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Sample records for brainstem response latencies

  1. Relation between derived-band auditory brainstem response latencies and behavioral frequency selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Derived-band click-evoked auditory brainstem responses ABRs were obtained for normal-hearing NH and sensorineurally hearing-impaired HI listeners. The latencies extracted from these responses, as a function of derived-band center frequency and click level, served as objective estimates of cochlear...... selectivity in human listeners and offer a window to better understand how hearing impairment affects the spatiotemporal cochlear response pattern....

  2. Longer brainstem auditory evoked response latencies of individuals with fragile X syndrome related to sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miezejeski, C M; Heaney, G; Belser, R; Brown, W T; Jenkins, E C; Sersen, E A

    1997-04-18

    Brainstem auditory evoked response latencies were studies in 75 males (13 with fragile X syndrome, 18 with mental retardation due to other causes, and 44 with no disability). Latency values were obtained for each ear for the positive deflections of waves I (P1), III (P3), and V (P5). Some individuals with mental retardation required sedation. Contrary to previous report, latencies obtained for individuals with fragile X did not differ from those obtained for persons without mental retardation. Persons receiving sedation, whether or not their retardation was due to fragile X, had longer latencies for wave P5 than persons who did not receive sedation. This effect of sedation may also explain the previously reported increased latencies for persons with fragile X.

  3. Relating the Variability of Tone-Burst Otoacoustic Emission and Auditory Brainstem Response Latencies to the Underlying Cochlear Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Sarah; Shera, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Forward and reverse cochlear latency and its relation to the frequency tuning of the auditory filters can be assessed using tone bursts (TBs). Otoacoustic emissions (TBOAEs) estimate the cochlear roundtrip time, while auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to the same stimuli aim at measuring the auditory filter buildup time. Latency ratios are generally close to two and controversy exists about the relationship of this ratio to cochlear mechanics. We explored why the two methods provide different estimates of filter buildup time, and ratios with large inter-subject variability, using a time-domain model for OAEs and ABRs. We compared latencies for twenty models, in which all parameters but the cochlear irregularities responsible for reflection-source OAEs were identical, and found that TBOAE latencies were much more variable than ABR latencies. Multiple reflection-sources generated within the evoking stimulus bandwidth were found to shape the TBOAE envelope and complicate the interpretation of TBOAE latency and TBOAE/ABR ratios in terms of auditory filter tuning. PMID:27175040

  4. Auditory brainstem response latency in forward masking, a marker of sensory deficits in listeners with normal hearing thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehraei, Golbarg; Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2017-01-01

    In rodent models, acoustic exposure too modest to elevate hearing thresholds can nonetheless cause auditory nerve fiber deafferentation, interfering with the coding of supra-threshold sound. Low-spontaneous rate nerve fibers, important for encoding acoustic information at supra-threshold levels......-V latency changes with increasing masker-to-probe intervals. In the same listeners, behavioral forward masking detection thresholds were measured. We hypothesized that 1) auditory nerve fiber deafferentation increases forward masking thresholds and increases wave-V latency and 2) a preferential loss of low...... behaviorally. Further, the amount of wave-V latency change with masker-to-probe interval was positively correlated with the rate of change in forward masking detection thresholds. Although we cannot rule out central contributions, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that auditory nerve fiber...

  5. On the use of click-evoked electric brainstem responses in audiological diagnosis. IV. Interaural latency differences (wave V) in cochlear hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhamer, H J; Lindström, B; Lundborg, T

    1981-01-01

    Interaural latency differences (ILDs) of wave V of the brainstem electric response (BSER) were studied (1) in 20 normal-hearing subjects at 90, 80, 60 and 40 dB HL click level, (2) in 22 patients with symmetrical cochlear hearing loss at 90 dB HL, corresponding to 45-80 dB SL, and (3) in 45 patients with asymetrical cochlear hearing loss with interaural recruitment, at 90 dB HL on one hand and at a click sensation level corresponding to 90 dB HL in the poorer ear (range 10-75 dB SL) on the other hand. In the normal hearing group the ILDs did not exceed 0.2 ms except in one case at 40 dB HL (0.3 ms). In the symmetrical cochlear loss group the ILD did not exceed 0.2 ms in any patient. In the asymmetrical cochlear loss group the ILD at 90 dB HL exceeded 0.2 ms in 12 cases, but only in four cases after correction for pure tone hearing loss at 4 kHz by 0.1 for each 10 dB above 50 dB HL; at equal sensation levels the ILDs were all zero or negative meaning that the wave V latency was shorter on stimulation of the poorer ear. Assuming ILD to be a valid discriminator between cochlear and retrocochlear lesions, the corrected ILD at equal click hearing levels (90 dB HL), with the critical value set at 0.2 ms, thus gave a 9% false-positive rate whereas the ILS at equal sensation levels, with the critical value set at zero, gave no false-positives. It still remains to be shown that the latter criterion will not increase the number of false-negative results in retrocochlear lesions.

  6. Auditory Brainstem and Middle Latency Responses Measured Pre- and Posttreatment for Hyperacusic Hearing-Impaired Persons Successfully Treated to Improve Sound Tolerance and to Expand the Dynamic Range for Loudness: Case Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, Craig; Korczak, Peggy; Sherlock, LaGuinn P; Hawley, Monica L; Gold, Susan

    2017-02-01

    In this report of three cases, we consider electrophysiologic measures from three hyperacusic hearing-impaired individuals who, prior to treatment to expand their dynamic ranges for loudness, were problematic hearing aid candidates because of their diminished sound tolerance and reduced dynamic ranges. Two of these individuals were treated with structured counseling combined with low-level broadband sound therapy from bilateral sound generators and the third case received structured counseling in combination with a short-acting placebo sound therapy. Each individual was highly responsive to his or her assigned treatment as revealed by expansion of the dynamic range by at least 20 dB at one or more frequencies posttreatment. Of specific interest in this report are their latency and amplitude measures taken from tone burst-evoked auditory brainstem response (ABR) and cortically derived middle latency response (MLR) recordings, measured as a function of increasing loudness at 500 and 2,000 Hz pre- and posttreatment. The resulting ABR and MLR latency and amplitude measures for each case are considered here in terms of pre- and posttreatment predictions. The respective pre- and posttreatment predictions anticipated larger pretreatment response amplitudes and shorter pretreatment response latencies relative to typical normal control values and smaller normative-like posttreatment response amplitudes and longer posttreatment response latencies relative to the corresponding pretreatment values for each individual. From these results and predictions, we conjecture about the neural origins of the hyperacusis conditions (i.e., brainstem versus cortical) and the neuronal sites responsive to treatment. The only consistent finding in support of the pre- and posttreatment predictions and, thus, the strongest index of hyperacusis and positive treatment-related effects was measured for MLR latency responses for wave Pa at 2,000 Hz. Other response indices, including ABR wave V

  7. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

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    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  8. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

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    Ali Akbar Tahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  9. Methylmercury Exposure Reduces the Auditory Brainstem Response of Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata )

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolf, Sarah E; Swaddle, John P; Cristol, Daniel A; Buchser, William J

    2017-01-01

    ...) by studying their auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Zebra finches exposed to mercury exhibited elevated hearing thresholds, decreased amplitudes, and longer latencies in the ABR, the first evidence of mercury-induced hearing impairment in birds...

  10. Identification of noisy response latency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2012-01-01

    be highly unreliable, unless the background signal is accounted for in the analysis. In fact, if the background signal is ignored, however small it is compared to the response and however large the delay is, the estimate of the time delay will go to zero for any reasonable estimator when increasing...... the number of observations. Here we propose a unified concept of response latency identification in event data corrupted by a background signal. It is done in the context of information transfer within a neural system, more specifically on spike trains from single neurons. The estimators are compared...

  11. Brainstem auditory evoked response: application in neurology

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    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available The tecnique that we use for eliciting brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs is described. BAERs are a non-invasive and reliable clinical test when carefully performed. This test is indicated in the evaluation of disorders which may potentially involve the brainstem such as coma, multiple sclerosis posterior fossa tumors and others. Unsuspected lesions with normal radiologic studies (including CT-scan can be revealed by the BAER.

  12. AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES IN SENILE PRESBYCUSIS PATIENTS OVER 90 YEARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Aiting; LIANG Sichao; ZHANG Ruining; GUO Weiwei; ZHOU Qiyou; JI Fei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of auditory brainstem response (ABR) in presbycusis patients el-der than 90 years. Methods Fourteen presbycusis patients elder than 90 years (presbycusis group, 91.1.4 ± 1.3 years, 26 ears) and 9 normal-hearing young adults (control group, 22.7 ± 1.2 years, 18 ears) participated in the study. Alternative click-evoked ABRs were recorded in both groups. The peak latency (PL) of peak I,Ⅲ, and V, and the inter-peak latency (IPI) of I-Ⅲ,Ⅲ-V, and I-V were compared between groups. Results In elder presbycusis patients, the occurrence rate of peak I andⅢwere both 76.9%, and that of peak V was 84.6%. In presbycusis group, the peak latencies of I, Ⅲ, V were significantly longer than that of control group (P<0.001). There was no significant difference between groups in the IPI of peak I-IⅢ (P=0.298, peakⅢ-V (P=0.254) and peak I-V (P=0.364). Conclusions Auditory brainstem responses in presbycusis pa-tients elder than 90 years showed worse wave differentiation.

  13. Modeling auditory evoked brainstem responses to transient stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative model is presented that describes the formation of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to tone pulses, clicks and rising chirps as a function of stimulation level. The model computes the convolution of the instantaneous discharge rates using the “humanized” nonlinear auditory...... of tone-pulse evoked wave-V latency with frequency but underestimates the level dependency of the tone-pulse as well as click-evoked latency values. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the nonlinear wave-V amplitude behavior in response to the chirp stimulation both as a function of chirp sweeping...... rate and level. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that the pattern of ABR generation is strongly affected by the nonlinear and dispersive processes in the cochlea....

  14. The impact of severity of hypertension on auditory brainstem responses

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    Gurdev Lal Goyal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory brainstem response is an objective electrophysiological method for assessing the auditory pathways from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. The aim of this study was to correlate and to assess the degree of involvement of peripheral and central regions of brainstem auditory pathways with increasing severity of hypertension, among the patients of essential hypertension. Method: This study was conducted on 50 healthy age and sex matched controls (Group I and 50 hypertensive patients (Group II. Later group was further sub-divided into - Group IIa (Grade 1 hypertension, Group IIb (Grade 2 hypertension, and Group IIc (Grade 3 hypertension, as per WHO guidelines. These responses/potentials were recorded by using electroencephalogram electrodes on a root-mean-square electromyography, EP MARC II (PC-based machine and data were statistically compared between the various groups by way of one-way ANOVA. The parameters used for analysis were the absolute latencies of Waves I through V, interpeak latencies (IPLs and amplitude ratio of Wave V/I. Result: The absolute latency of Wave I was observed to be significantly increased in Group IIa and IIb hypertensives, while Wave V absolute latency was highly significantly prolonged among Group IIb and IIc, as compared to that of normal control group. All the hypertensives, that is, Group IIa, IIb, and IIc patients were found to have highly significant prolonged III-V IPL as compared to that of normal healthy controls. Further, intergroup comparison among hypertensive patients revealed a significant prolongation of Wave V absolute latency and III-V IPL in Group IIb and IIc patients as compared to Group IIa patients. These findings suggest a sensory deficit along with synaptic delays, across the auditory pathways in all the hypertensives, the deficit being more markedly affecting the auditory processing time at pons to midbrain (IPL III-V region of auditory pathways among Grade 2 and 3

  15. Type-2 diabetes mellitus and auditory brainstem response

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    Sheelu S Siddiqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus (DM causes pathophysiological changes at multiple organ system. With evoked potential techniques, the brain stem auditory response represents a simple procedure to detect both acoustic nerve and central nervous system pathway damage. The objective was to find the evidence of central neuropathy in diabetes patients by analyzing brainstem audiometry electric response obtained by auditory evoked potentials, quantify the characteristic of auditory brain response in long standing diabetes and to study the utility of auditory evoked potential in detecting the type, site, and nature of lesions. Design: A total of 25 Type-2 DM [13 (52% males and 12 (48% females] with duration of diabetes over 5 years and aged over 30 years. The brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA was performed by universal smart box manual version 2.0 at 70, 80, and 90 dB. The wave latency pattern and interpeak latencies were estimated. This was compared with 25 healthy controls (17 [68%] males and 8 [32%] females. Result: In Type-2 DM, BERA study revealed that wave-III representing superior olivary complex at 80 dB had wave latency of (3.99 ± 0.24 ms P < 0.001, at 90 dB (3.92 ± 0.28 ms P < 0.001 compared with control. The latency of wave III was delayed by 0.39, 0.42, and 0.42 ms at 70, 80, and 90 dB, respectively. The absolute latency of wave V representing inferior colliculus at 70 dB (6.05 ± 0.27 ms P < 0.001, at 80 dB (5.98 ± 0.27 P < 0.001, and at 90 dB (6.02 ± 0.30 ms P < 0.002 compared with control. The latency of wave-V was delayed by 0.48, 0.47, and 0.50 ms at 70, 80, and 90 dB, respectively. Interlatencies I-III at 70 dB (2.33 ± 0.22 ms P < 0.001, at 80 dB (2.39 ± 0.26 ms P < 0.001, while at 90 dB (2.47 ± 0.25 ms P < 0.001 when compared with control. Interlatencies I-V at 70 dB (4.45 ± 0.29 ms P < 0.001 at 80 dB (4.39 ± 0.34 ms P < 0.001, and at 90 dB (4.57 ± 0.31 ms P < 0.001 compared with control. Out of 25 Type-2 DM, 13 (52

  16. Development of Brainstem-Evoked Responses in Congenital Auditory Deprivation

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    J. Tillein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the development of the auditory system in hearing and completely acoustically deprived animals, naive congenitally deaf white cats (CDCs and hearing controls (HCs were investigated at different developmental stages from birth till adulthood. The CDCs had no hearing experience before the acute experiment. In both groups of animals, responses to cochlear implant stimulation were acutely assessed. Electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses (E-ABRs were recorded with monopolar stimulation at different current levels. CDCs demonstrated extensive development of E-ABRs, from first signs of responses at postnatal (p.n. day 3 through appearance of all waves of brainstem response at day 8 p.n. to mature responses around day 90 p.n.. Wave I of E-ABRs could not be distinguished from the artifact in majority of CDCs, whereas in HCs, it was clearly separated from the stimulus artifact. Waves II, III, and IV demonstrated higher thresholds in CDCs, whereas this difference was not found for wave V. Amplitudes of wave III were significantly higher in HCs, whereas wave V amplitudes were significantly higher in CDCs. No differences in latencies were observed between the animal groups. These data demonstrate significant postnatal subcortical development in absence of hearing, and also divergent effects of deafness on early waves II–IV and wave V of the E-ABR.

  17. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses with and without sedation in autism and Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sersen, E A; Heaney, G; Clausen, J; Belser, R; Rainbow, S

    1990-04-15

    Brainstem auditory-evoked responses (BAER) were obtained from 46 control, 16 Down's syndrome, and 48 autistic male subjects. Six Down's syndrome and 37 autistic subjects were tested with sedation. Sedated and unsedated Down's syndrome subjects displayed shorter absolute and interpeak latencies for early components of the BAER whereas the sedated autistic group showed longer latencies for the middle and late components. The prolongation of latencies in the sedated autistic group was unrelated to age or intellectual level. Although individuals requiring sedation may have a higher probability of neurological impairment, an effect of sedation on the BAER cannot be ruled out.

  18. Auditory Brainstem Responses and EMFs Generated by Mobile Phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, Shilpa; Sood, Archana; Sood, Sanjay

    2013-12-01

    There has been a manifold increase in the number of mobile phone users throughout the world with the current number of users exceeding 2 billion. However this advancement in technology like many others is accompanied by a progressive increase in the frequency and intensity of electromagnetic waves without consideration of the health consequences. The aim of our study was to advance our understanding of the potential adverse effects of GSM mobile phones on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). 60 subjects were selected for the study and divided into three groups of 20 each based on their usage of mobile phones. Their ABRs were recorded and analysed for latency of waves I-V as well as interpeak latencies I-III, I-V and III-V (in ms). Results revealed no significant difference in the ABR parameters between group A (control group) and group B (subjects using mobile phones for maximum 30 min/day for 5 years). However the latency of waves was significantly prolonged in group C (subjects using mobile phones for 10 years for a maximum of 30 min/day) as compared to the control group. Based on our findings we concluded that long term exposure to mobile phones may affect conduction in the peripheral portion of the auditory pathway. However more research needs to be done to study the long term effects of mobile phones particularly of newer technologies like smart phones and 3G.

  19. Abnormal Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR Findings in a Near-Normal Hearing Child with Noonan Syndrome

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    Bahram Jalaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noonan syndrome (NS is a heterogeneous genetic disease that affects many parts of the body. It was named after Dr. Jacqueline Anne Noonan, a paediatric cardiologist.Case Report: We report audiological tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR findings in a 5-year old Malay boy with NS. Despite showing the marked signs of NS, the child could only produce a few meaningful words. Audiological tests found him to have bilateral mild conductive hearing loss at low frequencies. In ABR testing, despite having good waveform morphology, the results were atypical. Absolute latency of wave V was normal but interpeak latencies of wave’s I-V, I-II, II-III were prolonged. Interestingly, interpeak latency of waves III-V was abnormally shorter.Conclusion:Abnormal ABR results are possibly due to abnormal anatomical condition of brainstem and might contribute to speech delay.

  20. Neurodynamics, tonality, and the auditory brainstem response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Edward W; Almonte, Felix V

    2012-04-01

    Tonal relationships are foundational in music, providing the basis upon which musical structures, such as melodies, are constructed and perceived. A recent dynamic theory of musical tonality predicts that networks of auditory neurons resonate nonlinearly to musical stimuli. Nonlinear resonance leads to stability and attraction relationships among neural frequencies, and these neural dynamics give rise to the perception of relationships among tones that we collectively refer to as tonal cognition. Because this model describes the dynamics of neural populations, it makes specific predictions about human auditory neurophysiology. Here, we show how predictions about the auditory brainstem response (ABR) are derived from the model. To illustrate, we derive a prediction about population responses to musical intervals that has been observed in the human brainstem. Our modeled ABR shows qualitative agreement with important features of the human ABR. This provides a source of evidence that fundamental principles of auditory neurodynamics might underlie the perception of tonal relationships, and forces reevaluation of the role of learning and enculturation in tonal cognition.

  1. Response rate, latency, and resistance to change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, Stephen J.; Fields, Lanny; Malott, M. Kay; Grossett, Deborah

    1983-01-01

    Pigeons were trained on a multiple variable-interval/variable-interval schedule with pacing contingencies that generated high response rates in one component and low response rates in the other. Timeout periods separated the schedule components. During resistance-to-change tests, response-independent food was presented during the timeout periods, and the duration of that food presentation was varied among test sessions. Response rates in the schedule components decreased and latencies to the first response increased as a function of the duration of food presentations during the timeout. Both dependent measures changed about the same amount relative to their own baseline levels. The conclusions are that baseline response rates controlled by pacing contingencies are equally resistant to change, given equal reinforcement densities, and latency is a sensitive measure of resistance to change. PMID:16812319

  2. State-dependent variations in brainstem auditory evoked responses in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sersen, E A; Majkowski, J; Clausen, J; Heaney, G M

    1984-12-01

    BAERs from 16 subjects during 3 sessions varied in the latency or amplitude of some components depending upon level of arousal as indicated by EEG patterns. There was a general tendency for activation to produce the fastest responses with the largest amplitudes and for drowsiness to produce the slowest responses with the smallest amplitudes. The latency of P2 was significantly prolonged during drowsiness, relative to those during relaxation or activation. For right-ear stimulation, P5 latency was longest during drowsiness, and shortest during activation while for left-ear stimulation the shortest latency occurred during relaxation. The amplitudes of Wave II and Wave VII were significantly smaller during drowsiness than during activation. Although the differences were below the level of clinical significance, the data indicate a modification in the characteristics of brainstem transmission as a function of concurrent activity in other brain areas.

  3. Modulation of auditory brainstem responses by serotonin and specific serotonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papesh, Melissa A; Hurley, Laura M

    2016-02-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is found throughout the auditory system from the cochlea to the cortex. Although effects of serotonin have been reported at the level of single neurons in many brainstem nuclei, how these effects correspond to more integrated measures of auditory processing has not been well-explored. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effects of serotonin on far-field auditory brainstem responses (ABR) across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and intensities. Using a mouse model, we investigated the consequences of systemic serotonin depletion, as well as the selective stimulation and suppression of the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, on ABR latency and amplitude. Stimuli included tone pips spanning four octaves presented over a forty dB range. Depletion of serotonin reduced the ABR latencies in Wave II and later waves, suggesting that serotonergic effects occur as early as the cochlear nucleus. Further, agonists and antagonists of specific serotonergic receptors had different profiles of effects on ABR latencies and amplitudes across waves and frequencies, suggestive of distinct effects of these agents on auditory processing. Finally, most serotonergic effects were more pronounced at lower ABR frequencies, suggesting larger or more directional modulation of low-frequency processing. This is the first study to describe the effects of serotonin on ABR responses across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and amplitudes, and it presents an important step in understanding how serotonergic modulation of auditory brainstem processing may contribute to modulation of auditory perception.

  4. Aberrant lateralization of brainstem auditory evoked responses by individuals with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miezejeski, C M; Heaney, G; Belser, R; Sersen, E A

    1994-01-01

    Brainstem auditory evoked response latencies were studied in 80 males (13 with Down syndrome, 23 with developmental disability due to other causes, and 44 with no disability). Latencies for waves P3 and P5 were shorter for the Down syndrome than for the other groups, though at P5, as compared to latencies for the nondisabled group, the difference was not significant. The pattern of left versus right ear responses in the Down syndrome group differed from those of the other groups. This finding was related to research noting decreased lateralization of and decreased ability at receptive and expressive language among people with Down syndrome. Some individuals required sedation. A lateralized effect of sedation was noted.

  5. Effect of Infant Prematurity on Auditory Brainstem Response at Preschool Age

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    Sara Hasani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm birth is a risk factor for a number of conditions that requires comprehensive examination. Our study was designed to investigate the impact of preterm birth on the processing of auditory stimuli and brain structures at the brainstem level at a preschool age.   Materials and Methods: An auditory brainstem response (ABR test was performed with low rates of stimuli in 60 children aged 4 to 6 years. Thirty subjects had been born following a very preterm labor or late-preterm labor and 30 control subjects had been born following a full-term labor.   Results: Significant differences in the ABR test result were observed in terms of the inter-peak intervals of the I–III and III–V waves, and the absolute latency of the III wave (P

  6. Comparison of Auditory Brainstem Response in Noise Induced Tinnitus and Non-Tinnitus Control Subjects

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    Ghassem Mohammadkhani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Tinnitus is an unpleasant sound which can cause some behavioral disorders. According to evidence the origin of tinnitus is not only in peripheral but also in central auditory system. So evaluation of central auditory system function is necessary. In this study Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were compared in noise induced tinnitus and non-tinnitus control subjects.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study is conducted in 60 cases in two groups including of 30 noise induced tinnitus and 30 non-tinnitus control subjects. ABRs were recorded ipsilateraly and contralateraly and their latencies and amplitudes were analyzed.Results: Mean interpeak latencies of III-V (p= 0.022, I-V (p=0.033 in ipsilatral electrode array and mean absolute latencies of IV (p=0.015 and V (p=0.048 in contralatral electrode array were significantly increased in noise induced tinnitus group relative to control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded from that there are some decrease in neural transmission time in brainstem and there are some sign of involvement of medial nuclei in olivery complex in addition to lateral lemniscus.

  7. Short GSM mobile phone exposure does not alter human auditory brainstem response

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    Thuróczy György

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are about 1.6 billion GSM cellular phones in use throughout the world today. Numerous papers have reported various biological effects in humans exposed to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones. The aim of the present study was to advance our understanding of potential adverse effects of the GSM mobile phones on the human hearing system. Methods Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR was recorded with three non-polarizing Ag-AgCl scalp electrodes in thirty young and healthy volunteers (age 18–26 years with normal hearing. ABR data were collected before, and immediately after a 10 minute exposure to 900 MHz pulsed electromagnetic field (EMF emitted by a commercial Nokia 6310 mobile phone. Fifteen subjects were exposed to genuine EMF and fifteen to sham EMF in a double blind and counterbalanced order. Possible effects of irradiation was analyzed by comparing the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after genuine/sham EMF exposure. Results Paired sample t-test was conducted for statistical analysis. Results revealed no significant differences in the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after 10 minutes of genuine/sham EMF exposure. Conclusion The present results suggest that, in our experimental conditions, a single 10 minute exposure of 900 MHz EMF emitted by a commercial mobile phone does not produce measurable immediate effects in the latency of auditory brainstem waves I, III and V.

  8. Rate and adaptation effects on the auditory evoked brainstem response in human newborns and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, R E

    1997-09-01

    Auditory evoked brainstem response (ABR) latencies increased and amplitudes decreased with increasing stimulus repetition rate for human newborns and adults. The wave V latency increases were larger for newborns than adults. The wave V amplitude decreases were smaller for newborns than adults. These differences could not be explained by developmental differences in frequency responsivity. The transition from the unadapted to the fully adapted response was less rapid in newborns than adults at short (= 10 ms) inter stimulus intervals (ISIs). At longer ISIs (= 20 ms) there were no developmental differences in the transition to the fully adapted response. The newborn transition occurred in a two stage process. The rapid initial stage observed in adults and newborns was complete by about 40 ms. A second slower stage was observed only in newborns although it has been observed in adults in other studies (Weatherby and Hecox, 1982; Lightfoot, 1991; Lasky et al., 1996). These effects were replicated at different stimulus intensities. After the termination of stimulation the return to the wave V unadapted response took nearly 500 ms in newborns. Neither the newborn nor the adult data can be explained by forward masking of one click on the next click. These results indicate human developmental differences in adaptation to repetitive auditory stimulation at the level of the brainstem.

  9. [Speech evoked auditory brainstem response and cognitive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M; Wang, N Y

    2016-12-07

    Speech evoked auditory brainstem response(s-ABR)is evoked by compound syllable, and those stimulus are similar to the daily language which convey both semantic information and non-semantic information. Speech coding program can take place at brainstem. As a new method, s-ABR may reveal the mystery of speech coding program. Many tests have proved that s-ABR is somehow related to cognitive ability. We mainly illustrated the possibility of grading the cognitive ability using s-ABR, the abnormal test result from those cognitive disorders, and the family factors that contribute to cognitive disorder.

  10. Speech-evoked auditory brainstem responses in children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koravand, Amineh; Al Osman, Rida; Rivest, Véronique; Poulin, Catherine

    2017-08-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate subcortical auditory processing in children with sensorineural hearing loss. Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABRs) were recorded using click and speech/da/stimuli. Twenty-five children, aged 6-14 years old, participated in the study: 13 with normal hearing acuity and 12 with sensorineural hearing loss. No significant differences were observed for the click-evoked ABRs between normal hearing and hearing-impaired groups. For the speech-evoked ABRs, no significant differences were found for the latencies of the following responses between the two groups: onset (V and A), transition (C), one of the steady-state wave (F), and offset (O). However, the latency of the steady-state waves (D and E) was significantly longer for the hearing-impaired compared to the normal hearing group. Furthermore, the amplitude of the offset wave O and of the envelope frequency response (EFR) of the speech-evoked ABRs was significantly larger for the hearing-impaired compared to the normal hearing group. Results obtained from the speech-evoked ABRs suggest that children with a mild to moderately-severe sensorineural hearing loss have a specific pattern of subcortical auditory processing. Our results show differences for the speech-evoked ABRs in normal hearing children compared to hearing-impaired children. These results add to the body of the literature on how children with hearing loss process speech at the brainstem level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The auditory brainstem response in two lizard species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Tang, Yezhong

    2010-01-01

    Although lizards have highly sensitive ears, it is difficult to condition them to sound, making standard psychophysical assays of hearing sensitivity impractical. This paper describes non-invasive measurements of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in both Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko; nocturnal...... in most bird species....

  12. Construction of Hindi Speech Stimuli for Eliciting Auditory Brainstem Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohammad Shamim; Rangasayee, R

    2016-12-01

    Speech-evoked auditory brainstem responses (spABRs) provide considerable information of clinical relevance to describe auditory processing of complex stimuli at the sub cortical level. The substantial research data have suggested faithful representation of temporal and spectral characteristics of speech sounds. However, the spABR are known to be affected by acoustic properties of speech, language experiences and training. Hence, there exists indecisive literature with regards to brainstem speech processing. This warrants establishment of language specific speech stimulus to describe the brainstem processing in specific oral language user. The objective of current study is to develop Hindi speech stimuli for recording auditory brainstem responses. The Hindi stop speech of 40 ms containing five formants was constructed. Brainstem evoked responses to speech sound |da| were gained from 25 normal hearing (NH) adults having mean age of 20.9 years (SD = 2.7) in the age range of 18-25 years and ten subjects (HI) with mild SNHL of mean 21.3 years (SD = 3.2) in the age range of 18-25 years. The statistically significant differences in the mean identification scores of synthesized for speech stimuli |da| and |ga| between NH and HI were obtained. The mean, median, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and 95 % confidence interval for the discrete peaks and V-A complex values of electrophysiological responses to speech stimulus were measured and compared between NH and HI population. This paper delineates a comprehensive methodological approach for development of Hindi speech stimuli and recording of ABR to speech. The acoustic characteristic of stimulus |da| was faithfully represented at brainstem level in normal hearing adults. There was statistically significance difference between NH and HI individuals. This suggests that spABR offers an opportunity to segregate normal speech encoding from abnormal speech processing at sub cortical level, which implies that

  13. Evaluation of auditory brain-stem evoked response in middle: Aged type 2 diabetes mellitus with normal hearing subjects

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    Debadatta Mahallik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is commonly metabolic disorders of carbohydrate in which blood glucose levels are abnormally high due to relative or absolute insulin deficiency. In addition, it is characterized by abnormal metabolism of fat, protein resulting from insulin deficit or insulin action, or both. There are two broad categories of DM are designated as type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes is due to predominantly insulin resistance with relative insulin deficiency noninsulin-dependent DM. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than insulin-dependent DM. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess, if there is any abnormality in neural conduction in auditory brain-stem pathway in type 2 DM patients having normal hearing sensitivity when compared to age-matched healthy populations. Materials and Methods: This study included middle - aged 25 subjects having normal hearing with diabetes type 2 mellitus. All were submitted to the full audiological history taking, otological examination, basic audiological evaluation and auditory brain-stem response audiometry which was recorded in both ears, followed by calculation of the absolute latencies of wave I, III and V, as well as interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, I-V. Results: Type 2 DM patients showed significant prolonged absolute latencies of I, III (P = 0.001 and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V in left ear (P = 0.001 and absolute latencies of I, V (P = 0.001, interpeak latencies III-V was statistically significant in right ear. Conclusions: The prolonged absolute latencies and interpeak latencies suggests abnormal neural firing synchronization or in the transmission in the auditory pathways in normal hearing type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  14. Evaluation of otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses for hearing screening of high risk infants

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    Tania Nazir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the present study is the assessment of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs for hearing screening of high risk infants. Study Design: Prospective, hospital-based. Materials and Methods: Distortion product OAEs (DPOAEs and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA recordings were obtained for 30 controls and 100 infants with one or more high risk factors, in a sound treated room and the results were interpreted. ABR peak latencies, amplitudes, and waveform morphology in high risk infants were compared with those in control group. DPOAE as screening test was evaluated in terms of various parameters with BERA/ABR taken as gold standard. Results: Absolute latencies of Wave I and Wave V and interpeak latency of I-V were significantly prolonged in high risk group as compared to control group. The most common causes to contribute significantly for hearing impairment were found to be hyperbilirubinemia, birth asphyxia, meningitis/septicemia. DPOAE when compared with ABR taken as gold standard showed that sensitivity of the test was 87.7% (74.5%-94.9% and specificity was 74.5% (60.0%-85.2%. Positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.2%-86.6% and negative predictive value of the test was 86% (71.9%-94.3%. Positive likelihood ratio was 0.29 (0.18-0.46 and negative likelihood ratio was 6.08 (2.82-13.09. Conclusion : ABR/BERA, though highly reliable, is a tedious and time consuming test. DPOAE is a simple and rapid test with relatively higher acceptability but low sensitivity and specificity; therefore, limits its role as independent screening test. DPOAE-ABR test series is an effective way to screen all the high risk infants at the earliest.

  15. Auditory generalization gradients for response latency in the monkey1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, David B.; Stebbins, William C.; Iglauer, Carol

    1971-01-01

    Two monkeys were trained to press and hold a response key in the presence of a light and to release it at the onset of a pure tone. Initially, all responses with latencies shorter than 1 sec were reinforced without regard to the frequency of the pure tone, and the intensity of the pure tone that resulted in equal latencies at each frequency was determined. The second stage of the experiment consisted of discrimination training, during which releases to one pure-tone frequency (positive stimulus) were reinforced and releases to a second frequency (negative stimulus) were extinguished. Median latencies to the negative stimulus slowly increased as did the variability of the latency distribution for the negative stimulus. There was no evidence of a concurrent decrease in latencies to the positive stimulus indicative of behavioral contrast. The third part of the experiment consisted of determining maintained generalization gradients by increasing the number of nonreinforcement stimuli. The gradients that eventually resulted showed approximately equal latencies to all frequencies of the negative stimulus and shorter latencies to the positive stimulus frequency. PMID:5003971

  16. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldonate, J; Mercuri, C; Reta, J; Biurrun, J; Bonell, C; Gentiletti, G; Escobar, S; Acevedo, R [Laboratorio de Ingenieria en Rehabilitacion e Investigaciones Neuromusculares y Sensoriales (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Ruta 11 - Km 10, Oro Verde, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  17. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldonate, J.; Mercuri, C.; Reta, J.; Biurrun, J.; Bonell, C.; Gentiletti, G.; Escobar, S.; Acevedo, R.

    2007-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  18. Auditory brainstem response changes during exposure to GSM-900 radiation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaprana, Antigoni E; Chimona, Theognosia S; Papadakis, Chariton E; Velegrakis, Stylianos G; Vardiambasis, Ioannis O; Adamidis, Georgios; Velegrakis, George A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the possible electrophysiological time-related changes in auditory pathway during mobile phone electromagnetic field exposure. Thirty healthy rabbits were enrolled in an experimental study of exposure to GSM-900 radiation for 60 min and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded at regular time-intervals during exposure. The study subjects were radiated via an adjustable power and frequency radio transmitter for GSM-900 mobile phone emission simulation, designed and manufactured according to the needs of the experiment. The mean absolute latency of waves III-V showed a statistically significant delay (p < 0.05) after 60, 45 and 15 min of exposure to electromagnetic radiation of 900 MHz, respectively. Interwave latency I-III was found to be prolonged after 60 min of radiation exposure in correspondence to wave III absolute latency delay. Interwave latencies I-V and III-V were found with a statistically significant delay (p < 0.05) after 30 min of radiation. No statistically significant delay was found for the same ABR parameters in recordings from the ear contralateral to the radiation source at 60 min radiation exposure compared with baseline ABR. The ABR measurements returned to baseline recordings 24 h after the exposure to electromagnetic radiation of 900 MHz. The prolongation of interval latencies I-V and III-V indicates that exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phone can affect the normal electrophysiological activity of the auditory system, and these findings fit the pattern of general responses to a stressor.

  19. Long-term evolution of brainstem electrical evoked responses to sound after restricted ablation of the auditory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Lamas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to assess the top-down control of sound processing in the auditory brainstem of rats. Short latency evoked responses were analyzed after unilateral or bilateral ablation of auditory cortex. This experimental paradigm was also used towards analyzing the long-term evolution of post-lesion plasticity in the auditory system and its ability to self-repair. METHOD: Auditory cortex lesions were performed in rats by stereotactically guided fine-needle aspiration of the cerebrocortical surface. Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR were recorded at post-surgery day (PSD 1, 7, 15 and 30. Recordings were performed under closed-field conditions, using click trains at different sound intensity levels, followed by statistical analysis of threshold values and ABR amplitude and latency variables. Subsequently, brains were sectioned and immunostained for GAD and parvalbumin to assess the location and extent of lesions accurately. RESULTS: Alterations in ABR variables depended on the type of lesion and post-surgery time of ABR recordings. Accordingly, bilateral ablations caused a statistically significant increase in thresholds at PSD1 and 7 and a decrease in waves amplitudes at PSD1 that recover at PSD7. No effects on latency were noted at PSD1 and 7, whilst recordings at PSD15 and 30 showed statistically significant decreases in latency. Conversely, unilateral ablations had no effect on auditory thresholds or latencies, while wave amplitudes only decreased at PSD1 strictly in the ipsilateral ear. CONCLUSION: Post-lesion plasticity in the auditory system acts in two time periods: short-term period of decreased sound sensitivity (until PSD7, most likely resulting from axonal degeneration; and a long-term period (up to PSD7, with changes in latency responses and recovery of thresholds and amplitudes values. The cerebral cortex may have a net positive gain on the auditory pathway response to sound.

  20. Neonate Auditory Brainstem Responses to CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp Octave Band Stimuli II: Versus Adult Auditory Brainstem Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M; Stuart, Andrew

    The purpose of the study was to examine the differences in auditory brainstem response (ABR) latency and amplitude indices to the CE-Chirp stimuli in neonates versus young adults as a function of stimulus level, rate, polarity, frequency and gender. Participants were 168 healthy neonates and 20 normal-hearing young adults. ABRs were obtained to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. The effects of stimulus level, rate, and polarity were examined with air-conducted CE-Chirps. The effect of stimulus level was also examined with bone-conducted CE-Chirps and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. The effect of gender was examined across all stimulus manipulations. In general, ABR wave V amplitudes were significantly larger (p CE-Chirp stimuli with all stimulus manipulations. For bone-conducted CE-Chirps, infants had significantly shorter wave V latencies than adults at 15 dB nHL and 45 dB nHL (p = 0.02). Adult wave V amplitude was significantly larger for bone-conducted CE-Chirps only at 30 dB nHL (p = 0.02). The effect of gender was not statistically significant across all measures (p > 0.05). Significant differences in ABR latencies and amplitudes exist between newborns and young adults using CE-Chirp stimuli. These differences are consistent with differences to traditional click and tone burst stimuli and reflect maturational differences as a function of age. These findings continue to emphasize the importance of interpreting ABR results using age-based normative data.

  1. Auditory brainstem responses predict auditory nerve fiber thresholds and frequency selectivity in hearing impaired chinchillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kenneth S; Kale, Sushrut; Scheidt, Ryan E; Heinz, Michael G

    2011-10-01

    Noninvasive auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) are commonly used to assess cochlear pathology in both clinical and research environments. In the current study, we evaluated the relationship between ABR characteristics and more direct measures of cochlear function. We recorded ABRs and auditory nerve (AN) single-unit responses in seven chinchillas with noise-induced hearing loss. ABRs were recorded for 1-8 kHz tone burst stimuli both before and several weeks after 4 h of exposure to a 115 dB SPL, 50 Hz band of noise with a center frequency of 2 kHz. Shifts in ABR characteristics (threshold, wave I amplitude, and wave I latency) following hearing loss were compared to AN-fiber tuning curve properties (threshold and frequency selectivity) in the same animals. As expected, noise exposure generally resulted in an increase in ABR threshold and decrease in wave I amplitude at equal SPL. Wave I amplitude at equal sensation level (SL), however, was similar before and after noise exposure. In addition, noise exposure resulted in decreases in ABR wave I latency at equal SL and, to a lesser extent, at equal SPL. The shifts in ABR characteristics were significantly related to AN-fiber tuning curve properties in the same animal at the same frequency. Larger shifts in ABR thresholds and ABR wave I amplitude at equal SPL were associated with greater AN threshold elevation. Larger reductions in ABR wave I latency at equal SL, on the other hand, were associated with greater loss of AN frequency selectivity. This result is consistent with linear systems theory, which predicts shorter time delays for broader peripheral frequency tuning. Taken together with other studies, our results affirm that ABR thresholds and wave I amplitude provide useful estimates of cochlear sensitivity. Furthermore, comparisons of ABR wave I latency to normative data at the same SL may prove useful for detecting and characterizing loss of cochlear frequency selectivity.

  2. Comparison of the developmental changes of the brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) in taurine-supplemented and taurine-deficient kittens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecalle-Sandoval, M H; Heaney, G; Sersen, E; Sturman, J A

    1991-01-01

    A similar development of the brainstem auditory evoked response is present in taurine-supplemented and taurine-deficient kittens between the second postnatal week and the third month of life. Between birth and the second postnatal week kittens from mothers fed the 1% taurine diet showed earlier maturation of the brainstem auditory evoked response as indicated by lower threshold, shorter P1 latency and shorter central conduction time when compared to the kittens from mothers fed the 0.05% taurine diet. These results suggest an important role of taurine in the anatomical and functional development of the auditory system.

  3. Effect of the ketamine/xylazine anesthetic on the auditory brainstem response of adult gerbils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The auditory brainstem response (ABR is a test widely used to assess the integrity of the brain stem. Although it is considered to be an auditory-evoked potential that is influenced by the physical characteristics of the stimulus, such as rate, polarity and type of stimulus, it may also be influenced by the change in several parameters. The use of anesthetics may adversely influence the value of the ABR wave latency. One of the anesthetics used for e ABR assessment, especially in animal research, is the ketamine/xylazine combination. Our objective was to determine the influence of the ketamine/xylazine anesthetic on the ABR latency values in adult gerbils. The ABRs of 12 adult gerbils injected with the anesthetic were collected on three consecutive days, or a total of six collections, namely: pre-collection and A, B, C, D, and E collections. Before each collection the gerbil was injected with a dose of ketamine (100 mg/kg/xylazine (4 mg/kg. For the capture of the ABR, 2000 click stimuli were used with rarefaction polarity and 13 stimuli per second, 80 dBnHL intensity and in-ear phones. A statistically significant difference was observed in the latency of the V wave in the ABR of gerbils in the C and D collections compared to the pre-, A and E collections, and no difference was observed between the pre-, A, B, and E collections. We conclude that the use of ketamine/xylazine increases the latency of the V wave of the ABR after several doses injected into adult gerbils; thus clinicians should consider the use of this substance in the assessment of ABR.

  4. Auditory Brainstem Responses in Children Treated with Cisplatin

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    Mohammad Kamali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In view of improvement in therapeutic outcome of cancer treatment in children resulting in increased survival rates and the importance of hearing in speech and language development, this research project was intended to assess the effects of cisplatin group on hearing ability in children aged 6 months to 12 years.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, hearing of 10 children on cisplatin group medication for cancer who met the inclusion criteria was examined by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABR using the three stimulants of click and 4 and 8 kHz tone bursts. All children were examined twice: before drug administration and within 72 hours after receiving the last dose. Then the results were compared with each other.Results: There was a significant difference between hearing thresholds before and after drug administration (p<0.05. Right and left ear threshold comparison revealed no significant difference.Conclusion: Ototoxic effects of cisplatin group were confirmed in this study. Insignificant difference observed in comparing right and left ear hearing thresholds could be due to small sample size. auditory brainstem responses test especially with frequency specificity proved to be a useful method in assessing cisplatin ototoxicity.

  5. A Comparison of Commercially Available Auditory Brainstem Response Stimuli at a Neurodiagnostic Intensity Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesling, Devan A; Parker, Jordan Paige; Sanchez, Jason Tait

    2017-02-01

    iChirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) yield a larger wave V amplitude at low intensity levels than traditional broadband click stimuli, providing a reliable estimation of hearing sensitivity. However, advantages of iChirp stimulation at high intensity levels are unknown. We tested to see if high-intensity (i.e., 85 dBnHL) iChirp stimulation results in larger and more reliable ABR waveforms than click. Using the commercially available Intelligent Hearing System SmartEP platform, we recorded ABRs from 43 normal hearing young adults. We report that absolute peak latencies were more variable for iChirp and were ~3 ms longer: the latter of which is simply due to the temporal duration of the signal. Interpeak latencies were slightly shorter for iChirp and were most evident between waves I-V. Interestingly, click responses were easier to identify and peak-to-trough amplitudes for waves I, III and V were significantly larger than iChirp. These differences were not due to residual noise levels. We speculate that high intensity iChirp stimulation reduces neural synchrony and conclude that for retrocochlear evaluations, click stimuli should be used as the standard for ABR neurodiagnostic testing.

  6. Task-Related Suppression of the Brainstem Frequency following Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-18

    related mediation of the FFR in both amplitude and latency [28–30]. For example, attending to vowels leads to an amplitude increase of the fundamental...10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3900–09.2009. 4. Krishnan A (2002) Human frequency-following responses: representation of steady-state synthetic vowels . Hear Res 166: 192...Ashley R (2009) Musical experience and neural efficiency: effects of training on subcortical processing of vocal expressions of emotion . Eur J

  7. Brainstem auditory evoked response characteristics in normal-hearing subjects with chronic tinnitus and in non-tinnitus group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadman Nemati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: While most of the people with tinnitus have some degrees of hearing impairment, a small percent of patients admitted to ear, nose and throat clinics or hearing evaluation centers are those who complain of tinnitus despite having normal hearing thresholds. This study was performed to better understanding of the reasons of probable causes of tinnitus and to investigate possible changes in the auditory brainstem function in normal-hearing patients with chronic tinnitus.Methods: In this comparative cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study, 52 ears (26 with and 26 without tinnitus were examined. Components of the auditory brainstem response (ABR including wave latencies and wave amplitudes were determined in the two groups and analyzed using appropriate statistical methods.Results: The mean differences between the absolute latencies of waves I, III and V was less than 0.1 ms between the two groups that was not statistically significant. Also, the interpeak latency values of waves I-III, III-V and I-V in both groups had no significant difference. Only, the V/I amplitude ratio in the tinnitus group was significantly higher (p=0.04.Conclusion: The changes observed in amplitude of waves, especially in the latter ones, can be considered as an indication of plastic changes in neuronal activity and its possible role in generation of tinnitus in normal-hearing patients.

  8. A review of the methods for neuronal response latency estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levakovaa, Marie; Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Ditlevsen, Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal response latency is usually vaguely defined as the delay between the stimulus onset and the beginning of the response. It contains important information for the understanding of the temporal code. For this reason, the detection of the response latency has been extensively studied...... in the last twenty years, yielding different estimation methods. They can be divided into two classes, one of them including methods based on detecting an intensity change in the firing rate profile after the stimulus onset and the other containing methods based on detection of spikes evoked...... by the stimulation using interspike intervals and spike times. The aim of this paper is to present a review of the main techniques proposed in both classes, highlighting their advantages and shortcomings....

  9. Auditory Brainstem Response Wave Amplitude Characteristics as a Diagnostic Tool in Children with Speech Delay with Unknown Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Abadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Speech delay with an unknown cause is a problem among children. This diagnosis is the last differential diagnosis after observing normal findings in routine hearing tests. The present study was undertaken to determine whether auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli are different between normally developing children and children suffering from delayed speech with unknown causes. In this cross-sectional study, we compared click auditory brainstem responses between 261 children who were clinically diagnosed with delayed speech with unknown causes based on normal routine auditory test findings and neurological examinations and had >12 months of speech delay (case group and 261 age- and sex-matched normally developing children (control group. Our results indicated that the case group exhibited significantly higher wave amplitude responses to click stimuli (waves I, III, and V than did the control group (P=0.001. These amplitudes were significantly reduced after 1 year (P=0.001; however, they were still significantly higher than those of the control group (P=0.001. The significant differences were seen regardless of the age and the sex of the participants. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups considering the latency of waves I, III, and V. In conclusion, the higher amplitudes of waves I, III, and V, which were observed in the auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli among the patients with speech delay with unknown causes, might be used as a diagnostic tool to track patients’ improvement after treatment.

  10. Using Arduino microcontroller boards to measure response latencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Thomas W; D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Canto, Rosario

    2013-12-01

    Latencies of buttonpresses are a staple of cognitive science paradigms. Often keyboards are employed to collect buttonpresses, but their imprecision and variability decreases test power and increases the risk of false positives. Response boxes and data acquisition cards are precise, but expensive and inflexible, alternatives. We propose using open-source Arduino microcontroller boards as an inexpensive and flexible alternative. These boards connect to standard experimental software using a USB connection and a virtual serial port, or by emulating a keyboard. In our solution, an Arduino measures response latencies after being signaled the start of a trial, and communicates the latency and response back to the PC over a USB connection. We demonstrated the reliability, robustness, and precision of this communication in six studies. Test measures confirmed that the error added to the measurement had an SD of less than 1 ms. Alternatively, emulation of a keyboard results in similarly precise measurement. The Arduino performs as well as a serial response box, and better than a keyboard. In addition, our setup allows for the flexible integration of other sensors, and even actuators, to extend the cognitive science toolbox.

  11. Cochlear Responses and Auditory Brainstem Response Functions in Adults with Auditory Neuropathy/ Dys-Synchrony and Individuals with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Physiologic measures of cochlear and auditory nerve function may be of assis¬tance in distinguishing between hearing disorders due primarily to auditory nerve impairment from those due primarily to cochlear hair cells dysfunction. The goal of present study was to measure of co-chlear responses (otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response in some adults with auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony and subjects with normal hearing. Materials and Methods: Patients were 16 adults (32 ears in age range of 14-30 years with auditory neu¬ropathy/ dys-synchrony and 16 individuals in age range of 16-30 years from both sexes. The results of transient otoacoustic emissions, cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response measures were compared in both groups and the effects of age, sex, ear and degree of hearing loss were studied. Results: The pure-tone average was 48.1 dB HL in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony group and the fre¬quency of low tone loss and flat audiograms were higher among other audiogram's shapes. Transient oto¬acoustic emissions were shown in all auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony people except two cases and its average was near in both studied groups. The latency and amplitude of the biggest reversed co-chlear microphonics response were higher in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients than control peo¬ple significantly. The correlation between cochlear microphonics amplitude and degree of hearing loss was not significant, and age had significant effect in some cochlear microphonics measures. Audi-tory brainstem response had no response in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients even with low stim¬uli rates. Conclusion: In adults with speech understanding worsen than predicted from the degree of hearing loss that suspect to auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony, the frequency of low tone loss and flat audiograms are higher. Usually auditory brainstem response is absent in

  12. Alterations in peripheral and central components of the auditory brainstem response: a neural assay of tinnitus.

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    Andrea S Lowe

    Full Text Available Chronic tinnitus, or "ringing of the ears", affects upwards of 15% of the adult population. Identifying a cost-effective and objective measure of tinnitus is needed due to legal concerns and disability issues, as well as for facilitating the effort to assess neural biomarkers. We developed a modified gap-in-noise (GIN paradigm to assess tinnitus in mice using the auditory brainstem response (ABR. We then compared the commonly used acoustic startle reflex gap-prepulse inhibition (gap-PPI and the ABR GIN paradigm in young adult CBA/CaJ mice before and after administrating sodium salicylate (SS, which is known to reliably induce a 16 kHz tinnitus percept in rodents. Post-SS, gap-PPI was significantly reduced at 12 and 16 kHz, consistent with previous studies demonstrating a tinnitus-induced gap-PPI reduction in this frequency range. ABR audiograms indicated thresholds were significantly elevated post-SS, also consistent with previous studies. There was a significant increase in the peak 2 (P2 to peak 1 (P1 and peak 4 (P4 to P1 amplitude ratios in the mid-frequency range, along with decreased latency of P4 at higher intensities. For the ABR GIN, peak amplitudes of the response to the second noise burst were calculated as a percentage of the first noise burst response amplitudes to quantify neural gap processing. A significant decrease in this ratio (i.e. recovery was seen only at 16 kHz for P1, indicating the presence of tinnitus near this frequency. Thus, this study demonstrates that GIN ABRs can be used as an efficient, non-invasive, and objective method of identifying the approximate pitch and presence of tinnitus in a mouse model. This technique has the potential for application in human subjects and also indicates significant, albeit different, deficits in temporal processing in peripheral and brainstem circuits following drug induced tinnitus.

  13. Auditory brainstem responses to clicks and tone bursts in C57 BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimemi, P; Santarelli, R; Selmo, A; Mammano, F

    2014-08-01

    In auditory research, hearing function of mouse mutants is assessed in vivo by evoked potential recording. Evaluation of the response parameters should be performed with reference to the evoked responses recorded from wild-type mice. This study reports normative data calculated on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) obtained from 20 wild-type C57 BL/6J mice at a postnatal age between 21 and 45 days. Acoustic stimuli consisted tone bursts at 8, 14, 20, 26, 32 kHz, and clicks. Each stimulus was delivered in free field at stimulation intensity starting from a maximum of 100 dB peak equivalent SPL (dB peSPL) at decreasing steps of 10 dB with a repetition rate of 13/sec. Evoked responses were recorded by needle electrodes inserted subcutaneously. At high intensity stimulation, five response waveforms, each consisting of a positive peak and a subsequent negative valley, were identified within 7 msec, and were labelled with sequential capital Roman numerals from I to V. Peak IV was the most robust and stable at low intensities for both tone burst and click stimuli, and was therefore utilized to estimate hearing thresholds. Both latencies and amplitudes of ABR peaks showed good reproducibility with acceptable standard deviations. Mean wave IV thresholds measured across all animals ranged from a maximum of 23 dB peSPL for clicks to a minimum of 7 dB peSPL for 20 kHz-tone burst stimuli. Statistical analysis of the distribution of latencies and amplitudes of peaks from I to V performed for each stimulus type yielded a normative data set which was utilised to obtain the most consistent fitting-curve model. This could serve as a reference for further studies on murine models of hearing loss.

  14. Preoperative characteristics of auditory brainstem response in acoustic neuroma with useful hearing: importance as a preliminary investigation for intraoperative monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Noritaka; Murakami, Shingo; Takahashi, Mariko; Yamada, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We classified the results of preoperative auditory brainstem response (ABR) in 121 patients with useful hearing and considered the utility of preoperative ABR as a preliminary assessment for intraoperative monitoring. Wave V was confirmed in 113 patients and was not confirmed in 8 patients. Intraoperative ABR could not detect wave V in these 8 patients. The 8 patients without wave V were classified into two groups (flat and wave I only), and the reason why wave V could not be detected may have differed between the groups. Because high-frequency hearing was impaired in flat patients, an alternative to click stimulation may be more effective. Monitoring cochlear nerve action potential (CNAP) may be useful because CNAP could be detected in 4 of 5 wave I only patients. Useful hearing was preserved after surgery in 1 patient in the flat group and 2 patients in wave I only group. Among patients with wave V, the mean interaural latency difference of wave V was 0.88 ms in Class A (n = 57) and 1.26 ms in Class B (n = 56). Because the latency of wave V is already prolonged before surgery, to estimate delay in wave V latency during surgery probably underestimates cochlear nerve damage. Recording intraoperative ABR is indispensable to avoid cochlear nerve damage and to provide information for surgical decisions. Confirming the condition of ABR before surgery helps to solve certain problems, such as choosing to monitor the interaural latency difference of wave V, CNAP, or alternative sound-evoked ABR.

  15. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sara E.; Berlin, Alicia; Carr, Catherine E; Olsen, Glenn H.; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2015-01-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 63:676–680, 1969). We, therefore, measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of the greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e., frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species' vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range.

  16. Autism spectrum disorders and the amplitude of auditory brainstem response wave I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mariline; Marques, Cristina; Nóbrega Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Raquel; Coutinho, Miguel Bebiano; Almeida E Sousa, Cecília

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have an increased number of wave I abnormal amplitudes in auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) than age- and sex-matched typically developing children. This analytical case-control study compared patients with ASDs between the ages of 2 and 6 years and children who had a language delay not associated with any other pathology. Amplitudes of ABR waves I and V; absolute latencies (ALs) of waves I, III, and V; and interpeak latencies (IPLs) I-III, III-IV, and I-V at 90 dB were compared between ASD patients and normally developing children. The study enrolled 40 children with documented ASDs and 40 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Analyses of the ABR showed that children with ASDs exhibited higher amplitudes of wave 1 than wave V (35%) more frequently than the control group (10%), and this difference between groups reached statistical significance by Chi-squared analysis. There were no significant differences in ALs and IPLs between ASD children and matched controls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case-control study testing the amplitudes of ABR wave I in ASD children. The reported results suggest a potential for the use of ABR recordings in children, not only for the clinical assessment of hearing status, but also for the possibility of using amplitude of ABR wave I as an early marker of ASDs allowing earlier diagnosis and intervention. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A comparison of commercially available auditory brainstem response stimuli at a neurodiagnostic intensity level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keesling, Devan A; Parker, Jordan Paige; Sanchez, Jason Tait

    2017-01-01

    iChirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) yield a larger wave V amplitude at low intensity levels than traditional broadband click stimuli, providing a reliable estimation of hearing sensitivity...

  18. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response through hearing aid stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellier, Ludovic; Veuillet, Evelyne; Vesson, Jean-François; Bouchet, Patrick; Caclin, Anne; Thai-Van, Hung

    2015-07-01

    Millions of people across the world are hearing impaired, and rely on hearing aids to improve their everyday life. Objective audiometry could optimize hearing aid fitting, and is of particular interest for non-communicative patients. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response (speech ABR), a fine electrophysiological marker of speech encoding, is presently seen as a promising candidate for implementing objective audiometry; yet, unlike lower-frequency auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) such as cortical AEPs or auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), aided-speech ABRs (i.e., speech ABRs through hearing aid stimulation) have almost never been recorded. This may be due to their high-frequency components requesting a high temporal precision of the stimulation. We assess here a new approach to record high-quality and artifact-free speech ABR while stimulating directly through hearing aids. In 4 normal-hearing adults, we recorded speech ABR evoked by a /ba/ syllable binaurally delivered through insert earphones for quality control or through hearing aids. To assess the presence of a potential stimulus artifact, recordings were also done in mute conditions with the exact same potential sources of stimulus artifacts as in the main runs. Hearing aid stimulation led to artifact-free speech ABR in each participant, with the same quality as when using insert earphones, as shown with signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements. Our new approach consisting in directly transmitting speech stimuli through hearing aids allowed for a perfect temporal precision mandatory in speech ABR recordings, and could thus constitute a decisive step in hearing impairment investigation and in hearing aid fitting improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps for objective audiometry using auditory brainstem responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah I. Corona-Strauss

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown recently that chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs show better performance than click stimulations, especially at low intensity levels. In this paper we present the development, test, and evaluation of a series of notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps. ABRs were collected in healthy young control subjects using the developed stimuli. Results of the analysis of the corresponding ABRs using a time-scale phase synchronization stability (PSS measure are also reported. The resultant wave V amplitude and latency measures showed a similar behavior as for values reported in literature. The PSS of frequency specific chirp-evoked ABRs reflected the presence of the wave V for all stimulation intensities. The scales that resulted in higher PSS are in line with previous findings, where ABRs evoked by broadband chirps were analyzed, and which stated that low frequency channels are better for the recognition and analysis of chirp-evoked ABRs. We conclude that the development and test of the series of notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps allowed the assessment of frequency specific ABRs, showing an identifiable wave V for different intensity levels. Future work may include the development of a faster automatic recognition scheme for these frequency specific ABRs.

  20. Gender Disparities in Speech-evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaei, Bahram; Zakaria, Mohd Normani; Mohd Azmi, Mohd Hafiz Afifi; Nik Othman, Nik Adilah; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2017-04-01

    Gender disparities in speech-evoked auditory brainstem response (speech-ABR) outcomes have been reported, but the literature is limited. The present study was performed to further verify this issue and determine the influence of head size on speech-ABR results between genders. Twenty-nine healthy Malaysian subjects (14 males and 15 females) aged 19 to 30 years participated in this study. After measuring the head circumference, speech-ABR was recorded by using synthesized syllable /da/ from the right ear of each participant. Speech-ABR peaks amplitudes, peaks latencies, and composite onset measures were computed and analyzed. Significant gender disparities were noted in the transient component but not in the sustained component of speech-ABR. Statistically higher V/A amplitudes and less steeper V/A slopes were found in females. These gender differences were partially affected after controlling for the head size. Head size is not the main contributing factor for gender disparities in speech-ABR outcomes. Gender-specific normative data can be useful when recording speech-ABR for clinical purposes.

  1. Auditory brainstem responses for click and CE-chirp stimuli in individuals with and without occupational noise exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeena Venkatacheluvaiah Pushpalatha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Encoding of CE-chirp and click stimuli in auditory system was studied using auditory brainstem responses (ABRs among individuals with and without noise exposure. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of two groups. Group 1 (experimental group consisted of 20 (40 ears individuals exposed to occupational noise with hearing thresholds within 25 dB HL. They were further divided into three subgroups based on duration of noise exposure (0–5 years of exposure-T1, 5–10 years of exposure-T2, and >10 years of exposure-T3. Group 2 (control group consisted of 20 individuals (40 ears. Absolute latency and amplitude of waves I, III, and V were compared between the two groups for both click and CE-chirp stimuli. T1, T2, and T3 groups were compared for the same parameters to see the effect of noise exposure duration on CE-chirp and click ABR. Result: In Click ABR, while both the parameters for wave III were significantly poorer for the experimental group, wave V showed a significant decline in terms of amplitude only. There was no significant difference obtained for any of the parameters for wave I. In CE-Chirp ABR, the latencies for all three waves were significantly prolonged in the experimental group. However, there was a significant decrease in terms of amplitude in only wave V for the same group. Discussion: Compared to click evoked ABR, CE-Chirp ABR was found to be more sensitive in comparison of latency parameters in individuals with occupational noise exposure. Monitoring of early pathological changes at the brainstem level can be studied effectively by using CE-Chirp stimulus in comparison to click stimulus. Conclusion: This study indicates that ABR’s obtained with CE-chirp stimuli serves as an effective tool to identify the early pathological changes due to occupational noise exposure when compared to click evoked ABR.

  2. Comparison Acoustically Evoked Short Latency Negative Response with Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential in Adults with Profound Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ramezani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: A negative deflection with a 3-4 ms latency period has been reported to exist within the auditory brainstem response of some patients with profound hearing loss following a strong acoustic stimulus. This deflection, namingly the n3 or the acoustically evoked short latency negative response is assumed to be a vestibular-evoked potential, especially of saccular origin. Since the myogenic potential is also saccular in origin, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between these two tests in adults with profound hearing loss.Methods: The present cross sectional study was performed on 20 profoundly deaf volunteers(39 ears who aged between 18-40 years old, randomly selected from available deaf adults in Tehran. The auditory brainstem response of all subjects was recorded following a 1000 Hz tone burst in 70-100dB nHL. Subjects were also tested for vestibular evoked myogenic potential.Results: Only 34 of 39 ears recorded myogenic potential that negative response was recorded in 27 of 34 ears with normal p13 and n23. In seven ears with normal p13 and n23, the negative response was absent. In 3 ears with no p13 and n23, the negative response was observed, and two none.Conclusion: In view of the high prevalance of the negative response in profoundly deaf ears with normal p13 and n23, it could be concluded that the negative response can be used when for any reason, it is not possible to record myogenic potential and be considered as a new test in vestibular test battery.

  3. Effects of ankle joint cooling on peroneal short latency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J Ty; Hunter, Iain; McLoda, Todd

    2006-01-01

    While cryotherapy has direct physiological effects on contractile tissues, the extent to which joint cooling affects the neuromuscular system is not well understood. The purpose of the study was to detect changes in ankle dynamic restraint (peroneal short latency response and muscle activity amplitude) during inversion perturbation following ankle joint cryotherapy. A 2x3 factorial design was used to compare reaction time and EMG amplitude data of treatment conditions (cryotherapy and control) across time (pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 30 min post-treatment). Thirteen healthy volunteers (age 23 ± 4 yrs, ht 1.76 ± 0.09 m, mass 78.8 ± 16.6 kg), with no history of lower extremity joint injury participated in this study. Surface EMG was collected from the peroneus longus (PL) of the dominant leg during an ankle inversion perturbation triggered while walking. Subjects walked the length of a 6.1 m runway 30 times. A trap door mechanism, inducing inversion perturbation, was released at heel contact during six randomly selected trials for each leg. Following baseline measurements, a 1.5 L bag of crushed ice was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the treatment group with an elastic wrap. A bag similar in weight and consistency was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the control group. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare treatment conditions across time (p 0.05) for PL reaction time. Average RMS EMG, normalized to an isometric reference position, increased in the cryotherapy group at the 30 min post-treatment interval relative to the control group (p movement is unknown.Short latency response should be measured during functional movement instead of during stance to take into consideration alterations in motor drive.Joint cooling has no effect on peroneal short latency response, and joint cooling may result in increased short term peroneal activation.Joint cooling has no effect on the peroneus longus as a dynamic stabilizer during walking.

  4. Neural network connectivity and response latency modelled by stochastic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborrino, Massimiliano

    is connected to thousands of other neurons. The rst question is: how to model neural networks through stochastic processes? A multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, obtained as a diffusion approximation of a jump process, is the proposed answer. Obviously, dependencies between neurons imply dependencies...... between their spike times. Therefore, the second question is: how to detect neural network connectivity from simultaneously recorded spike trains? Answering this question corresponds to investigate the joint distribution of sequences of rst passage times. A non-parametric method based on copulas...... generation of pikes. When a stimulus is applied to the network, the spontaneous rings may prevail and hamper detection of the effects of the stimulus. Therefore, the spontaneous rings cannot be ignored and the response latency has to be detected on top of a background signal. Everything becomes more dicult...

  5. Effect of the Level of Anesthesia on the Auditory Brainstem Response in the Emei Music Frog (Babina daunchina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianguo; Zhu, Bicheng; Fang, Guangzhan; Smith, Ed; Brauth, Steven E.; Tang, Yezhong

    2017-01-01

    Anesthesia is known to affect the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in mice, rats, birds and lizards. The present study investigated how the level of anesthesia affects ABR recordings in an amphibian species, Babina daunchina. To do this, we compared ABRs evoked by tone pip stimuli recorded from 35 frogs when Tricaine methane sulphonate (MS-222) anesthetic immersion times varied from 0, 5 and 10 minutes after anesthesia induction at sound frequencies between 0.5 and 6 kHz. ABR thresholds increased significantly with immersion time across the 0.5 kHz to 2.5 kHz frequency range, which is the most sensitive frequency range for hearing and the main frequency range of male calls. There were no significant differences for anesthetic levels across the 3 kHz to 6 kHz range. ABR latency was significantly longer in the 10 min group than in the 0 and 5 min groups at frequencies of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.5 kHz, while ABR latency did not differ across the 3 kHz to 4 kHz range and at 2.0 kHz. Taken together, these results show that the level of anesthesia affects the amplitude, threshold and latency of ABRs in frogs. PMID:28056042

  6. Latencies in BOLD response during visual attention processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Thilo; Reske, Martina; Jansen, Andreas; Satrapi, Peyman; Shah, N Jon; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute

    2011-04-22

    One well-investigated division of attentional processes focuses on alerting, orienting and executive control, which can be assessed applying the attentional network test (ANT). The goal of the present study was to add further knowledge about the temporal dynamics of relevant neural correlates. As a right hemispheric dominance for alerting and orienting has previously been reported for intrinsic but not for phasic alertness, we additionally addressed a potential impact of this lateralization of attention by employing a lateralized version of the ANT, capturing phasic alertness processes. Sixteen healthy subjects underwent event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the ANT. Analyses of BOLD magnitude replicated the engagement of a fronto-parietal network in the attentional subsystems. The amplitudes of the attentional contrasts interacted with visual field presentation in the sense that the thalamus revealed a greater involvement for spatially cued items presented in the left visual field. Comparisons of BOLD latencies in visual cortices, first, verified faster BOLD responses following contra-lateral stimulus presentation. Second and more importantly, we identified attention-modulated activation in secondary visual and anterior cingulate cortices. Results are discussed in terms of bottom-up and lateralization processes. Although intrinsic and phasic alertness are distinct cognitive processes, we propose that neural substrates of intrinsic alertness may be accessed by phasic alertness provided that the attention-dominant (i.e., the right) hemisphere is activated directly by a warning stimulus.

  7. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in an equine patient population: part I--adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, M; Holliday, T A; Nieto, J E; Williams, D C

    2014-01-01

    Brainstem auditory evoked response has been an underused diagnostic modality in horses as evidenced by few reports on the subject. To describe BAER findings, common clinical signs, and causes of hearing loss in adult horses. Study group, 76 horses; control group, 8 horses. Retrospective. BAER records from the Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory were reviewed from the years of 1982 to 2013. Peak latencies, amplitudes, and interpeak intervals were measured when visible. Horses were grouped under disease categories. Descriptive statistics and a posthoc Bonferroni test were performed. Fifty-seven of 76 horses had BAER deficits. There was no breed or sex predisposition, with the exception of American Paint horses diagnosed with congenital sensorineural deafness. Eighty-six percent (n = 49/57) of the horses were younger than 16 years of age. The most common causes of BAER abnormalities were temporohyoid osteoarthropathy (THO, n = 20/20; abnormalities/total), congenital sensorineural deafness in Paint horses (17/17), multifocal brain disease (13/16), and otitis media/interna (4/4). Auditory loss was bilateral and unilateral in 74% (n = 42/57) and 26% (n = 15/57) of the horses, respectively. The most common causes of bilateral auditory loss were sensorineural deafness, THO, and multifocal brain disease whereas THO and otitis were the most common causes of unilateral deficits. Auditory deficits should be investigated in horses with altered behavior, THO, multifocal brain disease, otitis, and in horses with certain coat and eye color patterns. BAER testing is an objective and noninvasive diagnostic modality to assess auditory function in horses. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Processamento auditivo e potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco cerebral (BERA Auditory precessing and auditory brainstem response (ABR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Pfeiffer

    2009-01-01

    all of them should have normal hearing thresholds, type A tympanograms and presence of acoustic reflexes. Behavioral auditory processing evaluation consisted of: sound localization, memory for verbal and non verbal sounds in sequence, speech in noise test, SSW test and nonverbal dichotic test. After the behavioral testing children were divided into two groups, G1 ( without auditory processing disorders and G2 (with auditory processing disorders of any degree and categorization and have undergone the register of auditory brainstem response (ABR. The groups were compared using absolute latencies of Waves I, III, V and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, I-V and interaural difference of Wave V latency. RESULTS: our results indicated statistical significant differences considering interpeak latency in the left ear (p=0.009, in right and left ears considering interpeak latencies for G2 (p=0.02 and in interpeak latencies of waves I and V considering right and left ears between the groups G1 and G2 (p=0.025. CONCLUSION: significant differences were observed comparing behavioral evaluation and ABR considering interpeak latency of waves I and V in the left ear and interaural difference I-V in the left ear.

  9. Judgment and judgment latency for freedom and responsibility relatedness as a function of subtle linguistic variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Keith; McGahan, Joseph R; Stevens, Rick; Williamson, David; Low, Jean

    2009-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether differential response formats to covariation problems influence corresponding response latencies. The authors provided participants with 3 trials of 16 statements addressing positive and negative relations between freedom and responsibility. The authors framed half of the items around responsibility given freedom and the other half around freedom given responsibility. Response formats comprised true-false, agree-disagree, and yes-no answers as a between-participants factor. Results indicated that the manipulation of response format did not affect latencies. However, latencies differed according to the framing of the items. For items framed around freedom given responsibility, latencies were shorter. In addition, participants were more likely to report a positive relation between freedom and responsibility when items were framed around freedom given responsibility. The authors discuss implications relative to previous research in this area and give recommendations for future research.

  10. Hippocampal serotonin responses in short and long attack latency mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Riel, E; Meijer, OC; Veenema, AH; Joëls, M

    2002-01-01

    Short and long attack latency mice, which are selected based on their offensive behaviour in a resident-intruder model, differ in their neuroendocrine regulation as well as in aspects of their brain serotonin system. Previous studies showed that the binding capacity and expression of serotonin-1A re

  11. Modelling the level-dependent latency of the auditory brainstem response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James;

    2011-01-01

    ms at a peak equivalent sound pressure level of 55 dB, and reduces for increasing level by approximately 1 ms / 20 dB. A classical explanation for this finding asserts that an increasing stimulus levels lead to a broadened excitation pattern on the basilar membrane. This results in further activation...

  12. Mode-locking neurodynamics predict human auditory brainstem responses to musical intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerud, Karl D; Almonte, Felix V; Kim, Ji Chul; Large, Edward W

    2014-02-01

    The auditory nervous system is highly nonlinear. Some nonlinear responses arise through active processes in the cochlea, while others may arise in neural populations of the cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and higher auditory areas. In humans, auditory brainstem recordings reveal nonlinear population responses to combinations of pure tones, and to musical intervals composed of complex tones. Yet the biophysical origin of central auditory nonlinearities, their signal processing properties, and their relationship to auditory perception remain largely unknown. Both stimulus components and nonlinear resonances are well represented in auditory brainstem nuclei due to neural phase-locking. Recently mode-locking, a generalization of phase-locking that implies an intrinsically nonlinear processing of sound, has been observed in mammalian auditory brainstem nuclei. Here we show that a canonical model of mode-locked neural oscillation predicts the complex nonlinear population responses to musical intervals that have been observed in the human brainstem. The model makes predictions about auditory signal processing and perception that are different from traditional delay-based models, and may provide insight into the nature of auditory population responses. We anticipate that the application of dynamical systems analysis will provide the starting point for generic models of auditory population dynamics, and lead to a deeper understanding of nonlinear auditory signal processing possibly arising in excitatory-inhibitory networks of the central auditory nervous system. This approach has the potential to link neural dynamics with the perception of pitch, music, and speech, and lead to dynamical models of auditory system development.

  13. Low-frequency versus high-frequency synchronisation in chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Gøtsche-Rasmussen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the frequency specific contribution to the auditory brainstem response (ABR) of chirp stimuli. Frequency rising chirps were designed to compensate for the cochlear traveling wave delay, and lead to larger wave-V amplitudes than for click stimuli as more auditory nerve fibr...

  14. Ascending mechanisms of stress integration: Implications for brainstem regulation of neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Brent; Scheimann, Jessie R; Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Herman, James P

    2017-03-01

    In response to stress, defined as a real or perceived threat to homeostasis or well-being, brain systems initiate divergent physiological and behavioral processes that mobilize energy and promote adaptation. The brainstem contains multiple nuclei that engage in autonomic control and reflexive responses to systemic stressors. However, brainstem nuclei also play an important role in neuroendocrine responses to psychogenic stressors mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Further, these nuclei integrate neuroendocrine responses with stress-related behaviors, significantly impacting mood and anxiety. The current review focuses on the prominent brainstem monosynaptic inputs to the endocrine paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), including the periaqueductal gray, raphe nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, locus coeruleus, and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). The NTS is a particularly intriguing area, as the region contains multiple cell groups that provide neurochemically-distinct inputs to the PVN. Furthermore, the NTS, under regulatory control by glucocorticoid-mediated feedback, integrates affective processes with physiological status to regulate stress responding. Collectively, these brainstem circuits represent an important avenue for delineating interactions between stress and health.

  15. Evidence for Atypical Auditory Brainstem Responses in Young Children with Suspected Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Daphne Ari-Even; Muchnik, Chava; Shabtai, Esther; Hildesheimer, Minka; Henkin, Yael

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to characterize the auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) of young children with suspected autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and compare them with the ABRs of children with language delay and with clinical norms. Method: The ABRs of 26 children with suspected ASDs (21 males, five females; mean age 32.5 mo) and an age-…

  16. The Impact of Clinical History on the Threshold Estimation of Auditory Brainstem Response Results for Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitoun, Maha; Cumming, Steven; Purcell, Alison; O'Brien, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the impact of patient clinical history on audiologists' performance when interpreting auditory brainstem response (ABR) results. Method: Fourteen audiologists' accuracy in estimating hearing threshold for 16 infants through interpretation of ABR traces was compared on 2 occasions at least 5 months apart. On the 1st…

  17. Conventional and cross-correlation brain-stem auditory evoked responses in the white leghorn chick: rate manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, R.; Jones, S.; Jones, T.

    1994-01-01

    Rate-dependent changes in the chick brain-stem auditory evoked response (BAER) using conventional averaging and a cross-correlation technique were investigated. Five 15- to 19-day-old white leghorn chicks were anesthetized with Chloropent. In each chick, the left ear was acoustically stimulated. Electrical pulses of 0.1-ms duration were shaped, attenuated, and passed through a current driver to an Etymotic ER-2 which was sealed in the ear canal. Electrical activity from stainless-steel electrodes was amplified, filtered (300-3000 Hz) and digitized at 20 kHz. Click levels included 70 and 90 dB peSPL. In each animal, conventional BAERs were obtained at rates ranging from 5 to 90 Hz. BAERs were also obtained using a cross-correlation technique involving pseudorandom pulse sequences called maximum length sequences (MLSs). The minimum time between pulses, called the minimum pulse interval (MPI), ranged from 0.5 to 6 ms. Two BAERs were obtained for each condition. Dependent variables included the latency and amplitude of the cochlear microphonic (CM), wave 2 and wave 3. BAERs were observed in all chicks, for all level by rate combinations for both conventional and MLS BAERs. There was no effect of click level or rate on the latency of the CM. The latency of waves 2 and 3 increased with decreasing click level and increasing rate. CM amplitude decreased with decreasing click level, but was not influenced by click rate for the 70 dB peSPL condition. For the 90 dB peSPL click, CM amplitude was uninfluenced by click rate for conventional averaging. For MLS BAERs, CM amplitude was similar to conventional averaging for longer MPIs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  18. Using Differential Reinforcement to Decrease Academic Response Latencies of an Adolescent with Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinicke, Megan R.; Carr, James E.; Mozzoni, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of contingency-specifying rules and a token economy to decrease the latency to comply with academic instructions by a 16-year-old girl with acquired brain injury. Results showed that treatment was successful in reducing academic response latencies. These results replicate previous research in which…

  19. Activation of brainstem serotoninergic pathways decreases homosynaptic depression of monosynaptic responses of frog spinal motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A; Rudomin, P

    1983-12-05

    In the isolated neuraxis of the frog, low frequency stimulation (0.5-2 Hz) of the lateral columns produces monosynaptic responses in the ventral roots which are depressed with an exponential time course. Serotonin (10 mumol/liter) added to the bath, or stimulation of the brain-stem midline raphe nuclei, but not of the lateral reticular formation, reduced the magnitude of the low frequency depression of the responses. The above actions were abolished by methysergide (1 mumol/liter), a specific antagonist of serotonin. These observations show that the magnitude of the homosynaptic depression of monosynaptic responses of motoneurons can be controlled by descending serotonergic mechanisms. This action is considered to be an important component of the arousal behavior mediated by the brain-stem raphe nuclei.

  20. Brainstem response audiometry in the determination of low-frequency hearing loss : a study of various methods for frequency-specific ABR-threshold assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.G.J. Conijn

    1992-01-01

    textabstractBrainstem Electric Response Audiometry (BERA) is a method to visualize some of the electric activity generated in the auditory nerve and the brainstem during the processing of sound. The amplitude of the Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) is very small (0.05-0.5 flV). The potentials origi

  1. Potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco encefálico em frentistas Auditory brainstem response in gas station attendants

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    Lenita da Silva Quevedo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A ototoxidade dos solventes orgânicos pode atingir o sistema auditivo a nível coclear e retrococlear. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a integridade neurofisiológica do sistema auditivo até tronco cerebral por meio do PEATE. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo. Estudados frentistas de três postos de gasolina da cidade de Santa Maria/RS. A amostra ficou composta por 21 sujeitos, que foram avaliados por meio de potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco encefálico. RESULTADOS: Alteração nas latências absolutas das ondas I e III e em todas as latências interpicos, na orelha direita. Na orelha esquerda houve alteração na latência absoluta de todas as ondas, e em todos os intervalos interpicos. Alteração na diferença interaural da onda V foi verificada em 19% dos sujeitos. No grupo exposto há mais de cinco anos, foram estatisticamente significantes o número de sujeitos com alteração: no intervalo interpico I-V da orelha direita; na latência absoluta da onda I e no intervalo interpico III-V da orelha esquerda. CONCLUSÃO: A exposição a combustíveis pode causar alterações no sistema auditivo central.Ototoxicity of organic solvents can affect the hearing system up to the cochlea level and the central structures of hearing. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the neurophysiological integrity of the hearing system in subjects exposed to fuels using ABR. METHOD: Prospective study. We evaluated attendants from three gas stations in Santa Maria/RS. The sample had 21 subjects, who were evaluated by auditory brainstem response. RESULTS: We found an alteration in the absolute latencies of Waves I and III and in all the interpeak latencies, in the right ear. In the left ear there was a change in the absolute latencies of all Waves, and in all the interpeak intervals. A change in the interaural difference of Wave V was found in 19% of the individuals. In the group exposed for more than five years, there were subjects with a statistically significant changes: in the I

  2. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  3. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  4. Brainstem response audiometry in the determination of hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F.C. van der Drift (Frank)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe earlier hearing disorders are diagnosed in infants and children the sooner treatment and revalidation can be organised. Consequently. determining the hearing at the youngest age possible is important to promote the development of language and communication. Brainstern response audiom

  5. The relationship between auditory brainstem response, nerve conduction studies, and metabolic risk factors in type II diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported a correlation between auditory brainstem response (ABR) findings and nerve conduction studies (NCSs). The correlation between ABR findings and the metabolic profile of these patients is not well documented in previous studies. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of the disturbed metabolic profile (hyperglyceridemia and hyperlipidemia) in diabetic patients on the peripheral nervous system as well as the auditory brainstem response. ...

  6. Auditory brainstem responses to CE-Chirp® stimuli for normal ears and those with sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu-Hee; Jang, Hyun-Kyung; Chang, Sun O; Jung, Hyunseo; Lee, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the characteristic differences between click-and CE-Chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in normal hearing and sensorineural hearing loss. A prospective study. Ears with normal hearing and with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. Pure-tone audiometry and click-and CE-Chirp evoked ABRs exams were conducted for all ears. Visual detection levels, wave-V amplitudes, and latencies of the ABRs were assessed. Twenty-two ears with normal hearing and 22 ears with sloping type sensorineural hearing loss were examined. In normal-hearing ears, mean amplitudes were larger for CE-chirps than for clicks at all intensities until 80 dB nHL, at which the amplitudes dropped off, presumably due to upward spread of excitation. In ears with sensorineural hearing loss, however the drop-off was less significant at 80 dB nHL. Comparisons with pure-tone audiometry findings revealed ABRs to CE-Chirps to correlate at 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz, and to clicks at 1, 2, 3, and 4 kHz. The CE-Chirp has advantages over clicks for examining normal ears. However, under high-level stimulation, these advantages are no longer present. In ears with sensorineural hearing loss, the upward spread of excitation is less prominent. The CE-Chirps results correlate significantly to low frequency audiometric findings at 0.5 kHz, while clicks do not.

  7. Auditory Brainstem Response in Term and Preterm Infants with Neonatal Complications: The Importance of the Sequential Evaluation

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    Silva, Daniela da

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Literature data are not conclusive as to the influence of neonatal complications in the maturational process of the auditory system observed by auditory brainstem response (ABR in infants at term and preterm. Objectives Check the real influence of the neonatal complications in infants by the sequential auditory evaluation. Methods Historical cohort study in a tertiary referral center. A total of 114 neonates met inclusion criteria: treatment at the Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Program of the local hospital; at least one risk indicator for hearing loss; presence in both evaluations (the first one after hospital discharge from the neonatal unit and the second one at 6 months old; all latencies in ABR and transient otoacoustic emissions present in both ears. Results The complications that most influenced the ABR findings were Apgar scores less than 6 at 5 minutes, gestational age, intensive care unit stay, peri-intraventricular hemorrhage, and mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Sequential auditory evaluation is necessary in premature and term newborns with risk indicators for hearing loss to correctly identify injuries in the auditory pathway.

  8. Auditory brainstem responses of CBA/J mice with neonatal conductive hearing losses and treatment with GM1 ganglioside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, M K; Pippin, G W; Weaver, K E; Kirsch, J P; Webster, D B

    1995-07-01

    Exogenous administration of GM1 ganglioside to CBA/J mice with a neonatal conductive hearing loss ameliorates the atrophy of spiral ganglion neurons, ventral cochlear nucleus neurons, and ventral cochlear nucleus volume. The present investigation demonstrates the extent of a conductive loss caused by atresia and tests the hypothesis that GM1 ganglioside treatment will ameliorate the conductive hearing loss. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded from four groups of seven mice each: two groups received daily subcutaneous injections of saline (one group had normal hearing; the other had a conductive hearing loss); the other two groups received daily subcutaneous injections of GM1 ganglioside (one group had normal hearing; the other had a conductive hearing loss). In mice with a conductive loss, decreases in hearing sensitivity were greatest at high frequencies. The decreases were determined by comparing mean ABR thresholds of the conductive loss mice with those of normal hearing mice. The conductive hearing loss induced in the mice in this study was similar to that seen in humans with congenital aural atresias. GM1 ganglioside treatment had no significant effect on ABR wave I thresholds or latencies in either group.

  9. ScriptingRT: A Software Library for Collecting Response Latencies in Online Studies of Cognition.

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    Thomas W Schubert

    Full Text Available ScriptingRT is a new open source tool to collect response latencies in online studies of human cognition. ScriptingRT studies run as Flash applets in enabled browsers. ScriptingRT provides the building blocks of response latency studies, which are then combined with generic Apache Flex programming. Six studies evaluate the performance of ScriptingRT empirically. Studies 1-3 use specialized hardware to measure variance of response time measurement and stimulus presentation timing. Studies 4-6 implement a Stroop paradigm and run it both online and in the laboratory, comparing ScriptingRT to other response latency software. Altogether, the studies show that Flash programs developed in ScriptingRT show a small lag and an increased variance in response latencies. However, this did not significantly influence measured effects: The Stroop effect was reliably replicated in all studies, and the found effects did not depend on the software used. We conclude that ScriptingRT can be used to test response latency effects online.

  10. A new method for analyzing auditory brain-stem response waveforms using a moving-minimum subtraction procedure of digitized analog recordings

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    Källstr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Johan Källstrand,1 Tommy Lewander,2 Eva Baghdassarian,2,3 Sören Nielzén4 1SensoDetect AB, Lund, 2Department of Neuroscience, Medical Faculty, Uppsala University, 3Department of Psychiatry, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, 4Department of Psychiatry, Medical Faculty, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden Abstract: The auditory brain-stem response (ABR waveform comprises a set of waves (labeled I–VII recorded with scalp electrodes over 10 ms after an auditory stimulation with a brief click sound. Quite often, the waves are fused (confluent and baseline-irregular and sloped, making wave latencies and wave amplitudes difficult to establish. In the present paper, we describe a method, labeled moving-minimum subtraction, based on digitization of the analog ABR waveform (154 data points/ms in order to achieve alignment of the ABR response to a straight baseline, often with clear baseline separation of waves and resolution of fused waves. Application of the new method to groups of patients showed marked differences in ABR waveforms between patients with schizophrenia versus patients with adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder versus healthy controls. The findings show promise regarding the possibility to identify ABR markers to be used as biomarkers as support for clinical diagnoses of these and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Keywords: auditory brain-stem response, digitization, moving-minimum subtraction method, baseline alignment, schizophrenia, ADHD

  11. Amplitude and phase equalization of stimuli for click evoked auditory brainstem responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutelmann, Rainer; Laumen, Geneviève; Tollin, Daniel; Klump, Georg M

    2015-01-01

    Although auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), the sound-evoked brain activity in response to transient sounds, are routinely measured in humans and animals there are often differences in ABR waveform morphology across studies. One possible reason may be the method of stimulus calibration. To explore this hypothesis, click-evoked ABRs were measured from seven ears in four Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) using three common spectrum calibration strategies: Minimum phase filter, linear phase filter, and no filter. The results show significantly higher ABR amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio, and better waveform resolution with the minimum phase filtered click than with the other strategies.

  12. Brainstem reflexes in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Joel V; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-03-01

    Several distinctive clinical features of patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) including dysarthria and dysphagia suggest a developmental defect in brainstem reflexes. Our aim was to characterize the neurophysiological profile of brainstem reflexes in these patients. We studied the function of sensory and motor trigeminal tracts in 28 patients with FD. All were homozygous for the common mutation in the IKAP gene. Each underwent a battery of electrophysiological tests including; blink reflexes, jaw jerk reflex, masseter silent periods and direct stimulation of the facial nerve. Responses were compared with 25 age-matched healthy controls. All patients had significantly prolonged latencies and decreased amplitudes of all examined brainstem reflexes. Similar abnormalities were seen in the early and late components. In contrast, direct stimulation of the facial nerve revealed relative preservation of motor responses. The brainstem reflex abnormalities in FD are best explained by impairment of the afferent and central pathways. A reduction in the number and/or excitability of trigeminal sensory axons is likely the main problem. These findings add further evidence to the concept that congenital mutations of the elongator-1 protein (or IKAP) affect the development of afferent neurons including those carrying information for the brainstem reflex pathways. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spike latency and response properties of an excitable micropillar laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, F.; Braive, R.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Erneux, T.; Barbay, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present experimental measurements concerning the response of an excitable micropillar laser with saturable absorber to incoherent as well as coherent perturbations. The excitable response is similar to the behavior of spiking neurons but with much faster time scales. It is accompanied by a subnanosecond nonlinear delay that is measured for different bias pump values. This mechanism provides a natural scheme for encoding the strength of an ultrafast stimulus in the response delay of excitable spikes (temporal coding). Moreover, we demonstrate coherent and incoherent perturbations techniques applied to the micropillar with perturbation thresholds in the range of a few femtojoules. Responses to coherent perturbations assess the cascadability of the system. We discuss the physical origin of the responses to single and double perturbations with the help of numerical simulations of the Yamada model and, in particular, unveil possibilities to control the relative refractory period that we recently evidenced in this system. Experimental measurements are compared to both numerical simulations of the Yamada model and analytic expressions obtained in the framework of singular perturbation techniques. This system is thus a good candidate to perform photonic spike processing tasks in the framework of novel neuroinspired computing systems.

  14. Cortical influences on brainstem circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Andrew M; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2016-07-01

    Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is a powerful endogenous analgesic mechanism which can completely inhibit incoming nociceptor signals at the primary synapse. The circuitry responsible for CPM lies within the brainstem and involves the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis (SRD). While the brainstem is critical for CPM, the cortex can significantly modulate its expression, likely via the brainstem circuitry critical for CPM. Since higher cortical regions such as the anterior, mid-cingulate, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices are activated by noxious stimuli and show reduced activations during other analgesic responses, we hypothesized that these regions would display reduced responses during CPM analgesia. Furthermore, we hypothesized that functional connectivity strength between these cortical regions and the SRD would be stronger in those that express CPM analgesia compared with those that do not. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine sites recruited during CPM expression and their influence on the SRD. A lack of CPM analgesia was associated with greater signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus compared to test stimuli alone in the mid-cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and increased functional connectivity with the SRD. In contrast, those subjects exhibiting CPM analgesia showed no change in the magnitude of signal intensity increases in these cortical regions or strength of functional connectivity with the SRD. These data suggest that during multiple or widespread painful stimuli, engagement of the prefrontal and cingulate cortices prevents the generation of CPM analgesia, raising the possibility altered responsiveness in these cortical regions underlie the reduced CPM observed in individuals with chronic pain. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2630-2644, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The auditory brainstem response to complex sounds: a potential biomarker for guiding treatment of psychosis

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    Melissa A Tarasenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits limit psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. For many patients, cognitive remediation approaches have yielded encouraging results. Nevertheless, therapeutic response is variable, and outcome studies consistently identify individuals who respond minimally to these interventions. Biomarkers that can assist in identifying patients likely to benefit from particular forms of cognitive remediation are needed. Here we describe an event-related potential (ERP biomarker – the auditory brainstem response to complex sounds (cABR – that appears to be particularly well-suited for predicting response to at least one form of cognitive remediation that targets auditory information processing. Uniquely, the cABR quantifies the fidelity of sound encoded at the level of the brainstem and midbrain. This ERP biomarker has revealed auditory processing abnormalities in various neurodevelopmental disorders, correlates with functioning across several cognitive domains, and appears to be responsive to targeted auditory training. We present preliminary cABR data from 18 schizophrenia patients and propose further investigation of this biomarker for predicting and tracking response to cognitive interventions.

  16. Auditory Brainstem Gap Responses Start to Decline in Middle Age Mice: A Novel Physiological Biomarker for Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanika T.; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P.; Frisina, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    The CBA/CaJ mouse strain's auditory function is normal during the early phases of life and gradually declines over its lifespan, much like human age-related hearing loss (ARHL), but on a mouse life cycle “time frame”. This pattern of ARHL is relatively similar to that of most humans: difficult to clinically diagnose at its onset, and currently not treatable medically. To address the challenge of early diagnosis, CBA mice were used for the present study to analyze the beginning stages and functional onset biomarkers of ARHL. The results from Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) audiogram and Gap-in-noise (GIN) ABR tests were compared for two groups of mice of different ages, young adult and middle age. ABR peak components from the middle age group displayed minor changes in audibility, but had a significantly higher prolonged peak latency and decreased peak amplitude in response to temporal gaps in comparison to the young adult group. The results for the younger subjects revealed gap thresholds and recovery rates that were comparable to previous studies of auditory neural gap coding. Our findings suggest that age-linked degeneration of the peripheral and brainstem auditory system is already beginning in middle age, allowing for the possibility of preventative biomedical or hearing protection measures to be implemented as a possibility for attenuating further damage to the auditory system due to ARHL. PMID:25307161

  17. Auditory brainstem gap responses start to decline in mice in middle age: a novel physiological biomarker for age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanika T; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P; Frisina, Robert D

    2015-07-01

    The auditory function of the CBA/CaJ mouse strain is normal during the early phases of life and gradually declines over its lifespan, much like human age-related hearing loss (ARHL) but within the "time frame" of a mouse life cycle. This pattern of ARHL is similar to that of most humans: difficult to diagnose clinically at its onset and currently not treatable medically. To address the challenge of early diagnosis, we use CBA mice to analyze the initial stages and functional onset biomarkers of ARHL. The results from Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) audiogram and Gap-in-noise (GIN) ABR tests were compared for two groups of mice of different ages, namely young adult and middle age. ABR peak components from the middle age group displayed minor changes in audibility but had a significantly higher prolonged peak latency and decreased peak amplitude in response to temporal gaps in comparison with the young adult group. The results for the younger subjects revealed gap thresholds and recovery rates that were comparable with previous studies of auditory neural gap coding. Our findings suggest that age-linked degeneration of the peripheral and brainstem auditory system begins in middle age, allowing for the possibility of preventative biomedical or hearing protection measures to be implemented in order to attenuate further damage to the auditory system attributable to ARHL.

  18. Sensorineural hearing loss with brainstem auditory evoked responses changes in homozygote and heterozygote sickle cell patients in Guadeloupe (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic-Bateman, L; Hedreville, R

    2006-08-01

    This prospective study involved 79 homozygote and heterozygote sickle cell anaemia patients (16 to 50 years old) and a control group of 40 people.All patients underwent ENT, audiological and brainstem auditory evoked responses (BSER) examinations in order to evaluate the incidence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), to identify the changes at the level of the cochlear nerve and the central pathways, and to determine the most vulnerable group, in order to intervene with early prevention and rehabilitation for this condition.A hearing loss of greater than 20 dB at two or more frequencies was found in 36 (45.57 per cent) sickle cell patients (19 (47.22 per cent) HbSC patients and 17 (43.59 per cent) HbSS patients) and three (7.5 per cent) members of the control group. Homozygote and heterozygote patients, as well as both sexes, were equally affected. Bilateral hearing loss occurred in 19 (52.78 per cent) patients, unilateral right-sided hearing loss in five (13.89 per cent) patients and unilateral left-sided hearing loss in 12 (33.33 per cent) patients. Brainstem auditory evoked potential demonstrated a prolonged I-V (III-V) interpeak latency in 13 (25.35 per cent) sickle cell patients (11 men (eight with HbSS) and two women). The hearing loss in HbSS patients was neural in nature and of earlier onset; the hearing loss in HbSC patients was usually cochlear in nature and of later onset. Despite high medical standards and 100 per cent social security cover, the high incidence of SNHL in our sickle cell affected patients (the majority with the Benin haplotype) was probably due to their specific haematological profile and to the original geographical distribution of the disease in the tropics. Our results highlight the necessity for early and regular hearing assessment of sickle cell patients, including BSER examination, especially in male patients with SNHL.

  19. Middle latency auditory evoked responses in normal term infants: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, S H; Edwards, D A; Henderson-Smart, D J; Pettigrew, A G

    1989-05-01

    Middle latency auditory evoked responses (MLAERs) were measured in 21 normal term infants, three to five days after birth and then at 6 weeks, 7 months and 1 year of age. A polyphasic waveform was elicited during natural sleep in all infants at each recording session by monaural click stimulation at a rate of 9 per second. A 70 dBHL stimulus was found to be optimal as the MLAER became less well defined when the stimulus intensity approached the threshold hearing level. The first 60 to 70 msec of the waveform was found to be most stable, with decreasing detectability of peaks at longer latencies. There was no change in wave latency or reproducibility of MLAERs recorded during different sleep states. Waves Po and Na showed a significant decrease in latency with increasing stimulus intensity at term and/or 6 weeks of age. This was not evident for the remainder of the waveform. Waves Po, Na, Pa, Nb, Pb and Nc exhibited significant decreases in latency with age, attaining values indistinguishable from adults by 7 months of age.

  20. Parametric inference of neuronal response latency in presence of a background signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Neurons are commonly characterized by spontaneous generation of action potentials (spikes), which appear without any apparent or controlled stimulation. When a stimulus is applied, the spontaneous firing may prevail and hamper identification of the effect of the stimulus. Therefore, for any...... will persist even when sample size is increasing. The first question is: what is the response latency to the stimulus? Answering this question becomes even more difficult if the latency is of a complex nature, for example composed of a physically implied deterministic part and a stochastic part. This scenario...

  1. Note on changes in response latency following discrimination training in the monkey1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, William C.; Reynolds, Robert W.

    1964-01-01

    Two monkeys were trained to press and hold down a telegraph key in the presence of a red light. Subsequent release of the key in response to a white cross superimposed on the red background was followed by reinforcement. Key release in response to a white circle on the red background was never reinforced. Latencies for the key release response to the reinforced stimulus (cross) were considerably shorter and less variable than those to the unreinforced stimulus (circle). PMID:14143909

  2. Auditory Middle Latency Response and Phonological Awareness in Students with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Ana Carla Leite; Funayama, Carolina Araújo Rodrigues; Capellini, Simone Aparecida; Frizzo, Ana Claudia Figueiredo

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Behavioral tests of auditory processing have been applied in schools and highlight the association between phonological awareness abilities and auditory processing, confirming that low performance on phonological awareness tests may be due to low performance on auditory processing tests. Objective To characterize the auditory middle latency response and the phonological awareness tests and to investigate correlations between responses in a group of children with learning disorders. Methods The study included 25 students with learning disabilities. Phonological awareness and auditory middle latency response were tested with electrodes placed on the left and right hemispheres. The correlation between the measurements was performed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results There is some correlation between the tests, especially between the Pa component and syllabic awareness, where moderate negative correlation is observed. Conclusion In this study, when phonological awareness subtests were performed, specifically phonemic awareness, the students showed a low score for the age group, although for the objective examination, prolonged Pa latency in the contralateral via was observed. Negative weak to moderate correlation for Pa wave latency was observed, as was positive weak correlation for Na-Pa amplitude.

  3. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Källstrand

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Johan Källstrand1, Olle Olsson2, Sara Fristedt Nehlstedt1, Mia Ling Sköld1, Sören Nielzén21SensoDetect AB, Lund, Sweden; 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, SwedenAbstract: Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS. Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16, schizophrenic patients (n = 16 and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients (n = 16, respectively, of matching age and gender. The results showed that the AS subjects exhibited abnormally low activity in the early part of their ABRs that distinctly separated them from the three control groups. Specifically, wave III amplitudes were significantly lower in the AS group than for all the control groups in the forward masking condition (P < 0.005, which was not the case in the baseline condition. Thus, electrophysiological measurements of ABRs to complex sound stimuli (eg, forward masking may lead to a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiology of AS. Future studies may further point to specific ABR characteristics in AS individuals that separate them from individuals diagnosed with other neurodevelopmental diseases.Keywords: asperger syndrome, auditory brainstem response, forward masking, psychoacoustics

  4. The effects of polarity of click stimulation on auditory brainstem responses (ABR in patients with cochlear and retro-cochlear disorders in Amiralam and Resalat Hospitals 1995-97

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltani AH

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory brainstem response (A.B.R is one of the most important electrophysiological tests in evaluating of auditory system, especially for diagnosing of auditory nerve and brainstem disorders. It is a non-invasive test and has reliability and validity characteristic. There is no contra-indication for this test. One of the most important of stimulation parameters of A.B.R is click polarity (rarefaction, condensation and alternative. Some of the investigators believed that different polarities have no effects on A.B.R are affected by different polarities. Materials and Methods: In this study, the results of ABR of 148 patients (296 ears were compared with three different polarities of rarefaction, condensation and alternative half click stimuli. The cases were categorized in three groups of normal (60 cases, cochlear (62 cases and retro-cochlear (17 cases. This classification were done according to the hearing level in pure tone audiometry results in three frequencies of 1000, 2000, 4000 Hz and to the site of the their disorders. The mean absolute latencies of waves I, III and V were obtained for each polarity. Inter-peak latency (I.P.L of wave also measured in three groups (normal, cochlear and retro-cochlear. Results: The results were showed a significant difference between absolute latency of wave I among different polarities on three above mentioned groups (P0.05. Conclusion: It was concluded that rarefaction polarity has better and more stable results of ABR tests.

  5. Lateral asymmetry and reduced forward masking effect in early brainstem auditory evoked responses in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källstrand, Johan; Nehlstedt, Sara Fristedt; Sköld, Mia Ling; Nielzén, Sören

    2012-04-30

    Individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia show deficiencies of basic neurophysiological sorting mechanisms. This study further investigated this issue, focusing on the two phenomena, laterality of coding and auditory forward masking. A specific audiometric method for use in psychiatry was the measuring set up to register brain stem audiograms (ABRs). A sample of 49 schizophrenic patients was compared with three control groups consisting of healthy reference subjects (n=49), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients (n=29), Asperger syndrome (AS) patients (n=13) and drug-induced psychotic patients (n=14). Schizophrenic patients showed significant abnormal laterality of brainstem activity in wave II of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in comparison with all other study groups. Forward masking effects in the superior olive complex were coded significantly differently by schizophrenic patients compared to control groups except for the AS group. The results suggest deficits in the coding of auditory stimuli in the lower parts of the auditory pathway in schizophrenia and indicate that increased peripheral lateral asymmetry and forward masking aberrances could be neurophysiological markers for the disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sedation of children for auditory brainstem response using ketamine-midazolam-atropine combination - a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocskai, Tímea; Németh, Adrienne; Bogár, Lajos; Pytel, József

    2013-12-01

    Authors investigated sedation quality in children for auditory brainstem response testing. Two-hundred and seventy-six sedation procedures were retrospectively analyzed using recorded data focusing on efficacy of sedation and complications. Intramuscular ketamine-midazolam-atropine combination was administered on sedation preceded by narcotic suppository as pre-medication. On using the combination vital parameters remained within normal range, the complication rate was minimal. Pulse rate, arterial blood pressure and pulse oxymetry readings were stable, hypoventilation developed in 4, apnoea in none of the cases, post-sedation agitation occurred in 3 and nausea and/or vomiting in 2 cases. Repeated administration of narcotic agent was necessary in a single case only. Our practice is suitable for the sedation assisting hearing examinations in children. It has no influence on the auditory brainstem testing, the conditions necessary for the test can be met entirely with minimal side-effects. Our practice provides a more lasting sedation time in children during the examination hence there is no need for the repetition of the narcotics.

  7. Summed Parallel Infinite Impulse Response (SPIIR) Filters For Low-Latency Gravitational Wave Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Hooper, Shaun; Luan, Jing; Blair, David; Chen, Yanbei; Wen, Linqing

    2011-01-01

    With the upgrade of current gravitational wave detectors, the first detection of gravitational wave signals is expected to occur in the next decade. Low-latency gravitational wave triggers will be necessary to make fast follow-up electromagnetic observations of events related to their source, e.g., prompt optical emission associated with short gamma-ray bursts. In this paper we present a new time-domain low-latency algorithm for identifying the presence of gravitational waves produced by compact binary coalescence events in noisy detector data. Our method calculates the signal to noise ratio from the summation of a bank of parallel infinite impulse response (IIR) filters. We show that our summed parallel infinite impulse response (SPIIR) method can retrieve the signal to noise ratio to greater than 99% of that produced from the optimal matched filter. We emphasise the benefits of the SPIIR method for advanced detectors, which will require larger template banks.

  8. Otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Do otoacoustic emissions have prognostic value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Amiridavan

    2006-11-01

    prognostic factor in SSNHL, hence we recommend performing TEOAE in every patient with SSNHL. KEY WORDS: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss, pure tone audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, overall correlation, signal to noise ratio (S/N ratio, auditory brainstem responses, Interpeak latencies, retrocochlear lesion.

  9. A paradox of syntactic priming: Why response tendencies show priming for passives, and response latencies show priming for actives

    OpenAIRE

    Corley, M.; Segaert, K.; Menenti, L.; Weber, K; Hagoort, P.

    2011-01-01

    Speakers tend to repeat syntactic structures across sentences, a phenomenon called syntactic priming. Although it has been suggested that repeating syntactic structures should result in speeded responses, previous research has focused on effects in response tendencies. We investigated syntactic priming effects simultaneously in response tendencies and response latencies for active and passive transitive sentences in a picture description task. In Experiment 1, there were priming effects in re...

  10. A paradox of syntactic priming: Why response tendencies show priming for passives, and response latencies show priming for actives

    OpenAIRE

    Corley, M.; Segaert, K.; Menenti, L.; Weber, K.; Hagoort, P.

    2011-01-01

    Speakers tend to repeat syntactic structures across sentences, a phenomenon called syntactic priming. Although it has been suggested that repeating syntactic structures should result in speeded responses, previous research has focused on effects in response tendencies. We investigated syntactic priming effects simultaneously in response tendencies and response latencies for active and passive transitive sentences in a picture description task. In Experiment 1, there were priming effects in re...

  11. Unilateral and bilateral brainstem auditory-evoked response abnormalities in 900 Dalmatian dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, T A; Nelson, H J; Williams, D C; Willits, N

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 900 Dalmatian dogs, brainstem auditory-evoked responses (BAER) and clinical observations were used to determine the incidence and sex distribution of bilateral and unilateral BAER abnormalities and their association with heterochromia iridis (HI). To assess the efficacy of BAER testing in guiding breeding programs, data from 749 dogs (subgroup A), considered to be a sample of the population at large, were compared with data from a subgroup (subgroup B; n = 151) in which selection of breeding stock had been based on BAER testing from the beginning of the 4-year survey. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses were elicited by applying click stimuli unilaterally, while applying a white noise masking sound to the contralateral ear. Under these conditions, BAER were either normal, unilaterally absent, or bilaterally absent. Dogs with bilaterally absent BAER were clinically deaf; dogs with unilaterally absent BAER were not clinically deaf but appeared dependent on their BAER-normal ears for their auditory-cued behavior. Dogs with unilaterally absent BAER often were misidentified as normal by uninformed observers. Among the 900 dogs, 648 (72.0%) were normal, 189 (21.0%) had unilateral absence of BAER, and 63 (7.0%) had bilateral absence of BAER or were clinically deaf and assumed to have bilaterally absent BAER (n = 4). Total incidence in the population sampled was assumed to be higher, because some bilaterally affected dogs that would have been members of subgroup A undoubtedly did not come to our attention. Among females, 24.0% were unilaterally abnormal and 8.2% were bilaterally abnormal whereas, among males, 17.8% were unilaterally abnormal and 5.7% were bilaterally abnormal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Implementation of a nation-wide automated auditory brainstem response hearing screening programme in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straaten, H.L.M. van; Hille, E.T.M.; Kok, J.H.; Verkerk, P.H.; Baerts, W.; Bunkers, C.M.; Smink, E.W.A.; Elburg, R.M. van; Kleine, M.J.K. de; Ilsen, A.; Maingay-Visser, A.P.G.F.; Vries, L.S. de; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: As part of a future national neonatal hearing screening programme in the Netherlands, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) hearing screening was implemented in seven neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The objective was to evaluate key outcomes of this programme: participation rate,

  13. Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M.; Stuart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level…

  14. Effect of High-Pass Filtering on the Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Response to Air- and Bone-Conducted Clicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Andrew; Yang, Edward Y.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous 3- channel recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were obtained from 20 neonates with various high-pass filter settings and low intensity levels. Results support the advocacy of less restrictive high-pass filtering for neonatal and infant ABR screening to air-conducted and bone-conducted clicks. (Author/JDD)

  15. Correlations between word intelligibility under reverberation and speech auditory brainstem responses in elderly listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihira, H; Shiraishi, K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between speech auditory brainstem responses (speech ABRs) and word intelligibility under reverberation in elderly adults. Word intelligibility for words under four reverberation times (RTs) of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5s, and speech ABRs to the speech syllable/da/ were obtained from 30 elderly listeners. Root mean square (RMS) amplitudes and discrete Fourier transform (DFT) amplitudes were calculated for ADD and SUB responses in the speech ABRs. No significant correlations were found between the word intelligibility scores under reverberation and the ADD response components. However, in the SUB responses we found that the DFT amplitudes associated with H4-SUB, H5-SUB, H8-SUB, H9-SUB and H10-SUB significantly correlated with the word intelligibility scores for words under reverberation. With Bonferroni correction, the DFT amplitudes for H5-SUB and the intelligibility scores for words with the RT of 0.5s and 1.5s were significant. Word intelligibility under reverberation in elderly listeners is related to their ability to encode the temporal fine structure of speech. The results expand knowledge about subcortical responses of elderly listeners in daily-life listening situations. The SUB responses of speech ABR could be useful as an objective indicator to predict word intelligibility under reverberation. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Short latency cutaneous reflex responses of gamma-efferents in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P R; Hammond, G R

    1992-01-01

    The effect of single shock stimulation, up to 20 x threshold (T), of the sural nerve on the discharges of triceps surae gamma-efferents was investigated in decerebrate cats. Units were classified as static (12) or dynamic (7) on the basis of their resting discharge rates (Murphy et al. 1984). All neurones were excited at short latency by sural nerve stimulation and response size was graded with stimulus intensity. Short latency mixed or inhibitory responses were not evident. Although reflex effects first occurred at low stimulus strengths (less than or equal to 1.5T) in both types of efferent, most responses appeared at higher intensities (greater than 1.5T). The estimated central delays of the responses of static (3.0 +/- 1.1 ms, mean +/- SD) and dynamic (3.4 +/- 1.0 ms) gamma-motoneurones were not significantly different and are consistent with spinal oligosynaptic pathways. The present results differ from those of the only previous study (Johansson and Sojka 1985) of the short latency responses of triceps surae static and dynamic gamma-motoneurones to sural nerve stimulation, in which mixed and inhibitory effects were common in anaesthetised cats. Although differences in recording techniques and gamma sampling may account for the apparent disparity between these studies, it is also feasible that a difference in the setting of interneuronal pathways in the two types of preparation is responsible. The results are discussed in relation to the control of gamma-motoneurones with particular reference to the "final common input" hypothesis (Johansson 1981; Appelberg et al. 1983).

  17. Emotional Response, Brand Recall and Response Latency to Visual Register for Food and Beverage Print Ads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Puskarevic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the nature of advertising principles or any other means of marketing communication that affects consume behavior has long been the subject of marketing research. The research of emotional response in relation to ad efficiency in this paper is an extension of the research previously conducted (Nedeljkovic et al., 2011. The aim of this research is to show how the ad content i.e. visual message in printed advertisements affects emotional response. Two hypotheses were postulated. First, we expected more positive response for ads with predominating iconic content. The second hypothesis sought to determine if greater response latency can be expected for ads with dominant tropological content. The method of research was SAM visual method of self-assessment. Emotional response and response latency of the participants were measured for advertisements for food and beverage products and services in order to determine how visual ad content influences emotional response of the participants, as well as the effectiveness of the advertising campaign. In an experiment the participants could rate their emotional response using the Self-assessment Manikin (SAM scale toward both types of advertisements. At the same time the response latency was measured. The results show that the main hypothesis was neither confirmed nor rejected, whereas the second hypothesis was confirmed. We conclude that the attitude towards the ad, as mediating variable, is a good indicator of advertising effectiveness.

  18. Brain-stem auditory evoked responses during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: Predicting post-operative hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnarayan Ramachandran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The importance of brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring in reducing hearing loss during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia is now accepted. However the extent of the changes in the pattern of these potentials and the safe limits to which these changes are relevant in reducing postoperative hearing loss have not been established. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify these changes and relate these to the postoperative hearing loss. Settings and Design: This study was done at the Walton Centre for neurology and neurosurgery, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The study was designed to give a measure of the change in the wave pattern following microvascular decompression and relate it to postoperative hearing loss. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients undergoing microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia had preoperative and postoperative hearing assessments and intraoperative brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square tests. Results: It was found that the wave V latency was increased by more than 0.9ms in nine patients, eight of whom suffered significant postoperative hearing loss as demonstrated by audiometry. It was also seen that progressive decrease in amplitude of wave V showed progressive hearing loss with 25% loss when amplitude fell by 50 and 100% loss when wave V was lost completely. However most of the patients did not have a clinically manifest hearing loss. Conclusions: A per-operative increase in the latency of wave V greater than 0.9 ms and a fall of amplitude of wave V of more than 50% indicates a risk to hearing.

  19. Synchronized Progression of Prestin Expression and Auditory Brainstem Response during Postnatal Development in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Hang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prestin is the motor protein expressed in the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs of mammalian inner ear. The electromotility of OHCs driven by prestin is responsible for the cochlear amplification which is required for normal hearing in adult animals. Postnatal expression of prestin and activity of OHCs may contribute to the maturation of hearing in rodents. However, the temporal and spatial expression of prestin in cochlea during the development is not well characterized. In the present study, we examined the expression and function of prestin from the OHCs in apical, middle, and basal turns of the cochleae of postnatal rats. Prestin first appeared at postnatal day 6 (P6 for basal turn, P7 in middle turn, and P9 for apical turn of cochlea. The expression level increased progressively over the next few days and by P14 reached the mature level for all three segments. By comparison with the time course of the development of auditory brainstem response for different frequencies, our data reveal that prestin expression synchronized with the hearing development. The present study suggests that the onset time of hearing may require the expression of prestin and is determined by the mature function of OHCs.

  20. Evaluation of the relation between triceps surae H-reflex, M-response latencies and thigh length in normal population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Khosrawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The H-reflex is a useful electrophysiological procedure for evaluating the status of the peripheral nervous system, especially at the proximal segment of the peripheral nerve. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relation between triceps surae H-reflex and M- response latencies and thigh length in normal population, in order to determine if there is any regression equation between them. Materials and Methods: After screening 75 volunteers by considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, 72 of them were selected to enroll into our study (34 men and 38 women with the mean age of 36.04 ± 7.7 years. In all of the subjects H-reflex and M-response latencies were recorded by standard electrophysiological techniques and thigh length was measured. Finally, our data was analyzed for its relations with respect to ages in both sexes by appropriate statistical and mathematical methods. Results: Mean ± SD for H-reflex latency was 27.94 ± 1.6 ms. We found a significant correlation between H-reflex latency and M-latency (r = 0.28, no significant correlation was found between H-reflex latency and thigh length (r = -0.051. Finally based on our findings we introduce a new formula in this paper.Conclusion: We found a significant correlation among of M-response latency and other variables (H-reflex latency and thigh length. Despite this it was eliminated from our formula. The relationship between H-reflex latency and age was significant. Further studies are required to delineate the clinical usage and interpretation of the formula, which we found in this study.

  1. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källstrand, Johan; Olsson, Olle; Nehlstedt, Sara Fristedt; Sköld, Mia Ling; Nielzén, Sören

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS). Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16), schizophrenic patients (n = 16) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients (n = 16), respectively, of matching age and gender. The results showed that the AS subjects exhibited abnormally low activity in the early part of their ABRs that distinctly separated them from the three control groups. Specifically, wave III amplitudes were significantly lower in the AS group than for all the control groups in the forward masking condition (P < 0.005), which was not the case in the baseline condition. Thus, electrophysiological measurements of ABRs to complex sound stimuli (eg, forward masking) may lead to a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiology of AS. Future studies may further point to specific ABR characteristics in AS individuals that separate them from individuals diagnosed with other neurodevelopmental diseases. PMID:20628629

  2. Development of a Chirp Stimulus PC-Based Auditory Brainstem Response Audiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali AL-Afsaa

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing losses during infancy and childhood have many negative future effects and impacts on the child life and productivity. The earlier detection of hearing losses, the earlier medical intervention and then the greater benefit of remediation will be. During this research a PC-based audiometer is designed and, currently, the audiometer prototype is in its final development steps. It is based on the auditory brainstem response (ABR method. Chirp stimuli instead of traditional click stimuli will be used to invoke the ABR signal. The stimulus is designed to synchronize the hair cells movement when it spreads out over the cochlea. In addition to the available hardware utilization (PC and PCI board, the efforts confined to design and implement a hardware prototype and to develop a software package that enables the system to behave as ABR audiometer. By using such a method and chirp stimulus, it is expected to be able to detect hearing impairment (sensorineural in the first few days of the life and conduct hearing test at low frequency of stimulus. Currently, the intended chirp stimulus has been successfully generated and the implemented module is able to amplify a signal (on the order of ABR signal to a recordable level. Moreover, a NI-DAQ data acquisition board has been chosen to implement the PC-prototype interface.

  3. Neonate Auditory Brainstem Responses to CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp Octave Band Stimuli I: Versus Click and Tone Burst Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M; Stuart, Andrew

    The purpose of the study was to generate normative auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave component peak latency and amplitude values for neonates with air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli (i.e., 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz). A second objective was to compare neonate ABRs to CE-Chirp stimuli with ABR responses to traditional click and tone burst stimuli with the same stimulus parameters. Participants were 168 healthy neonates. ABRs were obtained to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirp and click stimuli and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band and tone burst stimuli. The effects of stimulus level, rate, and polarity were examined with air-conducted CE-Chirps and clicks. The effect of stimulus level was also examined with bone-conducted CE-Chirps and clicks and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. In general, ABR wave V amplitudes to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirp stimuli were significantly larger (p CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli relative to traditional click and tone burst stimuli. ABRs to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli may be valuable in the assessment of newborn infants. However, the prognostic value of such stimuli needs to be validated.

  4. Temporal, but not directional, prior knowledge shortens muscle reflex latency in response to sudden transition of support surface during walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eShinya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system takes advantage of prior knowledge about potential upcoming perturbations for modulating postural reflexes. There are two distinct aspects of prior knowledge: spatial and temporal. This study investigated how each of spatial and temporal prior knowledge contributes to the shortening of muscle response latency. Eleven participants walked on a split-belt treadmill and perturbed by sudden acceleration or deceleration of the right belt at right foot contact. Spatial prior knowledge was given by instruction of possible direction (e.g., only acceleration of upcoming perturbation at the beginning of an experimental session. Temporal prior knowledge was given to subjects by warning tones at foot contact during three consecutive strides before the perturbation. In response to acceleration perturbation, reflexive muscle activity was observed in soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. Onset latency of the gastrocnemius response was shorter (72 ms vs. 58 ms when subjects knew the timing of the upcoming perturbation, whereas the latency was independent of directional prior knowledge. Soleus onset latency (44 ms was not influenced by directional nor temporal prior knowledge. Although spinal neural circuit that mediates short-latency relfex was not influenced by the prior knowledge, excitability in supra-spinal neural circuit that mediates medium- and long-latency reflex might be enhanced by knowing the timing of the upcoming perturbation.

  5. Searching for the optimal stimulus eliciting auditory brainstem responses in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fobel, Oliver; Dau, Torsten

    2004-01-01

    functions fitted to tone-burst-evoked ABR wave-V data over a wide range of stimulus levels and frequencies [Neely et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 83(2), 652–656 (1988)]. In this case, a set of level-dependent chirps was generated. The chirp-evoked responses, particularly wave-V amplitude and latency, were...... compared to click responses and to responses obtained with the original chirp as defined in Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107(3), 1530–1540 (2000)], referred to here as the M-chirp since it is based on a (linear) cochlea model. The main hypothesis was that, at low and medium stimulation levels, the O......- and A-chirps might produce a larger response than the original M-chirp whose parameters were essentially derived from high-level BM data. The main results of the present study are as follows: (i) All chirps evoked a larger wave-V amplitude than the click stimulus indicating that for the chirps a broader...

  6. Goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Jeffrey; Gribble, Paul L; Pruszynski, J Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that muscle activity 50-100 ms after a mechanical perturbation (i.e., the long-latency stretch response) can be modulated in a manner that reflects voluntary motor control. These previous studies typically assessed modulation of the long-latency stretch response from individual muscles rather than how this response is concurrently modulated across multiple muscles. Here we investigated such concurrent modulation by having participants execute goal-directed reaches to visual targets after mechanical perturbations of the shoulder, elbow, or wrist while measuring activity from six muscles that articulate these joints. We found that shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch response, that the relative magnitude of participants' goal-dependent activity was similar across muscles, that the temporal onset of goal-dependent muscle activity was not reliably different across the three joints, and that shoulder muscles displayed goal-dependent activity appropriate for counteracting intersegmental dynamics. We also observed that the long-latency stretch response of wrist muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after elbow perturbations and that the long-latency stretch response of elbow muscles displayed goal-dependent modulation after wrist perturbations. This pattern likely arises because motion at either joint could bring the hand to the visual target and suggests that the nervous system rapidly exploits such simple kinematic redundancy when processing sensory feedback to support goal-directed actions.

  7. Age-related hearing loss in dogs : Diagnosis with Brainstem-Evoked Response Audiometry and Treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant.

    OpenAIRE

    ter Haar, G.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common cause of acquired hearing impairment in dogs. Diagnosis requires objective electrophysiological tests (brainstem evoked response audiometry [BERA]) evaluating the entire audible frequency range in dogs. In our laboratory a method was developed to deliver tone bursts ranging in frequency from 1 - 32 kHz for frequency-specific assessment of the cochlea in dogs. Brainstem auditory evoked responses to a click (CS) and to 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, a...

  8. NOISE-INDUCED TOUGHENING EFFECT IN WISTAR RATS: ENHANCED AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES ARE RELATED TO CALRETININ AND NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE UPREGULATION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos eAlvarado

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate conditioning noise exposure may reduce a subsequent noise-induced threshold shift. Although this toughening effect helps to protect the auditory system from a subsequent traumatic noise exposure, the mechanisms that regulate this protective process are not fully understood yet. Accordingly, the goal of the present study was to characterize physiological processes associated with ‘toughening’ and to determine their relationship to metabolic changes in the cochlea and cochlear nucleus (CN. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were evaluated in Wistar rats before and after exposures to a sound conditioning protocol consisting of a broad-band white noise of 118 dB SPL for 1h every 72h, 4 times. After the last ABR evaluation, animals were perfused and their cochleae and brains removed and processed for the activity markers calretinin (CR and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. Toughening was demonstrated by a progressively faster recovery of the threshold shift, as well as wave amplitudes and latencies over time. Immunostaining revealed an increase in CR and nNOS levels in the spiral ganglion, spiral ligament and CN in noise-conditioned rats. Overall, these results suggest that the protective mechanisms of the auditory toughening effect initiate in the cochlea and extend to the central auditory system. Such phenomenon might be in part related to an interplay between CR and nitric oxide signalling pathways, and involve an increased cytosolic calcium buffering capacity induced by the noise conditioning protocol.

  9. Environmental enrichment improves response strength, threshold, selectivity, and latency of auditory cortex neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Navzer D; Percaccio, Cherie R; Pandya, Pritesh K; Moucha, Raluca; Rathbun, Daniel L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2004-07-01

    Over the last 50 yr, environmental enrichment has been shown to generate more than a dozen changes in brain anatomy. The consequences of these physical changes on information processing have not been well studied. In this study, rats were housed in enriched or standard conditions either prior to or after reaching sexual maturity. Evoked potentials from awake rats and extracellular recordings from anesthetized rats were used to document responses of auditory cortex neurons. This report details several significant, new findings about the influence of housing conditions on the responses of rat auditory cortex neurons. First, enrichment dramatically increases the strength of auditory cortex responses. Tone-evoked potentials of enriched rats, for example, were more than twice the amplitude of rats raised in standard laboratory conditions. Second, cortical responses of both young and adult animals benefit from exposure to an enriched environment and are degraded by exposure to an impoverished environment. Third, housing condition resulted in rapid remodeling of cortical responses in <2 wk. Fourth, recordings made under anesthesia indicate that enrichment increases the number of neurons activated by any sound. This finding shows that the evoked potential plasticity documented in awake rats was not due to differences in behavioral state. Finally, enrichment made primary auditory cortex (A1) neurons more sensitive to quiet sounds, more selective for tone frequency, and altered their response latencies. These experiments provide the first evidence of physiologic changes in auditory cortex processing resulting from generalized environmental enrichment.

  10. Activation of autophagy at cerebral cortex and apoptosis at brainstem are differential responses to 835 MHz RF-EMF exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Hwan; Yu, Da-Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    With the explosive increase in exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) emitted by mobile phones, public concerns have grown over the last few decades with regard to the potential effects of EMF exposure on the nervous system in the brain. Many researchers have suggested that RF-EMFs can effect diverse neuronal alterations in the brain, thereby affecting neuronal functions as well as behavior. Previously, we showed that long-term exposure to 835 MHz RF-EMF induces autophagy in the mice brain. In this study, we explore whether short-term exposure to RF-EMF leads to the autophagy pathway in the cerebral cortex and brainstem at 835 MHz with a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 4.0 W/kg for 4 weeks. Increased levels of autophagy genes and proteins such as LC3B-II and Beclin1 were demonstrated and the accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes was observed in cortical neurons whereas apoptosis pathways were up-regulated in the brainstem but not in the cortex following 4 weeks of RF exposure. Taken together, the present study indicates that monthly exposure to RF-EMF induces autophagy in the cerebral cortex and suggests that autophagic degradation in cortical neurons against a stress of 835 MHz RF during 4 weeks could correspond to adaptation to the RF stress environment. However, activation of apoptosis rather than autophagy in the brainstem is suggesting the differential responses to the RF-EMF stresses in the brain system. PMID:28280411

  11. [Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) associated with swelling in the brainstem: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hiroki; Nakajima, Hideto; Yamane, Kazushi; Ohnishi, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Fumiharu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a rare central nervous system inflammatory disease characterized by the punctate gadolinium enhancement peppering the pons and the cerebellar peduncles as neuroimaging. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman who presented with CLIPPERS associated with swelling in the brainstem. She was hospitalized because of gait ataxia and consciousness disturbance. MRI of the brain showed FLAIR hyperintense lesions in the pons, cerebellar peduncles, cerebellum and the subcortical white matter lesion in the right occipital lobe with significant swelling in the brainstem. Diffusion-weighted MRI did not show an abnormal signal, indicating vasogenic edema. Post-contrast T1-weighted MRI showed enhanced area in the right occipital lobe and panctate gadolinium enhancement peppering brainstem. Treatment with steroids led to rapid improvement. However, she showed exacerbation of clinical and radiological findings during the tapering schedule of steroid. The biopsy from the occipital lobe revealed intense perivascular and parenchymal lymphocytic infiltrates composed of primarily T cells, B cells and macrophages. The patient was diagnosed with CLIPPERS, and treatment with increased dose of corticosteroid induced a clinical improvement. Previous reports well described a characteristic MRI finding of punctate enhancement peppering the pons. In addition, the pons and cerebellar peduncles swelling can occur in this disorder.

  12. STANDARDIZNG OF BRAINSTEM EVOKED RESPONSE AUDIOMETRY VALUES PRELIMINARY TO STARTING BERA LAB IN A HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaprasad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The subjective assessment of hearing is primarily done by pure tone audiometry. It is commonly undertaken test which can tell us the hearing acuity of a person when carried under ideal conditions. However, not infrequently the otologists encounter a difficulty to do subjective audiometry or in those circumstances where the test results are not correlating with the disease in question. Hence they have to depend upon the objective tests to get a workable knowledge about the patients hearing threshold. Of the various objective tests available the most popular are Brain stem evoked response audiometry –non-invasive and more standardized parameter, Electro-cochleography, auditory steady state response. Otoacoustic Emission test (OAE Otoacoustic emission doesn’t measure the hearing acuity, it gives us an idea whether there is any deafness or not. But BERA is useful in detecting and quantification of deafness in the difficult-to-test patients like infants, mentally retarded people, malingers, deeply sedated and anaesthetized patients. It determines objectively the nature of deafness (i.e., whether sensory or neural in difficult-to-test patients. It helps to locate the site of lesion in retro-cochlear pathologies (in an area from spiral ganglion of the cochlear nerve to midbrain (inferior colliculus. Study of central auditory disorders is possible. Study of maturity of central nervous system in newborns, objective identification of brain death, assessing prognosis in comatose patients are other uses. Before starting a BERA lab in a hospital it is mandatory to standardize the normal values in a randomly selected group of persons with certain criteria like; normal ears with intact T.M and without any complaints of loss of hearing. Persons aged between 05 to 60 years are taken for this study. The study group included both males and females. The aim of this study is to assess the hearing pathway in normal hearing individuals and compare

  13. Coordinating long-latency stretch responses across the shoulder, elbow, and wrist during goal-directed reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Jeffrey; Saravanamuttu, James; Gribble, Paul L; Pruszynski, J Andrew

    2016-11-01

    The long-latency stretch response (muscle activity 50-100 ms after a mechanical perturbation) can be coordinated across multiple joints to support goal-directed actions. Here we assessed the flexibility of such coordination and whether it serves to counteract intersegmental dynamics and exploit kinematic redundancy. In three experiments, participants made planar reaches to visual targets after elbow perturbations and we assessed the coordination of long-latency stretch responses across shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles. Importantly, targets were placed such that elbow and wrist (but not shoulder) rotations could help transport the hand to the target-a simple form of kinematic redundancy. In experiment 1 we applied perturbations of different magnitudes to the elbow and found that long-latency stretch responses in shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscles scaled with perturbation magnitude. In experiment 2 we examined the trial-by-trial relationship between long-latency stretch responses at adjacent joints and found that the magnitudes of the responses in shoulder and elbow muscles, as well as elbow and wrist muscles, were positively correlated. In experiment 3 we explicitly instructed participants how to use their wrist to move their hand to the target after the perturbation. We found that long-latency stretch responses in wrist muscles were not sensitive to our instructions, despite the fact that participants incorporated these instructions into their voluntary behavior. Taken together, our results indicate that, during reaching, the coordination of long-latency stretch responses across multiple joints counteracts intersegmental dynamics but may not be able to exploit kinematic redundancy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. DEVELOPING ‘STANDARD NOVEL ‘VAD’ TECHNIQUE’ AND ‘NOISE FREE SIGNALS’ FOR SPEECH AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES FOR HUMAN SUBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ranganadh Narayanam*

    2016-01-01

    In this research as a first step we have concentrated on collecting non-intra cortical EEG data of Brainstem Speech Evoked Potentials from human subjects in an Audiology Lab in University of Ottawa. The problems we have considered are the most advanced and most essential problems of interest in Auditory Neural Signal Processing area in the world: The first problem is the Voice Activity Detection (VAD) in Speech Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR); The second problem is to identify the best De-...

  15. Effect of auditory training on the middle latency response in children with (central auditory processing disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schochat

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the middle latency response (MLR characteristics (latency and amplitude in children with (central auditory processing disorder [(CAPD], categorized as such by their performance on the central auditory test battery, and the effects of these characteristics after auditory training. Thirty children with (CAPD, 8 to 14 years of age, were tested using the MLR-evoked potential. This group was then enrolled in an 8-week auditory training program and then retested at the completion of the program. A control group of 22 children without (CAPD, composed of relatives and acquaintances of those involved in the research, underwent the same testing at equal time intervals, but were not enrolled in the auditory training program. Before auditory training, MLR results for the (CAPD group exhibited lower C3-A1 and C3-A2 wave amplitudes in comparison to the control group [C3-A1, 0.84 µV (mean, 0.39 (SD - standard deviation for the (CAPD group and 1.18 µV (mean, 0.65 (SD for the control group; C3-A2, 0.69 µV (mean, 0.31 (SD for the (CAPD group and 1.00 µV (mean, 0.46 (SD for the control group]. After training, the MLR C3-A1 [1.59 µV (mean, 0.82 (SD] and C3-A2 [1.24 µV (mean, 0.73 (SD] wave amplitudes of the (CAPD group significantly increased, so that there was no longer a significant difference in MLR amplitude between (CAPD and control groups. These findings suggest progress in the use of electrophysiological measurements for the diagnosis and treatment of (CAPD.

  16. Effect of auditory training on the middle latency response in children with (central) auditory processing disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schochat, E; Musiek, F E; Alonso, R; Ogata, J

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the middle latency response (MLR) characteristics (latency and amplitude) in children with (central) auditory processing disorder [(C)APD], categorized as such by their performance on the central auditory test battery, and the effects of these characteristics after auditory training. Thirty children with (C)APD, 8 to 14 years of age, were tested using the MLR-evoked potential. This group was then enrolled in an 8-week auditory training program and then retested at the completion of the program. A control group of 22 children without (C)APD, composed of relatives and acquaintances of those involved in the research, underwent the same testing at equal time intervals, but were not enrolled in the auditory training program. Before auditory training, MLR results for the (C)APD group exhibited lower C3-A1 and C3-A2 wave amplitudes in comparison to the control group [C3-A1, 0.84 microV (mean), 0.39 (SD--standard deviation) for the (C)APD group and 1.18 microV (mean), 0.65 (SD) for the control group; C3-A2, 0.69 microV (mean), 0.31 (SD) for the (C)APD group and 1.00 microV (mean), 0.46 (SD) for the control group]. After training, the MLR C3-A1 [1.59 microV (mean), 0.82 (SD)] and C3-A2 [1.24 microV (mean), 0.73 (SD)] wave amplitudes of the (C)APD group significantly increased, so that there was no longer a significant difference in MLR amplitude between (C)APD and control groups. These findings suggest progress in the use of electrophysiological measurements for the diagnosis and treatment of (C)APD.

  17. Shortened Conditioned Eyeblink Response Latency in Male but not Female Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanellou, Alexandra; Schachinger, Kira M.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Reductions in the volume of the cerebellum and impairments in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning have been observed in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recently, it was reported that subjects with ADHD as well as male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a strain that is frequently employed as an animal model in the study of ADHD, exhibit a parallel pattern of timing deficits in eyeblink conditioning. One criticism that has been posed regarding the validity of the SHR strain as an animal model for the study of ADHD is that SHRs are not only hyperactive but also hypertensive. It is conceivable that many of the behavioral characteristics seen in SHRs that seem to parallel the behavioral symptoms of ADHD are not solely due to hyperactivity but instead are the net outcome of the interaction between hyperactivity and hypertension. We used Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive (WKHA) and Wistar-Kyoto Hypertensive (WKHT) rats (males and females), strains generated from recombinant inbreeding of SHRs and their progenitor strain, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, to compare eyeblink conditioning in strains that are exclusively hyperactive or hypertensive. We used a long-delay eyeblink conditioning task in which a tone conditioned stimulus was paired with a periorbital stimulation unconditioned stimulus (750-ms delay paradigm). Our results showed that WKHA and WKHT rats exhibited similar rates of conditioned response (CR) acquisition. However, WKHA males displayed shortened CR latencies (early onset and peak latency) in comparison to WKHT males. In contrast, female WKHAs and WKHTs did not differ. In subsequent extinction training, WKHA rats extinguished at similar rates in comparison to WKHT rats. The current results support the hypothesis of a relationship between cerebellar abnormalities and ADHD in an animal model of ADHD-like symptoms that does not also exhibit hypertension, and suggest that cerebellar-related timing deficits are specific to males. PMID:19485572

  18. Reinstatement of short-latency responses after asymptotic Pavlovian conditioning training by the presentation of an extraneous stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Edgar H

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the progressive disappearance of short-latency conditioned responses, or inhibition of delay, observed in Pavlovian conditioning with long inter-stimulus intervals, could be reverted by the presentation of a novel stimulus. In one experiment, two groups of rabbits received extensive training with a short (250 ms) or a long (1500 ms) tone that overlapped and terminated with a periorbital shock unconditioned stimulus. After training, the presentation of an extraneous stimulus prior to tone onset produced a reinstatement of short latency CRs in the group trained with the long CS, but did not affect CR latency in the group trained with the short CS. This finding is consistent with Pavlov's (1927) view that conditioning with long conditioned stimuli involves the acquisition of response tendencies in the early portion of the stimulus that are subsequently suppressed by the development of an inhibitory process.

  19. Brain responses to violet, blue, and green monochromatic light exposures in humans: prominent role of blue light and the brainstem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Vandewalle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Relatively long duration retinal light exposure elicits nonvisual responses in humans, including modulation of alertness and cognition. These responses are thought to be mediated in part by melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells which are more sensitive to blue light than violet or green light. The contribution of the melanopsin system and the brain mechanisms involved in the establishment of such responses to light remain to be established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We exposed 15 participants to short duration (50 s monochromatic violet (430 nm, blue (473 nm, and green (527 nm light exposures of equal photon flux (10(13ph/cm(2/s while they were performing a working memory task in fMRI. At light onset, blue light, as compared to green light, increased activity in the left hippocampus, left thalamus, and right amygdala. During the task, blue light, as compared to violet light, increased activity in the left middle frontal gyrus, left thalamus and a bilateral area of the brainstem consistent with activation of the locus coeruleus. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support a prominent contribution of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells to brain responses to light within the very first seconds of an exposure. The results also demonstrate the implication of the brainstem in mediating these responses in humans and speak for a broad involvement of light in the regulation of brain function.

  20. Combined laryngeal inflammation and trauma mediate long-lasting immunoreactivity response in the brainstem sensory nuclei in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina eSimonyan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensory feedback from the larynx plays a critical role in regulation of normal upper airway functions, such as breathing, deglutition and voice production, while altered laryngeal sensory feedback is known to elicit a variety of pathological reflex responses, including persistent coughing, dysphonia and laryngospasm. Despite its clinical impact, the central mechanisms underlying the development of pathological laryngeal responses remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of persistent vocal fold (VF inflammation and trauma, as frequent causes of long-lasting modulation of laryngeal sensory feedback, on brainstem immunoreactivity in the rat. Combined VF inflammation and trauma were induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS solution and compared to VF trauma alone from injection of vehicle solution and to controls without any VF manipulations. Using a c-fos marker, we found significantly increased Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI in the bilateral intermediate/parvicellular reticular formation (IRF/PCRF with a trend in the left solitary tract nucleus (NTS only in animals with LPS-induced VF inflammation and trauma. Further, FLI in the right NTS was significantly correlated with the severity of LPS-induced VF changes. However, increased brainstem FLI response was not associated with FLI changes in the first-order neurons of the laryngeal afferents located in the nodose and jugular ganglia in either group. Our data indicate that complex VF alterations (i.e., inflammation/trauma vs. trauma alone may cause prolonged excitability of the brainstem nuclei receiving a direct sensory input from the larynx, which, in turn, may lead to (malplastic changes within the laryngeal central sensory control.

  1. Low Latency DESDynI Data Products for Disaster Response, Resource Management and Other Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Joshua R.; Chien, Steve A.; Lou, Yunling

    2011-01-01

    We are developing onboard processor technology targeted at the L-band SAR instrument onboard the planned DESDynI mission to enable formation of SAR images onboard opening possibilities for near-real-time data products to augment full data streams. Several image processing and/or interpretation techniques are being explored as possible direct-broadcast products for use by agencies in need of low-latency data, responsible for disaster mitigation and assessment, resource management, agricultural development, shipping, etc. Data collected through UAVSAR (L-band) serves as surrogate to the future DESDynI instrument. We have explored surface water extent as a tool for flooding response, and disturbance images on polarimetric backscatter of repeat pass imagery potentially useful for structural collapse (earthquake), mud/land/debris-slides etc. We have also explored building vegetation and snow/ice classifiers, via support vector machines utilizing quad-pol backscatter, cross-pol phase, and a number of derivatives (radar vegetation index, dielectric estimates, etc.). We share our qualitative and quantitative results thus far.

  2. Neonatal hearing screening of high-risk infants using automated auditory brainstem response: a retrospective analysis of referral rates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGurgan, I J

    2013-10-07

    The past decade has seen the widespread introduction of universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) programmes worldwide. Regrettably, such a programme is only now in the process of nationwide implementation in the Republic of Ireland and has been largely restricted to one screening modality for initial testing; namely transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of employing a different screening protocol which utilises an alternative initial test, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), on referral rates to specialist audiology services.

  3. Canine sense and sensibility: tipping points and response latency variability as an optimism index in a canine judgement bias assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J Starling

    Full Text Available Recent advances in animal welfare science used judgement bias, a type of cognitive bias, as a means to objectively measure an animal's affective state. It is postulated that animals showing heightened expectation of positive outcomes may be categorised optimistic, while those showing heightened expectations of negative outcomes may be considered pessimistic. This study pioneers the use of a portable, automated apparatus to train and test the judgement bias of dogs. Dogs were trained in a discrimination task in which they learned to touch a target after a tone associated with a lactose-free milk reward and abstain from touching the target after a tone associated with water. Their judgement bias was then probed by presenting tones between those learned in the discrimination task and measuring their latency to respond by touching the target. A Cox's Proportional Hazards model was used to analyse censored response latency data. Dog and Cue both had a highly significant effect on latency and risk of touching a target. This indicates that judgement bias both exists in dogs and differs between dogs. Test number also had a significant effect, indicating that dogs were less likely to touch the target over successive tests. Detailed examination of the response latencies revealed tipping points where average latency increased by 100% or more, giving an indication of where dogs began to treat ambiguous cues as predicting more negative outcomes than positive ones. Variability scores were calculated to provide an index of optimism using average latency and standard deviation at cues after the tipping point. The use of a mathematical approach to assessing judgement bias data in animal studies offers a more detailed interpretation than traditional statistical analyses. This study provides proof of concept for the use of an automated apparatus for measuring cognitive bias in dogs.

  4. Canine sense and sensibility: tipping points and response latency variability as an optimism index in a canine judgement bias assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Melissa J; Branson, Nicholas; Cody, Denis; Starling, Timothy R; McGreevy, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in animal welfare science used judgement bias, a type of cognitive bias, as a means to objectively measure an animal's affective state. It is postulated that animals showing heightened expectation of positive outcomes may be categorised optimistic, while those showing heightened expectations of negative outcomes may be considered pessimistic. This study pioneers the use of a portable, automated apparatus to train and test the judgement bias of dogs. Dogs were trained in a discrimination task in which they learned to touch a target after a tone associated with a lactose-free milk reward and abstain from touching the target after a tone associated with water. Their judgement bias was then probed by presenting tones between those learned in the discrimination task and measuring their latency to respond by touching the target. A Cox's Proportional Hazards model was used to analyse censored response latency data. Dog and Cue both had a highly significant effect on latency and risk of touching a target. This indicates that judgement bias both exists in dogs and differs between dogs. Test number also had a significant effect, indicating that dogs were less likely to touch the target over successive tests. Detailed examination of the response latencies revealed tipping points where average latency increased by 100% or more, giving an indication of where dogs began to treat ambiguous cues as predicting more negative outcomes than positive ones. Variability scores were calculated to provide an index of optimism using average latency and standard deviation at cues after the tipping point. The use of a mathematical approach to assessing judgement bias data in animal studies offers a more detailed interpretation than traditional statistical analyses. This study provides proof of concept for the use of an automated apparatus for measuring cognitive bias in dogs.

  5. Neuromagnetic oscillations predict evoked-response latency delays and core language deficits in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J Christopher; Khan, Sarah Y; Blaskey, Lisa; Chow, Vivian Y; Rey, Michael; Gaetz, William; Cannon, Katelyn M; Monroe, Justin F; Cornew, Lauren; Qasmieh, Saba; Liu, Song; Welsh, John P; Levy, Susan E; Roberts, Timothy P L

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have observed evoked response latency as well as gamma band superior temporal gyrus (STG) auditory abnormalities in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A limitation of these studies is that associations between these two abnormalities, as well as the full extent of oscillatory phenomena in ASD in terms of frequency and time, have not been examined. Subjects were presented pure tones at 200, 300, 500, and 1,000 Hz while magnetoencephalography assessed activity in STG auditory areas in a sample of 105 children with ASD and 36 typically developing controls (TD). Findings revealed a profile such that auditory STG processes in ASD were characterized by pre-stimulus abnormalities across multiple frequencies, then early high-frequency abnormalities followed by low-frequency abnormalities. Increased pre-stimulus activity was a 'core' abnormality, with pre-stimulus activity predicting post-stimulus neural abnormalities, group membership, and clinical symptoms (CELF-4 Core Language Index). Deficits in synaptic integration in the auditory cortex are associated with oscillatory abnormalities in ASD as well as patient symptoms. Increased pre-stimulus activity in ASD likely demonstrates a fundamental signal-to-noise deficit in individuals with ASD, with elevations in oscillatory activity suggesting an inability to maintain an appropriate 'neural tone' and an inability to rapidly return to a resting state prior to the next stimulus.

  6. Investigation of auditory brainstem function in elderly diabetic patients with presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacií, Jelena; Lajtman, Zoran; Ozegović, Ivan; Knezević, Predrag; Carić, Tomislav; Vlasić, Ana

    2009-01-01

    We performed brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) examinations in 100 patients older than 60 years and having type I diabetes mellitus and presbycusis. The aim of our investigation was to compare the BAEP results of this group with those of healthy controls with presbycusis and to look for possible correlations between alteration of the auditory brainstem function and the aging of elderly diabetic patients. Absolute and interpeak latencies of all waves were prolonged significantly in the study group of diabetic patients. The amplitudes of all waves I through V were diminished in the study group as compared to those in the control group, with statistical significance present for all waves. Analysis of the latencies (waves I, II, I, and V), interpeak latencies (I-V), and amplitudes (I, II, III, and V) of BAEP revealed a significant difference between those of diabetics and those of healthy elderly controls with presbycusis. These data support a hypothesis that there is a brainstem neuropathy in diabetes mellitus that can be assessed with auditory brainstem response testing even in the group of elderly patients with sensorineural hearing loss.

  7. Auditory brain-stem response, CT and MR imaging in a family with classical type Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiomi, M.; Ookuni, H.; Sugita, T.

    1987-05-01

    A family in which 5 males in successive generations were clinically suspected to be affected with the classical X-linked recessive form of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is presented. Two brothers and their maternal uncle were examined by one of the authors (MS). In two brothers, aged 3 years and 2 years, the disease became obvious within a month after birth with nystagmus and head tremor. Head control and sitting were achieved at the age of 18 months at which time they began to speak. They could not stand nor walk without support. They had dysmetria, weakness and hyper-reflexia of lower extremities, and mild mental retardation. Their maternal uncle, aged 37 years, showed psychomotor retardation from birth and subsequently developed spastic paraplegia. He had been able to walk with crutches until adolescence. He had dysmetria, scanning speech, athetoid posture of fingers and significant intellectual deficits. Auditory brainstem response in both brothers revealed well defined waves I and II, low amplitude wave III and an absence of all subsequent components. CT demonstrated mild cerebral atrophy in the elder brother and was normal in the younger brother, but in their uncle, CT showed atrophy of the brainstem, cerebellum and cerebrum, and low density of the white matter of the centrum semiovale. MRI was performed in both brothers. Although the brainstem, the internal capsule and the thalamus were myelinated, the myelination in the subcortical white matter was restricted to periventricular regions on IR sequence scans. On SE sequence, the subcortical white matter was imaged as a brighter area than the cerebral cortex. These results demonstrate that the degree of myelination in these patients was roughly equal to that of 3-to 6-month old infants.

  8. Brainstem disconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, Curtis; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L. [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Jocson, Jennifer [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Brainstem disconnection is a very rare neonatal abnormality, with only seven cases reported. We report a unique case of a neonate who presented at delivery with hypertonia, dysmorphic facial features, and respiratory distress, as well as numerous musculoskeletal and genitourinary abnormalities. MRI of the brain showed disconnection between the pons and medulla with cerebellar hypoplasia and absent cerebellar peduncles. It aided in the description of the neurological and vascular anomalies associated with this diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Stochastic coordination of multiple actuators reduces latency and improves chemotactic response in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Michael W; Pontius, William; Emonet, Thierry

    2012-01-17

    Individual neuronal, signal transduction, and regulatory pathways often control multiple stochastic downstream actuators, which raises the question of how coordinated response to a single input can be achieved when individual actuators fluctuate independently. In Escherichia coli, the bacterial chemotaxis pathway controls the activity of multiple flagellar motors to generate the run-and-tumble motion of the cell. High-resolution microscopy experiments have identified the key conformational changes adopted by individual flagella during this process. By incorporating these observations into a stochastic model of the flagellar bundle, we demonstrate that the presence of multiple motors imposes a trade-off on chemotactic performance. Multiple motors reduce the latency of the response below the time scale of the stochastic switching of a single motor, which improves performance on steep gradients of attractants. However, the uncoordinated switching of multiple motors interrupts and shortens cell runs, which thereby reduces signal detection and performance on shallow gradients. Remarkably, when slow fluctuations generated by the adaptation mechanism of the chemotaxis system are incorporated in the model at levels measured in experiments, the chemotactic sensitivity and performance in shallow gradients is partially restored with marginal effects for steep gradients. The noise is beneficial because it simultaneously generates long events in the statistics of individual motors and coordinates the motors to generate a long tail in the run length distribution of the cell. Occasional long runs are known to enhance exploration of random walkers. Here we show that they have the additional benefit of enhancing the sensitivity of the bacterium to very shallow gradients.

  10. Persistent responsiveness of long-latency auditory cortical activities in response to repeated stimuli of musical timbre and vowel sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, Shinya; Ohta, Keisuke; Koyama, Sachiko

    2007-11-01

    Long-latency auditory-evoked magnetic field and potential show strong attenuation of N1m/N1 responses when an identical stimulus is presented repeatedly due to adaptation of auditory cortical neurons. This adaptation is weak in subsequently occurring P2m/P2 responses, being weaker for piano chords than single piano notes. The adaptation of P2m is more suppressed in musicians having long-term musical training than in nonmusicians, whereas the amplitude of P2 is enhanced preferentially in musicians as the spectral complexity of musical tones increases. To address the key issues of whether such high responsiveness of P2m/P2 responses to complex sounds is intrinsic and common to nonmusical sounds, we conducted a magnetoencephalographic study on participants who had no experience of musical training, using consecutive trains of piano and vowel sounds. The dipole moment of the P2m sources located in the auditory cortex indicated significantly suppressed adaptation in the right hemisphere both to piano and vowel sounds. Thus, the persistent responsiveness of the P2m activity may be inherent, not induced by intensive training, and common to spectrally complex sounds. The right hemisphere dominance of the responsiveness to musical and speech sounds suggests analysis of acoustic features of object sounds to be a significant function of P2m activity.

  11. Correlation of augmented startle reflex with brainstem electrophysiological responses in Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sadao; Saito, Yoshiaki; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Sugai, Kenji; Iso, Takashi; Inagaki, Masumi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the evolution of an augmented startle reflex in Tay-Sachs disease and compare the temporal relationship between this reflex and brainstem evoked potentials. Clinical and electrophysiological data from 3 patients with Tay-Sachs disease were retrospectively collected. The augmented startle reflex appeared between the age of 3 and 17 months and disappeared between the age of 4 and 6 years. Analysis of brainstem auditory evoked potentials revealed that poor segregation of peak I, but not peak III, coincided with the disappearance of the augmented startle reflex. A blink reflex with markedly high amplitude was observed in a patient with an augmented startle reflex. The correlation between the augmented startle reflex and the preservation of peak I but not peak III supports the theory that the superior olivary nucleus is dispensable for this reflex. The blink reflex with high amplitudes may represent augmented excitability of reticular formation at the pontine tegmentum in Tay-Sachs disease, where the pattern generators for the augmented startle and blink reflexes may functionally overlap. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 年龄对言语诱发 ABR 的频率跟随反应影响%The Effects of Aging on Frequency Following Response in Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝文洋; 商莹莹; 倪道凤; 姜鸿; 徐春晓; 高志强; 王素菊; 李奉蓉; 赵翠霞

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was to record the speech evoked auditory brainstem response (s-ABR) of normal hearing young and aged people ,then compared the frequency following responses (FFR) of s-ABR between the two groups ,in order to explore the contribution of FFR on revealing possible aging mechanisms of central audi‐tory system .Methods Twelve normal hearing young adults and aged people respectively (24 ears) were enrolled and s-ABRs (syllable/da/) were recorded using a SmartEP auditory evoked potential system .Results The comparison of waveforms between the two groups showed that the wave latencies of transient responses in the aged group was longer than that of young group ,while the wave latencies of the sustained response ,FFR ,were of no significant differences .The amplitudes of FFR waves in the aged group were lower than those of in the young group .The FFR spectrum analysis showed that the relative energy of each formant for the aged group was lower than that of in the young group and for some formants .Moreover ,for the aged group ,formant frequency differences between FFR and stimulus signal were greater than the young group .Conclusion Compared with young people ,the FFR of aged peo‐ple showed lower amplitudes and less accuracy ,meaning that aging can lead to the weakness of the brainstem neurons'spectral encoding ability .It may be one of the mechanisms causing the reduction of speech recognition in presbycusis patients .%目的:分析听力正常青年人与老年人之间言语诱发听性脑干反应(speech evoked auditory brainstem response ,s-ABR)的频率跟随反应(frequency following response ,FFR)差异,探讨其在揭示听觉系统老化机制中的作用。方法应用SmartEP听觉诱发电位系统对听力正常青年人(18~25岁)与老年人(60~70岁)各12例(24耳)进行言语声信号/da/诱发的s-ABR检测,比较两组s -ABR波形图及频谱图、FFR各波潜伏期及共振峰等。结

  13. Fast response electromagnetic follow-ups from low latency GW triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, E J; Rowlinson, A; Gao, H; Zhang, B; Tingay, S J; Boer, M; Wen, L

    2016-01-01

    We investigate joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming that BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of extreme low-latency search pipelines, we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs and use these to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. Using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors, we determine what EM observations could be achieved from low-frequency radio up to high energy $\\gamma$-ray. We show that while challenging, breakthrough multi-messenger science is possible through low latency pipelines.

  14. Recording of electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses (E-ABR) with an integrated stimulus generator in Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmer, Andreas; Peter, Otto; Baumann, Uwe

    2008-08-30

    Electrical auditory brainstem responses (E-ABRs) of subjects with cochlear implants are used for monitoring the physiologic responses of early signal processing of the auditory system. Additionally, E-ABR measurements allow the diagnosis of retro-cochlear diseases. Therefore, E-ABR should be available in every cochlear implant center as a diagnostic tool. In this paper, we introduce a low-cost setup designed to perform an E-ABR as well as a conventional ABR for research purposes. The distributable form was developed with Matlab and the Matlab Compiler (The Mathworks Inc.). For the ABR, only a PC with a soundcard, conventional system headphones, and an EEG pre-amplifier are necessary; for E-ABR, in addition, an interface to the cochlea implant is required. For our purposes, we implemented an interface for the Combi 40+/Pulsar implant (MED-EL, Innsbruck).

  15. Short-latency crossed responses in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend S.

    2015-01-01

    , indicating their existence in humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether short-latency crossed-spinal reflexes are present in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle following ipsilateral knee (iKnee) joint rotations during a sitting task, where participants maintained a slight pre...

  16. The Middle Latency Response (MLR) and Steady State Evoked Potential (SSEP) in Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    antibiotics, intracranial hemorrhage, and congenital malformations . Unfortunately, the items in this list often occur in combination rather than in isolation...JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN AUDITORY SOCIETY 5: 156-162, 1979. Yamada, 0., Kodera, K. and Yagi, T. Cochlear processes affecting wave V latency of the

  17. Contribution of resolved and unresolved harmonic regions to brainstem speech-evoked responses in quiet and in background noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laroche

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Speech auditory brainstem responses (speech ABR reflect activity that is phase-locked to the harmonics of the fundamental frequency (F0 up to at least the first formant (F1. Recent evidence suggests that responses at F0 in the presence of noise are more robust than responses at F1, and are also dissociated in some learning-impaired children. Peripheral auditory processing can be broadly divided into resolved and unresolved harmonic regions. This study investigates the contribution of these two regions to the speech ABR, and their susceptibility to noise. We recorded, in quiet and in background white noise, evoked responses in twelve normal hearing adults in response to three variants of a synthetic vowel: i Allformants, which contains all first three formants, ii F1Only, which is dominated by resolved harmonics, and iii F2&F3Only, which is dominated by unresolved harmonics. There were no statistically significant differences in the response at F0 due to the three variants of the stimulus in quiet, nor did the noise affect this response with the Allformants and F1Only variants. On the other hand, the response at F0 with the F2&F3Only variant was significantly weaker in noise than with the two other variants (p<0.001. With the response at F1, there was no difference with the Allformants and F1Only variants in quiet, but was expectedly weaker with the F2&F3Only variant (p<0.01. The addition of noise significantly weakened the response at F1 with the F1Only variant (p<0.05, but this weakening only tended towards significance with the Allformants variant (p=0.07. The results of this study indicate that resolved and unresolved harmonics are processed in different but interacting pathways that converge in the upper brainstem. The results also support earlier work on the differential susceptibility of responses at F0 and F1 to added noise.

  18. Normative Bilateral Brainstem Evoked Response Data for a Naval Aviation Student Population: Group Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-07

    The trend for the standard deviation of tho Fig.ure 8 latency data to decrease with an increase iW stimulus level via noc co ,ronounced for the...6.99 1 .68 .413 .061 45 64.3 60 6.53 6.62 5.59 7.15 1.56 .412 .014 24 34.3 40 6.34 NC NC NC NIC NC Hc 4 5,7 NC - NOI Colculoted, N - s A-2 Tak A III

  19. Comparison of cochlear delay estimates using otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, James; Pigasse, Gilles; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    delay non-invasively in normal-hearing humans. Tone bursts at nine frequencies from 0.5 to 8 kHz served as stimuli, with care taken to quantify possible bias due to the use of tone bursts with different rise times. BM delays are estimated from the ABR latency estimates by subtracting the neural...... and synaptic delays. This allows a comparison between individual OAE and BM delays over a large frequency range in the same subjects, and offers support to the theory that OAEs are reflected from a tonotopic place and carried back to the cochlear base via a reverse traveling wave....

  20. A case study of the changes in the speech-evoked auditory brainstem response associated with auditory training in children with auditory processing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Sridhar; Forrester, Jennifer; Rutledge, Casey; Holmes, Georgia W

    2013-04-01

    Studies related to plasticity and learning-related phenomena have primarily focused on higher-order processes of the auditory system, such as those in the auditory cortex and limited information is available on learning- and plasticity-related processes in the auditory brainstem. A clinical electrophysiological test of speech-evoked ABR known as BioMARK has been developed to evaluate brainstem responses to speech sounds in children with language learning disorders. Fast ForWord (FFW) was used as an auditory intervention program in the current study and pre- intervention and post-intervention speech-evoked ABR (BioMARK) measures were compared in 2 school-aged children with auditory processing disorders (APD). Significant changes were noted from pre-intervention to post-intervention and reflect plasticity in the auditory brainstem's neural activity to speech stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Short-latency crossed responses in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend Sparre;

    Ipsilateral knee (iKnee) joint rotations in seated humans elicit short-latency crossed spinal reflexes in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle (Stevenson et al., 2012). The short-latency cBF reflexes were inhibitory following iKnee extension perturbations, and facilitatory following...... of MUs. 11 seated participants (mean age 25 ± 5 years) performed a voluntary isometric knee extension with the ipsilateral leg and contralateral knee flexion to 10% of MVC. Surface EMG was recorded bilaterally from the BF and rectus femoris, and iEMG from the cBF. A mechanical actuator (MTS......-Systems Corporation) imposed iKnee flexion or extension perturbations (8° and 150°/s) in blocks of 60 trials. iEMG data for flexion and extension perturbations were decomposed (EMGLAB, McGill et al., 2005) into constituent MU action potentials (APs). The total number of APs was quantified using a 10 ms window...

  2. Estimating latency from inhibitory input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levakova, Marie; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2014-01-01

    to the stimulus by an increase in the firing rate. We focus on the estimation of the response latency in the case of inhibitory stimuli. Models used in this paper represent two different descriptions of response latency. We consider either the latency to be constant across trials or to be a random variable......Stimulus response latency is the time period between the presentation of a stimulus and the occurrence of a change in the neural firing evoked by the stimulation. The response latency has been explored and estimation methods proposed mostly for excitatory stimuli, which means that the neuron reacts....... In the case of random latency, special attention is given to models with selective interaction. The aim is to propose methods for estimation of the latency or the parameters of its distribution. Parameters are estimated by four different methods: method of moments, maximum-likelihood method, a method...

  3. Does behavioral response to novelty influence paw withdrawal latencies in repeated Hargreaves test?

    OpenAIRE

    Tvrdeić, Ante; Kočevski, Dragana

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Only recently, we have reported that single retesting session significantly decreases rat paw withdrawal latencies (PWL) in Hargreaves tests.We wondered, whether decrease in PWL values obtained during reexposure toHargreaves testmight be associated with reaction to the new environment. Therefore, we investigated PWL together with the open field behavior in an enclosure of the Hargreaves test device during the period of 3 subsequent days. Materials and Methods: Ten...

  4. Age-related hearing loss in dogs : Diagnosis with Brainstem-Evoked Response Audiometry and Treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Haar, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828750

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common cause of acquired hearing impairment in dogs. Diagnosis requires objective electrophysiological tests (brainstem evoked response audiometry [BERA]) evaluating the entire audible frequency range in dogs. In our laboratory a method was developed to

  5. Age-related hearing loss in dogs : Diagnosis with Brainstem-Evoked Response Audiometry and Treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Haar, G.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common cause of acquired hearing impairment in dogs. Diagnosis requires objective electrophysiological tests (brainstem evoked response audiometry [BERA]) evaluating the entire audible frequency range in dogs. In our laboratory a method was developed to de

  6. The influence of aging on interaural asymmetries in middle latency response amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihing, Jeffrey; Musiek, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Auditory-evoked potentials (EPs) provide a more objective assessment of central auditory nervous system (CANS) dysfunction when compared to behavioral measures because they do not require a behavioral response (Anderson and Kraus, 2010). In this regard, the middle latency response (MLR) has been considered an important component of CANS assessment (Jerger et al, 1988); however, its large within-group variability limits its usefulness (Musiek et al, 1999). It has been argued that performing intratest calculations on the MLR (e.g., difference in EP amplitude when stimulating the left ear versus the right ear) can reduce the within-group variability of the MLR and enhance its clinical usefulness (Musiek et al, 1999; Weihing et al, 2012). To date, it has not been investigated how well these MLR intratest measures reduce within-group variability in adults of various ages, nor has it been shown that these intratest measures are sensitive to aging-related changes in the CANS. The two primary goals of the present study were (1) to determine if calculating an intratest MLR measure, the difference in MLR Na-Pa peak-to-peak amplitude on left versus right ear stimulation (i.e., "ear effects"), will reduce within-group variability in adults of various ages; and (2) to determine if ear effect magnitude will change as a function of aging. Ear effects were measured in both quiet and in noise to determine if the addition of noise enhanced any age-related-effects. A cross-sectional study was conducted. The researchers studied 30 adults ranging in age from 20-80 yr with hearing sensitivity of 25 dB HL or better at the octave frequencies from 500-2000 Hz, and no history of neurologic issues. Adults were assigned to one of three age groups based on their chronological age, which were young adults, middle-aged adults, and older adults. MLRs were acquired using a Nicolet Spirit 2000 during a single laboratory visit. To determine if within-group variability decreased significantly with

  7. Effects of glutamate on distortion-product otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qing; SUN Jian-he; SHAN Xi-zheng; LI Xing-qi

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate changes in evoked potentials and structure of the guinea pig cochleae during whole cochlear perfusion with glutamate. Methods CM, CAP, DPOAE, and ABR were recorded as indicators of cochlear functions during whole cochlear perfusion. The morphology of the cochlea was studied via transmission electron microscopy. Results There were no significant changes in DPOAE amplitude before and after glutamate perfusion. CM I/O function remained nonlinear during perfusion. ABR latencies were delayed following glutamate perfusion. The average CAP threshold was elevated 35 dB SPL following glutamate perfusion.. The OHCs appeared normal, but the IHCs and afferent dendrites showed cytoplasmic blebs after glutamate perfusion. Conclusions While being a primary amino acid neurotransmitter at the synapses between hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, excessive glutamate is neurotoxic and can destroy IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons. The technique used in this study can also be used to build an animal model of auditory neuropathy.

  8. Hyperekplexia and trismus due to brainstem encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, M.; Humphrey, P.; Tedman, B.; Steiger, M.

    1998-01-01

    The brainstem is said to be the generator of pathological startle responses due to reticular reflex myoclonus or hyperekplexia. A patient with facial weakness, nystagmus, and pyramidal tract signs had generalised reflex spasms in response to auditory, visual and tactile stimuli which clinically and neurophysiologically resembled hyperekplexia. The case is unusual because as well as hyperekplexia, the patient's initial presentation was with an equally rare manifestation of brainstem pathology—brainstem mediated trismus. The causes of brainstem trismus and exaggerated startle responses are discussed with respect to their underlying mechanisms. 

 PMID:9667574

  9. Metabolic presbycusis: differential changes in auditory brainstem and otoacoustic emission responses with chronic furosemide application in the gerbil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, David M; Schmiedt, Richard A

    2004-03-01

    Auditory characteristics of metabolic or strial presbycusis were investigated using an animal model in which young adult Mongolian gerbils ( Meriones unguiculates) were implanted with an osmotic pump supplying furosemide continuously to the round window. This model causes chronic lowering of the endocochlear potential (EP) and results in auditory responses very similar to those seen in quiet-aged gerbils (Schmiedt et al., J. Neurosci. 22:9643-9650, 2002). Auditory function was examined up to one week post-implant by measurement of auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). Emission "threshold" was defined as the stimulus level required to reach a criterion emission amplitude. Comparing all responses on a "threshold-shift diagram," where emission threshold increases were plotted versus ABR threshold increases, the following results were obtained: (1) On average, the increase of the emission threshold was about 55% of the increase in ABR threshold, with comparatively little scatter. (2) The main dysfunction in metabolic presbycusis appears to be a decrease in the gain of the cochlear amplifier, combined with an additional, smaller increase in neural threshold, both effects caused by a chronically low EP. (3) For ABR threshold increases over 20 dB, the points for the chronic low-EP condition were largely separate from those previously found for permanent acoustic damage. The threshold-shift diagram therefore provides a method for noninvasive differential diagnosis of two common hearing dysfunctions.

  10. Short-term pressure induced suppression of the short-latency response: a new methodology for investigating stretch reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leukel, Christian; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Gruber, Markus;

    2009-01-01

    During experiments involving ischemic nerve block, we noticed that the short-latency response (SLR) of evoked stretches in m. soleus decreased immediately following inflation of a pneumatic cuff surrounding the lower leg. The present study aimed to investigate this short-term effect of pressure...... and inflated cuff. Results of the protocols were as follows: 1) inflation of the cuff reduced the SLR but not the MLR; 2) the H-reflex, the M-wave, and, 3) SNAPs of n. tibialis remained unchanged with deflated and inflated cuff; 4) the SLR was dependent on the stretch velocity with deflated and also inflated...

  11. Automated auditory brainstem response: Its efficacy as a screening tool for neonatal hearing screening in the postnatal ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavakula Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This observational study was carried out to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MB11 BERAphone® , when used for neonatal hearing screening in a postnatal ward setting in comparison against the gold standard, auditory brainstem response (ABR. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven consecutive newborns (74 ears who either unilaterally or bilaterally failed hearing screening with MB11 BERAphone in the postnatal ward were recruited and a second screening with BERAphone was performed after 1 week along with confirmatory testing using ABR. Results: MB11 BERAphone showed sensitivity of 92.9%, specificity of 50%, positive predictive value of 30.23%, and negative predictive value of 96.77% for the diagnosis of hearing loss. The prevalence of confirmed hearing impairment was 18.9%. The rate of unilateral impairment was 10.8%, and the rate of bilateral impairment was 13.5%. The average ambient noise levels in the postnatal ward setting was 62.1 dB. Conclusion: Although the sensitivity of MB11 BERAphone is good, the specificity is significantly lower when the test is performed in the postnatal ward setting with high ambient noise. Neonates who fail the two-step screening should undergo auditory response for confirming the diagnosis of hearing loss.

  12. A study of brainstem evoked response audiometry in high-risk infants and children under 10 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Thirunavukarasu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the hearing threshold and find the incidence of hearing loss in infants and children belonging to high-risk category and analyze the common risk factors. Subjects and Methods: Totally, 125 infants and children belonging to high-risk category were subjected to brainstem evoked response audiometry. Clicks were given at the rate of 11.1 clicks/s. Totally, 2000 responses were averaged. The intensity at which wave V just disappears was established as hearing the threshold. Degree of impairment and risk factors were analyzed. Results: Totally, 44 (35.2% were found to have sensorineural hearing loss. Totally, 30 children with hearing loss (68% belonged to age group 1-5 years. Consanguineous marriage was the most commonly associated risk factor. Majority (34 had profound hearing loss. Conclusion: Newborn screening is mandatory to identify hearing loss in the prelinguistic period to reduce the burden of handicap in the community. The need of the hour is health education and genetic counseling to decrease the hereditary hearing loss, as hearing impairment due to perinatal factors has reduced due to recent medical advancements.

  13. Craniofacial Pain: Brainstem Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Sessle

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent research advances in animals that have identified critical neural elements in the brainstem receiving and transmitting craniofacial nociceptive inputs, as well as some of the mechanisms involved in the modulation and plasticity of nociceptive transmission. Nociceptive neurones in the trigeminal (V brainstem sensory nuclear complex can be classified as nociceptive-specific (NS or wide dynamic range (WDR. Some of these neurones respond exclusively to sensory inputs evoked by stimulation of facial skin or oral mucosa and have features suggesting that they are critical neural elements involved in the ability to localize an acute superficial pain and sense its intensity and duration. Many of the V brainstem nociceptive neurones, however, receive convergent inputs from afferents supplying deep craniofacial tissues (eg, dural vessel, muscle and skin or mucosa. These neurones are likely involved in deep pain, including headache, because few nociceptive neurones receive inputs exclusively from afferents supplying these tissues. These extensive convergent input patterns also appear to be important factors in pain spread and referral, and in central mechanisms underlying neuroplastic changes in V neuronal properties that may occur with injury and inflammation. For example, application of the small fibre excitant and inflammatory irritant mustard oil into the temporomandibular joint, masseter or tongue musculature induces a prolonged but reversible enhancement of responses to cutaneous and deep afferent inputs of most WDR and NS neurones. These effects may be accompanied by increased electromyographic activity reflexly induced in the masticatory muscles by mustard oil, and involve endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate and opioid neurochemical mechanisms. Such peripherally induced modulation of brainstem nociceptive neuronal properties reflects the functional plasticity of the central V system, and may be involved in the development of

  14. A primate model for age and host response to genital herpetic infection: determinants of latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, W C; Di Giacomo, R; Alexander, E R

    1981-04-01

    Thirty five female Cebus albifrons monkeys (16 adolescents and 19 adults) were infected vaginally with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2. Fifteen developed spontaneous recurrent genital HSV infections. All 35 were killed for study eight to 12 months after primary infection, and tissue from the vagina, cervix, uterus, ovary, paracervical autonomic plexus, and lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia of eight animals. Host age was the most important variable influencing viral latency; 69% of adolescents and 42% of adults had latent HSV type 2 infections. Animals that developed latent infections were significantly easier to infect, shed virus during the primary infection significantly longer, and had more severe primary disease than those who did not become latently infected.

  15. The influence of cochlear traveling wave and neural adaptation on auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junius, D.; Dau, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between evoked responses to transient broadband chirps and responses to the same chirps when embedded in longer-duration stimuli. It examines to what extent the responses to the composite stimuli can be explained by a linear superposition of the res...

  16. Sensorineural hearing loss among cerebellopontine-angle tumor patients examined with pure tone audiometry and brainstem-evoked response audiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinindra, A. M.; Zizlavsky, S.; Bashiruddin, J.; Aman, R. A.; Wulani, V.; Bardosono, S.

    2017-08-01

    Tumor in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) accurs for approximately 5-10% of all intracranial tumors, where unilateral hearing loss and tinnitus are the most frequent symptoms. This study aimed to collect data on sensorineural hearing loss in CPA tumor patients in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (CMH) using pure tone audiometry and brainstem-evoked response audiometry (BERA). It also aimed to obtaine data on CPA-tumor imaging through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This was a descriptive, analytic, and cross-sectional study. The subjects of this study were gathered using a total sampling method from secondary data between July 2012 and November 2016. From 104 patients, 30 matched the inclusion criteria. The CPA-tumor patients in the ENT CMH outpatient clinic were mostly female, middle-aged patients (41-60 years) whose clinical presentation was mostly tinnitus and severe, asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss in 10 subjects. From 30 subjects, 29 showed ipsilaterally impaired BERA results, and 17 subjects showed contralaterally impaired BERA results. There were 24 subjects who with large-sized tumors and 19 subjects who had intracanal tumors that had spread until they were extracanal in 19 subjects.

  17. Evaluation of deafness in American Paint Horses by phenotype, brainstem auditory-evoked responses, and endothelin receptor B genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdesian, K Gary; Williams, D Colette; Aleman, Monica; Lecouteur, Richard A; Madigan, John E

    2009-11-15

    To evaluate deafness in American Paint Horses by phenotype, clinical findings, brainstem auditory-evoked responses (BAERs), and endothelin B receptor (EDNBR) genotype. Case series and case-control studies. 14 deaf American Paint Horses, 20 suspected-deaf American Paint Horses, and 13 nondeaf American Paint Horses and Pintos. Horses were categorized on the basis of coat color pattern and eye color. Testing for the EDNBR gene mutation (associated with overo lethal white foal syndrome) and BAERs was performed. Additional clinical findings were obtained from medical records. All 14 deaf horses had loss of all BAER waveforms consistent with complete deafness. Most horses had the splashed white or splashed white-frame blend coat pattern. Other patterns included frame overo and tovero. All of the deaf horses had extensive head and limb white markings, although the amount of white on the neck and trunk varied widely. All horses had at least 1 partially heterochromic iris, and most had 2 blue eyes. Ninety-one percent (31/34) of deaf and suspected-deaf horses had the EDNBR gene mutation. Deaf and suspected-deaf horses were used successfully for various performance events. All nondeaf horses had unremarkable BAER results. Veterinarians should be aware of deafness among American Paint Horses, particularly those with a splashed white or frame overo coat color pattern, blend of these patterns, or tovero pattern. Horses with extensive head and limb markings and those with blue eyes appeared to be at particular risk.

  18. Piracetam-induced changes on the brainstem auditory response in anesthetized juvenile rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Report of two clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Rivera, A; Gonzalez-Pina, R; Hernandez-Godinez, B; Ibanez-Contreras, A; Bueno-Nava, A; Alfaro-Rodriguez, A

    2012-10-01

    We describe two clinical cases and examine the effects of piracetam on the brainstem auditory response in infantile female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We found that the interwave intervals show a greater reduction in a 3-year-old rhesus monkey compared to a 1-year-old rhesus monkey. In this report, we discuss the significance of these observations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Towards an optimal paradigm for simultaneously recording cortical and brainstem auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2015-02-15

    Simultaneous recording of brainstem and cortical event-related brain potentials (ERPs) may offer a valuable tool for understanding the early neural transcription of behaviorally relevant sounds and the hierarchy of signal processing operating at multiple levels of the auditory system. To date, dual recordings have been challenged by technological and physiological limitations including different optimal parameters necessary to elicit each class of ERP (e.g., differential adaptation/habitation effects and number of trials to obtain adequate response signal-to-noise ratio). We investigated a new stimulus paradigm for concurrent recording of the auditory brainstem frequency-following response (FFR) and cortical ERPs. The paradigm is "optimal" in that it uses a clustered stimulus presentation and variable interstimulus interval (ISI) to (i) achieve the most ideal acquisition parameters for eliciting subcortical and cortical responses, (ii) obtain an adequate number of trials to detect each class of response, and (iii) minimize neural adaptation/habituation effects. Comparison between clustered and traditional (fixed, slow ISI) stimulus paradigms revealed minimal change in amplitude or latencies of either the brainstem FFR or cortical ERP. The clustered paradigm offered over a 3× increase in recording efficiency compared to conventional (fixed ISI presentation) and thus, a more rapid protocol for obtaining dual brainstem-cortical recordings in individual listeners. We infer that faster recording of subcortical and cortical potentials might allow more complete and sensitive testing of neurophysiological function and aid in the differential assessment of auditory function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Intact lexicon running slowly--prolonged response latencies in patients with subthalamic DBS and verbal fluency deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, Felicitas; Krugel, Lea K; Vonberg, Isabelle; Schoenecker, Thomas; Kühn, Andrea A; Klostermann, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Verbal Fluency is reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease, particularly if treated with deep brain stimulation. This deficit could arise from general factors, such as reduced working speed or from dysfunctions in specific lexical domains. To test whether DBS-associated Verbal Fluency deficits are accompanied by changed dynamics of word processing. 21 Parkinson's disease patients with and 26 without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus as well as 19 healthy controls participated in the study. They engaged in Verbal Fluency and (primed) Lexical Decision Tasks, testing phonemic and semantic word production and processing time. Most patients performed the experiments twice, ON and OFF stimulation or, respectively, dopaminergic drugs. Patients generally produced abnormally few words in the Verbal Fluency Task. This deficit was more severe in patients with deep brain stimulation who additionally showed prolonged response latencies in the Lexical Decision Task. Slowing was independent of semantic and phonemic word priming. No significant changes of performance accuracy were obtained. The results were independent from the treatment ON or OFF conditions. Low word production in patients with deep brain stimulation was accompanied by prolonged latencies for lexical decisions. No indication was found that the latter slowing was due to specific lexical dysfunctions, so that it probably reflects a general reduction of cognitive working speed, also evident on the level of Verbal Fluency. The described abnormalities seem to reflect subtle sequelae of the surgical procedure for deep brain stimulation rather than of the proper neurostimulation.

  1. Modeling binaural responses in the auditory brainstem to electric stimulation of the auditory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand; Colburn, H Steven

    2015-02-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) provide improvements in sound localization and speech perception in noise over unilateral CIs. However, the benefits arise mainly from the perception of interaural level differences, while bilateral CI listeners' sensitivity to interaural time difference (ITD) is poorer than normal. To help understand this limitation, a set of ITD-sensitive neural models was developed to study binaural responses to electric stimulation. Our working hypothesis was that central auditory processing is normal with bilateral CIs so that the abnormality in the response to electric stimulation at the level of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) is the source of the limited ITD sensitivity. A descriptive model of ANF response to both acoustic and electric stimulation was implemented and used to drive a simplified biophysical model of neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO). The model's ITD sensitivity was found to depend strongly on the specific configurations of membrane and synaptic parameters for different stimulation rates. Specifically, stronger excitatory synaptic inputs and faster membrane responses were required for the model neurons to be ITD-sensitive at high stimulation rates, whereas weaker excitatory synaptic input and slower membrane responses were necessary at low stimulation rates, for both electric and acoustic stimulation. This finding raises the possibility of frequency-dependent differences in neural mechanisms of binaural processing; limitations in ITD sensitivity with bilateral CIs may be due to a mismatch between stimulation rate and cell parameters in ITD-sensitive neurons.

  2. Modeling human auditory evoked brainstem responses based on nonlinear cochlear processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, James; Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    (ABR) to transient sounds and frequency following responses (FFR) to tones. The model includes important cochlear processing stages (Zilany and Bruce, 2006) such as basilar-membrane (BM) tuning and compression, inner hair-cell (IHC) transduction, and IHC auditory-nerve (AN) synapse adaptation...

  3. 窒息状态下ABR及其脑干功能的实验研究%Experimental study of the auditory brainstem response and brainstem function in apnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张榕; 林才朱; 殷羽白

    2001-01-01

    目的 通过观察豚鼠在窒息状态下ABR电位变化及其脑干功能的自然转归,探讨听觉通路损伤程度和临床意义。方法 听觉诱发电位仪和心电脉搏氧饱和度监测仪检测3组不同窒息时限的豚鼠的ABR各波潜伏期及波间期,氧饱和度(SO2)及心率(HR)等。结果 波Ⅴ最易受缺氧的影响,波Ⅲ次之,波Ⅰ最后消失和最早恢复。窒息时限影响脑干功能,导致1组和2组的各波潜伏期和波间期差有统计学上的意义。窒息时间超过5min30s,实验豚鼠均死亡。结论 ABR可作为窒息状态下判断脑功能及脑死亡的重要辅助指标。应争分夺秒抢救窒息并及时处理心脑的损害。%Objective To find some reasonable signs for hearing pathway injury during different apnea times in guinea pigs by using the change of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and brainstem function. Methods Twenty-six guinea pigs divided into 3 groups were tested with ABR audiometer and electrocaidio-pules-SO2 monitor during different apnea times. Results Wave Ⅴ was the most easily affected in apnea, Wave Ⅲ was also easily affected, and Wave Ⅰ was less affected. The time of apnea over 330 seconds caused the death of all the experimetal guinea pigs. Conclusion ABR may be used as an important measure to monitor the brainstem function during apnea. It is important to deal with the situation of the brain and heart as soon as possible.

  4. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses and behavioral estimates of hearing sensitivity in Lemur catta and Nycticebus coucang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsier, Marissa A; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2010-03-01

    Primates depend on acoustic signals and cues to avoid predators, locate food, and share information. Accordingly, the structure and function of acoustic stimuli have long been emphasized in studies of primate behavioral and cognitive ecology. Yet, few studies have addressed how well primates hear such stimuli; indeed, the auditory thresholds of most primate species are unknown. This empirical void is due in part to the logistic and economic challenges attendant on traditional behavioral testing methods. Technological advances have produced a safe and cost-effective alternative-the auditory brainstem response (ABR) method, which can be utilized in field conditions, on virtually any animal species, and without subject training. Here we used the ABR and four methods of threshold determination to construct audiograms for two strepsirrhine primates: the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) and slow loris (Nycticebus coucang). Next, to verify the general efficacy of the ABR method, we compared our results to published behaviorally-derived audiograms. We found that the four ABR threshold detection methods produced similar results, including relatively elevated thresholds but similarly shaped audiograms compared to those derived behaviorally. The ABR and behavioral absolute thresholds were significantly correlated, and the frequencies of best sensitivity and high-frequency limits were comparable. However, at frequencies Lemur, the ABR 10-dB range starting points were more than 2 octaves higher than the behavioral points. Finally, a comparison of ABR- and behaviorally-derived audiograms from various animal taxa demonstrates the widespread efficacy of the ABR for estimating frequency of best sensitivity, but otherwise suggests caution; factors such as stimulus properties and threshold definition affect results. We conclude that the ABR method is a promising technique for estimating primate hearing sensitivity, but that additional data are required to explore its efficacy for

  5. Endorphins and the hypotensive response to stimulation of alpha-receptors in the brainstem by alpha-methylnoradrenaline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Wybren de; Petty, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Opioid peptide involvement in the fall in blood pressure resulting from stimulation of alpha-receptors in the brainstem has been investigated in the urethane-anaesthetised rat. Unilateral microinjection of alpha-methylnoradrenaline into the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) induced a doserelated fall

  6. The relationship between auditory brainstem response, nerve conduction studies, and metabolic risk factors in type II diabetes mellitus

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    Noha M Abo-Elfetoh

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem dysfunction and ABR changes are common in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. These changes are significantly correlated to NCS parameters on one hand and serum HbA1c% and lipid profile (total cholesterol and triglycerides on the other hand.

  7. Separation of multiple evoked responses using differential amplitude and latency variability

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin H. Knuth; Truccolo, Wilson A.; Bressler, Steven L.; Ding, Mingzhou

    2002-01-01

    In neuroelectrophysiology one records electric potentials or magnetic fields generated by ensembles of synchronously active neurons in response to externally presented stimuli. These evoked responses are often produced by multiple generators in the presence of ongoing background activity. While source localization techniques or current source density estimation are usually used to identify generators, application of blind source separation techniques to obtain independent components has becom...

  8. Sex Differences in Orienting to Pictures with and without Humans : Evidence from the Cardiac Evoked Response (ECR) and the Cortical Long Latency Parietal Positivity (LPP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Althaus, Monika; Groen, Yvonne; van der Schaft, Lutske; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Tucha, Oliver; Mulder, Lambertus J. M.; Wijers, Albertus A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effect of social relevance in affective pictures on two orienting responses, i.e. the evoked cardiac response (ECR), and a long latency cortical evoked potential (LPP) and whether this effect would differ between males and females. Assuming that orienting to

  9. Treating Excessively Slow Responding of a Young Man with Asperger Syndrome Using Differential Reinforcement of Short Response Latencies

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    Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Bouxsein, Kelly J.; Fisher, Wayne W.

    2007-01-01

    Fjellstedt and Sulzer-Azaroff (1973) used differential reinforcement of short latencies to decrease a child's latency to comply with instructions. We replicated this contingency with a young man diagnosed with Asperger syndrome across two tasks (question answering and math problem solving). We added a differential reinforcement contingency to…

  10. A Cochlear Implant Performance Prognostic Test Based on Electrical Field Interactions Evaluated by eABR (Electrical Auditory Brainstem Responses.

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    Nicolas Guevara

    Full Text Available Cochlear implants (CIs are neural prostheses that have been used routinely in the clinic over the past 25 years. They allow children who were born profoundly deaf, as well as adults affected by hearing loss for whom conventional hearing aids are insufficient, to attain a functional level of hearing. The "modern" CI (i.e., a multi-electrode implant using sequential coding strategies has yielded good speech comprehension outcomes (recognition level for monosyllabic words about 50% to 60%, and sentence comprehension close to 90%. These good average results however hide a very important interindividual variability as scores in a given patients' population often vary from 5 to 95% in comparable testing conditions. Our aim was to develop a prognostic model for patients with unilateral CI. A novel method of objectively measuring electrical and neuronal interactions using electrical auditory brainstem responses (eABRs is proposed.The method consists of two measurements: 1 eABR measurements with stimulation by a single electrode at 70% of the dynamic range (four electrodes distributed within the cochlea were tested, followed by a summation of these four eABRs; 2 Measurement of a single eABR with stimulation from all four electrodes at 70% of the dynamic range. A comparison of the eABRs obtained by these two measurements, defined as the monaural interaction component (MIC, indicated electrical and neural interactions between the stimulation channels. Speech recognition performance without lip reading was measured for each patient using a logatome test (64 "vowel-consonant-vowel"; VCV; by forced choice of 1 out of 16. eABRs were measured in 16 CI patients (CIs with 20 electrodes, Digisonic SP; Oticon Medical ®, Vallauris, France. Significant correlations were found between speech recognition performance and the ratio of the amplitude of the V wave of the eABRs obtained with the two measurements (Pearson's linear regression model, parametric correlation: r

  11. Sensory Feedback in Interlimb Coordination: Contralateral Afferent Contribution to the Short-Latency Crossed Response during Human Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasio, Sabata; Voigt, Michael; Kersting, Uwe G.; Farina, Dario; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A constant coordination between the left and right leg is required to maintain stability during human locomotion, especially in a variable environment. The neural mechanisms underlying this interlimb coordination are not yet known. In animals, interneurons located within the spinal cord allow direct communication between the two sides without the need for the involvement of higher centers. These may also exist in humans since sensory feedback elicited by tibial nerve stimulation on one side (ipsilateral) can affect the muscles activation in the opposite side (contralateral), provoking short-latency crossed responses (SLCRs). The current study investigated whether contralateral afferent feedback contributes to the mechanism controlling the SLCR in human gastrocnemius muscle. Surface electromyogram, kinematic and kinetic data were recorded from subjects during normal walking and hybrid walking (with the legs moving in opposite directions). An inverse dynamics model was applied to estimate the gastrocnemius muscle proprioceptors’ firing rate. During normal walking, a significant correlation was observed between the magnitude of SLCRs and the estimated muscle spindle secondary afferent activity (P = 0.04). Moreover, estimated spindle secondary afferent and Golgi tendon organ activity were significantly different (P ≤ 0.01) when opposite responses have been observed, that is during normal (facilitation) and hybrid walking (inhibition) conditions. Contralateral sensory feedback, specifically spindle secondary afferents, likely plays a significant role in generating the SLCR. This observation has important implications for our understanding of what future research should be focusing on to optimize locomotor recovery in patient populations. PMID:28060839

  12. Effect of varying the intensity and train frequency of forelimb and cerebellar mossy fiber conditioned stimuli on the latency of conditioned eye-blink responses in decerebrate ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, P; Ivarsson, M; Hesslow, G

    1997-01-01

    To study the role of the mossy fiber afferents to the cerebellum in classical eye-blink conditioning, in particular the timing of the conditioned responses, we compared the effects of varying a peripheral conditioned stimulus with the effects of corresponding variations of direct stimulation of the mossy fibers. In one set of experiments, decerebrate ferrets were trained in a Pavlovian eye-blink conditioning paradigm with electrical forelimb train stimulation as conditioned stimulus and electrical periorbital stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. When stable conditioning had been achieved, the effect of increasing the intensity or frequency of the forelimb stimulation was tested. By increasing the intensity from 1 to 2 mA, or the train frequency from 50 to 100 Hz, an immediate decrease was induced in both the onset latency and the latency to peak of the conditioned response. If the conditioned stimulus intensity/frequency was maintained at the higher level, the response latencies gradually returned to preshift values. In a second set of experiments, the forelimb stimulation was replaced by direct train stimulation of the middle cerebellar peduncle as conditioned stimulus. Varying the frequency of the stimulus train between 50 and 100 Hz had effects that were almost identical to those obtained when using a forelimb conditioned stimulus. The functional meaning of the latency effect is discussed. It is also suggested that the results support the view that the conditioned stimulus is transmitted through the mossy fibers and that the mechanism for timing the conditioned response is situated in the cerebellum.

  13. Peak latency prolongation of Ⅴ wave in brainstem auditory evoked potential during intraoperative monitoring of acoustic neuroma surgery%脑干听觉诱发电位的Ⅴ波PL延长在听神经瘤手术监护中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包国庆; 朱沂; 李建新; 杨小朋

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨BAEP的Ⅴ波PL延长在听神经瘤手术中的应用价值. 方法 回顾性分析55例听神经瘤手术患者行BAEP术前检查、术中监护及术后疗效评估,分析Ⅴ波PL延长不同指标的监测结果. 结果 以Ⅴ波PL延长>0.6 ms为标准,脑干或听神经损伤的灵敏度100%,特异度95.3%,误诊率4.7%,漏诊率0%,符合率96.4%.以Ⅴ波PL延长>1.0 ms为标准,灵敏度58.3%,特异度97.7%,误诊率2.3%,漏诊率41.7%,符合率89.1%. 结论 BAEP监护听神经瘤手术中,V波PL延长>0.6 ms有较高的敏感度和特异度,作为术中监护报警指标更合适.%Objective To explore the applied value of peak latency (PL) prolongation of Ⅴ wave in brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) during intraoperative monitoring of acoustic neuroma surgery. Methods The preoperative BAEP examination data,intraoperative monitoring and postoperative evaluation data in 55 patients with acoustic neuroma were retrospectively analyzed; the monitoring results under the circumstance that different degrees of prolongation of PL of Ⅴ wave were chosen were analyzed. Results The PL prolongation of Ⅴ wave >0.6 ms was used as the baseline,the sensitivity of diagnosing the brainstem or acoustic nerve injury was 100%,the specificity was 95.3%,the misdiagnosis rate was 4.7%,the missed diagnosis rate was 0% and the accordance rate was 96.4%.The PL prolongation of Ⅴ wave >1.0 ms was used as the baseline,the sensitivity of diagnosing the brainstem or acoustic nerve injury was 58.3%,the specificity was 97.7%,the misdiagnosis rate was 2.3%,the missed diagnosis rate was 41.7% and the accordance rate was 89.1%. Conclusion It is more suitable that using thePL prolongation of Ⅴ wave >0.6 ms as the baseline,enjoying high sensitivity and specificity,during the intraoperative monitoring of acoustic neuroma.

  14. Changes of brainstem auditory and somatosensory evoked

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jian

    2000-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the characteristics and clinical value of evoked potentials in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy. Methods: Brainstem auditory, and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 6 patients, and compared with the results of CT scan. Results: All of the 6 patients had abnormal results of BAEP and MNSEP. The main abnormal parameters in BAEP were latency prolongation in wave I, inter-peak latency prolongation in Ⅰ-Ⅲ and Ⅰ-Ⅴ. The abnormal features of MNSEP were low amplitude and absence of wave N9, inter-Peak latency prolongation in Ng-N13 and N13-N20, but no significant change of N20 amplitude. The results also revealed that abnormal changes in BAEP and MNSEP were earlier than that in CT. Conclusion: The detection of BAEP and MNSEP in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy might early reveal the abnormality of conductive function in nervous system and might be a useful method in diagnosis.

  15. A Paradox of Syntactic Priming: Why Response Tendencies Show Priming for Passives, and Response Latencies Show Priming for Actives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segaert, K.R.; Menenti, L.M.E.; Weber, K.M.; Hagoort, P.

    2011-01-01

    Speakers tend to repeat syntactic structures across sentences, a phenomenon called syntactic priming. Although it has been suggested that repeating syntactic structures should result in speeded responses, previous research has focused on effects in response tendencies. We investigated syntactic

  16. Brainstem auditory evoked potential abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Sharat Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus represents a syndrome complex in which multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system, are affected. Aim: The study was conducted to determine the changes in the brainstem auditory evoked potentials in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 126 diabetic males, aged 35-50 years, and 106 age-matched, healthy male volunteers. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were recorded and the results were analyzed statistically using student′s unpaired t-test. The data consisted of wave latencies I, II, III, IV, V and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V, separately for both ears. Results: The latency of wave IV was significantly delayed only in the right ear, while the latency of waves III, V and interpeak latencies III-V, I-V showed a significant delay bilaterally in diabetic males. However, no significant difference was found between diabetic and control subjects as regards to the latency of wave IV unilaterally in the left ear and the latencies of waves I, II and interpeak latency I-III bilaterally. Conclusion: Diabetes patients have an early involvement of central auditory pathway, which can be detected with fair accuracy with auditory evoked potential studies.

  17. Short latency vestibular potentials evoked by electrical round window stimulation in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordure, P; Desmadryl, G; Uziel, A; Sans, A

    1989-11-01

    Short-latency potentials evoked by round window electrical stimulation were recorded in guinea pig by means of vertex-pinna skin electrodes using averaging techniques. Constant current shocks of 20 microseconds or 50 microseconds (25-300 microA) were used to evoke both auditory and vestibular brain-stem potentials. Pure auditory potentials, comparable to those evoked by acoustic clicks, were obtained by 20 microseconds electrical stimuli and disappeared during an auditory masking procedure made with a continuous white noise (110 dB SPL). Short latency potentials labeled V1, V2 and V3 were obtained by 50 microseconds electrical stimuli during an auditory masking procedure. This response disappeared after specific vestibular neurectomy, whereas the auditory response evoked by acoustic clicks or by electrical stimulation remained unchanged, suggesting that these latter potentials had a vestibular origin.

  18. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials with the use of acoustic clicks and complex verbal sounds in young adults with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouni, Sophia N; Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Ziavra, Nausika; Koutsojannis, Constantinos

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic signals are transmitted through the external and middle ear mechanically to the cochlea where they are transduced into electrical impulse for further transmission via the auditory nerve. The auditory nerve encodes the acoustic sounds that are conveyed to the auditory brainstem. Multiple brainstem nuclei, the cochlea, the midbrain, the thalamus, and the cortex constitute the central auditory system. In clinical practice, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to simple stimuli such as click or tones are widely used. Recently, complex stimuli or complex auditory brain responses (cABRs), such as monosyllabic speech stimuli and music, are being used as a tool to study the brainstem processing of speech sounds. We have used the classic 'click' as well as, for the first time, the artificial successive complex stimuli 'ba', which constitutes the Greek word 'baba' corresponding to the English 'daddy'. Twenty young adults institutionally diagnosed as dyslexic (10 subjects) or light dyslexic (10 subjects) comprised the diseased group. Twenty sex-, age-, education-, hearing sensitivity-, and IQ-matched normal subjects comprised the control group. Measurements included the absolute latencies of waves I through V, the interpeak latencies elicited by the classical acoustic click, the negative peak latencies of A and C waves, as well as the interpeak latencies of A-C elicited by the verbal stimulus 'baba' created on a digital speech synthesizer. The absolute peak latencies of waves I, III, and V in response to monoaural rarefaction clicks as well as the interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, and I-V in the dyslexic subjects, although increased in comparison with normal subjects, did not reach the level of a significant difference (p<0.05). However, the absolute peak latencies of the negative wave C and the interpeak latencies of A-C elicited by verbal stimuli were found to be increased in the dyslexic group in comparison with the control group (p=0.0004 and p=0.045, respectively

  19. Using response-time latencies to measure athletes' doping attitudes: the brief implicit attitude test identifies substance abuse in bodybuilders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Ralf; Wolff, Wanja; Thieme, Detlef

    2014-09-10

    Knowing and, if necessary, altering competitive athletes' real attitudes towards the use of banned performance-enhancing substances is an important goal of worldwide doping prevention efforts. However athletes will not always be willing to reporting their real opinions. Reaction time-based attitude tests help conceal the ultimate goal of measurement from the participant and impede strategic answering. This study investigated how well a reaction time-based attitude test discriminated between athletes who were doping and those who were not. We investigated whether athletes whose urine samples were positive for at least one banned substance (dopers) evaluated doping more favorably than clean athletes (non-dopers). We approached a group of 61 male competitive bodybuilders and collected urine samples for biochemical testing. The pictorial doping Brief Implicit Association Test (BIAT) was used for attitude measurement. This test quantifies the difference in response latencies (in milliseconds) to stimuli representing related concepts (i.e. doping-dislike/like-[health food]). Prohibited substances were found in 43% of all tested urine samples. Dopers had more lenient attitudes to doping than non-dopers (Hedges's g = -0.76). D-scores greater than -0.57 (CI95 = -0.72 to -0.46) might be indicative of a rather lenient attitude to doping. In urine samples evidence of administration of combinations of substances, complementary administration of substances to treat side effects and use of stimulants to promote loss of body fat was common. This study demonstrates that athletes' attitudes to doping can be assessed indirectly with a reaction time-based test, and that their attitudes are related to their behavior. Although bodybuilders may be more willing to reveal their attitude to doping than other athletes, these results still provide evidence that the pictorial doping BIAT may be useful in athletes from other sports, perhaps as a complementary measure in evaluations of

  20. Relationship between size summation properties, contrast sensitivity and response latency in the dorsomedial and middle temporal areas of the primate extrastriate cortex.

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    Leo L Lui

    Full Text Available Analysis of the physiological properties of single neurons in visual cortex has demonstrated that both the extent of their receptive fields and the latency of their responses depend on stimulus contrast. Here, we explore the question of whether there are also systematic relationships between these response properties across different cells in a neuronal population. Single unit recordings were obtained from the middle temporal (MT and dorsomedial (DM extrastriate areas of anaesthetized marmoset monkeys. For each cell, spatial integration properties (length and width summation, as well as the presence of end- and side-inhibition within 15° of the receptive field centre were determined using gratings of optimal direction of motion and spatial and temporal frequencies, at 60% contrast. Following this, contrast sensitivity was assessed using gratings of near-optimal length and width. In both areas, we found a relationship between spatial integration and contrast sensitivity properties: cells that summated over smaller areas of the visual field, and cells that displayed response inhibition at larger stimulus sizes, tended to show higher contrast sensitivity. In a sample of MT neurons, we found that cells showing longer latency responses also tended to summate over larger expanses of visual space in comparison with neurons that had shorter latencies. In addition, longer-latency neurons also tended to show less obvious surround inhibition. Interestingly, all of these effects were stronger and more consistent with respect to the selectivity for stimulus width and strength of side-inhibition than for length selectivity and end-inhibition. The results are partially consistent with a hierarchical model whereby more extensive receptive fields require convergence of information from larger pools of "feedforward" afferent neurons to reach near-optimal responses. They also suggest that a common gain normalization mechanism within MT and DM is involved, the

  1. Effect of noise pollution on hearing in auto-rickshaw drivers: A brainstem auditory-evoked potentials study

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    Bhupendra Marotrao Gathe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Auditory brainstem response is the most important tool in differential diagnosis and degree of hearing impairment. Many studies have been carried out to ascertain the effects of noise on human beings but very less on the transportation workers; hence, considering the need of time and use of brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP, this study was conducted to analyze the effect of noise pollution on auto-rickshaw drivers (ARDs. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate I, II, III, IV, and V wave latencies in ARDs and comparing it with control subjects in Central India. Settings and Design: This was a case-control study done on ARDs as participants and compared it with normal healthy individual BAEP pattern. Materials and Methods: We recorded BAEP from fifty healthy control subjects and fifty ARDs from the community of same sex and geographical setup. The absolute latencies were measured and compared. Recording was done using RMS EMG EP MARK II machine manufactured by RMS recorders and Medicare system, Chandigarh. Statistical Analysis Used: All the data related with subjects were filled in Excel sheet and analyzed with the help of EPI 6.0 info software with Student′s t-test. Results: There were prolongations of all absolute wave latencies of II, III, IV, and V in the ARDs as compared to control subjects. Conclusions: The prolongation of all absolute latencies of II, III, IV, and V suggests abnormality in brainstem auditory pathway mainly affecting the retrocochlear pathways in group of ARDs (noise exposure >10 years than other group who had exposed for <10 years and is more significant on the right ear than left.

  2. Response latencies are alive and well for identifying fakers on a self-report personality inventory: A reconsideration of van Hooft and Born (2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Ronald R; Lambert, Christine E

    2015-12-01

    Van Hooft and Born (Journal of Applied Psychology 97:301-316, 2012) presented data challenging both the correctness of a congruence model of faking on personality test items and the relative merit (i.e., effect size) of response latencies for identifying fakers. We suggest that their analysis of response times was suboptimal, and that it followed neither from a congruence model of faking nor from published protocols on appropriately filtering the noise in personality test item answering times. Using new data and following recommended analytic procedures, we confirmed the relative utility of response times for identifying personality test fakers, and our obtained results, again, reinforce a congruence model of faking.

  3. Resolving the Brainstem Contributions to Attentional Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jonathan C.W.; Davies, Wendy-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Previous human imaging studies manipulating attention or expectancy have identified the periaqueductal gray (PAG) as a key brainstem structure implicated in endogenous analgesia. However, animal studies indicate that PAG analgesia is mediated largely via caudal brainstem structures, such as the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and locus coeruleus (LC). To identify their involvement in endogenous analgesia, we used brainstem optimized, whole-brain imaging to record responses to concurrent thermal stimulation (left forearm) and visual attention tasks of titrated difficulty in 20 healthy subjects. The PAG, LC, and RVM were anatomically discriminated using a probabilistic atlas. Pain ratings disclosed the anticipated analgesic interaction between task difficulty and pain intensity (p pain intensity. Intersubject analgesia scores correlated to activity within a distinct region of the RVM alone. These results identify distinct roles for a brainstem triumvirate in attentional analgesia: with the PAG activated by attentional load; specific RVM regions showing pronociceptive and antinociceptive processes (in line with previous animal studies); and the LC showing lateralized activity during conflicting attentional demands. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attention modulates pain intensity, and human studies have identified roles for a network of forebrain structures plus the periaqueductal gray (PAG). Animal data indicate that the PAG acts via caudal brainstem structures to control nociception. We investigated this issue within an attentional analgesia paradigm with brainstem-optimized fMRI and analysis using a probabilistic brainstem atlas. We find pain intensity encoding in several forebrain structures, including the insula and attentional activation of the PAG. Discrete regions of the rostral ventromedial medulla bidirectionally influence pain perception, and locus coeruleus activity mirrors the interaction between attention and nociception. This approach has enabled the

  4. A human brainstem glioma xenograft model enabled for bioluminescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hashizume, Rintaro; Ozawa, Tomoko; Dinca, Eduard B.; Banerjee, Anuradha; Prados, Michael D.; James, Charles D.; Gupta, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    Despite the use of radiation and chemotherapy, the prognosis for children with diffuse brainstem gliomas is extremely poor. There is a need for relevant brainstem tumor models that can be used to test new therapeutic agents and delivery systems in pre-clinical studies. We report the development of a brainstem-tumor model in rats and the application of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy as part of this model. Luciferase-modified human glioblastoma...

  5. CNS-specific regulatory elements in brain-derived HIV-1 strains affect responses to latency-reversing agents with implications for cure strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, L R; Cowley, D; Welsh, C; Lu, H K; Brew, B J; Lewin, S R; Wesselingh, S L; Gorry, P R; Churchill, M J

    2016-01-01

    Latency-reversing agents (LRAs), including histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), are being investigated as a strategy to eliminate latency in HIV-infected patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. The effectiveness of LRAs in activating latent infection in HIV strains derived from the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. Here we show that CNS-derived HIV-1 strains possess polymorphisms within and surrounding the Sp transcription factor motifs in the long terminal repeat (LTR). These polymorphisms result in decreased ability of the transcription factor specificity protein 1 to bind CNS-derived LTRs, reducing the transcriptional activity of CNS-derived viruses. These mutations result in CNS-derived viruses being less responsive to activation by the HDACi panobinostat and romidepsin compared with lymphoid-derived viruses from the same subjects. Our findings suggest that HIV-1 strains residing in the CNS have unique transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, which impact the regulation of latency, the consideration of which is essential for the development of HIV-1 eradication strategies. PMID:26303660

  6. Cochlear and brainstem audiologic findings in normal hearing tinnitus subjects in comparison with non-tinnitus control group.

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    Shadman Nemati

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While most tinnitus cases have some degree of hearing impairment, a small percent of the patients admitted to Ear, Nose and Throat Clinics or Hearing Evaluation Centers are those who complain of tinnitus despite having normal hearing thresholds. Present study was performed in order to better understanding of the probable causes of tinnitus and to investigate possible changes in the cochlear and auditory brainstem function in normal hearing patients with chronic tinnitus. Altogether, 63 ears (31 ears with tinnitus and 32 ears without tinnitus were examined. The prevalence of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and characteristics of the auditory brainstem response components including wave latencies and wave amplitudes was determined in the two groups and analyzed with appropriate statistical methods. There was no difference between the prevalence of transient evoked emissions in the two groups. The mean difference between absolute latencies of waves I, III and V was less than 0.1 ms between the two groups that were not statistically significant. Also, the interpeak latency values of I-III, III-V and I-V in both groups had no significant difference. Only the V/I amplitude ratio in the tinnitus group was significantly larger than the other group (p =0.04. The changes observed in amplitude of waves, especially in the later ones, can be considered as an Audiologic finding in normal hearing tinnitus subjects and its possible role in generation of tinnitus in these patients must be investigated.

  7. Cochlear and brainstem audiologic findings in normal hearing tinnitus subjects in comparison with non-tinnitus control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Shadman; Faghih Habibi, Ali; Panahi, Rasool; Pastadast, Masoomeh

    2014-01-01

    While most tinnitus cases have some degree of hearing impairment, a small percent of the patients admitted to Ear, Nose and Throat Clinics or Hearing Evaluation Centers are those who complain of tinnitus despite having normal hearing thresholds. Present study was performed in order to better understanding of the probable causes of tinnitus and to investigate possible changes in the cochlear and auditory brainstem function in normal hearing patients with chronic tinnitus. Altogether, 63 ears (31 ears with tinnitus and 32 ears without tinnitus) were examined. The prevalence of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and characteristics of the auditory brainstem response components including wave latencies and wave amplitudes was determined in the two groups and analyzed with appropriate statistical methods. There was no difference between the prevalence of transient evoked emissions in the two groups. The mean difference between absolute latencies of waves I, III and V was less than 0.1 ms between the two groups that were not statistically significant. Also, the interpeak latency values of I-III, III-V and I-V in both groups had no significant difference. Only the V/I amplitude ratio in the tinnitus group was significantly larger than the other group (p =0.04). The changes observed in amplitude of waves, especially in the later ones, can be considered as an Audiologic finding in normal hearing tinnitus subjects and its possible role in generation of tinnitus in these patients must be investigated.

  8. Contribuição do potencial evocado auditivo em pacientes com vertigem Results of brainstem evoked response in patients with vestibular complaints

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    Gisiane Munaro

    2010-06-01

    -sectional, retrospective, observational study, held with 56 dizzy patients assessed by means of audiometry, vecto-electronystagmography and brainstem evoked auditory potential, broken down into Group A, with 31 normal-hearing individuals and Group B with 25 hearing loss patients, compared to the control group made up of ten normal-hearing asymptomatic individuals. RESULTS: Patients from groups A and B were compared to the Control Group, although with values within the normal range. A common finding for both groups was the lack of wave I at 80 dBHL and it happened bilaterally in four individuals (12.9% and unilaterally in three (9.6% for Group A; and bilaterally in eight individuals from Group B (32%. In the two cases in which vecto-electronystagmography showed central vestibular alteration, there were no changes to the evoked potential parameters. CONCLUSION: patients with vertigo, normal-hearing and hearing loss individuals had increased absolute latencies when compared to the Control Group

  9. EFFECTS OF NOISE EXPOSURE ON CLICK- AND TONE BURST-EVOKED AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSE IN RATS%噪声暴露对大鼠短纯音与短声听觉脑干反应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佘晓俊; 崔博; 吴铭权; 马强; 刘洪涛

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究噪声暴露对大鼠听觉脑干反应(ABR)的影响,及大鼠短声ABR(C-ABR)和短纯音ABR(Tb-ABR)的特点,以探讨Tb-ABR在听力评估中的价值.方法 将成年SD大鼠随机分为噪声组和正常组,每组7只(14耳).噪声组暴露于100 dB(SPL)白噪声,6 h/d,连续12周.噪声停止后24 h分别测定C-ABR和Tb-ABR(刺激声2、4、8、16、32 kHz).对2组的ABR结果进行统计分析.结果 随着刺激声从32 kHz到2 kHz,正常大鼠Tb-ABR各波的潜伏期延长;与C-ABR比较,Tb-ABR各频率波Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅳ的潜伏期都延迟,差异有显著性(P<0.01).大鼠听力在16 kHz比较敏感,阈值较低.噪声组大鼠在8 kHz听力损失最重,升高11 dB;各种短纯音刺激时,Tb-ABR各波潜伏期及峰间潜伏期无明显变化.结论 正常大鼠在各个频率的听力闽值、敏感性不同,噪声对各频率听力影响也不同;Tb-ABR较C-ABR更能反映听力损失的频率特性.%Objective To study the effects of noise exposure on click-evoked auditory brainstem responses( CABR) and tone burst-evoked ABR(Tb-ABR) in rats, so as to provide the reference for application of Tb-ABR to hearing evaluation.Methods Fourteen SD rats were divided into two groups, named the control group and the noise exposure group with seven rats per group(fourteen ears).The noise exposure group were exposed to the white noise[100 dB(SPL),6 h/day,12 weeks].C-ABR and Tb-ABR(2,4,8, 16,32 kHz) were measured 24 hours after noise exposure.Results The peak latency in normal rats was prolonged when the stimulate tone changed from 32 kHz to 2 kHz; the peak latency of TbABR with any frequency was significantly longer than that of C-ABR ( P < 0.01 ); the hearing threshold at 16 kHz of TbABR was the lowest, and the hearing was the best.The hearing loss in noise exposure group was most severe at 8 kHz ( 11 dB more than the control).The thresholds of C-ABR and Tb-ABR of noise exposure group were higher than those of control group.The peak latency of

  10. Reduced brainstem inhibition during anticipated pelvic visceral pain correlates with enhanced brain response to the visceral stimulus in women with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Steven M; Naliboff, Bruce D; Suyenobu, Brandall; Labus, Jennifer S; Stains, Jean; Ohning, Gordon; Kilpatrick, Lisa; Bueller, Joshua A; Ruby, Kim; Jarcho, Johanna; Mayer, Emeran A

    2008-01-09

    Cognitive factors such as fear of pain and symptom-related anxiety play an important role in chronic pain states. The current study sought to characterize abnormalities in preparatory brain response before aversive pelvic visceral distention in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and their possible relationship to the consequences of distention. The brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response to anticipated and delivered mild and moderate rectal distention was recorded from 14 female IBS patients and 12 healthy controls. During cued anticipation of distention, activity decreased in the insula, supragenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC), amygdala, and dorsal brainstem (DBS) of controls. IBS patients showed less anticipatory inactivation. Group differences were significant in the right posterior insula and bilateral DBS. Self-rated measures of negative affect during scanning were higher in patients than controls (p orbitofrontal cortex and bilateral sACC. Both regions have been associated previously with corticolimbic inhibition and cognitive coping. Deficits in preparatory inhibition of DBS, including the locus ceruleus complex and parabrachial nuclei, may interfere with descending corticolimbic inhibition and contribute to enhanced brain responsiveness and perceptual sensitivity to visceral stimuli in IBS.

  11. A brainstem anosognosia of hemiparesis

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    Kazuo Abe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A woman had anosognosia for hemiplegia as a manifestation of brainstem infarction. She had no mental or neuropsychological disturbances, and had involvement of the brainstem in the frontal/parietal-subcortical circuits to the right cerebral hemisphere. Brainstem lesions that disrupt frontal/parietal-subcortical areas may affect anosognosia for hemiplegia.

  12. Pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma

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    Sandeep Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the first report of pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma, infiltrating midbrain, and medulla oblongata. The report details clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical steps. As this entity is exceedingly uncommon, the overall epidemiology, prognosis, and long-term outcome remain far from established.

  13. Consciousness and the Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Josef; Damasio, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical framework and set of hypotheses aimed at accounting for consciousness in neurobiological terms. Discusses the functional neuroanatomy of nuclei in the brainstem reticular formation. Notes that the views presented are compatible with the idea that the reticular formation modulates the electrophysiological activity of the…

  14. Origin of acoustically evoked short latency negative response in guinea pigs%豚鼠声诱发短潜伏期负电位的来源初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文钦; 覃焕桦; 农东晓; 唐安洲; 李治美; 杨甜

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish a model of acoustically evoked short latency negative response (ASNR) in guinea pigs, a model of profound hearing loss with normal saccular functions, and verify the correlation between ASNR and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). Methods Thirty-two healthy guinea pigs were employed in the experiment, which were randomly divided into control group ( 16subjects) and deafened group (16 subjects). Each animal experienced auditory and vestibular tests including auditory brainstem response ( ABR), VEMP and caloric test. A quick treatment was employed for deafened group consisting of a subcutaneous injection of kanamycin at a dose of 400 mg/kg followed by a jugular vein injection of ethacrynic acid at a dose of 40 mg/kg one hour later. The animals were received ABR, VEMP and caloric test 7 - 10 days following the drug administration. The deafened group was further divided into ASNR group and non-ASNR group, based on the presence of ASNR. Results In deafened group, five subjects died postoperatively, 11 subjects (22 ears) provided full data, ASNR was elicited in eight ears (36.4%), the threshold was 120- 130 dB SPL with mean of (124.4 ±4.96) dB SPL. Its latency range was 1.75 - 2. 60 ms with mean of ( 2. 15 ± 0. 27 ) ms. The mean latency of threshold was (2. 34 ±0. 18) ms. All eight ASNR ears presented with VEMP. The VEMP threshold, positive and negative potential latencies proved no statistical difference (P > 0. 05 ) between ASNR group and control group.Significant difference was detected between the VEMP presence of ASNR group and non-ASNR group ( P =0. 002). There was no statistically significant correlation between VEMP and caloric test neither between ASNR and caloric test in deafened group. Conclusions This study evoked ASNR in an ototoxicity guinea pig model which has profound hearing loss with normal saccular functions. The presence of ASNR correlated with VEMP, however, not correlated with caloric test, suggesting that ASNR

  15. Long latency trigemino-cervical reflex in patients with cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Ergin, Hayal; Kızıltan, Meral E

    2015-01-01

    Trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) is elicited by stimulation of face using various modalities. TCR reflects the interaction between trigeminal system and cervical motoneurons. Such a specific interaction is assumed to play role in development of cervical dystonia (CD) through superior colliculus. In this study, we aimed to investigate alterations of the functional relationship between those structures in CD and in a subgroup with dystonic tremor. A total of consecutive 23 patients with primary CD (7 men, 16 women) and 16 age and sex matched control subjects (7 men, 9 women) were included in this study. TCR was obtained after percutaneous electrical stimulation (with duration of 0.5 ms) of infraorbital branch of trigeminal nerve while recording over splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoid muscles. Presence and onset latencies of TCR did not differ significantly between patients with CD and controls, and same pattern of muscle activation occurred in both groups. Responses of patient group seemed to have higher amplitudes and to be more persistent. There were no significant side-to-side differences of TCR probability, latency, amplitude or duration with respect to the side of head deviation in CD. Increased amplitudes and durations of responses probably reflect increased excitability of the reflex circuit. We suggest that similar latencies and response pattern in comparison to healthy individuals decrease the possibility of structural disturbance. TCR is probably under bilateral basal ganglia and dopaminergic control. Alterations of trigemino-cervical pathway are more extensive and are not solely due to local changes of brainstem interneurons.

  16. 正常听力豚鼠声诱发短潜伏期负电位的研究%The study of acoustically evoked short latency negative responses in normal guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张少华; 陈瑾; 林晨希; 农东晓; 唐安洲

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察听力正常豚鼠通过掩蔽能否引出声诱发短潜伏期负电位(acoustically evoked short latency negative response,ASNR),并与药物致聋豚鼠的ASNR进行对比,同时验证二者的神经核团来源是否相同.方法 40只健康豚鼠采用随机数字表法分为三组:对照组8只(16耳)、掩蔽组16只(32耳)和致聋组16只(32耳).掩蔽组选择气导白噪声作为掩蔽声,采用15 dB的掩蔽/刺激强度差以避免掩蔽不足和掩蔽过度,根据ASNR引出与否,分为掩蔽ASNR组和掩蔽非ASNR组.致聋组采用卡那霉素和利尿酸联合致聋,根据ASNR引出与否,分为致聋ASNR组和致聋非ASNR组.全部豚鼠均行前庭神经核定位及直流电损毁,24 h后再次行听性脑干反应(ABR)/ASNR测试,比较损毁前后ABR/ASNR的改变情况.脑干切片显微镜下验证电解损毁部位.结果 掩蔽组32耳中24耳引出ASNR,致聋组26耳重度聋耳中12耳引出 ASNR,掩蔽组ASNR的引出率(75.0%)高于致聋组(46.2%),差异具有统计学意义(x2=5.07,P=0.024);两组引出的ASNR在阈值和潜伏期上差异均无统计学意义(P值均>0.05).正常对照组前庭神经核损毁后,ABR波形及引出率无明显改变.掩蔽ASNR组和致聋ASNR组引出耳前庭神经核损毁后,ASNR均消失.脑干切片显示电损毁前庭神经核部位均准确无误.结论 利用适当强度的白噪声掩蔽可以成功地在豚鼠听力正常耳引出 ASNR,其波形、阈值和潜伏期与药物致聋豚鼠重度听力损失耳引出的ASNR相同,二者均起源于前庭神经核.%Objective To compare acoustically evoked short latency negative responses (ASNR) elicited from normal and profound hearing loss guinea pig ears and to confirm their vestibular nuclei origination.Methods Forty healthy guinea pigs were employed in the experiment, which were randomly divided into the control group (8 subjects, 16 ears), the masking group (16 subjects, 32 ears) and the deafened group (16 subjects, 32

  17. Rapid Increase in Neural Conduction Time in the Adult Human Auditory Brainstem Following Sudden Unilateral Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslin, M R D; Lloyd, S K; Rutherford, S; Freeman, S; King, A; Moore, D R; Munro, K J

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with sudden unilateral deafness offer a unique opportunity to study plasticity of the binaural auditory system in adult humans. Stimulation of the intact ear results in increased activity in the auditory cortex. However, there are no reports of changes at sub-cortical levels in humans. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate changes in sub-cortical activity immediately before and after the onset of surgically induced unilateral deafness in adult humans. Click-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to stimulation of the healthy ear were recorded from ten adults during the course of translabyrinthine surgery for the removal of a unilateral acoustic neuroma. This surgical technique always results in abrupt deafferentation of the affected ear. The results revealed a rapid (within minutes) reduction in latency of wave V (mean pre = 6.55 ms; mean post = 6.15 ms; p < 0.001). A latency reduction was also observed for wave III (mean pre = 4.40 ms; mean post = 4.13 ms; p < 0.001). These reductions in response latency are consistent with functional changes including disinhibition or/and more rapid intra-cellular signalling affecting binaurally sensitive neurons in the central auditory system. The results are highly relevant for improved understanding of putative physiological mechanisms underlying perceptual disorders such as tinnitus and hyperacusis.

  18. Individual differences in sound-in-noise perception are related to the strength of short-latency neural responses to noise.

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    Ekaterina Vinnik

    Full Text Available Important sounds can be easily missed or misidentified in the presence of extraneous noise. We describe an auditory illusion in which a continuous ongoing tone becomes inaudible during a brief, non-masking noise burst more than one octave away, which is unexpected given the frequency resolution of human hearing. Participants strongly susceptible to this illusory discontinuity did not perceive illusory auditory continuity (in which a sound subjectively continues during a burst of masking noise when the noises were short, yet did so at longer noise durations. Participants who were not prone to illusory discontinuity showed robust early electroencephalographic responses at 40-66 ms after noise burst onset, whereas those prone to the illusion lacked these early responses. These data suggest that short-latency neural responses to auditory scene components reflect subsequent individual differences in the parsing of auditory scenes.

  19. Sex differences in orienting to pictures with and without humans: evidence from the cardiac evoked response (ECR and the cortical long latency parietal positivity (LPP.

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    Monika Althaus

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effect of social relevance in affective pictures on two orienting responses, i.e. the evoked cardiac response (ECR, and a long latency cortical evoked potential (LPP and whether this effect would differ between males and females. Assuming that orienting to affective social information is fundamental to experiencing affective empathy, associations between self-report measures of empathy and the two orienting responses were investigated. METHOD: ECRs were obtained from 34 female and 30 male students, and LPPs from 25 female and 27 male students viewing 414 pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Pictures portrayed pleasant, unpleasant and neutral scenes with and without humans. RESULTS: Both the ECR and LPP showed the largest response to pictures with humans in unpleasant situations. For both measures, the responses to pictures with humans correlated with self-report measures of empathy. While we found a greater male than female responsiveness to the pictures without humans in the ECR, a greater female than male responsiveness was observed in the LPP response to pictures with humans. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: The sensitivity of these orienting responses to social relevance and their differential contribution to the prediction of individual differences underline the validity of their combined use in clinical studies investigating individuals with social disabilities.

  20. Sex differences in orienting to pictures with and without humans: evidence from the cardiac evoked response (ECR) and the cortical long latency parietal positivity (LPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaus, Monika; Groen, Yvonne; van der Schaft, Lutske; Minderaa, Ruud B; Tucha, Oliver; Mulder, Lambertus J M; Wijers, Albertus A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of social relevance in affective pictures on two orienting responses, i.e. the evoked cardiac response (ECR), and a long latency cortical evoked potential (LPP) and whether this effect would differ between males and females. Assuming that orienting to affective social information is fundamental to experiencing affective empathy, associations between self-report measures of empathy and the two orienting responses were investigated. ECRs were obtained from 34 female and 30 male students, and LPPs from 25 female and 27 male students viewing 414 pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Pictures portrayed pleasant, unpleasant and neutral scenes with and without humans. Both the ECR and LPP showed the largest response to pictures with humans in unpleasant situations. For both measures, the responses to pictures with humans correlated with self-report measures of empathy. While we found a greater male than female responsiveness to the pictures without humans in the ECR, a greater female than male responsiveness was observed in the LPP response to pictures with humans. The sensitivity of these orienting responses to social relevance and their differential contribution to the prediction of individual differences underline the validity of their combined use in clinical studies investigating individuals with social disabilities.

  1. Higher frequency of T-cell response to M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv2628 at the site of active tuberculosis disease than in peripheral blood.

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    Teresa Chiacchio

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Due to the invasive nature of the procedures involved, most studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb-specific immunity in humans have focused on the periphery rather than the site of active infection, the lung. Recently, antigens associated with Mtb-latency and -dormancy have been described using peripheral blood (PB cells; however their response in the lung is unknown. The objective of this report was to evaluate, in patients prospectively enrolled with suspected active tuberculosis (TB, whether the latency antigen Rv2628 induces local-specific immune response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells compared to PB cells. MATERIAL/METHODS: Among the 41 subjects enrolled, 20 resulted with active TB. Among the 21 without active disease, 9 were defined as subjects with latent TB-infection (LTBI [Quantiferon TB Gold In-tube positive]. Cytokine responses to Rv2628 were evaluated by enzyme linked immunospot (ELISPOT assay and flow cytometric (FACS analysis. RD1-secreted antigen stimulation was used as control. RESULTS: There was a significantly higher frequency of Rv2628- and RD1-specific CD4+ T-cells in the BAL of active TB patients than in PB. However the trend of the response to Rv2628 in subjects with LTBI was higher than in active TB in both PB and BAL, although this difference was not significant. In active TB, Rv2628 and RD1 induced a cytokine-response profile mainly consisting of interferon (IFN-γ-single-positive over double-IFN-γ/interleukin (IL-2 T-cells in both PB and BAL. Finally, BAL-specific CD4+ T-cells were mostly effector memory (EM, while peripheral T-cell phenotypes were distributed among naïve, central memory and terminally differentiated effector memory T-cells. CONCLUSIONS: In this observational study, we show that there is a high frequency of specific T-cells for Mtb-latency and RD1-secreted antigens (mostly IFN-γ-single-positive specific T-cells with an EM phenotype in the BAL of active TB patients. These data may

  2. Muscular response to physiologic tensile stretch of the caprine c5/6 facet joint capsule: dynamic recruitment thresholds and latencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Nadia R; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Chen, Chaoyang; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the cervical muscle response to physiologic, high-rate (100 mm/s) tensile facet joint capsule (FJC) stretch. Six in-vivo caprine C5/6 FJC preparations were subjected to an incremental tensile loading paradigm. EMG activity was recorded from the right trapezius (TR) and multifidus (MF) muscle groups at the C5 and C6 levels; and from the sternomastoid (SM) and longus colli (LC) muscle groups bilaterally at the C5/6 level; during FJC stretch. Capsule load during the displacement applications was recorded via a miniature load cell, and 3D capsule strains (based on stereoimaging of an array of markers on the capsule surface) were reconstructed using finite element methods. EMG traces from each muscle were examined for onset of muscular activity. Capsule strains and loads at the time of EMG onset were recorded for each muscle, as was the time from the onset of FJC stretch to the onset of muscle activity. All muscles were responsive to physiologic high-rate FJC stretch. The deep muscles (MF and LC) were recruited at significantly smaller capsule loads and onset latencies than the superficial muscles (TR and SM). MF activation strain was significantly smaller than LC and TR activation strains. These data were also compared to previously published low-rate data. MF was the first muscle group to be recruited regardless of the activation criterion under consideration (i.e. strain, load, or latency) or the rate of FJC stretch. LC recruitment occurred significantly sooner under high-rate vs. low-rate FJC stretch. The results of this study provide further evidence of extensive ligamento-muscular reflex pathways between the FJC and the cervical musculature, which are responsive to both low-rate and high-rate FJC stretch. These data add to our knowledge of the dynamic response of paraspinal muscles relative to facet joint motion and provide a unique contribution to enhance the precision of computer-simulated impacts.

  3. Role of sex hormones produced during menstrual cycle on brainstem encoding of speech stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Prashanth; Banerjee, Neha; Anil, Arya; Abdulla, Asma

    2016-11-01

    There are no studies attempted to determine the effects of different phases of menstrual cycle on frequency following response (FFR) for speech stimuli. The aim of the study was to determine the differences in latencies and amplitude of FFR waves recorded at four phases of menstrual cycle. In addition, it was also attempted to determine if there is any ear effect on latency and amplitude measures across the phases of menstrual cycle. FFR was recorded in 20 females in the age range of 18-25 years in the four menstrual cycles [Phase I-menses (day 1-3), Phase II-proliferative phase (day 11-14), Phase III-mid-luteal phase (day 17-22) and Phase IV-pre-menstrual phase (day 25-27)]. The results of the study showed that there was significant reduction in latencies and slight increase in amplitude during menses and mid-luteal phase compared to mid-cycle and pre-menstruation cycles. The present study supports the hypothesis that difference in the levels of sex hormones in women during menstrual cycle can affect brainstem encoding of speech stimuli.

  4. Musical training heightens auditory brainstem function during sensitive periods in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eSkoe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Experience has a profound influence on how sound is processed in the brain. Yet little is known about how enriched experiences interact with developmental processes to shape neural processing of sound. We examine this question as part of a large cross-sectional study of auditory brainstem development involving more than 700 participants, 213 of whom were classified as musicians. We hypothesized that experience-dependent processes piggyback on developmental processes, resulting in a waxing-and-waning effect of experience that tracks with the undulating developmental baseline. This hypothesis led to the prediction that experience-dependent plasticity would be amplified during periods when developmental changes are underway (i.e., early and later in life and that the peak in experience-dependent plasticity would coincide with the developmental apex for each subcomponent of the auditory brainstem response. Consistent with our predictions, we reveal that musicians have heightened response features at distinctive times in the life span that coincide with periods of developmental change and climax. The effect of musicianship is also quite specific: we find that only select components of auditory brainstem activity are affected, with musicians having heightened function for onset latency, high frequency phase-locking, and response consistency, and with little effect observed for other measures, including lower frequency phase-locking and non-stimulus-related activity. By showing that musicianship imparts a neural signature that is especially evident during childhood and old age, our findings reinforce the idea that the nervous system’s response to sound is chiseled by how a person interacts with his specific auditory environment, with the effect of the environment wielding its greatest influence during certain privileged windows of development.

  5. Hypotensive response in spontaneously hypertensive rats following microinjection of α-methylnoradrenaline in the caudal brain-stem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandberg, P.; Jong, Wybren de

    1979-01-01

    Local microinjection of 1.25 nmol (-)-α-methylnoradrenaline in the A2-region of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) caused a decrease of blood pressure and heart rate in both spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (W/K) rats. Although the maximal responses in both strains did not diffe

  6. A pivotal role for enhanced brainstem Orexin receptor 1 signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated pressor response in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2015-10-05

    Orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) signaling is implicated in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) modulation of feeding. Further, our studies established the dependence of the central CB1R-mediated pressor response on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the RVLM. Here, we tested the novel hypothesis that brainstem orexin-A/OX1R signaling plays a pivotal role in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response. Our multiple labeling immunofluorescence findings revealed co-localization of CB1R, OX1R and the peptide orexin-A within the C1 area of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Activation of central CB1R following intracisternal (i.c.) WIN55,212-2 (15μg/rat) in conscious rats caused significant increases in BP and orexin-A level in RVLM neuronal tissue. Additional studies established a causal role for orexin-A in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response because (i) selective blockade of central CB1R (AM251, 30μg/rat; i.c.) abrogated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM orexin-A level, (ii) the selective OX1R antagonist SB-408124 (10nmol/rat; i.c.) attenuated orexin-A (3nmol/rat; i.c.) or WIN55,212-2 (15μg/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response while selective CB1R blockade (AM251) had no effect on orexin-A (3nmol/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response, (iii) direct CB1R activation in the RVLM (WIN55,212-2; 0.1μg/rat) increased RVLM orexin-A and BP. Finally, SB-408124 attenuated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM nNOS and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and BP. Our findings suggest that orexin-A/OX1R dependent activation of the RVLM nNOS/ERK1/2 cascade is essential neurochemical mechanism for the central CB1R-mediated pressor response in conscious rats.

  7. 孤独症患儿听性脑干反应结果分析%Auditory Brainstem Responses in Children with Autism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晶; 刘维荣; 曾祥丽

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨孤独症患儿听性脑干反应(ABR)的特点.方法 对12例孤独症患儿分别进行声导抗、畸变产物耳声发射(DPOAE)、40 Hz相关电位及听性脑干反应(ABR)测试,并对其中3例ABR异常者进行分析.结果 12例双耳均为A型鼓室导抗图,双耳同侧及对侧声反射均可引出,DPOAE均可正常引出,40 Hz相关电位500、1000 Hz阈值均≤25 dB nHL;12例ABR反应阈均正常,其中9例波形分化好,重复性好,各波潜伏期及波间期正常;3例ABR表现异常:1例双耳波Ⅱ以后各波潜伏期延长;1例双耳Ⅰ-Ⅲ波间期延长;1例双耳波Ⅰ潜伏期正常,波Ⅲ后各波潜伏期、波间期缩短.结论 部分孤独症患儿虽中耳及耳蜗功能正常,但其脑干及下丘之间中枢听传导通路可能异常,故对孤独症患者应常规行听功能检测.%Objective To study the characteristics of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in children with Autism. Methods Acoustic impedance, otoacoustic emission(OAE) > 40 Hz auditory event related potential and auditory brainstem responses were recorded in 12 children with autism. Among of these, 3 cases of ABR were abnormal. Results The Type A tympanograms were found in 12 children. The ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic reflexes and distortion product acoustic emission(DPOAE) were elicited. The thresholds of ABR were normal. The incubation period and wave interphase of all waves was normal. 3 cases of ABR were abnormal. 1 case of incubation periods of all waves were prolonged after wave II. 1 case of I-III wave interphase was prolonged. 1 case of incubation period of wave I was normal, incubation periods and wave interphases of all waves were prolonged after wave III were shorter. Conclusion Although middle ears and cochlea of Autistic children may be normal, the auditory pathway of those children may be abnormal. Therefore, appropriate central auditory processing testing may be needed.

  8. Brainstem Tuberculoma in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A. Muin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a Somali refugee who presented in the second trimester of her first pregnancy with a four-week history of gradual right-sided sensomotoric hemisyndrome including facial palsy and left-sided paresis of the oculomotorius nerve causing drooping of the left eyelid and double vision. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solitary brainstem lesion. Upon detection of hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray (CXR, the diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis with involvement of the central nervous system was confirmed by PCR and treatment induced with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. The patient had a steady neurological improvement and a favorable pregnancy outcome.

  9. Effects of acupuncture in" inner Tinggong" acupoint on auditory brainstem response in sudden hearing loss patients%针刺"内听宫"穴对突发性耳聋患者脑干听觉诱发电位的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓彤; 袁国莲; 许珉; 赵龙柱; 张全安; 樊玉林

    2004-01-01

    AIM:To observe the changes of auditory brainstem response(ABR) in sudden hearing loss patients and normal ears by acupuncture in " inner Tinggong" acupoint to confirm the effectiveness of the acupuncture in this acupoint in hearing loss. METHODS:The ABR of 19 cases(21 ears) of sudden hearing loss was assayed under copper grid shielding by 2000 model of evoked potential instrument obtained from Dandi Company.ABR was retested after 15-minute acupuncture in inner Tinggong acupoint and 5-minute rest.The results were compared. RESULTS:There was no significant difference in I,V wave latency and I-V interval before and after acupuncture in normal ears(P >0.05).Tinnitus and auditory stuffiness in 15 of 21 ears with sudden hearing loss were relieved or even disappeared after acupuncture with auditory improvement.The ABR waves of 5 ears were poorly differentiated before acupuncture,and I wave or III wave disappeared with poor repetition,while the differentiations of ABR waves were markedly in focus with I wave,III wave and V wave,and moreover with good repetition.I wave latence of ABR in 16 ears with sudden hearing loss was( 2.00± 0.34) ms,V wave latence was(6.04± 0.59) ms, and I-V wave interval was(4.04± 0.57) ms before acupuncture;after acupunture, I wave latence was(1.77± 0.27) ms,V wave latence was(5.79± 0.63) ms and I-V interval was(3.98± 0.58) ms.There were significant differences in I and V latency between before and after acupuncture(t=2.406,2.463,P0.05). 21耳突聋中 15耳针刺内听宫穴耳鸣减轻,甚至消失.耳闷减轻,听力提高.其中 5耳针刺前 ABR波形分化差,Ⅰ波或Ⅲ波消失,重复性差,针刺后其 ABR波形分化明显清晰,Ⅰ,Ⅲ,Ⅴ波均出现,且重复性好. 16耳突聋针刺前 ABR的Ⅰ波潜伏期:( 2.00± 0.34) ms,Ⅴ波潜伏期 (6.04± 0.59)ms,ⅠⅤ波间期 (4.04± 0.57)ms,针刺后 ABR的Ⅰ波潜伏期: (1.77± 0.27)ms,Ⅴ波潜伏期: (5.79± 0.63)ms,ⅠⅤ波间期: (3.98± 0.58)ms,Ⅰ ,Ⅴ波潜伏期针刺

  10. Congenital brainstem disconnection associated with a syrinx of the brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, P. G.; de Vries, L. S.; Nikkels, P. G. J.; Troost, D.

    We report a case of congenital brainstem disconnection including the second detailed autopsy. A full-term newborn presented with irreversible apnoea and died on the fifth day. MRI revealed disconnection of the brainstem. The autopsy included a series of transverse sections of the mesencephalon,

  11. Congenital brainstem disconnection associated with a syrinx of the brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, P. G.; de Vries, L. S.; Nikkels, P. G. J.; Troost, D.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of congenital brainstem disconnection including the second detailed autopsy. A full-term newborn presented with irreversible apnoea and died on the fifth day. MRI revealed disconnection of the brainstem. The autopsy included a series of transverse sections of the mesencephalon, medu

  12. Priors engaged in long-latency responses to mechanical perturbations suggest a rapid update in state estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Crevecoeur

    Full Text Available In every motor task, our brain must handle external forces acting on the body. For example, riding a bike on cobblestones or skating on irregular surface requires us to appropriately respond to external perturbations. In these situations, motor predictions cannot help anticipate the motion of the body induced by external factors, and direct use of delayed sensory feedback will tend to generate instability. Here, we show that to solve this problem the motor system uses a rapid sensory prediction to correct the estimated state of the limb. We used a postural task with mechanical perturbations to address whether sensory predictions were engaged in upper-limb corrective movements. Subjects altered their initial motor response in ∼60 ms, depending on the expected perturbation profile, suggesting the use of an internal model, or prior, in this corrective process. Further, we found trial-to-trial changes in corrective responses indicating a rapid update of these perturbation priors. We used a computational model based on Kalman filtering to show that the response modulation was compatible with a rapid correction of the estimated state engaged in the feedback response. Such a process may allow us to handle external disturbances encountered in virtually every physical activity, which is likely an important feature of skilled motor behaviour.

  13. Development of electrically evoked auditory brainstem response modules of REZ-Ⅰ domestic cochlear implant device%REZ-Ⅰ型国产人工耳蜗电诱发听性脑干反应模块的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁秀勇; 张汝祥; 许长建; 樊伟; 张道行

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop electrically evoked auditory brainstem response(EABR) modules of REZ-Ⅰ domestic cochlear implant device,and testify the reliability and validity of the modules.Methods Postoperative EABR were recorded in guinea pigs by using the self-designed EABR module.Results EABR waves were recorded in all 15 ears of 9 guinea pigs with normal hearing.The threshold was (159.00 ±50.21) current level (CL) and e Ⅲ wave latency was (2.36 ± 0.46)ms of 100 μs pulse width stimulation; for 150 μs pulse width stimulation,the threshold was (131.44 ± 49.25)CL and e Ⅲ wave latency was (2.59 ± 0.46) ms ; for 200 μs pulse width stimulation,the threshold was (119.63 ± 52.56) CL and e Ⅲ wave latency was (2.62 ± 0.44) ms.Conclusion According the preliminary results of the study,the reliability and stability of the EABR modules of domestic cochlear implant device can meet the demands of EABR recording.%目的 建立REZ-Ⅰ型国产人工耳蜗电诱发听性脑干反应(electrically evoked auditory brainstem response,EABR)模块,并测试其稳定性及可靠性.方法 使用自行设计构建的REZ-Ⅰ型国产人工耳蜗EABR测试模块记录听力正常豚鼠人工耳蜗植入后的EABR,并探索相关技术参数.结果 9只豚鼠(15耳)EABR波形引出率为100%.100μs刺激脉宽的阈值平均(均数±标准差,下同)为(159.00±50.21)电流级(current level,CL),波Ⅲ潜伏期为(2.36 ±0.46) ms;150μs刺激脉宽的阈值为(131.44 ±49.25)CL,波Ⅲ潜伏期为(2.59±0.46)ms;200 μs刺激脉宽的阈值为(119.63 ±52.56)CL,波Ⅲ潜伏期为(2.62±0.44) ms.结论 REZ-Ⅰ型人工耳蜗EABR模块动物实验的引出率达到100%,其稳定性和可靠性能够满足EABR的测试要求.

  14. A novel method of brainstem auditory evoked potentials using complex verbal stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia N Kouni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The click and tone-evoked auditory brainstem responses are widely used in clinical practice due to their consistency and predictability. More recently, the speech-evoked responses have been used to evaluate subcortical processing of complex signals, not revealed by responses to clicks and tones. Aims: Disyllable stimuli corresponding to familiar words can induce a pattern of voltage fluctuations in the brain stem resulting in a familiar waveform, and they can yield better information about brain stem nuclei along the ascending central auditory pathway. Materials and Methods: We describe a new method with the use of the disyllable word "baba" corresponding to English "daddy" that is commonly used in many other ethnic languages spanning from West Africa to the Eastern Mediterranean all the way to the East Asia. Results: This method was applied in 20 young adults institutionally diagnosed as dyslexic (10 subjects or light dyslexic (10 subjects who were matched with 20 sex, age, education, hearing sensitivity, and IQ-matched normal subjects. The absolute peak latencies of the negative wave C and the interpeak latencies of A-C elicited by verbal stimuli "baba" were found to be significantly increased in the dyslexic group in comparison with the control group. Conclusions: The method is easy and helpful to diagnose abnormalities affecting the auditory pathway, to identify subjects with early perception and cortical representation abnormalities, and to apply the suitable therapeutic and rehabilitation management.

  15. Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 ORF48 Is an RTA-Responsive Gene Product and Functions in both Viral Lytic Replication and Latency during In Vivo Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jing; Han, Chuanhui; Gong, Danyang; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Sheng; Deng, Hongyu

    2015-06-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) of gammaherpesvirus is an immediate early gene product and regulates the expression of many downstream viral lytic genes. ORF48 is also conserved among gammaherpesviruses; however, its expression regulation and function remained largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the transcription unit of ORF48 from murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) and analyzed its transcriptional regulation. We showed that RTA activates the ORF48 promoter via an RTA-responsive element (48pRRE). RTA binds to 48pRRE directly in vitro and also associates with ORF48 promoter in vivo. Mutagenesis of 48pRRE in the context of the viral genome demonstrated that the expression of ORF48 is activated by RTA through 48pRRE during de novo infection. Through site-specific mutagenesis, we generated an ORF48-null virus and examined the function of ORF48 in vitro and in vivo. The ORF48-null mutation remarkably reduced the viral replication efficiency in cell culture. Moreover, through intranasal or intraperitoneal infection of laboratory mice, we showed that ORF48 is important for viral lytic replication in the lung and establishment of latency in the spleen, as well as viral reactivation from latency. Collectively, our study identified ORF48 as an RTA-responsive gene and showed that ORF48 is important for MHV-68 replication both in vitro and in vivo. The replication and transcription activator (RTA), conserved among gammaherpesviruses, serves as a molecular switch for the virus life cycle. It works as a transcriptional regulator to activate the expression of many viral lytic genes. However, only a limited number of such downstream genes have been uncovered for MHV-68. In this study, we identified ORF48 as an RTA-responsive gene of MHV-68 and mapped the cis element involved. By constructing a mutant virus that is deficient in ORF48 expression and through infection of laboratory mice, we showed that ORF48 plays important roles in different stages of

  16. The temporal relationship between the brainstem and primary cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N A

    1995-10-01

    Many methods are employed in order to define more precisely the generators of an evoked potential (EP) waveform. One technique is to compare the timing of an EP whose origin is well established with that of one whose origin is less certain. In the present article, the latency of the primary cortical auditory evoked potential (PCAEP) was compared to each of the seven subcomponents which compose the brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP). The data for this comparison was derived from a retrospective analysis of previous recordings of the PCAEP and BAEP. Central auditory conduction time (CACT) was calculated by subtracting the latency of the cochlear nucleus BAEP component (wave III) from that of the PCAEP. It was found that CACT in humans is 12 msec which is more than double that of central somatosensory conduction time. The interpeak latencies between BAEP waves V, VI, and VII and the PCAEP were also calculated. It was deduced that all three waves must have an origin rather more caudally within the central auditory system than is commonly supposed. In addition, it is demonstrated that the early components of the middle latency AEP (No and Na) largely reside within the time domain between the termination of the BAEP components and the PCAEP which would be consistent with their being far field reflections of midbrain and subcortical auditory activity. It is concluded that as the afferent volley ascends the central auditory pathways, it generates not a sequence of high frequency BAEP responses but rather a succession of slower post-synaptic waves. The only means of reconciling the timing of the BAEP waves with that of the PCAEP is to assume that the generation of all the BAEP components must be largely restricted to a quite confined region within the auditory nerve and the lower half of the pons.

  17. High Stimulus Rate Auditory Brainstem Responses in Presbycusis Patients Older than 80 Years%80岁以上老年性聋患者高刺激速率ABR的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐良慰; 冀飞; 杨仕明

    2016-01-01

    characteristics of auditory brainstem responses in presbycusis patients older than 80 years at high stimulus rates, as diagnostic evidence of posterior circulation ischemia and aging of the central nervous system in the elderly. Methods Fifty-four (108 ears) presbycusis patients older than 80 years participated in this study (mean age=88.17±4.99 years). Clicks-evoked ABRs were tested at stimulus rates of 11.1/s and 51.1/s. The peak latency (PL) of waves I, III and V, inter-peak latencies (IPL) of waves I-III, III-V and I-V in response to the low and high rate stimuli were com-pared. The inter-peak latency differences (ΔIPL) were calculated and compared with normal reference values. Results 1. The ABR waveforms in the presbycusis patients were poorly differentiated, with low signal-to-noise ratios. 2. PLs of waves I, III and V and IPLs of I-III, III-V and I-V were 1.66±0.17, 4.06±0.20, 6.16±0.20, 2.41±0.19, 2.10±0.20 and 4.50±0.19 ms respectively at the stimulus rate of 51.1/s, and 1.57±0.16, 3.87±0.19, 5.86±0.19, 2.30±0.18, 1.99±0.15 and 4.29±0.16 ms, re-spectively, at the stimulus rate of 11.1/s (p<0.05). 3.ΔIPLs of I-III, III-V and I-V were 0.11 ± 0.18, 0.11 ± 0.19 and 22 ± 0.10 ms, respectively, and the I-IIIΔIPL in males was prolonged compared to females. At the stimulus rate of 51.1/s, I-VΔIPL was longer than the normal value (P<0.001). 4. PLs of waves I, III and V in the presbycusis patients, as well as IPLs of I-III, III-V and I-V, at both stimulus rates were distinctly different from those in normal-hearing young subjects (P<0.05). Conclu-sion ABR waveforms in presbycusis patients are poorly differentiated. At high stimulus rate, PLs and IPLs are significantly prolonged, and wave I-VΔIPL is greater than that in normal-hearing young subjects. High stimulus rate ABRs can be an im-portant clinical diagnostic indicator of posterior circulation ischemia and aged central nervous system in the elderly.

  18. H-reflex excitability is inhibited in soleus, but not gastrocnemius, at the short-latency response of a horizontal jump-landing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cassandra S; Schabrun, Siobhan; Marshall, Paul W

    2016-06-01

    Impaired spinal-level neuromuscular control is suggested to contribute to instability and injury during dynamic landing tasks. Despite this suggestion, spinal-level neuromuscular control is yet to be examined during a horizontal jump-landing task. The aim of the current study was to assess changes in H-reflexes and its reliability at the short-latency response of landings from short and long distances. Eight healthy individuals (five male, three female; age, 22±1.2yrs; height, 178±8.1cm; weight, 72±15.7kg) participated in the study. H-reflexes were evoked at the SLR in the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles, during two landing conditions: 25% and 50% of maximal broad jump distance. H-reflexes were expressed relative to the background electromyography (EMG) and maximal M-wave responses (M-max). Soleus H-reflexes were inhibited when landing from shorter distance (25%, 13.9±7.6%; 50%, 8.3±6.5%; pH-reflex excitability was observed in medial gastrocnemius. Background EMG was unaltered across landing conditions. Inhibition of soleus H-reflex excitability from 25% to 50% landing condition indicates a reduced contribution of Ia-afferent feedback to the alpha-motor neuron during landings from greater distances, which may contribute to stiffness regulation at the ankle joint. Unaltered H-reflex excitability of medial gastrocnemius is most likely attributed to its functional role during the landing task.

  19. Auditory Rehabilitation in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Auditory Brainstem Implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Min Wang; Zhi-Jun Yang; Fu Zhao; Bo Wang; Xing-Chao Wang; Pei-Ran Qu; Pi-Nan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Background:The auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) have been used to treat deafness for patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 and nontumor patients.The lack of an appropriate animal model has limited the study of improving hearing rehabilitation by the device.This study aimed to establish an animal model of ABI in adult rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta).Methods:Six adult rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) were included.Under general anesthesia,a multichannel ABI was implanted into the lateral recess of the fourth ventricle through the modified suboccipital-retrosigmoid (RS) approach.The electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) waves were tested to ensure the optimal implant site.After the operation,the EABR and computed tomography (CT) were used to test and verify the effectiveness via electrophysiology and anatomy,respectively.The subjects underwent behavioral observation for 6 months,and the postoperative EABR was tested every two weeks from the 1st month after implant surgery.Result:The implant surgery lasted an average of 5.2 h,and no monkey died or sacrificed.The averaged latencies of peaks Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅳ were 1.27,2.34 and 3.98 ms,respectively in the ABR.One-peak EABR wave was elicited in the operation,and one-or two-peak waves were elicited during the postoperative period.The EABR wave latencies appeared to be constant under different stimulus intensities;however,the amplitudes increased as the stimulus increased within a certain scope.Conclusions:It is feasible and safe to implant ABIs in rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) through a modified suboccipital RS approach,and EABR and CT are valid tools for animal model establishment.In addition,this model should be an appropriate animal model for the electrophysiological and behavioral study of rhesus macaque monkey with ABI.

  20. Herpetic brainstem encephalitis: report of a post-mortem case studied electron microscopically and immunohisiochemically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eymard Homem Pitella

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available A post-mortem examined case of herpetic brainstem encephalitis is presented. Clinically, the patient had cephalea followed by ataxia, drowsiness and multiple palsies of some cranial nerves, developing into death in eight days. The pathologic examination of the brain showed necrotizing encephalitis in multiple foci limited to the brainstem, more distinctly in the pons and medula oblongata. The technique of immunoperoxidase revealed rare glial cells with intranuclear immunoreactivity for herpes antigen. Rare viral particles with the morphological characteristics of the herpesvirus were identified in the nuclei of neurons in 10% formol fixed material. This is the second reported case of herpetic brainstem encephalitis confirmed by post-mortem examination. The pathway used by the virus to reach the central nervous system and its posterior dissemination to the oral cavity, the orbitofrontal region and the temporal lobes as well as to the brainstem, after a period of latency and reactivation, are discussed.

  1. The Effects of Parent-Focused Slow Relaxed Speech Intervention on Articulation Rate, Response Time Latency, and Fluency in Preschool Children Who Stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Jean; Matteson, Colleen; Ou, Hua; Nagase, Takahisa

    2017-04-14

    This study investigated the effects of an intervention to reduce caregivers' articulation rates with children who stutter on (a) disfluency, (b) caregiver and child's articulation rates, and (c) caregiver and child's response time latency (RTL). Seventeen caregivers and their preschool children who stuttered participated in a group study of treatment outcomes. One speech sample was collected as a baseline, and 2 samples were collected after treatment. Posttreatment samples were of caregivers speaking as they typically would and using reduced articulation rates. Caregivers reduced articulation rates significantly in the 2 posttreatment samples, and a significant decrease of stuttering-like disfluencies (SLD) was found in the children in those 2 samples. No direct relationship was found between the caregiver's articulation rate and RTL, and there was a small correlation of RTL with the lower levels of SLD found postintervention. No significant relationships were found between the reduced levels of SLD and articulation rates for either caregivers or children. Results suggest caregivers can be trained to slow their speech, and children increased their fluency at the end of a program designed to slow caregiver articulation. The intentionally slower rate of the caregivers, however, was not significantly related to fluency.

  2. The effect of intrathecal iohexol on visual evoked response latency: a comparison including incidence of headache with iopamidol and metrizamide in myeloradiculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbridge, A T; Bayliss, S G; Brayshaw, C I

    1987-01-01

    Fifty consecutive unselected patients referred for myeloradiculography and examined by the same radiologist, when facilities for measuring the visual evoked response were available, are considered. The effect on the visual evoked response of the examination and the incidence of headache following the use of iohexol as the contrast medium are compared with those after the use of iopamidol and metrizamide reported in a previous study. A total of 400 cases examined with iopamidol and 200 cases examined with iohexol are reviewed with regard to the incidence of headache. Whereas iopamidol and, to a greater extent metrizamide, were found to cause significant lengthening of the visual evoked response latency 20 hours after the radiological examination, iohexol did not. Furthermore there was no significant difference in the 20 hour reading following the use of iohexol compared with the original control group of patients who underwent lumbar puncture alone. There was a lower incidence and severity of headache following the use of iohexol than with iopamidol and a markedly reduced incidence compared with metrizamide. Iohexol is considered less neurotoxic than iopamidol which had previously superceded metrizamide as the contrast medium used for myeloradiculography in the Royal Surrey County Hospital. Volumes of up to 14 ml of iohexol 300 mg I/ml have been used for lumbar radiculography and for total myelography and up to 10 ml for direct lateral cervical puncture. In 350 cases examined to date with iohexol the only serious sequel was a case of chemical meningitis following the lumbar injection of 10 ml of the 300 mg I/ml solution for a cervical examination. The patient made an uneventful recovery.

  3. Steroid receptor coactivator 1 deficiency increases MMTV-neu mediated tumor latency and differentiation specific gene expression, decreases metastasis, and inhibits response to PPAR ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowe David L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR subgroup of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily is activated by a variety of natural and synthetic ligands. PPARs can heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors, which have homology to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Ligand binding to PPAR/RXRs results in recruitment of transcriptional coactivator proteins such as steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1 and CREB binding protein (CBP. Both SRC-1 and CBP are histone acetyltransferases, which by modifying nucleosomal histones, produce more open chromatin structure and increase transcriptional activity. Nuclear hormone receptors can recruit limiting amounts of coactivators from other transcription factor binding sites such as AP-1, thereby inhibiting the activity of AP-1 target genes. PPAR and RXR ligands have been used in experimental breast cancer therapy. The role of coactivator expression in mammary tumorigenesis and response to drug therapy has been the subject of recent studies. Methods We examined the effects of loss of SRC-1 on MMTV-neu mediated mammary tumorigenesis. Results SRC-1 null mutation in mammary tumor prone mice increased the tumor latency period, reduced tumor proliferation index and metastasis, inhibited response to PPAR and RXR ligands, and induced genes involved in mammary gland differentiation. We also examined human breast cancer cell lines overexpressing SRC-1 or CBP. Coactivator overexpression increased cellular proliferation with resistance to PPAR and RXR ligands and remodeled chromatin of the proximal epidermal growth factor receptor promoter. Conclusions These results indicate that histone acetyltransferases play key roles in mammary tumorigenesis and response to anti-proliferative therapies.

  4. Signal, Noise, and Variation in Neural and Sensory-Motor Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonyeol; Joshua, Mati; Medina, Javier F; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of the neural code for sensory-motor latency in smooth pursuit eye movements reveals general principles of neural variation and the specific origin of motor latency. The trial-by-trial variation in neural latency in MT comprises a shared component expressed as neuron-neuron latency correlations and an independent component that is local to each neuron. The independent component arises heavily from fluctuations in the underlying probability of spiking, with an unexpectedly small contribution from the stochastic nature of spiking itself. The shared component causes the latency of single-neuron responses in MT to be weakly predictive of the behavioral latency of pursuit. Neural latency deeper in the motor system is more strongly predictive of behavioral latency. A model reproduces both the variance of behavioral latency and the neuron-behavior latency correlations in MT if it includes realistic neural latency variation, neuron-neuron latency correlations in MT, and noisy gain control downstream of MT.

  5. Instruction-dependent modulation of the long-latency stretch reflex is associated with indicators of startle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Vengateswaran J; Honeycutt, Claire F; Shemmell, Jonathan; Perreault, Eric J

    2013-09-01

    Long-latency responses elicited by postural perturbation are modulated by how a subject is instructed to respond to the perturbation, yet the neural pathways responsible for this modulation remain unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether instruction-dependent modulation is associated with activity in brainstem pathways contributing to startle. Our hypothesis was that elbow perturbations can evoked startle, indicated by activity in the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). Perturbation responses were compared to those elicited by a loud acoustic stimulus, known to elicit startle. Postural perturbations and startling acoustic stimuli both evoked SCM activity, but only when a ballistic elbow extension movement was planned. Both stimuli triggered SCM activity with the same probability. When SCM activity was present, there was an associated early onset of triceps electromyographic (EMG), as required for the planned movement. This early EMG onset occurred at a time often attributed to long-latency stretch reflexes (75-100 ms). The nature of the perturbation-triggered EMG (excitatory or inhibitory) was independent of the perturbation direction (flexion or extension) indicating that it was not a feedback response appropriate for returning the limb to its original position. The net EMG response to perturbations delivered after a movement had been planned could be explained as the sum of a stretch reflex opposing the perturbation and a startle-evoked response associated with the prepared movement. These results demonstrate that rapid perturbations can trigger early release of a planned ballistic movement, and that this release is associated with activity in the brainstem pathways contributing to startle reflexes.

  6. Electric auditory brainstem response (E-ABR in cochlear implant children: Effect of age at implantation and duration of implant use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithreen Mohammed Said Abdelsalam

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: A well-established EABR was obtained in cochlear implant children with proper parameters. The characterizations of the EABR waves including wave latencies and threshold were extracted at different electrodes. The EABR test proves to be an effective method to evaluate the functions of the auditory pathway in children after cochlear implantation.

  7. Gap prepulse inhibition and auditory brainstem evoked potentials as objective measures for tinnitus in guinea pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eDehmel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus or ringing of the ears is a subjective phantom sensation necessitating behavioral models that objectively demonstrate the existence and quality of the tinnitus sensation. The gap detection test uses the acoustic startle response elicited by loud noise pulses and its gating or suppression by preceding sub-startling prepulses. Gaps in noise bands serve as prepulses, assuming that ongoing tinnitus masks the gap and results in impaired gap detection. This test has shown its reliability in rats, mice, and gerbils. No data exists for the guinea pig so far, although gap detection is similar across mammals and the acoustic startle response is a well-established tool in guinea pig studies of psychiatric disorders and in pharmacological studies. Here we investigated the startle behavior and prepulse inhibition (PPI of the guinea pig and showed that guinea pigs have a reliable startle response that can be suppressed by 15 ms gaps embedded in narrow noise bands preceding the startle noise pulse. After recovery of auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds from a unilateral noise over-exposure centered at 7 kHz, guinea pigs showed diminished gap-induced reduction of the startle response in frequency bands between 8 and 18 kHz. This suggests the development of tinnitus in frequency regions that showed a temporary threshold shift (TTS after noise over-exposure. Changes in discharge rate and synchrony, two neuronal correlates of tinnitus, should be reflected in altered ABR waveforms, which would be useful to objectively detect tinnitus and its localization to auditory brainstem structures. Therefore we analyzed latencies and amplitudes of the first five ABR waves at suprathreshold sound intensities and correlated ABR abnormalities with the results of the behavioral tinnitus testing. Early ABR wave amplitudes up to N3 were increased for animals with tinnitus possibly stemming from hyperactivity and hypersynchrony underlying the tinnitus percept.

  8. Application of auditory brainstem response and pure tone audiometry in early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma%听性脑干反应和纯音听阈在听神经瘤早期诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵赋; 武丽; 王博; 杨智君; 王振民; 王兴朝; 李朋; 张晶; 刘丕楠

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨采用听性脑干反应和纯音听阈对早期诊断听神经瘤的临床应用价值.方法 回顾性分析了111例听神经瘤患者的临床资料、纯音听阈、听性脑干反应及增强磁共振结果,采用线性回归分析纯音听阈均值与肿瘤体积、病程是否存在相关性,采用卡方检验分析不同肿瘤体积在听性脑干反应异常发生率上是否存在差异.结果 听神经瘤引起感音神经性耳聋,纯音听阈均值与病程存在显著地相关性(P=0.000);听性脑干反应诊断听神经瘤的敏感度和特异度分别为98.2%和93.6%,肿瘤最大径>3 cm与≤3 cm两组,在患侧和对侧Ⅲ~Ⅳ波间期异常发生率上,差异均具有统计学意义(P值分别为0.038和0.045).结论 听性脑干反应联合纯音测听是早期诊断听神经瘤的有效方法.%Objective To investigate the clinical application value of using auditory brainstem response and pure tone audiometry for early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma.Methods The clinical data,the results of pure tone audiometry,auditory brainstem response,and enhanced MRI in 111 patients with acoustic neuroma were analyzed retrospectively.Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the correlation between the nean value of pure tone audiometry and the neuroma volune or course of disease.Chi-squared test was used to analyze the whether there were differences in the different neuroma volumes on the incidence of abnormal auditory brainstem response.Results Acoustic neuroma caused sensorineural deafness.There was a significant correlation between the mean value of pure tone audiometry and the course of disease (P =0.000).The sensitivity and specificity of auditory brainstem response for the diagnosis of acoustic neuroma were 98.2% and 93.6% respectively.The maximum diameters of neuromas were divided into 2 groups:> 3 cm or ≤3 cm.There were significant differences on the abnormal incidence of the Ⅲ to Ⅴ wave intervals of the

  9. The auditory brainstem is a barometer of rapid auditory learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoe, E; Krizman, J; Spitzer, E; Kraus, N

    2013-07-23

    To capture patterns in the environment, neurons in the auditory brainstem rapidly alter their firing based on the statistical properties of the soundscape. How this neural sensitivity relates to behavior is unclear. We tackled this question by combining neural and behavioral measures of statistical learning, a general-purpose learning mechanism governing many complex behaviors including language acquisition. We recorded complex auditory brainstem responses (cABRs) while human adults implicitly learned to segment patterns embedded in an uninterrupted sound sequence based on their statistical characteristics. The brainstem's sensitivity to statistical structure was measured as the change in the cABR between a patterned and a pseudo-randomized sequence composed from the same set of sounds but differing in their sound-to-sound probabilities. Using this methodology, we provide the first demonstration that behavioral-indices of rapid learning relate to individual differences in brainstem physiology. We found that neural sensitivity to statistical structure manifested along a continuum, from adaptation to enhancement, where cABR enhancement (patterned>pseudo-random) tracked with greater rapid statistical learning than adaptation. Short- and long-term auditory experiences (days to years) are known to promote brainstem plasticity and here we provide a conceptual advance by showing that the brainstem is also integral to rapid learning occurring over minutes.

  10. Functional imaging of the human brainstem during somatosensory input and autonomic output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Anthony Henderson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half a century, many experimental animal investigations have explored the role of various brainstem regions in a variety of conditions. Despite the accumulation of a considerable body of knowledge in primarily anaesthetized preparations, relatively few investigations have explored brainstem function in awake humans. It is important that human brainstem function is explored given that many neurological conditions, from obstructive sleep apnea, chronic pain and hypertension, likely involve significant changes in the processing of information within the brainstem. Recent advances in the collection and processing of magnetic resonance images, has resulted in the possibility of exploring brainstem activity changes in awake healthy individuals and in those with various clinical conditions. We and others have begun to explore changes in brainstem activity in humans during a number of challenges, including during cutaneous and muscle pain, as well as during challenges that evoke increases in sympathetic activity. More recently we have successfully recorded sympathetic nerve activity concurrently with fMRI of the brainstem, which will allow us, for the first time to explore brainstem sites directly responsible for conditions such as hypertension. Since many conditions will involve changes in brainstem function and structure, defining brainstem changes will likely result in a greater ability to develop more effective treatment regimes.

  11. Isolated in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparations remain important tools in respiratory neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen M; Turner, Sara M; Huxtable, Adrianne G; Ben-Mabrouk, Faiza

    2012-01-15

    Isolated in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparations are used extensively in respiratory neurobiology because the respiratory network in the pons and medulla is intact, monosynaptic descending inputs to spinal motoneurons can be activated, brainstem and spinal cord tissue can be bathed with different solutions, and the responses of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spinal motoneurons to experimental perturbations can be compared. The caveats and limitations of in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparations are well-documented. However, isolated brainstem-spinal cords are still valuable experimental preparations that can be used to study neuronal connectivity within the brainstem, development of motor networks with lethal genetic mutations, deleterious effects of pathological drugs and conditions, respiratory spinal motor plasticity, and interactions with other motor behaviors. Our goal is to show how isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparations still have a lot to offer scientifically and experimentally to address questions within and outside the field of respiratory neurobiology.

  12. Aging degrades the neural encoding of simple and complex sounds in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinard, Christopher G; Tremblay, Kelly L

    2013-01-01

    Older adults, with or without normal peripheral hearing sensitivity, have difficulty understanding speech. This impaired speech perception may, in part, be due to desynchronization affecting the neural representation of acoustic features. Here we determine if phase-locked neural activity generating the brainstem frequency-following response (FFR) exhibits age-related desynchronization and how this degradation affects the neural representation of simple and complex sounds. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the effects of age on the neural representation of simple tones and complex consonant-vowel stimuli, (2) determine if sustained and transient components of the FFR are differentially affected by age, and (3) determine if the inability to encode a simple signal predicts degradation in representation for complex speech signals. Correlational. Thirty four adults (aged 22-77 yr) with hearing thresholds falling within normal limits. Stimuli used to evoke FFRs were 1000 Hz tone bursts as well as a consonant-vowel /da/ sound. The neural representation of simple (tone) and complex (/da/) stimuli declines with advancing age. Tone-FFR phase coherence decreased as chronological age increased. For the consonant-vowel FFRs, transient onset and offset response amplitudes were smaller, and offset responses were delayed with age. Sustained responses at the onset of vowel periodicity were prolonged in latency and smaller in amplitude as age increased. FFT amplitude of the consonant-vowel FFR fundamental frequency did not significantly decline with increasing age. The ability to encode a simple signal was related to degradation in the neural representation of a complex, speechlike sound. Tone-FFR phase coherence was significantly related to the later vowel response components but not the earlier vowel components. FFR components representing the tone and consonant-vowel /da/ stimulus were negatively affected by age, showing age-related reductions in response

  13. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (ppain modulation circuitry provides a framework for the future investigations into the neural mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of persistent pain conditions thought to involve altered analgesic circuitry.

  14. 不同部位参考电极诱发的豚鼠听性脑干反应差异分析%The Auditory Brainstem Response of Guinea Pigs Recorded at Different Electrode Positions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文杰; 傅仲鹰; 刘淑芳; 陈玮伦

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe auditory brainstem response evoked at different electrode positions adopting electrode slices .Methods The ABRs of 12 normal guinea pigs (24 ears)were recorded by two methods using clicks as stimulation .Active electrode was positioned at the vertex while the ground electrode at the nose .The reference e‐lectrode was placed on bilateral pinnas or mastoids .Then observe waveforms ,response thresholds (RT) ,peak la‐tencies(PL) and inter-peak latencies (IPL)of ABR .Results No significant difference were observed in the RT ,Ⅰ ,Ⅱand Ⅲ PL ,Ⅰ - Ⅲ IPL of ABR between the two methods(P>0 .05) .When stimulation was decreasing and with the reference electrode slices placed at bilateral pinnas ,waveⅡpeak was stable and discernable of ABR record‐ings across twenty -four ears of guinea pigs .The amplitude decreased more slowly than any other waves ,and dis‐appeared at the last .While reference electrode slices were placed on bilateral mastoids ,the amplitude of wave Ⅲ de‐creased more slowly than any other waves except wave Ⅳ ,and disappeared at lost .Ⅱ - Ⅲ ,Ⅲ - Ⅳ IPL became shorter .These two positions both recorded amplitude higher and PL advanced for wave Ⅳ as the stimulation de‐creased by 20 to 40 dB nHL ,and Ⅲ - Ⅳ IPL became shorter .This phenomenon was more obvious when reference electrode was placed at mastoid .Conclusion Wave Ⅱwas more stable and discernible with reference electrode placed at the bilateral pinnas .Therefore wave Ⅱ recorded by this way can be a new method to record the ABR threshold of g uinea pig s .%目的:分析不同部位参考电极诱发豚鼠听性脑干反应(ABR )的差异。方法健康豚鼠12只(24耳),分别采用双侧耳廓或双侧乳突作为参考电极,鼻尖部为接地电极,颅顶为记录电极,给予短声刺激,分别观察以耳廓和乳突为参考电极时的ABR波形、反应阈、潜伏期、波间期。结果两

  15. P300 latency indexes nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, B; Pogue, J; Porlier, G

    1990-03-01

    This experiment investigated the effects of nitrogen narcosis on reaction time (RT) and P300 latency and amplitude. Ten subjects breathed either air or a non-narcotic 20% oxygen-80% helium (heliox) mixture in a hyperbaric chamber at 6.5, 8.3 and 10 atmospheres absolute (ATA). The subjects responded under controlled accuracy conditions to visually presented male or female names in an oddball paradigm. Single-trial analysis revealed a strong relationship between RT and P300 latency, both of which were slowed in a dose-related manner by hyperbaric air but not by heliox. A clear-cut dose-response relationship could not be established for P300 amplitude. These results indicate that P300 latency indexes nitrogen narcosis and are interpreted as support for the slowed processing model of inert gas narcosis.

  16. Brainstem evoked response in bus drivers with noise-induced hearing loss Audiometria de tronco encefálico em motoristas de ônibus com perda auditiva induzida pelo ruído

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Silveira Santos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies carried out by Brainstem Evoked Auditory Potentials (BEAP in Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL workers show different results in relation to neuronal involvement, not involving bus drivers as study object. AIM: to use BEAP in a prospective case/control clinical study to check whether or not there is neural auditory pathway involvement in bus drivers with NIHL. MATERIALS AND METHODS: we selected 50 bus drivers between 27 and 40 years with mild to moderate NIHL, and 20 individuals between 29 and 40 years with normal hearing and without prior history of noise exposure. BEAP tests were carried out and the traces were analyzed. RESULTS: in the NIHL group, the auditory thresholds in 3, 4 and 6 kHz were significantly higher in the left ear. In the NIHL group, potentials PI, PIII and/or PV were not present in a small number of the individuals; we observed a statistically significant increase in PI, PIII and PV absolute latencies, (LIP LIP I-III interpeak latencies, bilaterally and LIP I-V in the left ear. CONCLUSION: in the NIHL group, besides sensorial injury, changes in BEAP latencies suggest an early functional injury of the first auditory pathway afferent neuron.Estudos realizados com os Potenciais Auditivos Evocados de Tronco Encefálico (PEATE em trabalhadores com Perda Auditiva Induzida pelo Ruído (PAIR apresentam resultados díspares em relação ao comprometimento neuronal, além de não contemplar motoristas de ônibus como objeto de estudo. OBJETIVO: Avaliar pelo PEATE, em estudo clínico de série caso/controle, prospectivo, se há comprometimento das vias auditivas neurais em motoristas de ônibus com PAIR. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram selecionados 50 motoristas de ônibus entre 27 e 40 anos portadores de PAIR leve a moderada; e 20 sujeitos entre 29 e 40 anos com audibilidade normal e sem antecedentes de exposição a ruído. Os PEATEs foram realizados e os traçados analisados. RESULTADOS: No grupo PAIR, os limiares auditivos em 3, 4

  17. Gap prepulse inhibition and auditory brainstem-evoked potentials as objective measures for tinnitus in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmel, Susanne; Eisinger, Daniel; Shore, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus or ringing of the ears is a subjective phantom sensation necessitating behavioral models that objectively demonstrate the existence and quality of the tinnitus sensation. The gap detection test uses the acoustic startle response elicited by loud noise pulses and its gating or suppression by preceding sub-startling prepulses. Gaps in noise bands serve as prepulses, assuming that ongoing tinnitus masks the gap and results in impaired gap detection. This test has shown its reliability in rats, mice, and gerbils. No data exists for the guinea pig so far, although gap detection is similar across mammals and the acoustic startle response is a well-established tool in guinea pig studies of psychiatric disorders and in pharmacological studies. Here we investigated the startle behavior and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the guinea pig and showed that guinea pigs have a reliable startle response that can be suppressed by 15 ms gaps embedded in narrow noise bands preceding the startle noise pulse. After recovery of auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds from a unilateral noise over-exposure centered at 7 kHz, guinea pigs showed diminished gap-induced reduction of the startle response in frequency bands between 8 and 18 kHz. This suggests the development of tinnitus in frequency regions that showed a temporary threshold shift (TTS) after noise over-exposure. Changes in discharge rate and synchrony, two neuronal correlates of tinnitus, should be reflected in altered ABR waveforms, which would be useful to objectively detect tinnitus and its localization to auditory brainstem structures. Therefore, we analyzed latencies and amplitudes of the first five ABR waves at suprathreshold sound intensities and correlated ABR abnormalities with the results of the behavioral tinnitus testing. Early ABR wave amplitudes up to N3 were increased for animals with tinnitus possibly stemming from hyperactivity and hypersynchrony underlying the tinnitus percept. Animals that did not

  18. Unsupervised, low latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaram Raghuram

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method for detecting anomalous domain names, with focus on algorithmically generated domain names which are frequently associated with malicious activities such as fast flux service networks, particularly for bot networks (or botnets, malware, and phishing. Our method is based on learning a (null hypothesis probability model based on a large set of domain names that have been white listed by some reliable authority. Since these names are mostly assigned by humans, they are pronounceable, and tend to have a distribution of characters, words, word lengths, and number of words that are typical of some language (mostly English, and often consist of words drawn from a known lexicon. On the other hand, in the present day scenario, algorithmically generated domain names typically have distributions that are quite different from that of human-created domain names. We propose a fully generative model for the probability distribution of benign (white listed domain names which can be used in an anomaly detection setting for identifying putative algorithmically generated domain names. Unlike other methods, our approach can make detections without considering any additional (latency producing information sources, often used to detect fast flux activity. Experiments on a publicly available, large data set of domain names associated with fast flux service networks show encouraging results, relative to several baseline methods, with higher detection rates and low false positive rates.

  19. A Readout Mechanism for Latency Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Oran; Shamir, Maoz

    2016-01-01

    Response latency has been suggested as a possible source of information in the central nervous system when fast decisions are required. The accuracy of latency codes was studied in the past using a simplified readout algorithm termed the temporal-winner-take-all (tWTA). The tWTA is a competitive readout algorithm in which populations of neurons with a similar decision preference compete, and the algorithm selects according to the preference of the population that reaches the decision threshold first. It has been shown that this algorithm can account for accurate decisions among a small number of alternatives during short biologically relevant time periods. However, one of the major points of criticism of latency codes has been that it is unclear how can such a readout be implemented by the central nervous system. Here we show that the solution to this long standing puzzle may be rather simple. We suggest a mechanism that is based on reciprocal inhibition architecture, similar to that of the conventional winner-take-all, and show that under a wide range of parameters this mechanism is sufficient to implement the tWTA algorithm. This is done by first analyzing a rate toy model, and demonstrating its ability to discriminate short latency differences between its inputs. We then study the sensitivity of this mechanism to fine-tuning of its initial conditions, and show that it is robust to wide range of noise levels in the initial conditions. These results are then generalized to a Hodgkin-Huxley type of neuron model, using numerical simulations. Latency codes have been criticized for requiring a reliable stimulus-onset detection mechanism as a reference for measuring latency. Here we show that this frequent assumption does not hold, and that, an additional onset estimator is not needed to trigger this simple tWTA mechanism.

  20. Evaluation of brainstem auditory evoked potential in type 2 diabetes mellitus individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathnavel Kumaran Murugesan

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: These data reveal that there was a delay in both the latencies and IPLs which signifies the involvement of both the peripheral and central nervous system. The early diagnosis of brainstem defects may lead to improvement in treatment modalities of DM and decrease its morbidity. Thus BAEP might be used as a non- invasive tool to assess diabetic neuropathy. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(9.000: 3939-3944

  1. Lyme disease of the brainstem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalina, Peter [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Decker, Andrew [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Department of Neurology, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Kornel, Ezriel [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Halperin, John J. [North Shore University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Manhasset, NY (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement typically causes local inflammation, most commonly meningitis, but rarely parenchymal brain involvement. We describe a patient who presented with clinical findings suggesting a brainstem process. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) suggested a brainstem neoplasm. Prior to biopsy, laboratory evaluation led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. Clinical and imaging abnormalities improved markedly following antimicrobial therapy. We describe Lyme disease involvement of the cerebellar peduncles with hypermetabolism on PET. Although MRI is the primary imaging modality for most suspected CNS pathology, the practical applications of PET continue to expand. (orig.)

  2. Brainstem as a developmental gateway to social attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Ronny; Dital, Ayelet; Ramon, Dan; Yarmolovsky, Jessica; Gidron, Maor; Kuint, Jacob

    2017-05-15

    Evolution preserves social attention due to its key role in supporting survival. Humans are attracted to social cues from infancy, but the neurobiological mechanisms for the development of social attention are unknown. An evolutionary-based, vertical-hierarchical theoretical model of self-regulation suggests that neonatal brainstem inputs are key for the development of well-regulated social attention. Neonates born preterm (N = 44, GA 34 w.) were recruited and diagnosed at birth as a function of their auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABR). Participants enrolled in a prospective 8-year-long, double-blind, follow-up study comparing participants with brainstem dysfunctions and well-matched controls. Groups had comparable fetal, neonatal, and familial characteristics. Methods incorporated EEG power analysis and gaze tracking during the Attention Network Test (ANT, four cue types, and two targets) and a Triadic Gaze Engagement task (TGE, three social cue levels). Results showed that neonatal brainstem compromise is related to long-term changes in Alpha- and Theta-band power asymmetries (p < .034, p < .016, respectively), suggesting suppressed bottom-up input needed to alert social attention. Gaze tracking indicated dysregulated arousal-modulated attention (p < .004) and difficulty in gaze engagement to socially neutral compared to nonsocial cues (p < .012). Integrating models of Autism and cross-species data with current long-term follow-up of infants with discrete neonatal brainstem dysfunction suggests neonatal brainstem input as a gateway for bottom-up regulation of social attention. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  3. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fobe, Lisete Pessoa de Oliveira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: lispessoa@yahoo.com

    1999-12-01

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  4. 正常豚鼠听性脑干反应与听性稳态反应的对比%Comparison of auditory brainstem response and auditory steady-state response in normal guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢慧琴; 王海涛; 周枫; 黄利芬

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the difference of the threshold of normal guinea pigs between auditory brainstem response (ABR) and auditory steady state response (ASSR), and provide a theoretical basis for hearing research on guinea pigs.Methods 12 guinea pigs (24 ears) with normal hearing sedated by pentobarbital sodium were selected for the ABR and ASSR tests.The click- ABR stimulation rate was 11.1 beats/s, and the Ⅱ wave thresholds were recorded as the ABR response threshold.The carrier frequencies (CF) of ASSR were 0.5,1,2,3,4 and 6 kHz, the modulation frequency (MF) was 154 Hz, and the threshold of each carrier frequency was recorded.Results The threshold of ASSR was higher than that of ABR at 0.5-4 kHz CF in normal guinea pigs( P <0.01 ), but no significant difference was found at 6 kHz CF(P >0.05).Conclusion There are significant differences in most thresholds of ASSR and ABR in normal guinea pigs.However, there is no significant difference at 6 kHz CF.Therefore, the differences caused by different CF of ASSR must be noted when assessing the heating of guinea pigs.%目的 比较正常豚鼠听性脑干反应(ABR)和听性稳态反应(ASSR)阈值的差异,为利用豚鼠进行听力学研究提供理论依据.方法 选正常听力豚鼠12只(24耳),在戊巴比妥钠镇静状态下,分别行ABR和ASSR测试.ABR为click刺激声,刺激率为11.1次/s,记录ABR的Ⅱ渡反应阈值.ASSR载波频率(CF)为0.5、1、2、3、4、6 kHz,调制频率(MF)为154 Hz,记录各载频的反应阅值.结果 正常豚鼠ASSR反应阈值高于ABR反应阈值,CF:0.5.4 kHz时.ABR与ASSR阈值间有统计学差异(P0.05).结论 正常豚鼠ABR与ASSR阈值间存在较大差值,但ABR与6 kHz的ASSR阈值间无显著差异.故对豚鼠进行听阈评估时,要注意两者间由于ASSR载波频率不同所引起的差异.

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging of the inferior colliculus and brainstem auditory-evoked potentials in preterm infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, Milla; Lehtonen, Liisa; Lapinleimu, Helena [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology and Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Johansson, Reijo [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Turku (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, Satu K. [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Turku (Finland); Kujari, Harry [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Pathology, Turku (Finland); Haataja, Leena [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Turku (Finland)

    2009-08-15

    Preterm and low-birth-weight infants have an increased risk of sensorineural hearing loss. Brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP) are an effective method to detect subtle deficits in impulse conduction in the auditory pathway. Abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been shown to be associated with perinatal white-matter injury and reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) has been reported in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. To evaluate the possibility of a correlation between BAEP and DTI of the inferior colliculus in preterm infants. DTI at term age and BAEP measurements were performed on all very-low-birth-weight or very preterm study infants (n=56). FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the inferior colliculus were measured from the DTI. Shorter BAEP wave I, III, and V latencies and I-III and I-V intervals and higher wave V amplitude correlated with higher FA of the inferior colliculus. The association between the DTI findings of the inferior colliculus and BAEP responses suggests that DTI can be used to assess the integrity of the auditory pathway in preterm infants. (orig.)

  6. Glomerular latency coding in artificial olfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaber eAl Yamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory perception results from the way sensory information is subsequently transformed in the brain. Olfaction is a typical example in which odor representations undergo considerable changes as they pass from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs to second-order neurons. First, many ORNs expressing the same receptor protein yet presenting heterogeneous dose-response properties converge onto individually identifiable glomeruli. Second, onset latency of glomerular activation is believed to play a role in encoding odor quality and quantity in the context of fast information processing. Taking inspiration from the olfactory pathway, we designed a simple yet robust glomerular latency coding scheme for processing gas sensor data. The proposed bio-inspired approach was evaluated using an in-house Sn02 sensor array. Glomerular convergence was achieved by noting the possible analogy between receptor protein expressed in ORNs and metal catalyst used across the fabricated gas sensor array. Ion implantation was another technique used to account both for sensor heterogeneity and enhanced sensitivity. The response of the gas sensor array was mapped into glomerular latency patterns, whose rank order is concentration-invariant. Gas recognition was achieved by simply looking for a match within a library of spatio-temporal spike fingerprints. Because of its simplicity, this approach enables the integration of sensing and processing onto a single-chip.

  7. Therapeutics for HIV-1 reactivation from latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgarbanti, Marco; Battistini, Angela

    2013-08-01

    Intensive combined antiretroviral therapy successfully suppresses HIV-1 replication and AIDS disease progression making infection manageable, but it is unable to eradicate the virus that persists in long-lived, drug-insensitive and immune system-insensitive reservoirs thus asking for life-long treatments with problems of compliance, resistance, toxicity and cost. These limitations and recent insights into latency mechanisms have fueled a renewed effort in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Proposed eradication strategies involve reactivation of the latent reservoir upon induction of viral transcription followed by the elimination of reactivated virus-producing cells by viral cytopathic effect or host immune response. Several molecules identified by mechanism-directed approaches or in large-scale screenings have been proposed as latency reversing agents. Some of them have already entered clinical testing in humans but with mixed or unsatisfactory results.

  8. Latency and User Performance in Virtual Environments and Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    System rendering latency has been recognized by senior researchers, such as Professor Fredrick Brooks of UNC (Turing Award 1999), as a major factor limiting the realism and utility of head-referenced displays systems. Latency has been shown to reduce the user's sense of immersion within a virtual environment, disturb user interaction with virtual objects, and to contribute to motion sickness during some simulation tasks. Latency, however, is not just an issue for external display systems since finite nerve conduction rates and variation in transduction times in the human body's sensors also pose problems for latency management within the nervous system. Some of the phenomena arising from the brain's handling of sensory asynchrony due to latency will be discussed as a prelude to consideration of the effects of latency in interactive displays. The causes and consequences of the erroneous movement that appears in displays due to latency will be illustrated with examples of the user performance impact provided by several experiments. These experiments will review the generality of user sensitivity to latency when users judge either object or environment stability. Hardware and signal processing countermeasures will also be discussed. In particular the tuning of a simple extrapolative predictive filter not using a dynamic movement model will be presented. Results show that it is possible to adjust this filter so that the appearance of some latencies may be hidden without the introduction of perceptual artifacts such as overshoot. Several examples of the effects of user performance will be illustrated by three-dimensional tracking and tracing tasks executed in virtual environments. These experiments demonstrate classic phenomena known from work on manual control and show the need for very responsive systems if they are indented to support precise manipulation. The practical benefits of removing interfering latencies from interactive systems will be emphasized with some

  9. Efficacy of Distortion Product Oto-Acoustic Emission (OAE)/Auditory Brainstem Evoked Response (ABR) Protocols in Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening and Detecting Hearing Loss in Children <2 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Girish; Sharma, Yojana; Mehta, Kanishk; Patel, Gunjan

    2013-04-01

    Deafness is commonest curable childhood handicap. Most remedies and programmes don't address this issue at childhood level leading to detrimental impact on development of newborns. Aims and objectives are (A) screen all newborns for deafness and detect prevalence of deafness in children less than 2 years of age. and (B) assess efficacy of multi-staged OAE/ABR protocol for hearing screening. Non-randomized, prospective study from August 2008 to August 2011. All infants underwent a series of oto-acoustic emission (OAE) and final confirmatory auditory brainstem evoked response (ABR) audiometry. Finally, out of 1,101 children, 1,069 children passed the test while 12 children had impaired hearing after final testing, confirmed by ABR. Positive predictive value of OAE after multiple test increased to 100 %. OAE-ABR test series is effective in screening neonates and multiple tests reduce economic burden. High risk screening will miss nearly 50 % deaf children, thus universal screening is indispensable in picking early deafness.

  10. Interaural intensity and latency difference in the dolphin's auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V V; Supin AYa

    1991-12-09

    Binaural hearing mechanisms were measured in dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) by recording the auditory nerve evoked response from the body surface. The azimuthal position of a sound source at 10-15 degrees from the longitudinal axis elicited interaural intensity disparity up to 20 dB and interaural latency difference as large as 250 microseconds. The latter was many times greater than the acoustical interaural time delay. This latency difference seems to be caused by the intensity disparity. The latency difference seems to be an effective way of coding of intensity disparity.

  11. Establishment and application of experimental method of a new generation of event related potential cognitive function assessment and monitoring system---clinical application of auditory brainstem response%新一代事件相关电位认知功能评定和监测系统的实验方法建立--脑干听觉反应的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任清涛; 刘情情; 张勤峰; 宗文斌; 陈兴时; 张群峰; 茅顺明; 杨武庆; 刘群

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of auditory brainstem response ( ABR) in patients with depression disorder and schizophrenia . Methods The ABR measurement were carried out in 43 patients with depressive disorders ( the depression group ) , 43 patients with schizophrenias ( the schizophrenia group ) , and 50 normal controls ( the control group ) by using the NTS-2000 type ERP instrument . Results The differences between three groups in the absolute latency wave V ( Pz brain area ) , the absolute amplitude wave Ⅲ ( Pz brain area ) and wave V ( Pz brain area ) were significant ( all P<0.01 ) .Compared with that in the control group and the depression group , the schizophrenia group had significantly delayed the absolute latency wave V ( Pz brain area ) ( all P<0.01 ) as well as significantly decreased absolute wave amplitude Ⅲ( Pz brain area ) and absolute wave Ⅴ( Pz brain area ) . Conclusion ABR is of value for clinical differentiate the depression disorder and schizophrenia .%目的:探讨抑郁症患者和精神分裂症患者的脑干听觉反应( ABR)的特点。方法应用NTS-2000型ERP仪及Click短声刺激,测查43例抑郁症(抑郁症组)、43例精神分裂症(精神分裂症组)和50名健康成人对照(对照组)的ABR。结果抑郁症组、精神分裂症组及对照组在绝对潜伏期波Ⅴ( Pz脑区)、绝对波幅波Ⅲ( Pz脑区)、波Ⅴ( Pz脑区)上的差异有显著统计学意义(P均<0.01)。与对照组和抑郁症组相比,精神分裂症组的绝对潜伏期波Ⅴ(Pz脑区)显著延迟(P均<0.01),绝对波幅波Ⅲ( Pz脑区)和绝对波幅波Ⅴ( Pz脑区)亦显著降低。结论 ABR对临床鉴别抑郁症和精神分裂症有参考价值。

  12. The vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) score: a promising tool for evaluation of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelić, T; Krbot Skorić, M; Adamec, I; Barun, B; Zadro, I; Habek, M

    2015-02-01

    Concerning the great importance of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS), the aim of this study was to explore the role of the newly developed vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) score as a possible marker of brainstem involvement in MS patients. This was a prospective case-control study which included 100 MS patients divided into two groups (without and with clinical signs of brainstem involvement) and 50 healthy controls. Ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) measurements were performed in all participants and analyzed for latencies, conduction block and amplitude asymmetry ratio. Based on this the VEMP score was calculated and compared with Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), disease duration and magnetic resonance imaging data. Multiple sclerosis patients with clinical signs of brainstem involvement (group 2) had a statistically significant higher percentage of VEMP conduction blocks compared with patients without clinical signs of brainstem involvement (group 1) and healthy controls (P = 0.027 and P VEMP score was significantly higher in group 2 compared with group 1 (P = 0.018) and correlated with EDSS and disease duration (P = 0.011 and P = 0.032, respectively). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that the VEMP score has a statistically significant influence on the EDSS score (P VEMP score enables better evaluation of brainstem involvement than either of these evoked potentials alone and correlates well with disability. © 2014 EAN.

  13. Functional Ear (A)Symmetry in Brainstem Neural Activity Relevant to Encoding of Voice Pitch: A Precursor for Hemispheric Specialization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Ananthakrishnan, Saradha; Bidelman, Gavin M.; Smalt, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Pitch processing is lateralized to the right hemisphere; linguistic pitch is further mediated by left cortical areas. This experiment investigates whether ear asymmetries vary in brainstem representation of pitch depending on linguistic status. Brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) were elicited by monaural stimulation of the left and…

  14. [Brainstem auditory evoked potentials latencies, by age and sex, among Mexican adult population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Madrid, Guadalupe; Torres-Valenzuela, Arturo; Hinojos-Escobar, Wendoly; Cabello-López, Alejandro; Gopar-Nieto, Rodrigo; Ravelo-Cortés, Perla Estela; Haro-García, Luis Cuauhtémoc; Juárez-Pérez, Cuauhtémoc Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: los potenciales evocados auditivos del tallo cerebral (PEATC) evalúan la vía auditiva central y son una herramienta complementaria de la audiometría tonal para analizar enfermedades auditivas. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar el tiempo promedio de las latencias de las ondas y los intervalos de los potenciales evocados auditivos en adultos sanos. Métodos: estudio transversal que contó con 196 participantes, de 16 a 65 años de edad normo-oyentes, a quienes se investigaron antecedentes familiares y personales patológicos, se realizó exploración física y se obtuvieron estudios de laboratorio, audiometría tonal e impedanciometría normales, y potenciales evocados auditivos. Resultados: Se estudiaron 107 hombres y 89 mujeres. El promedio de las latencias de las ondas I, III y V e intervalos I-III, III-V y I-V de ambos oídos fueron similares. Los predictores que incrementaron el tiempo de latencia en los modelos de regresión lineal múltiple de las ondas e intervalos fueron el sexo masculino y la edad ≥ 45 años. Conclusiones: la edad y el sexo fueron las variables que mostraron mayor poder estadístico para explicar las diferencias de las latencias en este grupo de personas.

  15. HIV-1 infection, response to treatment and establishment of viral latency in a novel humanized T cell-only mouse (TOM) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Jenna B; Wahl, Angela; Archin, Nancie; Choudhary, Shailesh; Margolis, David; Garcia, J Victor

    2013-10-24

    The major targets of HIV infection in humans are CD4⁺ T cells. CD4⁺ T cell depletion is a hallmark of AIDS. Previously, the SCID-hu thy/liv model was used to study the effect of HIV on thymopoeisis in vivo. However, these mice did not develop high levels of peripheral T cell reconstitution and required invasive surgery for infection and analysis. Here, we describe a novel variant of this model in which thy/liv implantation results in systemic reconstitution with human T cells in the absence of any other human hematopoietic lineages. NOD/SCID-hu thy/liv and NSG-hu thy/liv mice were created by implanting human fetal thymus and liver tissues under the kidney capsule of either NOD/SCID or NSG mice. In contrast to NOD/SCID-hu thy/liv mice that show little or no human cells in peripheral blood or tissues, substantial systemic human reconstitution occurs in NSG-hu thy/liv. These mice are exclusively reconstituted with human T cells (i.e. T-cell only mice or TOM). Despite substantial levels of human T cells no signs of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were noted in these mice over a period of 14 months. TOM are readily infected after parenteral exposure to HIV-1. HIV replication is sustained in peripheral blood at high levels and results in modest reduction of CD4⁺ T cells. HIV-1 replication in TOM responds to daily administration of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) resulting in strong suppression of virus replication as determined by undetectable viral load in plasma. Latently HIV infected resting CD4⁺ T cells can be isolated from suppressed mice that can be induced to express HIV ex-vivo upon activation demonstrating the establishment of latency in vivo. NSG-hu thy/liv mice are systemically reconstituted with human T cells. No other human lymphoid lineages are present in these mice (i.e. monocytes/macrophages, B cells and DC are all absent). These T cell only mice do not develop GVHD, are susceptible to HIV-1 infection and can efficiently maintain virus

  16. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with lead exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia de Freitas Alvarenga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Earlier studies have demonstrated an auditory effect of lead exposure in children, but information on the effects of low chronic exposures needs to be further elucidated. Objective: To investigate the effect of low chronic exposures of the auditory system in children with a history of low blood lead levels, using an auditory electrophysiological test. Methods: Contemporary cross-sectional cohort. Study participants underwent tympanometry, pure tone and speech audiometry, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials, with blood lead monitoring over a period of 35.5 months. The study included 130 children, with ages ranging from 18 months to 14 years, 5 months (mean age 6 years, 8 months ± 3 years, 2 months. Results: The mean time-integrated cumulative blood lead index was 12 µg/dL (SD ± 5.7, range:2.433. All participants had hearing thresholds equal to or below 20 dBHL and normal amplitudes of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. No association was found between the absolute latencies of waves I, III, and V, the interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, and I-V, and the cumulative lead values. Conclusion: No evidence of toxic effects from chronic low lead exposures was observed on the auditory function of children living in a lead contaminated area.

  17. Auditory brainstem potentials in children with protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Dursun; Caksen, Hüseyin; Sar, Sakir; Tombul, Temel; Kisli, Mesude; Tuncer, Oğuz; Yuca, Köksal; Yilmaz, Cahide

    2005-07-01

    In this study, auditory brainstem potentials (ABPs) were studied in children with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) to determine the effects of PEM on the developing brain in children. A total of 31 children, aged 3-36 months with moderate/severe PEM and 25 healthy children, aged 3-48 months were included in the study. Nutritional status of the children was assessed by the Gomez classification. Recordings of ABPs were performed by using Nihon Kohden Neuropack 2 device. Of 31 children, 22 (71%) had severe malnutrition, 9 (29%) had moderate malnutrition. Additionally, 8 (26%) and 9 (29%) children had iron deficiency anemia and hypoalbuminemi, respectively. There were significant differences in the mean latencies of the waves I-V on the right and left ears and in the mean interpeak latencies (IPLs) of the waves III-V and I-V on the right ear between the study and control groups (Pmalnutrition and iron deficiency anemia. We think that more extensive studies should be performed to determine whether or not there was a relationship between these parameters.

  18. Brainstem injury in motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viano, David C; Parenteau, Chantal S

    2017-10-03

    This is a descriptive study of the frequency and risk for brainstem injury by crash type, belt use, and crash severity (delta-V). NASS-CDS electronic cases were reviewed to see whether the transition from vehicles without advanced airbags and seat belts and side airbags and curtains to vehicles with the safety technologies has influenced the risk for brainstem injury. 1994-2013 NASS-CDS was analyzed to determine the number of brainstem injuries in nonejected adults (15+ years old) in vehicle crashes. Crashes were grouped by front, side, rear, and rollover. The effect of belt use was investigated. Light vehicles were included with model year (MY) 1994+. Occupants with severe head injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] 4+) and Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (MAIS) 4+F injury were also determined. The risk for injury with standard errors was determined using the MAIS 0+F exposure by belt use and crash type. NASS-CDS electronic cases were studied with brainstem injury in 2001-2013 MY vehicles. NASS-CDS indicates there are 872 ± 133 cases of brainstem injury per year. About 16.0% of AIS 4+ head injury involves the brainstem. For belted occupants, the highest risk for brainstem injury was in side impacts at 0.065 ± 0.010%. In contrast, the highest risk for brainstem injury was 0.310 ± 0.291% in rear impacts and 0.310 ± 0.170% in rollovers for unbelted occupants. The risk for brainstem injury increased with crash severity. The highest risk for brainstem injury was 3.54 ± 1.45% in crashes with >72 km/h (>45 mph) delta-V. Exponential functions fit the change in risk with delta-V. Eighteen NASS-CDS electronic cases showed that brainstem injury occurred in very severe collisions where the occupant experienced multiple injuries from intrusion or impact on vehicle structures stiffened by deformation. The risk for brainstem injury in belted occupants has remained essentially constant over 20 years, whereas the risk for MAIS 4+F injury has declined 38.3%. The prevention

  19. Estudo das latências e amplitudes dos potenciais evocados auditivos de média latência em indivíduos audiologicamente normais Middle latency response study of auditory evoked potentials’ amplitudes and lantencies audiologically normal individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivone Ferreira Neves

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Estudo de coorte contemporânea com corte transversal. O Potencial Evocado Auditivo de Média Latência (PEAML é gerado entre 10 e 80ms e possui múltiplos geradores, com maior contribuição da região tálamo-cortical. O estabelecimento de critérios de normalidade para os valores de latência e amplitude é necessário para uso clínico. OBJETIVOS: Analisar a latência e amplitude do PEAML em indivíduos sem alterações audiológicas, e verificar a confiabilidade da amplitude Pa-Nb. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram coletados os PEAML de 25 indivíduos durante o ano de 2005 e analisados os componentes Na, Pa, Nb para cada orelha testada (A1 e A2, e posicionamento de eletrodo (C3 e C4. RESULTADOS: Observou-se diferença estatisticamente significante entre os valores médios de latência para C3A1 e C4A1 com relação aos componentes Na e Pa, não sendo encontrada esta diferença para o componente Nb e valores médios das amplitudes Na-Pa e Pa-Nb. CONCLUSÃO: Foram estabelecidos os valores das médias e desvios padrão para os parâmetros latência e amplitude dos componentes Na, Pa, Nb, e Na-Pa e Pa-Nb, nas condições C3A1, C4A1, C3A2, C4A2, proporcionando os parâmetros para a análise e interpretação deste potencial.Contemporary cohort cross-sectional study. Introduction: The auditory middle latency response (AMLR is generated between 10 and 80 ms and has multiple generators, with a greater contribution from the thalamus-cortical pathways. The establishment of normality criteria for latency and amplitude values is necessary for clinical use. AIM: to analyze the latency and amplitude of the AMLR in individuals without audiological disorders, and verify the reliability of Pa-Nb amplitude. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The AMLR of 25 individuals was collected during 2005 and the Na, Pa, Nb components were analyzed for each tested ear (A1 and A2, and electrode positioning (C3 and C4. RESULTS: A statistically significant difference was noticed among middle

  20. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, Bela, E-mail: purohitbela@yahoo.co.in; Kamli, Ali A.; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •BSG are classified on MRI into diffuse low-grade, malignant, focal tectal and exophytic subtypes. •Their prognosis and treatment is variable and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. •This article illustrates the imaging of adult BSGs on MRI and FET-PET. •We also describe prognostic factors and the treatment options of these tumours. -- Abstract: Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as {sup 18}F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours.

  1. Audiometria de tronco encefálico (abr: o uso do mascaramento na avaliação de indivíduos portadores de perda auditiva unilateral Auditory brainstem response (abr: use of masking in unilateral hearing loss patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. T. Toma

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A necessidade do mascaramento na avaliação da audição por meio da ABR ainda é um assunto consideravelmente debatido (Durrant & Ferraro, 2001. OBJETIVO: O presente estudo propôs investigar a necessidade do mascaramento contralateral, empregado na orelha normal, ao realizar a ABR em indivíduos portadores de perda auditiva neurossensorial unilateral. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico prospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: A amostra constituiu-se de 22 indivíduos portadores de perda auditiva neurossensorial unilateral de grau profundo, sendo 10 do sexo feminino e 12 do sexo masculino, com idades variando entre 9 e 44 anos. Todos os indivíduos foram submetidos a: audiometria tonal liminar, logoaudiometria (SRT, IPRF e SDT, medidas de imitância acústica (incluindo a pesquisa dos reflexos acústicos - modo ipsilateral e contralateral e audiometria de tronco encefálico na ausência e na presença do mascaramento. RESULTADOS: Todos os indivíduos apresentaram perda auditiva neurossensorial unilateral de grau profundo e curvas timpanométricas do tipo A bilateralmente. Na avaliação da ABR, 100% da amostra apresentou presença da Onda V na orelha comprometida, sendo que ao introduzir o mascaramento contralateral tais respostas não foram observadas. CONCLUSÕES: O mascaramento é um procedimento necessário para a avaliação da audição por meio da ABR em indivíduos portadores de perdas auditivas unilaterais, visando a obtenção de resultados fidedignos. Na ABR, a atenuação interaural para clicks foi maior (65 dB do que a observada na audiometria tonal liminar, sendo necessário, portanto, uma menor intensidade de mascaramento para eliminar a resposta da via auditiva contralateral.The need of masking in auditory brainstem response (ABR evaluation is still considerably debated issue (Durrant and Ferraro, 2001. AIM: In addition, the present study was to investigate the need of masking in ABR with unilateral hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical

  2. Influence of general anaesthesia on the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, L; Fernández-Candil, J; León, A; Gambús, P L

    2017-03-01

    The exact role of the brainstem in the control of body functions is not yet well known and the same applies to the influence of general anaesthesia on brainstem functions. Nevertheless in all general anaesthesia the anaesthesiologist should be aware of the interaction of anaesthetic drugs and brainstem function in relation to whole body homeostasis. As a result of this interaction there will be changes in consciousness, protective reflexes, breathing pattern, heart rate, temperature or arterial blood pressure to name a few. Brainstem function can be explored using three different approaches: clinically, analyzing changes in brain electric activity or using neuroimaging techniques. With the aim of providing the clinician anaesthesiologist with a global view of the interaction between the anaesthetic state and homeostatic changes related to brainstem function, the present review article addresses the influence of anaesthetic drug effects on brainstem function through clinical exploration of cranial nerves and reflexes, analysis of electric signals such as electroencephalographic changes and what it is known about brainstem through the use of imaging techniques, more specifically functional magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of neonatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway by recording auditory brainstem responses in newborn piglets: a new experimentation model to study the perinatal hypoxic-ischemic damage on the auditory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Jose Alvarez

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia (HI is a major perinatal problem that results in severe damage to the brain impairing the normal development of the auditory system. The purpose of the present study is to study the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the auditory pathway by recording auditory brain responses in a novel animal experimentation model in newborn piglets.Hypoxia-ischemia was induced to 1.3 day-old piglets by clamping 30 minutes both carotid arteries by vascular occluders and lowering the fraction of inspired oxygen. We compared the Auditory Brain Responses (ABRs of newborn piglets exposed to acute hypoxia/ischemia (n = 6 and a control group with no such exposure (n = 10. ABRs were recorded for both ears before the start of the experiment (baseline, after 30 minutes of HI injury, and every 30 minutes during 6 h after the HI injury.Auditory brain responses were altered during the hypoxic-ischemic insult but recovered 30-60 minutes later. Hypoxia/ischemia seemed to induce auditory functional damage by increasing I-V latencies and decreasing wave I, III and V amplitudes, although differences were not significant.The described experimental model of hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets may be useful for studying the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway.

  4. Brainstem auditory-evoked potential in Boxer dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Isa Poci Palumbo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem auditory-evoked potential (BAEP has been widely used for different purposes in veterinary practice and is commonly used to identify inherited deafness and presbycusis. In this study, 43 Boxer dogs were evaluated using the BAEP. Deafness was diagnosed in 3 dogs (2 bilateral and 1 unilateral allowing the remaining 40 Boxers to be included for normative data analysis including an evaluation on the influence of age on the BAEP. The animals were divided into 2 groups of 20 Boxers each based on age. The mean age was 4.54 years (range, 1-8 in group I, and 9.83 years (range, 8.5-12 in group II. The mean latency for I, III, and V waves were 1.14 (±0.07, 2.64 (±0.11, and 3.48 (±0.10 ms in group I, and 1.20 (±0.12, 2.73 (±0.15, and 3.58 (±0.22 ms in group II, respectively. The mean inter-peak latencies for the I-III, III-V and I-V intervals were 1.50 (±0.15, 0.84 (±0.15, and 2.34 (±0.11 ms in group I, and 1.53 (±0.16, 0.85 (±0.15, and 2.38 (±0.19 ms in group II, respectively. Latencies of waves I and III were significant different between group I and II. For the I-III, III-V and I-V intervals, no significant differences were observed between the 2 groups. As far as we know, this is the first normative study of BAEP obtained from Boxer dogs.

  5. Bayesian segmentation of brainstem structures in MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Bhatt, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to segment four brainstem structures (midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata and superior cerebellar peduncle) from 3D brain MRI scans. The segmentation method relies on a probabilistic atlas of the brainstem and its neighboring brain structures. To build the atlas, we...... the brainstem structures in novel scans. Thanks to the generative nature of the scheme, the segmentation method is robust to changes in MRI contrast or acquisition hardware. Using cross validation, we show that the algorithm can segment the structures in previously unseen T1 and FLAIR scans with great accuracy...

  6. Current clinical management of brainstem cavernomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinov, Oliver; Hatano, Taketo; Sarnthein, Johannes; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2010-11-26

    Over the last two decades a favourable course for treated or nontreated brainstem cavernomas has become possible with enhanced diagnostic tools and clinical experience, as well as minimally invasive microsurgical improvements. Currently, brainstem cavernoma can be treated microsurgically with excellent results and an acceptable morbidity rate. The preferred surgical route has progressively shifted from a dorsal to a lateral approach, but this remains dependent on the location of the lesion in the brainstem. Surgical evaluation and management of all cases of this rare disease should be performed by experienced teams from the outset.

  7. Data latency and the user community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, V. M.; Brown, M. E.; Carroll, M.

    2013-12-01

    The community using NASA Earth science observations in applications has grown significantly, with increasing sophistication to serve national interests. The National Research Council's Earth Science Decadal Survey report stated that the planning for applied and operational considerations in the missions should accompany the acquisition of new knowledge about Earth (NRC, 2007). This directive has made product applications at NASA an integral part of converting the data collected into actionable knowledge that can be used to inform policy. However, successfully bridging scientific research with operational decision making in different application areas requires looking into user data requirements and operational needs. This study was conducted to determine how users are incorporating NASA data into applications and operational processes. The approach included a review of published materials, direct interviews with mission representatives, and an online professional review, which was distributed to over 6000 individuals. We provide a complete description of the findings with definitions and explanations of what goes into measuring latency as well as how users and applications utilize NASA data products. We identified 3 classes of users: operational (need data in 3 hours or less), near real time (need data within a day of acquisition), and scientific users (need highest quality data, time independent). We also determined that most users with applications are interested in specific types of products that may come from multiple missions. These users will take the observations when they are available, however the observations may have additional applications value if they are available either by a certain time of day or within a period of time after acquisition. NASA has supported the need for access to low latency data on an ad-hoc basis and more substantively in stand-alone systems such as the MODIS Rapid Response system and more recently with LANCE. The increased level

  8. Air pollution is associated with brainstem auditory nuclei pathology and delayed brainstem auditory evoked potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; D’Angiulli, Amedeo; Kulesza, Randy J.; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Osnaya, Norma; Romero, Lina; Keefe, Sheyla; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane M.; Avila-Ramirez, Jose; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; González-González, Luis Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We assessed brainstem inflammation in children exposed to air pollutants by comparing brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) and blood inflammatory markers in children age 96.3± 8.5 months from highly polluted (n=34) versus a low polluted city (n=17). The brainstems of nine children with accidental deaths were also examined. Children from the highly polluted environment had significant delays in wave III (t(50)=17.038; p

  9. Brainstem involvement in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The parieto-occipital region of the brain is most frequently and severely affected in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE. The basal ganglia, cerebellum and corpus callosum are less commonly involved. Brainstem involvement is rarely described in SSPE, and usually there is involvement of other regions of the brain. We describe a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with brain magnetic resonance imaging showing extensive brainstem involvement without significant involvement of other cortical structures. Though rarely described in SSPE, one should be aware of such brainstem and cerebellum involvement, and SSPE should be kept in mind when brainstem signal changes are seen in brain MRI with or without involvement of other regions of brain to avoid erroneous reporting.

  10. A preliminary study on the correlation of electrically evoked auditory brainstem response and electrically evoked compound action potential with the inserting depth of cochlear electrode%EABR与人工耳蜗电极植入深度关系的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静; 谢景华; 丁秀勇; 李悦; 高志强

    2015-01-01

    目的 初步探讨人工耳蜗电极植入深度和术后电诱发听性脑干反应(EABR,Electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses)及电诱发听神经复合动作电位(electrically evoked compound actionpotentials,ECAP)的相关性. 方法 选取耳蜗形态正常植入奥地利标准电极患者24例,术后头颅侧位片检查判断电极全植入. 根据电极耳蜗内位置分为E9-E12耳蜗底区、E5-E8耳蜗中区、E1-E4耳蜗顶区三部分,分别记录各区域EABR阈值及波形特点和对应区域的ECAP阈值,分析其间相关性. 结果蜗顶部、蜗中部、蜗底部EABR引出率分别为87.50%,83.33%,79.16%;ECAP引出率分别为91.67%,79.17%,75%;EABR波V阈值为分别为(20.13±5.91)qu,(22.98±4.82)qu,(26.71±6.25)qu;ECAP阈值分别为 (21.61±4.18)qu,(23.28±3.70)qu,(29.18±3.74)qu.结论 蜗顶部和蜗中部EABR及ECAP引出率高于蜗底部,自蜗顶区至蜗底区EABR和EACP阈值依次增高,相同植入深度电极的EABR阈值低于ECAP阈值.%Objective To explore the correlation of electrically evoked auditory brain stem response (EABR) and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) with the inserting depth of cochlear electrode. Methods EABR and ECAP recordings were carried out among 24 subjects with MED-EL standard cochlear electrode array implanted. With the electrode insertion depth assayed by lateral cranial X-ray photography, these evoked potential recordings were then analyzed, based on the definition of electrode placed locations in the regions of apical (E1-E4), middle (E5-E8) and basal (E9-E12) to determine if the threshold and latency differ depending on the region stimulated. Results At the locations of apical, middle and basal region, the positive recording rate was 87.50%, 83.33% and 79.16% for EABR, and that was 91.67%, 79.17%, 75% fro ECAP, with the thresholds of EABR at eV were (20.13±5.91)qu, (22.98±4.82)qu and (26.71±6.25)qu and those of ECAP were (21.61±4.18)qu, (23.28±3.70)qu, (29.18±3

  11. Impairments in musical abilities reflected in the auditory brainstem: evidence from congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Skoe, Erika; Moreau, Patricia; Peretz, Isabelle; Kraus, Nina

    2015-07-01

    Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic condition, characterized by a deficit in music perception and production, not explained by hearing loss, brain damage or lack of exposure to music. Despite inferior musical performance, amusics exhibit normal auditory cortical responses, with abnormal neural correlates suggested to lie beyond auditory cortices. Here we show, using auditory brainstem responses to complex sounds in humans, that fine-grained automatic processing of sounds is impoverished in amusia. Compared with matched non-musician controls, spectral amplitude was decreased in amusics for higher harmonic components of the auditory brainstem response. We also found a delayed response to the early transient aspects of the auditory stimulus in amusics. Neural measures of spectral amplitude and response timing correlated with participants' behavioral assessments of music processing. We demonstrate, for the first time, that amusia affects how complex acoustic signals are processed in the auditory brainstem. This neural signature of amusia mirrors what is observed in musicians, such that the aspects of the auditory brainstem responses that are enhanced in musicians are degraded in amusics. By showing that gradients of music abilities are reflected in the auditory brainstem, our findings have implications not only for current models of amusia but also for auditory functioning in general.

  12. Foreknowledge of an impending startling stimulus does not affect the proportion of startle reflexes or latency of StartReact responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Neil M; Leguerrier, Alexandra; Carlsen, Anthony N

    2017-02-01

    During a simple reaction time (RT) task, movements can be initiated early and involuntarily through presentation of a loud startling acoustic stimulus (SAS), a phenomenon termed the StartReact effect. In order to infer that activity in startle-related structures led to the early response triggering, it is important to observe a concurrent startle reflex in sternocleidomastoid. It is generally accepted that to consistently elicit a startle reflex, the SAS must be both intense and unpredictable. However, it remains unclear what effect explicit foreknowledge of an impending SAS has on the effectiveness of a SAS to elicit a startle reflex when preparing a motor response. To test this, participants completed two separate blocks of a simple RT task (counterbalanced order), where the control auditory go-signal was replaced with a SAS on 20 % of trials. In an unwarned block, knowledge of the trial type (SAS vs. control) was not provided in advance, while in a warned block, the trial type was forewarned. Results revealed that while foreknowledge of an impending SAS reduced the magnitude of the startle reflex, it did not affect the proportion of startle reflexes elicited or the magnitude of the StartReact effect. An increase in control trial RT was observed during the unwarned block, but only when it was performed first. These results indicate that preparation of a motor response leads to sufficiently increased activation in startle-related neural structures such that even with explicit knowledge of an upcoming SAS, participants are unable to proactively gate the upcoming sensory input.

  13. Auditory responses to electric and infrared neural stimulation of the rat cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rohit U; Guex, Amélie A; Hancock, Kenneth E; Durakovic, Nedim; McKay, Colette M; Slama, Michaël C C; Brown, M Christian; Lee, Daniel J

    2014-04-01

    In an effort to improve the auditory brainstem implant, a prosthesis in which user outcomes are modest, we applied electric and infrared neural stimulation (INS) to the cochlear nucleus in a rat animal model. Electric stimulation evoked regions of neural activation in the inferior colliculus and short-latency, multipeaked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Pulsed INS, delivered to the surface of the cochlear nucleus via an optical fiber, evoked broad neural activation in the inferior colliculus. Strongest responses were recorded when the fiber was placed at lateral positions on the cochlear nucleus, close to the temporal bone. INS-evoked ABRs were multipeaked but longer in latency than those for electric stimulation; they resembled the responses to acoustic stimulation. After deafening, responses to electric stimulation persisted, whereas those to INS disappeared, consistent with a reported "optophonic" effect, a laser-induced acoustic artifact. Thus, for deaf individuals who use the auditory brainstem implant, INS alone did not appear promising as a new approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials induced by air-conducted sound in patients with acute brainstem lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Jong-Min; Shin, Byoung-Soo; Hwang, Seung-Bae; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Kim, Chanmi; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2013-04-01

    The ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), a recently documented otolith-ocular reflex, is considered to reflect the central projections of the primary otolithic afferent fibers to the oculomotor nuclei. The aim of our study is to define air-conducted sound oVEMP abnormality in patients with acute brainstem lesions and to determine the brainstem structures involved in the generation of oVEMPs. In response to air-conducted tone burst sounds (ACS), oVEMP was measured in 52 patients with acute brainstem lesions. Individualized brainstem lesions were analyzed by means of MRI-based voxel-wise lesion-behavior mapping, and the probabilistic lesion maps were constructed. More than half (n=28, 53.8%) of the patients with acute brainstem lesions showed abnormal oVEMP in response to ACS. The majority of patients with abnormal oVEMPs had lesions in the dorsomedial brainstem that contains the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF), the crossed ventral tegmental tract (CVTT), and the oculomotor nuclei and nerves. MLF, CVTT, and the oculomotor nuclei and nerves appear to be responsible for otolith-ocular responses in the brainstem. Complemented to cervical VEMP for the uncrossed otolith-spinal function, oVEMP to ACS may be applied to evaluate the crossed otolith-ocular function in central vestibulopathies. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Brainstem response and state-trait variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Kirby

    1988-01-01

    A series of investigations are summarized from a personality research program that have relevance for mental state estimation. Of particular concern are those personality variables that are believed to have either a biological or perceptual basis and their relationship to human task performance and psychophysiology. These variables are among the most robust personality measures and include such dimensions as extraversion-introversion, sensation seeking, and impulsiveness. These dimensions also have the most distinct link to performance and psychophysiology. Through the course of many of these investigations two issues have emerged repeatedly: these personality dimensions appear to mediate mental state, and mental state appears to influence measures of performance or psychophysiology.

  16. Reproducibility of multifocal VEP latency using different stimulus presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Prema; Klistorner, Alexander; Arvind, Hemamalini; Graham, Stuart L

    2012-08-01

    The aims of the article were to study the reproducibility of latency of multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) recorded using different stimulus presentations and to identify the peak with least variability. Ten normal subjects, aged between 22 and 52 years (mean age 32 ± 8.37 years), participated in the study. All subjects underwent mfVEP testing with pattern reversal and pattern pulse stimulus presentations. The stimulus subtends 26° from fixation and includes 24 segments. Only the vertical channel was recorded on all subjects. Testing was repeated after 1-2 weeks. Only the right eye of all subjects was analysed. Segments with low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR < 1.5) were excluded from analysis. The latencies were analysed to confirm values from the same peak for the two tests. The latency values were then analysed for the start of the response, the first peak and the second peak. The waveforms were reproducible throughout the field. Reproducibility of latency at the "start of the response" was significantly lesser than the first and the second peaks studied, while the reproducibility of latency at the first peak was not statistically different from the second peak for either pattern reversal or pattern pulse stimulation. The latency values were not different between the first and the second sessions for either pattern reversal or pattern pulse stimulation for any of the peaks. The pattern reversal stimulus presentation produced less variability in latency. The first peak is the most reproducible among the three measures in both the stimulus presentation.

  17. IMAGING WHITE MATTER IN HUMAN BRAINSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A Ford

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The human brainstem is critical for the control of many life-sustaining functions, such as consciousness, respiration, sleep, and transfer of sensory and motor information between the brain and the spinal cord. Most of our knowledge about structure and organization of white and gray matter within the brainstem is derived from ex vivo dissection and histology studies. However, these methods cannot be applied to study structural architecture in live human participants. Tractography from diffusion-weighted MRI may provide valuable insights about white matter organization within the brainstem in vivo. However, this method presents technical challenges in vivo due to susceptibility artifacts, functionally dense anatomy, as well as pulsatile and respiratory motion. To investigate the limits of MR tractography, we present results from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI of an intact excised human brainstem performed at 11.1T using isotropic resolution of 0.333, 1, and 2 mm, with the latter reflecting resolution currently used clinically. At the highest resolution, the dense fiber architecture of the brainstem is evident, but the definition of structures degrades as resolution decreases. In particular, the inferred corticopontine/corticospinal tracts (CPT/CST, superior (SCP and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP, and medial lemniscus (ML pathways are clearly discernable and follow known anatomical trajectories at the highest spatial resolution. At lower resolutions, the CST/CPT, SCP, and MCP pathways are artificially enlarged due to inclusion of collinear and crossing fibers not inherent to these three pathways. The inferred ML pathways appear smaller at lower resolutions, indicating insufficient spatial information to successfully resolve smaller fiber pathways. Our results suggest that white matter tractography maps derived from the excised brainstem can be used to guide the study of the brainstem architecture using diffusion MRI in vivo.

  18. Effect of click-polarity on abnormality of intraoperatively monitored brainstem acoustic evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrusch, T; Schramm, J; Hochstetter, A

    1988-01-01

    The configuration of brainstem acoustic evoked potentials (BAEP) is influenced by the type of click stimuli used and may thus affect detectability of abnormalities. In a group of 19 patients with lesions in the posterior fossa BAEP were recorded pre- and intraoperatively. Repeat recordings were performed in each patient in two alternating series with rarefaction and condensation click stimuli. The findings demonstrated that intraoperative potential changes in latency and amplitude were different between the two stimulation modes, but did not vary significantly in their incidence. It was also not possible to predict from the preoperative BAEP which click polarity would demonstrate intraoperative changes more markedly, taking latency and amplitude as parameters. Two conclusions are drawn from this study: None of the two stimulation modes is superior in detecting intraoperative changes and therefore no recommendation can be made which click polarity to use. When working with only one click polarity it is recommended to use occasional control recordings with the other click polarity.

  19. Context-Dependent Encoding in the Human Auditory Brainstem Relates to Hearing Speech in Noise: Implications for Developmental Dyslexia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Hornickel, Jane; Skoe, Erika; Nicol, Trent; Kraus, Nina

    2009-01-01

    We examined context-dependent encoding of speech in children with and without developmental dyslexia by measuring auditory brainstem responses to a speech syllable presented in a repetitive or variable context...

  20. Gamma Knife Treatment of Brainstem Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Halloran E.; Larson, Erik W.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; MacKay, Alexander R.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Call, Jason A.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Ling, Benjamin C.; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S.; Peressini, Ben; Lee, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The management of brainstem metastases is challenging. Surgical treatment is usually not an option, and chemotherapy is of limited utility. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a promising palliative treatment modality in these cases. The goal of this study is to assess our single institution experience treating brainstem metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). This retrospective chart review studied 41 patients with brainstem metastases treated with GKRS. The most common primary tumors were lung, breast, renal cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Median age at initial treatment was 59 years. Nineteen (46%) of the patients received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) prior to or concurrent with GKRS treatment. Thirty (73%) of the patients had a single brainstem metastasis. The average GKRS dose was 17 Gy. Post-GKRS overall survival at six months was 42%, at 12 months was 22%, and at 24 months was 13%. Local tumor control was achieved in 91% of patients, and there was one patient who had a fatal brain hemorrhage after treatment. Karnofsky performance score (KPS) >80 and the absence of prior WBRT were predictors for improved survival on multivariate analysis (HR 0.60 (p = 0.02), and HR 0.28 (p = 0.02), respectively). GKRS was an effective treatment for brainstem metastases, with excellent local tumor control. PMID:24886816

  1. Gamma Knife Treatment of Brainstem Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halloran E. Peterson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of brainstem metastases is challenging. Surgical treatment is usually not an option, and chemotherapy is of limited utility. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a promising palliative treatment modality in these cases. The goal of this study is to assess our single institution experience treating brainstem metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS. This retrospective chart review studied 41 patients with brainstem metastases treated with GKRS. The most common primary tumors were lung, breast, renal cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Median age at initial treatment was 59 years. Nineteen (46% of the patients received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT prior to or concurrent with GKRS treatment. Thirty (73% of the patients had a single brainstem metastasis. The average GKRS dose was 17 Gy. Post-GKRS overall survival at six months was 42%, at 12 months was 22%, and at 24 months was 13%. Local tumor control was achieved in 91% of patients, and there was one patient who had a fatal brain hemorrhage after treatment. Karnofsky performance score (KPS >80 and the absence of prior WBRT were predictors for improved survival on multivariate analysis (HR 0.60 (p = 0.02, and HR 0.28 (p = 0.02, respectively. GKRS was an effective treatment for brainstem metastases, with excellent local tumor control.

  2. Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Média Latência: estudo em crianças saudáveis Auditory Middle Latency Responses: a study of healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Figueiredo Frizzo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar os componentes dos PEAMLs em crianças saudáveis para determinar suas propriedades. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: 32 crianças, de ambos os sexos, 10 a 13 anos de idade, sem doenças neurológicas, participaram do estudo. Os dados foram analisados pela estatística descritiva (média e desvio padrão e por análise de variância (teste F. PEAMLs foram pesquisadas usando estímulo tom burst nas intensidades de 50, 60 e 70 dB NA. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: A média de latência dos componentes foi Na = 20.79ms, Pa = 35.34ms, Nb = 43.27ms e Pb = 53.36ms, a 70dB NA. A média dos valores de amplitude NaPa variou de 0.2 a 1.9 uV (M = 1.0 uV. A amplitude aumentou e a latência diminuiu com o aumento da intensidade sonora. A inclinação do complexo de ondas NaPa esteve presente em alguns casos, o que merece atenção em estudos semelhantes ou em mesmo em populações de crianças com dificuldade de fala e linguagem e do processamento auditivo. CONCLUSÃO: O presente trabalho trouxe informações adicionais sobre as AMLRs e pode servir como referência para outros estudos clínicos ou experimentais em crianças.AIM: To examine the components of auditory middle latency responses (AMLRs in a sample of healthy children to establish their properties. METHODS: Thirty-two children of both genders aged between 10 to 13 years, with no neurological disorders, were included in the study. Data were analyzed statistically by descriptive statistics (mean + SD and by analysis of variance using the F test. AMLRs were investigated with toneburst stimuli at 50, 60 and 70 dB HL. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The mean latencies of the components were Na = 20.79 ms, Pa = 35.34 ms, Nb = 43.27 ms, and Pb = 53.36 ms, in 70 dB HL. The mean values for the NaPa amplitude ranged from 0.2 to 1.9 mV (M = 1.0 mV. The amplitude increased and latency decreased with increasing sound intensity. Inclination of the NaPa wave complex was present in some cases, which deserves

  3. The driving system for hippocampal theta in the brainstem: an examination by single neuron recording in urethane-anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yuji; Hanada, Yasuhiro

    2009-05-08

    The brainstem has been shown to be involved in generating hippocampal theta; however, which brainstem region plays the most important role in generating the rhythm has remained unclear. To reveal which brainstem region triggers the theta, the hippocampal local field potential was recorded simultaneously with single unit activity in the brainstem of urethane-anesthetized rat. The firing latencies before theta onset and offset were compared among recording sites (deep mesencephalic nucleus, DpMe; pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, PPT; nucleus pontis oralis, PnO). We examined the activities of 59 cells; PPT showed the highest proportion of neurons changing their firing rates at theta onset (14/16, 87.5%). The proportion in the PnO was 14/22 (63.6%), but the neurons in the PnO showed the earliest changes in latencies (0.57s before theta onset). The change in the PPT was 0.96s after theta onset. Regarding the theta offset, the PPT showed the highest proportion of neurons changing their firing rates at theta offset (9/16, 56.3%; the proportion in the PnO was 5/22, 22.7%), but the difference in latent time was not significant among recorded regions. The neurons in the DpMe did not show any remarkable firing tendency at theta onset and offset. From these results, we propose a driving system of hippocampal theta, in which neurons in the PnO first trigger the theta onset and then those in the PPT maintain the theta by activating broadly the brainstem areas for the wave.

  4. Brainstem auditory-evoked potentials in two meditative mental states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Practicing mental repetition of "OM" has been shown to cause significant changes in the middle latency auditory-evoked potentials, which suggests that it facilitates the neural activity at the mesencephalic or diencephalic levels. Aims: The aim of the study was to study the brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP in two meditation states based on consciousness, viz. dharana, and dhyana. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects were selected, with ages ranging from 20 to 55 years (M=29.1; ±SD=6.5 years who had a minimum of 6 months experience in meditating "OM". Each subject was assessed in four sessions, i.e. two meditation and two control sessions. The two control sessions were: (i ekagrata, i.e. single-topic lecture on meditation and (ii cancalata, i.e. non-targeted thinking. The two meditation sessions were: (i dharana, i.e. focusing on the symbol "OM" and (ii dhyana, i.e. effortless single-thought state "OM". All four sessions were recorded on four different days and consisted of three states, i.e. pre, during and post. Results: The present results showed that the wave V peak latency significantly increased in cancalata, ekagrata and dharana, but no change occurred during the dhyana session. Conclusions: These results suggested that information transmission along the auditory pathway is delayed during cancalata, ekagrata and dharana, but there is no change during dhyana. It may be said that auditory information transmission was delayed at the inferior collicular level as the wave V corresponds to the tectum.

  5. Is enhanced MRI helpful in brainstem infarction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Y. M.; Shin, G. H.; Choi, W. S. [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To determine the role of MR contrast enhancement in evaluating time course of brainstem infarction. MR imaging with IV administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine was retrospectively reviewed in 43 patients with clinically and radiologically documented brainstem infarctions. The pattern of infarction was classified into spotty and patchy. Presence of parenchymal enhancement in infarction was evaluated. By location, there were 34 pontine, 3 midbrain, 6 medullary infarctions. The age of the infarctions ranged from 1 day to 9 months, with 5 patients scanned within 3 days and 10 scanned within 2 weeks of clinical ictus. Abnormalities on T2-weighted images were encountered in every case, with spotty pattern in 14 cases and patchy pattern in 29 cases. Parenchymal contrast enhancement was seen in 9 cases(20%), primarily occurring between days 8 and 20. MR contrast enhancement in brainstem infarction was infrequent that it may not be useful in the estimation of the age of infarction.

  6. Response Latency Measures for Biographical Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    University of New Mexico San Diego, CA 9r-.6800 Dr. Grant Henning AlbuqAuerque, N.M 87131 Senior Research Scietis Dr. Alfred R. Frecv Divsion of...Education P.O. BOX 168 Suite 440 Universty of Califoirnia Iowa City. IA 52243 St. Pal, MN 55114 Berkeley, CA 94720 Dr. Martha Stocking Dr. Frank L Vino , Dr

  7. Mechanisms of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency and Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengchun Ye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV consists of latent and lytic replication phases. During latent infection, only a limited number of KSHV genes are expressed. However, this phase of replication is essential for persistent infection, evasion of host immune response, and induction of KSHV-related malignancies. KSHV reactivation from latency produces a wide range of viral products and infectious virions. The resulting de novo infection and viral lytic products modulate diverse cellular pathways and stromal microenvironment, which promote the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. The mechanisms controlling KSHV latency and reactivation are complex, involving both viral and host factors, and are modulated by diverse environmental factors. Here, we review the cellular and molecular basis of KSHV latency and reactivation with a focus on the most recent advancements in the field.

  8. [Long-latency auditory evoked potentials in cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, J J; Jiménez, J M; Pérez, J; Postigo, A; Roldán, B

    1999-01-01

    Cortical evoked potentials were evaluated in patients with cochlear implants. In a group of 8 adults of different ages, the lingual state before implantation and during rehabilitation were evaluated. Using cortical evoked potentials, the results of the P300 wave in response to two tones, one frequent (1,000 Hz) and the other infrequent (2,000 Hz), presented at 70 and 80 dB HL were studied. Results were analyzed and compared in relation to locutive state, rehabilitation stage, and intensity of stimulus. Absolute latencies did not differ significantly. However, latency values in relation to reaction time were significantly longer in prelingual than in postlingual patients (p test). The results confirmed the normality of central cognitive processes in patients with cochlear implants in objective assessment of P300 latency. The results suggest differences between prelingual and postlingual patients in relation to central signal processing.

  9. Physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception: An fMRI study at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Laura H; Sprenger, Christian; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The brainstem is a major site of processing and modulation of nociceptive input and plays a key role in the pathophysiology of various headache disorders. However, human imaging studies on brainstem function following trigeminal nociceptive stimulation are scarce as brainstem specific imaging approaches have to address multiple challenges such as magnetic field inhomogeneities and an enhanced level of physiological noise. In this study we used a viable protocol for brainstem fMRI of standardized trigeminal nociceptive stimulation to achieve detailed insight into physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception. We conducted a study of 21 healthy participants using a nociceptive ammonia stimulation of the left nasal mucosa with an optimized MR acquisition protocol for high resolution brainstem echoplanar imaging in combination with two different noise correction techniques. Significant BOLD responses to noxious ammonia stimulation were observed in areas typically involved in trigeminal nociceptive processing such as the spinal trigeminal nuclei (sTN), thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, insular cortex and cerebellum as well as in a pain modulating network including the periaqueductal gray area, hypothalamus (HT), locus coeruleus and cuneiform nucleus (CNF). Activations of the left CNF were positively correlated with pain intensity ratings. Employing psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis we found enhanced functional connectivity of the sTN with the contralateral sTN and HT following trigeminal nociception. We also observed enhanced functional connectivity of the CNF with the RVM during painful stimulation thus implying an important role of these two brainstem regions in central pain processing. The chosen approach to study trigeminal nociception with high-resolution fMRI offers new insight into human pain processing and might thus lead to a better understanding of headache pathophysiology.

  10. Improved outcomes in auditory brainstem implantation with the use of near-field electrical compound action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalà, Marco; Colletti, Liliana; Colletti, Giacomo; Colletti, Vittorio

    2014-12-01

    To compare the outcomes (auditory threshold and open-set speech perception at 48-month follow-up) of a new near-field monitoring procedure, electrical compound action potential, on positioning the auditory brainstem implant electrode array on the surface of the cochlear nuclei versus the traditional far-field electrical auditory brainstem response. Retrospective study. Tertiary referral center. Among the 202 patients with auditory brainstem implants fitted and monitored with electrical auditory brainstem response during implant fitting, 9 also underwent electrical compound action potential recording. These subjects were matched retrospectively with a control group of 9 patients in whom only the electrical auditory brainstem response was recorded. Electrical compound action potentials were obtained using a cotton-wick recording electrode located near the surface of the cochlear nuclei and on several cranial nerves. Significantly lower potential thresholds were observed with the recording electrode located on the cochlear nuclei surface compared with the electrical auditory brainstem response (104.4 ± 32.5 vs 158.9 ± 24.2, P = .0030). Electrical brainstem response and compound action potentials identified effects on the neighboring cranial nerves on 3.2 ± 2.4 and 7.8 ± 3.2 electrodes, respectively (P = .0034). Open-set speech perception outcomes at 48-month follow-up had improved significantly in the near- versus far-field recording groups (78.9% versus 56.7%; P = .0051). Electrical compound action potentials during auditory brainstem implantation significantly improved the definition of the potential threshold and the number of auditory and extra-auditory waves generated. It led to the best coupling between the electrode array and cochlear nuclei, significantly improving the overall open-set speech perception. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  11. Click evoked auditory brainstem response in congenital heart diseases in children%先天性心脏病患儿短声诱发听性脑干反应的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周苏萍; 纪宏志; 李宏向; 张纪芸; 段晓辉; 张广福; 杨文东

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of congenital heart disease (CHD) on the development of brainstem in children .Method: The auditory brainstem response(ABR) was studied and compared with normal control. Results: In the study group aged under 12 months, latent period(LP) of wave I in cyanotic congenital heart disease(CCHD) was normal, and interpeak latency(IPL) from waves I to V was prolonged, while they were all prolonged in non- cyanotic congenital heart disease (NCCHD ). In the group aged 4 to 6 years, LP of wave I and IPL of waves Ⅰ~ V in NCCHD patients and CCHD patients without repeated hypoxia were normal while IPL of waves Ⅰ~ V in CCHD patients with repeated hypoxia was evidently prolonged. The abnormality rate was 2.3 %. Conclusion: C-HD do not delay the development of brainstem, but ischemia attacks may harm brainstem function, so early intervention is needed for ischemia attack patients.%探讨先天性心脏病(先心病)对患儿脑干发育的影响。方法:探讨先心病患儿听性脑干反应 (ABR),并以正常儿为对照组。结果:年龄<12月,青紫型先心病(CCHD)患儿Ⅰ波潜伏期(LP)正常,Ⅰ~V 波峰间潜伏期(IPL)较正常儿显著延长,非青紫型先心病(NCCHD)患儿Ⅰ波LP、Ⅰ~V波IPL均显著延长;4 ~6岁者NCCHD和CCHD无反复缺氧发作者LP和Ⅰ~V波IPL与正常儿无差异,CCHD反复缺氧发作者Ⅰ ~V波IPL较正常儿显著延长,异常率2.3%。结论:先心病不延迟婴儿期脑干发育,缺氧发作可损害脑干功 能,对缺氧发作者应尽早进行干预。

  12. Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis associated with typhoid fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Wali, G M

    1991-01-01

    A 14 year old boy developed the syndrome of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis during the course of bacteriologically proved typhoid fever. The clinical course and the results of various neurological investigations are detailed. This report adds a further manifestation to the published neuropsychiatric complications of typhoid fever.

  13. Neuromyelitis Optica Lesion Mimicking Brainstem Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl who presented with weakness of the left extremities and right sided sixth cranial nerve palsy had neuromyelitis optica (NMO mistaken for brainstem glioma on MRI, in a report from Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine,Seoul, Republic of KoreaNeuromyelitis Optica, Optic-Spinal Syndrome, Spectroscopy.

  14. Brainstem Encephalitis and ADEM Following Mumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestations of brainstem encephalitis (BSE with fever, decreased level of consciousness, and left facial and abducens paralysis developed 1 week after bilateral parotitis and mumps in a 4 year-old female child and were followed by symptoms of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM within 20 days of recovery from BSE.

  15. Biopsy of Brainstem Gliomas Using Flexible Endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Corzo, Jaime Gerardo; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Jose; Castillo-Rueda, Juan Lucino; Falcon-Escobedo, Reynaldo; Cervantes, Dominic; Rodriguez-Della Vecchia, Roberto; Vinas-Rios, Juan Manuel

    2015-07-01

    To describe our experience and the results obtained in performing transventricular brainstem biopsy with the use of flexible neuroendoscops. We identified patients who underwent a neuroendoscopic procedure with brainstem lesion biopsy to obtain histopathologic diagnosis and to treat obstructive hydrocephalus. All patients had follow-up examinations at months 1, 3, 6, and 12 postsurgery and then annually. Seven patients had a transventricular biopsy of the brainstem performed. Of those, five were pediatric patients. The median age was 10 years (range: 3-26 years). Five of them were female and two male. Four patients presented with secondary obstructive hydrocephalus. The main clinical presentations were intracranial hypertension syndrome in four patients, motor neuron disease in four patients, two with decreased state of alertness, two with gait ataxia, and one with Parinaud syndrome. The types of tumors found in the histopathology and their location were one ventral (pons) and one aqueductal anaplastic astrocytoma, two ventral, one aqueductal, and one attached to the floor of the fourth ventricle pilocytic astrocytoma and one ventral low-grade astrocytoma. The route taken to approach the ventral tumors was made through premammillary fenestration. The tumors of the aqueduct and floor of the fourth ventricle were approached transaqueductally. The use of flexible endoscops for biopsy of ventral, dorsal (tectum lamina quadrigemina), and diffuse brainstem tumors is a useful, effective, and safe procedure that also allows to treat obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to the tumors. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Pudendal nerve latency time in normal women via intravaginal stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A. Cavalcanti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES: Studies of motor conduction for the efferent functional assessment of the pudendal nerve in women with pelvic dysfunctions have been conducted through researching distal motor latency times. The transrectal approach has been the classic approach for this electrophysiological examination. The objective of the present study is to verify the viability of the transvaginal approach in performing the exam, to establish normal values for this method and to analyze the influence of age, stature and parity in the latency value of normal women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 23 volunteers without genitourinary pathologies participated in this study. In each, pudendal motor latency was investigated through the transvaginal approach, which was chosen due to patient’s higher tolerance levels. RESULTS: The motor response represented by registering the M-wave was obtained in all volunteers on the right side (100% and in 13 volunteers on the left side (56.5%. The mean motor latency obtained in the right and left was respectively: 1.99 ± 0.41 and 1.92 ± 0.48 milliseconds (ms. There was no difference between the sides (p = 0.66. Latency did not correlate with age, stature or obstetric history. The results obtained in the present study were in agreement with those found by other researchers using the transrectal approach. CONCLUSION: The vaginal approach represents an alternative for pudendal nerve distal motor latency time, with similar results to those achieved through the transrectal approach. Normative values obtained herein might serve as a comparative basis for subsequent physiopathological studies.

  17. CHRONIC DISSEMINATED HISTOPLASMOSIS WITH PROLONGED LATENCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A case of chronic disseminated histoplasmosis in an ex-serviceman is described. Evidence is presented to support a latency period of over sixty years between acquisition of infection and clinical manifestation. This is the longest latency period for histoplasmosis described in the medical literature...

  18. A template-free approach for determining the latency of single events of auditory evoked M100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghoff, M [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany); Link, A [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany); Salajegheh, A [Cognitive Neuroscience of Language Laboratory, University of Maryland College Park, MD (United States); Elster, C [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany); Poeppel, D [Cognitive Neuroscience of Language Laboratory, University of Maryland College Park, MD (United States); Trahms, L [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany)

    2005-02-07

    The phase of the complex output of a narrow band Gaussian filter is taken to define the latency of the auditory evoked response M100 recorded by magnetoencephalography. It is demonstrated that this definition is consistent with the conventional peak latency. Moreover, it provides a tool for reducing the number of averages needed for a reliable estimation of the latency. Single-event latencies obtained by this procedure can be used to improve the signal quality of the conventional average by latency adjusted averaging. (note)

  19. Electrically evoked middle latency responses in children with different cochlear implant ages and durations%不同植入年龄和植入后时间的EMLR反应特点研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王子健; 马芙蓉; 潘滔; 鲁兆毅

    2015-01-01

    Objective This research, using electrically evoked middle latency responses (EMLR) as a measure of auditory performance, aimed to investigate the effect of age at cochlear implant on auditory perfor-mance and to study dynamic changes in auditory performance after cochlear implant, in the hope of providing theoretical foundation for guiding future cochlear implantation and rehabilitation training. Methods There were 42 prelingual deafness children included in this research, divided into 2 groups by age at cochlear im-plant, i.e. before 3 years (n=28) or after (n=14) (mean=2.98±1.64 years);and into 4 groups by duration of implant use, i.e. less than 6 months (n=12), 6 to 12 months (n=16), 12 to 24 months (n=4) and more than 24 months (n=10) (mean=15.06±15.53 months). EMLRs were tested and results analyzed for each group. Result EMLRs were induced in 38 of the 42 children (90.48%). The PaNb amplitude was 2.34 ± 1.26μV in children who received implants before 3 years of age, and 1.48 ± 0.49 μV in those implanted after 3 years of age (p<0.05). Pa latency was 30.52±0.85 ms in children who had used cochlear implant for 6 to 12 months, and 25.98± 1.80 ms in those who had used implant for more than 24 months (p<0.05). Conclusion The age at cochlear im-plant and the duration after cochlear implantation affect auditory performance in children with prelingual deaf-ness, which appears to be bettern in those implanted before 3 years of age than after. Auditory performance ap-pears to rapidly improve in the first 2 years after implantation, suggesting that rehabilitation training in the first 2 years after cochlear implant is very important.%目的:利用电诱发中潜伏期反应(Electrically evoked middle latency response,EMLR)对语前聋人工耳蜗植入患儿进行听觉功能评估,了解人工耳蜗植入年龄对听觉功能的影响,研究语前聋患儿人工耳蜗植入后听觉功能的变化规律。为人工耳蜗植入时间的选择及植入

  20. Characteristics of brainstem auditory evoked potentials of students studying folk dance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxiang Li; Yuzhen Zhu

    2008-01-01

    averaged.Waveform identification and analysis:various components of the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values were identified,and the peak latencies and peak-peak values were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Latency of Ⅰ, Ⅱ,Ⅲ,Ⅳ,Ⅴ and Peak-Peak Value of Ⅰ,Ⅲ,Ⅴ were measured.RESULTS:Fifty-five subjects were enrolled in the final analysis,without any loss.Compared to the students who studied other subjects ① Ⅰ-Ⅴ peak latencies(PL):Ⅳ PL of the right ear of the folk dance students was obviously longer(P <0.05);②Ⅰ,Ⅲ, Ⅴpeak-peak values:Ⅰpeak-peak values of the right ear were obviously higher(P<0.05).CONCUSION:①PL of the right ear of the folk dance students was obviously longer,which indicates that dancing results in a stronger sensibility to auditory stimuli.②.Peak-peak values were obviously higher,which indicates that long-term exercise enhances the music senses and synchrony of auditory nerve impulses.

  1. Neural correlates of consonance, dissonance, and the hierarchy of musical pitch in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan

    2009-10-21

    Consonant and dissonant pitch relationships in music provide the foundation of melody and harmony, the building blocks of Western tonal music. We hypothesized that phase-locked neural activity within the brainstem may preserve information relevant to these important perceptual attributes of music. To this end, we measured brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) from nonmusicians in response to the dichotic presentation of nine musical intervals that varied in their degree of consonance and dissonance. Neural pitch salience was computed for each response using temporally based autocorrelation and harmonic pitch sieve analyses. Brainstem responses to consonant intervals were more robust and yielded stronger pitch salience than those to dissonant intervals. In addition, the ordering of neural pitch salience across musical intervals followed the hierarchical arrangement of pitch stipulated by Western music theory. Finally, pitch salience derived from neural data showed high correspondence with behavioral consonance judgments (r = 0.81). These results suggest that brainstem neural mechanisms mediating pitch processing show preferential encoding of consonant musical relationships and, furthermore, preserve the hierarchical pitch relationships found in music, even for individuals without formal musical training. We infer that the basic pitch relationships governing music may be rooted in low-level sensory processing and that an encoding scheme that favors consonant pitch relationships may be one reason why such intervals are preferred behaviorally.

  2. EBV latency types adopt alternative chromatin conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Tempera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp or type III (Cp gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer.

  3. Hearing Restoration with Auditory Brainstem Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKATOMI, Hirofumi; MIYAWAKI, Satoru; KIN, Taichi; SAITO, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) technology attempts to restore hearing in deaf patients caused by bilateral cochlear nerve injury through the direct stimulation of the brainstem, but many aspects of the related mechanisms remain unknown. The unresolved issues can be grouped into three topics: which patients are the best candidates; which type of electrode should be used; and how to improve restored hearing. We evaluated our experience with 11 cases of ABI placement. We found that if at least seven of eleven electrodes of the MED-EL ABI are effectively placed in a patient with no deformation of the fourth ventricle, open set sentence recognition of approximately 20% and closed set word recognition of approximately 65% can be achieved only with the ABI. Appropriate selection of patients for ABI placement can lead to good outcomes. Further investigation is required regarding patient selection criteria and methods of surgery for effective ABI placement. PMID:27464470

  4. Advanced LIGO low-latency searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Jonah; LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Advanced LIGO recently made the first detection of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes. The signal was first identified by a low-latency analysis, which identifies gravitational-wave transients within a few minutes of data collection. More generally, Advanced LIGO transients are sought with a suite of automated tools, which collectively identify events, evaluate statistical significance, estimate source position, and attempt to characterize source properties. This low-latency effort is enabling a broad multi-messenger approach to the science of compact object mergers and other transients. This talk will give an overview of the low-latency methodology and recent results.

  5. 耳鸣掩蔽对耳鸣患者脑干听觉诱发电位波幅的影响%Effect of tinnitus masking on auditory brainstem response wave amplitude in patients with tinnitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘淑芳; 祝威; 闻雨婷

    2006-01-01

    背景:研究发现耳鸣患者常伴有脑干听觉诱发电位波幅大Ⅲ小Ⅴ波的变化,耳鸣掩蔽是耳鸣治疗中的一种方法,在耳鸣掩蔽的治疗过程中耳鸣患者脑干听觉诱发电位将会如何变化?目的:观察耳鸣患者的脑干听觉诱发电位变化特点,以及耳鸣掩蔽后脑干听觉诱发电位变化规律.设计:病例-对照及自身前后对照.单位:吉林大学第一医院耳鼻咽喉-头颈外科.对象:持续性耳鸣组:63例(68耳),为1999-03/2001-10吉林大学第一医院门诊收治;对照组:听力正常的青年人(20~23岁)10例(20耳).所有受试者自愿接受检测及治疗.方法:耳鸣患者首先进行脑干听觉诱发电位检查(采用额部乳突部引导方法记录),然后进行耳鸣检查及耳鸣掩蔽试验(掩蔽5 min),随后立刻做脑干听觉诱发电位检查,并与对照组进行对比观察.主要观察指标:①耳鸣患者脑干听觉诱发电位的特点.②耳鸣掩蔽后对脑干听觉诱发电位波幅的影响,分为后效抑制试验阳性和阴性2组进行分析.结果:83例全部进入结果分析.①听力正常青年人的脑干听觉诱发电位波幅为小Ⅲ波大Ⅴ波,而63例(68耳)中有22耳(312%)脑干听觉诱发电位为大Ⅲ波小Ⅴ波,其中17耳后效抑制试验阳性,5耳阴性.②后效抑制试验阳性17耳经耳鸣掩蔽治疗后10耳由大Ⅲ波小Ⅴ波转为小Ⅲ波大Ⅴ波,3耳Ⅲ波幅度减小;阴性5耳经耳鸣掩蔽治疗后有2耳转为小Ⅲ波大Ⅴ波,其余3耳无改变.结论:耳鸣掩蔽能使耳鸣患者异常的脑干听觉诱发电位波幅恢复至正常,此结果有望作为后效抑制阳性判定的客观指标.%BACKGROUND: Research shows that the auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave amplitude of tinnitus patients often act as big Ⅲ small Ⅴ.Tinnitus masking is a therapy of tinnitus, then how dose the ABR change in the process of tinnitus masking?OBJECTIVE: To observe the changing characteristics of ABR in patients

  6. A Neurophysiological Approach for Evaluating Noise-Induced Sleep Disturbance: Calculating the Time Constant of the Dynamic Characteristics in the Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagusari, Junta; Matsui, Toshihito

    2016-03-25

    Chronic sleep disturbance induced by traffic noise is considered to cause environmental sleep disorder, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and other stress-related diseases. However, noise indices for the evaluation of sleep disturbance are not based on the neurophysiological process of awakening regulated by the brainstem. In this study, through the neurophysiological approach, we attempted (1) to investigate the thresholds of awakening due to external stimuli in the brainstem; (2) to evaluate the dynamic characteristics in the brainstem and (3) to verify the validity of existing noise indices. Using the mathematical Phillips-Robinson model, we obtained thresholds of awakening in the brainstem for different durations of external stimuli. The analysis revealed that the brainstem seemed insensitive to short stimuli and that the response to external stimuli in the brainstem could be approximated by a first-order lag system with a time constant of 10-100 s. These results suggest that the brainstem did not integrate sound energy as external stimuli, but neuroelectrical signals from auditory nerve. To understand the awakening risk accumulated in the brainstem, we introduced a new concept of "awakening potential" instead of sound energy.

  7. Low Latency High Throughout Circular Asynchronous FIFO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yong; ZHOU Runde

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a circular first in first out (FIFO) and its protocols which have a very low la-tency while still maintaining high throughput. Unlike the existing serial FIFOs based on asynchronous micro-pipelines, this FIFO's cells communicate directly with the input and output ports through a common bus, which effectively eliminates the data movement from the input port to the output port, thereby reducing the latency and the power consumption. Furthermore, the latency does not increase with the number of FIFO stages. Single-track asynchronous protocols are used to simplify the FIFO controller design, with only three C-gates needed in each cell controller, which substantially reduces the area. Simulations with the TSMC 0.25 Ijm CMOS logic process show that the latency of the 4-stage FIFO is less than 581 ps and the throughput is higher than 2.2 GHz.

  8. Auditory and audio-visual processing in patients with cochlear, auditory brainstem, and auditory midbrain implants: An EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierholz, Irina; Finke, Mareike; Kral, Andrej; Büchner, Andreas; Rach, Stefan; Lenarz, Thomas; Dengler, Reinhard; Sandmann, Pascale

    2017-04-01

    There is substantial variability in speech recognition ability across patients with cochlear implants (CIs), auditory brainstem implants (ABIs), and auditory midbrain implants (AMIs). To better understand how this variability is related to central processing differences, the current electroencephalography (EEG) study compared hearing abilities and auditory-cortex activation in patients with electrical stimulation at different sites of the auditory pathway. Three different groups of patients with auditory implants (Hannover Medical School; ABI: n = 6, CI: n = 6; AMI: n = 2) performed a speeded response task and a speech recognition test with auditory, visual, and audio-visual stimuli. Behavioral performance and cortical processing of auditory and audio-visual stimuli were compared between groups. ABI and AMI patients showed prolonged response times on auditory and audio-visual stimuli compared with NH listeners and CI patients. This was confirmed by prolonged N1 latencies and reduced N1 amplitudes in ABI and AMI patients. However, patients with central auditory implants showed a remarkable gain in performance when visual and auditory input was combined, in both speech and non-speech conditions, which was reflected by a strong visual modulation of auditory-cortex activation in these individuals. In sum, the results suggest that the behavioral improvement for audio-visual conditions in central auditory implant patients is based on enhanced audio-visual interactions in the auditory cortex. Their findings may provide important implications for the optimization of electrical stimulation and rehabilitation strategies in patients with central auditory prostheses. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2206-2225, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [Anesthesia with flunitrazepam/fentanyl and isoflurane/fentanyl. Unconscious perception and mid-latency auditory evoked potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwender, D; Kaiser, A; Klasing, S; Faber-Züllig, E; Golling, W; Pöppel, E; Peter, K

    1994-05-01

    There is a high incidence of intraoperative awareness during cardiac surgery. Mid-latency auditory evoked potentials (MLAEP) reflect the primary cortical processing of auditory stimuli. In the present study, we investigated MLAEP and explicit and implicit memory for information presented during cardiac anaesthesia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. Institutional approval and informed consent was obtained in 30 patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgery. Anaesthesia was induced in group I (n = 10) with flunitrazepam/fentanyl (0.01 mg/kg) and maintained with flunitrazepam/fentanyl (1.2 mg/h). The patients in group II (n = 10) received etomidate (0.25 mg/kg) and fentanyl (0.005 mg/kg) for induction and isoflurane (0.6-1.2 vol%)/fentanyl (1.2 mg/h) for maintenance of general anaesthesia. Group III (n = 10) served as a control and patients were anaesthetized as in I or II. After sternotomy an audiotape that included an implicit memory task was presented to the patients in groups I and II. The story of Robinson Crusoe was told, and it was suggested to the patients that they remember Robinson Crusoe when asked what they associated with the word Friday 3-5 days postoperatively. Auditory evoked potentials were recorded awake and during general anaesthesia before and after the audiotape presentation on vertex (positive) and mastoids on both sides (negative). Auditory clicks were presented binaurally at 70 dBnHL at a rate of 9.3 Hz. Using the electrodiagnostic system Pathfinder I (Nicolet), 1000 successive stimulus responses were averaged over a 100 ms poststimulus interval and analyzed off-line. Latencies of the peak V, Na, Pa were measured. V belongs to the brainstem-generated potentials, which demonstrates that auditory stimuli were correctly transduced. Na, Pa are generated in the primary auditory cortex of the temporal lobe and are the electrophysiological correlate of the primary cortical processing of the auditory stimuli. RESULTS. None of the patients had an explicit memory

  10. Relationships between behavior, brainstem and cortical encoding of seen and heard speech in musicians and non-musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, Gabriella; Strait, Dana; Kraus, Nina

    2008-07-01

    Musicians have a variety of perceptual and cortical specializations compared to non-musicians. Recent studies have shown that potentials evoked from primarily brainstem structures are enhanced in musicians, compared to non-musicians. Specifically, musicians have more robust representations of pitch periodicity and faster neural timing to sound onset when listening to sounds or both listening to and viewing a speaker. However, it is not known whether musician-related enhancements at the subcortical level are correlated with specializations in the cortex. Does musical training shape the auditory system in a coordinated manner or in disparate ways at cortical and subcortical levels? To answer this question, we recorded simultaneous brainstem and cortical evoked responses in musician and non-musician subjects. Brainstem response periodicity was related to early cortical response timing across all subjects, and this relationship was stronger in musicians. Peaks of the brainstem response evoked by sound onset and timbre cues were also related to cortical timing. Neurophysiological measures at both levels correlated with musical skill scores across all subjects. In addition, brainstem and cortical measures correlated with the age musicians began their training and the years of musical practice. Taken together, these data imply that neural representations of pitch, timing and timbre cues and cortical response timing are shaped in a coordinated manner, and indicate corticofugal modulation of subcortical afferent circuitry.

  11. Latency represents sound frequency in mouse IC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Frequency is one of the fundamental parameters of sound.The frequency of an acoustic stimulus can be represented by a neural response such as spike rate,and/or first spike latency(FSL)of a given neuron.The spike rates/frequency function of most neurons changes with different acoustic ampli-tudes,whereas FSL/frequency function is highly stable.This implies that FSL might represent the fre-quency of a sound stimulus more efficiently than spike rate.This study involved representations of acoustic frequency by spike rate and FSL of central inferior colliculus(IC)neurons responding to free-field pure-tone stimuli.We found that the FSLs of neurons responding to characteristic frequency(CF)of sound stimulus were usually the shortest,regardless of sound intensity,and that spike rates of most neurons showed a variety of function according to sound frequency,especially at high intensities.These results strongly suggest that FSL of auditory IC neurons can represent sound frequency more precisely than spike rate.

  12. Latency represents sound frequency in mouse IC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Qiang; TANG Jie; YU ZuLin; ZHANG Juan; ZHOU YingJie; XIAO ZhongJu; SHEN JunXian

    2007-01-01

    Frequency is one of the fundamental parameters of sound. The frequency of an acoustic stimulus can be represented by a neural response such as spike rate, and/or first spike latency (FSL) of a given neuron. The spike rates/frequency function of most neurons changes with different acoustic amplitudes, whereas FSL/frequency function is highly stable. This implies that FSL might represent the frequency of a sound stimulus more efficiently than spike rate. This study involved representations of acoustic frequency by spike rate and FSL of central inferior colliculus (IC) neurons responding to free-field pure-tone stimuli. We found that the FSLs of neurons responding to characteristic frequency (CF) of sound stimulus were usually the shortest, regardless of sound intensity, and that spike rates of most neurons showed a variety of function according to sound frequency, especially at high intensities.These results strongly suggest that FSL of auditory IC neurons can represent sound frequency more precisely than spike rate.

  13. Os efeitos da polaridade do estímulo nos Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico Polarity stimulation effects on brainstem auditory evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Patricio de Lima

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico (PEATE são considerados potenciais exógenos, ou seja, as respostas obtidas são altamente dependentes da característica do estímulo utilizado para evocá-los. OBJETIVO: Averiguar a influência da polaridade do estímulo clique na pesquisa dos PEATE em diferentes intensidades, utilizando-se fone de inserção. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: 33 indivíduos, idade entre 18 e 28 anos, sem alteração auditiva foram submetidos à pesquisa dos PEATE, com estímulo clique nas polaridades de rarefação, condensação e alternada, em diferentes intensidades. RESULTADOS: As latências absolutas da onda V mostraram-se menores na polaridade de rarefação quando comparadas às demais e na intensidade de 80 dBnHL houve diferença significante entre a rarefação e as demais polaridades para as latências interpicos III-V e I-V. Houve alta correlação entre as polaridades de condensação e alternada para as latências absolutas e interpicos na intensidade de 80 dBnHL. CONCLUSÃO: A polaridade do estímulo clique influência significativamente nos PEATE. Na rotina em que se utiliza o fone TDH 39, com apresentação de polaridade alternada, sugere-se que o uso da polaridade de condensação seja mais adequado para efeitos de comparação padronizada, devido à maior semelhança das latências encontradas nesse estudo com fone de inserção.Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials are considered exogenous potentials, that is, the responses obtained are highly dependent upon the characteristic of the stimulus used to evoke them. AIM: To investigate the influence of the click stimulus polarity in the study of Brainstem Evoked Response Audiometry (BERA at different intensities, using insertion-canal earphones. TYPE OF STUDY: Clinical. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 33 individuals, aged between 18 and 28, with no auditory alteration were submitted to BERA testing, with click stimulus on the

  14. Voluntary reaction time and long-latency reflex modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgaard, Christopher J; Franks, Ian M; Maslovat, Dana; Chin, Laurence; Chua, Romeo

    2015-12-01

    Stretching a muscle of the upper limb elicits short (M1) and long-latency (M2) reflexes. When the participant is instructed to actively compensate for a perturbation, M1 is usually unaffected and M2 increases in size and is followed by the voluntary response. It remains unclear if the observed increase in M2 is due to instruction-dependent gain modulation of the contributing reflex mechanism(s) or results from voluntary response superposition. The difficulty in delineating between these alternatives is due to the overlap between the voluntary response and the end of M2. The present study manipulated response accuracy and complexity to delay onset of the voluntary response and observed the corresponding influence on electromyographic activity during the M2 period. In all active conditions, M2 was larger compared with a passive condition where participants did not respond to the perturbation; moreover, these changes in M2 began early in the appearance of the response (∼ 50 ms), too early to be accounted for by voluntary overlap. Voluntary response latency influenced the latter portion of M2, with the largest activity seen when accuracy of limb position was not specified. However, when participants aimed for targets of different sizes or performed movements of various complexities, reaction time differences did not influence M2 period activity, suggesting voluntary activity was sufficiently delayed. Collectively, our results show that while a perturbation applied to the upper limbs can trigger a voluntary response at short latency (reflex gain modulation remains an important contributor to EMG changes during the M2 period. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Latency in Distributed Acquisition and Rendering for Telepresence Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Stephan; Willert, Malte; Staadt, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Telepresence systems use 3D techniques to create a more natural human-centered communication over long distances. This work concentrates on the analysis of latency in telepresence systems where acquisition and rendering are distributed. Keeping latency low is important to immerse users in the virtual environment. To better understand latency problems and to identify the source of such latency, we focus on the decomposition of system latency into sub-latencies. We contribute a model of latency and show how it can be used to estimate latencies in a complex telepresence dataflow network. To compare the estimates with real latencies in our prototype, we modify two common latency measurement methods. This presented methodology enables the developer to optimize the design, find implementation issues and gain deeper knowledge about specific sources of latency.

  16. Brainstem: neglected locus in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea T Grinberg

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with protein TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP. Neuropathologically, NDs are characterized by abnormal intracellular and extracellular protein deposits and by disease-specific neuronal death. Practically all terminal stages of NDs are clinically associated with dementia. Therefore, major attention was directed to protein deposits and neuron loss in supratentorial (telencephalic brain regions in the course of NDs. This was also true for PD, although the pathological hallmark of PD is degeneration of pigmented neurons of the brainstem’s substantia nigra. However, PD pathophysiology was explained by dopamine depletion in the telencephalic basal ganglia due to insufficiency and degeneration of the projection neurons located in substantia nigra. In a similar line of argumentation AD- and FTLD-related clinical deficits were exclusively explained by supratentorial allo- and neocortical laminar neuronal necrosis. Recent comprehensive studies in AD and PD early stages found considerable and unexpected involvement of brainstem nuclei, which could have the potential to profoundly change our present concepts on origin, spread, and early clinical diagnosis of these diseases. In contrast with PD and AD, few studies addressed brainstem involvement in the course of the different types of FTLD-TDP. Some of the results, including ours, disclosed a higher and more widespread pathology than anticipated. The present review will focus mainly on the impact of brainstem changes during the course of the most frequent NDs including PD, AD, and FTLD-TDP, with special emphasis on the need for more comprehensive research on FTLDs.

  17. Exploring brainstem function in multiple sclerosis by combining brainstem reflexes, evoked potentials, clinical and MRI investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnano, Immacolata; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Pilurzi, Giovanna; Cabboi, Maria Paola; Ginatempo, Francesca; Giaconi, Elena; Tolu, Eusebio; Achene, Antonio; Salis, Antonio; Rothwell, John C; Conti, Maurizio; Deriu, Franca

    2014-11-01

    To investigate vestibulo-masseteric (VMR), acoustic-masseteric (AMR), vestibulo-collic (VCR) and trigemino-collic (TCR) reflexes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); to relate abnormalities of brainstem reflexes (BSRs) to multimodal evoked potentials (EPs), clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings. Click-evoked VMR, AMR and VCR were recorded from active masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles, respectively; TCR was recorded from active sternocleidomastoid muscles, following electrical stimulation of the infraorbital nerve. EPs and MRI were performed with standard techniques. Frequencies of abnormal BSRs were: VMR 62.1%, AMR 55.1%, VCR 25.9%, TCR 58.6%. Brainstem dysfunction was identified by these tests, combined into a four-reflex battery, in 86.9% of cases, by EPs in 82.7%, MRI in 71.7% and clinical examination in 37.7% of cases. The sensitivity of paired BSRs/EPs (93.3%) was significantly higher than combined MRI/clinical testing (70%) in patients with disease duration ⩽6.4years. BSR alterations significantly correlated with clinical, EP and MRI findings. The four-BSR battery effectively increases the performance of standard EPs in early detection of brainstem impairment, otherwise undetected by clinical examination and neuroimaging. Multiple BSR assessment usefully supplements conventional testing and monitoring of brainstem function in MS, especially in newly diagnosed patients. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Construction and Evaluation of an Ultra Low Latency Frameless Renderer for VR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Sebastian; Steed, Anthony; Tilbury, Simon; Gaydadjiev, Georgi

    2016-04-01

    Latency - the delay between a user's action and the response to this action - is known to be detrimental to virtual reality. Latency is typically considered to be a discrete value characterising a delay, constant in time and space - but this characterisation is incomplete. Latency changes across the display during scan-out, and how it does so is dependent on the rendering approach used. In this study, we present an ultra-low latency real-time ray-casting renderer for virtual reality, implemented on an FPGA. Our renderer has a latency of ~1 ms from 'tracker to pixel'. Its frameless nature means that the region of the display with the lowest latency immediately follows the scan-beam. This is in contrast to frame-based systems such as those using typical GPUs, for which the latency increases as scan-out proceeds. Using a series of high and low speed videos of our system in use, we confirm its latency of ~1 ms. We examine how the renderer performs when driving a traditional sequential scan-out display on a readily available HMO, the Oculus Rift OK2. We contrast this with an equivalent apparatus built using a GPU. Using captured human head motion and a set of image quality measures, we assess the ability of these systems to faithfully recreate the stimuli of an ideal virtual reality system - one with a zero latency tracker, renderer and display running at 1 kHz. Finally, we examine the results of these quality measures, and how each rendering approach is affected by velocity of movement and display persistence. We find that our system, with a lower average latency, can more faithfully draw what the ideal virtual reality system would. Further, we find that with low display persistence, the sensitivity to velocity of both systems is lowered, but that it is much lower for ours.

  19. Developmental alterations of the auditory brainstem centers--pathogenetic implications in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Ottaviani, Giulia; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-10-15

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), despite the success of campaigns to reduce its risks, is the leading cause of infant death in the Western world. Even though the pathogenesis remains unexplained, brainstem abnormalities of the neuronal network that mediates breathing and protective responses to asphyxia, particularly in the arousal phase from sleep, are believed to play a fundamental role. This is the first study to identify, in SIDS, developmental defects of specific brainstem centers involved in hearing pathways, particularly in the cochlear and vestibular nuclei, in the superior olivary complex and in the inferior colliculus, suggesting a possible influence of the acoustic system on respiratory activity. In 49 SIDS cases and 20 controls an in-depth anatomopathological examination of the autonomic nervous system was performed, with the main aim of detecting developmental alterations of brainstem structures controlling both the respiratory and auditory activities. Overall, a significantly higher incidence of cytoarchitectural alterations of both the auditory and respiratory network components were observed in SIDS victims compared with matched controls. Even if there is not sufficient evidence to presume that developmental defects of brainstem auditory structures can affect breathing, our findings, showing that developmental deficit in the control respiratory areas are frequently accompanied by alterations of auditory structures, highlight an additional important element for the understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of SIDS.

  20. Short REM latency in impotence without depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H S; Nofzinger, E A

    1988-05-01

    In a retrospective study, the presence of depression was studied in a group of 14 impotent patients who were selected on the basis of the similarity between their electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep patterns and those of patients with endogenous depression. Specifically, the value of rapid eye movement (REM) latency plus age less than 100 was used as a selection criterion. Sleep continuity disturbances, increased REM time, and increased REM% were noted in the short REM latency impotent group. On the basis of MMPI and psychiatric history and interview, only one of these impotent patients showed major depression. The authors conclude that impotent patients with a short REM latency are not, as a group, depressed and that the incidence of depression in impotent men should be determined irrespective of EEG sleep findings.

  1. Reduced-Latency SC Polar Decoder Architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chuan; Parhi, Keshab K

    2011-01-01

    Polar codes have become one of the most favorable capacity achieving error correction codes (ECC) along with their simple encoding method. However, among the very few prior successive cancellation (SC) polar decoder designs, the required long code length makes the decoding latency high. In this paper, conventional decoding algorithm is transformed with look-ahead techniques. This reduces the decoding latency by 50%. With pipelining and parallel processing schemes, a parallel SC polar decoder is proposed. Sub-structure sharing approach is employed to design the merged processing element (PE). Moreover, inspired by the real FFT architecture, this paper presents a novel input generating circuit (ICG) block that can generate additional input signals for merged PEs on-the-fly. Gate-level analysis has demonstrated that the proposed design shows advantages of 50% decoding latency and twice throughput over the conventional one with similar hardware cost.

  2. MicroRNA-155 Reinforces HIV Latency*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas, Debbie S.; Chan, Jonathan K.; Oh, Eugene; Heidersbach, Amy J.; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Chavez, Leonard; Verdin, Eric; Rape, Michael; Greene, Warner C.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a small number of infected but transcriptionally dormant cells currently thwarts a cure for the more than 35 million individuals infected with HIV. Reactivation of these latently infected cells may result in three fates: 1) cell death due to a viral cytopathic effect, 2) cell death due to immune clearance, or 3) a retreat into latency. Uncovering the dynamics of HIV gene expression and silencing in the latent reservoir will be crucial for developing an HIV-1 cure. Here we identify and characterize an intracellular circuit involving TRIM32, an HIV activator, and miR-155, a microRNA that may promote a return to latency in these transiently activated reservoir cells. Notably, we demonstrate that TRIM32, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, promotes reactivation from latency by directly modifying IκBα, leading to a novel mechanism of NF-κB induction not involving IκB kinase activation. PMID:25873391

  3. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia of brainstem lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMario, F J; Bauer, L; Baxter, D

    1999-04-01

    In this pilot study we investigated the hypothesis that intrinsic and extrinsic brainstem lesions situated within the pontomedullary region would effect the integrity of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. The study sample consisted of three patients with anatomic brainstem abnormalities associated with isolated Chiari I malformation, Chiari II malformation with syringobulbia, and achondroplasia with cervicomedullary compression. They were compared to an age- and sex-matched control group of nine patients. Each subject's electrocardiogram was recorded in a quiet room and digitized by a personal computer during five 1-minute periods. R-R intervals within each 1-minute period were converted to heart rate in 120 successive 0.5-second intervals. The resultant heartrate time series was converted to its underlying frequency composition by a fast Fourier transform and averaged across minutes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia was defined as the variability in the time series over a frequency range (0.096 to 0.48 Hz) corresponding to a range of respiratory rates from 6 to 30 breaths per minute. Analysis revealed a significant reduction in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (P < .05), defined as the summated area under the curve, with a mean for controls of 35.42+/-28.13 SD and for subjects of 17.20+/-11.50 SD. There was a gradient of abnormality noted, with the mildest deviation in respiratory sinus arrhythmia for the patient with isolated Chiari I malformation and maximum deviation seen in the patient with extrinsic cervicomedullary compression.

  4. Phase-dependent modulation of short latency cutaneous reflexes during walking in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, B.C.M.; Dietz, V.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    In reduced animal preparation (cat fictive locomotion) most of our knowledge on the phase-dependent modulation of cutaneous reflexes concerns early- (P1 responses) rather than medium-latency (P2) responses. In contrast, in humans, virtually only P2 responses have been studied because P1 responses ar

  5. Orientation-reversal VEP: comparison of phase and peak latencies in adults and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Birtles, Deirdre; Wattam-Bell, John; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver

    2012-06-15

    The peak latency of pattern-reversal (PR)-VEP has been found to develop rapidly, reaching the adult level around 15 weeks of age. However, the development of orientation-reversal (OR)-VEP, reflecting the specific spatial organization of cortical receptive fields, still remains unknown. OR-VEP was tested in 81 adults at 1-12 reversals/sec (r/s) and 94 infants (age 4-79 weeks) at 2-8r/s. OR data at 4r/s from an additional 123 infants (age 4.0-20.3 weeks) studied previously were also analyzed. In addition to peak transient latencies at 1-4r/s, latency values derived from the gradient of phase against temporal frequency in steady-state recording were also calculated. For both adults and infants, no significant latency differences in the initial positive peaks were found among the low reversal rates. The calculated latency was statistically longer than the transient latency in both groups. While the transient latency asymptoted to adult value of 102 ms at around 50 weeks of age, the calculated latency, unlike that for PR-VEP, showed little variation across the age span. The data suggest a dominant effect of transmission delay on the initial peak in infancy, which reduces with age. However, the overall timing of the cortical response to orientation change remains slower than for pattern reversal in the fully developed visual cortex. Upon reaching maturity, the latencies of the initial positive peak in both pattern and orientation VEPs may arise from the same level of cortical processing in V1, but the overall time course reflected in the steady-state phase continues to show a much more prolonged response to orientation change than the transmission delay seen in the transient VEPs.

  6. Startle Response in Progressive Myoclonic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızıltan, Meral E; Gündüz, Ayşegül; Coşkun, Tülin; Delil, Şakir; Pazarcı, Nevin; Özkara, Çiğdem; Yeni, Naz

    2017-03-01

    Cortical reflex myoclonus is a typical feature of progressive myoclonic epilepsy (PME) in which it is accompanied by other types of mostly drug-resistant seizures and progressive neurological signs. Although PME is characterized by cortical hyperexcitability, studies have demonstrated atrophy and degenerative changes in the brainstem in various types of PME. Thus, we have questioned whether any stimuli may trigger a hyperactive response of brainstem reticular formation in PME and investigated the startle reflex in individuals with PME. We recorded the auditory startle response (ASR) and the startle response to somatosensory inputs (SSS) in patients with PME, and compared the results with healthy volunteers and patients with other types of drug-resistant epilepsy. All patients were using antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), 12 were on multiple AEDs. The probability of ASR was significantly lower and mean onset latency was longer in patients with PME compared with other groups. SSS responses over all muscles were low in both the PME and drug-resistant epilepsy groups; however, the differences were not statistically significant. The presence of a response over the biceps brachii muscle was zero in the PME group and showed a borderline difference compared with the other groups. Decreased probability and prolonged latencies of ASR in PME indicate inhibition of reflex circuit. A trend for decreased responses of SSS suggests hypoactive SSS in both PME and other epilepsy groups. Hypoactive ASR in PME and hypoactive SSS in both PME and other epilepsies may be attributed to the degeneration of pontine reticular nuclei in PME and functional inhibition by AEDs in both disorders.

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus Latency: The DNA Repair-Centered Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay C. Brown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Like all herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1 is able to produce lytic or latent infections depending on the host cell type. Lytic infections occur in a broad range of cells while latency is highly specific for neurons. Although latency suggests itself as an attractive target for novel anti-HSV1 therapies, progress in their development has been slowed due in part to a lack of agreement about the basic biochemical mechanisms involved. Among the possibilities being considered is a pathway in which DNA repair mechanisms play a central role. Repair is suggested to be involved in both HSV1 entry into latency and reactivation from it. Here I describe the basic features of the DNA repair-centered pathway and discuss some of the experimental evidence supporting it. The pathway is particularly attractive because it is able to account for important features of the latent response, including the specificity for neurons, the specificity for neurons of the peripheral compared to the central nervous system, the high rate of genetic recombination in HSV1-infected cells, and the genetic identity of infecting and reactivated virus.

  8. Latencies of extracted distortion-product otoacoustic source components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Dennis; Thiericke, John P.; Gummer, Anthony W.; Dalhoff, Ernst

    2015-12-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) evolve as a byproduct of the nonlinear amplification process of two stimulus tones f2 ≥ f1 in the cochlea. According to a prevailing model, DPOAEs comprise a nonlinear-generation and a coherent-reflection component. Recently, we introduced a new technique using short f2 pulses which enables the extraction of both source components in the time domain by nonlinear least-square curve fitting to decompose the DPOAE response into pulse basis functions (PBFs). The analysis of the extracted DPOAE source components in the time domain enables determination of their latencies which may be used to estimate cochlear frequency tuning. Short-pulse DPOAEs were acquired from 16 subjects for f2 = 1.5, 2, 3, and 4 kHz using six primary-tone levels with L2 = 25 - 65 dB SPL. For the extracted nonlinear-generation and coherent-reflection components, latencies decrease with increasing stimulus frequency and level. The obtained latency values are in accordance with the expected behavior of the cochlear amplifier and may provide an additional diagnostic parameter to assess frequency tuning.

  9. Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potentials during Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Shirley; Deepeshwar, Singh; Naveen, Kalkuni Visweswaraiah; Pailoor, Subramanya

    2015-10-01

    The auditory sensory pathway has been studied in meditators, using midlatency and short latency auditory evoked potentials. The present study evaluated long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEPs) during meditation. Sixty male participants, aged between 18 and 31 years (group mean±SD, 20.5±3.8 years), were assessed in 4 mental states based on descriptions in the traditional texts. They were (a) random thinking, (b) nonmeditative focusing, (c) meditative focusing, and (d) meditation. The order of the sessions was randomly assigned. The LLAEP components studied were P1 (40-60 ms), N1 (75-115 ms), P2 (120-180 ms), and N2 (180-280 ms). For each component, the peak amplitude and peak latency were measured from the prestimulus baseline. There was significant decrease in the peak latency of the P2 component during and after meditation (Pmeditation facilitates the processing of information in the auditory association cortex, whereas the number of neurons recruited was smaller in random thinking and non-meditative focused thinking, at the level of the secondary auditory cortex, auditory association cortex and anterior cingulate cortex.

  10. Clinical value of ipsi- and contralateral sacral reflex latency measurement: a normative data study in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, G; Kerdraon, J

    2000-01-01

    The latency of the bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) evoked by electrical stimulation of the penis provides a measure of the conduction velocity over the sacral reflex arc at the S2-4 level but does not allow evaluation of the side affected since it results from the simultaneous excitation of both dorsal nerves of the penis (DNP) at the penile root. To evaluate the reliability of the side-to-side BCR latency measurement, this study compared the reflex characteristics of the response elicited by both DNP stimulation and unilateral DNP block. After a unilateral selective DNP anesthesic block, we found that the early response of the contralateral BCR is strictly ipsilateral with no differences in terms of latency, morphology, and reflex threshold from controls. This result may indicate that the side-to-side BCR latency measurement allows a comparative study of the respective right and left sacral reflex arcs in men. We found a mean inter-latency difference of 1.8 +/- 0.4 millisecond of the early BCR response after simultaneous recording of the right and left sides in 10 normal men. We established that an inter-latency difference >3 milliseconds may be indicative of a significant alteration in the conduction over the sacral reflex arc.

  11. Towards Controlling Latency in Wireless Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Bouacida, Nader

    2017-04-24

    Wireless networks are undergoing an unprecedented revolution in the last decade. With the explosion of delay-sensitive applications in the Internet (i.e., online gaming and VoIP), latency becomes a major issue for the development of wireless technology. Taking advantage of the significant decline in memory prices, industrialists equip the network devices with larger buffering capacities to improve the network throughput by limiting packets drops. Over-buffering results in increasing the time that packets spend in the queues and, thus, introducing more latency in networks. This phenomenon is known as “bufferbloat”. While throughput is the dominant performance metric, latency also has a huge impact on user experience not only for real-time applications but also for common applications like web browsing, which is sensitive to latencies in order of hundreds of milliseconds. Concerns have arisen about designing sophisticated queue management schemes to mitigate the effects of such phenomenon. My thesis research aims to solve bufferbloat problem in both traditional half-duplex and cutting-edge full-duplex wireless systems by reducing delay while maximizing wireless links utilization and fairness. Our work shed lights on buffer management algorithms behavior in wireless networks and their ability to reduce latency resulting from excessive queuing delays inside oversized static network buffers without a significant loss in other network metrics. First of all, we address the problem of buffer management in wireless full-duplex networks by using Wireless Queue Management (WQM), which is an active queue management technique for wireless networks. Our solution is based on Relay Full-Duplex MAC (RFD-MAC), an asynchronous media access control protocol designed for relay full-duplexing. Compared to the default case, our solution reduces the end-to-end delay by two orders of magnitude while achieving similar throughput in most of the cases. In the second part of this thesis

  12. Potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco encefálico por frequência específica e de estado estável na audiologia pediátrica: estudo de caso Frequency-specific and steady-state evoked auditory brainstem responses in pediatric audiology: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ribeiro Ivo Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Preconiza-se o diagnóstico até os três meses de idade em crianças com deficiência auditiva congênita. Após a etapa inicial de confirmação do diagnóstico, é necessário que se obtenha limiares precisos nas diferentes frequências, para que seja possível uma adequada seleção, indicação e regulagem de aparelhos de amplificação sonora. Nesse contexto, inserem-se os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico por Frequência Específica (PEATE-FE e, mais recentemente, os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Estado Estável (PEAEE. O objetivo deste estudo de caso foi apresentar os achados das duas técnicas para estimar os limiares auditivos em uma criança de três meses de idade, com perda auditiva neurossensorial bilateral, diagnosticada utilizando-se como primeiro método de avaliação os Potenciais Evocados Auditivos de Tronco Encefálico com estímulo clique, tanto por via aérea como por via óssea. As duas técnicas mostraram-se eficientes para estimar os limiares auditivos, com uma vantagem dos PEAEE com relação ao tempo de duração de exame.It is recommended that congenital hearing loss is identified as early as three months old. After the initial step of confirming the diagnosis, it is necessary to obtain accurate hearing thresholds, allowing an adequate selection, indication and regulation of hearing aids for these children. It is inserted, in this context, the Frequency-Specific Auditory Brainstem Responses (FSABR and, more recently, the Auditory Steady-State Responses (ASSR. The aim of the present study was to describe the findings of the use of both techniques to estimate the auditory thresholds of a three-month-old infant with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss diagnosed using, as primary evaluation method, the click-evoked Auditory Brainstem Responses, with both air and bone stimuli conduction. Both techniques provided reliable findings for estimating auditory thresholds. The ASSR had an advantage regarding

  13. INFLUENCE OF ACUPUNCTURE ("JIN'S SAN ZHEN") ON BRAINSTEM EVOKED POTENTIALS IN MENTAL RETARDATION CHILDREN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Qing; MA Ruiling; JIN Rui

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of acupuncture ("JIN's San Zhen") on infantile mental retardation (MR) .Methods: 44 cases of MR children were attributed to treatment group and 39 normal children to control group.P3(event-related potential) and brainstem evoked potentials were used as the indexes. Acupoints "Si-shen Zhen","Head Zhi San Zhen", "Hand Zhi San Zhen", "Foot Zhi San Zhen" were punctured with filiform needles, and stimulated by manipulating the needle once every 5 minutes with uniform reinforcing-reducing method. The treatment was conducted once daily, 6 times every week, with 4 months being a therapeutic course. Results: In comparison with normal children, the latency of P3 was longer and its amplitude lower in MR children. After 4 months' acupuncture treatment,the latency was shortened and the amplitude increased significantly in comparison with pre-treatment ( P<0.01,0.05). Results of the total inteiiigence quotient (TIQ) evaluation showed a 70.3% coincidence rate compared with improvement of P3. Conclusion: Changes of P3 and BAEP(brain auditory evoked potential) after acupuncture treatment may be related to the effect of "JIN's San Zhen" in bettering clinical symptoms and signs of MR infantile patients.

  14. Intracranial neurenteric cyst traversing the brainstem

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    Jasmit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurenteric cysts (NECs, also called enterogenous cysts, are rare benign endodermal lesions of the central nervous system that probably result from separation failure of the notochord and upper gastrointestinal tract. Most frequently they are found in the lower cervical spine or the upper thoracic spine. Intracranial occurrence is rare and mostly confined to infratentorial compartment, in prepontine region [51%]. Other common locations are fourth ventricle and cerebellopontine angle. There are few reports of NEC in medulla or the cerebellum. Because of the rarity of the disease and common radiological findings, they are misinterpreted as arachnoid or simple cysts until the histopathological confirmation, unless suspected preoperatively. We herein report a rare yet interesting case of intracranial NEC traversing across the brainstem.

  15. 水杨酸钠对豚鼠听反应阈值、螺旋神经节形态及GABA、GLU表达的影响%Effects of sodium salicylate on the auditory brainstem response and the morphology, the expressions of γ-aminobutvricacid and glutamate of the spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周琦; 黄训健; 尹时华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of sodium salicylate on the auditory brainstem response and the morphology , the expressions of -y-aminobutyricacid and glutamate of spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs. Methods Forty a-dult guinea pigs were randomly divided into two groups (20 cases for each) ; the saline control group (group A) and the salicylate group [group B injected with a dose of 300 mg/(kg·d) for 15 days) ] respectively. After administration for 15 days, 10 guinea pigs were randomly chosen, then the rest of the animals were fed without adaministration for 30 days. Auditory brainstem response ( detected by Tucker Davis Technologies) , scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the auditory function of guinea pigs, the morphological changes and the expressions of 7-aminobutyri-cacid and glutamate of the spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs. Results After administration for 15 days, ABR thresholds of guinea pigs increased, spiral ganglion was disorganized, cell body not smooth, nerve fiber apt to divide, the expression of GABA, GLU of spiral ganglion increased in B group. After drug withdrawal for 30 days, ABR thresholds of guinea pigs was still at the high thresholds levels, spiral ganglion also exist aboved morphologically changes, the levels of GABA, GLU of spiral ganglion were higher than those after administration for 15 days (all P < 0. 05). But there was no obviously significance of the aboved indexes in group A. Conclusions Sodium salicylate could increase the the auditory brainstem response threshold of guinea pig and the expressions of -y-aminobutyricacid and glutamate of the spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs. It could also change the morphologies of the spiral ganglion neurons partly.%目的 探讨水杨酸钠对豚鼠听反应阈值、螺旋神经节形态及γ氨基丁酸(GABA)、谷氨酸(GLU)表达的影响.方法 将40只成年豚鼠随机均分为两组,A组予生理盐水

  16. Optical analysis of circuitry for respiratory rhythm in isolated brainstem of foetal mice

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Kenneth J.; Tsechpenakis, Gavriil; Homma, Ryota; Nicholls, John G.; Lawrence B Cohen; Eugenin, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory rhythms arise from neurons situated in the ventral medulla. We are investigating their spatial and functional relationships optically by measuring changes in intracellular calcium using the fluorescent, calcium-sensitive dye Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 AM while simultaneously recording the regular firing of motoneurons in the phrenic nerve in isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations of E17 to E19 mice. Responses of identified cells are associated breath by breath with inspiratory ...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging differential diagnosis of brainstem lesions in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo Cosimo Quattrocchi; Yuri Errante; Maria Camilla Rossi Espagnet; Stefania Galassi; Sabino Walter Della Sala; Bruno Bernardi; Giuseppe Fariello; Daniela Longo

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of brainstem lesions,either isolated or in association with cerebellar and supra-tentorial lesions,can be challenging. Knowledge of the structural organization is crucial for the differential diagnosis and establishment of prognosis of pathologies with involvement of the brainstem. Familiarity with the location of the lesions in the brainstem is essential,especially in the pediatric population. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) is the most sensitive and specific imaging technique for diagnosing disorders of the posterior fossa and,particularly,the brainstem. High magnetic static field MRI allows detailed visualization of the morphology,signal intensity and metabolic content of the brainstem nuclei,together with visualization of the normal development and myelination. In this pictorial essay we review the brainstem pathology in pediatric patients and consider the MR imaging patterns that may help the radiologist to differentiate among vascular,toxico-metabolic,infectiveinflammatory,degenerative and neoplastic processes. Helpful MR tips can guide the differential diagnosis: These include the location and morphology of lesions,the brainstem vascularization territories,gray and white matter distribution and tissue selective vulnerability.

  18. A brainstem variant of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitaguchi, H.; Tomimoto, H.; Terada, K. [Kyoto University, Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Miki, Y.; Yamamoto, A. [Kyoto University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Satoi, H.; Kanda, M. [Ijinkai Takeda General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuyama, H. [Kyoto University, Human Brain Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2005-09-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is caused by various heterogeneous factors, the commonest being hypertension, followed by nonhypertensive causes such as eclampsia, renal diseases and immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with RPLS exhibit bilateral white and gray matter abnormalities in the posterior aspects of the cerebral hemispheres. However, this syndrome may affect the brainstem predominantly, and these cases are designated as hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. We present here two patients with reversible brainstem encephalopathy: one with hypertension and the other without hypertension. These patients presented with swelling and diffuse hyperintensities of the brainstem in fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted MRI, but with relatively mild clinical symptoms. They recovered without major neurological deficits, but had residual lacunar lesions in the pons. Reversible brainstem encephalopathy with characteristic MRI features was found in both hypertensive and nonhypertensive patients. These patients were diagnosed with a brainstem variant of RPLS, which is potentially fully reversible after an adequate treatment, and therefore should be carefully differentiated from other brainstem disease conditions. (orig.)

  19. Neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of HSV-1 latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Pamela C; Katzenell, Sarah; Pesola, Jean M; North, Brian; Coen, Donald M; Leib, David A

    2016-10-01

    IFN responses control acute HSV infection, but their role in regulating HSV latency is poorly understood. To address this we used mice lacking IFN signaling specifically in neural tissues. These mice supported a higher acute viral load in nervous tissue and delayed establishment of latency. While latent HSV-1 genome copies were equivalent, ganglia from neuronal IFN signaling-deficient mice unexpectedly supported reduced reactivation. IFNβ promoted survival of primary sensory neurons after infection with HSV-1, indicating a role for IFN signaling in sustaining neurons. We observed higher levels of latency associated transcripts (LATs) per HSV genome in mice lacking neuronal IFN signaling, consistent with a role for IFN in regulating LAT expression. These data show that neuronal IFN signaling modulates the expression of LAT and may conserve the pool of neurons available to harbor latent HSV-1 genome. The data also show that neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of latency.

  20. Long-latency reflexes account for limb biomechanics through several supraspinal pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Louis Kurtzer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate control of body posture is enforced by a multitude of corrective actions operating over a range of time scales. The earliest correction is the short-latency reflex which occurs between 20-45 ms following a sudden displacement of the limb and is generated entirely by spinal circuits. In contrast, voluntary reactions are generated by a highly distributed network but at a significantly longer delay after stimulus onset (greater than 100 ms. Between these two epochs is the long-latency reflex (around 50-100 ms which but acts more rapidly than of voluntary reactions but shares some supraspinal pathways and functional capabilities. In particular, the long-latency reflex accounts for the arm’s biomechanical properties rather than only responding to local muscle stretch like the short-latency reflex. This paper will review how the long-latency reflex accounts for the arm’s biomechanical properties and the supraspinal pathways supporting this ability. Relevant experimental paradigms include clinical studies, non-invasive brain stimulation, neural recordings in monkeys, and human behavioral studies. The sum of this effort indicates that primary motor cortex and reticular formation contribute to the the long-latency reflex either by generating or scaling its structured response appropriate for the arm’s biomechanics whereas the cerebellum scales the magnitude of the feedback response. Additional putative pathways are discussed as well as potential research lines.

  1. A rare case of white pearls in brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanker Singh Mankotia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic brainstem epidermoid is extremely rare, and only 14 cases have been reported. Authors report a classic case of brainstem epidermoid in a 14-year-old male child presenting with symptoms of brainstem involvement. The child underwent a successful surgical excision. The lesion was intrinsic and caused diagnostic dilemma based on conventional radiological images. Based on our experience in this case and a thorough review of literature, we are of the opinion that diffusion-weighted images are very important in establishing the diagnosis. Such lesions are challenging and attempt to remove adherent tumor capsule may produce additional neurological deficits.

  2. Short latency vestibular evoked potentials in the chicken embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophysiological responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were recorded in chicken embryos incubated for 19 or 20 days (E19/E20). Responses occurred within the first 16 ms following the stimulus onset. The evoked potentials disappeared following bilateral labyrinthectomy, but persisted following cochlear destruction alone, thus demonstrating that the responses were vestibular. Approximately 8 to 10 response peaks could be identified. The first 4 positive and corresponding negative components (early peaks with latencies embryos was -15.9dBre 1.0 g/ms, which was significantly higher (P embryos and 2-week-old animals, but amplitude/intensity functions for embryos were significantly shallower than those for 2-week-old birds (P embryo and, as such, the method shows promise as an investigative tool. The results of the present study form the definitive basis for using vestibular evoked potentials in the detailed study of avian vestibular ontogeny and factors that may influence it.

  3. Role of latency jittering correction in motion-onset VEP amplitude decay during prolonged visual stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremláček, J; Hulan, M; Kuba, M; Kubová, Z; Langrová, J; Vít, F; Szanyi, J

    2012-06-01

    Visual evoked potentials to motion-onset stimulation (M-VEPs) gradually attenuate in amplitude during examination. The observed decline in averaged responses can be caused by decreases in single response magnitudes and/or increased variability in a response delays, that is, latency jittering. To illuminate the origins of the suppression of M-VEPs during stimuli repetition, we used correlation technique to estimate an upper bound of possible latency jittering of single sweeps and we evaluated the effect of its correction on the amplitudes of three M-VEP dominant peaks P1, N2 and P3. During prolonged visual motion stimulation, the variability of corrective latency shifts in the occipital region increased (r = 0.35: 0.44) and the number of single responses corresponding to the average curve declined in occipital and parietal derivations (r = -0.48: -0.62). While the P1 peak amplitude did not exhibit any time-specific behaviour, the N2 amplitude exhibited a significant decay of 29.4% that was partially reduced to 16.6% in the central occipital derivation by the latency jitter and non-correspondence corrections. The strongest attenuation (32.7%) was observed in the P3 amplitude and was less sensitive to the corrections, dropping only to 27.9%. The main part of the response suppression to repeated motion stimulation was caused by amplitude drop and represents non-stationary process that likely correspond to a fatigue model. The rise of variability in latency jitter correction and the reduction in single responses correlated with the M-VEP were significant factors associated with prolonged motion stimulation. The relation of these parameters to a hypothetical veridical response is ambiguous and can be caused by a time shift of the response or by a change of signal-to-noise ratio. Using selective averaging and latency jitter correction, the effect of response suppression was partially removed.

  4. Arbitration in crossbar interconnect for low latency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmacht, Martin; Sugavanam, Krishnan

    2013-02-05

    A system and method and computer program product for reducing the latency of signals communicated through a crossbar switch, the method including using at slave arbitration logic devices associated with Slave devices for which access is requested from one or more Master devices, two or more priority vector signals cycled among their use every clock cycle for selecting one of the requesting Master devices and updates the respective priority vector signal used every clock cycle. Similarly, each Master for which access is requested from one or more Slave devices, can have two or more priority vectors and can cycle among their use every clock cycle to further reduce latency and increase throughput performance via the crossbar.

  5. Epigenetic Control of Cytomegalovirus Latency and Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hummel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV gene expression is repressed in latency due to heterochromatinization of viral genomes. In murine CMV (MCMV latently infected mice, viral genomes are bound to histones with heterochromatic modifications, to enzymes that mediate these modifications, and to adaptor proteins that may recruit co-repressor complexes. Kinetic analyses of repressor binding show that these repressors are recruited at the earliest time of infection, suggesting that latency may be the default state. Kidney transplantation leads to epigenetic reprogramming of latent viral chromatin and reactivation of immediate early gene expression. Inflammatory signaling pathways, which activate transcription factors that regulate the major immediate early promoter (MIEP, likely mediate the switch in viral chromatin.

  6. Arbitration in crossbar interconnect for low latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmacht, Martin; Sugavanam, Krishnan

    2013-02-05

    A system and method and computer program product for reducing the latency of signals communicated through a crossbar switch, the method including using at slave arbitration logic devices associated with Slave devices for which access is requested from one or more Master devices, two or more priority vector signals cycled among their use every clock cycle for selecting one of the requesting Master devices and updates the respective priority vector signal used every clock cycle. Similarly, each Master for which access is requested from one or more Slave devices, can have two or more priority vectors and can cycle among their use every clock cycle to further reduce latency and increase throughput performance via the crossbar.

  7. Brainstem neurons survive the identical ischemic stress that kills higher neurons: insight to the persistent vegetative state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Devin Brisson

    Full Text Available Global ischemia caused by heart attack, pulmonary failure, near-drowning or traumatic brain injury often damages the higher brain but not the brainstem, leading to a 'persistent vegetative state' where the patient is awake but not aware. Approximately 30,000 U.S. patients are held captive in this condition but not a single research study has addressed how the lower brain is preferentially protected in these people. In the higher brain, ischemia elicits a profound anoxic depolarization (AD causing neuronal dysfunction and vasoconstriction within minutes. Might brainstem nuclei generate less damaging AD and so be more resilient? Here we compared resistance to acute injury induced from simulated ischemia by 'higher' hippocampal and striatal neurons versus brainstem neurons in live slices from rat and mouse. Light transmittance (LT imaging in response to 10 minutes of oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD revealed immediate and acutely damaging AD propagating through gray matter of neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. In adjacent brainstem nuclei, OGD-evoked AD caused little tissue injury. Whole-cell patch recordings from hippocampal and striatal neurons under OGD revealed sudden membrane potential loss that did not recover. In contrast brainstem neurons from locus ceruleus and mesencephalic nucleus as well as from sensory and motor nuclei only slowly depolarized and then repolarized post-OGD. Two-photon microscopy confirmed non-recoverable swelling and dendritic beading of hippocampal neurons during OGD, while mesencephalic neurons in midbrain appeared uninjured. All of the above responses were mimicked by bath exposure to 100 µM ouabain which inhibits the Na+/K+ pump or to 1-10 nM palytoxin which converts the pump into an open cationic channel. Therefore during ischemia the Na+/K+ pump of higher neurons fails quickly and extensively compared to naturally resilient hypothalamic and brainstem neurons. The selective survival

  8. The Depsipeptide Romidepsin Reverses HIV-1 Latency In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole S Søgaard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacologically-induced activation of replication competent proviruses from latency in the presence of antiretroviral treatment (ART has been proposed as a step towards curing HIV-1 infection. However, until now, approaches to reverse HIV-1 latency in humans have yielded mixed results. Here, we report a proof-of-concept phase Ib/IIa trial where 6 aviremic HIV-1 infected adults received intravenous 5 mg/m2 romidepsin (Celgene once weekly for 3 weeks while maintaining ART. Lymphocyte histone H3 acetylation, a cellular measure of the pharmacodynamic response to romidepsin, increased rapidly (maximum fold range: 3.7–7.7 relative to baseline within the first hours following each romidepsin administration. Concurrently, HIV-1 transcription quantified as copies of cell-associated un-spliced HIV-1 RNA increased significantly from baseline during treatment (range of fold-increase: 2.4–5.0; p = 0.03. Plasma HIV-1 RNA increased from <20 copies/mL at baseline to readily quantifiable levels at multiple post-infusion time-points in 5 of 6 patients (range 46–103 copies/mL following the second infusion, p = 0.04. Importantly, romidepsin did not decrease the number of HIV-specific T cells or inhibit T cell cytokine production. Adverse events (all grade 1–2 were consistent with the known side effects of romidepsin. In conclusion, romidepsin safely induced HIV-1 transcription resulting in plasma HIV-1 RNA that was readily detected with standard commercial assays demonstrating that significant reversal of HIV-1 latency in vivo is possible without blunting T cell-mediated immune responses. These finding have major implications for future trials aiming to eradicate the HIV-1 reservoir.clinicaltrials.gov NTC02092116.

  9. 胆红素/清蛋白比值及脑干听觉诱发电位与胆红素神经毒性的相关性%Relationship between bilirubin/albumin ratio, auditory brainstem responses and bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 杨波; 郑瑞平

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨高胆红素血症患儿血清总胆红素(TBIL)、总胆红素/清蛋白比值(B/A比值)与胆红素神经毒性的相关性,分析高胆红素血症患儿脑干听觉诱发电位(ABRs)中脑干功能损伤及听神经功能损伤敏感程度.方法 将91例足月高胆红素血症患儿根据ABRs结果分为A组(未见明显异常)、B组(仅脑干功能受损)、C组(仅听神经受损)、D组(脑干功能及听神经均受损),比较各组间TBIL、B/A比值的差异并分析二者与ABRs的关系.结果 A组与B组比较,TBIL差异无统计学意义(t=1.566,P>0.05),B/A比值差异有统计学意义(t=1.898,P<0.05);B组与C组TBIL、B/A比值比较差异均有统计学意义(tTBIL=2.372,PTBIL<0.05;tB/A=2.794,PB/A<0.01);A组与C组比较、A组与D组比较、B组与D组比较,TBIL比值差异均有统计学意义(t =2.452、3.328、2.256,P均<0.05);A组与C组比较、A组与D组比较、B组与D组比较,B/A比值差异均有统计学意义(=2.571、4.680、2.657,P均<0.05、0.01);C组与D组比较,TBIL、B/A比值差异均无统计学意义(tTBIL=0.705,PTBIL >0.05;tB/A=0.636,PB/A >0.05).TBIL、B/A比值的受试者工作特征曲线(ROC)下面积分别为0.919、0.829.TBIL、B/A比值与ABRs有显著相关性(r=0.495、0.564,P均<0.05).结论 B/A比值是预测足月儿胆红素神经毒性的良好指标,ABRs异常中脑干功能较听神经易受损.%Objective To explore the relationship between serum total bilirubin (TBIL),total bilirubin/albumin ratio (B/A ratio) and bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity,and to analyze the sensitivity of brainstem function and auditory nerval function in auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in full-term newborn infants with hyperbilirubinemia.Methods Ninety-one cases of full-term neonates with hyperbilirubinemia were divided into 4 groups according to the findings of ABRs:group A(with normal ABRs),group B (only brainstem dysfunction),group C (only auditory neural damage),group D(brainstem

  10. Musicians and Tone-Language Speakers Share Enhanced Brainstem Encoding but Not Perceptual Benefits for Musical Pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M.; Gandour, Jackson T.; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral and neurophysiological transfer effects from music experience to language processing are well-established but it is currently unclear whether or not linguistic expertise (e.g., speaking a tone language) benefits music-related processing and its perception. Here, we compare brainstem responses of English-speaking musicians/non-musicians…

  11. Detecting Intermediary Hosts by TCP Latency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurvinder; Eian, Martin; Willassen, Svein Y.; Mjølsnes, Stig Fr.

    Use of intermediary hosts as stepping stones to conceal tracks is common in Internet misuse. It is therefore desirable to find a method to detect whether the originating party is using an intermediary host. Such a detection technique would allow the activation of a number of countermeasures that would neutralize the effects of misuse, and make it easier to trace a perpetrator. This work explores a new approach in determining if a host communicating via TCP is the data originator or if it is acting as a mere TCP proxy. The approach is based on measuring the inter packet arrival time at the receiving end of the connection only, and correlating the observed results with the network latency between the receiver and the proxy. The results presented here indicate that determining the use of a proxy host is possible, if the network latency between the originator and proxy is larger than the network latency between the proxy and the receiver. We show that this technique has potential to be used to detect connections were data is sent through a TCP proxy, such as remote login through TCP proxies, or rejecting spam sent through a bot network.

  12. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  13. MicroRNA-155 Reinforces HIV Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas, Debbie S; Chan, Jonathan K; Oh, Eugene; Heidersbach, Amy J; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Chavez, Leonard; Verdin, Eric; Rape, Michael; Greene, Warner C

    2015-05-29

    The presence of a small number of infected but transcriptionally dormant cells currently thwarts a cure for the more than 35 million individuals infected with HIV. Reactivation of these latently infected cells may result in three fates: 1) cell death due to a viral cytopathic effect, 2) cell death due to immune clearance, or 3) a retreat into latency. Uncovering the dynamics of HIV gene expression and silencing in the latent reservoir will be crucial for developing an HIV-1 cure. Here we identify and characterize an intracellular circuit involving TRIM32, an HIV activator, and miR-155, a microRNA that may promote a return to latency in these transiently activated reservoir cells. Notably, we demonstrate that TRIM32, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, promotes reactivation from latency by directly modifying IκBα, leading to a novel mechanism of NF-κB induction not involving IκB kinase activation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Stress-induced increases in brainstem amino acid levels are prevented by chronic sodium hydrosulfide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warenycia, M W; Kombian, S B; Reiffenstein, R J

    1990-01-01

    Neurotransmitter amino acid levels were measured in select brain regions of rats and mice after chronic treatment with sublethal doses of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). Brainstem aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, taurine and GABA levels increased in chronically but not acutely saline-treated rats. These increases may have been due to stress from frequent handling, and were prevented by chronic NaHS treatment (7.5 mg/kg ip every 8 hr for 3 consecutive days). In contrast, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine increased in female but not in male ICR mouse brainstems after once daily treatment with 7.0 mg/kg NaHS for 5 consecutive days. These effects of NaHS may indicate chronic low level H2S neurotoxicity. Differences between chronic and acute treatments, female and male responses, and treatment paradigms may complicate interpretations of such toxicity studies.

  15. Impact of monaural frequency compression on binaural fusion at the brainstem level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Isabelle; Kohl, Manuel C; Hannemann, Ronny; Kornagel, Ulrich; Strauss, Daniel J; Corona-Strauss, Farah I

    2015-08-01

    A classical objective measure for binaural fusion at the brainstem level is the so-called β-wave of the binaural interaction component (BIC) in the auditory brainstem response (ABR). However, in some cases it appeared that a reliable detection of this component still remains a challenge. In this study, we investigate the wavelet phase synchronization stability (WPSS) of ABR data for the analysis of binaural fusion and compare it to the BIC. In particular, we examine the impact of monaural nonlinear frequency compression on binaural fusion. As the auditory system is tonotopically organized, an interaural frequency mismatch caused by monaural frequency compression could negatively effect binaural fusion. In this study, only few subjects showed a detectable β-wave and in most cases only for low ITDs. However, we present a novel objective measure for binaural fusion that outperforms the current state-of-the-art technique (BIC): the WPSS analysis showed a significant difference between the phase stability of the sum of the monaurally evoked responses and the phase stability of the binaurally evoked ABR. This difference could be an indicator for binaural fusion in the brainstem. Furthermore, we observed that monaural frequency compression could indeed effect binaural fusion, as the WPSS results for this condition vary strongly from the results obtained without frequency compression.

  16. Enterovirus 71 Brainstem Encephalitis and Cognitive and Motor Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Follow-up studies were conducted in 63 previously healthy children with enterovirus 71 brainstem encephalitis (49 stage II, 7 stage Ilia, and 7 stage Illb at National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.

  17. Brainstem encoding of speech and musical stimuli in congenital amusia: evidence from Cantonese speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Maggu, Akshay R; Lau, Joseph C Y; Wong, Patrick C M

    2014-01-01

    Congenital amusia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of musical processing that also impacts subtle aspects of speech processing. It remains debated at what stage(s) of auditory processing deficits in amusia arise. In this study, we investigated whether amusia originates from impaired subcortical encoding of speech (in quiet and noise) and musical sounds in the brainstem. Fourteen Cantonese-speaking amusics and 14 matched controls passively listened to six Cantonese lexical tones in quiet, two Cantonese tones in noise (signal-to-noise ratios at 0 and 20 dB), and two cello tones in quiet while their frequency-following responses (FFRs) to these tones were recorded. All participants also completed a behavioral lexical tone identification task. The results indicated normal brainstem encoding of pitch in speech (in quiet and noise) and musical stimuli in amusics relative to controls, as measured by FFR pitch strength, pitch error, and stimulus-to-response correlation. There was also no group difference in neural conduction time or FFR amplitudes. Both groups demonstrated better FFRs to speech (in quiet and noise) than to musical stimuli. However, a significant group difference was observed for tone identification, with amusics showing significantly lower accuracy than controls. Analysis of the tone confusion matrices suggested that amusics were more likely than controls to confuse between tones that shared similar acoustic features. Interestingly, this deficit in lexical tone identification was not coupled with brainstem abnormality for either speech or musical stimuli. Together, our results suggest that the amusic brainstem is not functioning abnormally, although higher-order linguistic pitch processing is impaired in amusia. This finding has significant implications for theories of central auditory processing, requiring further investigations into how different stages of auditory processing interact in the human brain.

  18. Radiotherapy for diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Fang, Yuan; Hui, Xuhui; Jv, Yan; You, Chao

    2016-06-27

    Diffuse brainstem glioma is a devastating disease with very poor prognosis. The most commonly used radiological treatment is conventional fractionated radiation. So far, there is no meta-analysis or systematic review available that assesses the benefits or harms of radiation in people with diffuse brainstem glioma. To assess the effects of conventional fractionated radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) versus other therapies (including different radiotherapy techniques) for newly diagnosed diffuse brainstem gliomas in children and young adults aged 0 to 21 years. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE/PubMed, and EMBASE to 19 August 2015. We scanned conference proceedings from the International Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOP), International Symposium on Paediatric Neuro-Oncology (ISPNO), Society of Neuro-Oncology (SNO), and European Association of Neuro-Oncology (EANO) from 1 January 2010 to 19 August 2015. We searched trial registers including the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) Register, the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the register of the National Institutes of Health to 19 August 2015. We imposed no language restrictions. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials (QRCTs), or controlled clinical trials (CCTs) that compared conventional fractionated radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) versus other therapies (including different radiotherapy techniques) for newly diagnosed diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults aged 0 to 21 years. Two review authors independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed the risk of bias in each eligible trial, and conducted GRADE assessment of included studies. We resolved disagreements through discussion. We performed analyses according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of

  19. Generation of spike latency tuning by thalamocortical circuits in auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Mesik, Lukas; Sun, Yujiao J; Liang, Feixue; Xiao, Zhongju; Tao, Huizhong W; Zhang, Li I

    2012-07-18

    In many sensory systems, the latency of spike responses of individual neurons is found to be tuned for stimulus features and proposed to be used as a coding strategy. Whether the spike latency tuning is simply relayed along sensory ascending pathways or generated by local circuits remains unclear. Here, in vivo whole-cell recordings from rat auditory cortical neurons in layer 4 revealed that the onset latency of their aggregate thalamic input exhibited nearly flat tuning for sound frequency, whereas their spike latency tuning was much sharper with a broadly expanded dynamic range. This suggests that the spike latency tuning is not simply inherited from the thalamus, but can be largely reconstructed by local circuits in the cortex. Dissecting of thalamocortical circuits and neural modeling further revealed that broadly tuned intracortical inhibition prolongs the integration time for spike generation preferentially at off-optimal frequencies, while sharply tuned intracortical excitation shortens it selectively at the optimal frequency. Such push and pull mechanisms mediated likely by feedforward excitatory and inhibitory inputs respectively greatly sharpen the spike latency tuning and expand its dynamic range. The modulation of integration time by thalamocortical-like circuits may represent an efficient strategy for converting information spatially coded in synaptic strength to temporal representation.

  20. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis.

  1. Brainstem cysticercose simulating cystic tumor lesion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter O. Arruda

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the case of a 37 year-old man with a solitary cysticercus cyst in the brainstem (pons successfully removed through a suboccipital craniectomy. Surgery in neurocysticercosis has been indicated in patients with hydrocephalus and/or large cystic lesions. Cystic lesions in the brainstem and spinal cord may have indication for surgery for two reasons: (1 diagnosis; and (2 treatment. Aspects related to differential diagnosis and therapeutic alternatives are discussed.

  2. Genetic variants in RBFOX3 are associated with sleep latency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Najaf; Allebrandt, Karla V.; van der Spek, Ashley; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Hek, Karin; Teder-Laving, Maris; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tonu; van Mill, Josine G.; Mbarek, Hamdi; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Melville, Scott A.; Del Greco, Fabiola M.; Byrne, Enda M.; Oole, Edwin; Kolcic, Ivana; Chen, Ting-hsu; Evans, Daniel S.; Coresh, Josef; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Karjalainen, Juha; Willemsen, Gonneke; Gharib, Sina A.; Zgaga, Lina; Mihailov, Evelin; Stone, Katie L.; Campbell, Harry; Brouwer, Rutger Ww; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Dogas, Zoran; Marciante, Kristin D.; Campbell, Susan; Borovecki, Fran; Luik, Annemarie I.; Li, Man; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; van den Hout, Mirjam C. G. N.; Cummings, Steven R.; Aulchenko, Yuru S.; Gehrman, Philip R.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Muller-Nurasyid, Martina; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hofman, Albert; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Oostra, Ben A.; Wright, Alan F.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wilson, James F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Polasek, Ozren; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Redline, Susan; Psaty, Bruce M.; Heath, Andrew C.; Merrow, Martha; Tranah, Gregory J.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Rudan, Igor; Tiemeier, Henning; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Metspalu, Andres; Meitinger, Thomas; Franke, Lude; Roenneberg, Till; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Time to fall asleep (sleep latency) is a major determinant of sleep quality. Chronic, long sleep latency is a major characteristic of sleep-onset insomnia and/or delayed sleep phase syndrome. In this study we aimed to discover common polymorphisms that contribute to the genetics of sleep latency. We

  3. The effects of iron supplementation on auditory brain-stem response with iron deficiency anemia in rats%缺铁性贫血治疗前后听性脑干反应的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周本忠; 王胜国; 王琼; 孙爱华; 马玉龙; 沈建军

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the therapeutic methods of sensorineural hearing loss with iron deficiency anemia and their effects. Method:Sixty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: Group A (iron deficiency group A) 24 rats, group B (iron deficiency group B) 24 rats and group C (control group) 20 rats. Group A and B were fed with iron deficiency diet for 6 weeks. By analyzing ABR and DPOAE, hearing loss was detected in group A and B. Then,group A was given iron supplementation diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapies. and group B was given iron supplementation diet only. Result:The auditory thresholds and period latencies (PL) of I waves of ABR and DPOAE amplitude in 2 kHz and 3kHz within group A and B were significantly different before and after treatment (P<0.05). But the effects of treatment between these two groups had not significant differences (P>0.05). Conclusion: It suggested that good results can be obtained by early iron supplementation in iron deficiency hearing loss cases. Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy may not be necessary.%目的:探讨缺铁性贫血导致感音神经性聋的治疗方法及疗效。方法:将68只Wistar大鼠分成3组:48只通过缺铁饮食制作缺铁性贫血模型,缺铁A组和B组各24只;另设标准对照C组正常大鼠20只。将A、B两组进行缺铁饲养6周,检测听性脑干反应(ABR),每组各随机取样10只检测畸变产物耳声发射(DPOAE),再分别给予铁剂加高压氧治疗和单纯铁剂治疗。结果:缺铁Wistar大鼠经6周饲养,较实验前ABR听觉阈值提高和Ⅰ波PL延长,经过两种不同方案治疗6周,均取得明显效果(P<0.05),但两组差异无显著性。结论:对于缺铁性贫血造成感音神经性耳聋,早期给予及时的铁剂治疗疗效好,而高压氧用于治疗此类耳聋并非必要。

  4. The study on the targets of the optical evoked auditory brainstem response on the cochlea of guinea pig stimulating by infrared laser%红外线激光刺激豚鼠耳蜗诱发听性脑干反应作用靶点的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢冰斌; 李华伟; 戴春富

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the targets of the infrared laser stimulating on the cochlea of guinea pig which evoked auditory brainstem response (oABR),and explore the mechanisms of the infrared neurostimulation.Methods A polished optical fiber with 200 μm diameter (NA =0.22) was planted into the scala tympani of guinea pigs to stimulate the cochlea of both the normal hearing and acute deafened guinea pigs.The direction of the fiber distal was changed to radiate different regions of the scala tympani,recording the oABR respectively.Differences of energy thresholds and amplitudes of oABR between normal hearing and acute deafened animals was concerned,and different responses were recorded as the optical path of laser fiber being changed to investigate the targets of the infrared laser stimulation.Immunofluorescence was used to detect the changes of inner and outer hair cells,and spiral ganglion neurons 7 days postdeafening,to looking for the probable association with the oABR changes at the same stimulus.SPSS 18.0 software was used to analyze the data.Results Inner and outer hair cells were damaged in basal and middle turn,butresidual hair cells were observed in apical turn.Only when the optical fiber pointed to Rosenthal's canal stimulated the spiral ganglion region directly could the oABR be evoked.No response was recorded while the fiber pointed to other directions.Conclusion Infrared laser stimulates cochlea evoked oABR generats from the response of spiral ganglion directly,the spiral ganglion neurons are the target of infrared stimulation.%目的 研究红外线激光刺激豚鼠耳蜗诱发听性脑干反应(optical evoled auditory brainstem response,oABR)的作用靶点,探讨激光刺激的作用机制.方法 对正常听力豚鼠及急性耳蜗损伤豚鼠耳蜗植入直径200μm的光纤(NA =0.22),光纤末端对准鼓阶不同部位进行激光刺激,记录并比较不同刺激角度下oABR的反应情况及正常听力与急性耳蜗损伤豚鼠oABR阈值和

  5. Group II muscle afferents probably contribute to the medium latency soleus stretch reflex during walking in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Ladouceur, Michel; Andersen, Jacob B.

    2001-01-01

    1. The objective of this study was to determine which afferents contribute to the medium latency response of the soleus stretch reflex resulting from an unexpected perturbation during human walking. 2. Fourteen healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at approximately 3.5 km h(-1) with the left ankle...... component (P = 0.004), whereas the medium latency component was unchanged (P = 0.437). 6. Two hours after the ingestion of tizanidine, an alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist known to selectively depress the transmission in the group II afferent pathway, the medium latency reflex was strongly depressed (P...... = 0.007), whereas the short latency component was unchanged (P = 0.653). 7. An ankle block with lidocaine hydrochloride was performed to suppress the cutaneous afferents of the foot and ankle. Neither the short (P = 0.453) nor medium (P = 0.310) latency reflexes were changed. 8. Our results support...

  6. Enhancements to the multiple sleep latency test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Vargas S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sonia Meza-Vargas, Eleni Giannouli, Magdy Younes Sleep Disorders Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Introduction: The utility of multiple sleep latency tests (MSLTs is limited to determining sleep onset latency (SOL and rapid eye movement sleep latency. The odds ratio product (ORP is a continuous index of sleep depth with values of 0, 1.0, and 2.5 reflecting very deep sleep, light sleep, and full wakefulness, respectively. We determined the time course of sleep depth during MSLT naps expecting that this would enhance the test's clinical utility. Methods: Thirty MSLTs (150 naps were performed for excessive somnolence. Patients indicated whether they slept (yes/no after each nap. SOL was scored by two experienced technologists. Time course of ORP was determined with a commercial system. We determined ORP at SOL (ORPSOL, times ORP decreased <2.0, <1.5, <1.0 and <0.5 during the entire nap duration, and the integral of decrease in ORP over nap duration (ΔORPINT. Results: SOL occurred almost invariably when ORP was between 1.0 and 2.0. Of 47 naps (21 patients with SOL ,5 minutes, ORP decreased <1.0 (light sleep in <5 minutes in only 13 naps (nine patients and <0.5 (deep sleep in only two naps in one patient. The relation between ORPINT and frequency of sleep perception was well defined, allowing determination of a threshold for sleep perception. This threshold ranged widely (5–50 ΔORP*epoch. Conclusion: As currently identified, SOL reflects transition into a highly unstable state between wakefulness and sleep. Reporting the times of attaining different sleep depths may help better identify patients at high risk of vigilance loss. Furthermore, an ORPSOL outside the range 1.0–2.0 can help identify scoring errors. Keywords: odds ratio product, sleep perception, idiopathic hypersomnia

  7. Delineating function and connectivity of optokinetic hubs in the cerebellum and the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehl, Ria Maxine; Hinkel, Carolin; Bauermann, Thomas; Eulenburg, Peter Zu

    2017-06-23

    Optokinetic eye movements are crucial for keeping a stable image on the retina during movements of the head. These eye movements can be differentiated into a cortically generated response (optokinetic look nystagmus) and the highly reflexive optokinetic stare nystagmus, which is controlled by circuits in the brainstem and cerebellum. The contributions of these infratentorial networks and their functional connectivity with the cortical eye fields are still poorly understood in humans. To map ocular motor centres in the cerebellum and brainstem, we studied stare nystagmus using small-field optokinetic stimuli in the horizontal and vertical directions in 22 healthy subjects. We were able to differentiate ocular motor areas of the pontine brainstem and midbrain in vivo for the first time. Direction and velocity-dependent activations were found in the pontine brainstem (nucleus reticularis, tegmenti pontis, and paramedian pontine reticular formation), the uvula, flocculus, and cerebellar tonsils. The ocular motor vermis, on the other hand, responded to constant and accelerating velocity stimulation. Moreover, deactivation patterns depict a governing role for the cerebellar tonsils in ocular motor control. Functional connectivity results of these hubs reveal the close integration of cortico-cerebellar ocular motor and vestibular networks in humans. Adding to the cortical concept of a right-hemispheric predominance for visual-spatial processing, we found a complementary left-sided cerebellar dominance for our ocular motor task. A deeper understanding of the role of the cerebellum and especially the cerebellar tonsils for eye movement control in a clinical context seems vitally important and is now feasible with functional neuroimaging.

  8. Pain fiber anesthetic reduces brainstem Fos after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badral, B; Davies, A J; Kim, Y H; Ahn, J S; Hong, S D; Chung, G; Kim, J S; Oh, S B

    2013-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that pain-sensing neurons in the trigeminal system can be selectively anesthetized by co-application of QX-314 with the TRPV1 receptor agonist, capsaicin (QX cocktail). Here we examined whether this new anesthetic strategy can block the neuronal changes in the brainstem following molar tooth extraction in the rat. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received infiltration injection of anesthetic 10 min prior to lower molar tooth extraction. Neuronal activation was determined by immunohistochemistry for the proto-oncogene protein c-Fos in transverse sections of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C). After tooth extraction, c-Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) detected in the dorsomedial region of bilateral Sp5C was highest at 2 hrs (p tooth extraction; reduced Fos-LI was also observed with the conventional local anesthetic lidocaine. Pulpal anesthesia by infiltration injection was confirmed by inhibition of the jaw-opening reflex in response to electrical tooth pulp stimulation. Our results suggest that the QX cocktail anesthetic is effective in reducing neuronal activation following tooth extraction. Thus, a selective pain fiber 'nociceptive anesthetic' strategy may provide an effective local anesthetic option for dental patients in the clinic.

  9. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs. PMID:23803414

  10. Cortical and brainstem plasticity in Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppa, Antonio; Marsili, Luca; Di Stasio, Flavio; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Pasquini, Massimo; Cardona, Francesco; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2014-10-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is characterized by motor/vocal tics commonly associated with psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. We investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in Tourette patients, exposed and unexposed to chronic drug treatment, with and without psychiatric disturbances. We also investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We studied 20 Tourette patients with and without psychiatric disturbances, 15 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 20 healthy subjects. All groups included drug-naïve patients. We conditioned the left primary motor cortex with intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation and recorded motor evoked potentials. We conditioned the supraorbital nerve with facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation and recorded the blink reflex late response area. In healthy subjects, intermittent theta-burst increased and continuous theta-burst stimulation decreased motor evoked potentials. Differently, intermittent theta-burst failed to increase and continuous theta-burst stimulation failed to decrease motor evoked potentials in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances. In obsessive-compulsive disorder, intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation elicited normal responses. In healthy subjects and in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder, the blink reflex late response area increased after facilitatory high-frequency and decreased after inhibitory high-frequency stimulation. Conversely, in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances, facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation left the blink reflex late response area unchanged. Theta-burst and high-frequency stimulation elicited similar responses in drug-naïve and chronically treated patients. Tourette patients have reduced plasticity regardless of psychiatric disturbances. These findings suggest that abnormal plasticity contributes to the

  11. 术中经蜗窗龛电刺激记录听性脑干反应方法的建立及初步应用%Establishment and rudimentary application of the method of recording auditory brainstem responses electrically stimulated via round-window niche in cochlear implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程靖宁; 曹克利; 魏朝刚; 杨立军; 栾岚; 李欢; 李原; 张秋航

    2008-01-01

    current Was used as electrical stimulation via round window niche,and then electrically evoked auditory brainstem responge was recorded.Results Electrically evoked auditory brainstem response waveforms were clearlv recorded in all 17 cases.The Iatencies of Ⅲ and Ⅴ waves were(2.12±0.18)ms and(4.18±0.19)ms respectively,with threshold as (220.0±16.04)CL.Thewaveforms of the 2 patientswith auditory neuropathy,5 pailentswithinner ear malformation.1 patient with ossifiod cochlea and 1 patient with leukodystrophy were well differentiated.Conclusions Monitoting electrically evoked auditory brainstem response was an obiective nerve electmphysiological testing method that accurately reflects function complexness of auditory pathway.It had important value for helping making the judgment whether patients could acquire auditory response after cochlear implantation.This method Was safe and gave high emission of auditory response,therefore should be spread widely.

  12. AN ANALYSIS AND COMPARISON OF BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED POTENTIALS AMONG SOUTH INDIAN MIDDLE-AGED AND ELDERLY SUBJECTS AND PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Venkatasubbaiah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Despite the evidence that the incidence of hearing impairment is higher in type 2 diabetes subjects, very little is known about the nature and characteristics of this disability and the specific mechanisms leading to the hearing problems in diabetic adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS 40 patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus were included in the study and grouped as patients aged 35 to 58 years (A and aged above 58 years (B; 40 patients were taken as control group with similar age grouping; 35 to 58 years (C above 58 years (D. Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA test was conducted according to the ASHA guidelines. Objective hearing evaluation was done by BERA (Brainstem Evoked Response Audiometry. RESULTS Higher degree of Hearing Loss (HL was observed in DM patients in all frequencies from 500 HZ to 10 KHZ in comparison to nonDM patients and it was statistically significant. Slower rate peaks occurred at I, III and V waves in elderly DM patients when compared to the elderly control group. (Peak I and V (p <0.001. Similarly, in the middle-aged group peaks I, III and V occurred at a significantly slower rate in the DM group when compared to the non-DM group (p <0.001. Interpeak latencies at 21.1 rate for peak III-V and peak I-V were consistently longer among the diabetics groups of two age groups when compared to the control group (p <0.001. Similar results were obtained at 63.3 rates in the elderly and middle-aged group. CONCLUSION In the earlier course of Type 2 Diabetes, though the person may be asymptomatic degenerative changes may begin to appear in the central auditory pathway and result in significant HL, which could be detected with early investigation to elicit of Brain Stem evoked potentials.

  13. Ablation of STAT3 in the B Cell Compartment Restricts Gammaherpesvirus Latency In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandeep Steven; Foreman, Hui-Chen Chang; Sioux, Thubten Ozula; Park, Gee Ho; Poli, Valeria; Reich, Nancy C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A challenging property of gammaherpesviruses is their ability to establish lifelong persistence. The establishment of latency in B cells is thought to involve active virus engagement of host signaling pathways. Pathogenic effects of these viruses during latency or following reactivation can be devastating to the host. Many cancers, including those associated with members of the gammaherpesvirus family, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus, express elevated levels of active host signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3). STAT3 is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation in response to many cytokines and can orchestrate effector responses that include proliferation, inflammation, metastasis, and developmental programming. However, the contribution of STAT3 to gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis remains to be completely understood. This is the first study to have identified STAT3 as a critical host determinant of the ability of gammaherpesvirus to establish long-term latency in an animal model of disease. Following an acute infection, murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) established latency in resident B cells, but establishment of latency was dramatically reduced in animals with a B cell-specific STAT3 deletion. The lack of STAT3 in B cells did not impair germinal center responses for immunoglobulin (Ig) class switching in the spleen and did not reduce either total or virus-specific IgG titers. Although ablation of STAT3 in B cells did not have a global effect on these assays of B cell function, it had long-term consequences for the viral load of the host, since virus latency was reduced at 6 to 8 weeks postinfection. Our findings establish host STAT3 as a mediator of gammaherpesvirus persistence. PMID:27486189

  14. Processing Complex Sounds Passing through the Rostral Brainstem: The New Early Filter Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, John E; Campbell, Tom A

    2016-01-01

    The rostral brainstem receives both "bottom-up" input from the ascending auditory system and "top-down" descending corticofugal connections. Speech information passing through the inferior colliculus of elderly listeners reflects the periodicity envelope of a speech syllable. This information arguably also reflects a composite of temporal-fine-structure (TFS) information from the higher frequency vowel harmonics of that repeated syllable. The amplitude of those higher frequency harmonics, bearing even higher frequency TFS information, correlates positively with the word recognition ability of elderly listeners under reverberatory conditions. Also relevant is that working memory capacity (WMC), which is subject to age-related decline, constrains the processing of sounds at the level of the brainstem. Turning to the effects of a visually presented sensory or memory load on auditory processes, there is a load-dependent reduction of that processing, as manifest in the auditory brainstem responses (ABR) evoked by to-be-ignored clicks. Wave V decreases in amplitude with increases in the visually presented memory load. A visually presented sensory load also produces a load-dependent reduction of a slightly different sort: The sensory load of visually presented information limits the disruptive effects of background sound upon working memory performance. A new early filter model is thus advanced whereby systems within the frontal lobe (affected by sensory or memory load) cholinergically influence top-down corticofugal connections. Those corticofugal connections constrain the processing of complex sounds such as speech at the level of the brainstem. Selective attention thereby limits the distracting effects of background sound entering the higher auditory system via the inferior colliculus. Processing TFS in the brainstem relates to perception of speech under adverse conditions. Attentional selectivity is crucial when the signal heard is degraded or masked: e.g., speech in

  15. [Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time: Advances in studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan-rong; Xie, Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Although premature ejaculation (PE) is a common type of male sexual dysfunction, to date we lack a unified definition of PE. The multidimensional definition of PE has been accepted by more and more clinicians. Intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) is one of the three important dimensions (time to ejaculation, inability to control or delay ejaculation, and negative consequences) for defining PE. Rapid ejaculation is one of the core symptoms of PE and IELT is an objective measurement as well as an important tool for the evaluation of PE. This article reviews estimated IELT, stopwatch-measured IELT, the correlation between estimated and stopwatch-measured IELT, and the factors affecting IELT in the general male population, PE patients, and those complaining of PE.

  16. Molecular Understanding of HIV-1 Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been an important breakthrough in the treatment of HIV-1 infection and has also a powerful tool to upset the equilibrium of viral production and HIV-1 pathogenesis. Despite the advent of potent combinations of this therapy, the long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs like cells from monocyte-macrophage lineage and resting memory CD4+ T cells which are established early during primary infection constitute a major obstacle to virus eradication. Further HAART interruption leads to immediate rebound viremia from latent reservoirs. This paper focuses on the essentials of the molecular mechanisms for the establishment of HIV-1 latency with special concern to present and future possible treatment strategies to completely purge and target viral persistence in the reservoirs.

  17. CD8α dendritic cells drive establishment of HSV-1 latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Mott

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that CD8 T cells play the key role to maintain HSV-1 latency in trigeminal ganglia of ocularly infected mice. Yet, comparably little is known about the role of innate immunity in establishment of viral latency. In the current study, we investigated whether CD8α DCs impact HSV-1 latency by examining latency in the trigeminal ganglia (TG of wild-type (WT C57BL/6 versus CD8α-/- (lack functional CD8 T cells and CD8α+ DCs, CD8β-/- (have functional CD8α+ T cells and CD8α+ DCs, and β2m-/- (lack functional CD8 T cells but have CD8α+ DCs mice as well as BXH2 (have functional CD8 T cells but lack CD8α+ DCs versus WT C3H (have functional CD8α T cells and CD8α+ DCs mice. We also determined whether the phenotype of CD8α-/- and BXH2 mice could be restored to that of WT mice by adoptive transfer of WT CD8+ T cells or bone marrow (BM derived CD8α+ DCs. Our results clearly demonstrate that CD8α DCs, rather than CD8 T cells, are responsible for enhanced viral latency and recurrences.

  18. HIV-1 Tat and Viral Latency: What We Can Learn from Naturally Occurring Sequence Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamori, Doreen; Ueno, Takamasa

    2017-01-01

    Despite the effective use of antiretroviral therapy, the remainder of a latently HIV-1-infected reservoir mainly in the resting memory CD4+ T lymphocyte subset has provided a great setback toward viral eradication. While host transcriptional silencing machinery is thought to play a dominant role in HIV-1 latency, HIV-1 protein such as Tat, may affect both the establishment and the reversal of latency. Indeed, mutational studies have demonstrated that insufficient Tat transactivation activity can result in impaired transcription of viral genes and the establishment of latency in cell culture experiments. Because Tat protein is one of highly variable proteins within HIV-1 proteome, it is conceivable that naturally occurring Tat mutations may differentially modulate Tat functions, thereby influencing the establishment and/or the reversal of viral latency in vivo. In this mini review, we summarize the recent findings of Tat naturally occurring polymorphisms associating with host immune responses and we highlight the implication of Tat sequence variations in relation to HIV latency.

  19. Classifier-based latency estimation: a novel way to estimate and predict BCI accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David E.; Warschausky, Seth; Huggins, Jane E.

    2013-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that detect event-related potentials (ERPs) rely on classification schemes that are vulnerable to latency jitter, a phenomenon known to occur with ERPs such as the P300 response. The objective of this work was to investigate the role that latency jitter plays in BCI classification. Approach. We developed a novel method, classifier-based latency estimation (CBLE), based on a generalization of Woody filtering. The technique works by presenting the time-shifted data to the classifier, and using the time shift that corresponds to the maximal classifier score. Main results. The variance of CBLE estimates correlates significantly (p < 10-42) with BCI accuracy in the Farwell-Donchin BCI paradigm. Additionally, CBLE predicts same-day accuracy, even from small datasets or datasets that have already been used for classifier training, better than the accuracy on the small dataset (p < 0.05). The technique should be relatively classifier-independent, and the results were confirmed on two linear classifiers. Significance. The results suggest that latency jitter may be an important cause of poor BCI performance, and methods that correct for latency jitter may improve that performance. CBLE can also be used to decrease the amount of data needed for accuracy estimation, allowing research on effects with shorter timescales.

  20. VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS-ITS PATHOGENESIS, LATENCY & CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Ahmed

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus causes primary infection as chickenpox, at which time latencyis established in the neurons of the dorsal root ganglia or ganglia of the cranial nerves.Reactivation produces herpes zoster infection (HZI, commonly called shingles. Anunderstanding of the mechanisms of latency is crucial in developing effective therapies forVZV infections of the nervous system. This article describes the pathogenesis of VZVwhich includes immune response to the virus, immune evasion by the virus, mechanism ofits latency and cell-mediated immunity.

  1. Choice Latency as a Cue for Children's Subjective Confidence in the Correctness of Their Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriat, Asher; Ackerman, Rakefet

    2010-01-01

    Research with adults indicates that confidence in the correctness of an answer decreases as a function of the amount of time it takes to reach that answer, suggesting that people use response latency as a mnemonic cue for subjective confidence. Experiment 1 extended investigation to 2nd, 3rd and 5th graders. When children chose the answer to…

  2. Toluene alters p75NTR expression in the rat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Jesús; Morón, Lena; Zárate, Jon; Gutiérrez, Arantza; Churruca, Itziar; Echevarría, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    Toluene is a neurotoxic organic solvent widely used in industry. Acute toluene administration in rats induced a significant increase in the numbers of neural cells immunostained for p75NTR in several brainstem regions, such as the raphe magnus and the nucleus of the solitary tract, as well as in the lateral reticular, gigantocellular, vestibular and ventral cochlear nuclei, without any in the facial and spinal trigeminal nuclei and the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. These data suggest that p75NTR could be involved in toluene-induced neurotoxic efffects in the rat brainstem.

  3. 穴位电刺激对豚鼠听皮质中潜伏期诱发电位波幅的影响%EFFECT OF ELECTRO-STIMULATION OF POINTS ON AMPLITUDES OF AUDITORY MIDDLE LATENCY RESPONSE IN GUINEA PIGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周庆辉; 曾兆麟; 等

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of electro-stimulation of points on amplitudes of auditory middle latency response in guinea pigs.Method:Electro-acupuncture stimulation(unsynchronous with the click) and repetitive electrical stimulation(synchronized with the click) of points on foreleg(Waiguan and Zhongzhu)were administered to guinea pigs of two groups respectively.Auditory middle latency responses evoked by click were recorded before and after the stimulation,and the different effects of these two electro-stimulation modalities on the amplitudes of the evoked response were analyzed.Result:The amplitudes of the evoked response decreased greatly during the electro-acupuncture period when electro-acupuncture of points on foreleg was administered,while the amplitudes increased greatly with the administration of repetitive electrical stimulation.Conclusion:It is not proper to assess the excitability of the cerebral cortex only by the changes of the amplitudes of the evoked potential during electro-acupuncture.%目的:观察穴位电刺激对豚鼠听皮质中潜伏期诱发电位波幅的影响。方法:分别以电针和重复电脉冲刺激豚鼠前肢的外关、中渚穴,刺激前后记录短声诱发的听皮质中潜伏期诱发电位,并分析两种电刺激方式对诱发电位波幅的不同影响。结果:电针前肢穴时,电针期间诱发电位波幅明显减小,而重复电脉冲刺激前肢穴时,波幅明显增大。结论:不能仅以电针期间诱发电位波幅大小的变化来衡量皮质兴奋性的变化。

  4. Genetics Home Reference: leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions LTBL leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Close All Description Leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate ( LTBL ) is a disorder that affects the ...

  5. Energy latency tradeoffs for medium access and sleep scheduling in wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Lu

    Wireless sensor networks are expected to be used in a wide range of applications from environment monitoring to event detection. The key challenge is to provide energy efficient communication; however, latency remains an important concern for many applications that require fast response. The central thesis of this work is that energy efficient medium access and sleep scheduling mechanisms can be designed without necessarily sacrificing application-specific latency performance. We validate this thesis through results from four case studies that cover various aspects of medium access and sleep scheduling design in wireless sensor networks. Our first effort, DMAC, is to design an adaptive low latency and energy efficient MAC for data gathering to reduce the sleep latency. We propose staggered schedule, duty cycle adaptation, data prediction and the use of more-to-send packets to enable seamless packet forwarding under varying traffic load and channel contentions. Simulation and experimental results show significant energy savings and latency reduction while ensuring high data reliability. The second research effort, DESS, investigates the problem of designing sleep schedules in arbitrary network communication topologies to minimize the worst case end-to-end latency (referred to as delay diameter). We develop a novel graph-theoretical formulation, derive and analyze optimal solutions for the tree and ring topologies and heuristics for arbitrary topologies. The third study addresses the problem of minimum latency joint scheduling and routing (MLSR). By constructing a novel delay graph, the optimal joint scheduling and routing can be solved by M node-disjoint paths algorithm under multiple channel model. We further extended the algorithm to handle dynamic traffic changes and topology changes. A heuristic solution is proposed for MLSR under single channel interference. In the fourth study, EEJSPC, we first formulate a fundamental optimization problem that provides tunable

  6. Tap Arduino: An Arduino microcontroller for low-latency auditory feedback in sensorimotor synchronization experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Benjamin G; van Vugt, Floris T

    2016-12-01

    Timing abilities are often measured by having participants tap their finger along with a metronome and presenting tap-triggered auditory feedback. These experiments predominantly use electronic percussion pads combined with software (e.g., FTAP or Max/MSP) that records responses and delivers auditory feedback. However, these setups involve unknown latencies between tap onset and auditory feedback and can sometimes miss responses or record multiple, superfluous responses for a single tap. These issues may distort measurements of tapping performance or affect the performance of the individual. We present an alternative setup using an Arduino microcontroller that addresses these issues and delivers low-latency auditory feedback. We validated our setup by having participants (N = 6) tap on a force-sensitive resistor pad connected to the Arduino and on an electronic percussion pad with various levels of force and tempi. The Arduino delivered auditory feedback through a pulse-width modulation (PWM) pin connected to a headphone jack or a wave shield component. The Arduino's PWM (M = 0.6 ms, SD = 0.3) and wave shield (M = 2.6 ms, SD = 0.3) demonstrated significantly lower auditory feedback latencies than the percussion pad (M = 9.1 ms, SD = 2.0), FTAP (M = 14.6 ms, SD = 2.8), and Max/MSP (M = 15.8 ms, SD = 3.4). The PWM and wave shield latencies were also significantly less variable than those from FTAP and Max/MSP. The Arduino missed significantly fewer taps, and recorded fewer superfluous responses, than the percussion pad. The Arduino captured all responses, whereas at lower tapping forces, the percussion pad missed more taps. Regardless of tapping force, the Arduino outperformed the percussion pad. Overall, the Arduino is a high-precision, low-latency, portable, and affordable tool for auditory experiments.

  7. Localization of the brainstem GABAergic neurons controlling paradoxical (REM sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sapin

    Full Text Available Paradoxical sleep (PS is a state characterized by cortical activation, rapid eye movements and muscle atonia. Fifty years after its discovery, the neuronal network responsible for the genesis of PS has been only partially identified. We recently proposed that GABAergic neurons would have a pivotal role in that network. To localize these GABAergic neurons, we combined immunohistochemical detection of Fos with non-radioactive in situ hybridization of GAD67 mRNA (GABA synthesis enzyme in control rats, rats deprived of PS for 72 h and rats allowed to recover after such deprivation. Here we show that GABAergic neurons gating PS (PS-off neurons are principally located in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and the dorsal part of the deep mesencephalic reticular nucleus immediately ventral to it (dDpMe. Furthermore, iontophoretic application of muscimol for 20 min in this area in head-restrained rats induced a strong and significant increase in PS quantities compared to saline. In addition, we found a large number of GABAergic PS-on neurons in the vlPAG/dDPMe region and the medullary reticular nuclei known to generate muscle atonia during PS. Finally, we showed that PS-on neurons triggering PS localized in the SLD are not GABAergic. Altogether, our results indicate that multiple populations of PS-on GABAergic neurons are distributed in the brainstem while only one population of PS-off GABAergic neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDpMe region exist. From these results, we propose a revised model for PS control in which GABAergic PS-on and PS-off neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDPMe region play leading roles.

  8. Sensitization of trigeminal brainstem pathways in a model for tear deficient dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mostafeezur; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Thompson, Randall; Katagiri, Ayano; Bereiter, David A

    2015-05-01

    Chronic dry eye disease (DE) is associated with an unstable tear film and symptoms of ocular discomfort. The characteristics of symptoms suggest a key role for central neural processing; however, little is known about central neuroplasticity and DE. We used a model for tear deficient DE and assessed effects on eye blink behavior, orbicularis oculi muscle activity (OOemg), and trigeminal brainstem neural activity in male rats. Ocular-responsive neurons were recorded at the interpolaris/caudalis transition (Vi/Vc) and Vc/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) regions under isoflurane, whereas OOemg activity was recorded under urethane. Spontaneous tear volume was reduced by ∼50% at 14 days after exorbital gland removal. Hypertonic saline-evoked eye blink behavior in awake rats was enhanced throughout the 14 days after surgery. Saline-evoked neural activity at the Vi/Vc transition and in superficial and deep laminae at the Vc/C1 region was greatly enhanced in DE rats. Neurons from DE rats classified as wide dynamic range displayed enlarged convergent periorbital receptive fields consistent with central sensitization. Saline-evoked OOemg activity was markedly enhanced in DE rats compared with controls. Synaptic blockade at the Vi/Vc transition or the Vc/C1 region greatly reduced hypertonic saline-evoked OOemg activity in DE and sham rats. These results indicated that persistent tear deficiency caused sensitization of ocular-responsive neurons at multiple regions of the caudal trigeminal brainstem and enhanced OOemg activity. Central sensitization of ocular-related brainstem circuits is a significant factor in DE and likely contributes to the apparent weak correlation between peripheral signs of tear dysfunction and symptoms of irritation.

  9. Endocannabinoids in the brainstem modulate dural trigeminovascular nociceptive traffic via CB1 and "triptan" receptors: implications in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Simon; Holland, Philip R; Lasalandra, Michele P; Goadsby, Peter J

    2013-09-11

    Activation and sensitization of trigeminovascular nociceptive pathways is believed to contribute to the neural substrate of the severe and throbbing nature of pain in migraine. Endocannabinoids, as well as being physiologically analgesic, are known to inhibit dural trigeminovascular nociceptive responses. They are also involved in the descending modulation of cutaneous-evoked C-fiber spinal nociceptive responses from the brainstem. The purpose of this study was to determine whether endocannabinoids are involved in the descending modulation of dural and/or cutaneous facial trigeminovascular nociceptive responses, from the brainstem ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). CB1 receptor activation in the vlPAG attenuated dural-evoked Aδ-fiber neurons (maximally by 19%) and basal spontaneous activity (maximally by 33%) in the rat trigeminocervical complex, but there was no effect on cutaneous facial receptive field responses. This inhibitory vlPAG-mediated modulation was inhibited by specific CB1 receptor antagonism, given via the vlPAG, and with a 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, given either locally in the vlPAG or systemically. These findings demonstrate for the first time that brainstem endocannabinoids provide descending modulation of both basal trigeminovascular neuronal tone and Aδ-fiber dural-nociceptive responses, which differs from the way the brainstem modulates spinal nociceptive transmission. Furthermore, our data demonstrate a novel interaction between serotonergic and endocannabinoid systems in the processing of somatosensory nociceptive information, suggesting that some of the therapeutic action of triptans may be via endocannabinoid containing neurons in the vlPAG.

  10. Brainstem death: A comprehensive review in Indian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanwate, Anant Dattatray

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, the cardiopulmonary definition of death lost its significance in favor of brain death. Brain death is a permanent cessation of all functions of the brain in which though individual organs may function but lack of integrating function of the brain, lack of respiratory drive, consciousness, and cognition confirms to the definition that death is an irreversible cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole. In spite of medical and legal acceptance globally, the concept of brain death and brain-stem death is still unclear to many. Brain death is not promptly declared due to lack of awareness and doubts about the legal procedure of certification. Many brain dead patients are kept on life supporting systems needlessly. In this comprehensive review, an attempt has been made to highlight the history and concept of brain death and brain-stem death; the anatomical and physiological basis of brain-stem death, and criteria to diagnose brain-stem death in India. PMID:25249744

  11. Stance disturbance in multiple sclerosis: brainstem lesions and posturographic assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schalek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Background. Balance disorders are commonly evidenced during the course of multiple sclerosis (MS. The aim of this study is to report characteristics of MS patient stance control disorders, measured by means of posturography and related to the brainstem lesions.

    Methods. Thirty-eight patients affected by MS, mildly to moderately disable according to Kurtzke’s Expanded Disability Status Scale, underwent a complete clinical neurological and vestibular evaluation and brain MRI scanning. All patients were then tested on a static posturography platform (Tetrax, Israel in four conditions: eyes open and closed standing on a firm surface and on a foam pad.

    Results. Clinical and/or MRI evidence of brainstem involvement was observed in 55.3 % of patients. When brainstem lesion was detected, Fourier analysis showed a typical pattern characterized by inversion of the  0- 0.1 Hz and  0.1 - 0.25 Hz. frequency bands.

    Conclusions. MS leads to pervasive postural disturbances in the majority of subjects, including the visuo-vestibular loops and proprioception involving vestibulo-spinal pathways in at least 55.3 % of patients. Our results may also suggest the presence of Fourier inversion in patients with brainstem lesions.


  12. Brainstem death: A comprehensive review in Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Dattatray Dhanwate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, the cardiopulmonary definition of death lost its significance in favor of brain death. Brain death is a permanent cessation of all functions of the brain in which though individual organs may function but lack of integrating function of the brain, lack of respiratory drive, consciousness, and cognition confirms to the definition that death is an irreversible cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole. In spite of medical and legal acceptance globally, the concept of brain death and brain-stem death is still unclear to many. Brain death is not promptly declared due to lack of awareness and doubts about the legal procedure of certification. Many brain dead patients are kept on life supporting systems needlessly. In this comprehensive review, an attempt has been made to highlight the history and concept of brain death and brain-stem death; the anatomical and physiological basis of brain-stem death, and criteria to diagnose brain-stem death in India.

  13. Brainstem death: A comprehensive review in Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanwate, Anant Dattatray

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, the cardiopulmonary definition of death lost its significance in favor of brain death. Brain death is a permanent cessation of all functions of the brain in which though individual organs may function but lack of integrating function of the brain, lack of respiratory drive, consciousness, and cognition confirms to the definition that death is an irreversible cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole. In spite of medical and legal acceptance globally, the concept of brain death and brain-stem death is still unclear to many. Brain death is not promptly declared due to lack of awareness and doubts about the legal procedure of certification. Many brain dead patients are kept on life supporting systems needlessly. In this comprehensive review, an attempt has been made to highlight the history and concept of brain death and brain-stem death; the anatomical and physiological basis of brain-stem death, and criteria to diagnose brain-stem death in India.

  14. Intraparenchymal papillary meningioma of brainstem: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xiao-Bing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both intraparenchymal papillary meningioma and papillary meningioma with cyst formation of brainstem have never been reported. The authors present an extremely rare case of patient with intraparenchymal papillary meningioma of brainstem. A 23-year-old Chinese male presented with a 4-month history of progressive left upper limb and facial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic-solid, heterogeneously enhancing mass in pons and right cerebral peduncle with no dural attachment. The tumor was totally removed via subtemporal approach. During surgery, the lesion was found to be completely intraparenchymal. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations were compatible with the diagnosis of papillary meningioma. The lesion recurred nine months after primary surgery, a second surgery followed by radiotherapy was performed. Till to now (nearly 2 years after the treatment, the patient is tumor free survival. Intraparenchymal meningioma of brainstem with cystic formation is very rare, however, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a brainstem neoplasm. The present case strongly recommended that postoperative radiotherapy was essential for the patients with papillary meningiomas.

  15. Mapping of CGRP in the alpaca (Lama pacos) brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Eliana; Coveñas, Rafael; Yi, Pedro; Aguilar, Luís Angel; Lerma, Luís; Andrade, Roy; Mangas, Arturo; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Narváez, José Angel

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the presence of immunoreactive structures containing calcitonin gene-related peptide in the alpaca brainstem. This is the first time that a detailed mapping of the cell bodies and fibers containing this neuropeptide in the alpaca brainstem has been carried out using an immunocytochemical technique. Immunoreactive cell bodies and fibers were widely distributed throughout the alpaca brainstem. A high density of calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive perikarya was found in the superior colliculus, the dorsal nucleus of the raphe, the trochlear nucleus, the lateral division of the marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, the motor trigeminal nucleus, the facial nucleus, the pons reticular formation, the retrofacial nucleus, the rostral hypoglossal nucleus, and in the motor dorsal nucleus of the vagus, whereas a high density of fibers containing calcitonin gene-related peptide was observed in the lateral division of the marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, the parvocellular division of the alaminar spinal trigeminal nucleus, the external cuneate nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the laminar spinal trigeminal nucleus, and in the area postrema. This widespread distribution indicates that the neuropeptide studied might be involved in multiple functions in the alpaca brainstem.

  16. Preparation and Culture of Chicken Auditory Brainstem Slices

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Jason T.; Seidl, Armin H.; Rubel, Edwin W; Barria, Andres

    2011-01-01

    The chicken auditory brainstem is a well-established model system that has been widely used to study the anatomy and physiology of auditory processing at discreet periods of development 1-4 as well as mechanisms for temporal coding in the central nervous system 5-7.

  17. INFLUENCE OF ACUPUNCTURE (“JIN‘S SAN ZHEN”) ON BRAINSTEM EVOKED POTENTIALS IN MENTAL RETARDATION CHILDREN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁青; 马瑞玲; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of acupuncture(“JIN's San Zhen”)on infantile mental retardation (MR).Methods:44 cases of MR children were attributed to treatment group and 3 normal children to control group.P3(event-related potential) and brainstem evoked potentials were used as the indexes.Acupoints “Si-shen Zhen”,“Head Zhi San Zhen”,“Hand Zhi San Zhen”,“Foot Zhi San Zhen” were unctured with filiform needles,and stimulated by manipulating the needle once every 5minutes with uniform reinforcing-reducing method.The treatment was conducted once daily,6 times every week,with 4 months being a therapeutic course.Results:In comparison with normal children,the latency of P3 was longer and its amplitude lower in MR children.After 4 months' acupuncture treatment,the latency was shortened and the smplitude increased significantly in comparison with pre-treatment (P<0.01,0.05).Results of the total intelligence quotient(TIQ) evaluation showed a 70.3% coincidence rate compared with improvement of P3.Conclusion:Changes of P3 and BAEP(brain auditory evoked potential) after acupuncture treatment may be related to the effect of “JIN's San Zhen” in bettering clinical symptoms and signs of MR infantile patients.

  18. Characteristics of brainstem auditory evoked potential of neonates with mild or moderate hyperbilirubinemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) has been widely used to evaluate the functional integrity and development of injured auditory system and brain, especially to objectively evaluate the function of auditory system and brain stem of very young babies, such as neonates and sick babies.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of BAEP of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia, and to investigate the relationship of bilirubin concentration and BAEP.DESIGN: An observation experiment.SETTING: Department of Pediatrics, the 309 Clinical Division, General Hospital of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-eight neonates with mild or moderate hyperbilirubinemia exhibiting jaundice within 24 hours after born, who received the treatment in the Department of Pediatrics, the 309 Clinical Division, General Hospital of Chinese PLA between January 2004 and May 2007, were recruited in this study. The involved neonates, 31 boys and 27 girls, had gestational age of 37 to 46 weeks. They had no history of birth asphyxia, and were scored 8 to 10 points when born. Written informed consents of examination and treatment were obtained from the guardians of the neonates. This study was approved by the Hospital Ethics Committee. According to serum total bilirubin value, the neonates were assigned into 3 groups: low-concentration bilirubin group (n =16), moderate-concentration bilirubin group (n =27) and high-concentration bilirubin group (n =15). According to mean daily bilirubin increase, the subjects were sub-assigned into bilirubin rapid increase group (n =39) and bilirubin slow increase group (n =19).METHODS: After admission, all the neonates received drug treatment. Meanwhile, their 116 ears were examined with a myoelectricity evoked potential equipment (KEYPOINT) in latency, wave duration,amplitude and wave shape differentiation of each wave of BAEP. BAEP abnormal type was observed and abnormal rate of BAEP was calculated.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Abnormal rate and abnormal type of BAEP

  19. Human hair genealogies and stem cell latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavaré Simon

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cells divide to reproduce themselves and produce differentiated progeny. A fundamental problem in human biology has been the inability to measure how often stem cells divide. Although it is impossible to observe every division directly, one method for counting divisions is to count replication errors; the greater the number of divisions, the greater the numbers of errors. Stem cells with more divisions should produce progeny with more replication errors. Methods To test this approach, epigenetic errors (methylation in CpG-rich molecular clocks were measured from human hairs. Hairs exhibit growth and replacement cycles and "new" hairs physically reappear even on "old" heads. Errors may accumulate in long-lived stem cells, or in their differentiated progeny that are eventually shed. Results Average hair errors increased until two years of age, and then were constant despite decades of replacement, consistent with new hairs arising from infrequently dividing bulge stem cells. Errors were significantly more frequent in longer hairs, consistent with long-lived but eventually shed mitotic follicle cells. Conclusion Constant average hair methylation regardless of age contrasts with the age-related methylation observed in human intestine, suggesting that error accumulation and therefore stem cell latency differs among tissues. Epigenetic molecular clocks imply similar mitotic ages for hairs on young and old human heads, consistent with a restart with each new hair, and with genealogies surreptitiously written within somatic cell genomes.

  20. Low latency memory access and synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Brewster, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY), Vranas; Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-10-19

    A low latency memory system access is provided in association with a weakly-ordered multiprocessor system. Bach processor in the multiprocessor shares resources, and each shared resource has an associated lock within a locking device that provides support for synchronization between the multiple processors in the multiprocessor and the orderly sharing of the resources. A processor only has permission to access a resource when it owns the lock associated with that resource, and an attempt by a processor to own a lock requires only a single load operation, rather than a traditional atomic load followed by store, such that the processor only performs a read operation and the hardware locking device performs a subsequent write operation rather than the processor. A simple prefetching for non-contiguous data structures is also disclosed. A memory line is redefined so that in addition to the normal physical memory data, every line includes a pointer that is large enough to point to any other line in the memory, wherein the pointers to determine which memory line to prefetch rather than some other predictive algorithm. This enables hardware to effectively prefetch memory access patterns that are non-contiguous, but repetitive.

  1. Low latency memory access and synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E. , Vranas; Pavlos M.

    2010-10-19

    A low latency memory system access is provided in association with a weakly-ordered multiprocessor system. Bach processor in the multiprocessor shares resources, and each shared resource has an associated lock within a locking device that provides support for synchronization between the multiple processors in the multiprocessor and the orderly sharing of the resources. A processor only has permission to access a resource when it owns the lock associated with that resource, and an attempt by a processor to own a lock requires only a single load operation, rather than a traditional atomic load followed by store, such that the processor only performs a read operation and the hardware locking device performs a subsequent write operation rather than the processor. A simple prefetching for non-contiguous data structures is also disclosed. A memory line is redefined so that in addition to the normal physical memory data, every line includes a pointer that is large enough to point to any other line in the memory, wherein the pointers to determine which memory line to prefetch rather than some other predictive algorithm. This enables hardware to effectively prefetch memory access patterns that are non-contiguous, but repetitive.

  2. Genetic variants in RBFOX3 are associated with sleep latency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Amin (Najaf); K.V. Allebrandt; A. van der Spek (Ashley); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); K. Hek (Karin); M. Teder-Laving (Maris); C. Hayward (Caroline); T. Esko (Tõnu); J. van Mill; H. Mbarek; N.F. Watson (Nathaniel F); S.A. Melville (Scott); F.M. Del Greco (Fabiola); E.M. Byrne (Enda); E. Oole (Edwin); I. Kolcic (Ivana); T.H. Chen; D.S. Evans (Daniel); J. Coresh (Josef); N. Vogelzangs (Nicole); J. Karjalainen (Juha); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); S.A. Gharib (Sina); L. Zgaga (Lina); E. Mihailov (Evelin); K.L. Stone (Katie L); H. Campbell (Harry); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); Z. Dogas; K. Marciante (Kristin); S. Campbell (Susan); F. Borovecki (Fran); A.I. Luik (Annemarie I); M. Li (Man); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); M.C.G.N. van den hout (Mirjam); S.R. Cummings (Steven R.); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); P.R. Gehrman (Philip); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); A. Hofman (Albert); W.H.L. Kao (Wen Hong Linda); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Wright (Alan); J.M. Vink (Jacqueline); J.F. Wilson (James F); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); O. Polasek (Ozren); N.M. Punjabi (Naresh); S. Redline (Susan); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); M. Merrow; G.J. Tranah (Gregory); D.J. Gottlieb (Daniel J); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); I. Rudan (Igor); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); B.W.J.H. Penninx; A. Metspalu (Andres); T. Meitinger (Thomas); L. Franke (Lude); T. Roenneberg; C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTime to fall asleep (sleep latency) is a major determinant of sleep quality. Chronic, long sleep latency is a major characteristic of sleep-onset insomnia and/or delayed sleep phase syndrome. In this study we aimed to discover common polymorphisms that contribute to the genetics of sleep

  3. Inhibition of superinfection and the evolution of viral latency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berngruber, Thomas W.; Weissing, Franz J.; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Latent viruses generally defend their host cell against superinfection by nonlatent virulent mutants that could destroy the host cell. Superinfection inhibition thus seems to be a prerequisite for the maintenance of viral latency. Yet viral latency can break down when resistance to superinfection in

  4. The Structural, Functional and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eNieuwenhuys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Wilhelm His (1891, 1893 the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature. Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this ‘four-functional-zones’ concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1 the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2 the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centres (superior and inferior olives. Nevertheless the ‘functional zonal model’ has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioural profiles, as ‘local hypertrophies’ of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units.

  5. On the Relevance of Natural Stimuli for the Study of Brainstem Correlates: The Example of Consonance Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Cousineau; Bidelman, Gavin M.; Isabelle Peretz; Alexandre Lehmann

    2015-01-01

    Some combinations of musical tones sound pleasing to Western listeners, and are termed consonant, while others sound discordant, and are termed dissonant. The perceptual phenomenon of consonance has been traced to the acoustic property of harmonicity. It has been repeatedly shown that neural correlates of consonance can be found as early as the auditory brainstem as reflected in the harmonicity of the scalp-recorded frequency-following response (FFR). "Neural Pitch Salience" (NPS) measured fr...

  6. Reversible silencing of cytomegalovirus genomes by type I interferon governs virus latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Dağ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses establish a lifelong latent infection posing the risk for virus reactivation and disease. In cytomegalovirus infection, expression of the major immediate early (IE genes is a critical checkpoint, driving the lytic replication cycle upon primary infection or reactivation from latency. While it is known that type I interferon (IFN limits lytic CMV replication, its role in latency and reactivation has not been explored. In the model of mouse CMV infection, we show here that IFNβ blocks mouse CMV replication at the level of IE transcription in IFN-responding endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The IFN-mediated inhibition of IE genes was entirely reversible, arguing that the IFN-effect may be consistent with viral latency. Importantly, the response to IFNβ is stochastic, and MCMV IE transcription and replication were repressed only in IFN-responsive cells, while the IFN-unresponsive cells remained permissive for lytic MCMV infection. IFN blocked the viral lytic replication cycle by upregulating the nuclear domain 10 (ND10 components, PML, Sp100 and Daxx, and their knockdown by shRNA rescued viral replication in the presence of IFNβ. Finally, IFNβ prevented MCMV reactivation from endothelial cells derived from latently infected mice, validating our results in a biologically relevant setting. Therefore, our data do not only define for the first time the molecular mechanism of IFN-mediated control of CMV infection, but also indicate that the reversible inhibition of the virus lytic cycle by IFNβ is consistent with the establishment of CMV latency.

  7. Phase locked neural activity in the human brainstem predicts preference for musical consonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, Oliver; Hopkins, Kathryn; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Plack, Christopher J

    2014-05-01

    When musical notes are combined to make a chord, the closeness of fit of the combined spectrum to a single harmonic series (the 'harmonicity' of the chord) predicts the perceived consonance (how pleasant and stable the chord sounds; McDermott, Lehr, & Oxenham, 2010). The distinction between consonance and dissonance is central to Western musical form. Harmonicity is represented in the temporal firing patterns of populations of brainstem neurons. The current study investigates the role of brainstem temporal coding of harmonicity in the perception of consonance. Individual preference for consonant over dissonant chords was measured using a rating scale for pairs of simultaneous notes. In order to investigate the effects of cochlear interactions, notes were presented in two ways: both notes to both ears or each note to different ears. The electrophysiological frequency following response (FFR), reflecting sustained neural activity in the brainstem synchronised to the stimulus, was also measured. When both notes were presented to both ears the perceptual distinction between consonant and dissonant chords was stronger than when the notes were presented to different ears. In the condition in which both notes were presented to the both ears additional low-frequency components, corresponding to difference tones resulting from nonlinear cochlear processing, were observable in the FFR effectively enhancing the neural harmonicity of consonant chords but not dissonant chords. Suppressing the cochlear envelope component of the FFR also suppressed the additional frequency components. This suggests that, in the case of consonant chords, difference tones generated by interactions between notes in the cochlea enhance the perception of consonance. Furthermore, individuals with a greater distinction between consonant and dissonant chords in the FFR to individual harmonics had a stronger preference for consonant over dissonant chords. Overall, the results provide compelling evidence

  8. Serial analysis of gene expression predicts structural differences in hippocampus of long attack latency and short attack latency mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldker, DEM; Datson, NA; Veenema, AH; Meulmeester, E; de Kloet, ER; Vreugdenhil, E

    2003-01-01

    The genetically selected long attack latency (LAL) and short attack latency (SAL) mice differ in a wide variety of behavioural traits and display differences in the serotonergic system and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA)-axis. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was used to gen

  9. TYPE-2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND BRAIN STEM EVOKED RESPONSE AUDIOMETRY: A CASE CONTROL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen S

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM causes pathophysiological changes in multiple organ system. The peripheral, autonomic and central neuropathy is known to occur in T2DM, which can be studied electrophysiologically. AIM Present study is aimed to evaluate functional integrity of auditory pathway in T2DM by Brainstem Evoked Response Audiometry (BERA. MATERIAL AND METHOD In the present case control study, BERA was recorded from the scalp of 20 T2DM patients aged 30-65 years and were compared with age matched 20 healthy controls. The BERA was performed using EMG Octopus, Clarity Medical Pvt. Ltd. The latencies of wave I, III, V and Wave I-III, I-V and III-V interpeak latencies of both right and left ear were recorded at 70dBHL. STATISTICAL RESULT AND USE Mean±SD of latencies of wave I, III, V and interpeak latency of I-III, I-V and III-V were estimated of T2DM and healthy controls. The significant differences between the two groups were assessed using unpaired student ‘t’ test for T2DM and control groups using GraphPad QuickCalcs calculator. P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. RESULT In T2DM BERA study revealed statistically significant (p<0.05 prolonged latencies of wave I, III and V in both right (1.81±0.33ms, 3.96±0.32ms, 5.60±0.25ms and left (1.96±0.24ms, 3.79±0.22ms, 5.67±0.25ms ear as compared to controls at 70dB. Wave III-V interpeak latency of left ear (1.87±0.31, 1.85±0.41ms and wave I-III (2.51±0.42ms, 1.96±0.48ms and III-V (2.01±0.43ms, 1.76±0.45ms of right ear was prolonged in diabetic patient as compared to controls, although no significant difference was obtained (p<0.05. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION Increase in absolute latencies and interpeak latencies inT2DM patients suggest involvement of central neuronal axis at the level of brain stem and midbrain.

  10. Facility Location with Client Latencies: Linear-Programming based Techniques for Minimum-Latency Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarty, Deeparnab

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a problem that is a common generalization of the uncapacitated facility location and minimum latency (ML) problems, where facilities need to be opened to serve clients and also need to be sequentially activated before they can provide service. Formally, we are given a set \\F of n facilities with facility-opening costs {f_i}, a set of m clients, and connection costs {c_{ij}} specifying the cost of assigning a client j to a facility i, a root node r denoting the depot, and a time metric d on \\F\\cup{r}. Our goal is to open a subset F of facilities, find a path P starting at r and spanning F to activate the open facilities, and connect each client j to a facility \\phi(j)\\in F, so as to minimize \\sum_{i\\in F}f_i +\\sum_{clients j}(c_{\\phi(j),j}+t_j), where t_j is the time taken to reach \\phi(j) along path P. We call this the minimum latency uncapacitated facility location (MLUFL) problem. Our main result is an O(\\log n\\max{\\log n,\\log m})-approximation for MLUFL. We also show that any improvement in th...

  11. On the Relevance of Natural Stimuli for the Study of Brainstem Correlates: The Example of Consonance Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Marion; Bidelman, Gavin M; Peretz, Isabelle; Lehmann, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Some combinations of musical tones sound pleasing to Western listeners, and are termed consonant, while others sound discordant, and are termed dissonant. The perceptual phenomenon of consonance has been traced to the acoustic property of harmonicity. It has been repeatedly shown that neural correlates of consonance can be found as early as the auditory brainstem as reflected in the harmonicity of the scalp-recorded frequency-following response (FFR). "Neural Pitch Salience" (NPS) measured from FFRs-essentially a time-domain equivalent of the classic pattern recognition models of pitch-has been found to correlate with behavioral judgments of consonance for synthetic stimuli. Following the idea that the auditory system has evolved to process behaviorally relevant natural sounds, and in order to test the generalizability of this finding made with synthetic tones, we recorded FFRs for consonant and dissonant intervals composed of synthetic and natural stimuli. We found that NPS correlated with behavioral judgments of consonance and dissonance for synthetic but not for naturalistic sounds. These results suggest that while some form of harmonicity can be computed from the auditory brainstem response, the general percept of consonance and dissonance is not captured by this measure. It might either be represented in the brainstem in a different code (such as place code) or arise at higher levels of the auditory pathway. Our findings further illustrate the importance of using natural sounds, as a complementary tool to fully-controlled synthetic sounds, when probing auditory perception.

  12. On the Relevance of Natural Stimuli for the Study of Brainstem Correlates: The Example of Consonance Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Cousineau

    Full Text Available Some combinations of musical tones sound pleasing to Western listeners, and are termed consonant, while others sound discordant, and are termed dissonant. The perceptual phenomenon of consonance has been traced to the acoustic property of harmonicity. It has been repeatedly shown that neural correlates of consonance can be found as early as the auditory brainstem as reflected in the harmonicity of the scalp-recorded frequency-following response (FFR. "Neural Pitch Salience" (NPS measured from FFRs-essentially a time-domain equivalent of the classic pattern recognition models of pitch-has been found to correlate with behavioral judgments of consonance for synthetic stimuli. Following the idea that the auditory system has evolved to process behaviorally relevant natural sounds, and in order to test the generalizability of this finding made with synthetic tones, we recorded FFRs for consonant and dissonant intervals composed of synthetic and natural stimuli. We found that NPS correlated with behavioral judgments of consonance and dissonance for synthetic but not for naturalistic sounds. These results suggest that while some form of harmonicity can be computed from the auditory brainstem response, the general percept of consonance and dissonance is not captured by this measure. It might either be represented in the brainstem in a different code (such as place code or arise at higher levels of the auditory pathway. Our findings further illustrate the importance of using natural sounds, as a complementary tool to fully-controlled synthetic sounds, when probing auditory perception.

  13. Mechanism of latency relaxation in frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, N

    2011-05-01

    The latency relaxation is a small drop of tension before skeletal muscle begins to develop active tension. This phenomenon was found nearly one century ago but its origin has not been clarified. In this review, the hypotheses for its mechanism are discussed in terms of the recent experimental results using X-ray diffraction. The latency relaxation takes place almost simultaneously as the structural change of the regulatory protein troponin, an unspecified structural change of the thick filament, and increase in stiffness. It seems difficult to associate all of these with the latency relaxation by assuming a simple mechanism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Response latency as a function of amount of reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, William C.

    1962-01-01

    Food-deprived rats were trained to press and hold down a telegraph key in the presence of a light. Subsequent release of the key during a tone was followed by 0.15 ml of a 20-percent sucrose solution as reinforcement. The Ss were subsequently shifted to a 0-percent and to a 5-percent solution from the 20-percent base line. The median RT and the variability of RT increased markedly as a result of the shift to the lower sucrose concentrations. For all Ss, the change in median and variability was greater for the shift to the 0-percent solution than for the shift to the 5-percent solution. It is probable that median RT and variability of RT are inversely related to amount of reinforcement. PMID:13916462

  15. Neural network connectivity and response latency modelled by stochastic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborrino, Massimiliano

    is connected to thousands of other neurons. The rst question is: how to model neural networks through stochastic processes? A multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, obtained as a diffusion approximation of a jump process, is the proposed answer. Obviously, dependencies between neurons imply dependencies......Stochastic processes and their rst passage times have been widely used to describe the membrane potential dynamics of single neurons and to reproduce neuronal spikes, respectively.However, cerebral cortex in human brains is estimated to contain 10-20 billions of neurons and each of them...... between their spike times. Therefore, the second question is: how to detect neural network connectivity from simultaneously recorded spike trains? Answering this question corresponds to investigate the joint distribution of sequences of rst passage times. A non-parametric method based on copulas...

  16. A parallel cholinergic brainstem pathway for enhancing locomotor drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Roy; Juvin, Laurent; Dubuc, Réjean; Alford, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The brainstem locomotor system is believed to be organized serially from the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) to reticulospinal neurons, which in turn, project to locomotor neurons in the spinal cord. In contrast, we now identify in lampreys, brainstem muscarinoceptive neurons receiving parallel inputs from the MLR and projecting back to reticulospinal cells to amplify and extend durations of locomotor output. These cells respond to muscarine with extended periods of excitation, receive direct muscarinic excitation from the MLR, and project glutamatergic excitation to reticulospinal neurons. Targeted block of muscarine receptors over these neurons profoundly reduces MLR-induced excitation of reticulospinal neurons and markedly slows MLR-evoked locomotion. Their presence forces us to rethink the organization of supraspinal locomotor control, to include a sustained feedforward loop that boosts locomotor output. PMID:20473293

  17. Mosaic Evolution of Brainstem Motor Nuclei in Catarrhine Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth D. Dobson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial motor nucleus volume coevolves with both social group size and primary visual cortex volume in catarrhine primates as part of a specialized neuroethological system for communication using facial expressions. Here, we examine whether facial nucleus volume also coevolves with functionally unrelated brainstem motor nuclei (trigeminal motor and hypoglossal due to developmental constraints. Using phylogenetically informed multiple regression analyses of previously published brain component data, we demonstrate that facial nucleus volume is not correlated with the volume of other motor nuclei after controlling for medulla volume. Our results show that brainstem motor nuclei can evolve independently of other developmentally linked structures in association with specific behavioral ecological conditions. This finding provides additional support for the mosaic view of brain evolution.

  18. Hemicrania continua secondary to an ipsilateral brainstem lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Marcelo M; Andrade-Valença, Luciana P A; da Silva, Wilson Farias; Dodick, David W

    2007-03-01

    We describe a 47-year-old woman with a 3-year history of a continuum mild-moderate right-side headache, with exacerbations, associated with stabbing volleys of pain on right orbit-temporal region (10/10) and right eye ptosis and lacrimation with conjunctival injection. The pain was completely abolished with indomethacin (100 mg per day). The diagnosis of hemicrania continua was made according to the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria. The headache presentation was precipitated by a stroke and a right-side brainstem lesion was present at magnetic resonance imaging. This case report shows anatomoclinical evidence of the involvement of brainstem structures on the pathophysiology of hemicrania continua.

  19. The Superior Transvelar Approach to the Fourth Ventricle and Brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Ezer, Haim; Banerjee, Anirban Deep; Bollam, Papireddy; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Objective The superior transvelar approach is used to access pathologies located in the fourth ventricle and brainstem. The surgical path is below the venous structures, through the superior medullary velum. Following splitting the tentorial edge, near the tentorial apex, the superior medullary velum is split in the cerebello-mesencephalic fissure. Using the supracerebellar infratentorial, transtentorial or parietal interhemispheric routes, the superior medullary velum is approached. Splittin...

  20. Adaptive hypofractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for a large brainstem metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinclair, Georges; Bartek, Jiri; Martin, Heather

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To demonstrate how adaptive hypofractionated radiosurgery by gamma knife (GK) can be successfully utilized to treat a large brainstem metastasis - a novel approach to a challenging clinical situation. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 42-year-old woman, diagnosed with metastatic nonsmall cell lung...... adaptive hypofractionation proved to be effective to achieve tumor control while limiting local adverse reactions. This surgical modality should be considered when managing larger brain lesions in critical areas....

  1. Effect of edaravone on acute brainstem-cerebellar infarction with vertigo and sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuta; Yabe, Takao; Okada, Kazunari; Nakamura, Yuka

    2014-06-01

    We report 2 cases with acute brainstem and brainstem-cerebellar infarction showed improvement of their signs and symptoms after administration of edaravone. Case 1, a 74-year-old woman who experienced sudden vertigo, also had dysarthria and left hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an abnormal region in the right ventrolateral medulla oblongata. The patient's vertigo and hemiplegia improved completely after treatment. Case 2, a 50-year-old man who experienced sudden vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), developed dysarthria after admission. MRI revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed dissection of the basilar artery and occlusion of the right anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient's vertigo and hearing remarkably improved. We have described 2 patients whose early symptoms were vertigo and sudden SNHL, but who were later shown to have ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. Edaravone is neuroprotective drug with free radical-scavenging actions. Free radicals in the ear are responsible for ischemic damage. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, may be useful in the treatment of vertigo and SNHL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Short-latency tachycardia evoked by stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsema, A J; Bouman, L N; Karemaker, J M

    1985-04-01

    The short-latency effect on heart rate of peripheral nerve stimulation was studied in decerebrate cats. Selective activation (17-40 microA, 100 Hz, 1 s long) of low-threshold fibers in the nerves to the triceps surae muscle yielded isometric contractions of maximal force that were accompanied by a cardiac cycle length shortening within 0.4 s from the start of stimulation. This effect was abolished by pharmacologically induced neuromuscular blockade. The cardiac cycle length shortening during paralysis reappeared after a 6- to 10-fold increase of the stimulation strength. Cutaneous (sural) nerve stimulation (15-25 microA, 100 Hz, 1 s long) elicited reflex contractions in the stimulated limb, which were also accompanied by a cardiac acceleration with similar latency. Paralysis prevented the reflex contractions and reduced the cardiac response in some cats and abolished it in others. The response reappeared in either case after a 5- to 10-fold increase of the stimulus strength. It is concluded that muscle nerve and cutaneous nerve activity both cause a similar cardiac acceleration with a latency of less than 0.4 s. The response to muscle nerve stimulation is elicited by activity in group III afferents. It is excluded that the cardiac response to nerve stimulation is secondary to a change in the respiratory pattern.

  3. Quality of life after brainstem cavernoma surgery in 71 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukatz, Thomas; Sarnthein, Johannes; Sitter, Helmut; Bozinov, Oliver; Benes, Ludwig; Sure, Ulrich; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-09-01

    Symptomatic patients with a brainstem cavernoma are treated surgically with increasing frequency. Generally, the patient's benefit from this difficult surgical intervention is quantified by the assessment of neurological symptoms. To document the beneficial effect of surgery in a larger patient population by assessing the postoperative quality of life (QoL). In a series of 71 surgically treated patients, a detailed neurological status was assessed by Patzold Rating and Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Patients rated their QoL with the Short Form 36 Health Survey. To document the effect of surgery on QoL, we devised a supplementary questionnaire. The last 24 patients completed Short Form 36 Health Survey pre- and postoperatively. Karnofsky Performance Status Scale improved in 44 of 71 surgical patients (62%), remained unchanged in 19 (27%), and deteriorated in 8 (11%) individuals. Patzold Rating showed a more detailed picture of the neurological symptoms. It correlated significantly with Karnofsky Performance Status Scale, which underscores its usefulness for patients with brainstem lesions. In the Short Form 36 Health Survey score, the Mental Component Summary improved with surgery (paired test, P = .015). In addition, 58 individuals (82%) declared a clear subjective benefit of surgery. The results of this large series support the notion that microsurgical removal of a brainstem cavernoma represents an effective therapy in experienced hands and is generally associated with good clinical outcome, both neurologically and in terms of QoL.

  4. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  5. Reflections on the brainstem dysfunction in neurologically disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki

    2009-08-01

    This article deals with the neurological basis of brainstem-related symptoms in disabled children. Synaptic interactions of respiratory and swallowing centers, which are briefly reviewed in this study, highlight the significance of the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) in the stereotyped motor events. Coordination mechanisms between these two central pattern generators are also studied with a focus on the inhibitory action of decrementing expiratory neurons that terminate the inspiratory activity and become activated during swallowing. Dorsal brainstem lesions in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) affect the area including NTS, and result in symptoms of apneusis, facial nerve paresis, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, and laryngeal stridor. Leigh syndrome patients with similar distributions of medullary lesions show increased sighs, post-sigh apnea, hiccups, and vomiting in addition to the symptoms of HIE, suggesting pathologically augmented vagal reflex pathways. The present article also discusses the pathophysiology of laryngeal dystonia in xeroderma pigmentosum group A, self-mutilation in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, and sudden unexpected death in Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Close observation and logical assessment of brainstem dysfunction symptoms should be encouraged in order to achieve better understanding and management of these symptoms in disabled children.

  6. THE EFFECTS OF SALICYLATE ON AUDITORY EVOKED POTENTIAL AMPLITWDE FROM THE AUDITORY CORTEX AND AUDITORY BRAINSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Sawka; SUN Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus has often been studied using salicylate in animal models as they are capable of inducing tempo-rary hearing loss and tinnitus. Studies have recently observed enhancement of auditory evoked responses of the auditory cortex (AC) post salicylate treatment which is also shown to be related to tinnitus like behavior in rats. The aim of this study was to observe if enhancements of the AC post salicylate treatment are also present at structures in the brainstem. Four male Sprague Dawley rats with AC implanted electrodes were tested for both AC and auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings pre and post 250 mg/kg intraperitone-al injections of salicylate. The responses were recorded as the peak to trough amplitudes of P1-N1 (AC), ABR wave V, and ABR waveⅡ. AC responses resulted in statistically significant enhancement of ampli-tude at 2 hours post salicylate with 90 dB stimuli tone bursts of 4, 8, 12, and 20 kHz. Wave V of ABR re-sponses at 90 dB resulted in a statistically significant reduction of amplitude 2 hours post salicylate and a mean decrease of amplitude of 31%for 16 kHz. WaveⅡamplitudes at 2 hours post treatment were signifi-cantly reduced for 4, 12, and 20 kHz stimuli at 90 dB SPL. Our results suggest that the enhancement chang-es of the AC related to salicylate induced tinnitus are generated superior to the level of the inferior colliculus and may originate in the AC.

  7. Automatic latency equalization in VHDL-implemented complex pipelined systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabołotny, Wojciech M.

    2016-09-01

    In the pipelined data processing systems it is very important to ensure that parallel paths delay data by the same number of clock cycles. If that condition is not met, the processing blocks receive data not properly aligned in time and produce incorrect results. Manual equalization of latencies is a tedious and error-prone work. This paper presents an automatic method of latency equalization in systems described in VHDL. The proposed method uses simulation to measure latencies and verify introduced correction. The solution is portable between different simulation and synthesis tools. The method does not increase the complexity of the synthesized design comparing to the solution based on manual latency adjustment. The example implementation of the proposed methodology together with a simple design demonstrating its use is available as an open source project under BSD license.

  8. Fast control latency uncertainty elimination for the BESIII ETOF upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Cao, Ping; Liu, Shu-bin; An, Qi

    2016-09-01

    A new fanning topology is proposed to precisely fan out fast control signals in the Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII) end-cap time-of-flight (ETOF) electronics. However, uncertainty in transfer latency is introduced by the new fanning channel, which will degrade the precision of fast control. In this paper, latency uncertainty elimination for the BESIII ETOF upgrade is introduced. The latency uncertainty is determined by a Time-Digital-Converter (TDC) embedded in a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and is eliminated by re-capturing at synchronous and determinate time. Compared with the existing method of Barrel-cap TOF (BTOF), it has advantages of flexible structure, easy calibration and good adaptability. Field tests on the BESIII ETOF system show that this method effectively eliminates transfer latency uncertainty. Supported by CAS Maintenance Project for Major Scientific and Technological Infrastructure (IHEP-SW-953/2013)

  9. Intraindividual reaction time variability affects P300 amplitude rather than latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha eRamchurn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The neural correlates of intraindividual response variability were investigated in a serial choice reaction time (CRT task. Reaction times (RTs from the faster and slower portions of the RT distribution for the task were separately aggregated and associated P300 event-related potentials computed. Independent behavioral measures of executive function and IQ were also recorded. Across frontal, fronto-central, central, centro-parietal and parietal scalp regions, P300 amplitudes were significantly greater for faster relative to slower behavioral responses. However, P300 peak amplitude latencies did not differ according to the speed of the behavioral RT. Importantly, controlling for select independent measures of executive function attenuated shared variance in P300 amplitude for faster and slower trials. The findings suggest that P300 amplitude rather than latency is associated with the speed of behavioral RTs, and the possibility that fluctuations in executive control underlie variability in speeded responding.

  10. The Role of Spike Temporal Latencies in Artificial Olfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, D.; Martinelli, E.; Dini, F.; Paolesse, R.; Filippini, D.; Lundström, I.; Di Natale, C.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the recognition power of spike time latencies in an artificial olfactory system. For the scope we used a recently introduced platform for artificial olfaction implementing an artificial olfactory epithelium, formed by thousands sensors, and an abstract olfactory bulb1. Results show that correct volatile compounds classification can be achieved considering only the first two spikes of the neural network output evidencing that the latency of the first spikes contains actually enough information for odor identification.

  11. 听力筛查转诊婴幼儿不同滤波条件短纯音诱发听性脑干反应的比较%Comparison of tone burst evoked auditory brainstem responses with different filter settings for referral infants after hearing screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁文雯; 倪道凤; 李奉荣; 商莹莹

    2011-01-01

    Objective Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) evoked by tone burst is an important method of hearing assessment in referral infants after hearing screening. The present study was to compare the thresholds of tone burst ABR with filter settings of 30 - 1500 Hz and 30 - 3000 Hz at each frequency,figure out the characteristics of ABR thresholds with the two filter settings and the effect of the waveform judgement, so as to select a more optimal frequency specific ABR test parameter. Methods Thresholds with filter settings of 30 - 1500 Hz and 30 -3000 Hz in children aged 2 -33 months were recorded by click,tone burst ABR. A total of 18 patients ( 8 male / 10 female), 22 ears were included. Results The thresholds of tone burst ABR with filter settings of 30 - 3000 Hz were higher than that with filter settings of 30 - 1500 Hz. Significant difference was detected for that at 0. 5 kHz and 2.0 kHz ( t values were 2.238 and 2. 217, P < 0. 05 ), no significant difference between the two filter settings was detected at the rest frequencies tone evoked ABR thresholds. The waveform of ABR with filter settings of 30 - 1500 Hz was smoother than that with filter settings of 30 - 3000 Hz at the same stimulus intensity. Response curve of the latter appeared jagged small interfering wave. Conclusions The filter setting of 30 - 1500 Hz may be a more optimal parameter of frequency specific ABR to improve the accuracy of frequency specificity ABR for infants' hearing assessment.%目的 短纯音诱发听性脑干反应(ABR)是听力筛查转诊婴幼儿听力评估的重要方法,本研究比较滤波分别为30~1500 Hz与30~3000 Hz时不同频率短纯音ABR阈值之间的差异,总结两种滤波条件下ABR波形特点及对阈值判断的影响,以选择更优化的频率特异性ABR测试参数.方法 应用美国IHS公司SmartEP听觉诱发电位仪记录18例(22耳)2~33月龄婴幼儿短声、滤波为30~1500 Hz与30~3000 Hz短纯音ABR各频率反应阈.结果 0.5 k

  12. Channel noise effects on first spike latency of a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisel, Brenton; Lindenberg, Katja

    2017-02-01

    While it is widely accepted that information is encoded in neurons via action potentials or spikes, it is far less understood what specific features of spiking contain encoded information. Experimental evidence has suggested that the timing of the first spike may be an energy-efficient coding mechanism that contains more neural information than subsequent spikes. Therefore, the biophysical features of neurons that underlie response latency are of considerable interest. Here we examine the effects of channel noise on the first spike latency of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron receiving random input from many other neurons. Because the principal feature of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron is the stochastic opening and closing of channels, the fluctuations in the number of open channels lead to fluctuations in the membrane voltage and modify the timing of the first spike. Our results show that when a neuron has a larger number of channels, (i) the occurrence of the first spike is delayed and (ii) the variation in the first spike timing is greater. We also show that the mean, median, and interquartile range of first spike latency can be accurately predicted from a simple linear regression by knowing only the number of channels in the neuron and the rate at which presynaptic neurons fire, but the standard deviation (i.e., neuronal jitter) cannot be predicted using only this information. We then compare our results to another commonly used stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley model and show that the more commonly used model overstates the first spike latency but can predict the standard deviation of first spike latencies accurately. We end by suggesting a more suitable definition for the neuronal jitter based upon our simulations and comparison of the two models.

  13. Updating and validating a new framework for restoring and analyzing latency-variable ERP components from single trials with residue iteration decomposition (RIDE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Guang; Sommer, Werner; Zhou, Changsong

    2015-06-01

    Trial-to-trial latency variability pervades cognitive EEG responses and may mix and smear ERP components but is usually ignored in conventional ERP averaging. Existing attempts to decompose temporally overlapping and latency-variable ERP components show major limitations. Here, we propose a theoretical framework and model of ERPs consisting of temporally overlapping components locked to different external events or varying in latency from trial to trial. Based on this model, a new ERP decomposition and reconstruction method was developed: residue iteration decomposition (RIDE). Here, we describe an update of the method and compare it to other decomposition methods in simulated and real datasets. The updated RIDE method solves the divergence problem inherent to previous latency-based decomposition methods. By implementing the model of ERPs as consisting of time-variable and invariable single-trial component clusters, RIDE obtains latency-corrected ERP waveforms and topographies of the components, and yields dynamic information about single trials.

  14. A rabbit model of graded primary mechanical injury to brainstem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong-min; WANG Xiao-wei; XUE Hai-bin; XIA Peng; LI Hong-wei; DAI Guo-xin; JI Xiao-yuan; ZHAO Hui; YIN Zhi-yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To introduce a new animal model of graded mechanical primary brainstem injury (BSI).Methods:Altogether 45 rabbits were subjected to BSI by type Ⅱ biological impact machine designed by the Third Military Medical University.The animals were divided into 4 experimental groups (n=10) and 1 control group (n=5) according to different magnitudes of impact pressure imposed on the occipital nodule:Group 1,500-520 kPa; Group 2,520-540 kPa; Group 3,540-560 kPa; Group 4,560-580 kPa and Group 5,0 kPa with 20 kPa increase in each grade.The impact depth was a constant 0.5 cm.After injury,the clinical symptoms and signs as well as pathological changes were observed.Results:Rabbits in Group 1 revealed mild physiological reaction of BSI.They had localized cerebral contusion with punctate hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was limited to the peripheral tissues at the impact area.In Group 2,obvious physiological reaction was observed.Local pathological lesions reached the superficial layer ofbrainstem tissues; focal hemorrhage and girdleshaped SAH in basilar pon were observed under microscope.In Group 3,BSI was more severe with a long respiratory depression.Pathological lesions reached the inner portion of brainstem with massive hemorrhage and the whole brainstem was wrapped by subarachnoid hematoma.In Group 4,most rabbits died due to severe BSI.Pathological lesions deepened to the central brainstem with wide pathological change,rapture of the medulla oblongata central canal.Group 5 was the control group,with normal brainstem structure and no lesion observed.Conclusion:This model successfully simulates different levels ofbrainstem mechanical injury and clearly shows the subsequent pathological changes following injury.It takes two external parameters (impact pressure and depth) and has a similar injury mechanism to clinical accelerating BSI.Moreover it is reproducible and stable,thus being beneficial for exploring pathophysiological mechanism,diagnosis and

  15. Architectural organization of the african elephant diencephalon and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseko, Busisiwe C; Patzke, Nina; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the organization of the diencephalon and brainstem of the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) - a region of the elephant brain that has not been examined for at least 50 years. The current description, employing material amenable for use with modern neuroanatomical methods, shows that, for the most part, the elephant diencephalon and brainstem are what could be considered typically mammalian, with subtle differences in proportions and topology. The variations from these previous descriptions, where they occurred, were related to four specific aspects of neural information processing: (1) the motor systems, (2) the auditory and vocalization systems, (3) the orexinergic satiety/wakefulness centre of the hypothalamus and the locus coeruleus, and (4) the potential neurogenic lining of the brainstem. For the motor systems, three specific structures exhibited interesting differences in organization - the pars compacta of the substantia nigra, the facial motor nerve nucleus, and the inferior olivary nuclear complex, all related to the timing and learning of movements and likely related to the control of the trunk. The dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra appear to form distinct islands separated from each other by large fibre pathways, an appearance unique to the elephant. Each island may send topologically organized projections to the striatum forming a dopaminergic innervation mosaic that may relate to trunk movements. At least five regions of the combined vocalization production and auditory/seismic reception system were specialized, including the large and distinct nucleus ellipticus of the periaqueductal grey matter, the enlarged lateral superior olivary nucleus, the novel transverse infrageniculate nucleus of the dorsal thalamus, the enlarged dorsal column nuclei and the ventral posterior inferior nucleus of the dorsal thalamus. These specializations, related to production and reception of infrasound, allow the proposal of a

  16. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  17. The mTOR Complex Controls HIV Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Emilie; Hakre, Shweta; Kampmann, Martin; Lim, Hyung W; Hosmane, Nina N; Martin, Alyssa; Bassik, Michael C; Verschueren, Erik; Battivelli, Emilie; Chan, Jonathan; Svensson, J Peter; Gramatica, Andrea; Conrad, Ryan J; Ott, Melanie; Greene, Warner C; Krogan, Nevan J; Siliciano, Robert F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Verdin, Eric

    2016-12-14

    A population of CD4 T lymphocytes harboring latent HIV genomes can persist in patients on antiretroviral therapy, posing a barrier to HIV eradication. To examine cellular complexes controlling HIV latency, we conducted a genome-wide screen with a pooled ultracomplex shRNA library and in vitro system modeling HIV latency and identified the mTOR complex as a modulator of HIV latency. Knockdown of mTOR complex subunits or pharmacological inhibition of mTOR activity suppresses reversal of latency in various HIV-1 latency models and HIV-infected patient cells. mTOR inhibitors suppress HIV transcription both through the viral transactivator Tat and via Tat-independent mechanisms. This inhibition occurs at least in part via blocking the phosphorylation of CDK9, a p-TEFb complex member that serves as a cofactor for Tat-mediated transcription. The control of HIV latency by mTOR signaling identifies a pathway that may have significant therapeutic opportunities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Brainstem thyrotropin-releasing hormone regulates food intake through vagal-dependent cholinergic stimulation of ghrelin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Yan; Go, Vay Liang W; Toy, Natalie; Li, Tei; Wang, Yu; Song, Moon K; Reeve, Joseph R; Liu, Yanyun; Yang, Hong

    2006-12-01

    The brainstem is essential for mediating energetic response to starvation. Brain stem TRH is synthesized in caudal raphe nuclei innervating brainstem and spinal vagal and sympathetic motor neurons. Intracisternal injection (ic) of a stable TRH analog RX77368 (7.5-25 ng) dose-dependently stimulated solid food intake by 2.4- to 3-fold in freely fed rats, an effect that lasted for 3 h. By contrast, RX77368 at 25 ng injected into the lateral ventricle induced a delayed and insignificant orexigenic effect only in the first hour. In pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, RX77368 (50 ng) ic induced a significant bipeak increase in serum total ghrelin levels from the basal of 8.7+/-1.7 ng/ml to 13.4+/-2.4 ng/ml at 30 min and 14.5+/-2.0 ng/ml at 90 min, which was prevented by either bilateral vagotomy (-60 min) or atropine pretreatment (2 mg/kg, -30 min) but magnified by bilateral adrenalectomy (-60 min). TRH analog ic-induced food intake in freely fed rats was abolished by either peripheral atropine or ghrelin receptor antagonist (D-Lys-3)-GHRP-6 (10 micromol/kg) or ic Y1 receptor antagonist 122PU91 (10 nmol/5 microl). Brain stem TRH mRNA and TRH receptor 1 mRNA increased by 57-58 and 33-35% in 24- and 48-h fasted rats and returned to the fed levels after a 3-h refeeding. Natural food intake in overnight fasted rats was significantly reduced by ic TRH antibody, ic Y1 antagonist, and peripheral atropine. These data establish a physiological role of brainstem TRH in vagal-ghrelin-mediated stimulation of food intake, which involves interaction with brainstem Y1 receptors.

  19. 正常听力耳鸣患者听尼特TM检测及高刺激率听觉脑干反应结果及分析%Tinni TestTM and high stimulus rate auditory brainstem response in patients with normal hearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹效平; 王天生; 顾东胜; 黄爱萍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of tinnitus and the relationship between inner ear micro-circulation and tinnitus by examining tinnitus pitch-matching, loudnessin-matching, Feldmann masking curves and high stimulus rat ABR in tinnitus patients with normal hearing. Methods 162 patients with normal hearing and 140 tinnitus patients were enrolled. Tinnitus measurements consisted of pitch-matching, loudnessin-matching, Feldmann masking curves, and high stimulus rat auditory brainstem response (ABR). Results The tinnitus pitch-matched frequencies of tinnitus patients with normal hearing ranged from 125 Hz to 8 000 Hz, in which 57. 3% of them located between 3 000 Hz ~ 8 000 Hz. The tinnitus loudness-matched frequencies ranged form 0 dB to 2 0 dB, in which 45. 6% of them were 5 ~ 10 dB. There was no difference in I ~ V interval between the tinnitus ears and normal ears. Conclusion The clinical characterisitics of 162 tinnitus patients with normal hearing were identified in order to facilitate the further management. The relationship between the inner ear micro-circulation and tinnitus could not be attributed to the tinnitus in patients with normal hearing.%目的 观察正常听力耳鸣患者的耳鸣音调、响度、掩蔽曲线及高刺激率听觉脑干反应(ABR)检测结果,探讨耳呜的临床特征及发病机制.方法 选取162例正常听力耳鸣患者,对其进行耳鸣音调、响度匹配,同时选取其中140例单侧耳鸣患者,对140患耳与对侧140健耳,分别进行高、低刺激率ABR检测,比较不同刺激率下PL差值(△PL)、IPL差值(△IPL).结果 听力正常耳鸣的耳鸣音调分布从125~8000 Hz,以4000 ~8000 Hz高频为主;耳鸣响度从0~20 dB,5~ 10 dB最多;佛德曼曲线以汇聚型为主;患耳与健侧耳高、低刺激率ABRⅠ~Ⅴ△IPL差值>0.28 ms的耳数分别为16耳及12耳,差值无显著意义(P>0.05).结论 总结162例听力正常耳鸣患者的临床特征,为进一步的

  20. Is the long-latency stretch reflex in human masseter transcortical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Sophie L; Miles, Timothy S; Thompson, Philip D; Nordstrom, Michael A

    2003-06-01

    A long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) has been described in the human masseter muscle, but its pathway remains uncertain. To investigate this, the excitability of corticomotoneuronal (CM) cells projecting to masseter motoneurons during the LLSR was assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). A facilitated response to TMS would be evidence of a LLSR pathway that traverses the motor cortex. Surface electromyogram electrodes were placed over the left or right masseter, and subjects ( n=10) bit on bars with their incisor teeth at 10% of maximal electromyographic activity (EMG). Servo-controlled displacements were imposed on the lower jaw to evoke a short- and long-latency stretch reflex in masseter. TMS intensity was just suprathreshold for a response in contralateral masseter. Trials consisted of: (1) stretch alone, (2) TMS alone, and (3) TMS with a preceding conditioning stretch at varied conditioning-testing (C-T) intervals chosen to combine TMS with the short-latency stretch reflex (3 ms, 5 ms) and the LLSR (23-41 ms). Masseter EMG was rectified and averaged. With TMS alone, mean (+/- SE) MEP area above baseline was 56+/-9%. The area of masseter MEPs above baseline in the C-T trials was calculated from each EMG average following subtraction of the response to stretch alone. Conditioning muscle stretch had no significant effect on masseter MEPs evoked by TMS with any C-T interval (ANOVA; P=0.90). In addition, subjects were unable to modify the SLSR or LLSR by voluntary command. It is concluded that the long-latency stretch reflex in the masseter does not involve the motor cortex and is not influenced by "motor set".

  1. Intrinsic brainstem schwannoma – A rare clinical entity and a histological enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraparenchymal schwannomas arising in the brainstem are very rare, and only eight cases have been reported in literature till now. We report an intraparenchymal brainstem schwannoma presenting with the classical clinical presentation of an intrinsic brainstem lesion, and discuss its clinicoradiological characteristics and histological origins. We highlight the importance of an intraoperative frozen section diagnosis in such cases. Intraoperative tissue diagnosis significantly may alter the surgical strategy, which should be aimed at near total intracapsular decompression of the schwannoma.

  2. LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE SHAPES PROCESSING OF PITCH RELEVANT INFORMATION IN THE HUMAN BRAINSTEM AND AUDITORY CORTEX: ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T

    2014-12-01

    -term experience shapes this adaptive process wherein the top-down connections provide selective gating of inputs to both cortical and subcortical structures to enhance neural responses to specific behaviorally-relevant attributes of the stimulus. A theoretical framework for a neural network is proposed involving coordination between local, feedforward, and feedback components that can account for experience-dependent enhancement of pitch representations at multiple levels of the auditory pathway. The ability to record brainstem and cortical pitch relevant responses concurrently may provide a new window to evaluate the online interplay between feedback, feedforward, and local intrinsic components in the hierarchical processing of pitch relevant information.

  3. Auditory evoked potentials and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in evaluation of brainstem lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Anita; Nesek Mađarić, Vesna; Starčević, Katarina; Krbot Skorić, Magdalena; Gabelić, Tereza; Adamec, Ivan; Habek, Mario

    2013-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the roles of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) in the evaluation of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS). Altogether 32 patients with the diagnosis of MS participated in the study. The following data was collected from all patients: age, gender, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, brainstem functional system score (BSFS) (part of the EDSS evaluating brainstem symptomatology), and involvement of the brainstem on the brain MRI. AEP and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) were studied in all patients. BSFS, MRI, AEP, oVEMP and cVEMP involvement of the brainstem was evident in 9 (28.1%), 14 (43.8%), 7 (21.9%), 12 (37.5%) and 10 (31.0%) patients, respectively. None of the tests used showed statistically significant advantage in the detection of brainstem lesions. When combining oVEMP and cVEMP 18 (56.3%) patients showed brainstem involvement. This combination showed brainstem involvement in greater percentage than BSFS or AEP, with statistical significance (p=0.035 and p=0.007, respectively). VEMP is a reliable method in detection of brainstem involvement in MS. It is comparable with MRI, but superior to clinical examination or AEP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Group Ia afferents contribute to short-latency interlimb reflexes in the human biceps femoris muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2017-01-01

    and velocity of the iKnee rotations. Methods 11 seated participants (mean age: 25 ± 5 years) performed a voluntary isometric knee extension with the ipsilateral leg and contralateral knee flexion to 10% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). A mechanical actuator (MTS-Systems Corporation) imposed i...... amplitudes (4 vs. 8°) at the same 150°/s velocity (p’s > 0.08). Conclusion Because fast conducting group Ia muscle spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in muscle stretch velocity, while group II spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in amplitude (Grey et al., JPhysiol., 2001; Matthews, Trends...... Neurosci., 1991), group Ia velocity sensitive muscle spindle afferents likely contribute to the short-latency crossed spinal reflexes in the cBF muscle following iKnee joint rotations. This supports the findings for the short-latency crossed responses in the human soleus muscle (Stubbs & Mrachacz...

  5. An improved approximation ratio for the minimum latency problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goemans, M.; Kleinberg, J. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Given a tour visiting n points in a metric space, the latency of one of these points p is the distance traveled in the tour before reaching p. The minimum latency problem asks for a tour passing through n given points for which the total latency of the n points is minimum; in effect, we are seeking the tour with minimum average {open_quotes}arrival time.{close_quotes} This problem has been studied in the operations research literature, where it has also been termed the {open_quotes}delivery-man problem{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}traveling repairman problem.{close_quotes} The approximability of the minimum latency problem was first considered by Sahni and Gonzalez in 1976; however, unlike the classical traveling salesman problem, it is not easy to give any constant-factor approximation algorithm for the minimum latency problem. Recently, Blum, Chalasani, Coppersmith, Pulleyblank, Raghavan, and Sudan gave the first such algorithm, obtaining an approximation ratio of 144. In this work, we present an algorithm which improves this ratio to 21.55. The development of our algorithm involves a number of techniques that seem to be of interest from the perspective of the traveling salesman problem and its variants more generally.

  6. An evolutionary role for HIV latency in enhancing viral transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzine, Igor M; Weinberger, Ariel D; Weinberger, Leor S

    2015-02-26

    HIV latency is the chief obstacle to eradicating HIV but is widely believed to be an evolutionary accident providing no lentiviral fitness advantage. However, findings of latency being "hardwired" into HIV's gene-regulatory circuitry appear inconsistent with latency being an evolutionary accident, given HIV's rapid mutation rate. Here, we propose that latency is an evolutionary "bet-hedging" strategy whose frequency has been optimized to maximize lentiviral transmission by reducing viral extinction during mucosal infections. The model quantitatively fits the available patient data, matches observations of high-frequency latency establishment in cell culture and primates, and generates two counterintuitive but testable predictions. The first prediction is that conventional CD8-depletion experiments in SIV-infected macaques increase latent cells more than viremia. The second prediction is that strains engineered to have higher replicative fitness—via reduced latency—will exhibit lower infectivity in animal-model mucosal inoculations. Therapeutically, the theory predicts treatment approaches that may substantially enhance "activate-and-kill" HIV-cure strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Brainstem and limbic encephalitis with paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussawi, Khaled; Lin, David J; Matiello, Marcelo; Chew, Sheena; Morganstern, Daniel; Vaitkevicius, Henrikas

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of disorders associated with anti-neuromyelitis optica (NMO) antibody is being extended to include infrequent instances associated with cancer. We describe a patient with brainstem and limbic encephalitis from NMO-immunoglobulin G in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the context of newly diagnosed breast cancer. The neurological features markedly improved with excision of her breast cancer and immune suppressive therapy. This case further broadens the NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD) by an association between NMOSD and cancer and raises the question of coincidental occurrence and the appropriate circumstances to search for a tumor in certain instances of NMO.

  8. Stereotactic LINAC radiosurgery for the treatment of brainstem cavernomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuetsch, M.; El Majdoub, F.; Hoevels, M.; Sturm, V.; Maarouf, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-04-15

    Background: The management of deep-seated cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) is still controversial. Although surgery remains the treatment of choice in patients with recurrent hemorrhage, patients with CCMs located in the brainstem are in many cases not eligible for resection due to high procedure-related morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the long-term outcome of LINAC radiosurgery (LINAC-RS) for the treatment of brainstem CCMs. Patients and methods: Between December 1992 and March 2008, 14 patients (6 men, 8 women) harboring brainstem CCMs underwent LINAC-RS. Pretreatment neuroimaging showed no associated developmental venous angiomas (DVAs) in any of our patients. Prior to treatment, all patients suffered at least from one symptomatic hemorrhage (median 1.8, range 1-3). A median follow-up of 7.1 years (range 2.0-16.8 years) could be obtained in 12 patients. We applied a median tumor surface dose of 13.9 Gy (range 11-18 Gy; median tumor volume 1.6 ml, range 0.4-4.3 ml). Results: Following LINAC-RS, neurological outcome improved in 4 (33.3%) and remained unchanged in 8 patients (66.7%). Rebleeding with subsequent transient neurological status deterioration occurred in 4 patients (33.3%), leading to additional surgical resection in 2 patients (16.7%). The corresponding annual hemorrhage rate was 4.8% (4/82.8 patient-years). Adverse radiation effects (ARE, defined by perilesional hyperintensity on T{sub 2}-weighted MR images) were revealed in 3 patients (25%), leading to transient neurological deficits in 2 patients (16.7%). There were no procedure-related complications leading to either permanent morbidity or mortality. Conclusion: Our results support the role of LINAC-RS as an efficient and safe treatment to significantly reduce the annual hemorrhage rate in patients suffering from brainstem CCMs not eligible to microsurgery. Compared with radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), the intervention-related morbidity is higher. (orig.)

  9. Dysarthria in children with cerebellar or brainstem tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, M; Catsman-Berrevoets, C E; Yousef-Bak, E; Paquier, P F; van Dongen, H R

    1998-05-01

    Speech features were perceptually analyzed in two groups of children. The first group (n = 6) had undergone cerebellar tumor resection, and the second group (n = 6) included children with brainstem tumors. Children belonging to the first group became dysarthric after a postoperative mute phase. Slow speech rate was a specific feature, but scanning speech and irregular articulatory breakdown (i.e., prominent characteristics in adult ataxic dysarthria) were not observed. In the second group, hypernasality was a prominent characteristic and resembled flaccid dysarthria in adults. These findings suggest that acquired childhood dysarthria needs a proper classification.

  10. Lissencephaly with brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia and congenital cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumansour, Iman S; Wrogemann, Jens; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Salman, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Classical lissencephaly may be associated with cerebellar hypoplasia and when significant cerebellar abnormalities occur, defects in proteins encoded by TUBA1A, RELN, and very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) genes have been reported. We present a neonate with a severe neurologic phenotype associated with hypotonia, oropharyngeal incoordination that required a gastric tube for feeding, intractable epilepsy, and congenital cataracts. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed classical lissencephaly, ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, globular and vertical hippocampi, and severe cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia. She died at 6 weeks of age. No specific molecular diagnosis was made. This likely represents a previously undescribed genetic lissencephaly syndrome.

  11. Metastatic Brainstem Glioma in Children: A Case Report and Review

    OpenAIRE

    Castaño González, Alexandra; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Angarita Ribero, Claudia Tatiana; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Guzmán Cruz, Paula Carolina; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a 33 months old patient, with failure to thrive, alterations in gait and swallow. Brain and spine magnetic resonance showed masses at medulla and pons, venous thrombosis in the left transverse sinus and metastatic masses to spinal cord. Unresectable metastatic brainstem glioma was diagnosed. Oncology started treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy having a survival time of more than 3 years. En este artículo se presenta el caso de un bebé de 33 meses de edad con ...

  12. Effects of lorazepam on short latency afferent inhibition and short latency intracortical inhibition in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Pilato, F; Nardone, R; Ranieri, F; Musumeci, G; Fiorilla, T; Tonali, P

    2005-04-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the GABAergic system modulates acetylcholine release and, through GABA(A) receptors, tonically inhibits cholinergic activity. Little is known about the effects of GABA on the cholinergic activity in the human central nervous system. In vivo evaluation of some cholinergic circuits of the human brain has recently been introduced using a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol based on coupling peripheral nerve stimulation with TMS of the motor cortex. Peripheral nerve inputs have an inhibitory effect on motor cortex excitability at short intervals (short latency afferent inhibition, SAI). We investigated whether GABA(A) activity enhancement by lorazepam modifies SAI. We also evaluated the effects produced by lorazepam on a different TMS protocol of cortical inhibition, the short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), which is believed to be directly related to GABA(A) activity. In 10 healthy volunteers, the effects of lorazepam were compared with those produced by quetiapine, a psychotropic drug with sedative effects with no appreciable affinity at cholinergic muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors, and with those of a placebo using a randomized double-blind study design. Administration of lorazepam produced a significant increase in SICI (F(3,9) = 3.19, P = 0.039). In contrast to SICI, SAI was significantly reduced by lorazepam (F(3,9) = 9.39, P = 0.0002). Our findings demonstrate that GABA(A) activity enhancement determines a suppression of SAI and an increase of SICI.

  13. Severe Metabolic Acidosis and Hepatopathy due to Leukoencephalopathy with Thalamus and Brainstem Involvement and High Lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellars, Elizabeth A; Balmakund, Tonya; Bosanko, Katherine; Nichols, Brandi L; Kahler, Stephen G; Zarate, Yuri A

    2017-04-01

    Leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate (LTBL) is a recently described autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease characterized by early onset of neurological symptoms, a biphasic clinical course, and distinctive neuroimaging. Pathogenic variants in the EARS2 gene that encode for mitochondrial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase are responsible for LTBL. Here, we describe the clinical course of an infant diagnosed with an acute crisis of LTBL and severe liver disease. This article illustrates the utility of blood lactate quantification in addition to basic metabolic testing and brain imaging in a child with low tone and poor growth. In addition, this case demonstrates the utility of current genetic diagnostic testing, in lieu of more invasive procedures, in obtaining rapid answers in this very complicated group of disorders. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Predicting naming latencies for action pictures: Dutch norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zeshu; Roelofs, Ardi; Meyer, Antje S

    2014-03-01

    The present study provides Dutch norms for age of acquisition, familiarity, imageability, image agreement, visual complexity, word frequency, and word length (in syllables) for 124 line drawings of actions. Ratings were obtained from 117 Dutch participants. Word frequency was determined on the basis of the SUBTLEX-NL corpus (Keuleers, Brysbaert, & New, Behavior Research Methods, 42, 643-650, 2010). For 104 of the pictures, naming latencies and name agreement were determined in a separate naming experiment with 74 native speakers of Dutch. The Dutch norms closely corresponded to the norms for British English. Multiple regression analysis showed that age of acquisition, imageability, image agreement, visual complexity, and name agreement were significant predictors of naming latencies, whereas word frequency and word length were not. Combined with the results of a principal-component analysis, these findings suggest that variables influencing the processes of conceptual preparation and lexical selection affect latencies more strongly than do variables influencing word-form encoding.

  15. Fast Control Latency Uncertainty Elimination for BESIII ETOF Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yun; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Under upgrade program of Beijing Spectrometer (BES III) end-cap time of flight (ETOF), which makes the total electronic channels increasing greatly. To fan out fast control signals precisely to new ETOF electronics, new fanning out scheme based on technique of high serial communication is used for upgraded ETOF and for barrel TOF meanwhile. However, uncertainty of transfer latency is introduced by the SerDes chip, which will degrade the precision of fast control. In this paper, a new method of latency uncertainty elimination is proposed. This method has advantages of flexible structure, easy for calibration, little resource cost and ability of multi-channel application. Field tests on BES III ETOF system shows that this method can eliminate transfer latency uncertainty effectively.

  16. Effects of psychot herapy on REM latency and REM time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, W; Hopper, M; Switzer, A; Corriere, R; Woldenberg, L

    1980-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of a functional psychotherapy on the sleep EEG patterns of 6 patients. Contrary to original expectations no significant group differences in REM time and REM latency were found between two nights following therapy sessions and two normal nights. However, across the 4 nights the patients exhibited an average REM latency of 71 min. which was significantly shorter than that recorded in an independent study with the same design and a similar subject population. Clausen, Sersen, and Lidsky (1974) reported an average REM latency of 107.3 min. for 10 normal subjects also recorded across four nights. This result is compared with those in several other studies and discussed in relation to possible changes in dream patterns.

  17. Scalla: Structured Cluster Architecture for Low Latency Access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanushevsky, Andrew; Wang, Daniel L.; /SLAC

    2012-03-20

    Scalla is a distributed low-latency file access system that incorporates novel techniques that minimize latency and maximize scalability over a large distributed system with a distributed namespace. Scalla's techniques have shown to be effective in nearly a decade of service for the high-energy physics community using commodity hardware and interconnects. We describe the two components used in Scalla that are instrumental in its ability to provide low-latency, fault-tolerant name resolution and load distribution, and enable its use as a high-throughput, low-latency communication layer in the Qserv system, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's (LSST's) prototype astronomical query system. Scalla arguably exceeded its three main design objectives: low latency, scaling, and recoverability. In retrospect, these objectives were met using a simple but effective design. Low latency was met by uniformly using linear or constant time algorithms in all high-use paths, avoiding locks whenever possible, and using compact data structures to maximize the memory caching efficiency. Scaling was achieved by architecting the system as a 64-ary tree. Nodes can be added easily and as the number of nodes increases, search performance increases at an exponential rate. Recoverability is inherent in that no permanent state information is maintained and whatever state information is needed it can be quickly constructed or reconstructed in real time. This allows dynamic changes in a cluster of servers with little impact on over-all performance or usability. Today, Scalla is being deployed in environments and for uses that were never conceived in 2001. This speaks well for the systems adaptability but the underlying reason is that the system can meet its three fundamental objectives at the same time.

  18. THE PARABRACHIAL NUCLEUS IS A CRITICAL LINK IN THE TRANSMISSION OF SHORT LATENCY NOCICEPTIVE INFORMATION TO MIDBRAIN DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coizet, V.; Dommett, E. J.; Klop, E. M.; Redgrave, P.; Overton, P. G.

    2010-01-01

    Many dopaminergic neurons exhibit a short-latency response to noxious stimuli, the source of which is unknown. Here we report that the nociceptive-recipient parabrachial nucleus appears to be a critical link in the transmission of pain related information to dopaminergic neurons. Injections of retro

  19. THE PARABRACHIAL NUCLEUS IS A CRITICAL LINK IN THE TRANSMISSION OF SHORT LATENCY NOCICEPTIVE INFORMATION TO MIDBRAIN DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coizet, V.; Dommett, E. J.; Klop, E. M.; Redgrave, P.; Overton, P. G.

    2010-01-01

    Many dopaminergic neurons exhibit a short-latency response to noxious stimuli, the source of which is unknown. Here we report that the nociceptive-recipient parabrachial nucleus appears to be a critical link in the transmission of pain related information to dopaminergic neurons. Injections of

  20. A case of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Youn Kim

    2010-04-01<