also included along with mechanical signals which confirm the visual interpretations. Final results, using a laser trigger delay technique, show that the disc mode waveform rotates about the disc at a rate equivalent to the frequency of vibration divided by the diametral mode order. Early work on a passenger car drum brake is also introduced, this complementing commercial 'noise fix' solutions and a proposed theoretical model.

  19. Pulsar Braking Index: A Test of Emission Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R. X.; Qiao, G. J.

    2001-11-01

    Pulsar braking torques due to magnetodipole radiation and the unipolar generator are considered, which results in a braking index n of less than 3 and could be employed to test the emission models. Improved equations for the pulsar braking index and magnetic field are presented, which are true if the rotation energy-loss rate equals the sum of the energy-loss rate of dipole radiation and of relativistic particles powered by a unipolar generator. The magnetic field calculated conventionally could be good enough, but only if it were modified by a factor of at most ~0.6. Both inner and outer gaps may coexist in the magnetosphere of the Vela pulsar.

  20. Design optimization of an opposed piston brake caliper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergent, Nicolas; Tirovic, Marko; Voveris, Jeronimas

    2014-11-01

    Successful brake caliper designs must be light and stiff, preventing excessive deformation and extended brake pedal travel. These conflicting requirements are difficult to optimize owing to complex caliper geometry, loading and interaction of individual brake components (pads, disc and caliper). The article studies a fixed, four-pot (piston) caliper, and describes in detail the computer-based topology optimization methodology applied to obtain two optimized designs. At first sight, relatively different designs (named 'Z' and 'W') were obtained by minor changes to the designable volume and boundary conditions. However, on closer inspection, the same main bridge design features could be recognized. Both designs offered considerable reduction of caliper mass, by 19% and 28%, respectively. Further finite element analyses conducted on one of the optimized designs (Z caliper) showed which individual bridge features and their combinations are the most important in maintaining caliper stiffness.

  1. Product and process innovation of grey cast iron brake discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorn, M. [Brembo S.P.A. (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The brake disc out of grey cast iron often seems to be playing the role of the ''underdog'' in the technical examinations of the entire brake system. This is also reflected by the 25 year history of the {mu}-club. In a total of 93 presentations in those 25 years, only 3 were related to the topic of grey cast iron discs. This is not a correct relation to the importance of this component within the brake system. The disc, although per definition with a lower specific load than the pad, has the major task to store and dissipate the heat in which the kinetic energy of the vehicle is transformed. The disc also has a significant effect on NVH behaviour, particularly in the low frequency range. It also has a permanent fight with its weight as an unsprung mass. (orig.)

  2. Effects of Running Shoes with Abrasion Resistant Rubber Sole on the Exercise Capacity of the Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the development of industrialization, rubber has been gradually used in the manufacture of sports equipment for its favourable properties. This study involved the addition of C5 petroleum resin into brominated isobutylene-isoprene rubber (BIIR and butadiene rubber (BR while manufacturing the sole of running shoes. The effects of running shoes with abrasion resistant rubber sole on the exercise capacity of the human body were investigated by analysing the skid resistance and abrasion resistance of the running shoes, and conducting biomechanical study on naked feet and feet wearing the shoes. The results demonstrated that the rubber sole had favourable slip resistance property and mechanical properties such as stretching, abrasion resistance, and hardness. Compared to naked feet, the peak pressure intensity of the whole step of feet wearing the newly developed shoes, was significantly lower than that of feet wearing ordinary shoes. In the future, rubber can bring more comfortable experience because of its favourable properties.

  3. Characterization of surface morphology and its correlation with friction performance of brake pads

    OpenAIRE

    Neis, Patrick Daniel; Ferreira, Ney Francisco; Sukumaran, Jacob; DE BAETS, Patrick; Ando, Matyas; Matozo, Luciano Tedesco; Masotti, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents the morphology evolution of a brake material surface submitted to braking tests through a laboratory-scale tribometer. Optical microscope images of the material’s surface were obtained for every 10 braking operations. These images were post-processed in appropriate computational software. By means of the image segmentation technique, morphological parameters related to the brake material surface were estimated. The wear rate and also the coefficient of friction resul...

  4. Study of heat transfer on front– and back-vented brake discs

    OpenAIRE

    Supachai Lakkam; Kullayot Suwantaroj; Phupoom Puangcharoenchai; Songwut Mongkonlerdmanee; Saiprasit Koetniyom

    2013-01-01

    A brake disc plays an important role in the automotive industry since it concerns directly with safety. In order to develop proper heat ventilation a wide range of brake discs have been designed. Different types of physical brake disc geometries, as front- and back-vented brake discs, affect the heat ventilation directly. This is a vital factor of the brake’s capability. We recognized the importance of this circumstance and therefore attempted to create a test to investigate the temperature g...

  5. EFFECT OF GENDER DIFFERENCE ON BRAKE REACTION TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY Reaction time is the time taken to respond to a stimulus or change in the environment. It is a method to assess the time taken from the perception of a stimulus followed by mental processing for a motor response. Reaction time in various day to day activities as in driving a car is very important. Brake reaction time (BRT is the time taken for the driver to respond to visualize an object and to press the brake pedal. It is affected by many features like age, gender, neuromuscular disorders. OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY Study has been undertaken to compare the BRT in male and female drivers and to analyze the effect of sex difference on Brake reaction time. MATERIALS & METHODS Male and female subjects between the age group of 25 – 35 years with driving license were included. Study is conducted in a stationary car. An in-house built; braking timer is fixed to the electric circuit of the braking system in the car. This device is wirelessly connected to the reaction time software installed in the laptop. The subject is instructed to press the brake pedal when the light changed from red to green in the laptop screen. 5 readings are taken and the mean BRT is recorded. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS & RESULTS Statistical analysis done with unpaired student t test indicates that the BRT was more in the females than the males and was statistically significant (p value - 0007. CONCLUSION Gender difference has a significant effect on BRT and reaction time in female is longer than for the males.

  6. Metallurgical Design and Development of NASA Crawler/Transporter Tread Belt Shoe Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Donald S.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Crawler/Transporters (CT-1 and CT-2) used to transport the Space Shuffles are one of the largest tracked vehicles in existence today. Two of these machines have been used to move space flight vehicles at Kennedy Space Center since the Apollo missions of the 1960's and relatively few modifications have been made to keep them operational. In September of 2003 during normal Crawler/Transporter operations cracks were observed along the roller pad surfaces of several tread belt shoes. Further examination showed 20 cracked shoes on CT-1 and 40 cracked shoes on CT-2 and a formal failure analysis investigation was undertaken while the cracked shoes were replaced. Six shoes were cross-sectioned with the fracture surfaces exposed and it was determined that the cracks were due to fatigue that initiated on the internal casting web channels at pre-existing casting defects and propagated through thickness both transgranularly and intergranularly between internal shrinkage cavities, porosity, and along austenitic and ferritic grain boundaries. The original shoes were cast during the 1960's using a modified 861330 steel with slightly higher levels of chromium, nickel and molybdenum followed by heat treatment to achieve a minimum tensile strength of 11 Oksi. Subsequent metallurgical analysis of the tread belt shoes after multiple failures showed excessive internal defects, alloy segregation, a nonuniform ferritic/ bainitic/martensitic microstructure, and low average tensile properties indicative of poor casting and poor heat-treatment. As a result, NASA funded an initiative to replace all of the tread belt shoes on both crawler/transporters along with a redesign of the alloy, manufacturing, and heat-treatment to create a homogeneous cast structure with uniform mechanical and metallurgical properties. ME Global, a wholly owned subsidiary of ME Elecmetal based in Minneapolis, MN was selected as manufacturing and design partner to develop the new shoes and this paper

  7. LOW HANDICAP GOLFERS GENERATE MORE TORQUE AT THE SHOE-NATURAL GRASS INTERFACE WHEN USING A DRIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Worsfold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to determine the rotational torque occurring at the shoe-natural grass interface during golf swing performance with different clubs, and to determine the influence of handicap and golf shoe design. Twenty-four golfers (8 low 0-7; 8 medium 8-14; and 8 high 15+ performed 5 shots with a driver, 3-iron and 7-iron when 3 shoes were worn: a modern 8 mm metal 7-spike shoe, an alternative 7-spike shoe and a flat soled shoe. Torque was measured at the front and back foot by grass covered force platforms in an outdoor field. Torque at the shoe- natural turf interface was similar at the front foot when using a driver, 3-iron and 7-iron with maximum mean torque (Tzmax 17-19 Nm and torque generation in the entire backswing and downswing approximately 40 Nm. At the back foot, torque was less than at the front foot when using the driver, 3-iron and 7-iron. At the back foot Tzmax was 6-7 Nm, and torque generation was 10-16 Nm, with a trend for greater torque generation when using the driver rather than the irons. The metal spike shoe allowed significantly more back foot torque generation when using a driver than a flat- soled shoe (p 0.05, although back foot mean torques generated tended to be greater for the metal spike shoe. The golf shot outcomes were similar for low, medium and high handicappers in both metal and alternative spike shoes (metal: 87%; 76%; 54%; alternative: 85%; 74%; 54% respectively. The better, low handicap golfers generated significantly more back foot torque (metal spike: 18.2 Nm; alternative: 15.8 Nm; p < 0.05 when using a driver. Further research should consider back foot shoe-grass interface demands during driver usage by low handicap and lighter body-weight golfers

  8. Evaluation of Flammability of Footwear Upper Materials. Patent and Regular Shoe Upper Leather vs. Porvair and Clarino Poromerics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    EVALUATION OF( 4 ) FLAMMABILITY OF FOOTWEAR UPPER MATERIALS: PATENT AND REGULAR SHOE UPPER LEATHER Vs. I’ORVAIR AND CLARINO POROMERICS 44., ET DTIC...EVALUATION OF FLAMMABILITY OF FOOTWEAR UPPER MATERIALS: PATENT AND REGULAR SHOE UPPER Final Report LEATHER VS. PORVAIR AND CLARINO POROMERICS S...Identify by block number) Flammability of Footwear Upper Materials;,’Military Dress Shoes ;-Poromeric Materials; Leather Materials; Patent Leather

  9. Evaluation of combined prescription of rocker sole shoes and custom-made foot orthoses for the treatment of plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Pang, Kai-Yip; Chung, Mandy Man-Ling; Hung, Aaron See-Long; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2012-12-01

    It is a routine practice to prescribe a combination of rocker shoes and custom-made foot orthoses for patients with plantar fasciitis. Recently, there has been a debate on this practice, and studies have shown that the individual prescription of rocker shoes or custom-made foot orthoses is effective in treating plantar fasciitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the immediate therapeutic effects of individually prescribed rocker sole shoes and custom-made foot orthoses, and a combined prescription of them on plantar fasciitis. This was a cross-over study. Fifteen patients with unilateral plantar fasciitis were recruited; they were from both genders and aged between 40 and 65. Subjects performed walking trials which consisted of one 'unshod' condition and four 'shod' conditions while wearing baseline shoes, rocker shoes, baseline shoes with foot orthotics, and rocker shoes with foot orthotics. The study outcome measures were the immediate heel pain intensity levels as reflected by visual analog scale pain ratings and the corresponding dynamic plantar pressure redistribution patterns as evaluated by a pressure insole system. The results showed that a combination of rocker shoes and foot orthoses produced a significantly lower visual analog scale pain score (9.7 mm) than rocker shoes (30.9 mm) and foot orthoses (29.5 mm). With regard to baseline shoes, it also significantly reduced the greatest amount of medial heel peak pressure (-33.58%) without overloading other plantar regions when compared to rocker shoes (-7.99%) and foot orthoses (-28.82%). The findings indicate that a combined prescription of rocker sole shoes and custom-made foot orthoses had greater immediate therapeutic effects compared to when each treatment had been individually prescribed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermal-mechanical coupled analysis of a brake disk rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhocine, Ali; Bouchetara, Mostefa

    2013-08-01

    The main purpose of this study is to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of the dry contact between the brake disk and pads during the braking phase. The simulation strategy is based on computer code ANSYS11. The modeling of transient temperature in the disk is actually used to identify the factor of geometric design of the disk to install the ventilation system in vehicles The thermal-structural analysis is then used with coupling to determine the deformation and the Von Mises stress established in the disk, the contact pressure distribution in pads. The results are satisfactory when compared to those of the specialized literature.

  11. Non-resonant magnetic braking on JET and TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Y.; Liang, Y.; Shaing, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    The non-resonant magnetic braking effect induced by a non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation is investigated on JET and TEXTOR. The collisionality dependence of the torque induced by the n = 1, where n is the toroidal mode number, magnetic perturbation generated by the error field correction coils...... in the 1/ν regime. The strongest NTV torque on JET is also located near the plasma core. The magnitude of the NTV torque strongly depends on the plasma response, which is also discussed in this paper. There is no obvious braking effect with n = 2 magnetic perturbation generated by the dynamic ergodic...

  12. NUMERICAL THERMAL ANALYSIS OF A CAR BRAKING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patryk Różyło

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study involved performing a numerical thermal analysis of selected components in a car braking system. The primary goal of the study was to determine the regions which are the most susceptible to variations in temperature, and to determine the degree of thermal impact upon them. The analysis was performed using the Abaqus environment. The examined components of the braking system were made of materials reflecting the mechanical properties of the real subassemblies. The FEM analysis enabled determination of the distribution of temperature in the system with respect to the properties of the investigated materials and applied boundary conditions.

  13. Brake deceleration of cars with light luggage trailers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan FILIPCZYK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some aspects of employing measurements of deceleration for the technical analysis of the brake process of cars with light luggage trailers. The analysis of the deceleration enables to assess the technical state regarding traffic safety and it can also be used for analysing the course of traffic accidents. The measurements of deceleration enables to determine the influence of load on the brake process for different kinds of cars. This method can be employed as the only way of examining during the periodical inspections and services for some kinds of trailers.

  14. Temperature and Thermal Stresses of Vehicles Gray Cast Brake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Belhocine

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of the dry contact between the brake disc and pads during the braking phase. The simulation strategy is based on computer code ANSYS11. The modeling of transient temperature in the disc is actually used to identify the factor of geometric design of the disc to install the ventilation system in vehicles. The thermo-structural analysis is then used with coupling to determine the deformation established and the Von Mises stresses in the disc, the contact pressure distribution in pads. The results are satisfactory when compared to those found in previous studies.

  15. Hierarchical Control Strategy for the Cooperative Braking System of Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiankun Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a hierarchical control strategy for cooperative braking system of an electric vehicle with separated driven axles. Two layers are defined: the top layer is used to optimize the braking stability based on two sliding mode control strategies, namely, the interaxle control mode and signal-axle control strategies; the interaxle control strategy generates the ideal braking force distribution in general braking condition, and the single-axle control strategy can ensure braking safety in emergency braking condition; the bottom layer is used to maximize the regenerative braking energy recovery efficiency with a reallocated braking torque strategy; the reallocated braking torque strategy can recovery braking energy as much as possible in the premise of meeting battery charging power. The simulation results show that the proposed hierarchical control strategy is reasonable and can adapt to different typical road surfaces and load cases; the vehicle braking stability and safety can be guaranteed; furthermore, the regenerative braking energy recovery efficiency can be improved.

  16. 77 FR 46633 - Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation: Brakes; Adjustment Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... risk and removed from revenue service until the brake adjustment problems are resolved. With respect to... RIN 2126-AB28 Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation: Brakes; Adjustment Limits AGENCY... the operators . The rule provides improved guidance concerning CMV brake adjustment limits. The...

  17. 75 FR 57393 - Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation: Antilock Brake Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). II. Abbreviations ABS Anti-lock Braking Systems CMV... for Safe Operation: Antilock Brake Systems AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA... requirement in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) that trailers with antilock brake systems...

  18. 49 CFR 214.529 - In-service failure of primary braking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false In-service failure of primary braking system. 214... Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.529 In-service failure of primary braking system. (a) In the event of a total in-service failure of its primary braking system, an on-track roadway maintenance...

  19. Investigations into the Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Behavior of Foreign and Locally Fabricated Brake Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil Olufemi Akinnuli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports investigations on mechanical and microstructural properties of foreign and locally fabricated brake disc. From safety point of view, brake disc is a crucial component of the braking system. Foreign brake disc (FBD are known for their long life span and better mechanical properties under service condition. However, locally fabricated brake disc (LFBD may possess similar or better mechanical properties than the foreign one. Therefore, the need to investigate their mechanical properties in order to determine which brake disc has better mechanical properties under the same service condition. It was observed that a high machinability index occurs in the locally fabricated brake disc as compared with the foreign brake disc, noticeable in the softness and weak graphite flakes formation in the matrix. Higher resistance to indentation was noticeable in the foreign brake disc as compared to the locally fabricated disc. The locally fabricated brake disc however, witnesses about 22% reduction in toughness compared to the foreign brake disc. An offshoot from this research will enhance the choice of material selection in the manufacturing of brake disc and assurance of locally made spare parts at affordable prices, and the provision of employment opportunities by establishing spare-parts production and allied industries

  20. 49 CFR 232.209 - Class II brake tests-intermediate inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT AND OTHER... the requirements contained in § 232.205(c)(1); (2) The air brake system shall be charged to the... accurate gauge or end-of-train device at the rear end of train; (3) The brakes on each car added to the...

  1. 49 CFR 232.211 - Class III brake tests-trainline continuity inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT... performed on a train by a qualified person, as defined in § 232.5, to test the train brake system when the... have previously received a Class I brake test, have not been off air more than four hours, and the cars...

  2. 49 CFR 232.207 - Class IA brake tests-1,000-mile inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... examine and observe the functioning of all moving parts of the brake system on each car in order to make... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT AND OTHER... Class IA brake test. The most restrictive car or block of cars in the train shall determine the location...

  3. 49 CFR 232.307 - Modification of the single car air brake test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Modification of the single car air brake test...) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT... Requirements § 232.307 Modification of the single car air brake test procedures. (a) Request. The AAR or other...

  4. 49 CFR 571.116 - Standard No. 116; Motor vehicle brake fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... use in hydraulic brake systems of motor vehicles. In addition, S5.3 applies to passenger cars.... This standard specifies requirements for fluids for use in hydraulic brake systems of motor vehicles... vehicle hydraulic brake system in which it will contact elastomeric components made of styrene and...

  5. 78 FR 44189 - Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) per 49 CFR 232.307 to modify the single car air brake test procedures located in AAR Standard S-486, Code of Air Brake System Tests for Freight Equipment-- Single Car... Federal Railroad Administration Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures In...

  6. 49 CFR 232.309 - Equipment and devices used to perform single car air brake tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... Testing Requirements § 232.309 Equipment and devices used to perform single car air brake tests. (a) Equipment and devices used to perform single car air brake tests shall be tested for correct operation at...

  7. 77 FR 51649 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Motorcycle Brake Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... passenger cars.\\7\\ \\6\\ Response to Petitions for Reconsideration, Motorcycle Brake Systems, 37 FR 11973... CFR Part 571 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Motorcycle Brake Systems; Final Rule #0;#0... Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Motorcycle Brake Systems AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety...

  8. ESTIMATION OF DRIVER’S POWER EXPENSES OF CAR BRAKE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Turenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation method of driver’s power expenses for the brake management is offered. The estimation method takes into account power expenses at driving in action of the brake system and power expenses at holding the pressed brake pedal

  9. 49 CFR 232.503 - Process to introduce new brake system technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Process to introduce new brake system technology... Technology § 232.503 Process to introduce new brake system technology. (a) Pursuant to the procedures... brake system technology, prior to implementing the plan. (b) Each railroad shall complete a pre-revenue...

  10. Vehicle state estimator based regenerative braking implementation on an electric vehicle to improve lateral vehicle stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.T.H.; Boekel, J.J.P. van; Iersel, S.S. van; Besselink, I.J.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2013-01-01

    The driving range of electric vehicles can be extended using regenerative braking. Regenerative braking uses the elctric drive system, and therefore only the driven wheels, for decelerating the vehicle. Braking on one axle affects the stability of the vehicle, especially for road conditions with

  11. Hierarchical Control Strategy for the Cooperative Braking System of Electric Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiankun; He, Hongwen; Guo, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a hierarchical control strategy for cooperative braking system of an electric vehicle with separated driven axles. Two layers are defined: the top layer is used to optimize the braking stability based on two sliding mode control strategies, namely, the interaxle control mode and signal-axle control strategies; the interaxle control strategy generates the ideal braking force distribution in general braking condition, and the single-axle control strategy can ensure braking safety in emergency braking condition; the bottom layer is used to maximize the regenerative braking energy recovery efficiency with a reallocated braking torque strategy; the reallocated braking torque strategy can recovery braking energy as much as possible in the premise of meeting battery charging power. The simulation results show that the proposed hierarchical control strategy is reasonable and can adapt to different typical road surfaces and load cases; the vehicle braking stability and safety can be guaranteed; furthermore, the regenerative braking energy recovery efficiency can be improved. PMID:26236772

  12. Recognition of household and athletic activities using SmartShoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, S Ryan; Fulk, George D; Sazonov, Edward S

    2012-01-01

    The ability to provide real time feedback concerning a person's activity level and energy expenditure can be beneficial for improving activity levels of individuals. Examples include biofeedback systems used for body weight and physical activity management and biofeedback systems for rehabilitation of stroke patients. A critical aspect of any such system is being able to accurately classify data in real-time so that active and timely feedback can be provided. In the paper we demonstrate feasibility of real-time recognition of multiple household and athletic activities on a cell phone using the data collected by a wearable sensor system consisting of SmartShoe sensor and a wrist accelerometer. The experimental data were collected for multiple household and athletic activities performed by a healthy individual. The data was used to train two neural networks, one to be used primarily for sedentary individuals and one for more active individuals. Classification of household activities including ascending stairs, descending stairs, doing the dishes, vacuuming, and folding laundry, achieved 89.62% average accuracy. Classification of athletic activities such as jumping jacks, swing dancing, and ice skating, was performed with 93.13% accuracy. As proof of real-time processing on a mobile platform the trained neural network for healthy individuals was timed and required less than 4 ms to perform each feature vector construction and classification.

  13. Rocker outsole shoe is not a threat to postural stability in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomian, Banafshe; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Jafari, Hassan; Khamseh, Mohammadebrahim; Healy, Aoife

    2016-04-01

    Rocker outsole shoes are commonly prescribed to patients with diabetic neuropathy to offload a particular area of the foot sole, thereby decreasing the risk of foot ulceration. Contrary to this, some evidence has reported a postural destabilising effect of these shoes in healthy adults. To explore the postural stability of patients with diabetic neuropathy who wear a rocker outsole shoe. Quasi-experimental. In total, 17 patients with diabetic neuropathy (aged 49.29 ± 7.48 years; 7 female, 10 males) participated in this study. A Motor Control Test measuring centre of force displacement, response strength scale and response latency in medium and large perturbations was conducted using the EquiTest system to evaluate postural stability while wearing a baseline shoe (without a rocker outsole) or a rocker outsole shoe (with a toe-only rocker sole). No significant difference was observed between the shoe conditions in centre of force displacement and response latency of the participants (p > 0.05). The results indicated a significant increase in the response strength scale of participants by the rocker outsole, for medium forward and backward and large forward perturbations (p = 0.014, p = 0.001 and p = 0.027, respectively). When the immediate effect is a concern, the rocker outsole shoe did not negatively affect postural stability in patients with diabetic neuropathy. This article will provide objective evidence about the effect of rocker outsole on postural balance in diabetic patients. In prescription of rocker outsole to prevent plantar ulceration of diabetic foot, immediate postural destabilising is not a concern. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  14. Comparative study on the lateral run-out of friction surfaces measurement of brake discs using a brake roller tester and a dial gauge

    OpenAIRE

    Toma Marius; Andreescu Cristian; Micu Dan

    2017-01-01

    Brake system diagnosis is one of the most common and necessary technical operations applied to the car, regardless of its type and operating phases. Measuring the diagnostic parameters on a roller brake tester is a fast operation with no disassembly necessary. Measuring the run-out of friction surfaces of brake discs with a dial gauge is an action that requires more extensive preparatory operations but it offers a high accuracy of the results. The paper aims to analyze the correlation between...

  15. Investigation into the Use of Water Based Brake Fluid for Light Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Akpan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the possibility of using water based fluid as a brake fluid for light loads. Characterization of both standard and water based braked fluids formulated was carried out. The properties of the latter were compared with that of a standard commercial brake fluid. The actual test of the formulated brake fluid was carried out with a Nissan Sunny vehicle model 1.5 within the speed range of 20km/hr to 80km/hr at the permanent campus of University of Uyo and the braking efficiency obtained attest to its suitability for light loads.

  16. Can dark matter explain the braking index of neutron stars?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouvaris, C.; Perez-Garcia, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We explore a new mechanism of slowing down the rotation of neutron stars via accretion of millicharged dark matter. We find that this mechanism yields pulsar braking indices that can be substantially smaller than the standard n similar to 3 of the magnetic dipole radiation model for millicharged...... dark matter particles that are not excluded by existing experimental constraints thus accommodating existing observations....

  17. 14 CFR 25.493 - Braked roll conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....493 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.493 Braked roll conditions. (a.... (e) In the absence of a more rational analysis, the nose gear vertical reaction prescribed in...

  18. Oxygen-Diffused Titanium as a Candidate Brake Rotor Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are one of several candidate materials for the next generation of truck disk brake rotors. Despite their advantages of lightweight relative to cast iron and good strength and corrosion resistance, titanium alloys are unlikely to be satisfactory brake rotor materials unless their friction and wear behavior can be significantly improved. In this study, a surface engineering process oxygen diffusion was applied to titanium rotors and has shown very encouraging results. The oxygen diffused Ti-6Al-4V (OD-Ti) was tested on a sub-scale brake tester against a flat block of commercial brake lining material and benchmarked against several other Ti-based materials, including untreated Ti-6Al-4V, ceramic particle-reinforced Ti composites (MMCs), and a thermal-spray-coated Ti alloy. With respect to friction, the OD-Ti outperformed all other candidate materials under the imposed test conditions with the friction coefficient remaining within a desirable range of 0.35-0.50, even under the harshest conditions when the disk surface temperature reached nearly 600 C. In addition, the OD-Ti showed significantly improved wear-resistance over the non-treated one and was even better than the Ti-based composite materials.

  19. Smart brake light system would provide more information to drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2008-01-01

    You are driving in heavy traffic. The brake lights on the car in front of you come on. Is the car slowing or is it going to stop? It slows to 25 mph and the lights go off. You drop back. The car in front of you stops suddenly! You stop just in time. The car behind you collects your rear bumper.

  20. Evaluation strategy of regenerative braking energy for supercapacitor vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhongyue; Cao, Junyi; Cao, Binggang; Chen, Wen

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of energy conversion and increase the driving range of electric vehicles, the regenerative energy captured during braking process is stored in the energy storage devices and then will be re-used. Due to the high power density of supercapacitors, they are employed to withstand high current in the short time and essentially capture more regenerative energy. The measuring methods for regenerative energy should be investigated to estimate the energy conversion efficiency and performance of electric vehicles. Based on the analysis of the regenerative braking energy system of a supercapacitor vehicle, an evaluation system for energy recovery in the braking process is established using USB portable data-acquisition devices. Experiments under various braking conditions are carried out. The results verify the higher efficiency of energy regeneration system using supercapacitors and the effectiveness of the proposed measurement method. It is also demonstrated that the maximum regenerative energy conversion efficiency can reach to 88%. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased vertical impact forces and altered running mechanics with softer midsole shoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Baltich

    Full Text Available To date it has been thought that shoe midsole hardness does not affect vertical impact peak forces during running. This conclusion is based partially on results from experimental data using homogeneous samples of participants that found no difference in vertical impact peaks when running in shoes with different midsole properties. However, it is currently unknown how apparent joint stiffness is affected by shoe midsole hardness. An increase in apparent joint stiffness could result in a harder landing, which should result in increased vertical impact peaks during running. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of shoe midsole hardness on apparent ankle and knee joint stiffness and the associated vertical ground reaction force for age and sex subgroups during heel-toe running. 93 runners (male and female aged 16-75 years ran at 3.33 ± 0.15 m/s on a 30 m-long runway with soft, medium and hard midsole shoes. The vertical impact peak increased as the shoe midsole hardness decreased (mean(SE; soft: 1.70BW(0.03, medium: 1.64BW(0.03, hard: 1.54BW(0.03. Similar results were found for the apparent ankle joint stiffness where apparent stiffness increased as the shoe midsole hardness decreased (soft: 2.08BWm/º x 100 (0.05, medium: 1.92 BWm/º x 100 (0.05, hard: 1.85 BWm/º x 100 (0.05. Apparent knee joint stiffness increased for soft (1.06BWm/º x 100 (0.04 midsole compared to the medium (0.95BWm/º x 100 (0.04 and hard (0.96BWm/º x 100 (0.04 midsoles for female participants. The results from this study confirm that shoe midsole hardness can have an effect on vertical impact force peaks and that this may be connected to the hardness of the landing. The results from this study may provide useful information regarding the development of cushioning guidelines for running shoes.

  2. SPECIFICITY AND TRENDS IN IMPROVEMENT OF TRACTOR TRAIN BRAKING DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Tayanovsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an important problem in improvement of  braking dynamics potential as part of the overall tractor train dynamics consisting of  an all-wheel drive tractor and heavy-duty trailers which are either locally manufactured or developed with the participation of the paper’s authors. The trailers have a mechanical drive for their wheels from the tractor engine. The trains are intended for transportation peat, organic fertilizers and various loads in  forest exploitation and under other complicated soil and climatic and road conditions where there is justified necessity to activate the trailer wheels.Methodological tools have been developed with the purpose to analyze an influence of the blocked inter-double-reduction axle drive of an active tractor train on distribution of braking forces in double-reduction axles with due account of the heavy-duty peat trailer specificity. Theoretical provisions for wheeled vehicles have been developed with regard to the braking application specificity of active tractor trains with mechanical multi-path drive for wheels of a multi-double-reduction axle propulsion device. The paper presents calculation and theoretical data in order to estimate  distribution of specific braking forces in the double-reduction axle links of the active tractor train when the blocked inter-double-reduction axle drive of the tractor and trailer wheels is switched on and also in the case when the tractor engine is involved in braking process and a clutch coupling is switched-on.Sequence of the calculation formula has been completely carried out in the paper. They represent clear design and operational parameters of the active tractor train. Such approach has made it possible to realize them in the form of a software application which is convenient for analysis of the braking process pertaining to the investigated objects in order to select means for improvement of braking dynamics, rational parameters of multi

  3. Comparison of shoe-length fit between people with and without diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McInnes Alistair D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amongst the many identified mechanisms leading to diabetic foot ulceration, ill-fitting footwear is one. There is anecdotal evidence that people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy wear shoes that are too small in order to increase the sensation of fit. The aim of this study was to determine whether people with diabetic sensory neuropathy wear appropriate length footwear. Methods A case–control design was used to compare internal shoe length and foot length differences between a group of people with diabetes and peripheral sensory neuropathy and a group of people without diabetes and no peripheral sensory neuropathy. Shoe and foot length measurements were taken using a calibrated Internal Shoe Size Gauge® and a Brannock Device®, respectively. Results Data was collected from 85 participants with diabetes and 118 participants without diabetes. The mean difference between shoe and foot length was not significantly different between the two groups. However, a significant number of participants within both groups had a shoe to foot length difference that lay outside a previously suggested 10 to 15 mm range. From the diabetic and non-diabetic groups 82% (70/85 and 66% (78/118, respectively had a foot to shoe length difference outside this same range. Conclusions This study shows that although there is no significant difference in shoe-length fit between participants with and without neuropathy, a significant proportion of these populations wear shoes that are either too long or too short for their foot length according to the 10 to 15 mm value used for comparison. The study has highlighted the need for standardised approaches when considering the allowance required between foot and internal shoe length and for the measurement and comparison of foot and shoe dimensions.

  4. Airborne Wear Particles Emissions ofCommercial Disc Brake Materials– Disc Brake Test Stand Simulations at LowContact Pressures and Rotors Pre-conditionedwith Rust

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlström, Jens; Olander, Lars; Olofsson, Ulf

    2008-01-01

    Most modern passenger cars have disc brakes on the front wheels, which unlike drum brakes are not sealed off to the ambient air. During braking, there is wear to both the rotor and the pads. This wear process generates particles, which may become airborne. A problem with measuring airborne wear particles in field tests is to distinguish them from the background noise. Therefore, a disc brake laboratory test stand that allows control of the cleanness of the surrounding air is used. With this t...

  5. Comparative study on the lateral run-out of friction surfaces measurement of brake discs using a brake roller tester and a dial gauge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Marius

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brake system diagnosis is one of the most common and necessary technical operations applied to the car, regardless of its type and operating phases. Measuring the diagnostic parameters on a roller brake tester is a fast operation with no disassembly necessary. Measuring the run-out of friction surfaces of brake discs with a dial gauge is an action that requires more extensive preparatory operations but it offers a high accuracy of the results. The paper aims to analyze the correlation between the dial gauge measured values and the diagnostic obtained using the brake roller tester.

  6. Shoe heel abrasion and its possible biomechanical cause: a transversal study with infantry recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumfeld, Daniel; Raduan, Fernando C; Macedo, Benjamim; Silva, Thiago Alexandre Alves; Baumfeld, Tiago; Favato, Danilo Fabrino; de Andrade, Marco Antonio Percope; Nery, Caio

    2015-11-19

    Excessive shoe heel abrasion is of concern to patients and shoe manufacturers, but little scientific information is available about this feature and its possible causes. The purpose of this study was to relate this phenomenon with biomechanical factors that could predispose to shoe heel abrasion. Ninety-seven recruits (median age 25) were enrolled in this study. Shoe abrasion was assessed manually with a metric plastic tape on the posterior part of the heel that comes in contact with the ground. The number of sprains, foot alignment, and calf muscle shortening (Silfverskiold test) was also assessed in order to relate it with shoe heel abrasion. After using our exclusion criteria, 86 recruits and 172 were considered for this study. The most common abrasion site was the lateral portion of the heel surface (50 %). Forty-four percent of the participants had neutral hind-foot alignment and 39 % had valgus alignment. Twenty-six (30 %) patients have had previous ankle or foot sprains. Neutral foot was related with less calf muscle shortening. On the other hand, valgus hind-foot alignment was more associated with Achilles shortening (p outsole abrasion with its possible biomechanical cause in order to predict and treat possible associated injuries.

  7. In-shoe loading in rearfoot and non-rearfoot strikers during running using minimalist footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernozek, T W; Meardon, S; Vannatta, C N

    2014-12-01

    Recent trends promote a "barefoot" running style to reduce injury. "Minimalist" shoes are designed to mimic the barefoot running with some foot protection. However, it is unknown how "minimalist" shoes alter plantar loading. Our purpose was to compare plantar loads between rearfoot strikers and non-rearfoot strikers after 4 weeks of running in minimalist footwear. 30 females were provided Vibram(®) Bikila shoes and instructed to gradually transition to running in these shoes. Plantar loading was measured using an in-shoe pressure sensor after the 4 weeks. Multivariate analysis was performed to detect differences in loading between rearfoot and non-rearfoot strikers in different plantar regions. Differences in plantar loading occurred between foot strike patterns running in minimalist footwear. Pressure and force variables were greater in the metatarsals and lower in the heel region in non-rearfoot strikers. Peak pressure for the whole foot was greater in non-rearfoot strikers while no difference was observed in maximum force or contact time for the whole foot between strike types. Allowing time for accommodation and adaptation to different stresses on the foot may be warranted when using minimalist footwear depending on foot strike pattern of the -runner. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Multibody Dynamic Stress Simulation of Rigid-Flexible Shovel Crawler Shoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Frimpong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electric shovels are used in surface mining operations to achieve economic production capacities. The capital investments and operating costs associated with the shovels deployed in the Athabasca oil sands formation are high due to the abrasive conditions. The shovel crawler shoes interact with sharp and abrasive sand particles, and, thus, are subjected to high transient dynamic stresses. These high stresses cause wear and tear leading to crack initiation, propagation and premature fatigue failure. The objective of this paper is to develop a model to characterize the crawler stresses and deformation for the P&H 4100C BOSS during propel and loading using rigid-flexible multi-body dynamic theory. A 3-D virtual prototype model of the rigid-flexible crawler track assembly and its interactions with oil sand formation is simulated to capture the model dynamics within multibody dynamics software MSC ADAMS. The modal and stress shapes and modal loads due to machine weight for each flexible crawler shoes are generated from finite element analysis (FEA. The modal coordinates from the simulation are combined with mode and stress shapes using modal superposition method to calculate real-time stresses and deformation of flexible crawler shoes. The results show a maximum von Mises stress value of 170 MPa occurring in the driving crawler shoe during the propel motion. This study provides a foundation for the subsequent fatigue life analysis of crawler shoes for extending crawler service life.

  9. Effects of unstable shoes on chronic low back pain in health professionals: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Stéphane; Tavcar, Ziva; Turcot, Katia; Allet, Lara; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Genevay, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of unstable shoes in reducing low back pain in health professionals. Of a volunteer sample of 144 participants, 40 with nonspecific chronic low back pain were eligible and enrolled in this study. Participants were randomized to an intervention group, who wore unstable shoes (model MBT Fora), or a control group, who wore conventional sports shoes (model Adidas Bigroar). The participants had to wear the study shoes during their work hours, and at least 6 hours per workday, over a period of 6 weeks. The primary outcome was low back pain assessed on a Visual Analog Scale. The secondary outcomes were patient satisfaction, disability evaluated using Roland-Morris questionnaire and quality of life evaluated using EQ-VAS. The intervention group showed a significant decrease in pain scores compared to the control group. The rate of satisfaction was higher in the intervention group (79%) compared to the control group (25%). There was no significant difference for the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire score and the EQ-VAS scale. The results of this clinical trial suggest that wearing unstable shoes for 6 weeks significantly decreases low back pain in patients suffering from chronic low back pain but had no significant effect on quality of life and disability scores. Copyright © 2014 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of sports flooring and shoes on impact forces and performance during jump tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisoux, Laurent; Gette, Paul; Urhausen, Axel; Bomfim, Joao; Theisen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We aim to determine the influence of sports floorings and sports shoes on impact mechanics and performance during standardised jump tasks. Twenty-one male volunteers performed ankle jumps (four consecutive maximal bounds with very dynamic ankle movements) and multi-jumps (two consecutive maximal counter-movement jumps) on force plates using minimalist and cushioned shoes under 5 sports flooring (SF) conditions. The shock absorption properties of the SF, defined as the proportion of peak impact force absorbed by the tested flooring when compared with a concrete hard surface, were: SF0 = 0% (no flooring), SF1 = 19%, SF2 = 26%, SF3 = 37% and SF4 = 45%. Shoe and flooring effects were compared using 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni-corrected comparisons. A significant interaction between SF and shoe conditions was found for VILR only (p = 0.003). In minimalist shoes, SF influenced Vertical Instantaneous Loading Rate (VILR) during ankle jumps (p = 0.006) and multi-jumps (pheight was higher (psports flooring. VILR is the variable that was the most affected.

  11. Effect of soccer shoe upper on ball behaviour in curve kicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hideyuki; Sakurai, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Takeo

    2014-08-01

    New soccer shoes have been developed by considering various concepts related to kicking, such as curving a soccer ball. However, the effects of shoes on ball behaviour remain unclear. In this study, by using a finite element simulation, we investigated the factors that affect ball behaviour immediately after impact in a curve kick. Five experienced male university soccer players performed one curve kick. We developed a finite element model of the foot and ball and evaluated the validity of the model by comparing the finite element results for the ball behaviour immediately after impact with the experimental results. The launch angle, ball velocity, and ball rotation in the finite element analysis were all in general agreement with the experimental results. Using the validated finite element model, we simulated the ball behaviour. The simulation results indicated that the larger the foot velocity immediately before impact, the larger the ball velocity and ball rotation. Furthermore, the Young's modulus of the shoe upper and the coefficient of friction between the shoe upper and the ball had little effect on the launch angle, ball velocity, and ball rotation. The results of this study suggest that the shoe upper does not significantly influence ball behaviour.

  12. The Preferred Movement Path Paradigm: Influence of Running Shoes on Joint Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Benno M; Vienneau, Jordyn; Smith, Aimée C; Trudeau, Matthieu B; Mohr, Maurice; Nigg, Sandro R

    2017-08-01

    (A) To quantify differences in lower extremity joint kinematics for groups of runners subjected to different running footwear conditions, and (B) to quantify differences in lower extremity joint kinematics on an individual basis for runners subjected to different running footwear conditions. Three-dimensional ankle and knee joint kinematics were collected for 35 heel-toe runners when wearing three different running shoes and when running barefoot. Absolute mean differences in ankle and knee joint kinematics were computed between running shoe conditions. The percentage of individual runners who displayed differences below a 2°, 3°, and 5° threshold were also calculated. The results indicate that the mean kinematics of the ankle and knee joints were similar between running shoe conditions. Aside from ankle dorsiflexion and knee flexion, the percentage of runners maintaining their movement path between running shoes (i.e., less than 3°) was in the order of magnitude of about 80% to 100%. Many runners showed ankle and knee joint kinematics that differed between a conventional running shoe and barefoot by more than 3°, especially for ankle dorsiflexion and knee flexion. Many runners stay in the same movement path (the preferred movement path) when running in various different footwear conditions. The percentage of runners maintaining their preferred movement path depends on the magnitude of the change introduced by the footwear condition.

  13. Design, simulation and testing of a novel radial multi-pole multi-layer magnetorheological brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xuezheng; Yao, Jin

    2018-02-01

    This paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a novel radial multi-pole multi-layer magnetorheological (MR) brake. This MR brake has an innovative structural design with superposition principle of two magnetic fields generated by the inner coils and the outer coils. The MR brake has several media layers of magnetorheological (MR) fluid located between the inner coils and the outer coils, and it can provide higher torque and higher torque density than conventional single-disk or multi-disk or multi-pole single-layer MR brakes can. In this paper, a brief introduction to the structure of the proposed MR brake was given first. Then, theoretical analysis of the magnetic circuit and the braking torque was conducted. In addition, a 3D electromagnetic model of the MR brake was developed to simulate and examine the magnetic flux intensity and corresponding braking torque. A prototype of the brake was fabricated and several tests were carried out to validate its torque capacity. The results show that the proposed MR brake can produce a maximum braking torque of 133 N m and achieve a high torque density of 25.0 kN m‑2, a high torque range of 42 and a high torque-to-power ratio of 0.95 N m W‑1.

  14. Enhanced Regenerative Braking Strategies for Electric Vehicles: Dynamic Performance and Potential Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyi Xiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A regenerative braking system and hydraulic braking system are used in conjunction in the majority of electric vehicles worldwide. We propose a new regenerative braking distribution strategy that is based on multi-input fuzzy control logic while considering the influences of the battery’s state of charge, the brake strength and the motor speed. To verify the braking performance and recovery economy, this strategy was applied to a battery electric vehicle model and compared with two other improved regenerative braking strategies. The performance simulation was performed using standard driving cycles (NEDC, LA92, and JP1015 and a real-world-based urban cycle in China. The tested braking strategies satisfied the general safety requirements of Europe (as specified in ECE-13H, and the emergency braking scenario and economic potential were tested. The simulation results demonstrated the differences in the braking force distribution performance of these three regenerative braking strategies, the feasibility of the braking methods for the proposed driving cycles and the energy economic potential of the three strategies.

  15. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Zakaria, Lambang, Lullus; Triyono, Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-03-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  16. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibowo,, E-mail: wibowo-uns@yahoo.com; Zakaria,, E-mail: zakaaria27@gmail.com; Lambang, Lullus, E-mail: lulus-l@yahoo.com; Triyono,, E-mail: tyon-bila@yahoo.co.id; Muhayat, Nurul, E-mail: nurulmuhayat@ymail.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta 57128 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  17. Guidelines for numerical vibration and acoustic analysis of disc brake squeal using simple models of brake systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.; Marburg, S.

    2013-04-01

    Brake squeal has become of increasing concern to the automotive industry but guidelines on how to confidently predict squeal propensity are yet to be established. While it is standard practice to use the complex eigenvalue analysis to predict unstable vibration modes, there have been few attempts to calculate their acoustic radiation. Here guidelines are developed for numerical vibration and acoustic analysis of brake squeal using models of simplified brake systems with friction contact by considering (1) the selection of appropriate elements, contact and mesh; (2) the extraction of surface velocities via forced response; and (3) the calculation of the acoustic response itself. Results indicate that quadratic tetrahedral elements offer the best option for meshing more realistic geometry. A mesh has to be sufficiently fine especially in the contact region to predict mesh-independent unstable vibration modes. Regarding the vibration response, only the direct, steady-state method with a pressurised pad and finite sliding formulation (allowing contact separation) should be used. Comparison of different numerical methods suggest that a obroadband fast multi-pole boundary element method with the Burton-Miller formulation would efficiently solve the acoustic radiation of a full brake system. Results also suggest that a pad lift-off can amplify the acoustic radiation similar to a horn effect. A horn effect is also observed for chamfered pads which are used in practice to reduce the number and strength of unstable vibration modes. These results highlight the importance of optimising the pad shape to reduce acoustic radiation of unstable vibration modes.

  18. A mechanical brake hardware-in-the-loop simulation of a railway vehicle that accounts for hysteresis and pneumatic cylinder dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Dong-Chan Lee; Chul-Goo Kang

    2015-01-01

    A brake hardware-in-the-loop simulation system for a railway vehicle provides an effective platform for testing the braking performance under various dangerous braking conditions. However, in general, four-brake calipers are required to implement a mechanical brake system for one car. In this article, we implement a brake hardware-in-the-loop simulation system only with one brake caliper and three air tanks accounting for hysteresis and pneumatic cylinder dynamics, ultimately saving installat...

  19. Interference of high-heeled shoes in static balance among young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Susana Bacelete; Costa, Rafael Vital; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Pasini, Hugo; Marconi, Nádia Fernanda; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of the use of high-heeled shoes on static balance in young adult women. Fifty-three women between 18 and 30 years of age and accustomed to wearing high-heeled shoes participated in the study. None of the participants had any orthopedic or neurologic alterations. Static balance was assessed using a force plate. Oscillations from the center of pressure in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions were measured both when barefoot and when wearing high-heeled shoes [7 centimeters (cm) in height and 1cm in diameter] under the conditions of eyes open and eyes closed. Two-way analysis of variance was employed for the statistical analysis, with the level of significance set at 5% (pstatic balance in the healthy young women analyzed, increasing the oscillation of the center of pressure, regardless of visual restriction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Compliance of patients wearing an orthotic device or orthopedic shoes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Eva; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Alongside the positive effects of use of orthotic devices for the lower extremities (ODLE) and orthopedic shoes, complaints and criticism by users possibly lead to non-compliance. The purpose is to determine the compliance of patients wearing an ODLE or orthopedic shoes and to describe the main reasons for using and not using. Different online databases were searched for articles about patients' compliance with regard to an ODLE or orthopedic shoes. A methodological quality control was conducted. Ten studies (1576 patients) were included. The data revealed between 6 and 80% not users. Several reasons for not using the orthotic device were described (e.g. pain, discomfort and cosmetically unacceptable). The high percentage of patients who are not wearing the prescribed orthotic devices leads to a high financial loss for society and a waste of therapeutic effort. These results should be taken into account during the design, construction and selection process of orthotic devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.