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Sample records for brainstem glioblastoma multiforme

  1. Difficult diagnosis of brainstem glioblastoma multiforme in a woman: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Brainstem gliomas are rare in adults. They most commonly occur in the pons and are most likely to be high-grade lesions. The diagnosis of a high-grade brainstem glioma is usually reached due to the presentation of rapidly progressing brainstem, cranial nerve and cerebellar symptoms. These symptoms do, however, overlap with a variety of other central nervous system disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the radiographic modality of choice, but can still be misleading. Case presentation A 48-year-old Caucasian woman presented with headache and vomiting followed by cerebellar signs and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were suggestive of a demyelinating process, but the patient failed to respond to therapy. Her condition rapidly progressed and she died. At autopsy, a high-grade invasive pontine tumor was identified. Histological evaluation revealed glioblastoma multiforme. Conclusion While pontine gliomas are rare in adults, those that do occur tend to be high-grade and rapidly progressive. Progression of symptoms from non-specific findings of headache and vomiting to rapid neurological deterioration, as occurred in our patient, is common in glioblastoma multiforme. While radiographic findings are often suggestive of the underlying pathology, this case represents the possibility of glioblastoma multiforme presenting as a deceptively benign appearing lesion.

  2. Cervical metastatic glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most malignant primary brain tumour in adults. In spite of the hostile nature of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), extracranial spread is not a common event. With improving management choices and survival times, reports of extracranial occurrence of GBM have increased. Most commonly these metastases are to the lungs, lymph nodes, neck, skull, scalp, liver, and bones; may be evident on routine follow-up images of the original lesion. Head and neck metastasis of GBM can be debilitating. We present a case of cervical metastasis of GBM and discuss possible mechanisms of extraneural spread of this tumour. (author)

  3. Lactate levels with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Arunpreet Singh; Alexander, Mariam; Kahlon, Arundeep; Wright, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    A 37-year-old woman with known glioblastoma multiforme was admitted for treatment of new deep vein thrombosis. Anion gap and plasma lactate levels were found to be elevated. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a stable, advanced glioblastoma multiforme. All causes of lactic acidosis, including infections and medications, were ruled out. Aggressive tumors have been shown to produce lactate levels in minute quantities in their microenvironment, which helps them metastasize and evade immune response and even radiation. PMID:27365883

  4. Lactate levels with glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlon, Arunpreet Singh; Alexander, Mariam; Kahlon, Arundeep; Wright, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman with known glioblastoma multiforme was admitted for treatment of new deep vein thrombosis. Anion gap and plasma lactate levels were found to be elevated. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a stable, advanced glioblastoma multiforme. All causes of lactic acidosis, including infections and medications, were ruled out. Aggressive tumors have been shown to produce lactate levels in minute quantities in their microenvironment, which helps them metastasize and evade ...

  5. Supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme with spinal metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhidha Shah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. Metastasis of intracranial glioblastoma via the cerebrospinal fluid to the spine is a rare occurrence. We present two cases of glioblastoma multiforme with spinal leptomeningeal spread who presented with back pain and paraparesis.

  6. TSPO Imaging in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per; Feng, Ling; Law, Ian; Svarer, Claus; Knudsen, Gitte M; Mikkelsen, Jens D; de Nijs, Robin; Larsen, Vibeke A; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Thomsen, Gerda; Fischer, Walter; Guilloteau, Denis; Pinborg, Lars H

    2015-01-01

    -CLINDE is superior to (18)F-FET in predicting progression of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at follow-up. METHODS: Three patients with World Health Organization grade IV GBM were scanned with (123)I-CLINDE SPECT, (18)F-FET PET, and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Molecular imaging data were compared with...... follow-up gadolinium-enhanced MR images or contrast-enhanced CT scans. RESULTS: The percentage overlap between volumes of interest (VOIs) of increased (18)F-FET uptake and (123)I-CLINDE binding was variable (12%-42%). The percentage overlap of MR imaging baseline VOIs was greater for (18)F-FET (79...

  7. Advanced case of glioblastoma multiforme and pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rasheedy, Intisar M.; Al-Hameed, Fahad M.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of the glial tumors. Advanced and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy for many reasons. Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy carries unique challenges to the patient, baby, family, and health care providers. We describe an unusual case of advanced GBM that was treated with maximum doses of chemotherapy and radiations, and she became pregnant and presented at eighteenth weeks of gestation. Her medica...

  8. Current data and strategy in glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Iacob, G; Dinca, EB

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or astrocytoma grade Ⅳ on WHO classification is the most aggressive and the most frequent of all primary brain tumors. Glioblastoma is multiforme , resistant to therapeutic interventions illustrating the heterogeneity exhibited by this tumor in its every aspect, including clinical presentation, pathology, genetic signature. Current data and treatment strategy in GBM are presented focusing on basic science data and key clinical aspects like surgery, including pers...

  9. Extraneural Glioblastoma Multiforme Vertebral Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Liang, Lydia; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Hdeib, Alia; Elder, Benjamin D.; Kosztowski, Thomas; Bettegowda, Chetan; Laterra, John; Burger, Peter; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor; however, extraneural metastasis is uncommon. Of those that metastasize extraneurally, metastases to the vertebral bodies represent a significant proportion. We present a review of 28 cases from the published literature of GBM metastasis to the vertebra. The mean age at presentation was 38.4 years with an average overall survival of 26 months. Patients were either asymptomatic with metastasis discovered at autopsy or presented with varying degrees of pain, weakness of the extremities, or other neurologic deficits. Of the cases that included the time to spinal metastasis, the average time was 26.4 months with a reported survival of 10 months after diagnosis of vertebral metastasis. A significant number of patients had no treatments for their spinal metastasis, although the intracranial lesions were treated extensively with surgery and/or adjuvant therapy. With increasing incremental gains in the survival of patients with GBM, clinicians will encounter patients with extracranial metastasis. As such, this review presents timely information concerning the presentation and outcomes of patients with vertebral metastasis. PMID:26704201

  10. Multiple extraneural metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme

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    J. Undabeitia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most frequent primary tumor in the brain. Despite improvements in its surgical, chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment, prognosis remains poor. Extracranial metastases of glioblastoma are a rare complication in this disease. Its appearance has been described in lung, liver, bone or lymph nodes. Case report. We describe the case of a 20 year-old patient who complained of a subacute-onset headache. In the MRI an enhancing right temporal lesion was detected suggesting a high grade glioma as first diagnosis. Surgery was performed, obtaining a gross total resection of the lesion. Our patient underwent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment, according to our hospital´s protocol. Five months after initial surgery our patient complained of chest pain and a hacking cough. A thoracic-abdominal-pelvic CT scan was obtained, which showed bilateral lung infiltrates with pleural effusion, a pancreatic nodule and several vertebral lytic lesions. The lung lesions were biopsied. The pathologic diagnosis was metastatic glioblastoma multiforme. The patient died eight months after initial diagnosis. Conclusion. Extracranial metastases of glioblastoma remain a rare event although its incidence is increasing, probably due to the improvement in survival among these patients and better imaging techniques. The mechanisms for extracranial dissemination of glioblastoma are not entirely known, as several theories exist in this regard. Physicians must be aware of this complication and keep it in mind as a differential diagnosis to improve the quality of life of our patients.

  11. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is ...

  12. Management of glioblastoma multiforme in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekera, Bodiabaduge A P; Bacon, Andrew D; Whitfield, Peter C

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy presents unique challenges to the clinician. In planning treatment, potential benefits to the mother must be balanced against the risks to the fetus. In addition, evidence relating to timing of surgery and the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in pregnancy is limited. Management of peritumoral edema and seizures in pregnancy is also complicated by the potential for drug-related teratogenic effects and adverse neonatal outcomes on the fetus. The general anesthetic used for surgery must factor obstetric and neurosurgical considerations. In this review article, the authors seek to examine the role, safety, and timing of therapies for glioblastoma in the context of pregnancy. This covers the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, timing of surgery, postoperative care, anesthetic considerations, and use of anticonvulsant medications and steroids. The authors hope that this will provide a framework for clinicians treating pregnant patients with glioblastomas. PMID:22404670

  13. Orphan drugs in glioblastoma multiforme: a review

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    Lassen U

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ulrik Lassen, Morten Mau-Sørensen, Hans Skovgaard Poulsen Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and deadly brain tumor in adults. The incidence of GBM in the USA and Europe is 2–3 per 100,000. By definition, an orphan disease affects up to 200,000 persons in the USA (one in every 1,500. A search was made in the US Food and Drug Administration orphan drug listing. In addition, a PubMed search of orphan drugs designated for GBM or high-grade glioma was performed, followed by a search for clinical studies in GBM with orphan drugs designated for other indications. This included cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted agents. Thirteen drugs with orphan designation for the treatment of glioblastoma, high-grade glioma, or primary malignant brain tumors were identified. In addition, 16 drugs with orphan designation for other indications were identified to have been evaluated in clinical studies of GBM. The efficacy data from the clinical studies is presented. A few agents have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of high-grade gliomas following orphan drug designation, but most have failed to reach the market. However, a few patients may have benefited from receiving developmental agents within clinical trials. Biomarkers for selection of these patients may result in more success in the field of personalized medicine. Keywords: orphan drugs, glioblastoma multiforme, brain tumor, targeted therapy, cytotoxic therapy

  14. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

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    Mattos João Paulo; Marenco Horacio Armando; Campos José Maria; Faria Andréa Vasconcellos; Queiroz Luciano de Souza; Borges Guilherme; Oliveira Evandro de

    2006-01-01

    Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare tumor. This is the third case published in Brazilian literature and, the last one has been described more than 15 years ago. The aggressive behavior of GBM prompts for fast treatment, which can be hampered by the fact that the diagnosis of GBM requires a high degree of suspicion. We describe a case of GBM in a 46 years old man. In conjunction, we present a literature review including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studi...

  15. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattos João Paulo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor. This is the third case published in Brazilian literature and, the last one has been described more than 15 years ago. The aggressive behavior of GBM prompts for fast treatment, which can be hampered by the fact that the diagnosis of GBM requires a high degree of suspicion. We describe a case of GBM in a 46 years old man. In conjunction, we present a literature review including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options and the behavior of such malignant tumor.

  16. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM's cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  17. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM’s cancer biology.

  18. TCGA Workshop: Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) - TCGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) held a workshop entitled, “Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM),” to review the initial GBM data from the TCGA pilot project.

  19. Statin use and survival following glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Hallas, Jesper; Friis, Søren; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2014-01-01

    glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). METHODS: We identified 1562 patients diagnosed with GBM during 2000-2009 from the Danish Cancer Registry and linked this cohort to Danish nationwide demographic and health registries. Within the GBM cohort, each patient recorded as using statins prior to diagnosis (defined as ≥2......-cause death associated with prediagnostic statin use. RESULTS: A total of 339 GBM patients were included in the analyses. Of these, 325 died during median follow-up of 6.9 months (interquartile range: 3.8-13.4 months). Prediagnostic statin use was associated with a reduced HR of death (0.79; 95% CI: 0......% CI: 0.63-1.01). CONCLUSION: Long-term prediagnostic statin use may improve survival following GBM....

  20. Irinotecan and bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése;

    2011-01-01

    BVZ and CPT-11 in recurrent GBM. Particular attention is placed on the literature and a discussion on whether treatment with BVZ and CPT-11 improves clinical outcome. Antiangiogenic treatment has led to difficulties when evaluating objective response by the conventional MacDonald criteria. In the......INTRODUCTION: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common high grade primary brain tumor in adults. Despite significant advances in treatment, the prognosis remains poor. Bevacizumab (BVZ) and irinotecan (CPT-11) are currently being investigated in the treatment of GBM patients. Although...... treatment with BVZ and irinotecan provides impressive response rates (RR), it is still uncertain if this treatment translates into improved clinical benefit in GBM patients. AREAS COVERED: This review discusses the clinical efficacy, safety and difficulties regarding response evaluation when treating with...

  1. Comparison of solitary cerebral metastasis and glioblastoma multiform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the MR images of solitary cerebral metastasis and glioblastoma multiform to determine the differential findings. Ten cases of solitary cerebral metastasis and 14 cases of glioblastoma multiform were retrospectively reviewed, all of which were proved by pathologically. The MR findings were compared in regard to tumor size and location, degree of edema, enhancement pattern, and shape of rime enhancement. Mean maximum diameter or solitary cerebral metastasis was 3.85 cm(s.d. 1.47). Metastatic lesions were located in corticomedullary junction(70%) with cerebellum in 2 cases. The locations of glioblastoma multiform were white matter(64%) without cerebellar involvement and the mean maximum diameter was 5.43 cm(s.d. 0.99). In solitary cerebral metastasis, the size of edema was larger than the tumor diameter in 50%, but glioblastoma multiform did not show severe degree of edema. Rim enhancement seen in 7 cases of solitary cerebral metastasis showed unilocular shape and complete rim in 6 cases, and even thickness and smooth inner margine in 5 cases. However, rim enhancement seen in 11 cases of glioblastoma multiform showed multilocular appearance with septa in all cases, incomplete rim in 5 cases, and uneven thickness and irregular inner margin in 10 cases. Tumor location, degree of edema, and rim enhancement pattern on Gd-enhanced MR may be useful in differentiation between solitary cerebral metastasis and glioblastoma multiform

  2. Morphometic analysis of TCGA glioblastoma multiforme

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    Chang Hang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our goals are to develop a computational histopathology pipeline for characterizing tumor types that are being generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA for genomic association. TCGA is a national collaborative program where different tumor types are being collected, and each tumor is being characterized using a variety of genome-wide platforms. Here, we have developed a tumor-centric analytical pipeline to process tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E for visualization and cell-by-cell quantitative analysis. Thus far, analysis is limited to Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM and kidney renal clear cell carcinoma tissue sections. The final results are being distributed for subtyping and linking the histology sections to the genomic data. Results A computational pipeline has been designed to continuously update a local image database, with limited clinical information, from an NIH repository. Each image is partitioned into blocks, where each cell in the block is characterized through a multidimensional representation (e.g., nuclear size, cellularity. A subset of morphometric indices, representing potential underlying biological processes, can then be selected for subtyping and genomic association. Simultaneously, these subtypes can also be predictive of the outcome as a result of clinical treatments. Using the cellularity index and nuclear size, the computational pipeline has revealed five subtypes, and one subtype, corresponding to the extreme high cellularity, has shown to be a predictor of survival as a result of a more aggressive therapeutic regime. Further association of this subtype with the corresponding gene expression data has identified enrichment of (i the immune response and AP-1 signaling pathways, and (ii IFNG, TGFB1, PKC, Cytokine, and MAPK14 hubs. Conclusion While subtyping is often performed with genome-wide molecular data, we have shown that it can also be applied to categorizing histology

  3. PARP-1 protein expression in glioblastoma multiforme

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    A. Galia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common type of primary brain tumors in adults is the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM (World Health Organization grade IV astrocytoma. It is the most common malignant and aggressive form of glioma and it is among the most lethal ones. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1 gene, located to 1q42, plays an important role for the efficient maintenance of genome integrity. PARP-1 protein is required for the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF translocation from the mitochondria to the nucleus. PARP-1 is proteolytically cleaved at the onset of apoptosis by caspase-3. Microarray analysis of PARP-1 gene expression in more than 8,000 samples revealed that PARP-1 is more highly expressed in several types of cancer compared with the equivalent normal tissues. Overall, the most differences in PARP-1 gene expression have been observed in breast, ovarian, endometrial, lung, and skin cancers, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. We evaluated the expression of PARP-1 protein in normal brain tissues and primary GBM by immunohistochemistry. Positive nuclear PARP-1 staining was found in all samples with GBM, but not in normal neurons from controls (n=4 and GBM patients (n=27. No cytoplasmic staining was observed in any sample. In conclusion, PARP-1 gene is expressed in GBM. This finding may be envisioned as an attempt to trigger apoptosis in this tumor, as well as in many other malignancies. The presence of the protein exclusively at the nucleus further support the function played by this gene in genome integrity maintenance and apoptosis. Finally, PARP-1 staining may be used as GBM cell marker.

  4. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Orlowski, Piotr; Hotowy, Anna Malgorzata; Niemiec, Tomasz; Szmidt, Maciej; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chrioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubati...

  5. Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme presenting as a cerebellopontine angle mass

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    Anupam Jindal

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly malignant brain tumour, which is exceedingly rare and such tumour presenting as cerebellopontine angle (CPA mass is even rarer. We here discuss the case of a 15-year-old girl who had cerebellar GBM presenting as CPA mass that resembled meningioma on CT scan and was managed successfully with minimal problems.

  6. Advanced case of glioblastoma multiforme and pregnancy. An ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rasheedy, Intisar M; Al-Hameed, Fahad M

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of the glial tumors. Advanced and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy for many reasons. Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy carries unique challenges to the patient, baby, family, and health care providers. We describe an unusual case of advanced GBM that was treated with maximum doses of chemotherapy and radiations, and she became pregnant and presented at eighteenth weeks of gestation. Her medical management was associated with a significant ethical dilemma. We managed to deliver the baby safely through cesarean section at week 28 despite the critical condition of the mother. Unfortunately, the mother died 2 weeks post delivery. We concluded that although recurrent and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy and carries dismal prognosis, but if it occurs, it can still be carried, and a multidisciplinary team work is the key for successful outcome. PMID:26492122

  7. Cases of glioblastoma multiforme metastasizing to spinal cord

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    Karaca Metehan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM metastasizing to the leptomeninx or the intramedullary spine are quite rare and prognoses are relatively poor. We present three cases of GBM with spinal metastasis, one of which also had leptomeningeal dissemination. Three patients with GBM were admitted to our clinic for postoperative radiotherapy after surgery. Leptomeningeal metastasis and dissemination were diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. Radiotherapy provided only temporary relief from pain with small improvement in neurological deficit but no survival advantage.

  8. Molecular Characteristics in MRI-Classified Group 1 Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-HsingAnnieLin; RebeccaAIhrie; ArturoAlvarez-Buylla; RobertNEisenman

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous brain tumor. Previous studies of transcriptional profiling have revealed biologically relevant GBM subtypes associated with specific mutations and dysregulated pathways. Here, we applied a modified proteome to uncover abnormal protein expression profile in a MRI-classified group I GBM (GBM1), which has a spatial relationship with one of the adult neural stem cell niches, subventricular zone (SVZ). Most importantly,...

  9. Genetic investigation of multicentric glioblastoma multiforme: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Brett; Shah, Nameeta; Rostad, Steve; McCullough, Brendan; Aguedan, Brian; Foltz, Greg; Cobbs, Charles

    2016-05-01

    The authors report a case of multicentric glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in which all 4 tumor foci were resected and evaluated using both comparative genomic hybridization array and RNA sequencing. Genetic analysis showed that the tumors shared a common origin, although each had its own unique set of genetic aberrations. The authors note that the genetic heterogeneity of multicentric GBM likely contributes to the failures of current treatments. The case underscores the necessity of increased genetic investigation. PMID:26473785

  10. Current Trends in Targeted Therapies for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Fumiharu Ohka; Atsushi Natsume; Toshihiko Wakabayashi

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most frequently occurring tumors in the central nervous system and the most malignant tumor among gliomas. Despite aggressive treatment including surgery, adjuvant TMZ-based chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, GBM still has a dismal prognosis: the median survival is 14.6 months from diagnosis. To date, many studies report several determinants of resistance to this aggressive therapy: (1) O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), (2) the complexity ...

  11. Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor Antibody for Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Joseph A.; Hsu, Frank P K; Jacob, Arun T; Bota, Daniela A.; Alexandru, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive investigation, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains one of the deadliest cancers, with low progression-free survival and high one-year mortality. Current first-line therapy includes surgery with adjuvant radiation therapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy, but virtually all tumors recur. Given the highly vascular nature of GBM and its high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and other angiogenic factors, recent investigation has turned to bevacizumab, an antivascular...

  12. Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: Implication of Nonenhancing Lesions on Bevacizumab Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Alexandru; Hung-Wen Kao; Mark Linskey; Ronald Kim; Hasso, Anton N; Daniela Bota

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumors, accounting for 15-20% of all intracranial tumors. It is one of the most lethal tumors of the central nervous system with a median survival from diagnosis on the order of 6 to 18 months. Despite aggressive resection and chemoradiation, the tumor always recurs. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging is an essential component in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and following response. However, the imaging features of recurrent GBM...

  13. The identification of mitochondrial DNA variants in glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, Ka Yu; Dickinson, Adam; Donoghue, Jacqueline F.; Polekhina, Galina; Stefan J. White; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K; McKenzie, Matthew; Johns, Terrance G; John, Justin C St

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes key proteins of the electron transfer chain (ETC), which produces ATP through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and is essential for cells to perform specialised functions. Tumor-initiating cells use aerobic glycolysis, a combination of glycolysis and low levels of OXPHOS, to promote rapid cell proliferation and tumor growth. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressively malignant brain tumor and mitochondria have been proposed to play a vital ...

  14. Glioblastoma multiforme of the pineal region: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparetto Emerson Leandro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: pineal region tumors are uncommon, and comprise more frequently three categories: germ cell, parenchymal cell and glial tumors. Most pineal gliomas are low-grade astrocytomas. Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive and common brain tumor, is extremely rare at this location with only few cases reported. CASE DESCRIPTION: a 29-year-old woman with a two month history of headache, nuchal pain, fever, nausea and seizures and physical examination showing nuchal rigidity, generalized hypotony, hypotrophy and hyper-reflexia, Babinski sign and left VI cranial par palsy. CT scan examination revealed a ill-defined hypodense lesion at the pineal region with heterogeneous contrast enhancement. MRI showed a lesion at the pineal region infiltrating the right thalamic region. The patient underwent a right craniotomy with partial resection of the mass. The histological examination of paraffin-embedded material defined the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme. Post-operative radiotherapy was indicated but the patient refused the treatment and died two months afterwards. CONCLUSION: in spite of its rarity at this location, glioblastoma multiforme should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aggressive lesions at the pineal region.

  15. Glioblastoma multiforme in the very elderly.

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    Connon, Felicity V; Rosenthal, Mark A; Drummond, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant and most common primary brain tumour and is treated with resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, a significant amount of patients are older than 80 years, and such an approach may not be appropriate. Data on patients aged 80 or older with glioblastoma from two hospitals was collected using the CNS Tumour Database on the Australian Comprehensive Cancer Outcomes and Research Database (ACCORD) system operated by BioGrid. Between 2008 and July 2011, 40 patients aged 80 years or older were diagnosed with glioblastoma. The median ECOG PS was 2 and the ASA score was 3. All 40 patients underwent surgery and 33% had a gross total resection. Only six patients (15%) had either post-operative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The overall median survival was 4 months (range 0-18 months) and 28% of patients lived between 6 and 24 months. This is the largest reported cohort of very elderly patients with glioblastoma. Patients tolerated surgery but few went on to receive post-operative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This patient population requires special attention and in particular would benefit from participation in suitable clinical trials to determine the best care regime. PMID:26208944

  16. Nestin expression in the cell lines derived from glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestin is a protein belonging to class VI of intermediate filaments that is produced in stem/progenitor cells in the mammalian CNS during development and is consecutively replaced by other intermediate filament proteins (neurofilaments, GFAP). Down-regulated nestin may be re-expressed in the adult organism under certain pathological conditions (brain injury, ischemia, inflammation, neoplastic transformation). Our work focused on a detailed study of the nestin cytoskeleton in cell lines derived from glioblastoma multiforme, because re-expression of nestin together with down-regulation of GFAP has been previously reported in this type of brain tumor. Two cell lines were derived from the tumor tissue of patients treated for glioblastoma multiforme. Nestin and other cytoskeletal proteins were visualized using imunocytochemical methods: indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold-labelling. Using epifluorescence and confocal microscopy, we described the morphology of nestin-positive intermediate filaments in glioblastoma cells of both primary cultures and the derived cell lines, as well as the reorganization of nestin during mitosis. Our most important result came through transmission electron microscopy and provided clear evidence that nestin is present in the cell nucleus. Detailed information concerning the pattern of the nestin cytoskeleton in glioblastoma cell lines and especially the demonstration of nestin in the nucleus represent an important background for further studies of nestin re-expression in relationship to tumor malignancy and invasive potential

  17. Initiation and characterization of a glioblastoma multiforme derived cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lucía Roa

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Las líneas celulares y los cultivos primarios son una excelente herramienta para el estudio de la biología, desarrollo y respuesta a la terapia en tumores cerebrales. Objetivo: Establecer y caracterizar una línea celular derivada de un glioblastoma multiforme como un modelo de estudio in vitro para la extrapolación y aplicación futura en terapia génica. Material y métodos: Se obtuvo una muestra de un paciente con diagnóstico clínico e histopatológico de glioblastoma multiforme, se caracterizó mediante inmunohistoquímica en cortes de tejido y por inmunocitoquímica sobre células cultivadas a partir del tumor desde el inicio del cultivo y durante los seis primeros pases, con dos tipos de marcadores específicos para glía: GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein y S-100 (proteína de unión a calcio. Además, se evaluó la expresión de p53 y Bcl-2, como moduladores de apoptosis. Por último se hizo la caracterización citogenética. Resultados: Histopatológicamente, se confirmó el diagnóstico de glioblastoma multiforme. En los cultivos primarios se encontraron características citomorfológicas propias de un glioblastoma: células fibroblastoides planas, células con escaso citoplasma con 3 ó más procesos y por último bipolares o unipolares. Se encontró una expresión diferencial con los cuatro marcadores, con un patrón de marcaciones a nivel citoplasmático y nuclear a través de los pases estudiados. La línea celular se caracterizó por ser en su mayoría aneuploide con un número modal cromosómico entre 43 y 45, con un gran número de poliploidías (55-102 , XXYY y endo-reduplicaciones (end 45, X, -Y. Conclusión: Se estableció una línea celular derivada de un glioblastoma multiforme con un fenotipo estable, con un notable mantenimiento del perfil glial y citogenético.

  18. Primary spinal cord glioblastoma multiforme presenting with transverse myelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melikhan Cerci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary spinal cord tumors are rarely encountered in childhood period. Ependymomas and pilocytic astrocytomas comprise the majority of spinal cord tumors in children. Spinal glioblastoma multiforme (GM (grade IV astrocytoma is a rare clinical entity accounting for only 1-3% of all pediatric intramedullary tumors. We report a 3- year-8- month-old male with primary spinal cord GM who presented with back pain, paraparesis, gait disturbance and loss of sphincter control and initially diagnosed as transverse myelitis. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 606-610

  19. In vivo radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Human glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most resistant tumors to radiation. In previous reports, we have demonstrated a wide range of radiation sensitivity of GBM in vitro; that is, SF2 values of 0.2 to 0.8. The great sensitivity of some of the cell lines is not in accord with the almost invariably fatal clinical outcome of patients with GBM. The sensitivity of cells in vitro pertains to cells cultured in optimal nutritional conditions. The TCD50 (the radiation dose necessary to control 50% of the tumors locally) determined in lab animals is analogous to the use of radiation with curative intent in clinical radiation oncology. The aim of the present study was (a) to evaluate the sensitivity of GBM in vivo relative to that of other tumor types and (b) assess the relationship between the single dose TCD50 of the xenografts and the sensitivity of the corresponding cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: The TCD50 assay was used to study twelve human tumor lines. Four previously published values were added. A total of 10 GBM, 4 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 1 soft tissue sarcoma (STS), and 1 cancer colon (CC) are included in the analysis. For further suppression of the residual immune system, all the animals received 6 Gy whole-body irradiation 1 day before transplantation. Local tumor irradiations were given as a single dose, under conditions of clamp hypoxia using a Cs irradiator. Results: The TCD50 values for the 10 GBM xenografts varied between 32.5 and 75.2 Gy, with an average of 47.2 ± 13.1 Gy. The TCD50 values for the SCC were similar to those of the GBM and ranged from 40.7 and 54.4 Gy, with a mean of 46.8 ± 6.4. The difference between the average TCD50 of GBM and SCC was not significant. The STS and CC xenografts had TCD50 values of 46.0 and 49.2 Gy, respectively. No correlation was found between the TCD50 in vivo and the SF2 or D0 in vitro. Conclusions: Our data on GBM xenografts showed a wide range of sensitivities to single dose irradiation

  20. Autopsy findings in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiforme. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autopsy detected no tumor tissues in a patient who died 6.5 years after the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme. A 54-year-old male developed left hemiparesis one month prior to admission. Computed tomography demonstrated a cystic lesion in the right frontal region with irregular ring-like enhancement. The tumor was extensively removed together with the surrounding tissues followed by irradiation (whole brain 32.4 Gy, local 28.8 Gy), and intravenous administration of interferon-β. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiform. He died of accidental head trauma 6.5 years after surgery. Autopsy of the brain detected no evidence of glioblastoma multiform. The only findings were cerebral edema and hematoma caused by head trauma, as well as histological changes due to radiation damage. This case apparently confirms the histological disappearance of tumor tissue in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiform. (author)

  1. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Gilbert Bernier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings.

  2. Prevalence of glioblastoma multiforme in subjects with prior therapeutic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study profiled subjects with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who had previously received therapeutic radiation. A chart review was conducted of 100 adult patients diagnosed with GBM and referred to a major medical center in the southwestern United States. Seventeen patients received previous radiation therapy with an average dose of 48.5 Grey (Gy) and an average latency period of 15 years between initial therapy and GBM diagnosis. Of these 17, four white females fit all four attribution criteria for radiation-induced GBM. Two had been treated with radiation for prolactinomas, one for pinealoma and one for squamous cell cancer of the ethmoid sinus. The addition of these four case studies to the previously published descriptions of 80 cases of gliomas, 36 of which were GBM, subsequent to radiation therapy provides additional support for considering therapeutic radiation as a risk factor for GBM development

  3. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  4. Patterns of Failure for Pediatric Glioblastoma Multiforme Following Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabason, Jacob E; Sutton, David; Kenton, Owen; Guttmann, David M; Lustig, Robert A; Hill-Kayser, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Despite aggressive multimodal therapy for pediatric glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), patient survival remains poor. This retrospective review of patients with GBM aims to evaluate the patterns of failure after radiation therapy (RT). The study included 14 pediatric patients treated with RT at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from 2007 to 2015. With a median follow-up of 16.9 months, 13 (92.9%) developed recurrent disease. Of recurrences, nine (69.2%) were in-field, three (23.1%) were marginal, and one (7.7%) was distant. The majority of patients treated with adjuvant radiation failed in the region of high-dose RT, indicating the need for improvements in local therapy. PMID:27128519

  5. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchino, Sabrina; Abdouh, Mohamed [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Bernier, Gilbert, E-mail: gbernier.hmr@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2011-03-30

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings.

  6. Cellular and subcellular distribution of BSH in human glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular and subcellular distribution of mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) in seven glioblastoma multiforme tissue sections of six patients having received BSH prior to surgery was investigated by light, fluorescence and electron microscopy. With use of specific antibodies against BSH its localization could be found in tissue sections predominantly (approx. 90%) in the cytoplasm of GFAP-positive cells of all but one patient. The latter was significantly younger (33 years in contrast of 46-71 (mean 60) years). In none of the tissue sections BSH could be found to a significant amount in the cell nuclei. In contrast, electron microscopy studies show BSH as well associated with the cell membrane as with the chromatin in the nucleus. (author)

  7. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  8. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings

  9. MRI Manifestions Correlate with Survival of Glioblastoma Multiforme Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the correlation between magnetic resonance manifestation and survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of 30 glioblastoma patients were collected. Imaging features including degrees of contrasted area, edema surrounding the tumor, and intensity in T2-weighted imaging were selected to determine their correlation with patient survival. The relationship between imaging and survival time was studied using SPSS 19.0 software. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank test were used to compare the survival curves. Patients with ≤5% contrasted enhancement area of tumor had longer overall survival (OS) than those with >5% contrasted enhancement area of tumor. Patients without edema surrounding the tumor had longer OS than those with edema. Patients with tumor of hyperintensity and/or isointensity in T2-weighted imaging had longer OS than those with hyperintensity and/or isointensity and hypointensity. Some MR imaging features including degrees of contrasted area, edema surrounding the tumor, and intensity in T2-weighted imaging are correlated with the survival of patients with GBM. These features can serve as prognostic indicators for GBM patients

  10. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inda, Maria-del-Mar, E-mail: mminda@vhio.net; Bonavia, Rudy [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Seoane, Joan [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Catalan Institution of Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Barcelona 08035 (Spain)

    2014-01-27

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  11. Prognostic factors influencing clinical outcomes of glioblastoma multiforme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shou-wei; QIU Xiao-guang; CHEN Bao-shi; ZHANG Wei; REN Huan; WANG Zhong-cheng; JIANG Tao

    2009-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant kind of astrocytic tumors and is associated with a poor prognosis. In this retrospective study, we assessed the clinical, radiological, genetic molecular and treatment factors that influence clinical outcomes of patients with GBM.Methods A total of 116 patients with GBM who received surgery and radiation between January 2006 and December 2007 were included in this study. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to find the factors independently influencing patients' progression free survival (PFS) time and overall survival (OS) time.Results Age, preoperative Kamofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, KPS score change at 2 weeks after operation, neurological deficit symptoms, tumor resection extent, maximal tumor diameter, involvement of eloquent cortex or deep structure, involvement of brain lobe, Ki-67 expression level and adjuvant chemotherapy were statistically significant factors (P <0.05) for both PFS and OS in the univariate analysis. Cox proportional hazards modeling revealed that age ≤50 years, preoperative KPS score ≥80, KPS score change after operation ≥0, involvement of single frontal lobe,non-eloquent area or deep structure involvement, low Ki-67 expression and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent favorable factors (P <0.05) for patients' clinical outcomes.Conclusions Age at diagnosis, preoperative KPS score, KPS score change at 2 weeks postoperation, involvement of brain lobe, involvement of eloquent cortex or deep structure, Ki-67 expression level and adjuvant chemotherapy correlate significantly with the prognosis of patients with GBM.

  12. The role of octamer binding transcription factors in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooj, A K; Bronisz, A; Godlewski, J

    2016-06-01

    A group of transcription factors (TF) that are master developmental regulators of the establishment and maintenance of pluripotency during embryogenesis play additional roles to control tissue homeostasis and regeneration in adults. Among these TFs, members of the octamer-binding transcription factor (OCT) gene family are well documented as major regulators controlling the self-renewal and pluripotency of stem cells isolated from different adult organs including the brain. In the last few years a large number of studies show the aberrant expression and dysfunction of OCT in different types of cancers including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is the most common malignant primary brain tumor, and contains a subpopulation of undifferentiated stem cells (GSCs), with self-renewal and tumorigenic potential that contribute to tumor initiation, invasion, recurrence, and therapeutic resistance. In this review, we have summarized the current knowledge about OCT family in GBM and their crucial role in the initiation, maintenance and drug resistance properties of GSCs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin. PMID:26968235

  13. Expression of cytomegalovirus in glioblastoma multiforme: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Mahmoud S; Abdalhamid, Baha A; El-Badawy, Samy A; Sorour, Yasser M; Almsned, Fahad M; Al-Abbadi, Mousa A

    2016-06-01

    A role for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was proposed more than a decade ago and has since generated a considerable debate as a possible therapeutic target. We investigate the presence of HCMV in the specimens of patients with GBM treated in our centre. This is a retrospective cohort study to investigate the presence of HCMV by routine immunohistochemical stains and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular analysis on formalin-fixed-paraffin-embedded tissue of all patients with GBM treated in our hospital in 2009-2013 (5 years). The evaluation of positivity by immunohistochemistry (IHC) was semi-quantitative. The molecular analysis was performed by extracting the tumour DNA from representative paraffin-embedded tissue blocks and amplified for detection by a sensitive real time PCR (RT-PCR) CMV assay. During the study period, we treated 45 patients with GBM; however, adequate pathology tissue materials were available only for 32 patients. All the pathology material was reviewed and the diagnosis was confirmed. All the cases were found to be negative for CMV expression by our IHC and RT-PCR CMV assay. Our study has shown no expression of CMV in GBM. Our results were similar to other recent reports that concluded insufficient evidence to recommend routine testing for CMV in GBM or treatment as an add-on therapy. PMID:26742571

  14. Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: Implication of Nonenhancing Lesions on Bevacizumab Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Alexandru

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumors, accounting for 15-20% of all intracranial tumors. It is one of the most lethal tumors of the central nervous system with a median survival from diagnosis on the order of 6 to 18 months. Despite aggressive resection and chemoradiation, the tumor always recurs. Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging is an essential component in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and following response. However, the imaging features of recurrent GBM may be challenging, particularly in patients undertaking novel antiangiogenic therapy. We present such a case treated with repeated surgeries, combined chemoradiation, and bevacizumab. The patient benefited from the regimen with a 6-month progression-free survival, evidenced on both stable clinical condition and MR imaging findings. However, despite chemotherapy, a fulminant progression developed with growth multiple tumors in different locations and variable imaging characteristics, ranging from typical enhancing nodules to nonenhancing signal changes. The lesions of different imaging features were biopsy-proved to be recurrent GBM. We discuss the use of MR imaging in the evaluation of GBM treated with bevacizumab and emphasize the implication of signal abnormality on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images for early evidence of recurrence. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(4.000: 217-222

  15. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzik M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Marta Grodzik1, Ewa Sawosz1, Mateusz Wierzbicki1, Piotr Orlowski1, Anna Hotowy2, Tomasz Niemiec1, Maciej Szmidt3, Katarzyna Mitura4, André Chwalibog21Division of Biotechnology and Biochemistry of Nutrition, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Division of Histology and Embryology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Koszalin University of Technology, Koszalin, PolandAbstract: The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubation, were treated with carbon nanoparticles administered in ovo to the tumor. Both types of nanoparticles significantly decreased tumor mass and volume, and vessel area. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed downregulated fibroblast growth factor-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at the messenger ribonucleic acid level. The present results demonstrate antiangiogenic activity of carbon nanoparticles, making them potential factors for anticancer therapy.Keywords: cancer, nanoparticle, embryo, angiogenesis, FGF-2, VEGF

  16. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape

  17. Current Trends in Targeted Therapies for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiharu Ohka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is one of the most frequently occurring tumors in the central nervous system and the most malignant tumor among gliomas. Despite aggressive treatment including surgery, adjuvant TMZ-based chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, GBM still has a dismal prognosis: the median survival is 14.6 months from diagnosis. To date, many studies report several determinants of resistance to this aggressive therapy: (1 O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, (2 the complexity of several altered signaling pathways in GBM, (3 the existence of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs, and (4 the blood-brain barrier. Many studies aim to overcome these determinants of resistance to conventional therapy by using various approaches to improve the dismal prognosis of GBM such as modifying TMZ administration and combining TMZ with other agents, developing novel molecular-targeting agents, and novel strategies targeting GSCs. In this paper, we review up-to-date clinical trials of GBM treatments in order to overcome these 4 hurdles and to aim at more therapeutical effect than conventional therapies that are ongoing or are about to launch in clinical settings and discuss future perspectives.

  18. Lipidomic Analysis of Glioblastoma Multiforme Using Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Soo Jung; Showalter, Gordon; Cai, Shanbao; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Wei Michael; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Rickus, Jenna; Springer, John; Adamec, Jiri; Pollok, Karen E.; Clase, Kari L.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of primary brain tumors. It is highly invasive and current treatment options have not improved the survival rate over the past twenty years. Novel approaches and technologies from systems biology have the potential to identify biomarkers that could serve as new therapeutic targets for GBM. This study employed lipid profiling technology to investigate lipid biomarkers in ectopic and orthotopic human GBM xenograft models. Primary patient cell lines, GBM10 and GBM43, were injected into the flank and the right cerebral hemisphere of NOD/SCID mice. Tumors were harvested from the brain and flank and proteins, metabolites, and lipids extracted from each sample. Reverse phase based high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS) was used to analyze the lipid profiles of tumor samples. Statistical and clustering analyses were performed to detect differences. Over 500 lipids were identified in each tumor model and lipids with the greatest fold effect in the comparison of ectopic versus orthotopic tumor models fell predominantly into four main classes of lipids: glycosphingolipids, glycerophoshpoethanolamines, triradylglycerols, and glycerophosphoserines. Lipidomic analysis revealed differences in glycosphingolipid and triglyceride profiles when the same tumor was propagated in the flank versus the brain. These results underscore the importance of the surrounding physiological environment on tumor development and are consistent with the hypothesis that specific classes of lipids are critical for GBM tumor growth in different anatomical sites. PMID:17929901

  19. The role of metabolic therapy in treating glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C Maroon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is an aggressive and nearly uniformly fatal malignancy of the central nervous system. Despite extensive research and clinical trials over the past 50 years, very little progress has been made to significantly alter its lethal prognosis. The current standard of care (SOC includes maximal surgical resection, radiation therapy and chemotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ, including the selective use of glucocorticoids for symptom control. These same treatments, however, have the potential to create an environment that may actually facilitate tumor growth and survival. Research investigating the unique metabolic needs of tumor cells has led to the proposal of a new metabolic treatment for various cancers including GBMs that may enhance the effectiveness of the SOC. The goal of metabolic cancer therapy is to restrict GBM cells of glucose, their main energy substrate. By recognizing the underlying energy production requirements of cancer cells, newly proposed metabolic therapy is being used as an adjunct to standard GBM therapies. This review will discuss the calorie restricted ketogenic diet (CR-KD as a promising potential adjunctive metabolic therapy for patients with GBMs. The effectiveness of the CR-KD is based on the "Warburg Effect" of cancer metabolism and the microenvironment of GBM tumors. We will review recent case reports, clinical studies, review articles, and animal model research using the CR-KD and explain the principles of the Warburg Effect as it relates to CR-KD and GBMs.

  20. The role of metabolic therapy in treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroon, Joseph C; Seyfried, Thomas N; Donohue, Joseph P; Bost, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive and nearly uniformly fatal malignancy of the central nervous system. Despite extensive research and clinical trials over the past 50 years, very little progress has been made to significantly alter its lethal prognosis. The current standard of care (SOC) includes maximal surgical resection, radiation therapy and chemotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ), including the selective use of glucocorticoids for symptom control. These same treatments, however, have the potential to create an environment that may actually facilitate tumor growth and survival. Research investigating the unique metabolic needs of tumor cells has led to the proposal of a new metabolic treatment for various cancers including GBMs that may enhance the effectiveness of the SOC. The goal of metabolic cancer therapy is to restrict GBM cells of glucose, their main energy substrate. By recognizing the underlying energy production requirements of cancer cells, newly proposed metabolic therapy is being used as an adjunct to standard GBM therapies. This review will discuss the calorie restricted ketogenic diet (CR-KD) as a promising potential adjunctive metabolic therapy for patients with GBMs. The effectiveness of the CR-KD is based on the "Warburg Effect" of cancer metabolism and the microenvironment of GBM tumors. We will review recent case reports, clinical studies, review articles, and animal model research using the CR-KD and explain the principles of the Warburg Effect as it relates to CR-KD and GBMs. PMID:25949849

  1. Aplastic anemia as a cause of death in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopecky, Jindrich; Priester, Peter; Slovacek, Ladislav; Petera, Jiri; Macingova, Zuzana [Dept. of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Hospital and Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Kopecky, Otakar [Clinical Oncology, Regional Hospital Nachod (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Background: Standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme consists of postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, followed by a 6-month chemotherapy. Serious hematologic complications are rarely reported. Case Report and Results: The authors present the case of a 61-year-old female patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with external-beam radiation therapy and concomitant temozolomide. After completion of treatment, the patient developed symptoms of serious aplastic anemia that eventually led to death due to prolonged neutro- and thrombocytopenia followed by infectious complications. Conclusion: Lethal complications following temozolomide are, per se, extremely rare, however, a total of four other cases of aplastic anemia have been reported in the literature so far. (orig.)

  2. Aplastic anemia as a cause of death in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with temozolomide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme consists of postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, followed by a 6-month chemotherapy. Serious hematologic complications are rarely reported. Case Report and Results: The authors present the case of a 61-year-old female patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with external-beam radiation therapy and concomitant temozolomide. After completion of treatment, the patient developed symptoms of serious aplastic anemia that eventually led to death due to prolonged neutro- and thrombocytopenia followed by infectious complications. Conclusion: Lethal complications following temozolomide are, per se, extremely rare, however, a total of four other cases of aplastic anemia have been reported in the literature so far. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of early imaging response criteria in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early and accurate prediction of response to cancer treatment through imaging criteria is particularly important in rapidly progressive malignancies such as Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). We sought to assess the predictive value of structural imaging response criteria one month after concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with GBM. Thirty patients were enrolled from 2005 to 2007 (median follow-up 22 months). Tumor volumes were delineated at the boundary of abnormal contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images prior to and 1 month after RT. Clinical Progression [CP] occurred when clinical and/or radiological events led to a change in chemotherapy management. Early Radiologic Progression [ERP] was defined as the qualitative interpretation of radiological progression one month post-RT. Patients with ERP were determined pseudoprogressors if clinically stable for ≥6 months. Receiver-operator characteristics were calculated for RECIST and MacDonald criteria, along with alternative thresholds against 1 year CP-free survival and 2 year overall survival (OS). 13 patients (52%) were found to have ERP, of whom 5 (38.5%) were pseudoprogressors. Patients with ERP had a lower median OS (11.2 mo) than those without (not reached) (p < 0.001). True progressors fared worse than pseudoprogressors (median survival 7.2 mo vs. 19.0 mo, p < 0.001). Volume thresholds performed slightly better compared to area and diameter thresholds in ROC analysis. Responses of > 25% in volume or > 15% in area were most predictive of OS. We show that while a subjective interpretation of early radiological progression from baseline is generally associated with poor outcome, true progressors cannot be distinguished from pseudoprogressors. In contrast, the magnitude of early imaging volumetric response may be a predictive and quantitative metric of favorable outcome

  4. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV46 and CTV60, respectively). MTVCho and MTVNAA were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTVNAA were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTVCho was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV46 and CTV60. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTVCho for these patients were outside of CTV60. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on metabolic information

  5. Dual integrated overprinting hypo fractionation (2xSIB) for glioblastoma multiform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiform e is characterized by being of a proliferative cell type and radiobiological behavior corresponding to an alpha / beta low. This tells us that we will have more success if we deal with fractions of higher doses than the standard treatment, and that shortening the total time is essential to reduce the effects of proliferation.

  6. Clinical variables serve as prognostic factors in a model for survival from glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Grunnet, Kirsten; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Broholm, Helle; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Although implementation of temozolomide (TMZ) as a part of primary therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has resulted in improved patient survival, the disease is still incurable. Previous studies have correlated various parameters to survival, although no single parameter has yet been...

  7. Pilocytic astrocytoma with neoplastic gemistocytes undergoing spontaneous transformation to glioblastoma multiforme without prior radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privett, Benjamin J; Liubinas, Simon V; Tsui, Alpha; Gonzales, Michael; Lo, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma, the most common glioma of childhood, is considered a clinically benign tumour. Malignant transformation of this tumour is rare and thought to occur almost exclusively in the setting of prior radiotherapy. We describe a patient with mixed pilocytic and gemistocytic astrocytoma which transformed into a glioblastoma multiforme, leading to rapid deterioration and death of the patient, without prior radiotherapy. PMID:21349721

  8. Targeting beta III-tubulin in glioblastoma multiforme: from cell biology and histopathology to cancer therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Dráber, Pavel; Kavallaris, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 8 (2011), s. 719-728. ISSN 1871-5206 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/10/1759 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : glioblastoma multiforme * tubulin binding agent * epothilones Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.862, year: 2011

  9. RNA expression patterns in serum microvesicles from patients with glioblastoma multiforme and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noerholm Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA from exosomes and other microvesicles contain transcripts of tumour origin. In this study we sought to identify biomarkers of glioblastoma multiforme in microvesicle RNA from serum of affected patients. Methods Microvesicle RNA from serum from patients with de-novo primary glioblastoma multiforme (N = 9 and normal controls (N = 7 were analyzed by microarray analysis. Samples were collected according to protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board. Differential expressions were validated by qRT-PCR in a separate set of samples (N = 10 in both groups. Results Expression profiles of microvesicle RNA correctly separated individuals in two groups by unsupervised clustering. The most significant differences pertained to down-regulated genes (121 genes > 2-fold down in the glioblastoma multiforme patient microvesicle RNA, validated by qRT-PCR on several genes. Overall, yields of microvesicle RNA from patients was higher than from normal controls, but the additional RNA was primarily of size Conclusions Serum microvesicle RNA from patients with glioblastoma multiforme has significantly down-regulated levels of RNAs coding for ribosome production, compared to normal healthy controls, but a large overabundance of RNA of unknown origin with size

  10. Glioblastoma multiforme in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Kirit

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had received prophylactic cranial irradiation (1800 cGy /10 fractions and intrathecal methotrexate. Five years later, he developed a glioblastoma multiforme in the right frontal region while the leukemia was in remission. It is possible that the glioma may have been induced by radiation and /or chemotherapy.

  11. Glioblastoma multiforme in four siblings : a cytogenetic and molecular genetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIRVEN, CMF; TUERLINGS, J; MOLENAAR, W.M.; GO, KG; LOUIS, DN

    1995-01-01

    The familial occurrence of gliomas, in the absence of well-defined neurological tumor syndromes such as the neurofibromatoses, is uncommon, We present a family of ten children in which the four eldest suffered from gliomas. Three of these siblings had histologically verified glioblastoma multiforme,

  12. RNA expression patterns in serum microvesicles from patients with glioblastoma multiforme and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA from exosomes and other microvesicles contain transcripts of tumour origin. In this study we sought to identify biomarkers of glioblastoma multiforme in microvesicle RNA from serum of affected patients. Microvesicle RNA from serum from patients with de-novo primary glioblastoma multiforme (N = 9) and normal controls (N = 7) were analyzed by microarray analysis. Samples were collected according to protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board. Differential expressions were validated by qRT-PCR in a separate set of samples (N = 10 in both groups). Expression profiles of microvesicle RNA correctly separated individuals in two groups by unsupervised clustering. The most significant differences pertained to down-regulated genes (121 genes > 2-fold down) in the glioblastoma multiforme patient microvesicle RNA, validated by qRT-PCR on several genes. Overall, yields of microvesicle RNA from patients was higher than from normal controls, but the additional RNA was primarily of size < 500 nt. Gene ontology of the down-regulated genes indicated these are coding for ribosomal proteins and genes related to ribosome production. Serum microvesicle RNA from patients with glioblastoma multiforme has significantly down-regulated levels of RNAs coding for ribosome production, compared to normal healthy controls, but a large overabundance of RNA of unknown origin with size < 500 nt

  13. Genome-wide allelotype study of primary glioblastoma multiforme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡杰; 江澄川; 吴浩强; 彭颂先; 唐婉君; 陈商群

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the molecular genetic pathogenesis of primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and identify which chromosomes or chromosomal regions of the entire genome may harbor tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) associated with GBM.Methods A high-resolution allelotype study of 21 cases of primary GBM was performed by PCR-based loss of heterozygosity (LOH)analysis. Three hundred and eighty-two fluorescent dye-labeled microsatellite markers covering all 22 autosomes were applied. The mean genetic distance between two flanking markers was about 10 cM.Results LOH was observed on all 39 nonacrocentric autosomal arms examined in this study. The LOH frequencies of 10q, 10p, 9p, 17p and 13q were the highest (>50%). Furthermore, high LOH frequencies were detected in the regions containing known TSGs including PTEN, DMBT1, p16, p15, p53 and RB; the LOH frequencies on 14q, 3q, 22q, 11p, 9q, 19q were also high (>40.5%). Our study observed the following commonly deleted regions: 9p22-23, 10p12.2-14, 10q21.3, 13q12.1-14.1, 13q14.3-31, 17p11.2-12, 17p13, 3q25.2-26.2, 11p12-13, 14q13-31, 14q32.1, 14q11.1-13, 22q13.3, 4q35, 4q31.1-31.2, 6q27 and 6q21-23.3. Conclusions The molecular pathogenesis of GBM is very complicated and associated with a variety of genetic abnormalities on many chromosomal arms. The most closely related chromosomal arms to the pathogenesis of GBM are 10q, 10p, 9p, 17p and 13q. Besides the well-known TSGs including PTEN, DMBT1, p16, p15, p53 and RB, multiple unknown TSGs associated with GBM may be present on the commonly deleted regions detected in the present study.

  14. MRP3: a molecular target for human glioblastoma multiforme immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is refractory to conventional therapies. To overcome the problem of heterogeneity, more brain tumor markers are required for prognosis and targeted therapy. We have identified and validated a promising molecular therapeutic target that is expressed by GBM: human multidrug-resistance protein 3 (MRP3). We investigated MRP3 by genetic and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of human gliomas to determine the incidence, distribution, and localization of MRP3 antigens in GBM and their potential correlation with survival. To determine MRP3 mRNA transcript and protein expression levels, we performed quantitative RT-PCR, raising MRP3-specific antibodies, and IHC analysis with biopsies of newly diagnosed GBM patients. We used univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the correlation of RNA expression and IHC of MRP3 with patient survival, with and without adjustment for age, extent of resection, and KPS. Real-time PCR results from 67 GBM biopsies indicated that 59/67 (88%) samples highly expressed MRP3 mRNA transcripts, in contrast with minimal expression in normal brain samples. Rabbit polyvalent and murine monoclonal antibodies generated against an extracellular span of MRP3 protein demonstrated reactivity with defined MRP3-expressing cell lines and GBM patient biopsies by Western blotting and FACS analyses, the latter establishing cell surface MRP3 protein expression. IHC evaluation of 46 GBM biopsy samples with anti-MRP3 IgG revealed MRP3 in a primarily membranous and cytoplasmic pattern in 42 (91%) of the 46 samples. Relative RNA expression was a strong predictor of survival for newly diagnosed GBM patients. Hazard of death for GBM patients with high levels of MRP3 RNA expression was 2.71 (95% CI: 1.54-4.80) times that of patients with low/moderate levels (p = 0.002). Human GBMs overexpress MRP3 at both mRNA and protein levels, and elevated MRP3 mRNA levels in GBM biopsy samples correlated with a higher risk of death. These data suggest

  15. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, N. Andres [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Maudsley, Andrew A. [Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Gupta, Rakesh K. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Walker, Gail R. [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core Resource, Sylvester Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Padgett, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Roy, Bhaswati [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Stoyanova, Radka, E-mail: RStoyanova@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  16. Gene expressions of TRP channels in glioblastoma multiforme and relation with survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, M; Eroglu, S; Tutar, E; Sencan, S; Geyik, M A; Ulasli, M; Demiryurek, A T; Camci, C

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer in humans, with a median survival of 10 to 12 months. Glioblastoma is highly malignant since the cells are supported by a great number of blood vessels. Although new treatments have been developed by increasing knowledge of molecular nature of the disease, surgical operation remains the standard of care. The TRP (transient receptor potential) superfamily consists of cation-selective channels that have roles in sensory physiology such as thermo- and osmosensation and in several complex diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, and neuronal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression levels of TRP channel genes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme and to evaluate the relationship between TRP gene expressions and survival of the patients. Thirty-three patients diagnosed with glioblastoma were enrolled to the study. The expression levels of 21 TRP genes were quantified by using qRT-PCR with dynamic array 48 × 48 chip (BioMark HD System, Fluidigm, South San Francisco, CA, USA). TRPC1, TRPC6, TRPM2, TRPM3, TRPM7, TRPM8, TRPV1, and TRPV2 were found significantly higher in glioblastoma patients. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between the overexpression of TRP genes and the survival of the patients. These results demonstrate for the first time that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients. PMID:26088448

  17. [Meningeal seeding of spinal cord glioblastoma multiforme without any signs of myelopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, K; Konno, H; Sahara, M; Takase, S

    1995-11-01

    An autopsy case of meningeal spreading of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) probably originating in the cervical cord was reported. In contrast to autopsy findings, main symptoms were similar to subacute meningitis, and any signs of myelopathy could not be detected during the clinical course. The patient was a 22-year-old man who was hospitalized because of a 2-week history of progressive headache following cough and slight fever. Vomiting and somnolence, developing 5 days before admission, were improved the day after a lumbar puncture performed at another hospital. On admission, meningeal signs, mild right abducens palsy, and depressed deep tendon reflexes were detected. There was no muscle weakness, sensory loss, or Babinski sign. Lumbar puncture yielded CSF with an opening pressure of 280 mmH2O, 21 mononuclear cells/mm3, a protein level of 645 mg/dl, and a glucose level of 7 mg/dl. Cytology for malignancy and multiple cultures were negative. Brain CT scan showed mild hydrocephalus and swelling of the brainstem and cerebellum. Intravenous administration of antimicrobial drugs was started and ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery was performed. During the third hospital week, however, meningeal signs progressed and somnolence reappeared, followed by progressive multiple cranial neuropathy and polyradiculopathy characterized by flaccid tetraparesis, muscle atrophy, and sensory impairment without a level. Babinski sign could not be detected. MRI revealed an intramedullary lesion in the lower cervical cord, swelling of the brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord and nerve roots, and a diffuse or nodular thickning of leptomeninges. Repeated CSF cytology disclosed atypical cells. Examinations for extraneural malignancies were negative. During the 9th hospital week, flaccid tetraplegia progressed and stupor developed, and the patient died 2 weeks later. The pathological study was limited to the brain. The brain showed a diffuse opalescent thickening of the leptomeninges, especially

  18. Pediatric glioblastoma multiforme in association with Turner's syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaei, Sara; Habibi, Zohreh; Nejat, Farideh; Sayarifard, Fatemeh; Vasei, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The Ullrich-Turner syndrome (complete or partial X-chromosome monosomy) has been found to be associated with an increased rate of some extragonadal neoplasms. Sporadic reports of the Turner syndrome with various brain tumors, including few cases of glioblastoma multiforme, have been found in the literature. However, published data are insufficient to establish a definite relationship between these tumors and the Turner syndrome. Herein, a rare case of primary pediatric glioblastoma multiforme in a 7-year-old girl with Turner's syndrome is reported, and various aspects regarding clinical and pathophysiological issues have been discussed. Although Turner's syndrome is not one of the congenital chromosomal abnormalities which demand routine CNS screening, neurological assessment may be of value in those with relevant clinical findings. PMID:25720952

  19. Aplastic anemia with concurrent temozolomide treatment in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    J. Oh; Kutas, G.J.; Davey, P.; Morrison, M; Perry, J R

    2010-01-01

    Temozolomide (tmz) is an oral alkylating agent used during concurrent and adjuvant chemotherapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Temozolomide is generally well tolerated and improves survival; however, severe adverse events have occasionally been reported. Here, we report the case of a patient who developed aplastic anemia with related complications in the setting of concurrent tmz treatment with radiotherapy. This case illustrates that aplastic anemia is a rare side effect of tmz...

  20. Fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery with concurrent temozolomide chemotherapy for locally recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Greenspoon JN; Sharieff W; Hirte H; Overholt A; Devillers R; Gunnarsson T; Whitton A

    2014-01-01

    Jeffrey Noah Greenspoon,1 Waseem Sharieff,1 Holger Hirte,1 Andrew Overholt,1 Rocco Devillers,2 Thorsteinn Gunnarsson,2 Anthony Whitton11Department of Oncology, McMaster University, ON, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, McMaster University, ON, CanadaAbstract: Local recurrence represents a significant challenge in the management of patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Salvage treatment options are limited by lack of clinical efficacy. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant response rat...

  1. p300- and Myc-mediated regulation of glioblastoma multiforme cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Panicker, Sreejith P.; Raychaudhuri, Baisakhi; Sharma, Pankaj; Tipps, Russell; Mazumdar, Tapati; Mal, Asoke K.; Palomo, Juan M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Haque, S. Jaharul

    2010-01-01

    Tumorigenic potential of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells is, in part, attributable to their undifferentiated (neural stem cell-like) phenotype. Astrocytic differentiation of GBM cells is associated with transcriptional induction of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and repression of Nestin, whereas the reciprocal transcription program operates in undifferentiated GBM cells. The molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of these transcription programs remain elusive. Here, we sho...

  2. Inhibition of PLK1 in glioblastoma multiforme induces mitotic catastrophe and enhances radiosensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Tandle, Anita T; Kramp, Tamalee; Kil, Whoon J; Halthore, Aditya; Gehlhaus, Kristen; Shankavaram, Uma; Tofilon, Philip J.; Caplen, Natasha J.; Camphausen, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in the USA with a median survival of approximately 14 months. Low survival rates are attributable to the aggressiveness of GBM and a lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying GBM. The disruption of signaling pathways regulated either directly or indirectly by protein kinases is frequently observed in cancer cells and thus the development of inhibitors of specific kinases has become a major focus of drug di...

  3. Specificity Protein 1 Expression Contributes to Bcl-w-Induced Aggressiveness in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woo Sang; Kwon, Junhye; Yun, Dong Ho; Lee, Young Nam; Woo, Eun Young; Park, Myung-Jin; Lee, Jae-Seon; Han, Young-Hoon; Bae, In Hwa

    2014-01-01

    We already had reported that Bcl-w promotes invasion or migration in gastric cancer cells and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by activating matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) via specificity protein 1 (Sp1) or β-cateinin, respectively. High expression of Bcl-w also has been reported in GBM which is the most common malignant brain tumor and exhibits aggressive and invasive behavior. These reports propose that Bcl-w-induced signaling is strongly associated with aggressive characteristic of GBM. W...

  4. Neuronal Activity, Mitogens, and mTOR: Overcoming the Hurdles for the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other malignant gliomas are considered to be the most prevalent of primary malignant brain tumors. The incidence of these tumors per year is reported as 4.13 per 100,000 individuals per year. The median survival time following the diagnosis of GBM is approximately fifteen months in the setting of providing presently available treatments with surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapy. Given these statistics, new strategies for the treatment of GBM and ot...

  5. Epigenetic modulation of the drug resistance genes MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Oberstadt, Moritz C.; Bien-Möller, Sandra; Weitmann, Kerstin; Herzog, Susann; Hentschel, Katharina; Rimmbach, Christian; Vogelgesang, Silke; Balz, Ellen; Fink, Matthias; Michael, Heike; Zeden, Jan-Philip; Bruckmüller, Henrike; Werk, Anneke N.; Cascorbi, Ingolf; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance of the highly aggressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) to drug therapy is a major clinical problem resulting in a poor patient’s prognosis. Beside promoter methylation of the O 6 -methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene the efflux transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 have been suggested as pivotal factors contributing to drug resistance, but the methylation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 has not been assessed before in GBM. Methods Therefore, we evaluated the proportion and pr...

  6. Phase II trial of irinotecan and thalidomide in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Giglio, Pierre; Groves, Morris D.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Mahankali, Srikanth; Jackson, Edward F.; Levin, Victor A.; Conrad, Charles A.; Hsu, Sigmund H.; Colman, Howard; de Groot, John F.; Ritterhouse, MeLesa G.; Ictech, Sandra E.; Alfred Yung, W. K.

    2008-01-01

    This phase II study aimed at determining the efficacy and safety of irinotecan combined with thalidomide in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) not taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (EIACs). Adult patients (⩾18 years) with recurrent GBM with up to three relapses following surgery and radiation therapy were eligible for this trial. The primary end point was rate of progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6); secondary end points were response rate, overall survival, and...

  7. New treatment options in the management of glioblastoma multiforme: a focus on bevacizumab

    OpenAIRE

    Argirios Moustakas; Kreisl, Teri N.

    2010-01-01

    Argirios Moustakas, Teri N KreislNational Cancer Institute, Neuro-Oncology Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USAAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults and carries the poorest prognosis. Despite recent progress in molecular biology, neuro-imaging and neuro-surgical care, the management of patients with GBM continues to harbor significant challenges. Survival after diagnosis is poor even with the most aggressiv...

  8. 13-cis-Retinoic acid in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    See, Siew-Ju; Levin, Victor A.; Yung, W.-K. Alfred; Hess, Kenneth R.; Groves, Morris D.

    2004-01-01

    Basic science and clinical investigations have demonstrated that 13-cis-retinoic acid (cRA) has activity against malignant gliomas. To assess its effectiveness in the setting of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we performed a retrospective analysis of the medical records and neuroimaging results of patients with recurrent GBM who were treated with cRA. The toxicity profile of cRA, response, and effect on progression-free survival from initiation of treatment were end points of our ana...

  9. Phase II study of bevacizumab and temsirolimus combination therapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik; Sorensen, Morten; Gaziel, Tine Bernhardtsen;

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy has recently shown promising efficacy in recurrent high-grade glioma. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients causes abnormally high activity of the pathways of Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K), Protein...... been investigated, but with the hypothesis that temsirolimus might provide complimentary therapeutic benefit in combination with bevacizumab, we included patients with progressive GBM after bevacizumab in an open phase II study....

  10. Olfactory and gustatory hallucinations presenting as partial status epilepticus because of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capampangan, Dan J; Hoerth, Matthew T; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Lipinski, Christopher A

    2010-10-01

    Olfactory and gustatory hallucinations are not often encountered in the acute care setting but may represent the subtle presenting features of a significant underlying disease process. We describe a patient whose most striking presenting symptoms were of olfactory and gustatory hallucinations and in whom the diagnosis and treatment of a new brain tumor and partial status epilepticus occurred entirely in the emergency department. The lesion was subsequently identified as glioblastoma multiforme involving the hippocampus and amygdala. PMID:20303620

  11. Glioblastoma multiforme following prophylactic cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate in a child with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cases of radiation-induced glioma in humans are extremely rare. A 2-year-old boy with acute lymphocytic leukemia had received prophylactic cranial irradiation (2400 rad/2 1/2 weeks) and intrathecal methotrexate. Five years later he developed a glioblastoma multiforme on the left cerebral hemisphere while the leukemia was in remission. This is the first reported association of these disorders. It is possible that the glioma may have been induced by radiation and/or chemotherapy

  12. Positron emission tomography-guided conformal fast neutron therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Stelzer, Keith J.; Douglas, James G.; Mankoff, David A.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Laramore, George E.; Spence, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to be a difficult therapeutic challenge. Our study was conducted to determine whether improved survival and tumor control could be achieved with modern delivery of fast neutron radiation using three-dimensional treatment planning. Ten patients were enrolled. Eligibility criteria included pathologic diagnosis of GBM, age ≥ 18 years, and KPS ≥60. Patients underwent MRI and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG PET) as part of initial three-dimensional treatment...

  13. Acquired MET expression confers resistance to EGFR inhibition in a mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Hyun Jung; Acquaviva, Jaime; Chi, Dorcas; Lessard, Julie; Zhu, Haihao; Woolfenden, Steve; Bronson, Roderick T.; Pfannl, Rolf; White, Forest; Housman, David E.; Iyer, Lakshmanan; Whittaker, Charles A; Boskovitz, Abraham; Raval, Ami; Charest, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor for which there is no cure. Overexpression of wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and loss of the tumor suppressor genes Ink4a/Arf and PTEN are salient features of this deadly cancer. Surprisingly, targeted inhibition of EGFR has been clinically disappointing, demonstrating an innate ability for GBM to develop resistance. Efforts at modeling GBM in mice using wild-type EGFR have proven unsuccessful to date, hampering end...

  14. Acquired MET Expression Confers Resistance to EGFR Inhibition In a Mouse Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Hyun Jung; Acquaviva, Jaime; Chi, Dorcas; Lessard, Julie; Zhu, Haihao; Woolfenden, Steve; Bronson, Roderick T.; Pfannl, Rolf; White, Forest; Housman, David E.; Iyer, Lakshmanan; Whittaker, Charles A; Boskovitz, Abraham; Raval, Ami; Charest, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor for which there is no cure. Overexpression of wild-type EGFR and loss of the tumor suppressor genes Ink4a/Arf and PTEN are salient features of this deadly cancer. Surprisingly, targeted inhibition of EGFR has been clinically disappointing, demonstrating an innate ability for GBM to develop resistance. Efforts at modeling GBM in mice using wild-type EGFR have proven unsuccessful to date, hampering endeavors at understanding molecular m...

  15. Dual integrated overprinting hypo fractionation (2xSIB) for glioblastoma multiform; Hipofraccionamiento de doble sobreimpresion integrada (2xSIB) para el flioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez Miranda, S.; Munoz Carmona, D. M.

    2011-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiform e is characterized by being of a proliferative cell type and radiobiological behavior corresponding to an alpha / beta low. This tells us that we will have more success if we deal with fractions of higher doses than the standard treatment, and that shortening the total time is essential to reduce the effects of proliferation.

  16. Feasibility of extreme dose escalation for glioblastoma multiforme using 4π radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) frequently recurs at the same location after radiotherapy. Further dose escalation using conventional methods is limited by normal tissue tolerance. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy has recently emerged as a new potential method to deliver highly conformal radiation dose using the C-arm linacs. We aim to study the feasibility of very substantial GBM dose escalation while maintaining normal tissue tolerance using 4π. 11 GBM patients previously treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT/RapidArc) on the NovalisTx™ platform to a prescription dose of either 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were included. All patients were replanned with 30 non-coplanar beams using a 4π radiotherapy platform, which inverse optimizes both beam angles and fluence maps. Four different prescriptions were used including original prescription dose and PTV (4πPTVPD), 100 Gy to the PTV and GTV (4πPTV100Gy), 100 Gy to the GTV only while maintaining prescription dose to the rest of the PTV (4πGTV100Gy), and a 5 mm margin expansion plan (4πPTVPD+5mm). OARs included in the study are the normal brain (brain – PTV), brainstem, chiasm, spinal cord, eyes, lenses, optical nerves, and cochleae. The 4π plans resulted in superior dose gradient indices, as indicated by >20% reduction in the R50, compared to the clinical plans. Among all of the 4π cases, when compared to the clinical plans, the maximum and mean doses were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by a range of 47.01-98.82% and 51.87-99.47%, respectively, or unchanged (p > 0.05) for all of the non-brain OARs. Both the 4πPTVPD and 4π GTV100GYplans reduced the mean normal brain mean doses. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy substantially increases the dose gradient outside of the PTV and better spares critical organs. Dose escalation to 100 Gy to the GTV or additional margin expansion while meeting clinical critical organ dose constraints is feasible. 100 Gy to the PTV result in higher normal brain doses but may be tolerated

  17. BCNU for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: efficacy, toxicity and prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinsker Marcus O

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with recurrent glioblastoma is still poor with a median survival between 3 and 6 months. Reports about the application of carmustine (BCNU, one of the standard chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma, in the recurrent situation are rare. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 patients with recurrent or progressive glioblastoma treated with 80 mg/m2 BCNU on days 1 on 3 intravenously at our department for efficacy, toxicity and prognostic factors. Progression free survival and overall survival were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The influence of age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS, tumor burden, pretreatment with temozolomide (TMZ, type of surgery for initial diagnosis and number of previous relapses on outcome was analyzed in a proportional hazards regression model. Results The median age of the group was 53 years, median KPS was 70. Median progression free survival was 11 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8-15, median overall survival 22 weeks (95% CI: 18-27. The rate of adverse events, especially hematological toxicity, is relatively high, and in 3 patients treatment had to be terminated due to adverse events (one pulmonary embolism, one pulmonary fibrosis, and one severe bone marrow suppression. No influence of age, KPS, tumor burden, pre-treatment with TMZ and number of previous relapses on outcome could be demonstrated, while gross total resection prior to recurrence showed a borderline statistically significant negative impact on PFS and OS. These data compare well with historical survival figures. However prospective randomized studies are needed to evaluate BCNU efficacy against newer drugs like bevacizumab or the intensified temozolomide regime (one week on/one week off. Conclusion In summary, BCNU treatment appears to be a valuable therapeutic option for recurrent glioblastomas, where no other validated radio- and/or chemotherapy are

  18. Glioblastoma Multiforme: Relationship to Subventricular Zone and Recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Margareth; Lee, Yeuh; Miller, Ryan; Castillo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain is active in two areas: the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone. Cancer stem cells have been isolated from malignant brain tumors and it is widely believed they arise from transformed endogenous stem cells. We sought to determine if the initial location of glioblastoma (GB) as seen on conventional MRI and its relationship to the subventricular zone (SVZ) predicts the pattern of recurrence. We analyzed t...

  19. Different molecular patterns in glioblastoma multiforme subtypes upon recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Ramon; Rohde, Veit; Schackert, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of glioblastoma is its inherent tendency to recur. At this point patients with relapsed GBM show a survival time of only few months. The molecular basis of the recurrence process in GBM is still poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetic profile of relapsed GBM compared to their respective primary tumors. We have included 20 paired GBMs. In all tumor samples, we have analyzed p53 and PTEN status by sequencing analysis, EGFR amplificatio...

  20. Serial analysis of imaging parameters in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yan; Lupo, Janine M.; Polley, Mei-Yin; Crane, Jason C; Bian, Wei; Cha, Soonmee; Chang, Susan; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the predictive value of serial MRI data in relation to clinical outcome for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Sixty-four patients with newly diagnosed GBM underwent conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted imaging postsurgery and prior to radiation/chemotherapy (pre-RT), immediately after RT (post-RT), and every 1–2 months thereafter until tumor progression, up to a maximum of 1 year. Tumor volumes and perfusion and diff...

  1. Glioblastoma multiforme med intra- og ekstramedullær disseminering til spinalkanalen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Karin; Idris, Fadi; Gutte Borgwardt, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Metastases to the spinal cord from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are uncommon, but important to have in mind when patients with a history of GBM present with symptoms that do not correlate with the primary disease pattern. We report a rare case, where a male with GBM, six months after tumour...... excision followed by concomitant radio- and chemotherapy, presented with gait disturbance and unspecific neurological symptoms of the lower right limb. Magnetic resonance imaging of columna totalis revealed both intra- and extramedullary metastases in the spinal cord. The patient died one month later....

  2. Phase 2 study of temozolomide and Caelyx in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Susan L.; Rosenthal, Mark A.; Wong, Shirley S.; Ashley, David M.; Woods, Anne-marie; Dowling, Anthony; Cher, Lawrence M.

    2004-01-01

    Temozolomide has established activity in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Caelyx (liposomal doxorubicin) has established activity in a broad range of tumors but has not been extensively evaluated in the treatment of GBM. Phase 1 data suggest that temozolomide and Caelyx can be combined safely at full dose. In this phase 2 study, combination temozolomide (200 mg/m2 orally, days 1–5) and Caelyx (40 mg/m2 i.v., day 1) was given every 4 weeks to a cohort of 22 patients wi...

  3. Pharmacologic inhibition of cdk4/6 arrests the growth of glioblastoma multiforme intracranial xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Karine; Solomon, David A.; Oermann, Eric; Kim, Jung-Sik; Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Prados, Michael D.; Ozawa, Tomoko; James, C. David; Waldman, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Activation of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (cdk4/6) occurs in the majority of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors, and represents a promising molecular target for the development of small molecule inhibitors. In the current study we investigated the molecular determinants and in vivo response of diverse GBM cell lines and xenografts to PD-0332991, a cdk4/6 specific inhibitor. In vitro testing of PD-0332991 against a panel of GBM cell lines revealed a potent G1 cell cycle arrest and induc...

  4. Retrospective Analysis of Bevacizumab in Combination with Fotemustine in Chinese Patients with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiguang Liu; Guanqun Zhang; Liang Zhu; Jiangbo Wang; Dongbo Liu; Lifei Lian; Jianlin Liu; Tianbao Lai; Xiaorong Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the activity and safety of bevacizumab (BEV) and fotemustine (FTM) for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients and explore the potential prognostic parameters on survival. This study retrospectively analyzed all patients with GBM who were treated with at least one cycle of BEV and FTM from July 2010 to October 2012. A total of 176 patients with recurrent GBM were enrolled. The response rate and disease control rate were 46.6% and 9...

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging for target volume definition in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberat, Jatta; Remonda, Luca [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Neuro-radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); McNamara, Jane; Rogers, Susanne [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); Bodis, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MR-based technique that may better detect the peritumoural region than MRI. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of using DTI for target volume delineation in glioblastoma patients. MR tensor tracts and maps of the isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components of water diffusion were coregistered with CT in 13 glioblastoma patients. An in-house image processing program was used to analyse water diffusion in each voxel of interest in the region of the tumour. Tumour infiltration was mapped according to validated criteria and contralateral normal brain was used as an internal control. A clinical target volume (CTV) was generated based on the T{sub 1}-weighted image obtained using contrast agent (T{sub 1Gd}), tractography and the infiltration map. This was compared to a conventional T{sub 2}-weighted CTV (T{sub 2}-w CTV). Definition of a diffusion-based CTV that included the adjacent white matter tracts proved highly feasible. A statistically significant difference was detected between the DTI-CTV and T{sub 2}-w CTV volumes (p < 0.005, t = 3.480). As the DTI-CTVs were smaller than the T{sub 2}-w CTVs (tumour plus peritumoural oedema), the pq maps were not simply detecting oedema. Compared to the clinical planning target volume (PTV), the DTI-PTV showed a trend towards volume reduction. These diffusion-based volumes were smaller than conventional volumes, yet still included sites of tumour recurrence. Extending the CTV along the abnormal tensor tracts in order to preserve coverage of the likely routes of dissemination, whilst sparing uninvolved brain, is a rational approach to individualising radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma patients. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusions-Tensor-Bildgebung (DTI) ist eine MR-Technik, die dank der Erfassung des peritumoralen Bereichs eine Verbesserung bezueglich MRI bringt. Unser Ziel war die Pruefung der Machbarkeit der Verwendung der DTI fuer die Zielvolumenabgrenzung fuer Patienten mit

  6. Saponin 1 Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses NF-κB-Mediated Survival Signaling in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Juan; Tang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yun; Tang, Chi; Li, Bo; Wang, Yuangang; Gao, Zhenhui; Luo, Peng; Yin, Anan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Cheng, Guang; Fei, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Saponin 1 is a triterpeniod saponin extracted from Anemone taipaiensis, a traditional Chinese medicine against rheumatism and phlebitis. It has also been shown to exhibit significant anti-tumor activity against human leukemia (HL-60 cells) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep-G2 cells). Herein we investigated the effect of saponin 1 in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) U251MG and U87MG cells. Saponin 1 induced significant growth inhibition in both glioblastoma cell lines, with a 50% inhi...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in 67 cases of glioblastoma multiform and occurrence of metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the main MRI characteristics of glioblastoma multiform (GBM), the most common CNS primary tumor, emphasizing its location and the occurrence of metastases. The MR imaging of 67 pathologically proven cases of glioblastoma multiform were retrospectively reviewed. The exams were realized in the period between 1995 and 2003, in one of three 1.5 Signa GE units (Milwaukee, WI). The ages of the patients ranged from 4 years to 86 years, mean 60 years, and the occurrence of the tumor was preponderant among men, with 39 cases (58%). The most common location was in the frontal lobes (47%) followed by the temporal lobes (18%) and the parietal lobes (16%). In 19% of the cases there were involvement of more than one site and long distance metastases were seen in 22% of the patients. According to the literature, the most common location of GBM was in the frontal lobe of older than 50 years old men. Metastases occurred in 22% of our cases. (author)

  8. Novel cellular and post-genomic technologies in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukhovetskiy, Igor; Bryukhovetskiy, Andrey; Khotimchenko, Yuri; Mischenko, Polina

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most aggressive brain tumors. The majority of modern treatment methods for GBM are not sufficiently effective with a median survival varying from 9 to 14 months. One of the main reasons for the therapeutic resistance of GBM is attributed to cancer stem cells. Pharmaceuticals that can effectively eliminate cancer stem cells do not exist. Experimentally, we have shown that cancer stem cells can be specifically affected to arrest adhesion, proliferation and migration, and other key functions. The main target of this therapy involves membrane intracellular signaling pathways of cancer stem cells that are not subject to neoplastic transformation. An effect on such a complex target requires the development of innovative biotechnological approaches. The research analysis of modern approaches towards creating biomedical drugs for treating cancer stem cells of glioblastoma multiforme is based on advances in the latest cellular and post-genomic technologies. The combination of targeted therapy with regulation of the key functions of cancer stem cells using cell systems with a remodeled proteome is suggested. PMID:26548844

  9. New treatment options in the management of glioblastoma multiforme: a focus on bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argirios Moustakas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Argirios Moustakas, Teri N KreislNational Cancer Institute, Neuro-Oncology Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USAAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults and carries the poorest prognosis. Despite recent progress in molecular biology, neuro-imaging and neuro-surgical care, the management of patients with GBM continues to harbor significant challenges. Survival after diagnosis is poor even with the most aggressive approach using multimodality therapy. Although the etiology of malignant gliomas is not known, the dependency of tumor growth on angiogenesis has identified this pathway as a promising therapeutic target. Bevacizumab was the first antiangiogenic therapy approved for use in cancer and received accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of recurrent GBM in 2009, the first new drug for this disease in over a decade. This review describes the rationale behind the treatment of GBM with bevacizumab. The pharmacology, efficacy, safety and tolerability of bevacizumab will also be reviewed.Keywords: glioblastoma multiforme, angiogenesis, bevacizumab

  10. A population-based study of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe (1) the use of surgery and radiotherapy (RT) in the treatment of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) in Ontario, (2) survival, and (3) proportion of survival time spent in the hospital after diagnosis. Methods and Materials: We performed a population-based cohort study of all Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) cases of GBM diagnosed between 1982 and 1994. We linked OCR records, hospital files containing surgical procedure codes from the Canadian Institute for Health Information, and province-wide RT records. We studied the odds of treatment using multivariate logistic regression. We expressed the time spent in the hospital as the mean number of days per case, and as a proportion of the interval between diagnosis and death, or 24 months following diagnosis, whichever came first. We used the life-table method and Cox proportional hazards regression to describe survival. Results: The proportion of patients with GBM undergoing any surgery directed at the tumor varied with age (p<0.0001) and region of residence (p<0.0001). The proportion undergoing RT varied with age (p<0.0001), region of residence (p<0.0001), and year of diagnosis (p=0.01). RT dose ≥53.5 Gy varied with age (p<0.0001), region of residence (p<0.0001), and year of diagnosis (p=0.0002). Median survival was 11 months among patients receiving RT and 3 months among those not receiving RT. The percentage of survival time spent in the hospital was similar among those who received from 49.5 to <53.5 Gy, compared to ≥53.5 Gy. Overall survival and the adjusted relative risk of death varied with age and region of residence. Conclusion: We observed practice variation in the treatment of patients with GBM according to age, region of residence, and year of diagnosis. Survival did not increase during the study period. The variation in RT dose between those receiving from 49.5 to <53.5 Gy compared to ≥53.5 Gy was not paralleled by variation in survival between regions where one or the other of the

  11. ET-54 immunotherapy based on tumor transplant antigen recognition emerges as a promising strategy for recurrent glioblastoma multiform (GBM) patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Pretto, C.; Devillers, L.; Pierre, D.; Hofman, F.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) prognosis remains very poor. This is especially true when the tumors relapse on the current standard of care treatments. Our preclinical data, generated in a rat CNS-1 glioma model in Lewis rats, provided the scientific rationale for a prototype clinical vaccine prepara

  12. Use of ERC-1671 vaccine in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after progression during bevacizumab therapy: first published report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bota, D.A.; Alexandru-Abrams, D.; Pretto, C.; Hofman, F.M.; Chen, T.C.; Fu, B.; Carrillo, J.A.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Stathopoulos, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive tumor, which recurs despite resection, focal beam radiation, and temozolomide chemotherapy. At recurrence, the only second-line treatment approved by the US Food and Drug Administration is bevacizumab (Avastin). To date, no single agen

  13. Complete clinical regression of a BRAF V600E-mutant pediatric glioblastoma multiforme after BRAF inhibitor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard therapies for high grade glioma have failed to substantially improve survival and are associated with significant morbidity. At relapse, high grade gliomas, such as glioblastoma multiforme, are refractory to therapy and universally fatal. BRAF V600E-mutations have been described in a modest 6% to 7% of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but with increased prevalence in the pediatric population and in certain brain tumor subtypes. The use of BRAF inhibitors have transformed melanoma therapy however their use in brain tumors remains unproven. We describe the pediatric case of a now 12 year old Caucasian male who originally presented at age 9 with a right fronto-parietal glioblastoma multiforme that recurred 2 ½ years from diagnosis. Molecular analysis of the primary tumor revealed a BRAF V600E mutation and the patient was placed on the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. A complete response was observed after 4 months of therapy and remains sustained at 6 months. This is the first report of a complete response of relapsed glioblastoma multiforme to targeted BRAF inhibitor therapy. While not a predominant mutation in glioblastoma multiforme, the increased prevalence of BRAF V600 mutations in pediatric CNS tumors and certain subtypes marks a population to whom this therapy could be applied. Response to this therapy suggests that BRAF inhibitors can affect primary CNS lesions when a documented and targetable mutation is present

  14. GlioLab-a space system for Glioblastoma multiforme cells on orbit behavior study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Chantal; Twiggs, Robert J.

    Microgravity conditions and ionizing radiation pose significant health risks for human life in space. This is a concern for future missions and also for future space tourism flights. Nev-ertheless, at the same time it is very interesting to study the effects of these conditions in unhealthy organism like biological samples affected by cancer. It is possible that space envi-ronment increases, decreases or doesn't have any effect on cancer cells. In any case the test results give important informations about cancer treatment or space tourism flight for people affected by cancer. GlioLab is a joint project between GAUSS-Group of Astrodynamics at the "Sapienza" University of Roma and the Morehead State University (MSU) Space Science Center in Kentucky. The main goal of this project is the design and manufacturing of an autonomous space system to investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on a human glioblastoma multiforme cell line derived from a 65-year-old male and on Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA). In particular the samples are Glioblastoma multiforme cancer cells because the radiotherapy using ionizing radiation is the only treatment after surgery that can give on ground an improvement on the survival rate for this very malignant cancer. During a mission on the ISS, GlioLab mission has to test the in orbit behavior of glioblastoma cancer cells and healthy neuronal cells, which are extremely fragile and require complex experimentation and testing. In this paper engineering solutions to design and manufacturing of an autonomous space system that can allow to keep alive these kind of cells are described. This autonomous system is characterized also by an optical device dedicated to cells behavior analysis and by microdosimeters for monitoring space radiation environment.

  15. Fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery with concurrent temozolomide chemotherapy for locally recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenspoon JN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Noah Greenspoon,1 Waseem Sharieff,1 Holger Hirte,1 Andrew Overholt,1 Rocco Devillers,2 Thorsteinn Gunnarsson,2 Anthony Whitton11Department of Oncology, McMaster University, ON, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, McMaster University, ON, CanadaAbstract: Local recurrence represents a significant challenge in the management of patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Salvage treatment options are limited by lack of clinical efficacy. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant response rate and acceptable toxicity with the use of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery in this patient population. Our primary objective was to determine the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery combined with concurrent temozolomide chemotherapy as a salvage treatment for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. We prospectively collected treatment and outcome data for patients having fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for locally recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after radical radiotherapy. Eligible patients had a maximum recurrence diameter of 60 mm without causing significant mass effect. The gross tumor volume was defined as the enhancing lesion on an enhanced fine-slice T1 (spin–lattice magnetic resonance imaging, and a circumferential setup margin of 1 mm was used to define the planning target volume. All patients were treated using robotic radiosurgery with three dose/fractionation schedules ranging from 25 to 35 Gy in five fractions, depending on the maximum tumor diameter. Concurrent temozolomide 75 mg/m2 was prescribed to all patients. Tumor response was judged using the Macdonald criteria, and toxicity was assessed using the CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. A total of 31 patients were enrolled in this study. The median overall survival was 9 months, and progression-free survival was 7 months. The 6-month progression-free survival was 60% with a 95% confidence interval of 43%–77%. The a priori

  16. Prognostic factors in glioblastoma multiforme. 10 years experience of a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with a glioblastoma multiforme treated in an academic institute over the last 10 years. Patients and method: From 1988 to 1998, 198 patients with pathologically confirmed glioblastoma multiforme were analyzed. Five radiation schedules were used mainly based on pretreatment selection criteria: 1. 60 Gy in 30 fractions followed by an interstitial iridium-192 (Ir-192) boost for selected patients with a good performance and a small circumscribed tumor, 2. 66 Gy in 33 fractions for good performance patients, 3. 40 Gy in eight fractions or 4. 28 Gy in four fractions for poor prognostic patients and 5. no irradiation. Results: Median survival was 16 months, 7 months, 5.6 months, 6.6 months and 1.8 months for the groups treated with Ir-192, 66 Gy, 40 Gy, 28 Gy and the group without treatment, respectively. No significant improvement in survival was encountered over the last 10 years. At multivariate analysis patients treated with a hypofractionated scheme showed a similar survival probability and duration of palliative effect compared to the conventionally fractionated group. The poor prognostic groups receiving radiotherapy had a highly significant better survival compared to the no-treatment group. Patients treated with an Ir-192 boost had a better median survival compared to a historical group matched on selection criteria but without boost treatment (16 vs 9.7 months, n.s.). However, survival at 2 years was similar. Analysis on pretreatment characteristics at multivariate analysis revealed age, neurological performance, addition of radiotherapy, total resection, tumor size post surgery and deterioration before start of radiotherapy (borderline) as significant prognostic factors for survival. Conclusion: Despite technical developments in surgery and radiotherapy over the last 10 years, survival of patients with a glioblastoma multiforme has not improved in our institution. The analysis of prognostic factors

  17. Transcription factor 3 controls cell proliferation and migration in glioblastoma multiforme cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiting; Li, Yinghui; Hu, Xin; Lian, Haiwei; Wang, Lei; Fu, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Transcription factor 3 (TCF3) is a member of the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factor family. Recent studies have demonstrated its potential carcinogenic properties. Here we show that TCF3 was upregulated in glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. This upregulation of the TCF3 gene probably has functional significance in brain-tumor progression. Our studies on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines show that knock-down of TCF3 induced apoptosis and inhibited cell migration. Further analysis revealed that down-regulation of TCF3 gene expression inhibits Akt and Erk1/2 activation, suggesting that the carcinogenic properties of TCF3 in GBM are partially mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt and MAPK-Erk signaling pathways. Considered together, the results of this study demonstrate that high levels of TCF3 in gliomas potentially promote glioma development through the Akt and Erk pathways. PMID:27105323

  18. 5-aminolevulinic acid guidance during awake craniotomy to maximise extent of safe resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corns, Robert; Mukherjee, Soumya; Johansen, Anja; Sivakumar, Gnanamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Overall survival for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been consistently shown to improve when the surgeon achieves a gross total resection of the tumour. It has also been demonstrated that surgical adjuncts such as 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence--which delineates malignant tumour tissue--normal brain tissue margin seen using violet-blue excitation under an operating microscope--helps achieve this. We describe the case of a patient with recurrent left frontal GBM encroaching on Broca's area (eloquent brain). Gross total resection of the tumour was achieved by combining two techniques, awake resection to prevent damage to eloquent brain and 5-ALA fluorescence guidance to maximise the extent of tumour resection.This technique led to gross total resection of all T1-enhancing tumour with the avoidance of neurological deficit. The authors recommend this technique in patients when awake surgery can be tolerated and gross total resection is the aim of surgery. PMID:26177997

  19. A genome-wide allelotype study of primary and corresponding recurrent glioblastoma multiforme in one patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡杰; 江澄川; 吴浩强; 彭颂先; 唐婉君; 陈商群

    2004-01-01

    @@Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Although comprehensive therapeutic measures are available, recurrence is very frequent and the prognosis of GBM remains dismal. To date, little is known about the molecular pathogenesis associated with GBM recurrence. According to Knudson ' s two-hit hypothesis of tumor suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation,1 deletion of a chromosomal region, as revealed by loss of heterozygosity (LOH), is often indicative of the presence of a potential TSG. Allelotype studies involving a comprehensive LOH analysis of the whole genome can provide more detailed and thorough information for detecting genetic anomalies than traditional LOH analysis. The present study is designed to conduct a genome-wide allelotype analysis of one patient ' s primary and corresponding recurrent GBM tumors in an effort to reveal molecular genetic alterations associated with the recurrence of this malignancy.

  20. Irinotecan-based regimens for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: [corrected] a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Omar; Fouad, Mona

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review aims to assess irinotecan-based salvage regimens for patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) beyond first line treatment. Eligible trials were identified using databases search and 25 studies were included in the final analysis. Among the 25 studies, PFS-6 rate was reported in 15 studies and it ranged from 16% to 63%. Median PFS was reported in 18 studies and it ranged from 1 to 7.6 months. While for median OS, it was reported in 17 studies and it ranged from 5.8 months to 17.9 months. The available data suggests that routine use of irinotecan-based salvage regimens cannot be recommended outside the setting of well-controlled prospective randomized studies investigating novel combinations of irinotecan. PMID:26469869

  1. Comparing predictive models of glioblastoma multiforme built using multi-institutional and local data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Kyle W; Hsu, William; Bui, Alex A T

    2012-01-01

    The growing amount of electronic data collected from patient care and clinical trials is motivating the creation of national repositories where multiple institutions share data about their patient cohorts. Such efforts aim to provide sufficient sample sizes for data mining and predictive modeling, ultimately improving treatment recommendations and patient outcome prediction. While these repositories offer the potential to improve our understanding of a disease, potential issues need to be addressed to ensure that multi-site data and resultant predictive models are useful to non-contributing institutions. In this paper we examine the challenges of utilizing National Cancer Institute datasets for modeling glioblastoma multiforme. We created several types of prognostic models and compared their results against models generated using data solely from our institution. While overall model performance between the data sources was similar, different variables were selected during model generation, suggesting that mapping data resources between models is not a straightforward issue. PMID:23304418

  2. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance of nicotinamide combined with radiation therapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pharmacokinetic properties of nicotinamide and its tolerance were studied in seven patients affected by glioblastoma multiforme and treated with two fractions per day of radiation therapy. Nicotinamide was given orally at two daily doses of 4 g and then 2 g separated by a 6-h-interval. The treatment was well tolerated in almost all patients and had no effect on blood pressure, cardiac rhythm or body temperature. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed peak plasma levels (Cmax) above 100 mg/l 45 minutes after the administration of both doses. This was followed by a biexponential decay of plasma concentrations with a thermal half life of 9.4 h. Tumours were irradiated 1 hour after each drug dose to match with drug Cmax in plasma, and although it is too early to evaluate the tumour response, the drug levels achieved should be sufficient to improve radiation therapy. (orig.)

  3. Phase II open-label study of nintedanib in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Mau-Sørensen, Paul Morten;

    2013-01-01

    Nintedanib (BIBF 1120) is a small, orally available, triple angiokinase inhibitor in phase III development (various indications) that targets VEGFR 1-3, FGFR 1-3, and PDGFR-α/β. This open-label, uncontrolled, phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of nintedanib in patients with recurrent...... RANO) were enrolled. Nintedanib was given orally at a dose of 200 mg twice daily (bid), with magnetic resonance imaging undertaken every 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was objective response rate. The study was stopped prematurely following a preplanned futility analysis after inclusion of 13 patients...... glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who had previously failed radiotherapy plus temozolomide as first-line therapy (STUPP), or the same regimen with subsequent bevacizumab-based therapy as second-line treatment (BEV). Patients with a performance status of 0-1, histologically proven GBM, and measurable disease (by...

  4. Metabolic management of glioblastoma multiforme using standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servadei Franco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM has been difficult using standard therapy (radiation with temozolomide chemotherapy. The ketogenic diet is used commonly to treat refractory epilepsy in children and, when administered in restricted amounts, can also target energy metabolism in brain tumors. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with progressive memory loss, chronic headaches, nausea, and a right hemisphere multi-centric tumor seen with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Following incomplete surgical resection, the patient was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme expressing hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter. Methods Prior to initiation of the standard therapy, the patient conducted water-only therapeutic fasting and a restricted 4:1 (fat: carbohydrate + protein ketogenic diet that delivered about 600 kcal/day. The patient also received the restricted ketogenic diet concomitantly during the standard treatment period. The diet was supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Steroid medication (dexamethasone was removed during the course of the treatment. The patient was followed using MRI and positron emission tomography with fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET. Results After two months treatment, the patient's body weight was reduced by about 20% and no discernable brain tumor tissue was detected using either FDG-PET or MRI imaging. Biomarker changes showed reduced levels of blood glucose and elevated levels of urinary ketones. MRI evidence of tumor recurrence was found 10 weeks after suspension of strict diet therapy. Conclusion This is the first report of confirmed GBM treated with standard therapy together with a restricted ketogenic diet. As rapid regression of GBM is rare in older patients following incomplete surgical resection and standard therapy alone, the response observed in this case could result in part from the action of the calorie restricted ketogenic diet. Further studies are needed

  5. Glioblastoma multiforme and papillary thyroid carcinoma - A rare combination of multiple primary malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaroopa Pulivarthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are describing a 19-year-old white woman who presented with two synchronous primary cancers, namely glioblastoma multiforme and papillary thyroid cancer. The patient was admitted with dizziness, headache, and vomiting. CT head revealed acute intraparenchymal hematoma in the right cingulate gyrus and the splenium of the corpus callosum. Carotid and cerebral angiogram were unremarkable. MRI of the brain demonstrated a non-enhancing and non-hemorrhagic component of the lesion along the lateral margin of the hemorrhage just medial to the atrium of the right lateral ventricle that was suspicious for a tumor or metastasis. Brain biopsy confirmed it as glioblastoma mutiforme. CT chest was done to rule out primary cancer that revealed a 11 mm hypodense lesion in the left lobe of the thyroid and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy confirmed it as papillary thyroid carcinoma. We should evaluate for multiple primary malignancies in young patients who are found to have primary index cancer.

  6. Nanocarriers for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: Current state-of-the-art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Reatul; Palazzo, Claudio; Evrard, Brigitte; Piel, Geraldine

    2016-04-10

    Glioblastoma multiforme, a grade IV glioma, is the most frequently occurring and invasive primary tumor of the central nervous system, which causes about 4% of cancer-associated-deaths, making it one of the most fatal cancers. With present treatments, using state-of-the-art technologies, the median survival is about 14months and 2year survival rate is merely 3-5%. Hence, novel therapeutic approaches are urgently necessary. However, most drug molecules are not able to cross the blood-brain barrier, which is one of the major difficulties in glioblastoma treatment. This review describes the features of blood-brain barrier, and its anatomical changes with different stages of tumor growth. Moreover, various strategies to improve brain drug delivery i.e. tight junction opening, chemical modification of the drug, efflux transporter inhibition, convection-enhanced delivery, craniotomy-based drug delivery and drug delivery nanosystems are discussed. Nanocarriers are one of the highly potential drug transport systems that have gained huge research focus over the last few decades for site specific drug delivery, including drug delivery to the brain. Properly designed nanocolloids are capable to cross the blood-brain barrier and specifically deliver the drug in the brain tumor tissue. They can carry both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, protect them from degradation, release the drug for sustained period, significantly improve the plasma circulation half-life and reduce toxic effects. Among various nanocarriers, liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and lipid nanocapsules are the most widely studied, and are discussed in this review. For each type of nanocarrier, a general discussion describing their composition, characteristics, types and various uses is followed by their specific application to glioblastoma treatment. Moreover, some of the main challenges regarding toxicity and standardized evaluation techniques are narrated in brief. PMID:26892752

  7. Epigenetic modulation of the drug resistance genes MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance of the highly aggressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) to drug therapy is a major clinical problem resulting in a poor patient’s prognosis. Beside promoter methylation of the O 6 -methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene the efflux transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 have been suggested as pivotal factors contributing to drug resistance, but the methylation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 has not been assessed before in GBM. Methods Therefore, we evaluated the proportion and prognostic significance of promoter methylation of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in 64 GBM patient samples using pyrosequencing technology. Further, the single nucleotide polymorphisms MGMT C-56 T (rs16906252), ABCB1 C3435T (rs1045642) and ABCG2 C421A (rs2231142) were determined using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method (RFLP). To study a correlation between promoter methylation and gene expression, we analyzed MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 expression in 20 glioblastoma and 7 non-neoplastic brain samples. Results Despite a significantly increased MGMT and ABCB1 promoter methylation in GBM tissue, multivariate regression analysis revealed no significant association between overall survival of glioblastoma patients and MGMT or ABCB1 promoter methylation. However, a significant negative correlation between promoter methylation and expression could be identified for MGMT but not for ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, MGMT promoter methylation was significantly associated with the genotypes of the MGMT C-56 T polymorphism showing a higher methylation level in the T allele bearing GBM. Conclusions In summary, the data of this study confirm the previous published relation of MGMT promoter methylation and gene expression, but argue for no pivotal role of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 promoter methylation in GBM patients’ survival. PMID:24380367

  8. MR-guided laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: Preliminary results in 16 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim [Center for Medical Research, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany)]. E-mail: schwarzmaier@klinikum-krefeld.de; Eickmeyer, Frank [Department of Radiology, Coordination Center for Clinical Studies, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Tempelhoff, Wernholt von [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Fiedler, Volkhard Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Coordination Center for Clinical Studies, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Niehoff, Hendrik [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Ulrich, Slif Dagobert [Department of Radiology, Coordination Center for Clinical Studies, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany); Yang Qin [University of Duesseldorf (Germany); Ulrich, Frank [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Krefeld, University of Duesseldorf Medical School at Krefeld (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    We investigated the survival after laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in 16 patients suffering from recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. The concept underlying the intervention is the cytoreduction of the tumor tissue by local thermocoagulation. All patients received standard chemotherapy (temozolomide). The median overall survival time after the first relapse was 9.4 months, corresponding to a median overall survival time after laser irradiation of 6.9 months. During the study, however, the median survival after laser coagulation increased to 11.2 months. This survival time is substantially longer than those reported for the natural history (<5 months) or after chemotherapy (temozolomide: 5.4-7.1 months). We conclude that cytoreduction by laser irradiation might be a promising option for patients suffering from recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. In addition, the data indicate the presence of a substantial learning curve. Future work should optimize the therapeutic regimen and evaluate this treatment approach in controlled clinical trials.

  9. Late onset leptomeningeal and whole spine metastasis from supratentorial Glioblastoma multiforme: An uncommon manifestation of a common tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divyam; Gupta, Anshul; Dhillon, Gurupal S; Chhabra, Satnam Singh

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most common and aggressive primary brain tumors, composing 12-20% of all the intracranial tumors in adults with a highly malignant course and average life expectancy of approximately 12-14 months following initial diagnosis. Leptomeningeal or intramedullary metastasis from primary GBM is a rare phenomenon with a poor prognosis. We present a rare case of GBM with late onset intramedullary, extramedullary, as well as leptomeningeal spinal metastasis. PMID:27217661

  10. Late onset leptomeningeal and whole spine metastasis from supratentorial Glioblastoma multiforme: An uncommon manifestation of a common tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Divyam Sharma; Anshul Gupta; Gurupal S Dhillon; Satnam Singh Chhabra

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most common and aggressive primary brain tumors, composing 12-20% of all the intracranial tumors in adults with a highly malignant course and average life expectancy of approximately 12-14 months following initial diagnosis. Leptomeningeal or intramedullary metastasis from primary GBM is a rare phenomenon with a poor prognosis. We present a rare case of GBM with late onset intramedullary, extramedullary, as well as leptomeningeal spinal metastasis.

  11. VEGF-D is an X-linked/AP-1 regulated putative onco-angiogen in human glioblastoma multiforme.

    OpenAIRE

    Debinski, W; Slagle-Webb, B.; Achen, M. G.; Stacker, S A; Tulchinsky, E; Gillespie, G. Y.; Gibo, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a hypervascularized and locally infiltrating brain tumor of astroglial origin with a very poor prognosis. An X-linked c-fos oncogene-inducible mitogenic, morphogenic, and angiogenic factor, endothelial growth factor-D (VEGF-D), is the newest mammalian member of VEGF family. We analyzed VEGF-D in GBM because of its high angiogenic potential and its linkage to the X chromosome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nonmalignant brain and GBM tissue sections as well...

  12. Inhibition of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Tivnan, Amanda; Zakaria, Zaitun; O'Leary, Caitrín; Kögel, Donat; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30–40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10–20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it's role in BBB ...

  13. ET-54IMMUNOTHERAPY BASED ON TUMOR TRANSPLANT ANTIGEN RECOGNITION EMERGES AS A PROMISING STRATEGY FOR RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME (GBM) PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Schijns, Virgil; Pretto, Chrystel; Devillers, Laurent; Pierre, Denis; Hofman, Florence; Kruse, Carol; Chen, Thomas; Oertel, Joachim; Hantos, Peter; Bota, Daniela; Stathopoulos, Apostolos

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) prognosis remains very poor. This is especially true when the tumors relapse on the current standard of care treatments. Our preclinical data, generated in a rat CNS-1 glioma model in Lewis rats, provided the scientific rationale for a prototype clinical vaccine preparation, named ERC 1671 (Gliovac). ERC1671 is composed of autologous antigens, derived from the patient's own tumour tissue, and administered in conjunction with allogeneic antigens from histologicall...

  14. Salvage Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy with or without Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy for Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Single Institution Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Shaakir; Chen, Eda; Lanciano, Rachelle; Yang, Jun; Hanlon, Alex; Lamond, John; Arrigo, Stephen; Ding, William; Mikhail, Michael; Ghaneie, Arezoo; Brady, Luther

    2015-01-01

    Background The current standard of care for salvage treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is gross total resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for operable patients. Limited evidence exists to suggest that any particular treatment modality improves survival for recurrent GBM, especially if inoperable. We report our experience with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (fSRT) with and without chemo/immunotherapy, identifying prognostic factors associated with prolonged survival. ...

  15. Impact of therapy on quality of life, neurocognitive function and their correlates in glioblastoma multiforme: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksson, Roger; Asklund, Thomas; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of quality of life (QoL) in patients with high-grade glioma is an important endpoint during treatment, particularly in those with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) given its dismal prognosis despite limited advances in standard therapy. It has proven difficult to identify new therapies that extend survival in patients with recurrent GBM, so one of the primary aims of new therapies is to reduce morbidity, restore or preserve neurologic functions, and the capacity to perform daily a...

  16. Inhibition of Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda eTivnan; Zaitun eZakaria; Caitrin eO'Leary; Donat eKogel; Pokorny, Jenny L.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30-40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10-20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it’s role in BB...

  17. Increased expression of EphA7 correlates with adverse outcome in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rose Frank; You An; Juricko Janko; Fokas Emmanouil; Wang Lin-Fang; Pagenstecher Axel; Engenhart-Cabillic Rita; An Han-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant gliomas are lethal cancers, highly dependent on angiogenesis and treatment options and prognosis still remain poor for patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Ephs and ephrins have many well-defined functions during embryonic development of central nervous system such as axon mapping, neural crest cell migration, hindbrain segmentation and synapse formation as well as physiological and abnormal angiogenesis. Accumulating evidence indicates that Eph...

  18. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme cells with temozolomide-BioShuttle ligated by the inverse Diels-Alder ligation chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Spring, Herbert; Debus, Juergen; Didinger, Bernd; Koch, Mario; Muller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), insensitive against most therapeutic interventions, has low response and survival rates. Temozolomide (TMZ) was approved for second-line therapy of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma. However, TMZ therapy in GBM patients reveals properties such as reduced tolerability and inauspicious hemogram. The solution addressed here concerning GBM therapy consolidates and uses the potential of organic and peptide chemistry with molecular medicine. We enhanced the p...

  19. Therapy and progression – induced O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and mismatch repair alterations in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, S.; Suri, V.; M C Sharma; C. Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Despite multimodality treatment protocol including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), most suffer from treatment failure and tumor recurrence within a few months of initial surgery. The effectiveness of temozolomide (TMZ), the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, is largely dependent on the methylation status of the promoter of the gene O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and the integrity of the mismatch repair (...

  20. Strong adverse prognostic impact of hyperglycemic episodes during adjuvant chemoradiotherapy of glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Arnulf; Vaupel, Peter; Stockinger, Marcus; Schmidberger, Heinz [University Medical Center, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Mainz (Germany); Struss, Hans-Garlich [University Medical Center, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Mainz (Germany); Giese, Alf [University Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Mainz (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    In comparison to normal brain tissue, glioblastomas exhibit significantly increased glucose uptake. Brain edema is a common complication during adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, leading to a requirement for glucocorticoid treatment. Glucocorticoid treatment frequently causes considerable deregulation of blood glucose levels. Therefore, episodes of hyperglycemia may contribute to radio- and/or chemoresistance. This study comprises a retrospective analysis of the influence of hyperglycemic episodes (HEs) during adjuvant therapy on the overall survival of 106 glioblastoma multiforme patients. The occurrence of one or more deregulated blood glucose value(s) > 10 mM is associated with a reduction in median overall survival from 16.7 to 8.8 months. A significantly poorer overall survival of patients with hyperglycemia could also be detected in subgroup analyses of patients with complete tumor resection and complete treatment according to the EORTC 22891/26891 trial protocol, as well as in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis. A history of diabetes mellitus had no influence on prognosis. Our data suggest that the observed negative impact of elevated blood glucose levels on overall survival may not solely be explained by the patients' poorer general condition; the elevated blood glucose concentration itself may play a pathogenetic role. This could be due to increased activity of antioxidant systems, elevated expression of DNA damage response proteins and protection of hypoxic tumor cells against apoptosis combined with hypoxia-mediated radioresistance. A possible prognostic impact of elevated blood glucose levels during the period of adjuvant (chemo-) radiotherapy of glioblastoma should be evaluated in a prospective clinical trial. (orig.) [German] Glioblastome zeigen im Vergleich mit normalem Gehirngewebe eine deutlich vermehrte Glukoseaufnahme. Im Rahmen der adjuvanten Radio(chemo)therapie von Glioblastomen treten vielfach Hirnoedeme auf, die eine

  1. Theranostic Application of Mixed Gold and Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Micelles in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lova; Joh, Daniel Y; Al-Zaki, Ajlan; Stangl, Melissa; Murty, Surya; Davis, James J; Baumann, Brian C; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Kaol, Gary D; Tsourkas, Andrew; Dorsey, Jay F

    2016-02-01

    The treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, the most prevalent and lethal form of brain cancer in humans, has been limited in part by poor delivery of drugs through the blood-brain barrier and by unclear delineation of the extent of infiltrating tumor margins. Nanoparticles, which selectively accumulate in tumor tissue due to their leaky vasculature and the enhanced permeability and retention effect, have shown promise as both therapeutic and diagnostic agents for brain tumors. In particular, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been leveraged as T2-weighted MRI contrast agents for tumor detection and imaging; and gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been demonstrated as radiosensitizers capable of propagating electron and free radical-induced radiation damage to tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the potential applications of novel gold and SPION-loaded micelles (GSMs) coated by polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone (PEG-PCL) polymer. By quantifying gh2ax DNA damage foci in glioblastoma cell lines, we tested the radiosensitizing efficacy of these GSMs, and found that GSM administration in conjunction with radiation therapy (RT) led to ~2-fold increase in density of double-stranded DNA breaks. For imaging, we used GSMs as a contrast agent for both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of stereotactically implanted GBM tumors in a mouse model, and found that MRI but not CT was sufficiently sensitive to detect and delineate tumor borders after administration and accumulation of GSMs. These results suggest that with further development and testing, GSMs may potentially be integrated into both imaging and treatment of brain tumors, serving a theranostic purpose as both an MRI-based contrast agent and a radiosensitizer. PMID:27305768

  2. Pathway analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms potentially associated with glioblastoma multiforme susceptibility using random forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Wiencke, John K; Wiemels, Joseph L; Smirnov, Ivan; Pico, Alexander R; Tihan, Tarik; Patoka, Joe; Miike, Rei; Sison, Jennette D; Rice, Terri; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2008-06-01

    Glioma is a complex disease that is unlikely to result from the effect of a single gene. Genetic analysis at the pathway level involving multiple genes may be more likely to capture gene-disease associations than analyzing genes one at a time. The current pilot study included 112 Caucasians with glioblastoma multiforme and 112 Caucasian healthy controls frequency matched to cases by age and gender. Subjects were genotyped using a commercially available (ParAllele/Affymetrix) assay panel of 10,177 nonsynonymous coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) spanning the genome known at the time the panel was constructed. For this analysis, we selected 10 pathways potentially involved in gliomagenesis that had SNPs represented on the panel. We performed random forests (RF) analyses of SNPs within each pathway group and logistic regression to assess interaction among genes in the one pathway for which the RF prediction error was better than chance and the permutation P < 0.10. Only the DNA repair pathway had a better than chance classification of case-control status with a prediction error of 45.5% and P = 0.09. Three SNPs (rs1047840 of EXO1, rs12450550 of EME1, and rs799917 of BRCA1) of the DNA repair pathway were identified as promising candidates for further replication. In addition, statistically significant interactions (P < 0.05) between rs1047840 of EXO1 and rs799917 or rs1799966 of BRCA1 were observed. Despite less than complete inclusion of genes and SNPs relevant to glioma and a small sample size, RF analysis identified one important biological pathway and several SNPs potentially associated with the development of glioblastoma. PMID:18559551

  3. Glioblastoma multiforme versus solitary supratentorial brain metastasis. Differentiation based on morphology and magnetic resonance signal characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic potential of a multi-factor analysis of morphometric parameters and magnetic resonance (MR) signal characteristics of a mass and peritumoral area to distinguish solitary supratentorial metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Materials and Methods: MR examinations of 51 patients with histologically proven GBM and 44 with a single supratentorial metastasis were evaluated. A large variety of morphologic criteria and MR signal characteristics in different sequences were analyzed. The data were subjected to logistic regression to investigate their ability to discriminate between GBM and cerebral metastasis. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to select an optimal cut-off point for prediction and to assess the predictive value in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the final model. Results: The logistic regression analysis revealed that the ratio of the maximum diameter of the peritumoral area measured on T2-weighted images (d T2) to the maximum diameter of the enhancing mass area (d T1, post-contrast) is the only useful criterion to distinguish single supratentorial brain metastasis from GBM with a lower ratio favoring GBM (accuracy 68 %, sensitivity 84 % and specificity 45 %). The cut-off point for the ratio d T2/d T1 post-contrast was calculated as 2.35. Conclusion: Measurement of maximum diameters of the peritumoral area in relation to the enhancing mass can be evaluated easily in the clinical routine to discriminate GBM from solitary supratentorial metastasis with an accuracy comparable to that of advanced MRI techniques. (orig.)

  4. Standard fractionation intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) affords unparalleled capacity to deliver conformal radiation doses to tumors in the central nervous system. However, to date, there are few reported outcomes from using IMRT, either alone or as a boost technique, for standard fractionation radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Forty-two patients were treated with IMRT alone (72%) or as a boost (28%) after 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Thirty-three patients with primary disease and 9 patients with recurrent tumors were included. Thirty-four patients (81%) had surgery, with gross tumor resection in 13 patients (36%); 22 patients (53%) received chemo-radiotherapy. The median total radiation dose for all patients was 60 Gy with a range from 30.6 to 74 Gy. Standard fractions of 1.8 Gy/day to 2.0 Gy/day were utilized. Median survival was 8.7 months, with 37 patients (88%) deceased at last contact. Nonparametric analysis showed no survival difference in IMRT-boost vs. IMRT-only groups. While technically feasible, preliminary results suggest delivering standard radiation doses by IMRT did not improve survival outcomes in this series compared to historical controls. In light of this lack of a survival benefit and the costs associated with use of IMRT, future prospective trials are needed to evaluate non-survival endpoints such as quality of life and functional preservation. Short of such evidence, the use of IMRT for treatment of GBM needs to be carefully rationalized

  5. Concerns about anti-angiogenic treatment in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relevance of angiogenesis inhibition in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) should be considered in the unique context of malignant brain tumours. Although patients benefit greatly from reduced cerebral oedema and intracranial pressure, this important clinical improvement on its own may not be considered as an anti-tumour effect. GBM can be roughly separated into an angiogenic component, and an invasive or migratory component. Although this latter component seems inert to anti-angiogenic therapy, it is of major importance for disease progression and survival. We reviewed all relevant literature. Published data support that clinical symptoms are tempered by anti-angiogenic treatment, but that tumour invasion continues. Unfortunately, current imaging modalities are affected by anti-angiogenic treatment too, making it even harder to define tumour margins. To illustrate this we present MRI, biopsy and autopsy specimens from bevacizumab-treated patients. Moreover, while treatment of other tumour types may be improved by combining chemotherapy with anti-angiogenic drugs, inhibiting angiogenesis in GBM may antagonise the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs by normalising the blood-brain barrier function. Although angiogenesis inhibition is of considerable value for symptom reduction in GBM patients, lack of proof of a true anti-tumour effect raises concerns about the place of this type of therapy in the treatment of GBM

  6. Kinomic exploration of temozolomide and radiation resistance in Glioblastoma multiforme xenolines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents the most common and deadly primary brain malignancy, particularly due to temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation (RT) resistance. To better understand resistance mechanisms, we examined global kinase activity (kinomic profiling) in both treatment sensitive and resistant human GBM patient-derived xenografts (PDX or “xenolines”). Materials and methods: Thirteen orthotopically-implanted xenolines were examined including 8 with known RT sensitivity/resistance, while 5 TMZ resistant xenolines were generated through serial TMZ treatment in vivo. Tumors were harvested, prepared as total protein lysates, and kinomically analyzed on a PamStation®12 high-throughput microarray platform with subsequent upstream kinase prediction and network modeling. Results: Kinomic profiles indicated elevated tyrosine kinase activity associated with the radiation resistance phenotype, including FAK and FGFR1. Furthermore, network modeling showed VEGFR1/2 and c-Raf hubs could be involved. Analysis of acquired TMZ resistance revealed more kinomic variability among TMZ resistant tumors. Two of the five tumors displayed significantly altered kinase activity in the TMZ resistant xenolines and network modeling indicated PKC, JAK1, PI3K, CDK2, and VEGFR as potential mediators of this resistance. Conclusion: GBM xenolines provide a phenotypic model for GBM drug response and resistance that when paired with kinomic profiling identified targetable pathways to inherent (radiation) or acquired (TMZ) resistance

  7. Rad51 Protein Expression and Survival in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to pose a significant therapeutic challenge, with most tumors recurring within the previously irradiated tumor bed. To improve outcomes, we must be able to identify and treat resistant cell populations. Rad51, an enzyme involved in homologous recombinational repair, leads to increased resistance of tumor cells to cytotoxic treatments such as radiotherapy. We hypothesized that Rad51 might contribute to GBM's apparent radioresistance and consequently influence survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with an initial diagnosis of GBM were retrospectively evaluated; for 10 of these patients, recurrent tumor specimens were used to construct a tissue microarray. Rad51 protein expression was then correlated with the actual and predicted survival using recursive partitioning analysis. Results: Rad51 protein was elevated in 53% of the GBM specimens at surgery. The Rad51 levels correlated directly with survival, with a median survival of 15 months for patients with elevated Rad51 compared with 9 months for patients with low or absent levels of Rad51 (p = .05). At disease recurrence, 70% of patients had additional increases in Rad51 protein. Increased Rad51 levels at disease recurrence similarly predicted for improved overall survival, with a mean survival of 16 months from the second craniotomy compared with only 4 months for patients with low Rad51 levels (p = .13). Conclusion: Elevated levels of the double-stranded DNA repair protein Rad51 predicted for an increase survival duration in patients with GBM, at both initial tumor presentation and disease recurrence.

  8. Semi-automated segmentation of a glioblastoma multiforme on brain MR images for radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a computerized method for semi-automated segmentation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) of a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) on brain MR images for radiotherapy planning (RTP). Three-dimensional (3D) MR images of 28 cases with a GBM were used in this study. First, a sphere volume of interest (VOI) including the GBM was selected by clicking a part of the GBM region in the 3D image. Then, the sphere VOI was transformed to a two-dimensional (2D) image by use of a spiral-scanning technique. We employed active contour models (ACM) to delineate an optimal outline of the GBM in the transformed 2D image. After inverse transform of the optimal outline to the 3D space, a morphological filter was applied to smooth the shape of the 3D segmented region. For evaluation of our computerized method, we compared the computer output with manually segmented regions, which were obtained by a therapeutic radiologist using a manual tracking method. In evaluating our segmentation method, we employed the Jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC) and the true segmentation coefficient (TSC) in volumes between the computer output and the manually segmented region. The mean and standard deviation of JSC and TSC were 74.2±9.8% and 84.1±7.1%, respectively. Our segmentation method provided a relatively accurate outline for GBM and would be useful for radiotherapy planning. (author)

  9. Prolonged survival when temozolomide is added to accelerated radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate accelerated radiotherapy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This retrospective analysis evaluated 86 patients with histologically proven GBM who were treated with accelerated radiotherapy of 1.8 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54 Gy within 3 weeks. Median age was 62 years and median Karnofsky index was 90. A total of 41 patients received radiotherapy only from 2002-2005 and 45 patients were treated with TMZ concomitantly and after radiotherapy from 2005-2007. Median overall survival (OS) was 12.5 months and 2-year OS was 15.4%. Patient characteristics were well balanced between the two groups except for better performance status (p = 0.05) and higher frequency of retreatment for the first recurrence (p = 0.02) in the TMZ group. Age at diagnosis (HR 2.83) and treatment with TMZ (HR 0.60) were correlated with OS in the multivariate analysis: treatment with and without TMZ resulted in median OS of 16 months and 11.3 months, respectively. Hematological toxicity grade > II was observed in 2/45 patients and 5/37 patients during simultaneous radiochemotherapy and adjuvant TMZ. TMZ added to accelerated radiotherapy for GBM resulted in prolonged overall survival with low rates of severe hematological toxicity. (orig.)

  10. 5-ALA Fluorescence Image Guided Resection of Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Meta-Analysis of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Eljamel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is one of the most deadly cancers in humans. Despite recent advances in anti-cancer therapies, most patients with GBM die from local disease progression. Fluorescence image guided surgical resection (FIGR was recently advocated to enhance local control of GBM. This is meta-analyses of 5-aminolevulinic (5-ALA induced FIGR. Materials: Review of the literature produced 503 potential publications; only 20 of these fulfilled the inclusion criteria of this analysis, including a total of 565 patients treated with 5-ALA-FIGR reporting on its outcomes and 800 histological samples reporting 5-ALA-FIGR sensitivity and specificity. Results: The mean gross total resection (GTR rate was 75.4% (95% CI: 67.4–83.5, p < 0.001. The mean time to tumor progression (TTP was 8.1 months (95% CI: 4.7–12, p < 0.001. The mean overall survival gain reported was 6.2 months (95% CI: −1–13, p < 0.001. The specificity was 88.9% (95% CI: 83.9–93.9, p < 0.001 and the sensitivity was 82.6% (95% CI: 73.9–91.9, p < 0.001. Conclusion: 5-ALA-FIGR in GBM is highly sensitive and specific, and imparts significant benefits to patients in terms of improved GTR and TTP.

  11. Fast Neutron Induced Autophagy Leads To Necrosis In Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast neutrons are highly effective at killing glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), U87 and U251 cells. The mode of cell death was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify the fraction of irradiated U87 or U251 cells having morphological features of autophagy and/or necrosis. U87 or U251 cells were irradiated with 2 Gy fast neturons or 10 Gy γ rays. A majority of U87 and U251 cells exhibit features of cell death with autophagy after irradiation with either 10 Gy γ rays or 2 Gy fast neutrons. Very few γ irradiated cells had features of necrosis (U87 or U251 cell samples processed for TEM 1 day after 10 Gy γ irradiation). In contrast, a significant increase was observed in necrotic U87 and U251 cells irradiated with fast neutrons. These results show a greater percentage of cells exhibit morphological evidence of necrosis induced by a lower dose of fast neutron irradiation compared to γ irradiation. Also, the evidence of necrosis in fast neutron irradiated U87 and U251 cells occurs in a background of autophagy. Since autophagy is observed before necrosis, autophagy may play a role in signaling programmed necrosis in fast neutron irradiated U87 and U251 cells.

  12. Fast Neutron Induced Autophagy Leads To Necrosis In Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Linda; Gladden, Samantha; Andorf, Christine; Kroc, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Fast neutrons are highly effective at killing glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), U87 and U251 cells. The mode of cell death was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify the fraction of irradiated U87 or U251 cells having morphological features of autophagy and/or necrosis. U87 or U251 cells were irradiated with 2 Gy fast neturons or 10 Gy γ rays. A majority of U87 and U251 cells exhibit features of cell death with autophagy after irradiation with either 10 Gy γ rays or 2 Gy fast neutrons. Very few γ irradiated cells had features of necrosis (U87 or U251 cell samples processed for TEM 1 day after 10 Gy γ irradiation). In contrast, a significant increase was observed in necrotic U87 and U251 cells irradiated with fast neutrons. These results show a greater percentage of cells exhibit morphological evidence of necrosis induced by a lower dose of fast neutron irradiation compared to γ irradiation. Also, the evidence of necrosis in fast neutron irradiated U87 and U251 cells occurs in a background of autophagy. Since autophagy is observed before necrosis, autophagy may play a role in signaling programmed necrosis in fast neutron irradiated U87 and U251 cells.

  13. CT-guided interstitial HDR brachytherapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, N.; Roeddiger, S.; Filipowicz, I.; Kontova, M.; Heyd, R.; Zamboglou, N. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Interdisciplinary Oncology; Kolotas, C. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Interdisciplinary Oncology; Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiotherapy; Birn, G. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Fountzilas, G.; Selviaridis, P. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Thessaloniki (Greece); Baltas, D.; Anagnostopoulos, G. [Offenbach Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics and Engineering

    2007-10-15

    Background and Purpose: Recurrences of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) within previously irradiated volumes pose a serious therapeutic challenge. This retrospective study evaluates the long-term tumor control of recurrent GBM treated with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BRT). Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2003, 84 patients were treated for recurrent cerebral GBM located within previously irradiated volumes. All patients had received adjuvant external radiotherapy following primary surgery, with a focal dose up to 60 Gy. The median recurrent tumor volume was 51 cm{sup 3} (3-207 cm{sup 3}), and the HDR-BRT consisted of an afterloading {sup 192}Ir implant which delivered a median dose of 40 Gy (30-50 Gy). Catheter implantation was implemented using interactive computed tomography (CT) guidance under local anesthesia and sedoanalgesia. Results: After a median follow-up of 61 months, 5/84 patients (6%) were alive. The median post-BRT survival was 37 weeks, and the median overall survival 78 weeks. Moderate to severe complications occurred in 5/84 cases (6%). Conclusion: For patients with recurrences of GBM within previously irradiated volumes, CT-guided interstitial HDR-BRT is a feasible treatment option that can play an important role in providing palliation. (orig.)

  14. PET imaging of glioblastoma multiforme EGFR expression for therapeutic decision guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrenberg-Klee, Eric; Redjal, Navid; Leece, Alicia; Turker, N Selcan; Heidari, Pedram; Shah, Khalid; Mahmood, Umar

    2015-01-01

    After initial therapy and total resection of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 80-90% of recurrences occur at the surgical margins. Insufficient sensitivity and specificity of current imaging techniques based on non-specific vascular imaging agents lead to delay in diagnosis of residual and/or recurrent disease. A tumor-specific imaging agent for GBM may improve detection of small residual disease in the post-operative period, and improve ability to distinguish tumor recurrence from its imaging mimics that can delay diagnosis. To this end, we developed an EGFR-targeted PET probe and assessed its ability to image EGFR WT (U87) and EGFRvIII (Gli36vIII) expressing GBMs in both murine intra-cranial xenografts and in a surgical-resection model. The developed imaging probe, (64)Cu-DOTAcetuximab-F(ab´)2, binds with a Kd of 11.2 nM to EGFR expressing GBM. (64)Cu-DOTA-cetuximab-F(ab´)2 specifically localized to intra-cranial tumor with a significant difference in SUVmean between tumor and contralateral brain for both Gli36vIII and U87 tumors (PGBM, demonstrates excellent TBR, and specifically images small residual tumor in a surgical model, suggesting future clinical utility in identifying true tumor recurrence. PMID:26269775

  15. Long-term survival of patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme treated with tumor-treating fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rulseh Aaron

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and malignant primary intracranial tumor, and has a median survival of only 10 to 14 months with only 3 to 5% of patients surviving more than three years. Recurrence (RGBM is nearly universal, and further decreases the median survival to only five to seven months with optimal therapy. Tumor-treating fields (TTField therapy is a novel treatment technique that has recently received CE and FDA approval for the treatment of RGBM, and is based on the principle that low intensity, intermediate frequency electric fields (100 to 300 kHz may induce apoptosis in specific cell types. Our center was the first to apply TTField treatment to histologically proven GBM in a small pilot study of 20 individuals in 2004 and 2005, and four of those original 20 patients are still alive today. We report two cases of GBM and two cases of RGBM treated by TTField therapy, all in good health and no longer receiving any treatment more than seven years after initiating TTField therapy, with no clinical or radiological evidence of recurrence.

  16. Radiotherapy with concurrent or sequential temozolomide in elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this article was to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated by surgery followed by combined modality therapy and compare achievable outcomes to those of a younger age population. Seventy-eight adult patients with histologically confirmed grade IV astrocytoma were treated at King Hussein Cancer Center (Amman, Jordan) between September 2004 and December 2008. Records were retrospectively reviewed and included 55 males and 23 females between 19 and 78 years of age (median age 50 years). This case series included 20 patients aged 60 years or older. All patients underwent craniotomy followed radiotherapy and concurrent or sequential temozolomide. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 56 months (median 9.4 months). The median survival for the whole cohort was 13.8 months. The median survival for patients less than 60 years was 14.3 months and for patients 60 years or older was 12.3 months (P = 0.19). Among elderly patients, radical surgical resection (P = 0.002), concurrent delivery of chemoradiation (0.041) and radiotherapy dose ≥5400 cGy (P = 0.0001) conferred statistically significant improvements in overall survival. Management of GBM in elderly patients should include maximal surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide whenever medically feasible. Outcomes comparable to those obtained in younger age groups can be expected. Our results indicate that concurrent chemoradiation is superior to sequential chemoradiation in these patients.

  17. Historical controls for phase II surgically based trials requiring gross total resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Prados, Michael D; Chang, Susan M

    2007-10-01

    New treatments for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are frequently tested in phase II surgically based clinical trials that require gross total resection (GTR). In order to determine efficacy in such single-arm phase II clinical trials, the results are often compared to those from a historical control group that is not limited to patients with GTR. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) can define risk groups within historical control groups; however, RPA analyses to date included patients irrespective of whether a patient had a GTR or not. To provide a more appropriate historical control group for surgically based trials requiring a GTR, we sought to determine survival for a group of patients with newly diagnosed GBM, all of who underwent GTR and were treated on prospective clinical trials. GTR was defined as removal of >90% of the enhancing mass, determined by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Of 893 patients with GBM treated during these trials, 153 underwent GTR. The median survival for the GTR group was 71 weeks (95% CI 65-76) which was better than those who did not have a GTR. Within the GTR group, the median age was 54 years (range 25-77 years), and median Karnofsky Performance Score was 90 (range 60-100). Considering only patients with GTR, age at diagnosis continued to be a statistically significant prognostic factor. Patients treated during surgically based phase II studies should be matched with a historical control group restricted to patients with similar pretreatment variables, including GTR. PMID:17457513

  18. Gene expression profiling reveals molecularly and clinically distinct subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Diehn, Maximilian; Watson, Nathan; Bollen, Andrew W.; Aldape, Ken D.; Nicholas, M. Kelly; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Israel, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of malignant glioma, characterized by genetic instability, intratumoral histopathological variability, and unpredictable clinical behavior. We investigated global gene expression in surgical samples of brain tumors. Gene expression profiling revealed large differences between normal brain samples and tumor tissues and between GBMs and lower-grade oligodendroglial tumors. Extensive differences in gene expression were found among GBMs, particularly in genes involved in angiogenesis, immune cell infiltration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. We found that the gene expression patterns in paired specimens from the same GBM invariably were more closely related to each other than to any other tumor, even when the paired specimens had strikingly divergent histologies. Survival analyses revealed a set of ≈70 genes more highly expressed in rapidly progressing tumors that stratified GBMs into two groups that differed by >4-fold in median duration of survival. We further investigated one gene from the group, FABP7, and confirmed its association with survival in two unrelated cohorts totaling 105 patients. Expression of FABP7 enhanced the motility of glioma-derived cells in vitro. Our analyses thus identify and validate a prognostic marker of both biologic and clinical significance and provide a series of putative markers for additional evaluation. PMID:15827123

  19. Exploring miRNA-Associated Signatures with Diagnostic Relevance in Glioblastoma Multiforme and Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique C. LeBlanc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The growing attention that non-coding RNAs have attracted in the field of cancer research in recent years is undeniable. Whether investigated as prospective therapeutic targets or prognostic indicators or diagnostic biomarkers, the clinical relevance of these molecules is starting to emerge. In addition, identification of non-coding RNAs in a plethora of body fluids has further positioned these molecules as attractive non-invasive biomarkers. This review will first provide an overview of the synthetic cascade that leads to the production of the small non-coding RNAs microRNAs (miRNAs and presents their strengths as biomarkers of disease. Our interest will next be directed at exploring the diagnostic utility of miRNAs in two types of cancer: the brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and breast cancer. Finally, we will discuss additional clinical implications associated with miRNA detection as well as introduce other non-coding RNAs that have generated recent interest in the cancer research community.

  20. Integrative Network-based Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Genome Wide Expression in Glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiland, Dieter Henrik; Mader, Irina; Schlosser, Pascal; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Carro, Maria Stella; Lange, Thomas; Schwarzwald, Ralf; Vasilikos, Ioannis; Urbach, Horst; Weyerbrock, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify correlations between metabolites from proton MR spectroscopy and genetic pathway activity in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Twenty patients with primary GBM were analysed by short echo-time chemical shift imaging and genome-wide expression analyses. Weighed Gene Co-Expression Analysis was used for an integrative analysis of imaging and genetic data. N-acetylaspartate, normalised to the contralateral healthy side (nNAA), was significantly correlated to oligodendrocytic and neural development. For normalised creatine (nCr), a group with low nCr was linked to the mesenchymal subtype, while high nCr could be assigned to the proneural subtype. Moreover, clustering of normalised glutamine and glutamate (nGlx) revealed two groups, one with high nGlx being attributed to the neural subtype, and one with low nGlx associated with the classical subtype. Hence, the metabolites nNAA, nCr, and nGlx correlate with a specific gene expression pattern reflecting the previously described subtypes of GBM. Moreover high nNAA was associated with better clinical prognosis, whereas patients with lower nNAA revealed a shorter progression-free survival (PFS). PMID:27350391

  1. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling index in glioblastoma multiforme: relation to radiation response, age, and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Various measures of the rate of tumor cell proliferation have been found to predict survival in patients with intracerebral gliomas. We correlated the bromodeoxyuridine labeling index (BrdUrd LI) with the response to radiation therapy, survival, and known prognostic factors in a series of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GM) to test its utility as a prognostic factor. Methods and Materials: The BrdUrd LI was determined in 200 newly diagnosed intracranial GMs. Age and sex were known for all patients. The response to radiation therapy was determined in 116 patients by comparing neuroimaging studies obtained before and after external beam radiation therapy. Survival was analyzed in 64 patients who were treated according to two consecutive prospective clinical protocols. Results: The median BrdUrd LI was 6.5% (mean, 7.2%; range, 1.1-25.4%). The BrdUrd LI did not correlate significantly with age, sex, radiation response, or survival. Age and Karnofsky performance score were independent prognostic factors in our cohort. Conclusion: The proliferative rate as measured by BrdUrd LI was not a prognostic factor in our GM cohort. The BrdUrd LI did not correlate significantly with known prognostic factors in GM. There was no significant relationship between the BrdUrd LI and radiation response

  2. GliaSite Brachytherapy Boost as Part of Initial Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Retrospective Multi-Institutional Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report on a retrospective analysis of the cumulative experience from eight institutions using the GliaSite Radiotherapy System as a brachytherapy boost in the initial management of glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eight institutions provided data on 20 patients with histologically proven glioblastoma multiforme with a median age of 59 years (range, 39-76) and median Karnofsky performance scale of 80 (range, 50-100). After maximal surgical debulking, patients were treated with GliaSite brachytherapy to a median dose of 50 Gy, followed by external beam radiotherapy to a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 46-60 Gy), for a cumulative dose escalation of 110 Gy (range, 84-130 Gy). Results: The average survival for this study population was 11.4 months (range, 4-29). When the patients' survival was compared with that of historical controls according to their Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis class, the average survival was increased by 3 months (95% confidence interval, 0.23-4.9) corresponding to a 43% increase (p = 0.033). Three patients (14%) experienced Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 central nervous system toxicity. Of the treatment failures, 50% were >2 cm from the edge of the balloon. Conclusion: The results of this analysis have demonstrated that dose escalation (>100 Gy) with GliaSite is well tolerated and associated with minimal toxicity. Local control improved with the use of GliaSite brachytherapy. The putative survival advantage seen in this study needs to be interpreted with caution; nevertheless, the data provide sufficient justification to investigate the potential role of radiation dose escalation in conjunction with GliaSite in the initial treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

  3. Myelin structure is a key difference in the x-ray scattering signature between meningioma, schwannoma and glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzon, G.; Pearson, S.; Murison, R.; Hall, C.; Siu, K.; Round, A.; Schültke, E.; Kaye, A. H.; Lewis, R.

    2007-11-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns of benign and malignant brain tumour tissue were examined. Independent component analysis was used to find a feature set representing the images collected. A set of coefficients was then used to describe each image, which allowed the use of the statistical technique of flexible discriminant analysis to discover a hidden order in the data set. The key difference was found to be in the intensity and spectral content of the second and fourth order myelin scattering peaks. This has clearly demonstrated that significant differences in the structure of myelin exist in the highly malignant glioblastoma multiforme as opposed to the benign: meningioma and schwannoma.

  4. Prospective evaluation of angiogenic, hypoxic and EGFR-related biomarkers in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme treated with cetuximab, bevacizumab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Broholm, Helle; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Grunnet, Kirsten; Horsman, Michael Robert; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Lassen, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    , hypoxia and mediators of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway were investigated. Tumor tissue was obtained from a previous phase II study, treating recurrent primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab in combination with bevacizumab and irinotecan. Of...... the 37 patients with available tumor tissue, 29 were evaluable for response. We concurrently performed immunohistochemical stainings on tumor tissue from 21 GBM patients treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan. We found a tendency of correlation between the hypoxia-related markers, indicating that...

  5. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 as a potential therapeutic target in glioblastoma multiforme and other cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Yi-Wei; Wang, Pao-Yuan; Yeh, Shih-Chi; Chuang, Po-Kai; Li, Shiou-Ting; wu, Chung-Yi; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Hsiao, Michael; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a deadly brain tumor. More than 50% of patients who suffer from GBM die within 15 mo even received all possible medical treatment. In this study we report that the glycolipid stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) is highly expressed on the surface of both GBM cells and GBM specimens. We further demonstrate that the growth of GBM tumor is inhibited when anti–SSEA-4 antibody is administered to experimental mice, suggesting a research proof of concept for t...

  6. Level of Notch activation determines the effect on growth and stem cell-like features in glioblastoma multiforme neurosphere cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Karina; Villingshøj, Mette; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) are cancer cells with neural stem cell (NSC)-like properties found in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and they are assigned a central role in tumor initiation, progression and relapse. The Notch pathway is important for maintenance and cell fate decisions in the...... normal NSC population. Notch signaling is often deregulated in GBM and recent results suggest that this pathway plays a significant role in bCSC as well. We therefore wished to further elucidate the role of Notch activation in GBM-derived bCSC....

  7. Neoadjuvant bevacizumab and irinotecan versus bevacizumab and temozolomide followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofland, Kenneth F; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Sorensen, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgery followed by radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide is standard therapy in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Bevacizumab combined with irinotecan produces impressive response rates in recurrent GBM. In a randomized phase II study, we investigated the...... efficacy of neoadjuvant bevacizumab combined with irinotecan (Bev-Iri) versus bevacizumab combined with temozolomide (Bev-Tem) before, during and after radiotherapy in newly diagnosed GBM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: After surgery, patients were randomized to Bev-Iri or Bev-Tem for eight weeks, followed by...

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Diaz, A.Z.; Chadha, M. [Univ. Hospital, State Univ. of New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The abstract describes evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for two groups of glioblastoma multiforme patients. From September 1994 to February 1996 15 patients have been treated. In September 1997 another 34 patients were examined. Authors determined a safe starting dose for BNCT using epithermal neutrons and BPA-F. They have also evaluated adverse effects of BNCT at this starting dose. Therapeutic effectiveness of this starting dose has been evaluated. No significant side effects from BPA-F infusion or BNCT treatment were observed in normal brains.

  9. Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme in the Era of Temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badiyan, Shahed N.; Markovina, Stephanie; Simpson, Joseph R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; DeWees, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tran, David D.; Linette, Gerry [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Jalalizadeh, Rohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Dacey, Ralph; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Kim, Albert H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Huang, Jiayi, E-mail: jhuang@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To review clinical outcomes of moderate dose escalation using high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) in the setting of concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), compared with standard-dose radiation therapy (SDRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients aged <70 years with biopsy-proven GBM were treated with SDRT (60 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction) or with HDRT (>60 Gy) and TMZ from 2000 to 2012. Biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions was calculated for the HDRT assuming an α/β ratio of 5.6 for GBM. Results: Eighty-one patients received SDRT, and 128 patients received HDRT with a median (range) biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions of 64 Gy (61-76 Gy). Overall median follow-up time was 1.10 years, and for living patients it was 2.97 years. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for patients that received HDRT versus SDRT were 12.4% versus 13.2% (P=.71), and 5.6% versus 4.1% (P=.54), respectively. Age (P=.001) and gross total/near-total resection (GTR/NTR) (P=.001) were significantly associated with PFS on multivariate analysis. Younger age (P<.0001), GTR/NTR (P<.0001), and Karnofsky performance status ≥80 (P=.001) were associated with improved OS. On subset analyses, HDRT failed to improve PFS or OS for those aged <50 years or those who had GTR/NTR. Conclusion: Moderate radiation therapy dose escalation above 60 Gy with concurrent TMZ does not seem to improve clinical outcomes for patients with GBM.

  10. Subcurative radiation significantly increases cell proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary glioblastoma multiforme in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adarsh Shankar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell proliferation, infiltration, migration, and neovascularization are known causes of treatment resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radiation on the growth characteristics of primary human GBM developed in a nude rat. Primary GBM cells grown from explanted GBM tissues were implanted orthotopically in nude rats. Tumor growth was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging on day 77 (baseline after implantation. The rats underwent irradiation to a dose of 50 Gy delivered subcuratively on day 84 postimplantation (n = 8, or underwent no radiation (n = 8. Brain tissues were obtained on day 112 (nonirradiated or day 133 (irradiated. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67 and to assess the expression of infiltration marker (matrix metalloproteinase-2, MMP-2 and cell migration marker (CD44. Tumor neovascularization was assessed by microvessel density using von-Willebrand factor (vWF staining. Magnetic resonance imaging showed well-developed, infiltrative tumors in 11 weeks postimplantation. The proportion of Ki-67-positive cells in tumors undergoing radiation was (71+/- 15% compared with (25 +/- 12% in the nonirradiated group (P = 0.02. The number of MMP-2-positive areas and proportion of CD44-positive cells were also high in tumors receiving radiation, indicating great invasion and infiltration. Microvessel density analysis did not show a significant difference between nonirradiated and irradiated tumors. Taken together, we found that subcurative radiation significantly increased proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary GBM. Our study provides insights into possible mechanisms of treatment resistance following radiation therapy for GBM.

  11. Involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation of human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Aldaz

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM-initiating cells (GICs represent a tumor subpopulation with neural stem cell-like properties that is responsible for the development, progression and therapeutic resistance of human GBM. We have recently shown that blockade of NFκB pathway promotes terminal differentiation and senescence of GICs both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that induction of differentiation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for GBM. MicroRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of GBM, but a high-throughput analysis of their role in GIC differentiation has not been reported. We have established human GIC cell lines that can be efficiently differentiated into cells expressing astrocytic and neuronal lineage markers. Using this in vitro system, a microarray-based high-throughput analysis to determine global expression changes of microRNAs during differentiation of GICs was performed. A number of changes in the levels of microRNAs were detected in differentiating GICs, including over-expression of hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-29b, hsa-miR-221 and hsa-miR-222, and down-regulation of hsa-miR-93 and hsa-miR-106a. Functional studies showed that miR-21 over-expression in GICs induced comparable cell differentiation features and targeted SPRY1 mRNA, which encodes for a negative regulator of neural stem-cell differentiation. In addition, miR-221 and miR-222 inhibition in differentiated cells restored the expression of stem cell markers while reducing differentiation markers. Finally, miR-29a and miR-29b targeted MCL1 mRNA in GICs and increased apoptosis. Our study uncovers the microRNA dynamic expression changes occurring during differentiation of GICs, and identifies miR-21 and miR-221/222 as key regulators of this process.

  12. Involvement of miRNAs in the Differentiation of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaz, Beatriz; Sagardoy, Ainara; Nogueira, Lorena; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Grande, Lara; Huse, Jason T.; Aznar, Maria A.; Díez-Valle, Ricardo; Tejada-Solís, Sonia; Alonso, Marta M.; Fernandez-Luna, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)-initiating cells (GICs) represent a tumor subpopulation with neural stem cell-like properties that is responsible for the development, progression and therapeutic resistance of human GBM. We have recently shown that blockade of NFκB pathway promotes terminal differentiation and senescence of GICs both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that induction of differentiation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for GBM. MicroRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of GBM, but a high-throughput analysis of their role in GIC differentiation has not been reported. We have established human GIC cell lines that can be efficiently differentiated into cells expressing astrocytic and neuronal lineage markers. Using this in vitro system, a microarray-based high-throughput analysis to determine global expression changes of microRNAs during differentiation of GICs was performed. A number of changes in the levels of microRNAs were detected in differentiating GICs, including over-expression of hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-29b, hsa-miR-221 and hsa-miR-222, and down-regulation of hsa-miR-93 and hsa-miR-106a. Functional studies showed that miR-21 over-expression in GICs induced comparable cell differentiation features and targeted SPRY1 mRNA, which encodes for a negative regulator of neural stem-cell differentiation. In addition, miR-221 and miR-222 inhibition in differentiated cells restored the expression of stem cell markers while reducing differentiation markers. Finally, miR-29a and miR-29b targeted MCL1 mRNA in GICs and increased apoptosis. Our study uncovers the microRNA dynamic expression changes occurring during differentiation of GICs, and identifies miR-21 and miR-221/222 as key regulators of this process. PMID:24155920

  13. Serial analysis of imaging parameters in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Li, Yan; Lupo, Janine M; Polley, Mei-Yin; Crane, Jason C; Bian, Wei; Cha, Soonmee; Chang, Susan; Nelson, Sarah J

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to test the predictive value of serial MRI data in relation to clinical outcome for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Sixty-four patients with newly diagnosed GBM underwent conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted imaging postsurgery and prior to radiation/chemotherapy (pre-RT), immediately after RT (post-RT), and every 1-2 months thereafter until tumor progression, up to a maximum of 1 year. Tumor volumes and perfusion and diffusion parameters were calculated and subject to time-independent and time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models that were adjusted for age and MR scanner field strength. Larger volumes of the T2 hyperintensity lesion (T2ALL) and nonenhancing lesion (NEL) at pre-RT, as well as increased anatomic volumes at post-RT, were associated with worse overall survival (OS). Higher normalized cerebral blood volumes (nCBVs), normalized peak height (nPH) and normalized recirculation factors (nRF) at pre-RT, and nCBV at post-RT, in the T2ALL and NEL, were associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS). From pre- to post-RT, there was a reduction in nCBV and nPH and an increase in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Patients with lower nRF values at pre-RT, or a larger increase in nRF from pre-RT to post-RT, had significantly longer PFS. Time-dependent analysis showed that patterns of changes in ADC and anatomic volumes were associated with OS, while changes in nCBV, nPH, and the contrast-enhancing volume were associated with PFS. Our studies suggest that quantitative MRI variables derived from anatomic and physiological MRI provide useful information for predicting outcome in patients with GBM. PMID:21297128

  14. The prognostic significance of midline shift at presentation on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: While patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who present with midline shift have a presumably worse prognosis, there is little literature evaluating the prognostic significance of this presentation in multivariate analysis in the context of other known prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: From March 1981 to September 1993, 219 patients underwent irradiation for intracranial glioma at our institution. One hundred fourteen patients with a diagnosis of a primary GBM were analyzed for the influence of the presence of midline shift at diagnosis on survival with respect to other known prognostic factors, including age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), and extent of surgery. Eighty-five patients (74%) presented with midline shift. Surgical treatment consisted of subtotal/total resection in 86 patients (75%). Among patients presenting with midline shift, 68 (80%) underwent subtotal/total resection before irradiation. Results: Multivariate analysis of the entire cohort of patients found none of the potential prognostic factors analyzed to significantly influence survival. The overall median survival was 6 months. However, when multivariate analysis was limited to patients with a KPS of ≥ 70, only the presence of midline shift and age were found to significantly influence survival. Patients with a KPS ≥ 70 and with midline shift present at diagnosis had a median survival of 8 months, as compared to 14 months for those not having midline shift at presentation (p = 0.04). Patients with a KPS ≥ 70 and age > 50 years had a median survival of 5 months as compared to 11 months for those ≤ 50 (p 0.02). Conclusion: In this series, where 80% of patients who presented with a midline shift underwent decompressive resection of GBM before irradiation, the presence of midline shift at diagnosis remained an independent prognostic factor influencing survival among good performance status patients. While the role of decompressive surgery in this setting is

  15. Impact of PARP-1 and DNA-PK expression on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze, whether higher tumor levels of DNA repair enzymes contribute to worse treatment results of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients after postoperative radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Thirty four patients with GBM received postoperative radiotherapy. Tumor sections were examined for poly-ADP ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and DNA protein kinase (DNA-PK) expression. Immunohistochemical staining intensities of PARP-1 and DNA-PK were determined (score 0–3) and expression levels were correlated with patients overall survival. Results: Median survival time of the whole study group was 10.0 months (95% CI 8.1–11.9). Median survival of patients with high and low (⩾median and < median) tumor PARP-1 levels were 10.0 months (95% CI 7.9–12.1) and 12.0 months (95% CI 8.3–15.7), respectively (p = 0.93). In contrast, median survival of patients with high and low tumor DNA-PK levels were 9.0 months (95% CI 7.2–10.8) and 13.0 months (95% CI 10.7–15.3), respectively (p = 0.02). In multivariate analysis, DNA-PK expression emerged as a significant independent predictor for overall survival (HR 3.9, 95% CI 1.5–10.7, p = 0.01). Conclusion: This hypothesis generating study showed that high tumor levels of DNA-PK correlate with poor survival of GBM patients. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to clarify whether DNA-PK inhibitors might have a potential to radiosensitize GBM and improve the treatment outcome of this devastating disease.

  16. The addition of temozolomide does not change the pattern of progression glioblastoma multiforme post-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether the pattern of progressive disease (PD) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients has changed with the introduction of the current standard of care protocol – postoperative conformal radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray in 30 fractions with concurrent low-dose (75–100 mg/m2) temozolomide, followed by six cycles of adjuvant high-dose (150–200 mg/m2) temozolomide – as compared with radiotherapy alone. For GBM patients commencing combined modality treatment between October 2005 and August 2009, the MRI scan confirming progression (if any) was co-registered with the original planning CT scan, and progression site(s) marked. Coverage of the composite progression volume (PDvol) by the original 95% prescription isodose volume was obtained from dose-volume histogram (DVH) data, and assigned as ‘central’, ‘in field’, ‘marginal’ and ‘out of field’, corresponding to >95%, >80%, 20–80% and <20% coverage. Of 68 consecutive patients identified, 54 (79.4%) had documented PD. Of the 47 (87%) evaluable patients, 43 (91%) had in field progression with 36 (77%) of these being central. Of the remaining four cases, three (6%) had marginal progression, and only one patient (2%) had out of field progression. Median overall and progression-free survival were 11.6 and 6.6 months, respectively. The pattern of progression in our GBM patients does not appear to have been altered by the addition of temozolomide. The overwhelming majority of first PD occurred within the original radiotherapy planning target volume, as is the case in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Major changes to radiotherapy volumes are not indicated, with alternative strategies required to improve outcomes.

  17. Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme in the Era of Temozolomide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review clinical outcomes of moderate dose escalation using high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) in the setting of concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), compared with standard-dose radiation therapy (SDRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients aged <70 years with biopsy-proven GBM were treated with SDRT (60 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction) or with HDRT (>60 Gy) and TMZ from 2000 to 2012. Biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions was calculated for the HDRT assuming an α/β ratio of 5.6 for GBM. Results: Eighty-one patients received SDRT, and 128 patients received HDRT with a median (range) biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions of 64 Gy (61-76 Gy). Overall median follow-up time was 1.10 years, and for living patients it was 2.97 years. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for patients that received HDRT versus SDRT were 12.4% versus 13.2% (P=.71), and 5.6% versus 4.1% (P=.54), respectively. Age (P=.001) and gross total/near-total resection (GTR/NTR) (P=.001) were significantly associated with PFS on multivariate analysis. Younger age (P<.0001), GTR/NTR (P<.0001), and Karnofsky performance status ≥80 (P=.001) were associated with improved OS. On subset analyses, HDRT failed to improve PFS or OS for those aged <50 years or those who had GTR/NTR. Conclusion: Moderate radiation therapy dose escalation above 60 Gy with concurrent TMZ does not seem to improve clinical outcomes for patients with GBM

  18. Impact of CD133 positive stem cell proportion on survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact of CD133-positive (CD133+) cancer stem cell proportions on treatment results of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Patients with GBM (n = 42) received postoperative radiotherapy (± chemotherapy). Surgically excised GBM tissue sections were immunohistochemically examined for CD133 expression. The proportions of CD133+ GBM cells were determined (%). The proportion of CD133+ GBM stem cells was established by 2 independent researchers whose results were in good accordance (R = 0.8, p < 0.01). Additionally, CD133 expression levels were correlated with patients overall survival. The proportion of CD133+ cells varied between patients, being from 0.5% to 82%. Mean and median proportions of CD133+ cells of the entire study group were 33% ± 24% (mean ± SD) and 28%, respectively. Clinical data do not support the association between higher proportion of stem cells and the aggressiveness of GBM. Median survival time of the study group was 10.0 months (95% CI 9.0–11.0). The survival time clearly depended on the proportion of CD133+ cells (log rank test, p = 0.02). Median survival times for patients with low (< median) and high (≥ median) proportion of CD133+ cells were 9.0 months (95% CI 7.6–10.5) and 12.0 months (95% CI 9.3–14.7), respectively. In multivariate analysis, the proportion of CD133+ cells emerged as a significant independent predictor for longer overall survival (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–3.8, p = 0.04). In patients with higher stem cell proportion, significantly longer survival times after postoperative radiotherapy were achieved. Underlying reasons and possible higher sensitivity of GBM stem cells to fractionated radio-therapy should be clarified in further studies

  19. Standard fractionation intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT of primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Clifton D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT affords unparalleled capacity to deliver conformal radiation doses to tumors in the central nervous system. However, to date, there are few reported outcomes from using IMRT, either alone or as a boost technique, for standard fractionation radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Methods Forty-two patients were treated with IMRT alone (72% or as a boost (28% after 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT. Thirty-three patients with primary disease and 9 patients with recurrent tumors were included. Thirty-four patients (81% had surgery, with gross tumor resection in 13 patients (36%; 22 patients (53% received chemo-radiotherapy. The median total radiation dose for all patients was 60 Gy with a range from 30.6 to 74 Gy. Standard fractions of 1.8 Gy/day to 2.0 Gy/day were utilized. Results Median survival was 8.7 months, with 37 patients (88% deceased at last contact. Nonparametric analysis showed no survival difference in IMRT-boost vs. IMRT-only groups. Conclusion While technically feasible, preliminary results suggest delivering standard radiation doses by IMRT did not improve survival outcomes in this series compared to historical controls. In light of this lack of a survival benefit and the costs associated with use of IMRT, future prospective trials are needed to evaluate non-survival endpoints such as quality of life and functional preservation. Short of such evidence, the use of IMRT for treatment of GBM needs to be carefully rationalized.

  20. Retrospective Analysis of Bevacizumab in Combination with Fotemustine in Chinese Patients with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the activity and safety of bevacizumab (BEV and fotemustine (FTM for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM patients and explore the potential prognostic parameters on survival. This study retrospectively analyzed all patients with GBM who were treated with at least one cycle of BEV and FTM from July 2010 to October 2012. A total of 176 patients with recurrent GBM were enrolled. The response rate and disease control rate were 46.6% and 90.9%, respectively. A 6-month PFS rate of 33.3% (95% CI: 26.5%–40.3% and a median PFS of 5.0 (95% CI: 2.4–7.5 months were observed. The median OS was 8.0 (95% CI: 6.7–9.2 months. Multivariate analysis showed that risk factors with a significant influence on the PFS of all patients were Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS (≥70 versus <70, HR=0.53, 95% CI: 0.39–0.73, and P=0.01 and MGMT status (methylated versus unmethylated, HR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.52–0.97, and P=0.04. The most common treatment-related adverse events were fatigue, proteinuria, hypophonia, hypertension, thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia. In conclusion, combination of BEV with FTM is well tolerated and may derive some clinical benefits in recurrent GBM patients. Higher KPS and MGMT promoter hypermethylation were suggested to be associated with prolonged survival.

  1. Contrast-enhancing computed tomography ring in glioblastoma multiforme after intraoperative endocurietherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance of the contrast-enhancing ring seen on serial follow-up postirradiation computed tomograms (CT) of the brain was evaluated in a group of 41 patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GM) who were treated in a phase I/II study by means of intraoperative remote afterloading endocurietherapy (ECT) with a high activity cobalt 60 probe (20.00 Gy) in one high-dose rate fraction), and conventional fractionated external-beam (EXRT) radiotherapy (60.00 Gy in 30 fractions in 7.5 weeks). All received minimum total tumor doses of 80.00 Gy. After completion of treatment, all patients were followed with serial CT scans of the brain. Two to 6 months after treatment, 27 of 41 patients developed the similar thin-walled, regular, contrast-enhancing CT rings with low-density attenuation inside and outside the ring. Postmortem study in two of these patients revealed that the thin-walled, regular, contrast-enhancing ring represented a continuous capsule of dilated cerebral vessels with inner low-density attenuation corresponding to necrosis, and outer low-density attenuation corresponding to edema. The CT appearance of the thin-walled, regular, contrast-enhancing ring produced after high-dose rate intraoperative ECT and EXRT is distinctly different from the CT ring characteristic of untreated or recurrent GM. After high-dose rate intracranial ECT and EXRT, the appearance of a post-ECT contrast-enhancing CT ring should not be automatically interpreted as recurrent disease as previously reported after conventional fractionated EXRT

  2. Subcurative radiation significantly increases cell proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary glioblastoma multiforme in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adarsh Shankar; Robert A. Knight; Stephen Brown; Ali S. Arbab; Sanath Kumar; Asm Iskander; Nadimpalli RS Varma; Branislava Janic; Ana deCarvalho; Tom Mikkelsen; Joseph A. Frank; Meser M. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cellproliferation, infiltration, migration, and neovascularization are known causes of treatment resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radiation on the growth characteristics of primary human GBM developed in a nude rat. Primary GBM cells grown from explanted GBM tissues were implanted orthotopically in nude rats. Tumor growth was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging on day 77 (baseline) after implantation. The rats underwent irradiation to a dose of 50 Gy delivered subcuratively on day 84 postimplantation (n= 8), or underwent no radiation (n= 8). Brain tissues were obtained on day 112 (nonirradiated) or day 133 (irradiated). Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67) and to assess the expression of infiltration marker (matrix metalloproteinase-2, MMP-2) and cell migration marker (CD44). Tumor neovascularization was assessed by microvessel density using von-Willebrand factor (vWF) staining. Magnetic resonance imaging showed well-developed, infiltrative tumors in 11 weeks postimplantation. The proportion of Ki-67-positive cells in tumors undergoing radiation was (71 ± 15)%compared with (25 ± 12)%in the nonirradiated group (P=0.02). The number of MMP-2-positive areas and proportion of CD44-positive cells were also high in tumors receiving radiation, indicating great invasion and infiltration. Microvessel density analysis did not show a significant difference between nonirradiated and irradiated tumors. Taken together, we found that subcurative radiation significantly increased proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary GBM. Our study provides insights into possible mechanisms of treatment resistance fol owing radiation therapy for GBM.

  3. Enzastaurin plus temozolomide with radiation therapy in glioblastoma multiforme: A phase I study†

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    Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Polley, Mei Yin; Parvataneni, R.; Hristova-Kazmierski, Maria; Musib, Luna; Nicol, Steven J.; Thornton, Donald E.; Prados, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study to determine the safety and recommended phase II dose of enzastaurin (oral inhibitor of the protein kinase C-beta [PKCβ] and the PI3K/AKT pathways) when given in combination with radiation therapy (RT) plus temozolomide to patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme or gliosarcoma. Patients with Karnofsky performance status ≥60 and no enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs received RT (60 Gy) over 6 weeks, concurrently with temozolomide (75 mg/m2 daily) followed by adjuvant temozolomide (200 mg/m2) for 5 days/28-d cycle. Enzastaurin was given once daily during RT and adjuvantly with temozolomide; the starting dose of 250 mg/d was escalated to 500 mg/d if ≤1/6 patients had dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) during RT and the first adjuvant cycle. Patients continued treatment for 12 adjuvant cycles unless disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Twelve patients enrolled. There was no DLT in the first 6 patients treated with 250 mg enzastaurin. At 500 mg, 2 of 6 patients experienced a DLT (1 Grade 4 and 1 Grade 3 thrombocytopenia). The patient with Grade 3 DLT recovered to Grade <1 within 28 days and adjuvant temozolomide and enzastaurin was reinitiated with dose reductions. The other patient recovered to Grade <1 toxicity after 28 days and did not restart treatment. Enzastaurin 250 mg/d given concomitantly with RT and temozolomide and adjuvantly with temozolomide was well tolerated and is the recommended phase II dose. The proceeding phase II trial has finished accrual and results will be reported in 2009. PMID:20156802

  4. Permanent iodine 125 brachytherapy in patients with progressive or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David A.; Suplica, Jeffrey M.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; McDermott, Michael W.; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Wara, William M.; Nicholas, M. Kelly; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2004-01-01

    This study reports the initial experience at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) with tumor resection and permanent, low-activity iodine 125 (125I) brachytherapy in patients with progressive or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GM) and compares these results to those of similar patients treated previously at UCSF with temporary brachytherapy without tumor resection. Thirty-eight patients with progressive or recurrent GM were treated at UCSF with repeat craniotomy, tumor resection, and permanent, low-activity 125I brachytherapy between June 1997 and May 1998. Selection criteria were Karnofsky performance score ⩾60, unifocal, contrast-enhancing, well-circumscribed progressive or recurrent GM that was judged to be completely resectable, and no evidence of leptomeningeal or subependymal spread. The median brachytherapy dose 5 mm exterior to the resection cavity was 300 Gy (range, 150–500 Gy). One patient was excluded from analysis. Median survival was 52 weeks from the date of brachytherapy. Age, Karnofsky performance score, and preimplant tumor volume were all statistically significant on univariate analyses. Multivariate analysis for survival showed only age to be significant. Median time to progression was 16 weeks. Both univariate and multivariate analysis of freedom from progression showed only preoperative tumor volume to be significant. Comparison to temporary brachytherapy patients showed no apparent difference in survival time. Chronic steroid requirements were low in patients with minimal postoperative residual tumor. We conclude that permanent 125I brachytherapy for recurrent or progressive GM is well tolerated. Survival time was comparable to that of a similar group of patients treated with temporary brachytherapy. PMID:15134626

  5. Enzastaurin plus temozolomide with radiation therapy in glioblastoma multiforme: a phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan M; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Polley, Mei Yin; Parvataneni, R; Hristova-Kazmierski, Maria; Musib, Luna; Nicol, Steven J; Thornton, Donald E; Prados, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a phase I study to determine the safety and recommended phase II dose of enzastaurin (oral inhibitor of the protein kinase C-beta [PKCbeta] and the PI3K/AKT pathways) when given in combination with radiation therapy (RT) plus temozolomide to patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme or gliosarcoma. Patients with Karnofsky performance status > or =60 and no enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs received RT (60 Gy) over 6 weeks, concurrently with temozolomide (75 mg/m(2) daily) followed by adjuvant temozolomide (200 mg/m(2)) for 5 days/28-d cycle. Enzastaurin was given once daily during RT and adjuvantly with temozolomide; the starting dose of 250 mg/d was escalated to 500 mg/d if < or =1/6 patients had dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) during RT and the first adjuvant cycle. Patients continued treatment for 12 adjuvant cycles unless disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Twelve patients enrolled. There was no DLT in the first 6 patients treated with 250 mg enzastaurin. At 500 mg, 2 of 6 patients experienced a DLT (1 Grade 4 and 1 Grade 3 thrombocytopenia). The patient with Grade 3 DLT recovered to Grade <1 within 28 days and adjuvant temozolomide and enzastaurin was reinitiated with dose reductions. The other patient recovered to Grade <1 toxicity after 28 days and did not restart treatment. Enzastaurin 250 mg/d given concomitantly with RT and temozolomide and adjuvantly with temozolomide was well tolerated and is the recommended phase II dose. The proceeding phase II trial has finished accrual and results will be reported in 2009. PMID:20156802

  6. Partial correlation analyses of global diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics in glioblastoma multiforme: Pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Cortez-Conradis; Camilo; Rios; Sergio; Moreno-Jimenez; Ernesto; Roldan-Valadez; Ernesto; Roldan-Valadez

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine existing correlates among diffusion tensor imaging(DTI)-derived metrics in healthy brains and brains with glioblastoma multiforme(GBM). METHODS: Case-control study using DTI data from brain magnetic resonance imaging of 34 controls(mean, 41.47; SD, ± 21.94 years; range, 21-80 years) and 27 patients with GBM(mean, SD; 48.41 ± 15.18 years; range, 18-78 years). Image postprocessing using FSL software calculated eleven tensor metrics: fractional(FA) and relative anisotropy; pure isotropic(p) and anisotropic diffusions(q), total magnitude of diffusion(L); linear(Cl), planar(Cp) and spherical tensors(Cs); mean(MD), axial(AD) and radial diffusivities(RD). Partial correlation analyses(controlling the effect of ageand gender) and multivariate Mancova were performed.RESULTS: There was a normal distribution for all metrics. Comparing healthy brains vs brains with GBM, there were significant very strong bivariate correlations only depicted in GBM: [FA?Cl(+)], [FA?q(+)], [p?AD(+)], [AD?MD(+)], and [MD?RD(+)]. Among 56 pairs of bivariate correlations, only seven were significantly different. The diagnosis variable depicted a main effect [F-value(11, 23) = 11.842, P ≤ 0.001], with partial eta squared = 0.850, meaning a large effect size; age showed a similar result. The age also had a significant influence as a covariate [F(11, 23) = 10.523, P < 0.001], with a large effect size(partial eta squared = 0.834).CONCLUSION: DTI-derived metrics depict significant differences between healthy brains and brains with GBM, with specific magnitudes and correlations. This study provides reference data and makes a contribution to decrease the underlying empiricism in the use of DTI parameters in brain imaging.

  7. Comparison of radiation regimens in the treatment of Glioblastoma multiforme: results from a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal fractionation schedule of radiotherapy (RT) for Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is yet to be determined. We aim to compare different fractionation regimens and identify prognostic factors to better tailor RT for newly diagnosed GBM patients. All data for patients who underwent surgery for GBM between January 2005 and December 2012 were compiled. Clinical information was collected using patient charts and government registry. Cox analysis was used to identify variables affecting survival and treatment outcome. The median follow-up time was 13.2 months. Two hundred and seventy-six patients met the inclusion criteria, including 147 patients in the 60 Gy in 30 fractions (ConvRT) group, 86 patients in the 60 Gy in 20 fractions (HF60) group, and 43 patients in the 40 Gy in 15 fractions (HF40) group. Median survival (MS) was 16.0 months with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 9.23 months in the ConvRT group. This was comparable to outcome in the HF60 group with MS 15.0 months and a median PFS of 9.1 months. Patients in the HF40 group had MS of 8 months, with a median PFS 5.4 months. Cox analysis showed no significant difference in OS between the ConvRT and HF60 groups but worse outcome in the HF40 group (HR 2.22, P = 0.04). MGMT methylation, extent of resection, use of chemotherapy, and repeat surgery were found to be significant independent prognostic factors for survival. HF60 constitutes a safe RT approach that shows survival comparable to standard RT while allowing for a shorter treatment time

  8. Molecular Predictors of Long-Term Survival in Glioblastoma Multiforme Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowperthwaite, Matthew C.; Burnett, Mark G.; Shpak, Max

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive adult primary brain cancer, with age) and individual molecular biomarkers have been associated with prolonged survival in GBM patients. However, comprehensive systems-level analyses of molecular profiles associated with long-term survival (LTS) in GBM patients are still lacking. We present an integrative study of molecular data and clinical variables in these long-term survivors (LTSs, patients surviving >3 years) to identify biomarkers associated with prolonged survival, and to assess the possible similarity of molecular characteristics between LGG and LTS GBM. We analyzed the relationship between multivariable molecular data and LTS in GBM patients from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), including germline and somatic point mutation, gene expression, DNA methylation, copy number variation (CNV) and microRNA (miRNA) expression using logistic regression models. The molecular relationship between GBM LTS and LGG tumors was examined through cluster analysis. We identified 13, 94, 43, 29, and 1 significant predictors of LTS using Lasso logistic regression from the somatic point mutation, gene expression, DNA methylation, CNV, and miRNA expression data sets, respectively. Individually, DNA methylation provided the best prediction performance (AUC = 0.84). Combining multiple classes of molecular data into joint regression models did not improve prediction accuracy, but did identify additional genes that were not significantly predictive in individual models. PCA and clustering analyses showed that GBM LTS typically had gene expression profiles similar to non-LTS GBM. Furthermore, cluster analysis did not identify a close affinity between LTS GBM and LGG, nor did we find a significant association between LTS and secondary GBM. The absence of unique LTS profiles and the lack of similarity between LTS GBM and LGG, indicates that there are multiple genetic and epigenetic pathways to LTS in GBM patients. PMID

  9. Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme Using the Supertoroidal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Metellus, Philippe; Kostis, William J.; Martuzzi, Roberto; Pereira, Fabricio R.; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Reese, Timothy G.; Constable, Todd R.; Jackowski, Marcel P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is a powerful imaging technique that has led to improvements in the diagnosis and prognosis of cerebral lesions and neurosurgical guidance for tumor resection. Traditional tensor modeling, however, has difficulties in differentiating tumor-infiltrated regions and peritumoral edema. Here, we describe the supertoroidal model, which incorporates an increase in surface genus and a continuum of toroidal shapes to improve upon the characterization of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Materials and Methods DTI brain datasets of 18 individuals with GBM and 18 normal subjects were acquired using a 3T scanner. A supertoroidal model of the diffusion tensor and two new diffusion tensor invariants, one to evaluate diffusivity, the toroidal volume (TV), and one to evaluate anisotropy, the toroidal curvature (TC), were applied and evaluated in the characterization of GBM brain tumors. TV and TC were compared with the mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) indices inside the tumor, surrounding edema, as well as contralateral to the lesions, in the white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM). Results The supertoroidal model enhanced the borders between tumors and surrounding structures, refined the boundaries between WM and GM, and revealed the heterogeneity inherent to tumor-infiltrated tissue. Both MD and TV demonstrated high intensities in the tumor, with lower values in the surrounding edema, which in turn were higher than those of unaffected brain parenchyma. Both TC and FA were effective in revealing the structural degradation of WM tracts. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the supertoroidal model enables effective tensor visualization as well as quantitative scalar maps that improve the understanding of the underlying tissue structure properties. Hence, this approach has the potential to enhance diagnosis, preoperative planning, and intraoperative image guidance during surgical management of brain lesions. PMID:26761637

  10. Socioeconomic status does not affect prognosis in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasl, Rebecca A.; Brinson, Philip R.; Chambless, Lola B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive malignancy, but there is marked heterogeneity in survival time. Health care disparities have demonstrated significance in oncologic outcomes but have not been clearly examined in this patient population. We investigated the role of sociodemographic variables in the prognosis of adult patients diagnosed with GBM. Methods: This retrospective analysis included patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of GBM, who underwent resection or biopsy at a single institution from 2000 to 2014. Socioeconomic status (SES) was determined by household income according to the US Census zip code tabulation areas and the US national poverty level. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis calculated effects on patient survival. Results: Thirty percent of 218 subjects were of low SES, 57% mid, and 13% high. Low SES patients tended to be male (62%), Caucasian (92%), unmarried (91%), have dependents (100%), and limited to high school education (55%). SES did not predict insurance or employment status. SES was associated with marital status and number of cohabitants (P < 0.0001) but not clinical trial enrollment. Multivariate analysis demonstrated no relationship between SES and survival. Shorter prognosis was associated with history of military service (hazard ratio [HR] 2.06, P = 0.0125), elderly patients (HR 1.70, P = 0.0158), and multifocal disease (HR 1.75, P = 0.0119). Longer prognosis was associated with gross total resection (HR 0.49, P = 0.0009), radiation therapy (HR 0.12, P < 0.0001), and temozolomide (HR 0.28, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: SES alone does not predict prognosis in patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Sociodemographic variables such as old age, military service record, and insurance type may have a prognostication role. PMID:27217966

  11. Differential analysis of glioblastoma multiforme proteome by a 2D-DIGE approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamlat Abderrahmane

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM have recently emerged as possible tools to discover therapeutic targets and biomarkers for new therapies including immunotherapy. It is well known that macroscopically complete surgical excision, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have therapeutic limitations to improve survival in these patients. In this study, we used a differential proteomic-based technique (2D-Difference Gel Electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to identify proteins that may serve as brain tumor antigens in new therapeutic assays. Five samples of patients presenting a GBM and five samples of microscopically normal brain tissues derived from brain epileptic surgery specimen were labeled and run in 2D-PAGE (Two-Dimensional Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis with an internal pool sample on each gel. Five gels were matched and compared with DIA (Difference In-gel Analysis software. Differential spots were picked, in-gel digested and peptide mass fingerprints were obtained. Results From 51 protein-spots significantly up-regulated in GBM samples, mass spectrometry (MS identified twenty-two proteins. The differential expression of a selected protein set was first validated by western-blotting, then tested on large cohorts of GBM specimens and non-tumor tissues, using immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. Conclusions Our results confirmed the importance of previously described proteins in glioma pathology and their potential usefulness as biological markers but also revealed some new interesting targets for future therapies.

  12. Comparação da dose calculada entre a tomoterapia helicoidal e a arcoterapia de intensidade modulada em glioblastomas multiformes

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Cidália; Carvalho, Filipa; Sá, Ana Cravo; Coelho, Carina Marques; Monsanto, Fátima; Sacco, Vincenzo; Pereira, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo do estudo - Comparar a dose calculada nos órgãos de risco (OR’s) e no volume alvo de planeamento (PTV), entre a tomoterapia helicoidal (TH) e a arcoterapia de intensidade modulada (RapidArc®), em glioblastomas multiformes (GBM).

  13. Gliadel (BCNU) wafer plus concomitant temozolomide therapy after primary resection of glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirt, Matthew J.; Than, Khoi D.; Weingart, Jon D.; Chaichana, Kaisorn L.; Attenello, Frank J.; Olivi, Alessandro; Laterra, John; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Grossman, Stuart A.; Brem, Henry; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Object Gliadel (BCNU) wafer and concomitant temozolomide (TMZ) therapy, when used individually as adjuvant therapies, extend survival from that achieved by resection and radiation therapy (XRT) for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). It remains unstudied whether combining Gliadel and TMZ therapy is safe or further improves survival in patients with newly diagnosed GBM. The authors reviewed their initial experience utilizing combined Gliadel, TMZ, and radiation therapy for the treatment of GBM. Methods All cases involving patients undergoing primary resection of GBM with or without Gliadel wafer (3.85% BCNU) implantation and adjuvant XRT over a 10-year period (1997–2006) were retrospectively reviewed. Beginning in 2004, concomitant TMZ became the standard of care at the authors’ institution and all patients with Gliadel implantation also received concomitant TMZ (Stupp protocol). Overall survival and treatment-related morbidity were assessed for all patients treated with Gliadel plus concomitant TMZ (XRT + Gliadel + TMZ). Age-matched (≤ 70 years) comparison of survival and morbidity was performed between the XRT + Gliadel + TMZ (post-2003) and XRT + Gliadel (pre-2004) cohorts. Results Thirty-three patients were treated with XRT + Gliadel + TMZ. The median survival in this group was 20.7 months, with a 2-year survival rate of 36%. Six-month morbidity included surgical site infection in 1 case (3%), perioperative seizures in 2 cases (6%), deep-vein thrombus in 1 (3%), pulmonary embolism in 3 (9%), and cerebral edema requiring admission for intravenous dexamethasone in 1 case (3%). Myelosuppression required premature termination of TMZ in 7 patients (21%) (thrombocytopenia in 5, neutropenia in 2 cases). In patients ≤ 70 years of age, XRT + Gliadel + TMZ (30 patients, post-2003) was independently associated with improved median survival (21.3 vs 12.4 months, p = 0.005) versus XRT + Gliadel (78 patients, pre-2004), with 2-year survival of 39 versus 18%, respectively

  14. The future role of personalized medicine in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Jing Li1,2, Chunhui Di1,2, Austin K Mattox1,2, Linda Wu1,2, D Cory Adamson1,2,3,41Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 2Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 3Department of Neurobiology, Duke Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA; 4Neurosurgery Section, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USAAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains one of the most malignant primary central nervous system tumors. Personalized therapeutic approaches have not become standard of care for GBM, but science is fast approaching this goal. GBM’s heterogeneous genomic landscape and resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy make this tumor one of the most challenging to treat. Recent advances in genome-wide studies and genetic profiling show that there is unlikely to be a single genetic or cellular event that can be effectively targeted in all patients. Instead, future therapies will likely require personalization for each patient’s tumor genotype or proteomic profile. Over the past year, many investigations specifically focused simultaneously on strategies to target oncogenic pathways, angiogenesis, tumor immunology, epigenomic events, glioma stem cells (GSCs, and the highly migratory glioma cell population. Combination therapy targeting multiple pathways is becoming a fast growing area of research, and many studies put special attention on small molecule inhibitors. Because GBM is a highly vascular tumor, therapy that directs monoclonal antibodies or small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors toward angiogenic factors is also an area of focus for the development of new therapies. Passive, active, and adoptive immunotherapies have been explored by many studies recently, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression with microRNAs is also becoming an important area of study. GSCs can be useful targets to stop tumor recurrence and

  15. {sup 23}Na-MRI of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after intraoperative radiotherapy: technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haneder, Stefan; Buesing, Karen A.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Ong, Melissa M. [Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg University, Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Brehmer, Stefanie; Schmiedek, Peter [Heidelberg University, Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    We report the first case of an intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who was followed up with a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method - {sup 23}Na-MRI - in comparison to a standard contrast-enhanced {sup 1}H-MRI and {sup 18}F-FET-PET. A 56-year-old female patient with diagnosed GBM in July 2012 underwent tumor resection, radiochemotherapy, and three cycles of chemotherapy. After a relapse, 6 months after the initial diagnosis, an IORT was recommended which was performed in March 2013 using the INTRABEAM system (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany) with a 3-cm applicator and a surface dose of 20 Gy. Early post-operative contrast-enhanced and 1-month follow-up {sup 1}H-MRI and a {sup 18}F-FET-PET were performed. In addition, an IRB-approved {sup 23}Na-MRI was performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner (MAGNETOM TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Germany). After re-surgery and IORT in March 2013, only a faint contrast enhancement but considerable surrounding edema was visible at the medio-posterior resection margins. In April 2013, new and progressive contrast enhancement, edema, {sup 23}Na content, and increased uptake in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET were visible, indicating tumor recurrence. Increased sodium content within the area of contrast enhancement was found in the {sup 23}Na-MRI, but also exceeding this area, very similar to the increased uptake depicted in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET. The clearly delineable zone of edema in both examinations exhibits a lower {sup 23}Na content compared to areas with suspected proliferating tumor tissue. {sup 23}Na-MRI provided similar information in the suspicious area compared to {sup 18}F-FET-PET, exceeding conventional {sup 1}H-MRI. Still, {sup 23}Na-MRI remains an investigational technique, which is worth to be further evaluated. (orig.)

  16. Clinical outcome of gliosarcoma compared with glioblastoma multiforme: a clinical study in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guobin; Huang, Shengyue; Zhang, Junting; Wu, Zhen; Lin, Song; Wang, Yonggang

    2016-04-01

    Gliosarcoma (GSM) is a rare biphasic neoplasms of the central nervous system composed of a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) admixed with a sarcomatous component. In clinical practice GSM is generally managed similarly to GBM. However, there are conflicting reports regarding their clinical aggressiveness, cell line of origin and possible prognosis compared with those of GBM. The objective of this study was to compare clinic-pathological features in GSM patients with the GBM patients during the same study period. 518 patients with GBM were treated at our hospital between 2008 and 2013, among them 51 were GSM. In this series the GSMs represented 9.8 % of all GBMs and included 58.8 % male with a median age of 44.7 years. The locations, all supratentorial, included temporal in 41.2 %, frontal in 25.5 %, parietal in 19.6 %, and occipital in 13.7 %. All patients underwent tumor resection followed by post-operative radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. The O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation studies were significantly more frequent in the GBMs than GSMs (80.1 % vs. 44.7 %, P GSM were 8.0 and 13.0 months, respectively, as compared with 9.0 and 14.0 months in the GBM group (log rank test P = 0.001 and 0.004, respectively). The Cox proportional hazards regression model indicated that the extent of tumor resection (HR = 1.518, P = 0.009) and pathological types (HR = 0.608, P = 0.002) were the significant prognostic factors in our own series. With regard to clinical features and outcomes, GSM and GBM cannot be distinguished clinically. GSM in China may be managed similarly to GBM, with maximal safe surgical resection followed by chemo-radiotherapy. Our study adds further evidence to support GSM as a unique clinical entity with a likely worse prognosis than GBM. PMID:26725096

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor amplification does not have prognostic significance in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There have been conflicting reports in the literature regarding the prognostic significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The purpose of this study is to determine the prognostic significance of EGFR amplification in patients with GBM treated at Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of GBM patients treated with surgery at Cleveland Clinic Foundation was performed. Amplification of EGFR was evaluated with fluorescence in situ hybridization in a total of 107 patients diagnosed between December 1995 and May 2003. In addition to EGFR status, various prognostic factors were evaluated to determine the factors that influenced survival and radiographic response rate. The median follow-up was 9 months. Results: The overall median survival was 9.8 months, with a 1-year survival of 40%. Of the 107 patients in whom EGFR status was evaluated, 36 (33.6%) were found to have EGFR amplification. On multivariate analysis, median survival was found to be significantly improved for patients with age <60 (12.6 months vs. 8 months, p = 0.0061), patients with Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70 (12.1 months vs. 4.4 months, p < 0.0001), patients who had undergone subtotal resection or gross total resection (11.1 months vs. 4.1 months, p = 0.002), and patients who received a radiation dose ≥60 Gy compared with no radiation (12.7 months vs. 3 months, p < 0.0001). There was no association of EGFR amplification with survival. When stratified by age (<60 vs. ≥60), EGFR status still did not reach statistical significance in predicting for survival. For the 81 patients who had radiographic follow-up, the 1-year overall local control was 14%. On univariate analysis, only treatment with radiation (<60 Gy vs. ≥60 Gy vs. no radiation, p = 0.03) was found to predict for improved local control. Treatment with radiation did not remain statistically significant on multivariate

  18. Liposomal n-butylidenephthalide protects the drug from oxidation and enhances its antitumor effects in glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin YL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Ling Lin,1,2,* Kai-Fu Chang,3,* Xiao-Fan Huang,3 Che-Lun Hung,4 Shyh-Chang Chen,5 Wan-Ru Chao,6,7 Kuang-Wen Liao,1,8 Nu-Man Tsai3,9 1College of Biological Science and Technology, 2Center for Bioinformatics Research, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 3School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, 4Department of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, Providence University, 5Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 6Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, 7Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University and Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, 8Institute of Molecular Medicine and Bioengineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 9Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The natural compound n-butylidenephthalide (BP can pass through the blood–brain barrier to inhibit the growth of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. However, BP has an unstable structure that reduces its antitumor activity and half-life in vivo.Objective: The aim of this study is to design a drug delivery system to encapsulate BP to enhance its efficacy by improving its protection and delivery.Methods: To protect its structural stability against protein-rich and peroxide solutions, BP was encapsulated into a lipo-PEG-PEI complex (LPPC. Then, the cytotoxicity of BP/LPPC following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions was analyzed by MTT. Cell uptake of BP/LPPC was also measured by confocal microscopy. The therapeutic effects of BP/LPPC were analyzed in xenograft mice following intratumoral and intravenous injections.Results: When BP was encapsulated in LPPC, its cytotoxicity was maintained following preincubation in protein-rich, acid/alkaline, and peroxide solutions. The cytotoxic activity of encapsulated BP was higher than

  19. Prospective study evaluating the radiosensitizing effect of reduced doses of temozolomide in the treatment of Egyptian patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the documented toxicity of continuous daily radiosensitizer doses of temozolomide concomitant with radiation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, we aimed to compare it with a different schedule of abbreviated radiosensitizer dosing. This was a randomized prospective study comparing toxicity and survival in 60 Egyptian patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Patients in arm I received temozolomide at a dose of 75 mg/m2 daily with radiotherapy for 42 days, starting 4 weeks after surgery and reaching to a total radiation dose of 60 Gy/30 Fractions/6 weeks, while patients in arm II received temozolomide at a dose of 75 mg/m2 concomitantly with the same radiotherapy schedule daily in the first and last weeks of the same radiotherapy program. Common grade 1–2 adverse events were malaise in 28 patients (46.7%), followed by alopecia (40%) and nausea (26.7%). Grade 3–4 convulsion and decreased level of consciousness was seen in only four patients who were all from arm I. The median progression-free survival (PFS) for the entire study population was 10.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.3–14), and PFS at 12 months was 32%. The median PFS in arm I was 8.8 months (95% CI 5.9–11.7) and in arm II 11.5 months (95% CI 8.9–14.2), and PFS at 12 months for both arms was 32% and 30% respectively (P=0.571). The median overall survival (OS) of the whole group of patients was 14.2 months (95% CI 13–15.5), and OS was 70% at 12 months and 25% at 18 months. The median OS for patients in arm I was 12.3 months (95% CI 7.7–16.9), whereas in arm II it was 14.3 months (95% CI 14–14.7) (P=0.83). Reduced radiosensitizer dosing of temozolomide concomitant with radiotherapy in glioblastoma multiforme exhibited comparable efficacy with a classic continuous daily schedule, though with better tolerability

  20. Impact of waiting time after surgery and overall time of postoperative radiochemotherapy on treatment outcome in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time factor of radiooncological treatment has been demonstrated for several tumours, most prominently for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and lung cancer. In glioblastoma multiforme studies of the impact of postoperative waiting times before initiation of radio- or radiochemotherapy were inconclusive. Moreover analysis of the impact of overall treatment time of radiochemotherapy as well as overall duration of local treatment from surgery to the end of radiochemotherapy is lacking to date. In this retrospective cohort study, we included 369 consecutive patients treated at our institution between 2001 and 2014. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven glioblastoma multiforme, age ≥ 18 years, ECOG performance status 0–2 before radiotherapy, radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy with 33 × 1.8 Gy to 59.4 Gy or with 30 × 2.0 Gy to 60 Gy. The impact of postoperative waiting time, radiation treatment time and overall duration of local treatment from surgery to the end of radiotherapy on overall (OS) and progression-free (PFS) survival were evaluated under consideration of known prognostic factors by univariate Log-rank tests and multivariate Cox-regression analysis. The majority of patients had received simultaneous and further adjuvant chemotherapy, mainly with temozolomide. Median survival time and 2-year OS were 18.0 months and 38.9 % after radiochemotherapy compared to 12.7 months and 12.6 % after radiotherapy alone. Median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months and PFS at 2 years was 14.3 % compared to 6.0 months and 3.3 %, respectively. Significant prognostic factors in multivariate analysis were age, resection status and application of simultaneous chemotherapy. No effect of the interval between surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (median 27, range 11–112 days), radiation treatment time (median 45, range 40–71 days) and of overall time from surgery until the end of radiotherapy (median 54, range 71–154 days) on overall and progression

  1. Outcome and prognostic factors in cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme in adults: A retrospective study from the Rare Cancer Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the outcome in patients with cerebellar glioblastoma (GBM) treated in 15 institutions of the Rare Cancer Network. Methods and Materials: Data from a series of 45 adult patients with cerebellar GBM were collected in a retrospective multicenter study. Median age was 50.3 years. Brainstem invasion was observed in 9 (20%) patients. Radiotherapy (RT) was administered to 36 patients (with concomitant chemotherapy, 7 patients). Adjuvant chemotherapy after RT was administered in 8 patients. Median RT dose was 59.4 Gy. Median follow-up was 7.2 months (range, 3.4-39.0). Results: The 1-year and 2-year actuarial overall survival rate was 37.8% and 14.7%, respectively, and was significantly influenced by salvage treatment (p = 0.048), tumor volume (p = 0.044), extent of neurosurgical resection (p = 0.019), brainstem invasion (p = 0.0013), additional treatment after surgery (p < 0.001), and completion of the initial treatment (p < 0.001) on univariate analysis. All patients experienced local progression: 8 and 22 had progression with and without a distant failure, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial progression free survival was 25% and 10.7%, respectively, and was significantly influenced by brainstem invasion (p = 0.002), additional treatment after surgery (p = 0.0016), and completion of the initial treatment (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, survival was negatively influenced by the extent of surgery (p = 0.03) and brainstem invasion (p = 0.02). Conclusions: In this multicenter retrospective study, the observed pattern of failure was local in all cases, but approximately 1 patient of 4 presented with an extracerebellar component. Brainstem invasion was observed in a substantial number of patients and was an adverse prognostic factor

  2. Impact of therapy on quality of life, neurocognitive function and their correlates in glioblastoma multiforme: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksson, Roger; Asklund, Thomas; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of quality of life (QoL) in patients with high-grade glioma is an important endpoint during treatment, particularly in those with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) given its dismal prognosis despite limited advances in standard therapy. It has proven difficult to identify new therapies...... impact response or survival, but produce toxicity that is likely to negatively impact QoL. New biological agents, such as bevacizumab, can induce a clinically meaningful proportion of durable responses among patients with recurrent GBM with an acceptable safety profile. Emerging evidence suggests that...... bevacizumab produces an improvement or preservation of neurocognitive function in GBM patients, suggestive of QoL improvement, in most poor-prognosis patients who would otherwise be expected to show a sudden and rapid deterioration in QoL....

  3. Maintenance of EGFR and EGFRvIII expressions in an in vivo and in vitro model of human glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Broholm, Helle; Villingshøj, Mette; Kirchhoff, Maria; Gerdes, Tommy; Kristoffersen, Karina; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common, and most aggressive primary brain tumor among adults. A vast majority of the tumors express high levels of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a consequence of gene amplification. Furthermore, gene amplification is often associated with...... mutation of EGFR, and the constitutive activated deletion variant EGFRvIII is the most common EGFR mutation found in GBM. Activated EGFR signaling, through overexpression and/or mutation, is involved in increased tumorigenic potential. As such, EGFR is an attractive target for GBM therapy. However......, clinical studies with EGFR inhibitors have shown inconsistent results, and as such, further knowledge regarding the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII in GBM is needed. For this, an appropriate in vivo/in vitro tumor model is required. Here, we report the establishment of an experimental GBM model in which the...

  4. Prospective evaluation of angiogenic, hypoxic and EGFR-related biomarkers in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme treated with cetuximab, bevacizumab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Broholm, Helle;

    2010-01-01

    , hypoxia and mediators of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway were investigated. Tumor tissue was obtained from a previous phase II study, treating recurrent primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab in combination with bevacizumab and irinotecan. Of......Several recent studies have demonstrated a beneficial effect of anti-angiogenic treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor-neutralizing antibody bevacizumab in recurrent high-grade glioma. In the current study, immunohistochemical evaluation of biomarkers involved in angiogenesis...... the 37 patients with available tumor tissue, 29 were evaluable for response. We concurrently performed immunohistochemical stainings on tumor tissue from 21 GBM patients treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan. We found a tendency of correlation between the hypoxia-related markers, indicating that...

  5. Impact of therapy on quality of life, neurocognitive function and their correlates in glioblastoma multiforme: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksson, Roger; Asklund, Thomas; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard

    2011-01-01

    that extend survival in patients with recurrent GBM, so one of the primary aims of new therapies is to reduce morbidity, restore or preserve neurologic functions, and the capacity to perform daily activities. Apart from temozolomide, cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents do not appear to significantly...... impact response or survival, but produce toxicity that is likely to negatively impact QoL. New biological agents, such as bevacizumab, can induce a clinically meaningful proportion of durable responses among patients with recurrent GBM with an acceptable safety profile. Emerging evidence suggests that......The maintenance of quality of life (QoL) in patients with high-grade glioma is an important endpoint during treatment, particularly in those with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) given its dismal prognosis despite limited advances in standard therapy. It has proven difficult to identify new therapies...

  6. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report

  7. Bilateral posterior RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) is a rare but severe consequence of radiation therapy that is associated with adjuvant chemotherapy, specifically therapy with vincristine or nitrosoureas. However, there is very little evidence regarding the occurrence of RION after concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide. The case of a 63 year old woman with glioblastoma multiforme and concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide is described. Due to a slight depressive episode the patient also took hypericum perforatum. Five months after cessation of fractionated radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (cumulative dose of 11040 mg) the patient developed bilateral amaurosis due to RION. Tumor regrowth was excluded by magnetic resonance imaging. After the application of gadolinium a pathognomonic contrast enhancement of both prechiasmatic optic nerves could be observed. In this patient, the occurrence of RION may have been the result of radiosensitization by temozolomide, which could have been strengthened by hypericin. Consequently, physicians should avoid a concomitant application of hypericum perforatum and radiochemotherapy

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Chadha, M. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1994-12-31

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report.

  9. 18F-Fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography may differentiate glioblastoma multiforme from less malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and its prognosis is significantly poorer than those of less malignant gliomas. Pathologically, necrosis is one of the most important characteristics that differentiate GBM from lower grade gliomas; therefore, we hypothesized that 18F fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), a radiotracer for hypoxia imaging, accumulates in GBM but not in lower grade gliomas. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of FMISO positron emission tomography (PET) for the differential diagnosis of GBM from lower grade gliomas. This prospective study included 23 patients with pathologically confirmed gliomas. All of the patients underwent FMISO PET and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET within a week. FMISO images were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 400 MBq of FMISO. Tracer uptake in the tumor was visually assessed. Lesion to normal tissue ratios and FMISO uptake volume were calculated. Of the 23 glioma patients, 14 were diagnosed as having GBM (grade IV glioma in the 2007 WHO classification), and the others were diagnosed as having non-GBM (5 grade III and 4 grade II). In visual assessment, all GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor greater than that in the surrounding brain tissues, whereas all the non-GBM patients showed FMISO uptake in the tumor equal to that in the surrounding brain tissues (p ≤ 0.001). One GBM patient was excluded from FDG PET study because of hyperglycemia. All GBM patients and three of the nine (33%) non-GBM patients showed FDG uptake greater than or equal to that in the gray matter. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing GBM were 100 and 100% for FMISO, and 100 and 66% for FDG, respectively. The lesion to cerebellum ratio of FMISO uptake was higher in GBM patients (2.74 ± 0.60, range 1.71-3.81) than in non-GBM patients (1.22 ± 0.06, range 1.09-1.29, p ≤ 0.001) with no overlap between the groups. The lesion to gray matter ratio of FDG was also higher in GBM patients

  10. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme cells with temozolomide-BioShuttle ligated by the inverse Diels-Alder ligation chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Braun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Klaus Braun1, Manfred Wiessler1, Volker Ehemann2, Ruediger Pipkorn3, Herbert Spring4, Juergen Debus5, Bernd Didinger5, Mario Koch3, Gabriele Muller6, Waldemar Waldeck61German Cancer Research Center, Dept of Imaging and Radiooncology, Heidelberg, Germany; 2University of Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg, Germany; 3German Cancer Research Center, Central Peptide Synthesis Unit, Heidelberg, Germany; 4German Cancer Research Center, Dept of Structural Analysis of Gene Structure and Function, Heidelberg, Germany; 5University of Heidelberg, Dept of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg, Germany; 6German Cancer Research Center,Division of Biophysics of Macromolecules, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: Recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, insensitive against most therapeutic interventions, has low response and survival rates. Temozolomide (TMZ was approved for second-line therapy of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma. However, TMZ therapy in GBM patients reveals properties such as reduced tolerability and inauspicious hemogram. The solution addressed here concerning GBM therapy consolidates and uses the potential of organic and peptide chemistry with molecular medicine. We enhanced the pharmacologic potency with simultaneous reduction of unwanted adverse reactions of the highly efficient chemotherapeutic TMZ. The TMZ connection to transporter molecules (TMZ-BioShuttle was investigated, resulting in a much higher pharmacological effect in glioma cell lines and also with reduced dose rate. From this result we can conclude that a suitable chemistry could realize the ligation of pharmacologically active, but sensitive and highly unstable pharmaceutical ingredients without functional deprivation. The TMZ-BioShuttle dramatically enhanced the potential of TMZ for the treatment of brain tumors and is an attractive drug for combination chemotherapy.Keywords: drug delivery, carrier molecules, facilitated transport, glioblastoma multiforme, temozolomide

  11. Phase II study of topotecan plus cranial radiation for glioblastoma multiforme: results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9513

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A Phase II trial was conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) to compare the survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme treated with topotecan combined with standard cranial radiotherapy (RT) for matched patients treated in prior RTOG studies. A secondary objective was to document the acute and late toxicities of this combination of chemotherapy and RT. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma multiforme received standard cranial RT (60 Gy/30 fractions in 6 weeks) plus topotecan 1.5 mg/m2 per day i.v. for 5 d/wk every 3 weeks for 3 cycles. Eighty-four patients were evaluated, of whom 60 (71%) were ≥50 years, 44 (52%) were men, and 61 (73%) had a Karnofsky performance status of ≥80. Twenty-nine percent of patients had undergone biopsies, 48% partial resections, and 21% gross total resections. Two resections were unspecified as to the extent of tumor removal. Fourteen percent of patients were recursive partitioning analysis Class III, 46% were Class IV, 35% were Class V, and 5% were Class VI. Results: The median survival was 9.3 months. Sixty-seven patients (80%) had progression. The 1-year survival rate was 32%. One patient remained alive without recurrence. RTOG 9513 patients were matched with patients in an RTOG clinical trial database from previous clinical trials. The matching variables were age, Karnofsky performance status, mental status, and prior surgery. No statistically significant difference was found between the survival of the study patients and that of the matched patients from the RTOG database. Fifty-four percent of patients had Grade IV acute toxicity. The toxicity was primarily hematologic. Four patients had Grade III late central nervous system toxicities. Conclusion: Topotecan administered at a dose of 1.5 mg/m2 per day i.v. for 5 d/wk every 3 weeks for 3 cycles given concurrently with standard cranial RT for glioblastoma does not produce a statistically

  12. Optimizing cancer radiotheraphy with 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Dose escalation studies in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Gupta, J.P. [Dharmshila Cancer Hospital, New Delhi (India); Banerji, A.K. [Vidyasagar Inst. of Mental Health and Neurosciences, New Delhi (India); Dwarakanath, B.S.; Tripathi, R.P.; Mathew, T.L.; Ravindranath, T. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India); Jain, V. [Wright State University, Dayton, OH (United States). Kettering Medical Center

    2005-08-01

    Background and purpose: Higher rates of glucose utilization and glycolysis generally correlate with poor prognosis in several types of malignant tumors. Own earlier studies on model systems demonstrated that the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) could enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy in a dose-dependent manner by selectively sensitizing cancer cells while protecting normal cells. Phase I/II clinical trials indicated that the combination of 2-DG, at an oral dose of 200 mg/kg body weight (BW), with large fractions of {gamma}-radiation was well tolerated in cerebral glioma patients. Since higher 2-DG doses are expected to improve the therapeutic gain, present studies were undertaken to examine the tolerance and safety of escalating 2-DG dose during combined treatment (2-DG + radiotherapy) in glioblastoma multiforme patients. Patients and methods: Untreated patients with histologically proven glioblastoma multiforme (WHO criteria) were included in the study. Seven weekly fractions of {sup 60}C {gamma}-rays (5 Gy/fraction) were delivered to the tumor volume (presurgical CT/MRI evaluation) plus 3 cm margin. Escalating 2-DG doses (200-250-300 mg/kg BW) were administered orally 30 min before irradiation after overnight fasting. Acute toxicity and tolerance were studied by monitoring the vital parameters and side effects. Late radiation damage and treatment responses were studied radiologically and clinically in surviving patients. Results: Transient side effects similar to hypoglycemia were observed in most of the patients. Tolerance and patient compliance to the combined treatment were very good up to a 2-DG dose of 250 mg/kg BW. However, at the higher dose of 300 mg/kg BW, two out of six patients were very restless and could not complete treatment, though significant changes in the vital parameters were not observed even at this dose. No significant damage to the normal brain tissue was observed during follow-up in seven out of ten patients who

  13. Reinduction of Bevacizumab in Combination with Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in a Patient with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme Who Progressed on Bevacizumab/Irinotecan

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin Altaha; Mohammed Almubarak; Michael Newton

    2008-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) carries a dismal prognosis despite the current standard of multimodality treatments. Recent studies showed promising results to a regimen consisting of a VEGF inhibitor, (bevacizumab) and a topoisomerase I inhibitor (irinotecan) [BI] in recurrent GBM. However, those patients with GBM who progress on BI will succumb to their disease generally in a very short period of time. We report a case of a 56-year-old male patient with GBM who declined surgical resection and...

  14. The autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid–lysophosphatidic acid receptor cascade: proposal of a novel potential therapeutic target for treating glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Tabuchi, Sadaharu

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). Its prognosis is one of the worst among all cancer types, and it is considered a fatal malignancy, incurable with conventional therapeutic strategies. As the bioactive multifunctional lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is well recognized to be involved in the tumorigenesis of cancers by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors, LPA receptor (LPAR) antagonists and LPA synthesis inhibitors have b...

  15. Two phase II trials of temozolomide with interferon-α2b (pegylated and non-pegylated) in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Groves, M. D.; Puduvalli, V K; Gilbert, M. R.; Levin, V. A.; Conrad, C. A.; Liu, V H; Hunter, K; Meyers, C.; Hess, K. R.; Alfred Yung, W. K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Because of the poor outcomes for patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and some laboratory and clinical evidence of efficacy using interferon in GBM, we assessed the toxicity and efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ) combined with either short-acting (IFN) or long-acting (pegylated) interferon α2b (PEG) in two single-arm phase II studies, and compared the results to 6-month progression-free survival (PFS-6) data from historical controls. Methods: Two single-arm phase II ...

  16. The Role of a Single Angiogenesis Inhibitor in the Treatment of Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yawei Wang; Dan Xing; Meng Zhao; Jie Wang; Yang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, the standard treatment for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiation therapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. However, disease recurs in almost all patients, and the optimal salvage treatment for recurrent GBM remains unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published clinical trials to assess the efficacy and toxicities of angiogenesis inhibitors alone as salvage treatment in th...

  17. Long-Term Survival and Improved Quality of Life following Multiple Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries for Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Erik W.; Peterson, Halloran E.; Fairbanks, Robert K; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Call, Jason A.; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S; Lee, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    The management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is in most cases complex and must be specifically tailored to the needs of the patient with the goals of extended survival and improved quality of life. Despite advancements in therapy, treatment outcomes remain almost universally poor. Salvage treatment options for the recurrence of the disease is an area of intense study. The following case highlights the utility of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS) as a salvage treatment. In this clinical situa...

  18. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis brain abscess mimicking meningitis after surgery for glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, Léa; Dubourg, Grégory; Graillon, Thomas; Honnorat, Estelle; Lepidi, Hubert; Drancourt, Michel; Seng, Piseth; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Salmonella brain abscess associated with brain tumor is rare. Only 11 cases have been reported to date. Here we report a case of brain abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mimicking post-surgical meningitis in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Case presentation A 60-year-old Algerian woman was admitted through an emergency department for a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting, and behavioral disorders. Surgery for cerebral tumor excision was per...

  19. The influence of regional health system characteristics on the surgical management and receipt of post operative radiation therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Aneja, Sanjay; Khullar, Dhruv; Yu, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a known optimal treatment protocol for the management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), many patients fail to receive complete surgical resection or postoperative radiation therapy (PORT). The underlying reasons behind this disparity are unclear. Our study investigates the influence of regional health system resources on the surgical management and PORT receipt in patients with GBM. Surgical intervention, PORT receipt and patient data for patients diagnosed with GBM were obtained from...

  20. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors. PMID:20596476

  1. Surprisal Analysis of Glioblastoma Multiform (GBM) MicroRNA Dynamics Unveils Tumor Specific Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Zadran, Sohila; Remacle, Françoise; Levine, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Gliomablastoma multiform (GBM) is the most fatal form of all brain cancers in humans. Currently there are limited diagnostic tools for GBM detection. Here, we applied surprisal analysis, a theory grounded in thermodynamics, to unveil how biomolecule energetics, specifically a redistribution of free energy amongst microRNAs (miRNAs), results in a system deviating from a non-cancer state to the GBM cancer –specific phenotypic state. Utilizing global miRNA microarray expression data of normal an...

  2. Tubulin targets in the pathobiology and therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. I. class III beta-tubulin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Dráberová, Eduarda; Legido, A.; Dumontet, C.; Dráber, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 221, č. 3 (2009), s. 505-513. ISSN 0021-9541 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Beta-II-tubulin * glioblastoma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.586, year: 2009

  3. Global diffusion tensor imaging derived metrics differentiate glioblastoma multiforme vs. normal brains by using discriminant analysis: introduction of a novel whole-brain approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histological behavior of glioblastoma multiforme suggests it would benefit more from a global rather than regional evaluation. A global (whole-brain) calculation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) derived tensor metrics offers a valid method to detect the integrity of white matter structures without missing infiltrated brain areas not seen in conventional sequences. In this study we calculated a predictive model of brain infiltration in patients with glioblastoma using global tensor metrics. Retrospective, case and control study; 11 global DTI-derived tensor metrics were calculated in 27 patients with glioblastoma multiforme and 34 controls: mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, pure isotropic diffusion, pure anisotropic diffusion, the total magnitude of the diffusion tensor, linear tensor, planar tensor, spherical tensor, relative anisotropy, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. The multivariate discriminant analysis of these variables (including age) with a diagnostic test evaluation was performed. The simultaneous analysis of 732 measures from 12 continuous variables in 61 subjects revealed one discriminant model that significantly differentiated normal brains and brains with glioblastoma: Wilks’ λ = 0.324, χ2 (3) = 38.907, p < .001. The overall predictive accuracy was 92.7%. We present a phase II study introducing a novel global approach using DTI-derived biomarkers of brain impairment. The final predictive model selected only three metrics: axial diffusivity, spherical tensor and linear tensor. These metrics might be clinically applied for diagnosis, follow-up, and the study of other neurological diseases

  4. Outcome in elderly patients undergoing definitive surgery and radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme at a tertiary care institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of definitive surgery and radiation in patients aged 70 years and older with supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: We selected elderly patients (≥ 70 years) who had primary treatment for glioblastoma multiforme at our tertiary care institution from 1977 through 1996. The study group (n = 102) included 58 patients treated with definitive radiation, 19 treated with palliative radiation, and 25 who received no radiation. To compare our results with published findings, we grouped our patients according to the applicable prognostic categories developed by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG): RTOG group IV (n = 6), V (n = 70), and VI (n = 26). Patients were retrospectively assigned to prognostic group IV, V, or VI based on age, performance status, extent of surgery, mental status, neurologic function, and radiation dose. Treatment included surgical resection and radiation (n 49), biopsy alone (n = 25), and biopsy followed by radiation (n = 28). Patients were also stratified according to whether they were optimally treated (gross total or subtotal resection with postoperative definitive radiation) or suboptimally treated (biopsy, biopsy + radiation, surgery alone, or surgery + palliative radiation). Patients were considered to have a favorable prognosis (n = 39) if they were optimally treated and had a Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score of at least 70. Results: The median survival for patients according to RTOG groups IV, V, and VI was 9.2, 6.6, and 3.1 months, respectively (log-rank, p < 0.0004). The median overall survival was 5.3 months. The definitive radiation group (n = 58) had a median survival of 7.3 months compared to 4.5 months in the palliative radiation group (n = 19) and 1.2 months in the biopsy-alone group (p < 0.0001). Optimally treated patients had a median survival of 7.4 months compared to 2.4 months in those suboptimally treated (p < 0.0001). The favorable prognosis group had an

  5. Phase I Trial of Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Temozolomide Chemotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated biologic dose intensification of radiotherapy using fractional dose escalation with temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status, bone marrow, and organ function were eligible. The patients underwent postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. All patients received a total dose of 60 Gy to the surgical cavity and residual tumor, with a 5-mm margin. IMRT biologic dose intensification was achieved by escalating from 3 Gy/fraction (Level 1) to 6 Gy/fraction (Level 4) in 1-Gy increments. Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m2/d for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150–200 mg/m2/d for 5 days every 28 days. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity, excluding Grade 3 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. A standard 3+3 Phase I design was used. Results: A total of 16 patients were accrued (12 men and 4 women, median age, 69 years; range, 34–84. The median Karnofsky performance status was 80 (range, 60–90). Of the 16 patients, 3 each were treated at Levels 1 and 2, 4 at Level 3, and 6 at Level 4. All patients received IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to the protocol, except for 1 patient, who received 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 7.5 (range, 0–12). The median survival was 16.2 months (range, 3–33). One patient experienced vision loss in the left eye 7 months after IMRT. Four patients underwent repeat surgery for suspected tumor recurrence 6–12 months after IMRT; 3 had radionecrosis. Conclusions: The maximal tolerated IMRT fraction size was not reached in our study. Our results have shown that 60 Gy IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions within 2 weeks with

  6. Phase I Trial of Gross Total Resection, Permanent Iodine-125 Brachytherapy, and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: From April 1999 to May 2002, 21 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were enrolled on a Phase I protocol investigating planned gross total resection and immediate placement of permanent I-125 seeds, followed by postoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy at 100 cGy b.i.d., 5 days per week. Median age and Karnofsky performance status were 50 years (range, 32-65 years) and 90 (range, 70-100), respectively. Toxicity was assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Eighteen patients completed treatment according to protocol. The median preoperative tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging was 18.6 cm3 (range, 4.4-41.2 cm3). The median brachytherapy dose measured 5 mm radially outward from the resection cavity was 400 Gy (range, 200-600 Gy). Ten patients underwent 12 reoperations, with 11 of 12 reoperations demonstrating necrosis without evidence of tumor. Because of high toxicity, the study was terminated early. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 57 and 114 weeks, respectively, but not significantly improved compared with historical patients treated at University of California, San Francisco, with gross total resection and radiotherapy without brachytherapy. Conclusions: Treatment with gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy as performed in this study results in high toxicity and reoperation rates, without demonstrated improvement in survival

  7. Case numbers for a randomized clinical trial of boron neutron capture therapy for Glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with Na2B12H11SH (BSH) or p-dihydroxyborylphenylalanine (BPA), and with a combination of both, was compared to radiotherapy with temozolomide, and the number of patients required to show statistically significant differences between the treatments was calculated. Whereas arms using BPA require excessive number of patients in each arm, a two-armed clinical trial with BSH and radiotherapy plus temozolomide is feasible. - Highlights: • BNCT of Glioblastoma with BPA is not more effective than RT+TMZ. • BNCT of Glioblastoma with BSH is probably more effective than RT+TMZ. • A clinical trial with patients of class V and an unmethylated MGMT gene should be conducted

  8. Ultrastructural characterization of primary cilia in pathologically characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Joanna J; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Rattner, Jerome B

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that are involved in cell cycle progression. Ultrastructurally, the primary cilium region is complex, with normal ciliogenesis progressing through five distinct morphological stages in human astrocytes. Defects in early stages of ciliogenesis are key features of astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines and provided the impetus for the current study which describes the morphology of primary cilia in molecularly characterized hum...

  9. Stem cell associated gene expression in glioblastoma multiforme: relationship to survival and the subventricular zone

    OpenAIRE

    Kappadakunnel, Melanie; Eskin, Ascia; DONG, JUN; Nelson, Stanley F.; Mischel, Paul S.; Liau, Linda M.; Ngheimphu, Phioanh; Lai, Albert; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Goldin, Jonathan; Pope, Whitney B.

    2009-01-01

    Current therapies for glioblastoma (GBM) target bulk tumor through measures such as resection and radiotherapy. However, recent evidence suggests that targeting a subset of tumor cells, so-called cancer stem cells, may be critical for inhibiting tumor growth and relapse. The subventricular zone (SVZ), which lines the ventricles of the brain, is thought to be the origin for the majority of neural stem cells and potentially cancer stem cells. Therefore, we assessed the relationship between tumo...

  10. Perfusion MR Imaging and Proton MR Spectroscopic Imaging in Differentiating Necrotizing Cerebritis from Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Pivawer, Gabriel; Law, Meng; Zagzag, David

    2006-01-01

    We describe a lesion with the MR imaging characteristics of a glioblastoma mutiforme and demonstrate how perfusion MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopic imaging can be used to differentiate necrotizing cerebritis from what appeared to be a high-grade glioma. A 43 year old woman presented to her physician complaining of progressive visual disturbance and headache for several weeks. Conventional MR imaging demonstrated a parietal peripherally enhancing mass with central necrosis and moderate t...

  11. Piperlongumine selectively kills glioblastoma multiforme cells via reactive oxygen species accumulation dependent JNK and p38 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju Mei; Pan, Feng; Li, Li; Liu, Qian Rong; Chen, Yong; Xiong, Xin Xin; Cheng, Kejun; Yu, Shang Bin; Shi, Zhi; Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2013-07-19

    Piperlongumine (PL), a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, may have anti-cancer properties. It selectively targets and kills cancer cells but leaves normal cells intact. Here, we reported that PL selectively killed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells via accumulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) to activate JNK and p38. PL at 20μM could induce severe cell death in three GBM cell lines (LN229, U87 and 8MG) but not astrocytes in cultures. PL elevated ROS prominently and reduced glutathione levels in LN229 and U87 cells. Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) completely reversed PL-induced ROS accumulation and prevented cell death in LN229 and U87 cells. In LN229 and U87 cells, PL-treatment activated JNK and p38 but not Erk and Akt, in a dosage-dependent manner. These activations could be blocked by NAC pre-treatment. JNK and p38 specific inhibitors, SB203580 and SP600125 respectively, significantly blocked the cytotoxic effects of PL in LN229 and U87 cells. Our data first suggests that PL may have therapeutic potential for one of the most malignant and refractory tumors GBM. PMID:23796709

  12. Methylglyoxal (MGO) inhibits proliferation and induces cell death of human glioblastoma multiforme T98G and U87MG cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Łasut, Barbara; Pudełko, Adam; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Suchanek-Raif, Renata; Zieliński, Michał; Borkowska, Paulina; Kowalski, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant and invasive human brain tumor and it is characterized by a poor prognosis and short survival time. Current treatment strategies for GBM using surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are ineffective. Thus new therapeutic strategies to target GBM are urgently needed. The effect of methylglyoxal (MGO) on the cell cycle, cell death and proliferation of human GBM cells was investigated. The T98G and U87MG cell lines were cultured in modified EMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and maintained at 37°C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air. Cells were exposed to methylglyoxal (0.025mM) per 72h. The influence of MGO on T98G and U87MG cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis was evaluated as well. Cell cycle phase distribution, proliferation, apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. MGO causes changes in cell cycle and induces accumulation of G1/G0-phase cells and reduced fraction of cells in S and G2/M phases. We have also observed inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We have also revealed that MGO induces senescence of U87MG but not T98G cells, but further studies are necessary in order to clarify and check mechanism of action of methylglyoxal and it Is a positive phenomenon for the treatment of GBM. PMID:27133062

  13. C-Myc negatively controls the tumor suppressor PTEN by upregulating miR-26a in glioblastoma multiforme cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Pin; Nie, Quanmin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Qiu, Yongming, E-mail: qiuzhoub@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China); Mao, Qing, E-mail: maoq@netease.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •The c-Myc oncogene directly upregulates miR-26a expression in GBM cells. •ChIP assays demonstrate that c-Myc interacts with the miR-26a promoter. •Luciferase reporter assays show that PTEN is a specific target of miR-26a. •C-Myc–miR-26a suppression of PTEN may regulate the PTEN/AKT pathway. •Overexpression of c-Myc enhances the proliferative capacity of GBM cells. -- Abstract: The c-Myc oncogene is amplified in many tumor types. It is an important regulator of cell proliferation and has been linked to altered miRNA expression, suggesting that c-Myc-regulated miRNAs might contribute to tumor progression. Although miR-26a has been reported to be upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the mechanism has not been established. We have shown that ectopic expression of miR-26a influenced cell proliferation by targeting PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in many common malignancies, including GBM. Our findings suggest that c-Myc modulates genes associated with oncogenesis in GBM through deregulation of miRNAs via the c-Myc–miR-26a–PTEN signaling pathway. This may be of clinical relevance.

  14. Establishment and Biological Characterization of a Panel of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and GBM Variant Oncosphere Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Zev A.; Wilson, Kelli M.; Salmasi, Vafi; Orr, Brent A.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Siu, I-Mei; Lim, Michael; Weingart, Jon D.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bettegowda, Chetan; Kassam, Amin B.; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Riggins, Gregory J.; Gallia, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human tumor cell lines form the basis of the majority of present day laboratory cancer research. These models are vital to studying the molecular biology of tumors and preclinical testing of new therapies. When compared to traditional adherent cell lines, suspension cell lines recapitulate the genetic profiles and histologic features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with higher fidelity. Using a modified neural stem cell culture technique, here we report the characterization of GBM cell lines including GBM variants. Methods Tumor tissue samples were obtained intra-operatively and cultured in neural stem cell conditions containing growth factors. Tumor lines were characterized in vitro using differentiation assays followed by immunostaining for lineage-specific markers. In vivo tumor formation was assayed by orthotopic injection in nude mice. Genetic uniqueness was confirmed via short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling. Results Thirteen oncosphere lines derived from GBM and GBM variants, including a GBM with PNET features and a GBM with oligodendroglioma component, were established. All unique lines showed distinct genetic profiles by STR profiling. The lines assayed demonstrated a range of in vitro growth rates. Multipotency was confirmed using in vitro differentiation. Tumor formation demonstrated histologic features consistent with high grade gliomas, including invasion, necrosis, abnormal vascularization, and high mitotic rate. Xenografts derived from the GBM variants maintained histopathological features of the primary tumors. Conclusions We have generated and characterized GBM suspension lines derived from patients with GBMs and GBM variants. These oncosphere cell lines will expand the resources available for preclinical study. PMID:27028405

  15. Development of siRNA-loaded chitosan nanoparticles targeting Galectin-1 for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme via intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Woensel, Matthias; Wauthoz, Nathalie; Rosière, Rémi; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Lefranc, Florence; Steelant, Brecht; Dilissen, Ellen; Van Gool, Stefaan W; Mathivet, Thomas; Gerhardt, Holger; Amighi, Karim; De Vleeschouwer, Steven

    2016-04-10

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) is a naturally occurring galactose-binding lectin, which is overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Gal-1 is associated with tumor progression, and is a potent immune suppressor in the tumor micro-environment. To inhibit Gal-1 in GBM, an effective therapy is required that reaches the central nervous system tumor, with limited systemic effects. In this study, we report for the first time that concentrated chitosan nanoparticle suspensions can deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the central nervous system tumor within hours after intranasal administration. These nanoparticles are able to complex siRNA targeting Gal-1 to a high percentage, and protect them from RNAse degradation. Moreover, a successful intracellular delivery of anti-Gal-1 siRNA resulted in a decreased expression of Gal-1 in both murine and human GBM cells. Sequence specific RNAinterference, resulted in more than 50% Gal-1 reduction in tumor bearing mice. This study indicates that the intranasal pathway is an underexplored transport route for delivering siRNA-based therapies targeting Gal-1 in the treatment of GBM. PMID:26902800

  16. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme cells with temozolomide-BioShuttle ligated by the inverse Diels-Alder ligation chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Spring, Herbert; Debus, Juergen; Didinger, Bernd; Koch, Mario; Muller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), insensitive against most therapeutic interventions, has low response and survival rates. Temozolomide (TMZ) was approved for second-line therapy of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma. However, TMZ therapy in GBM patients reveals properties such as reduced tolerability and inauspicious hemogram. The solution addressed here concerning GBM therapy consolidates and uses the potential of organic and peptide chemistry with molecular medicine. We enhanced the pharmacologic potency with simultaneous reduction of unwanted adverse reactions of the highly efficient chemotherapeutic TMZ. The TMZ connection to transporter molecules (TMZ-BioShuttle) was investigated, resulting in a much higher pharmacological effect in glioma cell lines and also with reduced dose rate. From this result we can conclude that a suitable chemistry could realize the ligation of pharmacologically active, but sensitive and highly unstable pharmaceutical ingredients without functional deprivation. The TMZ-BioShuttle dramatically enhanced the potential of TMZ for the treatment of brain tumors and is an attractive drug for combination chemotherapy. PMID:19920915

  17. Dysregulation of TFDP1 and of the cell cycle pathway in high-grade glioblastoma multiforme: a bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X; Lv, X D; Ren, Y H; Yang, W D; Li, Z B; Zhang, L; Bai, X F

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive research, the prognosis of high-grade glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has improved only slightly because of the limited response to standard treatments. Recent advances (discoveries of molecular biomarkers) provide new opportunities for the treatment of GBM. The aim of the present study was to identify diagnostic biomarkers of high-grade GBM. First, we combined 3 microarray expression datasets to screen them for genes differentially expressed in patients with high-grade GBM relative to healthy subjects. Next, the target network was constructed via the empirical Bayesian coexpression approach, and centrality analysis and a molecular complex detection (MCODE) algorithm were performed to explore hub genes and functional modules. Finally, a validation test was conducted to verify the bioinformatic results. A total of 277 differentially expressed genes were identified according to the criteria P < 0.05 and |log2(fold change)| ≥ 1.5. These genes were most significantly enriched in the cell cycle pathway. Centrality analysis uncovered 9 hub genes; among them, TFDP1 showed the highest degree of connectivity (43) and is a known participant in the cell cycle pathway; this finding pointed to the important role of TFDP1 in the progression of high-grade GBM. Experimental validation mostly supported the bioinformatic results. According to our study results, the gene TFDP1 and the cell cycle pathway are strongly associated with high-grade GBM; this result may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of GBM. PMID:27323154

  18. Therapy and progression--induced O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and mismatch repair alterations in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S; Suri, V; Sharma, M C; Sarkar, C

    2015-01-01

    Despite multimodality treatment protocol including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), most suffer from treatment failure and tumor recurrence within a few months of initial surgery. The effectiveness of temozolomide (TMZ), the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, is largely dependent on the methylation status of the promoter of the gene O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and the integrity of the mismatch repair (MMR) system. Changes in these regulatory mechanisms at the time of recurrence may influence response to therapy. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms of resistance to these drugs may in future lead to improvised patient management. In this article, we provide an update of the spectrum of molecular changes that occur in recurrent GBMs, and thus may have an impact on patient survival and treatment response. For review, electronic search for the keywords "Recurrent GBM", "Recurrent GBM AND MGMT" "Recurrent glioma AND MGMT", "Recurrent GBM AND MMR" and "Recurrent glioma AND MMR", "Recurrent GBM AND MMR" and "Recurrent glioma AND MMR" was done on PubMed and relevant citations were screened including cross-references. PMID:26960480

  19. Therapy and progression – induced O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and mismatch repair alterations in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multimodality treatment protocol including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, most suffer from treatment failure and tumor recurrence within a few months of initial surgery. The effectiveness of temozolomide (TMZ, the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, is largely dependent on the methylation status of the promoter of the gene O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and the integrity of the mismatch repair (MMR system. Changes in these regulatory mechanisms at the time of recurrence may influence response to therapy. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms of resistance to these drugs may in future lead to improvised patient management. In this article, we provide an update of the spectrum of molecular changes that occur in recurrent GBMs, and thus may have an impact on patient survival and treatment response. For review, electronic search for the keywords “Recurrent GBM”, “Recurrent GBM AND MGMT” “Recurrent glioma AND MGMT”, “Recurrent GBM AND MMR” and “Recurrent glioma AND MMR”, “Recurrent GBM AND MMR” and “Recurrent glioma AND MMR” was done on PubMed and relevant citations were screened including cross-references.

  20. High mobility group A1 expression shows negative correlation with recurrence time in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Pang, Bo; Liu, Huajie; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Zhang, Rui; Feng, Bin; Zhong, Peng; Murata, Daiki; Fan, Haitao; Xin, Tao; Zhao, Guangyu; Liu, Wei; Guo, Hua; Luan, Liming; Xu, Shangchen; Miyamoto, Susumu; Pang, Qi

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the difference in high mobility group A1 (HMGA1) expression and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 R132H point mutation in initial and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and to further identify whether the expression of HMGA1 has a role in the malignant progression of GBM. Paired initial and recurrent GBM specimens from the same patient were evaluated using immunohistochemical analysis. The association between HMGA1 expression and progression-free survival time (PFST) was analyzed. Three patients were confirmed with IDH-1 R132H mutations in both initial and recurrent groups (3/25, 12%). There was a significant difference in HMGA1 expression between initial and recurrent GBM (P=0.002), and patients with tumors expressing HMGA1 at higher level had a significantly shorter PFST (7.3 months versus 11.1months; P=0.044). Our study indicates that recurrent GBM express HMGA1 at a higher level and that HMGA1 overexpressoin is associated with shorter PFST in patients with GBM. These findings suggest that HMGA1 potentially plays an important role in the treatment of GBM. PMID:26092597

  1. 18F-Fluorothymidine-Pet Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme: Effects of Radiation Therapy on Radiotracer Uptake and Molecular Biomarker Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. PET imaging is a useful clinical tool for studying tumor progression and treatment effects. Conventional 18F-FDG-PET imaging is of limited usefulness for imaging Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM due to high levels of glucose uptake by normal brain and the resultant signal-to-noise intensity. 18F-Fluorothymidine (FLT in contrast has shown promise for imaging GBM, as thymidine is taken up preferentially by proliferating cells. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of 18F-FLT-PET in a GBM mouse model, especially after radiation therapy (RT, and its correlation with useful biomarkers, including proliferation and DNA damage. Methods. Nude/athymic mice with human GBM orthografts were assessed by microPET imaging with 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT. Patterns of tumor PET imaging were then compared to immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for markers of proliferation (Ki-67, DNA damage and repair (γH2AX, hypoxia (HIF-1α, and angiogenesis (VEGF. Results. We confirmed that 18F-FLT-PET uptake is limited in healthy mice but enhanced in the intracranial tumors. Our data further demonstrate that 18F-FLT-PET imaging usefully reflects the inhibition of tumor by RT and correlates with changes in biomarker expression. Conclusions. 18F-FLT-PET imaging is a promising tumor imaging modality for GBM, including assessing RT effects and biologically relevant biomarkers.

  2. The effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on proliferation and apoptosis of in ovo cultured glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbańska, Kaja; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz; Sokołowska, Justyna; Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Szmidt, Maciej; Sysa, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) provide a unique approach to the treatment of tumors, especially those of neuroepithelial origin. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of AgNPs on proliferation and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells cultured in an in ovo model. Human GBM cells, line U-87, were placed on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane. After 8 days, the tumors were divided into three groups: control (non-treated), treated with colloidal AgNPs (40 μg/ml), and placebo (tumors supplemented with vehicle only). At the end of the experiment, all tumors were isolated. Assessment of cell proliferation and cell apoptosis was estimated by histological, immunohistochemical, and Western blot analyses. The results show that AgNPs can influence GBM growth. AgNPs inhibit proliferation of GBM cells and seem to have proapoptotic properties. Although there were statistically significant differences between control and AgNP groups in the AI and the levels of active caspase 9 and active caspase 3, the level of these proteins in GBM cells treated with AgNPs seems to be on the border between the spontaneous apoptosis and the induced. Our results indicate that the antiproliferative properties of silver nanoparticles overwhelm proapoptotic ones. Further research focused on the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs on tumor and normal cells should be conducted.

  3. MiR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme cells through targeting of ataxia–telangiectasia mutated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Pin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei; Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Liemei [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Qiu, Yongming, E-mail: qiuzhoub@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China); Mao, Qing, E-mail: maoq@netease.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is notoriously resistant to radiation, and consequently, new radiosensitizers are urgently needed. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous gene modulators with emerging roles in DNA repair. We found that overexpression of miR-26a can enhance radiosensitivity and reduce the DNA repair ability of U87 cells. However, knockdown miR-26a in U87 cells could act the converse manner. Mechanistically, this effect is mediated by direct targeting of miR-26a to the 3′UTR of ATM, which leads to reduced ATM levels and consequent inhibition of the homologous recombination repair pathway. These results suggest that miR-26a may act as a new radiosensitizer of GBM. - Highlights: ●miR-26a directly target ATM in GBM cells. ●miR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of GBM cells. ●miR-26a could reduce the DNA repair capacity of GBM cells.

  4. Quantitative proteomics reveals the novel co-expression signatures in early brain development for prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuexin; Feng, Lin; Liu, Dianming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wu, Bo; Jiang, Wei; Han, Zujing; Cheng, Shujun

    2016-03-22

    Although several researches have explored the similarity across development and tumorigenesis in cellular behavior and underlying molecular mechanisms, not many have investigated the developmental characteristics at proteomic level and further extended to cancer clinical outcome. In this study, we used iTRAQ to quantify the protein expression changes during macaque rhesus brain development from fetuses at gestation 70 days to after born 5 years. Then, we performed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) on protein expression data of brain development to identify co-expressed modules that highly expressed on distinct development stages, including early stage, middle stage and late stage. Moreover, we used the univariate cox regression model to evaluate the prognostic potentials of these genes in two independent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) datasets. The results showed that the modules highly expressed on early stage contained more reproducible prognostic genes, including ILF2, CCT7, CCT4, RPL10A, MSN, PRPS1, TFRC and APEX1. These genes were not only associated with clinical outcome, but also tended to influence chemoresponse. These signatures identified from embryonic brain development might contribute to precise prediction of GBM prognosis and identification of novel drug targets in GBM therapies. Thus, the development could become a viable reference model for researching cancers, including identifying novel prognostic markers and promoting new therapies. PMID:26895104

  5. FNAB cytology of extra-cranial metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme may resemble a lung primary: A diagnostic pitfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dincer HE

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As extra-cranial metastasis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is rare, it may create a diagnostic dilemma especially during interpretation of fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB cytology. Case presentation We present transbronchial FNAB findings in a 62-year-old smoker with lung mass clinically suspicious for a lung primary. The smears of transbronchial FNAB showed groups of cells with ill-defined cell margins and cytological features overlapping with poorly differentiated non-small cell carcinoma. The tumor cells demonstrated lack of immunoreactivity for cytokeratin, thyroid transcription factor-1, and usual neuroendocrine markers, synaptophysin and chromogranin in formalin-fixed cellblock sections. However, they were immunoreactive for the other neuroendocrine immunomarker, CD56, suggesting neural nature of the cells. Further scrutiny of clinical details revealed a history of GBM, 13 months status-post surgical excision with radiation therapy and systemic chemotherapy. The tumor recurred 7 months earlier and was debulked surgically and with intra-cranial chemotherapy. Additional evaluation of tumor cells for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP immunoreactivity with clinical details resulted in final interpretation of metastatic GBM. Conclusion Lack of clinical history and immunophenotyping may lead to a diagnostic pitfall with possible misinterpretation of metastatic GBM as poorly differentiated non-small cell carcinoma of lung in a smoker.

  6. Brain Stem and Entire Spinal Leptomeningeal Dissemination of Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme in a Patient during Postoperative Radiochemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangyi; Wang, Yu; Liu, Shuai; Chen, Keyin; Zhou, Qiangyi; Yan, Chengrui; He, Huayu; Gao, Jun; Guan, Jian; Yang, Yi; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Wang, Renzhi; Ma, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignancy of the central nervous system in adults. Macroscopically evident and symptomatic spinal metastases occur rarely. Autopsy series suggest that approximately 25% of patients with intracranial GBM have evidence of spinal subarachnoid seeding, although the exact incidence is not known as postmortem examination of the spine is not routinely performed.1–3 Herein, we present a rare case of symptomatic brain stem and entire spinal dissemination of GBM in a 36-year-old patient during postoperative adjuvant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide and cisplatin. Visual deterioration, intractable stomachache, and limb paralysis were the main clinical features. The results of cytological and immunohistochemical tests on the cerebrospinal fluid cells were highly suggestive of spinal leptomeningeal dissemination. After 1 month, the patient's overall condition deteriorated and succumbed to his disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of GBM dissemination presenting in this manner. Because GBM extracranial dissemination is rare, we also reviewed pertinent literature regarding this uncommon entity. Although metastases to spinal cord from GBM are uncommon, it is always important to have in mind when patients with a history of GBM present with symptoms that do not correlate with the primary disease pattern.

  7. C-Myc negatively controls the tumor suppressor PTEN by upregulating miR-26a in glioblastoma multiforme cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The c-Myc oncogene directly upregulates miR-26a expression in GBM cells. •ChIP assays demonstrate that c-Myc interacts with the miR-26a promoter. •Luciferase reporter assays show that PTEN is a specific target of miR-26a. •C-Myc–miR-26a suppression of PTEN may regulate the PTEN/AKT pathway. •Overexpression of c-Myc enhances the proliferative capacity of GBM cells. -- Abstract: The c-Myc oncogene is amplified in many tumor types. It is an important regulator of cell proliferation and has been linked to altered miRNA expression, suggesting that c-Myc-regulated miRNAs might contribute to tumor progression. Although miR-26a has been reported to be upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the mechanism has not been established. We have shown that ectopic expression of miR-26a influenced cell proliferation by targeting PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in many common malignancies, including GBM. Our findings suggest that c-Myc modulates genes associated with oncogenesis in GBM through deregulation of miRNAs via the c-Myc–miR-26a–PTEN signaling pathway. This may be of clinical relevance

  8. MiR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme cells through targeting of ataxia–telangiectasia mutated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is notoriously resistant to radiation, and consequently, new radiosensitizers are urgently needed. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous gene modulators with emerging roles in DNA repair. We found that overexpression of miR-26a can enhance radiosensitivity and reduce the DNA repair ability of U87 cells. However, knockdown miR-26a in U87 cells could act the converse manner. Mechanistically, this effect is mediated by direct targeting of miR-26a to the 3′UTR of ATM, which leads to reduced ATM levels and consequent inhibition of the homologous recombination repair pathway. These results suggest that miR-26a may act as a new radiosensitizer of GBM. - Highlights: ●miR-26a directly target ATM in GBM cells. ●miR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of GBM cells. ●miR-26a could reduce the DNA repair capacity of GBM cells

  9. Demonstration of brachytherapy boost dose-response relationships in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate brachytherapy dose-response relationships in adults with glioblastoma undergoing temporary 125I implant boost after external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Since June 1987, orthogonal radiographs using a fiducial marker box have been used to verify brain implant source positions and generate dose-volume histograms at the University of California, San Francisco. For adults who underwent brachytherapy boost for glioblastoma from June 1987 through December 1992, tumor volumes were reoutlined to ensure consistency and dose-volume histograms were recalculated. Univariate and multivariate analyses of various patient and treatment parameters were performed evaluating for influence of dose on freedom from local failure (FFLF) and actuarial survival. Results: Of 102 implant boosts, 5 were excluded because computer plans were unavailable. For the remaining 97 patients, analyses with adjustment for known prognostic factors (age, KPS, extent of initial surgical resection) and prognostic factors identified on univariate testing (adjuvant chemotherapy) showed that higher minimum brachytherapy tumor dose was strongly associated with improved FFLF (p = 0.001). A quadratic relationship was found between total biological effective dose and survival, with a trend toward optimal survival probability at 47 Gy minimum brachytherapy tumor dose (corresponding to about 65 Gy to 95% of the tumor volume); survival decreased with lower or higher doses. Two patients expired and one requires hospice care because of brain necrosis after brachytherapy doses > 63 Gy to 95% of the tumor volume with 60 Gy to > 18 cm3 of normal brain. Conclusion: Although higher minimum brachytherapy tumor dose was strongly associated with better local control, a brachytherapy boost dose > 50-60 Gy may result in life-threatening necrosis. We recommend careful conformation of the prescription isodose line to the contrast enhancing tumor volume, delivery of a minimum brachytherapy boost

  10. The relationship between six-month progression-free survival and 12-month overall survival end points for phase II trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Ballman, Karla V.; Buckner, Jan C.; Brown, Paul D.; Giannini, Caterina; Flynn, Patrick J.; LaPlant, Betsy R.; Jaeckle, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    Common end points for phase II trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are six-month progression-free survival (PFS6) and 12-month overall survival (OS12). OS12 can be accurately measured but may be confounded with subsequent therapies upon progression, whereas the converse is true for PFS6. Our goal was to assess the relationship between these end points separately for phase II trials in patients with newly diagnosed GBM and patients with recurrent GBM. Data were pooled from 11...

  11. TSPO imaging in glioblastoma multiforme: A direct comparison between 123ICLINDE-SPECT, 18F-FET PET and gadolinium-enhanced MRI.

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Per; Feng, Li; Law, Ian; Svarer, Claus; Knudsen, Gitte M; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; de Nijs, Robin; Larsen, Vibeke A; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Thomsen, Gerda; Fischer, Walter; GUILLOTEAU, Denis; Pinborg, Lars H.

    2015-01-01

    Here we compare TSPO imaging using 123 I-CLINDE and amino acid transport imaging using 18 F-FET and investigate if 123 I-CLINDE is superior to 18 F-FET in predictingprogression of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at follow up. Methods  Three patients with WHO grade IV GBM were scanned with 123 I-CLINDE SPECT, 18 F-FET PET and Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (gadolinium-MRI). Molecular imaging data were compared to follow-up gadolinium-MRI or contrast enhanc...

  12. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4–5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  13. Increased expression of EphA7 correlates with adverse outcome in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant gliomas are lethal cancers, highly dependent on angiogenesis and treatment options and prognosis still remain poor for patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Ephs and ephrins have many well-defined functions during embryonic development of central nervous system such as axon mapping, neural crest cell migration, hindbrain segmentation and synapse formation as well as physiological and abnormal angiogenesis. Accumulating evidence indicates that Eph and ephrins are frequently overexpressed in different tumor types including GBM. However, their role in tumorigenesis remains controversial, as both tumor growth promoter and suppressor potential have been ascribed to Eph and ephrins while the function of EphA7 in GBM pathogenesis remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of EphA7 in a series of 32 primary and recurrent GBM and correlated it with clinical pathological parameters and patient outcome. In addition, intratumor microvascular density (MVD) was quantified by immunostaining for endothelial cell marker von Willebrand factor (vWF). Overexpression of EphA7 protein was predictive of the adverse outcome in GBM patients, independent of MVD expression (p = 0.02). Moreover, high density of MVD as well as higher EphA7 expression predicted the disease outcome more accurately than EphA7 variable alone (p = 0.01). There was no correlation between MVD and overall survival or recurrence-free survival (p > 0.05). However, a statistically significant correlation between lower MVD and tumor recurrence was observed (p = 0.003). The immunohistochemical assessment of tissue EphA7 provides important prognostic information in GBM and would justify its use as surrogate marker to screen patients for tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy

  14. Early post-treatment pseudo-progression amongst glioblastoma multiforme patients treated with radiotherapy and temozolomide: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the incidence and impact of early post-chemoradiation (cRT) 'pseudoprogression' (PsPD) amongst glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with the current standard of care – 60 Gy conformal radiotherapy with concurrent low-dose temozolomide, followed by six cycles of high-dose temozolomide (the 'Stupp protocol'). Clinical notes and radiology reports for GBM patients treated as per the Stupp protocol were reviewed. PsPD was defined as apparent radiological progression on the first post-cRT scan, with further imaging within 3 months being stable or improving, while true early progression (ePD) was confirmed by continued progression in the subsequent 3 months following the first post-cRT scan. Of the 68 patients evaluated, 14 (21%) and 27 (40%) experienced PsPD and ePD, respectively; 3/14 (21%) patients experiencing PsPD and 14/27(52%), ePD were symptomatic for progression on first post-cRT follow-up (P = 0.096 for difference). Median survival for patients with ePD, PsPD and neither were 10.4, 27.4 and 13.0 months, respectively (P = 0.003 for ePD vs. PsPD, P = 0.19 for neither vs. PsPD groups). These data confirm a significant incidence of PsPD in post-cRT GBM patients, associated with improved median survival compared with those with neither ePD nor PsPD (not statistically significant). It appears likely that PsPD actually represents tumour response, conflicting with the traditional notion that increase in lesion size on contrast-enhanced imaging represents disease progression. Early post-cRT imaging should thus be interpreted with caution. Accompanying clinical symptoms are more commonly associated with ePD, but do not reliably distinguish PsPD from ePD.

  15. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temozolomide chemotherapy may alter the patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to report the patterns of failure in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated on a phase II trial of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Patients with newly diagnosed GBM post-resection received postoperative hypo-IMRT to 60Gy in 10 fractions. TMZ was given concurrently at 75mg/m2/day for 28 consecutive days and adjuvantly at 150–200mg/m2/day for 5 days every 28 days. Radiographic failure was defined as any new T1-enhancing lesion or biopsy-confirmed progressive enhancement at the primary site. MRIs obtained at the time of failure were fused to original hypo-IMRT plans. Central, in-field, marginal and distant failure were defined as ≥95%, 80% to 95%, any to 80% and 0% of the volume of a recurrence receiving 60Gy, respectively. Twenty-four patients were treated on the trial. Median follow-up was 14.8 months (range 2.7–34.2). Seventeen of 24 patients experienced radiographic failure: one central, five in-field, two marginal, eight distant and one both in-field and distant. Two of the eight distant failures presented with leptomeningeal disease. Two other patients died without evidence of radiographic recurrence. Five of 24 patients demonstrated asymptomatic, gradually progressive in-field T1 enhancement, suggestive of post-treatment changes, without clear evidence of failure; three of these patients received a biopsy/second resection, with 100% radiation necrosis found. The median overall survival of this group was 33.0 months. A 60-Gy hypo-IMRT treatment delivered in 6-Gy fractions with TMZ altered the patterns of failure in GBM, with more distant failures.

  16. Pulsed Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy in Combination With Temozolomide in a Murine Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, David Y.; Chunta, John L.; Park, Sean S.; Huang, Jiayi; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Grills, Inga S.; Krueger, Sarah A.; Wilson, George D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of pulsed low-dose radiation therapy (PLRT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) as a novel treatment approach for radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a murine model. Methods and Materials: Orthotopic U87MG hGBM tumors were established in Nu-Foxn1{sup nu} mice and imaged weekly using a small-animal micropositron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) system. Tumor volume was determined from contrast-enhanced microCT images and tumor metabolic activity (SUVmax) from the F18-FDG microPET scan. Tumors were irradiated 7 to 10 days after implantation with a total dose of 14 Gy in 7 consecutive days. The daily treatment was given as a single continuous 2-Gy dose (RT) or 10 pulses of 0.2 Gy using an interpulse interval of 3 minutes (PLRT). TMZ (10 mg/kg) was given daily by oral gavage 1 hour before RT. Tumor vascularity and normal brain damage were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Radiation therapy with TMZ resulted in a significant 3- to 4-week tumor growth delay compared with controls, with PLRT+TMZ the most effective. PLRT+TMZ resulted in a larger decline in SUVmax than RT+TMZ. Significant differences in survival were evident. Treatment after PLRT+TMZ was associated with increased vascularization compared with RT+TMZ. Significantly fewer degenerating neurons were seen in normal brain after PLRT+TMZ compared with RT+TMZ. Conclusions: PLRT+TMZ produced superior tumor growth delay and less normal brain damage when compared with RT+TMZ. The differential effect of PLRT on vascularization may confirm new treatment avenues for GBM.

  17. OP33GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE KINASE INHIBITORS REDUCE 3D MIGRATION OF PATIENT DERIVED GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tams, Daniel M.; Murray, Clare; Barry, Simon T.; Lawler, Sean; Bruning-Richardson, Anke; Short, Susan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a fast growing, highly invasive malignant brain tumour. Inhibition of tumour cell migration into normal brain tissue represents a major target for treatment. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3) inhibition has been associated with reduced GBM invasion in in vitro and in vivo models. Targeting this pathway with established and/or novel drugs may elucidate more effective treatment combinations. METHOD: The effect of GSK-3 inhibitors BIO, AZD2858, AZ1293 and AZ1080 on GBM migration was assessed in patient derived GBM stem cells (GBM-1) and two established cell lines (U251 and U87) using a 3D collagen based assay. Multiple drug concentrations were investigated with up to 72 hours exposure. A migration index was determined using aggregate core size and cell migration area. Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry were used to assess cell morphology and cytoskeletal changes. RESULTS: All compounds inhibit migration in this model. AZD2858 was the most potent, causing significant effects at 1 micro molar. All compounds were cytotoxic at between 10 and 20 micro molar. Cytoskeletal and nuclear abnormalities were noted following drug exposure in all cell lines. These data suggest that possible mechanisms for the anti-migratory effect of these compounds include effects on F-actin localization and microtubule polarity. Inhibition of migration and cell architecture changes occurred at non-toxic doses. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of GSK3 significantly reduced migration of this highly invasive tumour. It is evident from these data that inhibiting the complex biological mechanisms driven by GSK3 may aid treatment of GBM through a number of different mechanisms.

  18. Inhibition of Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1 improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eTivnan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30-40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10-20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1 in high grade glioma, and it’s role in BBB active transport, highlights this member of the ABC transporter family as a target for improving drug responses in GBM. In this study we show that small molecule inhibitors and gene silencing of MRP1 had a significant effect on GBM cell response to temozolomide (150µM, vincristine (100nM and etoposide (2µM. Pre-treatment with Reversan (inhibitor of MRP1 and P-glycoprotein led to a significantly improved response to cell death in the presence of all three chemotherapeutics, in both primary and recurrent GBM cells. The presence of MK571 (inhibitor of MRP1 and Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4 led to an enhanced effect of vincristine and etoposide in reducing cell viability over a 72 hour period. Specific MRP1 inhibition led to a significant increase in vincristine and etoposide-induced cell death in all three cell lines assessed. Treatment with MK571, or specific MRP1 knockdown, did not have any effect on temozolomide drug response in these cells. These findings have significant implications in providing researchers an opportunity to improve currently used chemotherapeutics for the initial treatment of primary GBM, and improved treatment for recurrent GBM patients.

  19. Increased expression of EphA7 correlates with adverse outcome in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Frank

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant gliomas are lethal cancers, highly dependent on angiogenesis and treatment options and prognosis still remain poor for patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Ephs and ephrins have many well-defined functions during embryonic development of central nervous system such as axon mapping, neural crest cell migration, hindbrain segmentation and synapse formation as well as physiological and abnormal angiogenesis. Accumulating evidence indicates that Eph and ephrins are frequently overexpressed in different tumor types including GBM. However, their role in tumorigenesis remains controversial, as both tumor growth promoter and suppressor potential have been ascribed to Eph and ephrins while the function of EphA7 in GBM pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Methods In this study, we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of EphA7 in a series of 32 primary and recurrent GBM and correlated it with clinical pathological parameters and patient outcome. In addition, intratumor microvascular density (MVD was quantified by immunostaining for endothelial cell marker von Willebrand factor (vWF. Results Overexpression of EphA7 protein was predictive of the adverse outcome in GBM patients, independent of MVD expression (p = 0.02. Moreover, high density of MVD as well as higher EphA7 expression predicted the disease outcome more accurately than EphA7 variable alone (p = 0.01. There was no correlation between MVD and overall survival or recurrence-free survival (p > 0.05. However, a statistically significant correlation between lower MVD and tumor recurrence was observed (p = 0.003. Conclusion The immunohistochemical assessment of tissue EphA7 provides important prognostic information in GBM and would justify its use as surrogate marker to screen patients for tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

  20. Inhibition of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivnan, Amanda; Zakaria, Zaitun; O'Leary, Caitrín; Kögel, Donat; Pokorny, Jenny L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30-40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10-20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it's role in BBB active transport, highlights this member of the ABC transporter family as a target for improving drug responses in GBM. In this study we show that small molecule inhibitors and gene silencing of MRP1 had a significant effect on GBM cell response to temozolomide (150 μM), vincristine (100 nM), and etoposide (2 μM). Pre-treatment with Reversan (inhibitor of MRP1 and P-glycoprotein) led to a significantly improved response to cell death in the presence of all three chemotherapeutics, in both primary and recurrent GBM cells. The presence of MK571 (inhibitor of MRP1 and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) led to an enhanced effect of vincristine and etoposide in reducing cell viability over a 72 h period. Specific MRP1 inhibition led to a significant increase in vincristine and etoposide-induced cell death in all three cell lines assessed. Treatment with MK571, or specific MRP1 knockdown, did not have any effect on temozolomide drug response in these cells. These findings have significant implications in providing researchers an opportunity to improve currently used chemotherapeutics for the initial treatment of primary GBM, and improved treatment for recurrent GBM patients. PMID:26136652

  1. Differentiation of solitary brain metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme: a predictive multiparametric approach using combined MR diffusion and perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solitary brain metastasis (MET) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can appear similar on conventional MRI. The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion-weighted biomarkers that can differentiate MET from GBM. In this retrospective study, patients were included if they met the following criteria: underwent resection of a solitary enhancing brain tumor and had preoperative 3.0 T MRI encompassing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE), and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion. Using co-registered images, voxel-based fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), Ktrans, and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were obtained in the enhancing tumor and non-enhancing peritumoral T2 hyperintense region (NET2). Data were analyzed by logistic regression and analysis of variance. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter/s and threshold for predicting of GBM vs. MET. Twenty-three patients (14 M, age 32-78 years old) met our inclusion criteria. Pathology revealed 13 GBMs and 10 METs. In the enhancing tumor, rCBV, Ktrans, and FA were higher in GBM, whereas MD was lower, neither without statistical significance. In the NET2, rCBV was significantly higher (p = 0.05) in GBM, but MD was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in GBM. FA and Ktrans were higher in GBM, though not reaching significance. The best discriminative power was obtained in NET2 from a combination of rCBV, FA, and MD, resulting in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. The combination of MR diffusion and perfusion matrices in NET2 can help differentiate GBM over solitary MET with diagnostic accuracy of 98 %. (orig.)

  2. Differentiation of solitary brain metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme: a predictive multiparametric approach using combined MR diffusion and perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Adam Herman; Moser, Franklin G.; Maya, Marcel [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Erly, William; Nael, Kambiz [University of Arizona Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Solitary brain metastasis (MET) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can appear similar on conventional MRI. The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion-weighted biomarkers that can differentiate MET from GBM. In this retrospective study, patients were included if they met the following criteria: underwent resection of a solitary enhancing brain tumor and had preoperative 3.0 T MRI encompassing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE), and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion. Using co-registered images, voxel-based fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), K{sup trans}, and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were obtained in the enhancing tumor and non-enhancing peritumoral T2 hyperintense region (NET2). Data were analyzed by logistic regression and analysis of variance. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter/s and threshold for predicting of GBM vs. MET. Twenty-three patients (14 M, age 32-78 years old) met our inclusion criteria. Pathology revealed 13 GBMs and 10 METs. In the enhancing tumor, rCBV, K{sup trans}, and FA were higher in GBM, whereas MD was lower, neither without statistical significance. In the NET2, rCBV was significantly higher (p = 0.05) in GBM, but MD was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in GBM. FA and K{sup trans} were higher in GBM, though not reaching significance. The best discriminative power was obtained in NET2 from a combination of rCBV, FA, and MD, resulting in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. The combination of MR diffusion and perfusion matrices in NET2 can help differentiate GBM over solitary MET with diagnostic accuracy of 98 %. (orig.)

  3. Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Radiation Therapy and Daily Temozolomide Is Associated With Minimal Toxicity in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled in the study, and received standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide. All patients underwent a craniotomy and were at least 2 weeks postoperative. Radiation therapy was administered in 1.8-Gy fractions, with the clinical target volume for the primary course treated to a dose of 45 to 50.4 Gy, followed by a boost of 9 to 14.4 Gy, to a total dose of 59.4 Gy. Patients received temozolomide at 75 mg/m2 daily throughout the course of radiation therapy. Bevacizumab was given at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 14 days, beginning a minimum of 4 weeks postoperatively. Results: Of the 125 patients, 120 (96%) completed the protocol-specified radiation therapy. Five patients had to stop the protocol therapy, 2 patients with pulmonary emboli, and 1 patient each with a Grade 2 central nervous system hemorrhage, Grade 4 pancytopenia, and wound dehiscence requiring surgical intervention. All 5 patients ultimately finished the radiation therapy. After radiation therapy, 3 patients had progressive disease, 2 had severe fatigue and decreased performance status, 1 patient had a colonic perforation, and 1 had a rectal fissure; these 7 patients therefore did not proceed with the protocol-specified adjuvant temozolomide, bevacizumab, and irinotecan. However, 113 patients (90%) were able to continue on study. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide was found to be associated with minimal toxicity in patients newly diagnosed with GBM.

  4. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W.S.; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient's survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient's survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells. In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation. PMID:26887055

  5. Tumor-associated macrophages in glioblastoma multiforme-a suitable target for somatostatin receptor-based imaging and therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Lapa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN',N″,N'″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM.15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68, proliferative activity (Ki67 as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry.The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from 50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns.SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies are less promising in GBM.

  6. Perfusion MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in differentiating necrotizing cerebritis from glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivawer, Gabriel; Law, Meng; Zagzag, David

    2007-02-01

    We describe a lesion with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of a glioblastoma mutiforme and demonstrate how perfusion MRI and proton MR spectroscopic imaging can be used to differentiate necrotizing cerebritis from what appeared to be a high-grade glioma. A 43-year-old woman presented to her physician complaining of progressive visual disturbance and headache for several weeks. Conventional MRI demonstrated a parietal peripherally enhancing mass with central necrosis and moderate to severe surrounding T2 hyperintensity, suggesting an infiltrating high-grade glioma. However, advanced imaging, including dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), suggested a nonneoplastic lesion. The DSC MRI data demonstrated no hyperperfusion within the lesion and surrounding T2 signal abnormality, and the MRSI data showed overall decrease in metabolites in this region, except for lactate. Because of the aggressive appearance to the lesion and the patients' worsening symptoms, a biopsy was performed. The pathologic diagnosis was necrotizing cerebritis. After the commencement of steroid therapy, imaging findings and patient symptoms improved. This report will review the utility of advanced imaging for differentiating inflammatory from neoplastic appearing lesions on conventional imaging. PMID:17275620

  7. Survival benefit of hyperthermia in a prospective randomized trial of brachytherapy boost ± hyperthermia for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B patients vs. 76 weeks for 33 arm A patients (p = 0.014). Factors associated with improved survival in the multivariate analysis of all 80 randomized patients included lower age (p = 0.001), higher KPS (p = 0.022), and randomization to arm B as opposed to arm A (p = 0.014). Thermal parameters were not associated with survival. There were 2 Grade 4 toxicities (meningitis) and 3 Grade 3 toxicities (1 infection, 1 case of increased hemiparesis, and 1 case of liver toxicity from hydroxyurea) on arm B, representing a 12.5% ((5(40))) incidence of serious toxicity. There were no grade 3, 4, or grade 5 toxicities on arm A. Conclusion: Adjuvant interstitial brain hyperthermia given for 30 minutes before and after brain brachytherapy boost after conventional external beam radiotherapy significantly improves survival of patients with focal glioblastoma multiforme, with acceptable toxicity. This represents the first positive randomized North American hyperthermia trial. We feel that our study benefited from the precise image-based treatment planning and catheter placement inherent in stereotactic technique and the lack of pain sensation within brain parenchyma, allowing good quality hyperthermia

  8. Glioblastoma multiforme with oligodendroglial component (GBMO): favorable outcome after post-operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy with nimustine (ACNU) and teniposide (VM26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of an oligodendroglial component within a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is considered a prognostically favorable factor, but the clinical outcome of patients with glioblastoma multiforme with oligodendroglial component (GBMO) after combined post-operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy has rarely been reported. We analyzed overall and progression-free survival in a group of ten consecutive patients initially diagnosed with GBMO between 1996 and 2004 (4.2% of all GBM patients). Median (range) age was 54 (34–73) years, 90% were resected and median radiotherapy dose was 54 (45–60.6) Gy. 80% of patients received post-operative chemotherapy with nimustine (ACNU) and VM26 (teniposide) for a median of 3.5 (1–6) cycles, the remainder were treated with post-operative radiotherapy alone. All specimens were reviewed by an experienced neuropathologist. Neuropathological re-evaluation revealed GBM with an oligodendroglial component of 30% or less in five cases, predominant oligoastrocytic tumors with focal areas of GBM in four patients and WHO grade III oligoastrocytoma with questionable transition to GBM in one patient. Four of ten patients were alive at at 40, 41, 41 and 82 months. The median overall survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 26 months, the 2-year survival rate was 60% (progression-free survival: 9.8 months and 40%, respectively). In conclusion, patients with GBMO treated with post-operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy with ACNU/VM26 had a better prognosis than reported for GBM in modern chemoradiation series

  9. First clinical results of a personalized immunotherapeutic vaccine against recurrent, incompletely resected, treatment-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors, based on combined all- and auto-immune tumor reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Pretto, C.; Devillers, L.; Pierre, D.; Hofman, F.M.; Chen, T.C.; Mespouille, P.; Hantos, P.; Glorieux, P.; Bota, D.A.; Stathopolous, A.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients have a poor prognosis. After tumor recurrence statistics suggestan imminent death within 1–4.5 months. Supportive preclinical data, from a rat model, provided therational for a prototype clinical vaccine preparation, named Gliovac (or ERC 1671) composed of auto

  10. Impact of [11C]Methionine Positron Emission Tomography for Target Definition of Glioblastoma Multiforme in Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to define the optimal margins for gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-MRI) and T2-weighted MRI (T2-MRI) for delineating target volumes in planning radiation therapy for postoperative patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by comparison to carbon-11-labeled methionine positron emission tomography ([11C]MET-PET) findings. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT), MRI, and [11C]MET-PET were separately performed for radiation therapy planning for 32 patients newly diagnosed with GBM within 2 weeks after undergoing surgery. The extent of Gd-MRI (Gd-enhanced clinical target volume [CTV-Gd]) uptake and that of T2-MRI of the CTV (CTV-T2) were compared with the extent of [11C]MET-PET (CTV--[11C]MET-PET) uptake by using CT--MRI or CT--[11C]MET-PET fusion imaging. We defined CTV-Gd (x mm) and CTV-T2 (x mm) as the x-mm margins (where x = 0, 2, 5, 10, and 20 mm) outside the CTV-Gd and the CTV-T2, respectively. We evaluated the relationship between CTV-Gd (x mm) and CTV-- [11C]MET-PET and the relationship between CTV-T2 (x mm) and CTV-- [11C]MET-PET. Results: The sensitivity of CTV-Gd (20 mm) (86.4%) was significantly higher than that of the other CTV-Gd. The sensitivity of CTV-T2 (20 mm) (96.4%) was significantly higher than that of the other CTV-T2 (x = 0, 2, 5, 10 mm). The highest sensitivity and lowest specificity was found with CTV-T2 (x = 20 mm). Conclusions: It is necessary to use a margin of at least 2 cm for CTV-T2 for the initial target planning of radiation therapy. However, there is a limit to this setting in defining the optimal margin for Gd-MRI and T2-MRI for the precise delineation of target volumes in radiation therapy planning for postoperative patients with GBM.

  11. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  12. Phase II Radiation therapy oncology group trial of weekly paclitaxel and conventional external beam radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± carmustine (BCNU) is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but survival results remain poor. Preclinical studies indicate synergy between RT and paclitaxel (TAX) in astrocytoma cell lines. Phase I studies in GBM have demonstrated a maximum tolerated dose for TAX of 225 mg/m2/3 h/week x 6, during EBRT, with no exacerbation of typical RT-induced toxicities. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) therefore mounted a Phase II study to determine the feasibility and efficacy of conventional EBRT and concurrent weekly TAX at its MTD. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with histologic diagnosis of GBM were enrolled from 8/16/96 through 3/21/97 in a multi-institutional Phase II trial of EBRT and TAX 225 mg/m2/3 h (1-3 h before EBRT), administered the first treatment day of each RT week. Total EBRT dose was 60 Gy (200 cGy/fraction), 5 days per week. A smaller treatment field, to include gross disease plus a margin only, was used after 46 Gy. Results: Sixty-one patients (98%) were evaluable. Median age was 55 years (range, 28-78). Seventy-four percent were ≥50 years. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Classes III, IV, V, VI included 10 (17%), 21 (34%), 25 (41%), and 5 (8%) patients, respectively. Gross total resection was performed in only 16%. There was no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Hypersensitivity reactions precluding further use of TAX occurred in 4 patients. There were 2 instances of late neurotoxicity (4% Grade 3 or 4). Ninety-one percent of patients received treatment per protocol. Seventy-seven percent completed prescribed treatment (6 weeks). Of 35 patients with measurable disease, CR/PR was observed in 23%, MR in 17%, and SD in 43%. Seventeen percent demonstrated progression at first follow-up. Median potential follow-up time is 20 months. Median survival is 9.7 months, with median survivals for RPA classes III, IV, V, and VI of 16.3, 10.2, 9

  13. Phase I study of hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (Hypo-IMRT) using helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent low dose temozolomide (TMZ) followed by adjuvant TMZ in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Adult patients with GBM and KPS > 70 were prospectively enrolled between 2005 and 2007 in this phase I study. The Fibonacci dose escalation protocol was implemented to establish a safe radiation fractionation regimen. The protocol defined radiation therapy (RT) dose level I as 54.4 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks and dose level II as 60 Gy in 22 fractions over 4.5 weeks. Concurrent TMZ followed by adjuvant TMZ was given according to the Stupp regimen. The primary endpoints were feasibility and safety of Hypo-IMRT with concurrent TMZ. Secondary endpoints included progression free survival (PFS), pattern of failure, overall survival (OS) and incidence of pseudoprogression. The latter was defined as clinical or radiological suggestion of tumour progression within three months of radiation completion followed by spontaneous recovery of the patient. A total of 25 patients were prospectively enrolled with a median follow-up of 12.4 months. The median age at diagnosis was 53 years. Based on recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) criteria, 16%, 52% and 32% of the patients were RPA class III, class IV and class V, respectively. All patients completed concurrent RT and TMZ, and 19 patients (76.0%) received adjuvant TMZ. The median OS was 15.67 months (95% CI 11.56 - 20.04) and the median PFS was 6.7 months (95% CI 4.0 – 14.0). The median time between surgery and start of RT was 44 days (range of 28 to 77 days). Delaying radiation therapy by more than 6 weeks after surgery was an independent prognostic factor associated with a worse OS (4.0 vs. 16.1 months, P = 0.027). All recurrences occurred within 2 cm of the original gross tumour volume (GTV). No cases of pseudoprogression were identified in our cohort of patients. Three

  14. The regulating role of mutant IκBα in expression of TIMP-2 and MMP-9 in human glioblastoma multiform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yu-hua; YU Li-Jie; SHAO En-de; WU Jian-liang; JI Jian-wen

    2009-01-01

    Background Our previous studies demonstrated that mutant IκBα (IκBαM) inhibited the occurrence, growth and angiogenesis of human glioblastoma multiform (GBM). However, the specific mechanism by which IKBαM regulates protein-degrading enzymes secreted from GBM to inhibit invasion and metastasis has remained unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulatory role and significance of IκBαM genes in the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in human GBM. Methods We established the following four GBM cell lines stably expressing IκBαM by plasmid construction, gene transfection and screening for IκBαM protein expression: mutant IκBα-transfected cells (G36△-M), wild-type IκBα-transfected cells (G36△-W), empty plasmid transfected cells (G36△-P) and untransfected cells (G36△). The TIMP-2 and MMP-9 expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Tumor cells were then implanted subcutaneously into nude mice to establish an animal model of ectopic tumor growth, and TIMP-2 and MMP-9 expression was determined by immunohistochemical methods. Results The results showed that there was a significant increase in TIMP-2 expression and a significant decrease in MMP-9 expression in the G36A-M group at both the RNA and protein levels compared with the G36A-W group, G36△-P group and G36△ group. Similar results were observed in the immunohistochemical staining analysis of tumor tissues. In the G36A-M group, TIMP-2 expression was significantly higher while MMP-9 expression was significantly lower than in the other three groups. Conclusions Our findings indicate that IκBαM inhibits the activation of NF-κB. It significantly up-regulates TIMP-2 expression in human malignant glioma cells and down-regulates the expression of MMP-9. Thus, IκBαM maintains the integrity of the extracellular matrix and further inhibits the growth and metastasis of tumor tissues.

  15. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  16. Clinical radiobiology of glioblastoma multiforme. Estimation of tumor control probability from various radiotherapy fractionation schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Radiotherapy, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Negrar, Verona (Italy); Simeon, Vittorio [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Laboratory of Preclinical and Translational Research, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Tini, Paolo; Pirtoli, Luigi [University of Siena and Tuscany Tumor Institute, Unit of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medicine Surgery and Neurological Sciences, Siena (Italy); Chiumento, Costanza [Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Radiotherapy, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Napoli (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to estimate a radiobiological set of parameters from the available clinical data on glioblastoma (GB). A number of clinical trial outcomes from patients affected by GB and treated with surgery and adjuvant radiochemotherapy were analyzed to estimate a set of radiobiological parameters for a tumor control probability (TCP) model. The analytical/graphical method employed to fit the clinical data allowed us to estimate the intrinsic tumor radiosensitivity (α), repair capability (b), and repopulation doubling time (T{sub d}) in a first phase, and subsequently the number of clonogens (N) and kick-off time for accelerated proliferation (T{sub k}). The results were used to formulate a hypothesis for a scheduleexpected to significantly improve local control. The 95 % confidence intervals (CI{sub 95} {sub %}) of all parameters are also discussed. The pooled analysis employed to estimate the parameters summarizes the data of 559 patients, while the studies selected to verify the results summarize data of 104 patients. The best estimates and the CI{sub 95} {sub %} are α = 0.12 Gy{sup -1} (0.10-0.14), b = 0.015 Gy{sup -2} (0.013-0.020), α/b = 8 Gy (5.0-10.8), T{sub d} = 15.4 days (13.2-19.5), N = 1 . 10{sup 4} (1.2 . 10{sup 3} - 1 . 10{sup 5}), and T{sub k} = 37 days (29-46). The dose required to offset the repopulation occurring after 1 day (D{sub prolif}) and starting after T{sub k} was estimated as 0.30 Gy/day (0.22-0.39). The analysis confirms a high value for the α/b ratio. Moreover, a high intrinsic radiosensitivity together with a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation and moderate repopulation kinetics were found. The results indicate a substantial independence of the duration of the overall treatment and an improvement in the treatment effectiveness by increasing the total dose without increasing the dose fraction. (orig.) [German] Schaetzung eines strahlenbiologischen Parametersatzes auf der Grundlage klinischer Daten bei

  17. The Synergistic Effect of Fotemustine and Genistein on Expressions of p53, EGFR and COX-2 Genes in Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çığır Biray AVCI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available GBM is the most common primary malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system in adults. Fotemustine (FTM is a cytotoxic alkylating agent and a lipophilic chloroethylnitrosourea derivative. Its mechanism of action consists mainly in inducing DNA strand breaks and cross-linking. Genistein, one of the soy-derived isoflavones, exerts its anticancer properties via several mechanisms, including inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation, weak estrogenic and anti-estrogenic properties, as an antioxidant, inhibition of topoisomerase II, inhibition of angiogenesis, and induction of cell differentiation in a number of human tumors. We aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative synergistic effect of genistein with fotemustine on human glioblastoma multiforme U87-MG cells. This study was also designed to answer the following question: Do the p53, EGFR, COX-2 genes' expression patterns differ in treatment of these both drugs alone and in combination?

  18. Differentiation of glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells leads to downregulation of EGFR and EGFRvIII and decreased tumorigenic and stem-like cell potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Kristoffersen, Karina; Stobbe, Louise;

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and devastating primary brain tumor among adults. Despite recent treatment progress, most patients succumb to their disease within 2 years of diagnosis. Current research has highlighted the importance of a subpopulation of cells, assigned brain...... cancer stem-like cells (bCSC), to play a pivotal role in GBM malignancy. bCSC are identified by their resemblance to normal neural stem cells (NSC), and it is speculated that the bCSC have to be targeted in order to improve treatment outcome for GBM patients. One hallmark of GBM is aberrant expression......, differentiation is induced. Furthermore, we show that differentiation leads to decreased tumorigenic and stem cell-like potential of the neurosphere cultures and that by specifically inhibiting EGFR signaling it is possible to target the bCSC population. Our results suggest that differentiation therapy, possibly...

  19. Osthole Suppresses the Migratory Ability of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells via Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase-Mediated Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fang Tsai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common type of primary and malignant tumor occurring in the adult central nervous system. GBM often invades surrounding regions of the brain during its early stages, making successful treatment difficult. Osthole, an active constituent isolated from the dried C. monnieri fruit, has been shown to suppress tumor migration and invasion. However, the effects of osthole in human GBM are largely unknown. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is important for the metastasis of cancer cells. Results from this study show that osthole can not only induce cell death but also inhibit phosphorylation of FAK in human GBM cells. Results from this study show that incubating GBM cells with osthole reduces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 expression and cell motility, as assessed by cell transwell and wound healing assays. This study also provides evidence supporting the potential of osthole in reducing FAK activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility in human GBM cells.

  20. Integrated-boost IMRT or 3-D-CRT using FET-PET based auto-contoured target volume delineation for glioblastoma multiforme - a dosimetric comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological brain tumor imaging using O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET)-PET combined with inverse treatment planning for locally restricted dose escalation in patients with glioblastoma multiforme seems to be a promising approach. The aim of this study was to compare inverse with forward treatment planning for an integrated boost dose application in patients suffering from a glioblastoma multiforme, while biological target volumes are based on FET-PET and MRI data sets. In 16 glioblastoma patients an intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique comprising an integrated boost (IB-IMRT) and a 3-dimensional conventional radiotherapy (3D-CRT) technique were generated for dosimetric comparison. FET-PET, MRI and treatment planning CT (P-CT) were co-registrated. The integrated boost volume (PTV1) was auto-contoured using a cut-off tumor-to-brain ratio (TBR) of ≥ 1.6 from FET-PET. PTV2 delineation was MRI-based. The total dose was prescribed to 72 and 60 Gy for PTV1 and PTV2, using daily fractions of 2.4 and 2 Gy. After auto-contouring of PTV1 a marked target shape complexity had an impact on the dosimetric outcome. Patients with 3-4 PTV1 subvolumes vs. a single volume revealed a significant decrease in mean dose (67.7 vs. 70.6 Gy). From convex to complex shaped PTV1 mean doses decreased from 71.3 Gy to 67.7 Gy. The homogeneity and conformity for PTV1 and PTV2 was significantly improved with IB-IMRT. With the use of IB-IMRT the minimum dose within PTV1 (61.1 vs. 57.4 Gy) and PTV2 (51.4 vs. 40.9 Gy) increased significantly, and the mean EUD for PTV2 was improved (59.9 vs. 55.3 Gy, p < 0.01). The EUD for PTV1 was only slightly improved (68.3 vs. 67.3 Gy). The EUD for the brain was equal with both planning techniques. In the presented planning study the integrated boost concept based on inversely planned IB-IMRT is feasible. The FET-PET-based automatically contoured PTV1 can lead to very complex geometric configurations, limiting the achievable mean dose in the boost

  1. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) open label phase II study on glufosfamide administered as a 60-minute infusion every 3 weeks in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Bent, Martin; Stupp, Roger; Lacombe, Denis; Desir, J.P.; Lesimple, T; Dittrich, Christian; Baron, B.; Fumoleau, Pierre; de Jonge, Maja; Brandes, Alba; Oliveira, J.,; Frenay, Marc; Chollet, P; Schuessler, M.; Carpentier, A F

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Glufosfamide is a new alkylating agent in which the active metabolite of isophosphoramide mustard is covalently linked to beta-D-glucose to target the glucose transporter system and increase intracellular uptake in tumor cells. We investigated this drug in a multicenter prospective phase II trial in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eligible patients had recurrent GBM following surgery, radiotherapy and no more than one prior line of chemot...

  2. A phase II trial of erlotinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas and nonprogressive glioblastoma multiforme postradiation therapy†

    OpenAIRE

    Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Abrey, Lauren E; Lassman, Andrew B.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R.; Aldape, Kenneth A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Fine, Howard A.; Mehta, Minesh; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Lieberman, Frank; Cloughesy, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with (a) recurrent malignant glioma (MG): glioblastoma (GBM) or recurrent anaplastic glioma (AG), and (b) nonprogressive (NP) GBM following radiation therapy (RT) were eligible. Primary objective for recurrent MG was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and overall survival at 12 months for NP GBM post-RT. Secondary objectives for recurrent MGs were response, survival, assessment of toxicity, and pharmacokinetics (PKs). Treatment with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs was ...

  3. Volumetry of [11C]-methionine PET uptake and MRI contrast enhancement in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Galldiks, Norbert; Ullrich, Roland; Schroeter, Michael; Fink, Gereon R.; Kracht, Lutz W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the relationship between three-dimensional volumetric data of the metabolically active tumour volume assessed using [11C]-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) and the area of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhancement assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). Material and methods MET-PET and contrast-enhanced MRI with Gd-DTPA were performed in 12 uniformly pretreated patients wit...

  4. A spatiotemporal, patient individualized simulation model of solid tumor response to chemotherapy in vivo: the paradigm of glioblastoma multiforme treated by temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakos, Georgios S; Antipas, Vassilis P; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos K

    2006-08-01

    A novel four-dimensional, patient-specific Monte Carlo simulation model of solid tumor response to chemotherapeutic treatment in vivo is presented. The special case of glioblastoma multiforme treated by temozolomide is addressed as a simulation paradigm. Nevertheless, a considerable number of the involved algorithms are generally applicable. The model is based on the patient's imaging, histopathologic and genetic data. For a given drug administration schedule lying within acceptable toxicity boundaries, the concentration of the prodrug and its metabolites within the tumor is calculated as a function of time based on the drug pharamacokinetics. A discretization mesh is superimposed upon the anatomical region of interest and within each geometrical cell of the mesh the most prominent biological "laws" (cell cycling, necrosis, apoptosis, mechanical restictions, etc.) are applied. The biological cell fates are predicted based on the drug pharmacodynamics. The outcome of the simulation is a prediction of the spatiotemporal activity of the entire tumor and is virtual reality visualized. A good qualitative agreement of the model's predictions with clinical experience supports the applicability of the approach. The proposed model primarily aims at providing a platform for performing patient individualized in silico experiments as a means of chemotherapeutic treatment optimization. PMID:16916081

  5. Dedifferentiation of patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme cell lines results in a cancer stem cell-like state with mitogen-independent growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmez, Inan; Shen, Wangzhen; McDonald, Hayes; Ozpolat, Bulent

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence shows that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) originates from cancer stem cells (CSCs). Characterization of CSC-specific signalling pathways would help identify new therapeutic targets and perhaps lead to the development of more efficient therapies selectively targeting CSCs. Here; we successfully dedifferentiated two patient-derived GBM cell lines into CSC-like cells (induced glioma stem cells, iGSCs) through expression of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog transcription factors. Transformed cells exhibited significant suppression of epidermal growth factor receptor and its downstream pathways. Compared with parental GBM cells, iGSCs formed large neurospheres even in the absence of exogenous mitogens; they exhibited significant sensitivity to salinomycin and chemoresistance to temozolomide. Further characterization of iGSCs revealed induction of NOTCH1 and Wnt/β-catenin signalling and expression of CD133, CD44 and ALDH1A1. Our results indicate that iGSCs may help us understand CSC physiology and lead to development of potential therapeutic interventions aimed at differentiating tumour cells to render them more sensitive to chemotherapy or other standard agents. PMID:25787115

  6. Assessing Response Using Tc99m-MIBI Early after Interstitial Chemotherapy with Carmustine-Loaded Polymers in Glioblastoma Multiforme: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cecchin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Early signs of response after applying wafers of carmustine-loaded polymers (gliadel are difficult to assess with imaging because of time-related imaging changes. Tc99m-sestamibi (MIBI brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET has reportedly been used to reveal areas of cellularity distinguishing recurrent neoplasm from radionecrosis. Our aim was to explore the role of MIBI SPET in assessing response soon after gliadel application in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the charts on 28 consecutive patients with a radiological diagnosis of GBM who underwent MIBI SPET/CT before surgery (with intracavitary gliadel placement in 17 patients, soon after surgery, and at 4 months. The area of uptake was selected using a volume of interest that was then mirrored contralaterally to obtain a semiquantitative ratio. Results. After adjusting for ratio at the baseline, the effect of treatment (gliadel versus non-gliadel was not statistically significant. Soon after surgery, however, 100% of patients treated with gliadel had a decreased ratio, as opposed to 62.5% of patients in the non-gliadel group P=0.0316. The difference between ratios of patients with radical versus partial resection reached statistical significance by a small margin P=0.0528. Conclusions. These data seem to suggest that the MIBI ratio could be a valuable tool for monitoring the effect of gliadel early after surgery.

  7. Reinduction of Bevacizumab in Combination with Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin in a Patient with Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme Who Progressed on Bevacizumab/Irinotecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Almubarak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM carries a dismal prognosis despite the current standard of multimodality treatments. Recent studies showed promising results to a regimen consisting of a VEGF inhibitor, (bevacizumab and a topoisomerase I inhibitor (irinotecan [BI] in recurrent GBM. However, those patients with GBM who progress on BI will succumb to their disease generally in a very short period of time. We report a case of a 56-year-old male patient with GBM who declined surgical resection and received chemoradiation with temozolomide. This treatment was withheld secondary to significant thrombocytopenia. Subsequently, he achieved stable disease for 10 months with a regimen consisting of thalidomide and tamoxifen before progressing. This was followed by bevacizumab with irinotecan [BI], for which he had a significant partial response for 8 months with subsequent progression. Reinducing the patient with bevacizumab in combination with a pegylated liposomal doxorubicin [PLD] (a topoisomerase II inhibitor demonstrated antitumor activity with significant shrinkage of contrast enhancing mass and peritumoral edema.

  8. Long-Term Survival and Improved Quality of Life following Multiple Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries for Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik W. Larson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is in most cases complex and must be specifically tailored to the needs of the patient with the goals of extended survival and improved quality of life. Despite advancements in therapy, treatment outcomes remain almost universally poor. Salvage treatment options for the recurrence of the disease is an area of intense study. The following case highlights the utility of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS as a salvage treatment. In this clinical situation, three sequential GKRS treatments led to prolonged survival (beyond four years after diagnosis and improved quality of life in a patient who was unable to receive further chemotherapy regimens and was unwilling to undergo further aggressive resection. To date, there have been few reports of three or more sequential GKRS treatment sessions utilized as salvage therapy for recurrent GBM in patients who can no longer tolerate chemotherapy. This report provides evidence that aggressive local treatment with GKRS at the time of recurrence may be appropriate, depending on a patient’s individual clinical situation, and can lead to prolonged survival and improved quality of life.

  9. Radioactive 125I seeds inhibit cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human glioblastoma multiforme via a ROS-mediated signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary central nervous system neoplasm in adults. Radioactive 125I seed implantation has been widely applied in the treatment of cancers. Moreover, previous clinical trials have confirmed that 125I seeds treatment was an effective therapy in GBM. We sought to investigate the effect of 125I seed on GBM cell growth and Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cells were exposed to irradiation at different doses. Colony-formation assay, EdU assay, cell cycle analysis, and TUNEL assay were preformed to investigate the radiation sensitivity. The effects of 125I seeds irradiation on EMT were measured by transwell, Boyden and wound-healing assays. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by DCF-DA assay. Moreover, the radiation sensitivity and EMT were investigated with or without pretreatment with glutathione. Additionally, nude mice with tumors were measured after treated with radiation. Radioactive 125I seeds are more effective than X-ray irradiation in inhibiting GBM cell growth. Moreover, EMT was effectively inhibited by 125I seed irradiation. A mechanism study indicated that GBM cell growth and EMT inhibition were induced by 125I seeds with the involvement of a ROS-mediated signaling pathway. Radioactive 125I seeds exhibit novel anticancer activity via a ROS-mediated signaling pathway. These findings have clinical implications for the treatment of patients with GBM by 125I seeds

  10. Severe sustained cholestatic hepatitis following temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme: case study and review of data from the FDA adverse event reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarganas, Giselle; Orzechowski, Hans D; Klimpel, Andreas; Thomae, Michael; Kauffmann, Wolfgang; Herbst, Hermann; Bronder, Elisabeth; Garbe, Edeltraut

    2012-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent malignant brain tumor in adults. Its established first-line adjuvant treatment is radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide (TZM). Hematotoxicity is listed as a frequent adverse drug reaction in the US prescribing information and hepatotoxicity has been reported infrequently in the postmarketing period. We here present the case of a patient diagnosed with GBM who developed severe sustained cholestatic hepatitis following treatment with TZM. The cholestasis was not reversible after withdrawal of TZM during 6 months before the patient's death. Another 2 published case reports of sustained cholestasis following TZM treatment were identified; however, the sustained nature of cholestasis was not emphasized in these reports. Sixteen cases of cholestatic hepatitis/cholestasis associated with TZM were identified in the FDA spontaneous reporting system between 2007 and 2010. Information on the course of the cholestasis in these cases could not be retrieved. In the literature there are other published reports of hepatotoxicity associated with TZM that have reported reversibility upon withdrawal of the drug. Thus, TZM appears to cause different types of hepatotoxicity. Particular attention should be paid to sustained cholestasis as a very serious type of TZM-associated liver toxicity. PMID:22394496

  11. Dysregulated miR-671-5p / CDR1-AS / CDR1 / VSNL1 axis is involved in glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salito, Loredana; Sammito, Mariangela; Banelli, Barbara; Caltabiano, Rosario; Barbagallo, Giuseppe; Zappalà, Agata; Battaglia, Rosalia; Cirnigliaro, Matilde; Lanzafame, Salvatore; Vasquez, Enrico; Parenti, Rosalba; Cicirata, Federico; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Romani, Massimo; Purrello, Michele

    2016-01-01

    MiR-671-5p is encoded by a gene localized at 7q36.1, a region amplified in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most malignant brain cancer. To investigate whether expression of miR-671-5p were altered in GBM, we analyzed biopsies from a cohort of forty-five GBM patients and from five GBM cell lines. Our data show significant overexpression of miR-671-5p in both biopsies and cell lines. By exploiting specific miRNA mimics and inhibitors, we demonstrated that miR-671-5p overexpression significantly increases migration and to a less extent proliferation rates of GBM cells. Through a combined in silico and in vitro approach, we identified CDR1-AS, CDR1, VSNL1 as downstream miR-671-5p targets in GBM. Expression of these genes significantly decreased both in GBM biopsies and cell lines and negatively correlated with that of miR-671-5p. Based on our data, we propose that the axis miR-671-5p / CDR1-AS / CDR1 / VSNL1 is functionally altered in GBM cells and is involved in the modification of their biopathological profile. PMID:26683098

  12. Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these tumors to contain cystic mineral, calcium deposits, blood vessels, or a mixed grade of cells. Glioblastomas are usually highly malignant—a large number of tumor cells are reproducing at any given time, and they are nourished by an ample blood supply. Dead cells may also be seen, especially ...

  13. Neural Stem Cells and Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rispoli, Rossella; Conti, Carlo; Celli, Paolo; Caroli, Emanuela; Carletti, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme represents one of the most common brain cancers with a rather heterogeneous cellular composition, as indicated by the term “multiforme". Recent reports have described the isolation and identification of cancer neural stem cells from human adult glioblastoma multiforme, which possess the capacity to establish, sustain, and expand these tumours, even under the challenging settings posed by serial transplantation experiments. Our study focused on the distribution of neura...

  14. Survival benefit of hyperthermia in a prospective randomized trial of brachytherapy boost ± hyperthermia for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine if adjuvant interstitial hyperthermia (HT) significantly improves survival of patients with glioblastoma undergoing brachytherapy boost after conventional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Adults with newly-diagnosed, focal, supratentorial glioblastoma ≤ 5 cm in diameter were registered postoperatively on a Phase II/III randomized trial and treated with partial brain radiotherapy to 59.4 Gy with oral hydroxyurea. Those patients whose tumor was still implantable after teletherapy were randomized to brachytherapy boost (60 Gy at 0.40-0.60 Gy/h) ± HT for 30 min immediately before and after brachytherapy. Time to progression (TTP) and survival from date of diagnosis were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: From 1990 to 1995, 112 eligible patients were entered in the trial. Patient ages ranged from 21-78 years (median, 54 years) and KPS ranged from 70-100 (median, 90). Most commonly due to tumor progression or patient refusal, 33 patients were never randomized. Of the patients, 39 were randomized to brachytherapy ('no heat') and 40 to brachytherapy + HT ('heat'). By intent to treat, TTP and survival were significantly longer for 'heat' than 'no heat' (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04). For the 33 'no heat' patients and 35 'heat' patients who underwent brachytherapy boost, TTP and survival were significantly longer for 'heat' than 'no heat' (p = 0.045 and p = 0.02, respectively; median survival 85 weeks vs. 76 weeks; 2-year survival 31% vs. 15%). A multivariate analysis for these 68 patients adjusting for age and KPS showed that improved survival was significantly associated with randomization to 'heat' (p = 0.008; hazard ratio 0.51). There were no Grade 5 toxicities, 2 Grade 4 toxicities (1 on each arm), and 7 Grade 3 toxicities (1 on 'no heat' and 6 on the 'heat' arm). Conclusion: Adjuvant interstitial brain HT, given before and after brachytherapy boost, after conventional radiotherapy significantly improves survival of patients with

  15. A case of complete clearance of chronic subdural hematoma accompanied by recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after administration of bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiko; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Kanemaru, Kazuya; Mitsuka, Kentaro; Ogiwara, Masakazu; Sato, Hiroki; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    The efficacy of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as an adjuvant therapy against various malignant tumors was recently established. Its pharmacological effects in malignant tumors, including gliomas, were speculated to involve neovascularization inhibition and vascular permeability. Recently, it has been reported that the outer membrane of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) contains high levels of VEGF, which were implicated in neovascularization of the outer membrane. Furthermore, studies suggested that VEGF has the etiology in CSDH development, although its involvement is not fully understood. Here, we report the first case of chronic subdural hematoma that was improved by bevacizumab administration for recurrent glioblastoma. The present case could contribute to the hypothesis that VEGF may be associated with CSDH. We also discuss the pathogenesis and mechanism of CSDH recurrence from the viewpoint of VEGF function. PMID:26919835

  16. Peripheral blood-derived, γ9δ2 t cell-enriched cell lines from glioblastoma multiforme patients exert anti-tumoral effects in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu-Malina, V; Garelick, D; Peshes-Yeloz, N; Wohl, A; Zach, L; Nagar, M; Amariglio, N; Besser, M J; Cohen, Z R; Bank, I

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to assess the potential of T cells expressing Vγ9Vδ2+ T cell receptors (TCR, γ9δ2T cells) present in peripheral blood (PB) m ononuclear cells (MC, PBMC) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients to act as anti-tumoral agents. We found that γ9δ2T cell levels were decreased in patients' PB relative to a cohort of healthy donors (HD) (respectively 0.52±0.55%, n=16, vs 1.12±0.6%, n=14, p=0.008) but did not significantly correlate with postoperative survival (R=0.6, p=0.063). Importantly, however, the γ9δ2T cells could be expanded in vitro to consist 51±23% of the cultured lymphocytes (98% CD3+). This was achieved after 14 days of culture in medium containing the amino-bisphosphonate (ABP) Zoledronate (Zol) and interleukin (IL)-2, resulting in γ9δ2T cell-enriched lines (gdTCEL) similar to those of HD derived gdTCEL (54±19%). Moreover, gdTCEL from patients and HD mediated cytotoxicity to GBM-derived cell lines (GBMDCL), which was abrogated by immune-magnetic removal of the γ9δ2T cells. Furthermore, low level interferon (IFN) γ secretion was induced by gdTCEL briefly co-cultured with GBMDCL or autologous - tumor-derived cells, which was greatly amplified in the presence of Zol. Importantly, IFNγ secretion was inhibited by mevastatin but enhanced by cross-linking of butyrophilin 3A1 (CD277) on a CD277+ GBMDCL (U251MG) or by pretreatment of GBMDCL with temozolomide (TMZ). Taken together, these data suggest that γ9δ2T cells in PB of GBM patients can give rise to gdTCEL that mediate anti-tumoral activities. PMID:27049073

  17. Postoperative treatment of glioblastoma multiforme with radiation therapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide : A mono-institutional experience of 215 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Julka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the clinical results and prognostic factors of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM treated by postoperative radiation therapy (PORT and concomitant temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Methods: From 2005 to 2008, 215 patients (median age 48 years with GBM were treated with PORT plus temozolomide chemotherapy. Radiation therapy (RT was employed with a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks by conventional fractionation with concomitant temozolomide (75 mg/m 2 /day. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 6 cycles of temozolomide (150 mg/m 2 for 5 days, 28 days cycle. The primary end point of the study was overall survival (OS, and the secondary end points were progression free survival (PFS and toxicity. OS was determined with respect to different variables to study the prognostic significance. Results: Median follow up was 11 months (range 2-50 months. Median OS and PFS were 13 months and 11 months respectively. The 1-year and 2-year OS was 44% and 18% respectively. There was no statistical significant impact of age, sex, KP score, anatomical location and extent of surgery. Presentation without seizures (on univariate analysis and 6 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide therapy (on univariate as well as multivariate analysis were found significant prognostic factors. Sixteen patients developed grade III-IV neutropenia/thrombocytopenia during the course of RT. Conclusion: Our results authenticate the role of concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in combination with PORT for the management of GBM patients. We strongly recommend complete 6 cycle of adjuvant temozolomide since it significantly improved the survival in our study.

  18. MicroPET/CT Imaging of an Orthotopic Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme and Evaluation of Pulsed Low-Dose Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive tumor that typically causes death due to local progression. To assess a novel low-dose radiotherapy regimen for treating GBM, we developed an orthotopic murine model of human GBM and evaluated in vivo treatment efficacy using micro-positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) tumor imaging. Methods: Orthotopic GBM xenografts were established in nude mice and treated with standard 2-Gy fractionation or 10 0.2-Gy pulses with 3-min interpulse intervals, for 7 consecutive days, for a total dose of 14 Gy. Tumor growth was quantified weekly using the Flex Triumph (GE Healthcare/Gamma Medica-Ideas, Waukesha, WI) combined PET-single-photon emission CT (SPECT)-CT imaging system and necropsy histopathology. Normal tissue damage was assessed by counting dead neural cells in tissue sections from irradiated fields. Results: Tumor engraftment efficiency for U87MG cells was 86%. Implanting 0.5 x 106 cells produced a 50- to 70-mm3 tumor in 10 to 14 days. A significant correlation was seen between CT-derived tumor volume and histopathology-measured volume (p = 0.018). The low-dose 0.2-Gy pulsed regimen produced a significantly longer tumor growth delay than standard 2-Gy fractionation (p = 0.045). Less normal neuronal cell death was observed after the pulsed delivery method (p = 0.004). Conclusion: This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo brain tumor imaging and longitudinal assessment of tumor growth and treatment response with microPET/CT. Pulsed radiation treatment was more efficacious than the standard fractionated treatment and was associated with less normal tissue damage.

  19. The Role of a Single Angiogenesis Inhibitor in the Treatment of Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yawei; Xing, Dan; Zhao, Meng; Wang, Jie; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, the standard treatment for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiation therapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. However, disease recurs in almost all patients, and the optimal salvage treatment for recurrent GBM remains unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published clinical trials to assess the efficacy and toxicities of angiogenesis inhibitors alone as salvage treatment in these patients. Methods Trials published between 1994 and 2015 were identified by an electronic search of public databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library). Demographic data, treatment regimens, objective response rate (ORR), median progression-free survival (PFS), median overall survival (OS), 6-months PFS rate, 1-year OS and grade 3/4 toxicities were extracted. We also compared the main outcomes of interest between bevacizumab and other angiogenesis inhibitors. All analyses were performed using Comprehensive Meta Analysis software (Version 2.0). Results A total of 842 patients were included for analysis: 343 patients were treated with bevacizumab, 386 with other angiogenesis inhibitors and 81 with thalidomide. The pooled ORR, 6-months PFS, and 1-year OS for recurrent GBM patients receiving angiogenesis inhibitors was 20.1%, 19.5% and 29.3%, respectively. The use of single agent bevacizumab in recurrent GBM significantly improved ORR and 6-months PFS when compared to other angiogenesis inhibitors [relative risk (RR) 2.93, 95% CI 1.38–6.21; p = 0.025; and RR 2.36 95% CI 1.46–3.82; pGBM significantly improved ORR (RR 6.8, 95%CI: 2.64–17.6, pGBM patients improve ORR and 6-months PFS, but not for 1-year OS. PMID:27007828

  20. Extended disease-free interval of 6 years in a recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with G207 oncolytic viral therapy

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    Whisenhunt Jr TR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas R Whisenhunt Jr, Kiran F Rajneesh, James R Hackney, James M Markert Department of Neurosurgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a relentless primary central nervous system malignancy that remains resistant to conventional therapy despite major advances in clinical neurooncology. This report details the case of a patient who had failed conventional treatment for recurrent GBM and was ultimately treated with a genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 vector, G207. Methods: Case report detailing the outcomes of one patient enrolled into the gene therapy arm of the Neurovir G207 protocol whereby stereotactic injection of 120 µL G207 viral suspension containing 1×107 plaque-forming units (or active viral particles was made into the enhancing region of the tumor. Results: In this patient, despite aggressive surgical resection, adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, tumor progression occurred. However, with G207 oncolytic therapy and brief exposures to second and third treatments, this patient had an extended survival time of 7.5 years and a 6-year apparent disease-free interval, an extraordinarily unusual finding in the pretemozolomide era. Conclusion: With minimal adjunctive chemotherapy, including one course of temozolomide, one course of procarbazine, and four cycles of irinotecan, the patient survived over 7 years before the next recurrence. Addition of G207 to this patient’s traditional therapy may have been the critical treatment producing her prolonged survival. This report demonstrates the potential for long-term response to a one-time treatment with oncolytic HSV and encourages continued research on oncolytic viral therapy for GBM. Keywords: oncolytic virotherapy, malignant glioma, tumor, herpes simplex, HSV-1, immunotherapy

  1. Salvage fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (fSRT with or without chemotherapy and immunotherapy for recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaakir eHasan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current standard of care for salvage treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is gross total resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for operable patients. Limited evidence exists to suggest that any particular treatment modality improves survival for recurrent GBM, especially if inoperable. We report our experience with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (fSRT with and without chemo/immunotherapy, identifying prognostic factors associated with prolonged survival. Methods: From 2007 to 2014, 19 patients between 29 and 78 years old (median 55 with recurrent GBM following resection and chemoradiation for their initial tumor, received 18 – 35 Gy (median 25 in 3 – 5 fractions via Cyberknife fSRT. Clinical target volume (CTV ranged from 0.9 to 152 cc. Sixteen patients received adjuvant systemic therapy with bevacizumab (BEV, temozolomide (TMZ, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (125I-mAb 425, or some combination thereof. Results: The median overall survival (OS from date of recurrence was 8 months (2.5 – 61 and 5.3 months (0.6 – 58 from the end of fSRT. The OS at 6 and 12 months was 47% and 32%, respectively. Three of 19 patients were alive at the time of this review at 20, 49 and 58 months from completion of fSRT. Hazard ratios for survival indicated that patients with a frontal lobe tumor, adjuvant treatment with either BEV or TMZ, time to first recurrence >16 months, CTV < 36 cc, Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA < 5, and ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status < 2 were all associated with improved survival (P <0.05. There was no evidence of radionecrosis for any patient.Conclusions: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG 1205 will establish the role of reirradiation for recurrent GBM, however our study suggests that cyberknife with chemotherapy can be safely delivered, and is most effective in patients with smaller frontal lobe tumors, good performance status or long interval from diagnosis.

  2. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with recurrent Glioblastoma multiforme treated with last-line bevacizumab versus bevacizumab/lomustine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiland, D H; Masalha, W; Franco, P; Machein, M R; Weyerbrock, A

    2016-02-01

    Bevacizumab (BEV) is widely used for treatment of patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). 1-(2-Chlorethyl)-cyclohexyl-nitrosourea (CCNU, lomustine) monotherapy is an approved chemotherapeutical option for recurrent GBM. Recent evidence demonstrated a survival benefit of combined treatment with BEV and CCNU in patients with a first recurrence of GBM. We examined the outcome of recurrent GBM patients with BEV monotherapy versus BEV/CCNU therapy when used as last-line therapy. 35 patients with recurrent GBM treated between 2010 and 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Progression-free and overall survival was determined with reference to the beginning of BEV or BEV/CCNU therapy and initial diagnosis. 17 patients received BEV monotherapy, 18 patients received combined BEV and CCNU therapy. The impact of parameters such as IDH mutation, MGMT promoter methylation, tumor localization, histology and the number of surgeries were included in a multivariate ANOVA analysis. Furthermore, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), neurological function and toxicity were assessed. BEV/CCNU treatment led to an extension of PFS (6.11 months; 95% CL 3.41-12.98 months; log-rank p = 0.00241) and OS (6.59 months; 95% CL 5.51-16.3 months; log-rank p = 0.0238) of 2 months compared to BEV monotherapy. This survival advantage was independent of histology, IDH mutation status or the number of previous surgeries. Neurological function, KPS and toxicity were not significantly different between both treatment groups. Last-line therapy with BEV/CCNU results in a longer PFS and OS compared to BEV monotherapy and is well-tolerated. These findings confirm the role of these agents in the treatment of recurrent GBM and are in line with other studies. PMID:26614518

  3. 复发难治多形性胶质母细胞瘤的综合治疗%Combined Modality Therapy of Recurrent and Refractory Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨群英; 沈冬; 赛克; 牟永告; 张湘衡; 陈忠平

    2010-01-01

    恶性脑胶质瘤是成人最常见的原发脑肿瘤,治疗困难,预后差.以手术治疗为主,放疗、化疗联合应用的综合治疗策略对生存的改善有一定帮助,但即使初次治疗有效者大多最终又复发.我们报道一例复发难治多形性胶质母细胞瘤(glioblastoma multiforme,GBM),患者经5次手术、放疗,以及包括替莫唑胺、伊立替康、替尼泊苷、顺铂、尼妥珠单抗、血管内皮抑素、干扰素β等在内的细胞毒药物及分子靶向药物等综合治疗,该患者随访至今,生存时间已超过33个月.本文结合此病例的治疗过程,对恶性胶质瘤的规范化治疗、复发恶性胶质瘤的挽救治疗以及恶性胶质瘤治疗新方法的探索进行讨论,并分析存在的不足和可以参考的经验.

  4. Phase II and pharmacogenomics study of enzastaurin plus temozolomide during and following radiation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme and gliosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan M; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Polley, Mei-Yin; Pieper, Russell; Costello, Joseph F; Vandenberg, Scott; Parvataneni, Rupa; Nicole, Angelina; Sneed, Patricia K; Clarke, Jennifer; Hsieh, Emily; Costa, Bruno M; Reis, Rui M; Hristova-Kazmierski, Maria; Nicol, Steven J; Thornton, Donald E; Prados, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    This open-label, single-arm, phase II study combined enzastaurin with temozolomide plus radiation therapy (RT) to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and gliosarcoma. Adults with newly diagnosed disease and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 60 were enrolled. Treatment was started within 5 weeks after surgical diagnosis. RT consisted of 60 Gy over 6 weeks. Temozolomide was given at 75 mg/m(2) daily during RT and then adjuvantly at 200 mg/m(2) daily for 5 days, followed by a 23-day break. Enzastaurin was given once daily during RT and in the adjuvant period at 250 mg/day. Cycles were 28 days. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Progression-free survival (PFS), toxicity, and correlations between efficacy and molecular markers analyzed from tumor tissue samples were also evaluated. A prospectively planned analysis compared OS and PFS of the current trial with outcomes from 3 historical phase II trials that combined novel agents with temozolomide plus RT in patients with GBM or gliosarcoma. Sixty-six patients were enrolled. The treatment regimen was well tolerated. OS (median, 74 weeks) and PFS (median, 36 weeks) results from the current trial were comparable to those from a prior phase II study using erlotinib and were significantly better than those from 2 other previous studies that used thalidomide or cis-retinoic acid, all in combination with temozolomide plus RT. A positive correlation between O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation and OS was observed. Adjusting for age and KPS, no other biomarker was associated with survival outcome. Correlation of relevant biomarkers with OS may be useful in future trials. PMID:21896554

  5. The effect of combining recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha with local radiation on tumor control probability of a human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rHuTNF-α) on a human glioblastoma multiforme (U87) xenograft in nude mice, and to study the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation on the tumor control probability of this tumor model. Methods and Materials: U87 xenograft was transplanted SC into the right hindleg of NCr/Sed nude mice (7-8 weeks old, male). When tumors reached a volume of about 110 mm3, mice were randomly assigned to treatment: rHuTNF-α alone compared with normal saline control; or local radiation plus rHuTNF-α vs. local radiation plus normal saline. Parameters of growth delay, volume doubling time, percentage of necrosis, and cell loss factor were used to assess the antitumor effects of rHuTNF-α on this tumor. The TCD50 (tumor control dose 50%) was used as an endpoint to determine the effect of combining rHuTNF-α with local radiation. Results: Tumor growth in mice treated with a dose of 150 μg/kg body weight rHuTNF-α, IP injection daily for 7 consecutive days, was delayed about 8 days compared to that in controls. Tumors in the treatment group had a significantly longer volume doubling time, and were smaller in volume and more necrotic than matched tumors in control group. rHuTNF-α also induced a 2.3 times increase of cell loss factor. The administration of the above-mentioned dose of rHuTNF-α starting 24 h after single doses of localized irradiation under hypoxic condition, resulted in a significant reduction in TCD50 from the control value of 60.9 Gy to 50.5 Gy (p 50 value in the treatment vs. the control groups

  6. Patterns of Recurrence Analysis in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy With Respect to Pre-Radiation Therapy Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether the combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) before radiation therapy (RT) is valuable for RT target definition, and to evaluate the feasibility of replacing the current definition of uniform margins by custom-shaped margins based on the information from MRI and MRSI. Methods and Materials: A total of 23 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients underwent MRI and MRSI within 4 weeks after surgery but before the initiation of RT and at 2-month follow-up intervals thereafter. The MRSI data were quantified on the basis of a Choline-to-NAA Index (CNI) as a measure of spectroscopic abnormality. A combined anatomic and metabolic region of interest (MRI/S) consisting of T2-weighted hyperintensity, contrast enhancement (CE), resection cavity, and CNI2 (CNI ≥ 2) based on the pre-RT imaging was compared to the extent of CNI2 and the RT dose distribution. The spatial relationship of the pre-RT MRI/S and the RT dose volume was compared with the extent of CE at each follow-up. Results: Nine patients showed new or increased CE during follow-up, and 14 patients were either stable or had decreased CE. New or increased areas of CE occurred within CNI2 that was covered by 60 Gy in 6 patients and within the CNI2 that was not entirely covered by 60 Gy in 3 patients. New or increased CE resided within the pre-RT MRI/S lesion in 89% (8/9) of the patients with new or increased CE. Conclusion: These data indicate that the definition of RT target volumes according to the combined morphologic and metabolic abnormality may be sufficient for RT targeting

  7. Association of WT1 IgG antibody against WT1 peptide with prolonged survival in glioblastoma multiforme patients vaccinated with WT1 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oji, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Murakami, Yui; Iwai, Miki; Kagawa, Naoki; Chiba, Yasuyoshi; Izumoto, Shuichi; Elisseeva, Olga; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Sakamoto, Junichi; Morita, Satoshi; Nakajima, Hiroko; Takashima, Satoshi; Nakae, Yoshiki; Nakata, Jun; Kawakami, Manabu; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Hosen, Naoki; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Adachi, Mayuko; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2016-09-15

    We previously evaluated Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) peptide vaccination in a large number of patients with leukemia or solid tumors and have reported that HLA-A*24:02 restricted, 9-mer WT1-235 peptide (CYTWNQMNL) vaccine induces cellular immune responses and elicits WT1-235-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, whether this vaccine induces humoral immune responses to produce WT1 antibody remains unknown. Thus, we measured IgG antibody levels against the WT1-235 peptide (WT1-235 IgG antibody) in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) receiving the WT1 peptide vaccine. The WT1-235 IgG antibody, which was undetectable before vaccination, became detectable in 30 (50.8%) of a total of 59 patients during 3 months of WT1 peptide vaccination. The dominant WT1-235 IgG antibody subclass was Th1-type, IgG1 and IgG3 . WT1-235 IgG antibody production was significantly and positively correlated with both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Importantly, the combination of WT1-235 IgG antibody production and positive delayed type-hypersensitivity (DTH) to the WT1-235 peptide was a better prognostic marker for long-term OS than either parameter alone. These results suggested that WT1-235 peptide vaccination induces not only WT1-235-specific CTLs as previously described but also WT1-235-specific humoral immune responses associated with antitumor cellular immune response. Our results indicate that the WT1 IgG antibody against the WT1 peptide may be a useful predictive marker, with better predictive performance in combination with DTH to WT1 peptide, and provide a new insight into the antitumor immune response induction in WT1 peptide vaccine-treated patients. PMID:27170523

  8. Hypofractionated radiotherapy with or without concurrent temozolomide in elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme: a review of ten-year single institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jeffrey Q; Fisher, Barbara J; Bauman, Glenn S; Megyesi, Joseph F; Watling, Christopher J; Macdonald, David R

    2012-04-01

    The landmark Stupp study demonstrated a survival advantage with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) with standard radiotherapy (RT) in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients but excluded those older than 70 years. The prospective Roa study of older GBM patients treated with hypofractionated 3-week course RT demonstrated equivalence to standard 6-week course RT. Taken together, these trials suggest hypofractionated RT with TMZ may be a reasonable treatment option for elderly GBM patients. We conducted a retrospective review of GBM patients (age ≥60 years) treated with hypofractionated RT and temozolomide at our institution between 2000 and 2010. We identified 112 patients who received hypofractionated RT, with 57 receiving concurrent and adjuvant TMZ and 55 without concurrent chemotherapy. Of the 55 patients who received hypofractionated RT alone initially, 24 subsequently received TMZ as salvage treatment at time of progression. Among the concurrent RT + TMZ patients, mean age was 70 years (range 60-86), median KPS was 80 (range 30-100) and 24/57 (42%) received prior debulking surgery. Median overall survival (OS) among the RT + TMZ patients was 6.9 months (95% CI, 4.5-8.6). Patients without concurrent chemotherapy were similar in demographics (age, sex, corticosteroid use, KPS) except 34/55 (62%) were debulked (P-value 0.045.) Median OS was 9.3 months (95% CI, 5.9-11.8) (P-value 0.351). Sub-group analysis revealed patients treated with initial hypofractionated radiation with salvage TMZ had increased median OS of 13.3 months (95% CI, 9.9-19.3) (P-value 0.012). Our results suggest concurrent and adjuvant TMZ does not confer a survival benefit in elderly GBM patients. A sequential approach may be a more effective and efficient strategy by selecting responding patients who may benefit most from subsequent salvage chemotherapy. PMID:22105851

  9. Enhancing tumor apparent diffusion coefficient histogram skewness stratifies the postoperative survival in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients undergoing salvage surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolal, Amir; Juratli, Tareq A; Linn, Jennifer; Podlesek, Dino; Sitoci Ficici, Kerim Hakan; Kitzler, Hagen H; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan B; Rieger, Bernhard; Krex, Dietmar

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters for the prediction of individual survival in patients undergoing surgery for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) in a retrospective cohort study. Methods Thirty-one patients who underwent surgery for first recurrence of a known GBM between 2008 and 2012 were included. The following parameters were collected: age, sex, enhancing tumor size, mean ADC, median ADC, ADC skewness, ADC kurtosis and fifth percentile of the ADC histogram, initial progression free survival (PFS), extent of second resection and further adjuvant treatment. The association of these parameters with survival and PFS after second surgery was analyzed using log-rank test and Cox regression. Results Using log-rank test, ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing tumor was significantly associated with both survival (p = 0.001) and PFS after second surgery (p = 0.005). Further parameters associated with prolonged survival after second surgery were: gross total resection at second surgery (p = 0.026), tumor size (0.040) and third surgery (p = 0.003). In the multivariate Cox analysis, ADC histogram skewness was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for survival after second surgery. Conclusion ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing lesion, enhancing lesion size, third surgery, as well as gross total resection have been shown to be associated with survival following the second surgery. ADC histogram skewness was an independent prognostic factor for survival in the multivariate analysis. PMID:26830088

  10. Development and in vitro testing of liposomal gadolinium-formulations for neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the improvement of current neutron capture therapy, several liposomal formulations of neutron capture agent gadolinium were developed and tested in a glioma cell model. Formulations were analyzed regarding physicochemical and biological parameters, such as size, zeta potential, uptake into cancer cells and performance under neutron irradiation. The neutron and photon dose derived from intracellular as well as extracellular Gd was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations and set in correlation with the reduction of cell survival after irradiation. To investigate the suitability of Gd as a radiosensitizer for photon radiation, cells were also irradiated with synchrotron radiation in addition to clinically used photons generated by linear accelerator. Irradiation with neutrons led to significantly lower survival for Gd-liposome-treated F98 and LN229 cells, compared to irradiated control cells and cells treated with non-liposomal Gd-DTPA. Correlation between Gd-content and -dose and respective cell survival displayed proportional relationship for most of the applied formulations. Photon irradiation experiments showed the proof-of-principle for the radiosensitizer approach, although the photon spectra currently used have to be optimized for higher efficiency of the radiosensitizer. In conclusion, the newly developed Gd-liposomes show great potential for the improvement of radiation treatment options for highly malignant glioblastoma.

  11. Volumetry of [11C]-methionine PET uptake and MRI contrast enhancement in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the relationship between three-dimensional volumetric data of the metabolically active tumour volume assessed using [11C]-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) and the area of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhancement assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). MET-PET and contrast-enhanced MRI with Gd-DTPA were performed in 12 uniformly pretreated patients with recurrent GBM. To calculate the volumes in cubic centimetres, a threshold-based volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis of the metabolically active tumour volume (MET uptake indexes of ≥1.3 and ≥1.5) and of the area of Gd-DTPA enhancement was performed after coregistration of all images. In all patients, the metabolically active tumour volume as shown using a MET uptake index of ≥1.3 was larger than the volume of Gd-DTPA enhancement (30.2 ± 22.4 vs. 13.7 ± 10.6 cm3; p = 0.04). Metabolically active tumour volumes as shown using MET uptake indexes of ≥1.3 and ≥1.5 and the volumes of Gd-DTPA enhancement showed a positive correlation (r = 0.76, p = 0.003, for an index of ≥1.3, and r = 0.74, p = 0.005, for an index of ≥1.5). The present data suggest that in patients with recurrent GBM the metabolically active tumour volume may be substantially underestimated by Gd-DTPA enhancement. The findings support the notion that complementary information derived from MET uptake and Gd-DTPA enhancement may be helpful in developing individualized, patient-tailored therapy strategies in patients with recurrent GBM. (orig.)

  12. Volumetry of [{sup 11}C]-methionine PET uptake and MRI contrast enhancement in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galldiks, Norbert; Schroeter, Michael; Fink, Gereon R. [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Ullrich, Roland; Kracht, Lutz W. [Max Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Cologne (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    We investigated the relationship between three-dimensional volumetric data of the metabolically active tumour volume assessed using [{sup 11}C]-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) and the area of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhancement assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). MET-PET and contrast-enhanced MRI with Gd-DTPA were performed in 12 uniformly pretreated patients with recurrent GBM. To calculate the volumes in cubic centimetres, a threshold-based volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis of the metabolically active tumour volume (MET uptake indexes of {>=}1.3 and {>=}1.5) and of the area of Gd-DTPA enhancement was performed after coregistration of all images. In all patients, the metabolically active tumour volume as shown using a MET uptake index of {>=}1.3 was larger than the volume of Gd-DTPA enhancement (30.2 {+-} 22.4 vs. 13.7 {+-} 10.6 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.04). Metabolically active tumour volumes as shown using MET uptake indexes of {>=}1.3 and {>=}1.5 and the volumes of Gd-DTPA enhancement showed a positive correlation (r = 0.76, p = 0.003, for an index of {>=}1.3, and r = 0.74, p = 0.005, for an index of {>=}1.5). The present data suggest that in patients with recurrent GBM the metabolically active tumour volume may be substantially underestimated by Gd-DTPA enhancement. The findings support the notion that complementary information derived from MET uptake and Gd-DTPA enhancement may be helpful in developing individualized, patient-tailored therapy strategies in patients with recurrent GBM. (orig.)

  13. A phase II trial of erlotinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas and nonprogressive glioblastoma multiforme postradiation therapy†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Lassman, Andrew B.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R.; Aldape, Kenneth A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Fine, Howard A.; Mehta, Minesh; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Lieberman, Frank; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Dancey, Janet; Prados, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with (a) recurrent malignant glioma (MG): glioblastoma (GBM) or recurrent anaplastic glioma (AG), and (b) nonprogressive (NP) GBM following radiation therapy (RT) were eligible. Primary objective for recurrent MG was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and overall survival at 12 months for NP GBM post-RT. Secondary objectives for recurrent MGs were response, survival, assessment of toxicity, and pharmacokinetics (PKs). Treatment with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs was not allowed. Patients received 150 mg/day erlotinib. Patients requiring surgery were treated 7 days prior to tumor removal for PK analysis and effects of erlotinib on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and intracellular signaling pathways. Ninety-six patients were evaluable (53 recurrent MG and 43 NP GBM); 5 patients were not evaluable for response. PFS-6 in recurrent GBM was 3% with a median PFS of 2 months; PFS-6 in recurrent AG was 27% with a median PFS of 2 months. Twelve-month survival was 57% in NP GBMs post-RT. Primary toxicity was dermatologic. The tissue-to-plasma ratio normalized to nanograms per gram dry weight for erlotinib and OSI-420 ranged from 25% to 44% and 30% to 59%, respectively, for pretreated surgical patients. No effect on EGFR or intratumoral signaling was seen. Patients with NP GBM post-RT who developed rash in cycle 1 had improved survival (P < .001). Single-agent activity of erlotinib is minimal for recurrent MGs and marginally beneficial following RT for NP GBM patients. Development of rash in cycle 1 correlates with survival in patients with NP GBM after RT. PMID:20150372

  14. A phase II trial of erlotinib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas and nonprogressive glioblastoma multiforme postradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizer, Jeffrey J; Abrey, Lauren E; Lassman, Andrew B; Chang, Susan M; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Kuhn, John G; Yung, W K Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R; Aldape, Kenneth A; Wen, Patrick Y; Fine, Howard A; Mehta, Minesh; Deangelis, Lisa M; Lieberman, Frank; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Robins, H Ian; Dancey, Janet; Prados, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Patients with (a) recurrent malignant glioma (MG): glioblastoma (GBM) or recurrent anaplastic glioma (AG), and (b) nonprogressive (NP) GBM following radiation therapy (RT) were eligible. Primary objective for recurrent MG was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and overall survival at 12 months for NP GBM post-RT. Secondary objectives for recurrent MGs were response, survival, assessment of toxicity, and pharmacokinetics (PKs). Treatment with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs was not allowed. Patients received 150 mg/day erlotinib. Patients requiring surgery were treated 7 days prior to tumor removal for PK analysis and effects of erlotinib on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and intracellular signaling pathways. Ninety-six patients were evaluable (53 recurrent MG and 43 NP GBM); 5 patients were not evaluable for response. PFS-6 in recurrent GBM was 3% with a median PFS of 2 months; PFS-6 in recurrent AG was 27% with a median PFS of 2 months. Twelve-month survival was 57% in NP GBMs post-RT. Primary toxicity was dermatologic. The tissue-to-plasma ratio normalized to nanograms per gram dry weight for erlotinib and OSI-420 ranged from 25% to 44% and 30% to 59%, respectively, for pretreated surgical patients. No effect on EGFR or intratumoral signaling was seen. Patients with NP GBM post-RT who developed rash in cycle 1 had improved survival (P < .001). Single-agent activity of erlotinib is minimal for recurrent MGs and marginally beneficial following RT for NP GBM patients. Development of rash in cycle 1 correlates with survival in patients with NP GBM after RT. PMID:20150372

  15. SU-E-T-183: Feasibility of Extreme Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme Using 4π Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D; Rwigema, J; Yu, V; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Selch, M; Low, D; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: GBM recurrence primarily occurs inside or near the high-dose radiation field of original tumor site requiring greater than 100 Gy to significantly improve local control. We utilize 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy to test the feasibility of planning target volume (PTV) margin expansions or extreme dose escalations without incurring additional radiation toxicities. Methods: 11 GBM patients treated with VMAT to a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were replanned with 4π. Original VMAT plans were created with 2 to 4 coplanar or non-coplanar arcs using 3 mm hi-res MLC. The 4π optimization, using 5 mm MLC, selected and inverse optimized 30 beams from a candidate pool of 1162 beams evenly distributed through 4π steradians. 4π plans were first compared to clinical plans using the same prescription dose. Two more studies were then performed to respectively escalate the GTV and PTV doses to 100 Gy, followed by a fourth plan expanding the PTV by 5 mm and maintaining the prescription dose. Results: The standard 4π plan significantly reduced (p<0.01) max and mean doses to critical structures by a range of 47.0–98.4% and 61.0–99.2%, respectively. The high dose PTV/high dose GTV/expanded PTV studies showed a reduction (p<0.05) or unchanged* (p>0.05) maximum dose of 72.1%/86.7%/77.1% (chiasm), 7.2%*/27.7%*/30.7% (brainstem), 39.8%*/84.2%/51.9%* (spinal cord), 69.0%/87.0%/66.9% (L eye), 76.2%/88.1%/84.1% (R eye), 95.0%/98.6%/97.5% (L lens), 93.9%/98.8%/97.6% (R lens), 74.3%/88.5%/72.4% (L optical nerve), 80.4%/91.3%/75.7% (R optical nerve), 64.8%/84.2%/44.9%* (L cochlea), and 85.2%/93.0%/78.0% (R cochlea), respectively. V30 and V36 for both brain and (brain - PTV) were reduced for all cases except the high dose PTV plan. PTV dose coverage increased for all 4π plans. Conclusion: Extreme dose escalation or further margin expansion is achievable using 4π, maintaining or reducing OAR doses. This study indicates that clinical trials employing 4π delivery using

  16. The autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid-lysophosphatidic acid receptor cascade: proposal of a novel potential therapeutic target for treating glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Sadaharu

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). Its prognosis is one of the worst among all cancer types, and it is considered a fatal malignancy, incurable with conventional therapeutic strategies. As the bioactive multifunctional lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is well recognized to be involved in the tumorigenesis of cancers by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors, LPA receptor (LPAR) antagonists and LPA synthesis inhibitors have been proposed as promising drugs for cancer treatment. Six LPARs, named LPA1-6, are currently recognized. Among them, LPA1 is the dominant LPAR in the CNS and is highly expressed in GBM in combination with the overexpression of autotaxin (ATX), the enzyme (a phosphodiesterase, which is a potent cell motility-stimulating factor) that produces LPA.Invasion is a defining hallmark of GBM. LPA is significantly related to cell adhesion, cell motility, and invasion through the Rho family GTPases Rho and Rac. LPA1 is responsible for LPA-driven cell motility, which is attenuated by LPA4. GBM is among the most vascular human tumors. Although anti-angiogenic therapy (through the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) was established, sufficient results have not been obtained because of the increased invasiveness triggered by anti-angiogenesis. As both ATX and LPA play a significant role in angiogenesis, similar to VEGF, inhibition of the ATX/LPA axis may be beneficial as a two-pronged therapy that includes anti-angiogenic and anti-invasion therapy. Conventional approaches to GBM are predominantly directed at cell proliferation. Recurrent tumors regrow from cells that have invaded brain tissues and are less proliferative, and are thus quite resistant to conventional drugs and radiation, which preferentially kill rapidly proliferating cells. A novel approach that targets this invasive subpopulation of GBM cells may improve the prognosis of GBM. Patients with GBM that

  17. The Role of a Single Angiogenesis Inhibitor in the Treatment of Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawei Wang

    Full Text Available Currently, the standard treatment for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiation therapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. However, disease recurs in almost all patients, and the optimal salvage treatment for recurrent GBM remains unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published clinical trials to assess the efficacy and toxicities of angiogenesis inhibitors alone as salvage treatment in these patients.Trials published between 1994 and 2015 were identified by an electronic search of public databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library. Demographic data, treatment regimens, objective response rate (ORR, median progression-free survival (PFS, median overall survival (OS, 6-months PFS rate, 1-year OS and grade 3/4 toxicities were extracted. We also compared the main outcomes of interest between bevacizumab and other angiogenesis inhibitors. All analyses were performed using Comprehensive Meta Analysis software (Version 2.0.A total of 842 patients were included for analysis: 343 patients were treated with bevacizumab, 386 with other angiogenesis inhibitors and 81 with thalidomide. The pooled ORR, 6-months PFS, and 1-year OS for recurrent GBM patients receiving angiogenesis inhibitors was 20.1%, 19.5% and 29.3%, respectively. The use of single agent bevacizumab in recurrent GBM significantly improved ORR and 6-months PFS when compared to other angiogenesis inhibitors [relative risk (RR 2.93, 95% CI 1.38-6.21; p = 0.025; and RR 2.36 95% CI 1.46-3.82; p<0.001, respectively], while no significant difference in 1-year OS was found between the two groups (p = 0.07. when compared to thalidomide, bevacizumab treatment in recurrent GBM significantly improved ORR (RR 6.8, 95%CI: 2.64-17.6, p<0.001, but not for 6-months PFS (p = 0.07 and 1-year OS (p = 0.31. As for grade 3/4 toxicities, the common toxicity was hypertension with pooled incidence of 12.1%, while high

  18. Phase 1/2 Trials of Temozolomide, Motexafin Gadolinium, and 60-Gy Fractionated Radiation for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme: Final Results of RTOG 0513

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of phase 1 was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) given concurrently with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Phase 2 determined whether this combination improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in GBM recursive partitioning analysis class III to V patients compared to therapies for recently published historical controls. Methods and Materials: Dose escalation in phase 1 progressed through 3 cohorts until 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity or a dose of 5 mg/kg was reached. Once MTD was established, a 1-sided 1-sample log-rank test at significance level of .1 had 85% power to detect a median survival difference (13.69 vs 18.48 months) with 60 deaths over a 12-month accrual period and an additional 18 months of follow-up. OS and PFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In phase 1, 24 patients were enrolled. The MTD established was 5 mg/kg, given intravenously 5 days a week for the first 10 RT fractions, then 3 times a week for the duration of RT. The 7 patients enrolled in the third dose level and the 94 enrolled in phase 2 received this dose. Of these 101 patients, 87 were eligible and evaluable. Median survival time was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.9-17.6 months), not significantly different from that of the historical control (P=.36). Median PFS was 7.6 months (95% CI: 5.7-9.6 months). One patient (1%) experienced a grade 5 adverse event possibly related to therapy during the concurrent phase, and none experience toxicity during adjuvant TMZ therapy. Conclusions: Treatment was well tolerated, but median OS did not reach improvement specified by protocol compared to historical control, indicating that the combination of standard RT with TMZ and MGd did not achieve a significant survival advantage

  19. Phase 1/2 Trials of Temozolomide, Motexafin Gadolinium, and 60-Gy Fractionated Radiation for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme: Final Results of RTOG 0513

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachman, David G., E-mail: david.brachman@dignityhealth.org [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Pugh, Stephanie L. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ashby, Lynn S. [Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Thomas, Theresa A. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Dunbar, Erin M. [University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Narayan, Samir [St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bovi, Joseph A. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Rockhill, Jason K. [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Won, Minhee [Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Curran, Walter P. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of phase 1 was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) given concurrently with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Phase 2 determined whether this combination improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in GBM recursive partitioning analysis class III to V patients compared to therapies for recently published historical controls. Methods and Materials: Dose escalation in phase 1 progressed through 3 cohorts until 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity or a dose of 5 mg/kg was reached. Once MTD was established, a 1-sided 1-sample log-rank test at significance level of .1 had 85% power to detect a median survival difference (13.69 vs 18.48 months) with 60 deaths over a 12-month accrual period and an additional 18 months of follow-up. OS and PFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In phase 1, 24 patients were enrolled. The MTD established was 5 mg/kg, given intravenously 5 days a week for the first 10 RT fractions, then 3 times a week for the duration of RT. The 7 patients enrolled in the third dose level and the 94 enrolled in phase 2 received this dose. Of these 101 patients, 87 were eligible and evaluable. Median survival time was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.9-17.6 months), not significantly different from that of the historical control (P=.36). Median PFS was 7.6 months (95% CI: 5.7-9.6 months). One patient (1%) experienced a grade 5 adverse event possibly related to therapy during the concurrent phase, and none experience toxicity during adjuvant TMZ therapy. Conclusions: Treatment was well tolerated, but median OS did not reach improvement specified by protocol compared to historical control, indicating that the combination of standard RT with TMZ and MGd did not achieve a significant survival advantage.

  20. MiR-196a exerts its oncogenic effect in glioblastoma multiforme by inhibition of IκBα both in vitro and in vivo

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Guang

    2014-01-23

    BackgroundRecent studies have revealed that miR-196a is upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and that it correlates with the clinical outcome of patients with GBM. However, its potential regulatory mechanisms in GBM have never been reported.MethodsWe used quantitative real-time PCR to assess miR-196a expression levels in 132 GBM specimens in a single institution. Oncogenic capability of miR-196a was detected by apoptosis and proliferation assays in U87MG and T98G cells. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of IκBα in GBM tissues, and a luciferase reporter assay was carried out to confirm whether IκBα is a direct target of miR-196a. In vivo, xenograft tumors were examined for an antiglioma effect of miR-196a inhibitors.ResultsWe present for the first time evidence that miR-196a could directly interact with IκBα 3′-UTR to suppress IκBα expression and subsequently promote activation of NF-κB, consequently promoting proliferation of and suppressing apoptosis in GBM cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our study confirmed that miR-196a was upregulated in GBM specimens and that high levels of miR-196a were significantly correlated with poor outcome in a large cohort of GBM patients. Our data from human tumor xenografts in nude mice treated with miR-196 inhibitors demonstrated that inhibition of miR-196a could ameliorate tumor growth in vivo.ConclusionsMiR-196a exerts its oncogenic effect in GBM by inhibiting IκBα both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of GBM and indicate that miR-196a may predict clinical outcome of GBM patients and serve as a new therapeutic target for GBM. © 2014 © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Inhibition of Notch signaling alters the phenotype of orthotopic tumors formed from glioblastoma multiforme neurosphere cells but does not hamper intracranial tumor growth regardless of endogene Notch pathway signature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Karina; Nedergaard, Mette Kjølhede; Villingshøj, Mette; Borup, Rehannah; Broholm, Helle; Kjær, Andreas; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése

    2014-01-01

    DAPT-treated neurosphere cells were injected into the brain of immunocompromised mice, no increase in survival was obtained regardless of Notch pathway signature and Notch inhibition. We did however observe a decrease in the expression of the stem cell marker Nestin, an increase in the proliferative...... marker Ki-67 and an increased number of abnormal vessels in tumors formed from DAPT-treated, high Notch-1 expressing cultures, when compared with the control. CONCLUSION: Based on the presented results we propose that Notch inhibition partly induces differentiation of bCSC, and selects for a cell type......BACKGROUND: Brain cancer stem-like cells (bCSC) are cancer cells with neural stem cell (NSC)-like properties found in the devastating brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). bCSC are proposed a central role in tumor initiation, progression, treatment resistance and relapse and as such present a...

  2. A randomized multicenteric controlled comparative trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) as a radiomodifier in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme is one of the most common adult brain tumor but have poor prognosis despite multimodality approach. The research strategies in GBM are directed towards improving quality of life, improving survival, reducing toxicity of treatment and reducing treatment cost and inconvenience. 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a radiosensitizer has shown promising results as a radiomodifier during the Phase I and II clinical trials in the treatment of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The primary objective was to compare median survival time on 2-DG + Radiation Therapy (Treatment arm) with that of Radiation Therapy alone (Reference arm). There were two secondary objectives: 1. To compare QoL on T with that of R. 2. To compare the pharmaco-economic aspects of T with that of R. One hundred GBM patients were randomized to receive either radiation alone (2 Gy radiation daily, 5 days a week for a period of 6 weeks) or hypo fractionated dose of radiation (5 Gy once weekly for 7 weeks) along with 2-DG (250 mg/kg). T was found to be equally effective as R with respect to median survival time, disease progression, and progression free survival. There was significant improvement in QoL (FACT scores) in T compared to R. There was an overall reduction in the total cost of treatment, total number of consultations, hospital visits, radiation costs and days of hospitalization in T group compared to R group. The combined treatment (2-DG + Radiation) has been found to be well tolerated by patients and has to be considered as a safe and feasible outpatient approach with additional benefits of providing better quality of life and pharmaco-economic benefits to the patients. (author)

  3. Hemispheric cerebral glioblastoma multiform survival. Analysis of 65 cases treated at the Department of Oncology in the Clinic's Hospital from 1980-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multiform gliobastoma is the most aggressive form of glioma. The five-year survival with surgical exclusive is zero. The life is prolonged by radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). The median survival in this series was similar to that described in the literature, there being a higher survival in patients with good neurological treated with surgery followed by RT and QT

  4. Urticaria Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Emer, Jason J.; Bernardo, Sebastian G.; Kovalerchik, Olga; Ahmad, Moneeb

    2013-01-01

    Urticaria multiforme is a benign cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction seen in pediatric patients that is characterized by the acute and transient onset of blanchable, annular, polycyclic, erythematous wheals with dusky, ecchymotic centers in association with acral edema. It is most commonly misdiagnosed as erythema multiforme, a serum-sickness-like reaction, or urticarial vasculitis. Since these three diagnoses represent distinct clinical entities with unique prognoses and management strategie...

  5. Overexpression and Constitutive Nuclear Localization of Cohesin Protease Separase Protein Correlates with High Incidence of Relapse and Reduced Overall Survival in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Malini; Byrd, Tiara; Brawley, Vita S.; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Li, Xiao-Nan; Merchant, Fatima; Maitra, Saurabh; Sumazin, Pavel; Fuller, Greg; Kew, Yvonne; Sun, David; Powell, Suzanne Z.; Ahmed, Nabil M.; Zhang, Nenggang; Pati, Debananda

    2014-01-01

    Separase, an enzyme that cleaves the chromosomal cohesin during mitosis, is overexpressed in a wide range of human epithelial cancers of breast, bone and prostate [Meyer et al, 2009, Clin Cancer Res 15(8): 2703-2710] [1]. Overexpression of Separase in animal models results in aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. We have examined the expression and localization of Separase protein in adult and pediatric glioblastoma and normal brain specimens. Immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis showed significant overexpression of Separase in all adult and a subset of pediatric glioblastoma cells. Tumor status and patient survival strongly correlate with the mislocalization of Separase into the nucleus throughout all stages of the cell cycle. Unlike exclusively nuclear localization in mitotic control cells, glioblastoma samples have a significantly higher number of resting (interphase) cells with strong nuclear Separase staining. Additionally, patient survival analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between overexpression of Separase protein in adult glioblastoma and a high incidence of relapse and reduced overall survival. These results further strengthen our hypothesis that Separase is an oncogene whose overexpression induces tumorigenesis, and indicate that Separase overexpression and aberrant nuclear localization are common in many tumor types and may predict outcome in some human malignancies. PMID:24792645

  6. Dioscin, a natural steroid saponin, induces apoptosis and DNA damage through reactive oxygen species: a potential new drug for treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Linlin; Zheng, Lingli; Dong, Deshi; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Youwei; Qi, Yan; Han, Xu; Peng, Jinyong

    2013-09-01

    Dioscin, a natural product obtained from medicinal plants shows lipid-lowering, anti-cancer and hepatoprotective effects. However, the effect of it on glioblastoma is unclear. In this study, dioscin significantly inhibited proliferation of C6 glioma cells and caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Ca²⁺ release. ROS accumulation affected levels of malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, glutathione disulfide and glutathione, and caused cell apoptosis. In addition, ROS generation caused mitochondrial damage including structural changes, increased mitochondrial permeability transition and decreased mitochondria membrane potential, which led to the release of cytochrome C, nuclear translation of programmed cell death-5 and increased activities of caspase-3,9. Simultaneously, dioscin down-regulated protein expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, up-regulated expression of Bak, Bax, Bid and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Also, oxygen stress induced S-phase arrest of cancer cells by way of regulating expression of DNA Topo I, p53, CDK2 and Cyclin A and caused DNA damage. In a rat allograft model, dioscin significantly inhibited tumor size and extended the life cycle of the rats. In conclusion, dioscin shows noteworthy anti-cancer activity on glioblastoma cells by promoting ROS accumulation, inducing DNA damage and activating mitochondrial signal pathways. Ultimately, we believe dioscin has promise as a new therapy for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:23871826

  7. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates improved

  8. A clinical review of treatment outcomes in glioblastoma multiforme - the validation in a non-trial population of the results of a randomised Phase III clinical trial: has a more radical approach improved survival?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rock, K

    2012-01-03

    Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for up to 60% of all malignant primary brain tumours in adults, occurring in 2-3 cases per 100 000 in Europe and North America. In 2005, a Phase III clinical trial demonstrated a significant improvement in survival over 2, and subsequently, 5 years with the addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) to radical radiotherapy (RT) (Stupp R, Hegi M, van den Bent M, et al. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial. Lancet Oncol 2009:10:459-66). The aim of this study was to investigate if the demonstrated improved survival in the literature translated to clinical practice.Methods: This was a retrospective study including all patients with histologically proven GBM diagnosed from 1999 to 2008 and treated with adjuvant RT at our institution. A total of 273 patients were identified. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS v18.Results: The median survival for the whole group (n = 273) over the 10-year period was 7.6 months (95% confidence interval 6.7-8.4 months). Overall, the cumulative probability of survival at 1 and 2 years was 31.5 and 9.4%, respectively. In total, 146 patients received radical RT. 103 patients were treated with radical RT and TMZ and 43 patients received radical RT alone. The median survival for patients receiving radical RT with TMZ was 13.4 months (95% CI 10.9-15.8 months) vs 8.8 months for radical RT alone (95% CI 6.9 - 10.7 months, p = 0.006). 2-year survival figures were 21.2 vs 4.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, independent predictors of survival included KPS, RT dose, TMZ and extent of surgery. The strongest predictors of poorer outcome based on the hazard ratio were palliative RT, followed by not receiving TMZ chemotherapy, then KPS <90 and a biopsy only surgical approach.Conclusion: This paper demonstrates

  9. 胶质母细胞瘤放射治疗靶区设计现状与思考%Target volume delineation for glioblastoma multiforme: current practice and advice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明焕; 孔莉; 于金明

    2013-01-01

    胶质母细胞瘤(GBM)术后放疗大都采用MRI与CT融合影像来勾画靶区,但是否包含瘤周水肿区尚有争议.根据术后、放疗后的复发范围,不论靶区设计是否包含水肿区,大部分复发都发生在磁共振(MRI)显示增强原发肿瘤灶外2 cm之内,瘤周水肿程度与复发模式无必然关系.GBM的临床和病理特征对放化疗疗效预测和预后也有重要指导意义.GBM的靶区设计趋向于个体化,可在保证疗效的同时减少治疗毒性.%The use of adjuvant extemal-beam RT is well established in the postoperative treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (CBM).It is consensus that target volume should be determined based on the fusion images of MRI and CT,but the inclusion of peritumoural edematous is controversial.The vast majority of recurrences occur within 2 cm of the original tumor site or " in radiation field".There is no inevitable relation between the degree of peritumoral edema and recurrence model.The clinical and pathological characteristics may be as predictive and prognostic factors for the treatment of GBM.Target volume delineation for CBM tend to individual,which can maintain known outcomes and reduce treatment toxicity.

  10. Clinical variables serve as prognostic factors in a model for survival from glioblastoma multiforme: an observational study of a cohort of consecutive non-selected patients from a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although implementation of temozolomide (TMZ) as a part of primary therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has resulted in improved patient survival, the disease is still incurable. Previous studies have correlated various parameters to survival, although no single parameter has yet been identified. More studies and new approaches to identify the best and worst performing patients are therefore in great demand. This study examined 225 consecutive, non-selected GBM patients with performance status (PS) 0–2 receiving postoperative radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ as primary therapy. At relapse, patients with PS 0–2 were mostly treated by reoperation and/or combination with bevacizumab/irinotecan (BEV/IRI), while a few received TMZ therapy if the recurrence-free period was >6 months. Median overall survival and time to progression were 14.3 and 8.0 months, respectively. Second-line therapy indicated that reoperation and/or BEV/IRI increased patient survival compared with untreated patients and that BEV/IRI was more effective than reoperation alone. Patient age, ECOG PS, and use of corticosteroid therapy were significantly correlated with patient survival and disease progression on univariate analysis, whereas p53, epidermal growth factor receptor, and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase expression (all detected by immunohistochemistry), tumor size or multifocality, and extent of primary operation were not. A model based on age, ECOG PS, and corticosteroids use was able to predict survival probability for an individual patient. The survival of RT/TMZ-treated GBM patients can be predicted based on patient age, ECOG PS, and corticosteroid therapy status

  11. Recurrent Glioblastoma: Where we stand

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjoy Roy; Debarshi Lahiri; Tapas Maji; Jaydip Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Current first-line treatment regimens combine surgical resection and chemoradiation for Glioblastoma that provides a slight increase in overall survival. Age on its own should not be used as an exclusion criterion of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treatment, but performance should be factored heavily into the decision-making process for treatment planning. Despite aggressive initial treatment, most patients develop recurrent diseases which can be treated with re-resection, systemic treatment w...

  12. Discrepancy between lesion distributions on methionine PET and MR images in patients with glioblastoma multiforme -insight form a PET and MR fusion images study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: 11C-methyl methionine (MET) accumulation on positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of glioblastomaPmultiforme (GBM) was examined to determine the distribution of metabolic abnormality of this tumour. This distribution was compared with the abnormal tumour signal intensity of GBM on MRI to evaluate the discrepancy between lesion distributions yielded by these methods. Methods: MET-PET was performed for 10 patients with newly diagnosed GBM before treatment. At the same time, MRI was performed and superimposed on corresponding MET-PET images using a SUN workstation. The differences between the extended area of MET accumulation on PET imaging (MET area), that of the gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced area on T1-weighted images (Gd area), and that of the abnormal high signal intensity area on T2-weighted images (T2-high area) were assessed. Results: The MET area was distinctly larger than the Gd area and included the entire Gd area. The discrepancy in volume between the MET area and the Gd area became larger with increasing tumour diameter. On average, 58.6% of the MET area was located within the Gd area, 90.1% within 10 mm outside of the Gd area, 98.1% within 20 mm of the Gd area and 99.8% within 30 mm of the Gd area. A newly developed Gd area has emerged in 5 of the 10 cases in their clinical courses until the time of this study. The newly developed Gd area was demonstrated even in the MET area after completely surgical resection of Gd area in the initial MRI in 3 of the 5 cases, and originated in the residual Gd area after surgery in the remaining 2 cases. In all cases, the T2-high area was larger than the MET area. The MET area extended partly beyond the T2-high area in 9 cases, and the MET area was completely within the T2-high area in one case. Conclusion: Previous PET studies on GBM have reported that the MET area corresponds well with the area of tumour extension. The results of our study show that GBM cells may extend over the Gd area and more widely with

  13. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einstein, Douglas B., E-mail: douglas.einstein@khnetwork.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Wessels, Barry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Bangert, Barbara [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Fu, Pingfu [Department of Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Nelson, A. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Cohen, Mark [Department of Pathology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sagar, Stephen [Department of Neurology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Lewin, Jonathan [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Maciunas, Robert [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS

  14. 复发前后多形性胶质母细胞瘤的等位基因谱分析%An allelotype study of primary and corresponding recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡杰; 江澄川; 吴浩强; 彭颂先; 唐婉君; 陈商群

    2003-01-01

    目的研究多形性胶质母细胞瘤(glioblastoma multiforme, GBM)复发前后的分子遗传学变化,了解基因组范围内哪些染色体区域可能与GBM复发有关. 方法应用聚合酶链反应技术为基础的杂合性丢失(loss of heterozygosity, LOH)分析法,采用荧光标记的引物和377型DNA序列自动分析仪,检测了1例复发前后GBM所有22对常染色体上多达382个微卫星位点.相邻2个微卫星位点之间的平均距离为10 cM. 结果对原发肿瘤标本的等位基因谱分析显示,染色体9p21上D9S157位点和10q21.3-26.3上D10S537、D10S185、D10S192、D10S597、D10S587、D10S217位点存在LOH.对复发肿瘤标本的研究显示,不但9p21和10q21.3-26.3上LOH的范围扩大,而且在其它多条染色体上也出现了LOH(包括1q、7p、7q、21q、20p、20q、10p、19p、19q).结论染色体9p和10q可能在该例GBM的发生中起着重要作用.尽管该病例复发前后的病理诊断相同,复发后GBM存在着更广泛的分子遗传学异常改变,可能伴随着更多肿瘤抑制基因的失活.

  15. Phase I/IIa study of intratumoral/intracerebral or intravenous/intracerebral administration of Parvovirus H-1 (ParvOryx in patients with progressive primary or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: ParvOryx01 protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geletneky Karsten

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors remains a major oncological problem. The median survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most malignant type, is only 15 months after initial diagnosis and even less after tumor recurrence. Improvements of standard treatment including surgery and radio-chemotherapy have not lead to major improvements. Therefore, alternative therapeutics such as oncolytic viruses that specifically target and destroy cancer cells are under investigation. Preclinical data of oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV infection of glioma cells demonstrated strong cytotoxic and oncosuppressing effects, leading to a phase I/IIa trial of H-1PV in patients with recurrent GBM (ParvOryx01. ParvOryx01 is the first trial with a replication competent oncolytic virus in Germany. Methods ParvOryx01 is an open, non-controlled, two groups, intra-group dose escalation, single center, phase I/IIa trial. 18 patients with recurrent GBM will be treated in 2 groups of 9 patients each. Treatment group 1 will first receive H-1PV by intratumoral injection and second by administration into the walls of the tumor cavity during tumor resection. In treatment group 2 the virus will initially be injected intravenously and afterwards, identical to group 1, into the surrounding brain tissue during tumor removal. Main eligibility criteria are: age of 18 years, unifocal recurrent GBM, amenable to complete or subtotal resection. Dose escalation will be based on the Continual Reassessment Method. The primary objective of the trial is local and systemic safety and tolerability and to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD. Secondary objectives are proof of concept (PoC and Progression-free Survival (PFS up to 6 months. Discussion This is the first trial with H-1PV in patients with recurrent GBM. The risks for the participants appear well predictable and justified. Furthermore, ParvOryx01 will be the first assessment

  16. Treatment of brain glioblastoma multiforme with pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 combined with gamma knife radiation: An experimental study on nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High post-operative recurrence and poor prognosis are likely to be related to the infiltrative growth of the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Objectives: The primary objective of this study is to investigate the possible synergistic effect of the combined treatment of gamma knife radio-surgery (GKRS and gene therapy for GBM and secondary objective is to explore the role of GKRS for the temporal and spatial regulation of the gene expression. Materials and Methods: The study performed on 70 nude mice and randomly divided into seven groups. Subcutaneous injection of human GBM tumor cells (T98G was carried out to establish the animal models. Various doses of liposome-mediated pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 recombinant plasmid were transfected through intra-tumor injection. GKRS was scheduled following the plasmid transfection. Tumor volumes were measured every 4 days after the treatment. Subcutaneous tumor nodule specimens were collected to analyze the cell apoptosis and p16 gene expression using terminal-deoxynucleoitidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Tumor volumes, levels of cell apoptosis and p16 gene expression were compared between groups. Results: Rates of tumor growth were significantly lower in the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid + GKRS groups than that in the remaining groups 28 days following the GKRS management. The p16mRNA expression was noted in both of the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid group and the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid + GKRS with marginal-dose of 20 Gy group. The level of messenger ribonucleic acid expression was higher in the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid + GKRS with the marginal-dose of 20 Gy group, with a markedly increased apoptotic and necrotic cells, than that in the pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 plasmid group. Conclusions: In animal studies, pcDNA3.1-Egr. 1p-p16 in combination with GKRS is a preferable management option for the GBM to the sole use of GKRS or gene

  17. Phase I/IIa study of intratumoral/intracerebral or intravenous/intracerebral administration of Parvovirus H-1 (ParvOryx) in patients with progressive primary or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: ParvOryx01 protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors remains a major oncological problem. The median survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most malignant type, is only 15 months after initial diagnosis and even less after tumor recurrence. Improvements of standard treatment including surgery and radio-chemotherapy have not lead to major improvements. Therefore, alternative therapeutics such as oncolytic viruses that specifically target and destroy cancer cells are under investigation. Preclinical data of oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) infection of glioma cells demonstrated strong cytotoxic and oncosuppressing effects, leading to a phase I/IIa trial of H-1PV in patients with recurrent GBM (ParvOryx01). ParvOryx01 is the first trial with a replication competent oncolytic virus in Germany. ParvOryx01 is an open, non-controlled, two groups, intra-group dose escalation, single center, phase I/IIa trial. 18 patients with recurrent GBM will be treated in 2 groups of 9 patients each. Treatment group 1 will first receive H-1PV by intratumoral injection and second by administration into the walls of the tumor cavity during tumor resection. In treatment group 2 the virus will initially be injected intravenously and afterwards, identical to group 1, into the surrounding brain tissue during tumor removal. Main eligibility criteria are: age of 18 years, unifocal recurrent GBM, amenable to complete or subtotal resection. Dose escalation will be based on the Continual Reassessment Method. The primary objective of the trial is local and systemic safety and tolerability and to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary objectives are proof of concept (PoC) and Progression-free Survival (PFS) up to 6 months. This is the first trial with H-1PV in patients with recurrent GBM. The risks for the participants appear well predictable and justified. Furthermore, ParvOryx01 will be the first assessment of combined intratumoral and intravenous application

  18. Influence of bromodeoxyuridine radiosensitization on malignant glioma patient survival: a retrospective comparison of survival data from the Northern California oncology group (NCOG) and radiation therapy oncology group trials (RTOG) for glioblastoma multiforme and anaplastic astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the effect of treatment using Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) during radiation therapy on malignant glioma patient survival by comparing historical survival data from several large clinical trials. Methods: A retrospective analysis of patient data from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials 74-01, 79-18, and 83-02 and the Northern California Oncology Group (NCOG) study 6G-82-1 was conducted. Patient data was supplied by both groups, and analyzed by the RTOG. Pretreatment characteristics including age, extent of surgery, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), and histopathology were collected; the only treatment variable evaluated was the use of BrdU during radiation therapy. Radiation dose, dose-fractionation schedule, use of chemotherapy, and/or type of chemotherapy was not controlled for in the analyses. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the potential treatment effect of BrdU on patient survival. Results: Data from 334 patients treated with BrdU on NCOG 6G-82-1 and 1743 patients treated without BrdU on 3 RTOG studies was received. Patients were excluded from the review if confirmation of eligibility could not be obtained, if the patient was ineligible for the study they entered, if central pathology review was not done, or if radiotherapy data was not available. Patients treated according to the RTOG studies had to start radiotherapy within 4 weeks of surgery; no such restriction existed for the NCOG studies. To ensure comparability between the studies, patients from the NCOG studies who began treatment longer than 40 days from surgery were also excluded. The final data set included 296 cases from the NCOG studies (89%) and 1478 cases from the RTOG studies (85%). For patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) the median survival was 9.8 months in the RTOG studies and 13.0 months in the NCOG trial (p < 0.0001). For patients with AA the median survival was 35.1 months for the RTOG studies and 42.8 months in the NCOG

  19. Brainstem disconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Curtis; Jocson, Jennifer; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.

    2009-01-01

    Brainstem disconnection is a very rare neonatal abnormality, with only seven cases reported. We report a unique case of a neonate who presented at delivery with hypertonia, dysmorphic facial features, and respiratory distress, as well as numerous musculoskeletal and genitourinary abnormalities. MRI of the brain showed disconnection between the pons and medulla with cerebellar hypoplasia and absent cerebellar peduncles. It aided in the description of the neurological and vascular anomalies ass...

  20. Brainstem disconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, Curtis; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L. [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Jocson, Jennifer [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Brainstem disconnection is a very rare neonatal abnormality, with only seven cases reported. We report a unique case of a neonate who presented at delivery with hypertonia, dysmorphic facial features, and respiratory distress, as well as numerous musculoskeletal and genitourinary abnormalities. MRI of the brain showed disconnection between the pons and medulla with cerebellar hypoplasia and absent cerebellar peduncles. It aided in the description of the neurological and vascular anomalies associated with this diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. Associations between polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Inskip, Peter D; Ruder, Avima M; Butler, Maryann; Rajaraman, Preetha; Razavi, Pedram; Patoka, Joe; Wiencke, John K; Bondy, Melissa L; Wrensch, Margaret

    2009-04-01

    A pooled analysis was conducted to examine the association between select variants in DNA repair genes and glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and deadliest form of adult brain tumors. Genetic data for approximately 1,000 glioblastoma multiforme cases and 2,000 controls were combined from four centers in the United States that have conducted case-control studies on adult glioblastoma multiforme, including the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, and the University of California at San Francisco. Twelve DNA repair single-nucleotide polymorphisms were selected for investigation in the pilot collaborative project. The C allele of the PARP1 rs1136410 variant was associated with a 20% reduction in risk for glioblastoma multiforme (odds ratio(CT or CC), 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.95). A 44% increase in risk for glioblastoma multiforme was found for individuals homozygous for the G allele of the PRKDC rs7003908 variant (odds ratio(GG), 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.84); there was a statistically significant trend (P = 0.009) with increasing number of G alleles. A significant, protective effect was found when three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (ERCC2 rs13181, ERCC1 rs3212986, and GLTSCR1 rs1035938) located near each other on chromosome 19 were modeled as a haplotype. The most common haplotype (AGC) was associated with a 23% reduction in risk (P = 0.03) compared with all other haplotypes combined. Few studies have reported on the associations between variants in DNA repair genes and brain tumors, and few specifically have examined their impact on glioblastoma multiforme. Our results suggest that common variation in DNA repair genes may be associated with risk for glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:19318434

  2. Epigenetic pathways and glioblastoma treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Jennifer; Penas, Clara; Pastori, Chiara; Komotar, Ricardo J.; Bregy, Amade; Shah, Ashish H; Wahlestedt, Claes; Ayad, Nagi G.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant adult brain tumor. Standard GBM treatment includes maximal safe surgical resection with combination radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. Alarmingly, patient survival at five-years is below 10%. This is in part due to the invasive behavior of the tumor and the resulting inability to resect greater than 98% of some tumors. In fact, recurrence after such treatment may be inevitable, even in cases where gross total r...

  3. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol ...

  4. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H;

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  5. Phase II, two-arm RTOG trial (94-11) of bischloroethyl-nitrosourea plus accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (64.0 or 70.4 Gy) based on tumor volume (> 20 or ≤ 20 cm2, respectively) in the treatment of newly-diagnosed radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare survivorship, and acute and delayed toxicities following radiation therapy (RT) of radiosurgery-ineligible glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with tumor volume-influenced, high-dose accelerated, hyperfractionated RT plus bischloroethyl-nitrosourea (BCNU), using prior RTOG malignant glioblastoma patients as historical controls. Methods and Materials: One hundred four of 108 patients accrued from June 1994 through May 1995 from 26 institutions were analyzable. Patients were histologically confirmed with GBM, and previously untreated. Treatment assignment (52 patients/arm) was based on tumor mass (TM), defined as the product of the maximum diameter and greatest perpendicular dimension of the titanium-gadolinium-enhanced postoperative MRI: Arm A, 64 Gy, TM > 20 cm2; or Arm B, 70.4 Gy, TM ≤ 20 cm2. Both Arms A and B received BCNU (80 mg/m2, under hyperhydration) days 1-3, 56-58, then 4 cycles, each 8 weeks, for a total of 6 treatment series. Results: During the 24 months immediately post-treatment, the overall median survival was 9.1 months in Arm A (64 Gy) and 11.0 months in Arm B (70.4 Gy). Median survival in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class III/IV was 10.4 months in Arm A and 12.2 months in Arm B, while RPA Class V/VI was 7.6 months in Arm A and 6.1 months in Arm B. There were no grade 4 neurological toxicities in Arm A; 2 grade 4 neurological toxicities were observed in Arm B (1 motor deficit, 1 necrosis at 157 days post-treatment). Conclusion: This strategy of high-dose, accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy shortens overall RT treatment times while allowing dose escalation, and it provides the potential for combination with currently available, as well as newer, chemotherapy agents. Survival is comparable with previously published RTOG data, and toxicities are within acceptable limits.

  6. MRI texture features as biomarkers to predict MGMT methylation status in glioblastomas

    OpenAIRE

    Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Kline, Timothy L.; Coufalova, Lucie; Lachance, Daniel H.; Parney, Ian F.; Carter, Rickey E.; Buckner, Jan C.; Erickson, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Imaging biomarker research focuses on discovering relationships between radiological features and histological findings. In glioblastoma patients, methylation of the O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter is positively correlated with an increased effectiveness of current standard of care. In this paper, the authors investigate texture features as potential imaging biomarkers for capturing the MGMT methylation status of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors when combi...

  7. Eritema Multiform Di Rongga Mulut

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Aminah

    2008-01-01

    Eritema multiform adalah suatu penyakit akut yang terdapat pada kulit dan membran mukosa, yang dapat menyebabkan beberapa jenis lesi kulit. Penyebab eritema multiform belum diketahui dengan pasti, banyak para peneliti menganggap bahwa etiologi dari penyakit eritema multiform ini disebabkan oleh beberapa faktor penunjang seperti reaksi alergi dari obatobatan, alergi dari makanan, reaksi terhadap mikro .orqanisme, efek radioterapi, penyakit sistemik, infeksi dan neoplasia. Gambaran klin...

  8. Metabolic modulation of glioblastoma with dichloroacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelakis, E D; Sutendra, G; Dromparis, P; Webster, L; Haromy, A; Niven, E; Maguire, C; Gammer, T-L; Mackey, J R; Fulton, D; Abdulkarim, B; McMurtry, M S; Petruk, K C

    2010-05-12

    Solid tumors, including the aggressive primary brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme, develop resistance to cell death, in part as a result of a switch from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to cytoplasmic glycolysis. This metabolic remodeling is accompanied by mitochondrial hyperpolarization. We tested whether the small-molecule and orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA) can reverse this cancer-specific metabolic and mitochondrial remodeling in glioblastoma. Freshly isolated glioblastomas from 49 patients showed mitochondrial hyperpolarization, which was rapidly reversed by DCA. In a separate experiment with five patients who had glioblastoma, we prospectively secured baseline and serial tumor tissue, developed patient-specific cell lines of glioblastoma and putative glioblastoma stem cells (CD133(+), nestin(+) cells), and treated each patient with oral DCA for up to 15 months. DCA depolarized mitochondria, increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and induced apoptosis in GBM cells, as well as in putative GBM stem cells, both in vitro and in vivo. DCA therapy also inhibited the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, promoted p53 activation, and suppressed angiogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The dose-limiting toxicity was a dose-dependent, reversible peripheral neuropathy, and there was no hematologic, hepatic, renal, or cardiac toxicity. Indications of clinical efficacy were present at a dose that did not cause peripheral neuropathy and at serum concentrations of DCA sufficient to inhibit the target enzyme of DCA, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase II, which was highly expressed in all glioblastomas. Metabolic modulation may be a viable therapeutic approach in the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:20463368

  9. Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma Cell Lines: Implication of MGMT, MMR, P-Glycoprotein and CD133 Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Perazzoli; Jose Prados; Raul Ortiz; Octavio Caba; Laura Cabeza; Maria Berdasco; Beatriz Gónzalez; Consolación Melguizo

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of temozolomide (TMZ) has improved the prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme patients. However, TMZ resistance may be one of the main reasons why treatment fails. Although this resistance has frequently been linked to the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) it seems that this enzyme is not the only molecular mechanism that may account for the appearance of drug resistance in glioblastoma multiforme patients as the mismatch repair (MMR) complex, P-gly...

  10. Biological Rationale for the Use of PPARγ Agonists in Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hayley Patricia Ellis; Kathreena Mary Kurian

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary intrinsic central nervous system tumor and has an extremely poor overall survival with only 10% patients being alive after 5 years. There has been interesting preliminary evidence suggesting that diabetic patients receiving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists, a group of anti-diabetic, thiazolidinedione drugs, have an increased median survival for glioblastoma. Although thiazolidinediones are effective oral...

  11. Identification of ZCCHC8 as fusion partner of ROS1 in a case of congenital glioblastoma multiforme with a t(6;12)(q21;q24.3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccé, Mariela C; Mardin, Balca R; Bens, Susanne; Stütz, Adrian M; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Vater, Inga; Korbel, Jan O; Siebert, Reiner; Alonso, Cristina N; Gallego, Marta S

    2016-09-01

    Congenital gliobastoma multiforme (GBM) is rare and little is known about the molecular defects underlying the initiation and progression of this tumor type. We present a case of congenital GBM analyzed by conventional cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, array comparative genomic hybridization and next generation sequencing. On cytogenetic analysis we detected a reciprocal translocation t(6;12)(q21;q24.3). By sequencing, the translocation was shown to form a fusion between the 5' region of ZCCHC8 and the 3' region of ROS1. RT-PCR analyses confirmed the existence of an in-frame fusion transcript with ZCCHC8 exons 1-3 joined to ROS1 exons 36-43. In addition to the ZCCHC8-ROS1 fusion, we detected a deletion in the short arm of chromosome 9, including homozygous loss of the CDKN2A/2B locus in 9p21.3 and heterozygous deletion of the HAUS6 gene in 9p22.1. The latter encodes a protein involved in faithful chromosome segregation by regulating microtubule nucleation and its deletion might be associated with the marked subclonal changes of ploidy observed in the tumor. This report adds the ZCCHC8-ROS1 fusion as oncogenic driver in GBM and supports the role of ROS1 activation in the pathogenesis of a subset of GBM. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27121553

  12. Recurrent Glioblastoma: Where we stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjoy Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current first-line treatment regimens combine surgical resection and chemoradiation for Glioblastoma that provides a slight increase in overall survival. Age on its own should not be used as an exclusion criterion of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM treatment, but performance should be factored heavily into the decision-making process for treatment planning. Despite aggressive initial treatment, most patients develop recurrent diseases which can be treated with re-resection, systemic treatment with targeted agents or cytotoxic chemotherapy, reirradiation, or radiosurgery. Research into novel therapies is investigating alternative temozolomide regimens, convection-enhanced delivery, immunotherapy, gene therapy, antiangiogenic agents, poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors, or cancer stem cell signaling pathways. Given the aggressive and resilient nature of GBM, continued efforts to better understand GBM pathophysiology are required to discover novel targets for future therapy.

  13. Recurrent Glioblastoma: Where we stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sanjoy; Lahiri, Debarshi; Maji, Tapas; Biswas, Jaydip

    2015-01-01

    Current first-line treatment regimens combine surgical resection and chemoradiation for Glioblastoma that provides a slight increase in overall survival. Age on its own should not be used as an exclusion criterion of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treatment, but performance should be factored heavily into the decision-making process for treatment planning. Despite aggressive initial treatment, most patients develop recurrent diseases which can be treated with re-resection, systemic treatment with targeted agents or cytotoxic chemotherapy, reirradiation, or radiosurgery. Research into novel therapies is investigating alternative temozolomide regimens, convection-enhanced delivery, immunotherapy, gene therapy, antiangiogenic agents, poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors, or cancer stem cell signaling pathways. Given the aggressive and resilient nature of GBM, continued efforts to better understand GBM pathophysiology are required to discover novel targets for future therapy. PMID:26981507

  14. A Phase I Study of Mebendazole for the Treatment of Pediatric Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Glioma, Astrocytic; Optic Nerve Glioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Gliosarcoma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; DIPG; Low-grade Glioma; Brainstem Glioma

  15. Tectal glioblastoma Glioblastoma tetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feres Chaddad Neto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem gliomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising mostly in paediatric patients. Tectal plate gliomas represent a particular type of brain stem tumours usually with a benign, indolent clinical course, presenting with signs of raised intracranial hipertension due to supra-tentorialhydrocephalous caused by aqueductal stenosis. Seldom high-grade lesions arise in this location with tremendous therapeutic implications. When a malignant tumour is clinically and radiographically suspected a biopsy should be performed to obtain histhological confirmation. Treatment is then planned in a case-by-case basis. We present the case of a glioblastoma of the tectal plate in a 22 years-old woman operated upon by a supracerebellar-infratentorial approach.Os gliomas do tronco cerebral são um grupo heterogêneo de neoplasias que acometem habitualmente crianças. Os gliomas da placa quadrigeminal representam um tipo particular de tumores do tronco cerebral, habitualmente com um curso benigno e indolente, surgindo com sinais de hipertensão intracraniana devido a hidrocefalia supra-tentorial provocada por compressão do aqueduto cerebral. Raramente surgem lesões de alto grau nesta região, mas as implicações terapêuticas são tremendas. Quando existe suspeita clínica e imagiológica de que se trata de lesão maligna, esta deve ser biopsada para se obter confirmação histológica. O tratamento deve então ser planejado caso a caso. Apresentamos o caso de glioblastoma da placa quadrigeminal em uma paciente de 22 anos intervencionado por via supracerebelar-infratentorial.

  16. Evaluation of the Lactate-to-N-Acetyl-aspartate Ratio Defined With Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Before Radiation Therapy as a New Predictive Marker of the Site of Relapse in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviers, Alexandra [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); INP (Institut National Polytechnique), ENVT (Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Toulouse), Unité d' Anatomie-Imagerie-Embryologie, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Ken, Soléakhéna [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas [Bureau des Etudes Cliniques, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Rowland, Benjamin; Laruelo, Andrea [Département de Radiothérapie, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Catalaa, Isabelle; Lubrano, Vincent [UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); Hôpital de Rangueil, CHU (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire) de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Celsis, Pierre [UMR (Unité Mixte de Recherche) 825, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Toulouse (France); and others

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Because lactate accumulation is considered a surrogate for hypoxia and tumor radiation resistance, we studied the spatial distribution of the lactate-to-N-acetyl-aspartate ratio (LNR) before radiation therapy (RT) with 3D proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (3D-{sup 1}H-MRSI) and assessed its impact on local tumor control in glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with newly diagnosed GBM included in a phase 2 chemoradiation therapy trial constituted our database. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI data before RT were evaluated and correlated to MRI data at relapse. The optimal threshold for tumor-associated LNR was determined with receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of the pre-RT LNR values and MRI characteristics of the tumor. This threshold was used to segment pre-RT normalized LNR maps. Two spatial analyses were performed: (1) a pre-RT volumetric comparison of abnormal LNR areas with regions of MRI-defined lesions and a choline (Cho)-to- N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio ≥2 (CNR2); and (2) a voxel-by-voxel spatial analysis of 4,186,185 voxels with the intention of evaluating whether pre-RT abnormal LNR areas were predictive of the site of local recurrence. Results: A LNR of ≥0.4 (LNR-0.4) discriminated between tumor-associated and normal LNR values with 88.8% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity. LNR-0.4 voxels were spatially different from those of MRI-defined lesions, representing 44% of contrast enhancement, 64% of central necrosis, and 26% of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) abnormality volumes before RT. They extended beyond the overlap with CNR2 for most patients (median: 20 cm{sup 3}; range: 6-49 cm{sup 3}). LNR-0.4 voxels were significantly predictive of local recurrence, regarded as contrast enhancement at relapse: 71% of voxels with a LNR-0.4 before RT were contrast enhanced at relapse versus 10% of voxels with a normal LNR (P<.01). Conclusions: Pre-RT LNR-0.4 in GBM

  17. Brainstem gliomas - A clinicopathological study of 45 cases with p53 immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badhe Prerna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brainstem tumors represent 10% of central nervous system tumors, accounting for 30% of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. AIMS: The aim of this study was to clinicopathologically correlate 45 cases of brain stem gliomas and determine the occurrence and prognostic significance of p53 expression. MATERIALS AND METHOD: 45 cases of brain stem gliomas encountered during a 19-year period. 30 were diagnosed by surgical biopsy and 15 at autopsy. In 25 cases p53 immunohistochemistry (Avidin Biotinylated technique was performed. The WHO brain tumor classification and Stroink's CT classification were applied. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Chi square test. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: 51 % of gliomas were observed in the first decade of life. The female to male ratio was 1.04: 1. The commonest presenting features were cranial nerve palsies (33% and cerebellar signs (29.8%. 55.55% of cases were located in the pons, 31.01% in the medulla and 13.33% in the midbrain. Diffuse astrocytomas were seen in 40 cases (5% were Grade I, 47.5%Grade II, 32.5% Grade III and 15% Grade IV and pilocytic astrocytomas in 5 cases. Grade IV patients had 2- 3 mitoses /10 high power fields and had a poorer survival rate. Grade II astrocytomas were treated with excision and radiotherapy, while grade III and IV tumors were treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy (CCNU. Improvement was noted in 20% of patients postoperatively. The outcome was better in patients who were treated surgically. p53 is a frequently mutated gene in brain stem astrocytomas. It was found in 50 % of glioblastoma multiforme, 28.57% of grade III astrocytoma and 12.5% of grade II astrocytoma, while grade 1 astrocytomas failed to express p53 protein. p53 positivity was more in high grade lesions, decreasing significantly in lower grade lesions.

  18. Brainstem Cavernous Angioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in significant, and potentially life-threatening, symptoms. The nerves that transverse the brainstem control basic, involuntary functions such as respiration, gag reflex, heartbeat regulation, body temperature, pain and heat sensation, ...

  19. Selective Lentiviral Gene Delivery to CD133-Expressing Human Glioblastoma Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    N Sumru Bayin; Aram S Modrek; August Dietrich; Jonathan Lebowitz; Tobias Abel; Hae-Ri Song; Markus Schober; David Zagzag; Christian J Buchholz; Chao, Moses V; Placantonakis, Dimitris G.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a deadly primary brain malignancy. Glioblastoma stem cells (GSC), which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into tumor lineages, are believed to cause tumor recurrence due to their resistance to current therapies. A subset of GSCs is marked by cell surface expression of CD133, a glycosylated pentaspan transmembrane protein. The study of CD133-expressing GSCs has been limited by the relative paucity of genetic tools that specifically target them. H...

  20. Targeting EGFR for Treatment of Glioblastoma: Molecular Basis to Overcome Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Tiffany E.; Furnari, Frank B.; Cavenee, Webster K.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (glioblastoma multiforme; GBM; WHO Grade IV) accounts for the majority of primary malignant brain tumors in adults. Amplification and mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene represent signature genetic abnormalities encountered in GBM. A range of potential therapies that target EGFR or its mutant constitutively active form, ΔEGFR, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, and RNA-based agents, are currently in development o...

  1. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  2. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  3. Paediatric brain-stem gliomas: MRI, FDG-PET and histological grading correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Kim, In-One; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Moon, Sung Gyu; Kim, Tae Jung; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Chi, Je Geun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea); Wang, Kyu-Chang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea); Chung, June Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    MRI and FDG-PET may predict the histological grading of paediatric brain-stem gliomas. To assess MRI findings and metabolic imaging using FDG-PET of brain-stem gliomas based on histological grading. Included in the study were 20 paediatric patients (age 3-14 years, mean 8.2 years) with brain-stem glioma (five glioblastomas, ten anaplastic astrocytomas and five low-grade astrocytomas). MR images were assessed for the anatomical site of tumour origin, focality, pattern of tumour growth, and enhancement. All glioblastomas were located in the pons and showed diffuse pontine enlargement with focally exophytic features. Eight anaplastic astrocytomas were located in the pons and demonstrated diffuse pontine enlargement without exophytic features. Low-grade astrocytomas were located in the pons, midbrain or medulla and showed focally exophytic growth features and peripheral enhancement. In 12 patients in whom FDG-PET was undertaken, glioblastomas showed hypermetabolic or hypometabolic lesions, anaplastic astrocytomas showed no metabolic change or hypometabolic lesions and low-grade astrocytomas showed hypometabolism compared with the cerebellum. MRI findings correlated well with histological grading of brain-stem gliomas and MRI may therefore predict the histological grading. FDG-PET may be helpful in differentiating between anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastomas among high-grade tumours. (orig.)

  4. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    OpenAIRE

    Grodzik M; Sawosz E; Wierzbicki M; Orlowski P; Hotowy A; Niemiec T; Szmidt M; Mitura K; Chwalibog A

    2011-01-01

    Marta Grodzik1, Ewa Sawosz1, Mateusz Wierzbicki1, Piotr Orlowski1, Anna Hotowy2, Tomasz Niemiec1, Maciej Szmidt3, Katarzyna Mitura4, André Chwalibog21Division of Biotechnology and Biochemistry of Nutrition, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Division of Histology and Embryology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering...

  5. A Flexible Semi-Automatic Approach for Glioblastoma multiforme Segmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Kuhnt, Daniela; Kappus, Christoph; Carl, Barbara; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors, evolving from the cerebral supportive cells. For clinical follow-up, the evaluation of the preoperative tumor volume is essential. Volumetric assessment of tumor volume with manual segmentation of its outlines is a time-consuming process that can be overcome with the help of segmentation methods. In this paper, a flexible semi-automatic approach for grade IV glioma segmentation is presented. The approach uses a novel segmentation scheme for spherical objects that creates a directed 3D graph. Thereafter, the minimal cost closed set on the graph is computed via a polynomial time s-t cut, creating an optimal segmentation of the tumor. The user can improve the results by specifying an arbitrary number of additional seed points to support the algorithm with grey value information and geometrical constraints. The presented method is tested on 12 magnetic resonance imaging datasets. The ground truth of the tumor boundaries are manually extracted by neurosurgeons. The...

  6. Genetic Characteristics of Glioblastoma: Clinical Implications of Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a heterogeneous group of tumors, each with its own distinct molecular and genetic signatures. This heterogeneity is a major clinical hurdle for classifying tumors and for devising effective personalized therapies targeting the disease pathways. Herein, the primary genetic and epigenetic alterations in GBM that have been used as therapeutic targets in clinical settings nowadays, with or without clinical benefits for patients, as well as the future directions for developing novel strategies were discussed.

  7. Master Regulators, Regulatory Networks, and Pathways of Glioblastoma Subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Serdar Bozdag; Aiguo Li; Mehmet Baysan; Fine, Howard A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor. GBM samples are classified into subtypes based on their transcriptomic and epigenetic profiles. Despite numerous studies to better characterize GBM biology, a comprehensive study to identify GBM subtype- specific master regulators, gene regulatory networks, and pathways is missing. Here, we used FastMEDUSA to compute master regulators and gene regulatory networks for each GBM subtype. We also ran Gene Set Enrichment Analy...

  8. Glioblastoma and intracranial aneurysms: Case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Rushna Ali; Aqueel Pabaney; Adam Robin; Horia Marin; Mark Rosenblum

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of data on the association of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with intracranial aneurysms. It is an important clinical entity for physicians to be aware of and its presence illustrates several critical features of the pathophysiology of malignant glioma. In this article we present a case of a middle cerebral artery (MCA) pseudoaneurysm that occurred in a patient with recurrent GBM as well discuss the current literature relating to this unique combination of pathol...

  9. An integrative characterization of recurrent molecular aberrations in glioblastoma genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Liu, Pei-Ling; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumor in adults. Decades of investigations and the recent effort of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project have mapped many molecular alterations in GBM cells. Alterations on DNAs may dysregulate gene expressions and drive malignancy of tumors. It is thus important to uncover causal and statistical dependency between ‘effector’ molecular aberrations and ‘target’ gene expressions in GBMs. A rich collection of prior st...

  10. Clinical outcomes following salvage Gamma Knife radiosurgery for recurrent glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Erik W.; Peterson, Halloran E.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Fairbanks, Robert K; Call, Jason A.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Ling, Benjamin C; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S; Lee, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor with a survival prognosis of 14-16 mo for the highest functioning patients. Despite aggressive, multimodal upfront therapies, the majority of GBMs will recur in approximately six months. Salvage therapy options for recurrent GBM (rGBM) are an area of intense research. This study compares recent survival and quality of life outcomes following Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) salvage therapy. Following a PubMed search...

  11. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN POLYMORPHISMS IN DNA REPAIR GENES AND GLIOBLASTOMA

    OpenAIRE

    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Inskip, Peter; Ruder, Avima; Butler, MaryAnn; Rajaraman, Preetha; Razavi, Pedram; Patoka, Joe; Wiencke, John; Bondy, Melissa; Wrensch, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    A pooled analysis was conducted to examine the association between select variants in DNA repair genes and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and deadliest form of adult brain tumors. Genetic data for approximately 1,000 GBM cases and 2,000 controls were combined from four centers in the United States that have conducted case-control studies of adult GBM including the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the University of Texas M.D....

  12. Urticaria multiforme er en variant af urticaria, som imiterer erythema multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Authried, Georg; Bracher, Linda; Bygum, Anette

    2013-01-01

    A 21-month-old boy developed urticaria multiforme during the course of a presumed pneumonia, which was treated with imacillin. At admission to hospital he was initially considered to have erythema multiforme, but the correct diagnosis was soon established as urticaria multiforme. He had a good re...... response to antihistamines. The diagnostic differences between urticaria multiforme and erythema multiforme are presented in this case report....

  13. Natural killer (NK) cells inhibit systemic metastasis of glioblastoma cells and have therapeutic effects against glioblastomas in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Se Jeong; Kang, Won Young; Yoon, Yeup; Jin, Ju Youn; Song, Hye Jin; Her, Jung Hyun; Kang, Sang Mi; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Kang, Kyeong Jin; Joo, Kyeung Min; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized by extensive local invasion, which is in contrast with extremely rare systemic metastasis of GBM. Molecular mechanisms inhibiting systemic metastasis of GBM would be a novel therapeutic candidate for GBM in the brain. Methods Patient-derived GBM cells were primarily cultured from surgical samples of GBM patients and were inoculated into the brains of immune deficient BALB/c-nude or NOD-SCID IL2Rgammanull (NSG) mice. Human NK cells were...

  14. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 Encephalitis Mimicking Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM often presents as a brain mass with encephalitis. In a patient with GBM, subsequent presentation with new onset encephalitis may be due to another GBM or Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 encephalitis. We present a case of HSV-1 encephalitis mimicking GBM in a patient with previous GBM.

  15. Mutations in glioblastoma oncosuppressive pathways pave the way for oncomodulatory activity of cytomegalovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Hollon, Todd C; Price, Richard L.; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been suggested to promote the development of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Recent evidence demonstrates that CMV contributes to the progression of GBM in the context of oncosuppressor gene mutations. This finding provides further insights into the mechanisms whereby CMV exacerbates the malignancy of GBM.

  16. SC-27CD13 REPRESENTS A NOVEL BRAIN TUMOR STEM CELL MARKER FOR GLIOBLASTOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Reeve, Nathaniel; Markert, Tara; Oliva, Claudia; Griguer, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a very deadly and highly vascularized tumor, but targeting glioma angiogenesis by vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition has been minimally successful. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that control glioma angiogenesis and progression could lead to significant new therapies. We previously described that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induces increased tumor angiogenesis, decreased mouse survival, increased resistance to chemotherapy, and...

  17. Cellular immunotherapy directed against human cytomegalovirus as a novel approach for glioblastoma treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Schuessler, Andrea; Walker, David G.; Khanna, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has a very poor prognosis, despite multimodal therapy including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. A novel adoptive immunotherapy that exploits the presence of cytomegalovirus antigens in malignant brain cancer cells has been shown to be safe and elicit potential clinical benefit for the treatment of recurrent GBM.

  18. Pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the first report of pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma, infiltrating midbrain, and medulla oblongata. The report details clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical steps. As this entity is exceedingly uncommon, the overall epidemiology, prognosis, and long-term outcome remain far from established.

  19. Glioblastoma familiar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter O. Arruda

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a family with three members affected by glioblastoma. The proband patient, a 7 year-old girl, developed a rare complication, a pulmonary metastasis. Chromosomal analysis of her peripheral blood lymphocytes showed a normal karyotype (46, XX, without structural abnormalities. Cytogenetic study of the tumor cells disclosed several abnormalities: 46, XX, 7q - / 46, XX, -2, 4p-, 7p-, +15/ 46, XX. Some aspects about genetics of glial neoplasms are discussed.

  20. Pharmacological inhibition of lipid droplet formation enhances the effectiveness of curcumin in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Issan; Cui, Yiming; Amiri, Abdolali; Ding, Yidan; Campbell, Robert E; Maysinger, Dusica

    2016-03-01

    Increased lipid droplet number and fatty acid synthesis allow glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer, to withstand accelerated metabolic rates and resist therapeutic treatments. Lipid droplets are postulated to sequester hydrophobic therapeutic agents, thereby reducing drug effectiveness. We hypothesized that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation in glioblastoma cells using pyrrolidine-2, a cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 alpha inhibitor, can sensitize cancer cells to the killing effect of curcumin, a promising anticancer agent isolated from the turmeric spice. We observed that curcumin localized in the lipid droplets of human U251N glioblastoma cells. Reduction of lipid droplet number using pyrrolidine-2 drastically enhanced the therapeutic effect of curcumin in both 2D and 3D glioblastoma cell models. The mode of cell death involved was found to be mediated by caspase-3. Comparatively, the current clinical chemotherapeutic standard, temozolomide, was significantly less effective in inducing glioblastoma cell death. Together, our results suggest that the inhibition of lipid droplet accumulation is an effective way to enhance the chemotherapeutic effect of curcumin against glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:26763536

  1. Pediatric brainstem glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-four pediatric patients, twenty with presumed and fourteen with biopsy or autopsy proven brainstem gliomas were imaged by CT and MR before radiation therapy. Twenty-eight patients received radiotherapy. Of these, eighteen fit the protocol for combined clinical and MR post-treatment evaluation. No cases of radionecrosis were seen at autopsy. This study shows that MR can demonstrate tumor response to radiation therapy, tumor progression prior to clinical deterioration, post-treatment cyst formation and hemorrhage. Although MR clinical correlation was not optimal on six week post-treatment evaluation, 4-10 months post-treatment MR scanning correlated well with clinical evaluation. MR appears useful in post-therapeutic monitoring of tumor response. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei; Zeng, Zhao-Jun; Yoshida, Takeshi; Funa, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells. PMID:27048878

  3. Live attenuated measles virus vaccine therapy for locally established malignant glioblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shammari AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Al-Shammari,1 Farah E Ismaeel,2 Shahlaa M Salih,2 Nahi Y Yaseen11Experimental Therapy Department, Iraqi Center for Cancer and Medical Genetic Researches, Mustansiriya University, 2Departments of Biotechnology, College of Science, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, with poor prognosis. A new glioblastoma cell line (ANGM5 was established from a cerebral glioblastoma multiforme in a 72-year-old Iraqi man who underwent surgery for an intracranial tumor. This study was carried out to evaluate the antitumor effect of live attenuated measles virus (MV Schwarz vaccine strain on glioblastoma multiforme tumor cell lines in vitro. Live attenuated MV Schwarz strain was propagated on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human glioblastoma-multiform (ANGM5 cell lines. The infected confluent monolayer appeared to be covered with syncytia with granulation and vacuolation, as well as cell rounding, shrinkage, and large empty space with cell debris as a result of cell lysis and death. Cell lines infected with virus have the ability for hemadsorption to human red blood cells after 72 hours of infection, whereas no hemadsorption of uninfected cells is seen. Detection of MV hemagglutinin protein by monoclonal antibodies in infected cells of all cell lines by immunocytochemistry assay gave positive results (brown color in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cell viability was measured after 72 hours of infection by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results showed a significant cytotoxic effect for MV (P≤0.05 on growth of ANGM5 and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines after 72 hours of infection. Induction of apoptosis by MV was assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potentials in tumor cells after 48, 72, and 120 hours of infection. Apoptotic cells were counted, and the mean percentage of dead cells was significantly higher after 48, 72

  4. Analysis of the TP53 gene in laser-microdissected glioblastoma vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Andres; Burkhardt, Karim; Meyer-Puttlitz, Birgit; Teesalu, Tambet; Asser, Toomas; Wiestler, Otmar D; Becker, Albert J

    2003-04-01

    Malignant transformation of human gliomas is accompanied by extensive proliferation of stromal blood vessels. Recent data suggest mesenchymal transdifferentiation of neoplastic cells in various human cancers, including colon and breast cancer as well as gliosarcoma. In this study, we have analyzed proliferating stromal blood vessels in glioblastoma multiforme for the presence of mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53. Using tissue arrays derived from glioblastoma specimens, cases with significant immunohistochemical p53 accumulation were selected for molecular genetic detection of TP53 mutations in exons 5 to 8. None of the tumors included in this series displayed properties of gliosarcoma. Proliferating glomeruloid stromal vessels were isolated by laser microdissection from paraffin sections. In six cases, single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for mutations of the TP53 gene in stromal blood vessels compared with adjacent tumor cells and subsequent DNA sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments were carried out. Glioblastoma cells of these cases exhibited TP53 mutations in exons 5, 7 and 8. None of these tumors showed TP53 mutations in microdissected samples from glomeruloid vessels. The absence of TP53 mutations in vascular stromal components of glioblastoma multiforme supports the hypothesis that microvascular proliferations originate from the tumor stroma and are not derived from transdifferentiated glioblastoma cells. PMID:12624785

  5. Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Primary Glioblastoma Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinkuk; Lee, In-Hee; Cho, Hee Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Jung, Yang-Soon; Kim, Yanghee; Nam, So Hee; Kim, Byung Sup; Johnson, Mark D; Kong, Doo-Sik; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Joo, Kyeung Min; Yoon, Yeup; Park, Woong-Yang; Lee, Jeongwu; Park, Peter J; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-09-14

    Tumor recurrence following treatment is the major cause of mortality for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Thus, insights on the evolutionary process at recurrence are critical for improved patient care. Here, we describe our genomic analyses of the initial and recurrent tumor specimens from each of 38 GBM patients. A substantial divergence in the landscape of driver alterations was associated with distant appearance of a recurrent tumor from the initial tumor, suggesting that the genomic profile of the initial tumor can mislead targeted therapies for the distally recurred tumor. In addition, in contrast to IDH1-mutated gliomas, IDH1-wild-type primary GBMs rarely developed hypermutation following temozolomide (TMZ) treatment, indicating low risk for TMZ-induced hypermutation for these tumors under the standard regimen. PMID:26373279

  6. Evaluation Of Lenalidomide Activity On Glioblastoma Cell Lines In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Mut, Melike; Gregory POLAR; Carpenter, Joan E.; Gerard REDPATH; Larner, James; Schiff, David; Shaffrey, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Thalidomide analog, Lenalidomide (Revlimid®) is a chemotherapeutic agent. In this study, lenalidomide was used in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines to determine its pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative and radiosensitizing properties. Methods: The GBM cells were treated with lenalidomide [0, 1, 5, 30, 60 µM] before ultravioletB (UVB) [0, 50, 100 mj] or γ -irradiation [0, 5, 20 Gy], and kept in drug for 5 days. Viable cell numbers were determined by trypan blue exclusion. Th...

  7. Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells—Biology and Therapeutic Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cancer stem-cell hypothesis proposes that malignant tumors are likely to encompass a cellular hierarchy that parallels normal tissue and may be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in patients. The purpose of this manuscript is to review methods for optimizing the derivation and culturing of stem-like cells also known as tumor stem cells (TSCs) from patient-derived GBM tissue samples. The hallmarks of TSCs are that they must be able to self-renew and retain tumorigenicity. The isolation, optimization and derivation of TSCs as outlined in this review, will be important in understanding biology and therapeutic applications related to these cells

  8. Characterization and immunotherapeutic potential of γδ T-cells in patients with glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Nichole L.; Suarez-Cuervo, Catalina; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Markert, James M.; Nabors, L. Burt; Meleth, Sreelatha; Lopez, Richard D.; Lamb, Lawrence S.

    2009-01-01

    Classical immunotherapeutic approaches to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) have shown mixed results, and therapies focused on innate lymphocyte activity against GBM have not been rigorously evaluated. We examined peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype, γδ T-cell number, mitogenic response, and cytotoxicity against GBM cell lines and primary tumor explants from GBM patients at selected time points prior to and during GBM therapy. Healthy volunteers served as controls and were grouped by age. T-cel...

  9. Angiopoietin-4 Promotes Glioblastoma Progression by Enhancing Tumor Cell Viability and Angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Brunckhorst, Melissa K.; Wang, Hui; Rong LU; Yu, Qin

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly invasive and vascularized aggressive brain tumor. Less than 10% of GBM patients survive more than 5 years after diagnosis. Angiogenesis plays an important role in GBM growth and anti-angiogenesis based therapies have demonstrated clinical efficacy for GBM patients. Unfortunately, therapeutic resistance often develops in these patients, suggesting GBM cells are capable of switching their dependency on one pro-angiogenic signaling pathway to an alternat...

  10. Glioblastoma specific antigens, GD2 and CD90, are not involved in cancer stemness

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Seon Rang; Oh, Young Taek; An, Jae Yeol; Kang, Bong Gu; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant World Health Organization grade IV brain tumor. GBM patients have a poor prognosis because of its resistance to standard therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiation. Since stem-like cells have been associated with the treatment resistance of GBM, novel therapies targeting the cancer stem cell (CSC) population is critically required. However, GBM CSCs share molecular and functional characteristics with normal neural stem cells (NSCs). To el...

  11. NG2 expression in glioblastoma identifies an actively proliferating population with an aggressive molecular signature

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mayhani, M. Talal F.; Grenfell, Richard; Narita, Masashi; Piccirillo, Sara; Kenney-Herbert, Emma; Fawcett, James W.; Collins, V. Peter; Ichimura, Koichi; Watts, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common type of primary brain tumor and a highly malignant and heterogeneous cancer. Current conventional therapies fail to eradicate or curb GBM cell growth. Hence, exploring the cellular and molecular basis of GBM cell growth is vital to develop novel therapeutic approaches. Neuroglia (NG)-2 is a transmembrane proteoglycan expressed by NG2+ progenitors and is strongly linked to cell proliferation in the normal brain. By using NG2 as a biomarker we id...

  12. Identification and characterization of a small molecule inhibitor of WNT signaling in glioblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Valensin, Silvia; Rossi, Marco; Tunici, Patrizia; Verani, Margherita; De Rosa, Antonella; Giordano, Cinzia; Varrone, Maurizio; Nencini, Arianna; Pratelli, Carmela; Benicchi, Tiziana; Bakker, Annette; Hill, Jeffrey; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and prognostically unfavorable form of brain tumor. The aggressive and highly invasive phenotype of these tumors makes them among the most anatomically damaging human cancers with a median survival of less than one year. Although canonical WNT pathway activation in cancers has been historically linked to the presence of mutations involving key components of the pathway (APC, β-CATENIN or AXIN proteins), an increasing number of studies suggest t...

  13. Evaluation of MGMT Promoter Methylation Status and Correlation with Temozolomide Response in Orthotopic Glioblastoma Xenograft Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kitange, Gaspar J.; Carlson, Brett L.; Mladek, Ann C.; Decker, Paul A.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Wu, Wenting; Grogan, Patrick T.; Giannini, Caterina; Ballman, Karla V.; Buckner, Jan C.; James, C. David; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2008-01-01

    CpG methylation within the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is associated with enhanced survival of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Although MGMT promoter is methylated in ~50% of GBM, several studies have reported a lack of correlation between MGMT methylation and protein expression levels and consequently inaccurate discrimination of TMZ sensitive and resistant patients. To understand the limitations of currently used assays, TMZ...

  14. Optical Touch Pointer for Fluorescence Guided Glioblastoma Resection Using 5-Aminolevulinic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Richter, Johan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Wårdell, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective Total tumor resection in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is difficult to achieve due to the tumor's infiltrative way of growing and morphological similarity to the surrounding functioning brain tissue. The diagnosis is usually subjectively performed using a surgical microscope. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a hand-held optical touch pointer using a fluorescence spectroscopy system to quantitatively distinguish healthy from maligna...

  15. Real-time multi-modality imaging of Glioblastoma tumor resection and recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Hingtgen, Shawn; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Farrar, Christian; Duebgen, Matthias; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Bhere, Deepak; Shah, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    The lack of relevant pre-clinical animal models incorporating the clinical scenario of GBM resection and recurrence has contributed significantly to the inability to successfully treat the devastating brain tumor Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A multi-modality imaging approach that allows real-time assessment of tumor resection during surgery and non-invasive detection of post-operative tumor volumes is urgently needed. In this study, we report the development and implementation of an optical...

  16. Temozolomide suppresses MYC via activation of TAp63 to inhibit progression of human glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaki, Tomohiro; Suenaga, Yusuke; Iuchi, Toshihiko; Alagu, Jennifer; Takatori, Atsushi; Itami, Makiko; Araki, Akinobu; Ohira, Miki; Inoue, Masahiro; Kageyama, Hajime; Yokoi, Sana; Saeki, Naokatsu; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly invasive and chemoradioresistant brain malignancy. Temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA-alkylating agent, is effective against GBM and has become the standard first-line drug. However, the mechanism by which TMZ regulates the progression of GBM remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that TMZ targets TAp63, a p53 family member, inducing its expression to suppress the progression of human GBM. High levels of TAp63 expression in GBM tissues after TMZ treatment was a...

  17. Response as a predictor of survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab

    OpenAIRE

    Prados, Michael; Cloughesy, Timothy; Samant, Meghna; Fang, Liang; Wen, Patrick Y.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Schiff, David; Abrey, Lauren E; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Paleologos, Nina; Nicholas, Martin K.; Jensen, Randy; Vredenburgh, James; Das, Asha; Friedman, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Development of effective therapies for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and reliable, timely evaluation of their benefit are needed. Understanding the relationship between objective response (OR) and survival is important for determining whether OR can provide an early signal of treatment activity in clinical trials. We performed a landmark analysis to evaluate the association between OR and survival at 9, 18, and 26 weeks for 167 patients with recurrent GBM who participated in BRAIN, ...

  18. Valganciclovir and bevacizumab for recurrent glioblastoma: A single-institution experience

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Chengwei; Wang, Jialing; Tanksley, Jarred P.; Mobley, Bret C.; Gregory D. Ayers; Moots, Paul L.; Clark, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged treatment with adjuvant valganciclovir has been shown in one retrospective study to exert a significant effect on overall survival (OS) in newly diagnosed patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, studies evaluating the effectiveness of valganciclovir in the treatment of recurrent GBM have not been performed. We evaluated the effect of valganciclovir in the recurrent setting in combination with bevacizumab therapy. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treat...

  19. Molecular properties of CD133+ glioblastoma stem cells derived from treatment-refractory recurrent brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qinghai; Nguyen, David H.; DONG, QINGHUA; Shitaku, Peter; Chung, Kenneth; Liu, On Ying; Jonathan L Tso; Liu, Jason Y; Konkankit, Veerauo; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Mischel, Paul S; Lane, Timothy F.; Liau, Linda M.; Stanley F Nelson; Tso, Cho-Lea

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains refractory to conventional therapy. CD133+ GBM cells have been recently isolated and characterized as chemo-/radio-resistant tumor-initiating cells and are hypothesized to be responsible for post-treatment recurrence. In order to explore the molecular properties of tumorigenic CD133+ GBM cells that resist treatment, we isolated CD133+ GBM cells from tumors that are recurrent and have previously received chemo-/radio-therapy. We found that the purified CD1...

  20. Continuous Low-Dose Temozolomide Chemotherapy and Microvessel Density in Recurrent Glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Jong-Yun; Yang, Seung Ho; Lee, Youn Soo; Lee, Su Youn; Kim, Jeana; Hong, Yong Kil

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of continuous low-dose temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy for recurrent and TMZ-refractory glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and to study the relationship between its efficacy and microvessel density within the tumor. Methods Thirty patients who had recurrent GBM following Stupp's regimen received TMZ daily at 50 mg/m2/day until tumor progression between 2007 and 2013. The median duration of continuous low-dose TMZ administrat...

  1. Induction of MGMT expression is associated with temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Kitange, Gaspar J.; Carlson, Brett L.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Grogan, Patrick T.; Lamont, Jeff D.; Decker, Paul A.; Wu, Wenting; James, C. David; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2009-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ)-based therapy is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and resistance to this drug in GBM is modulated by the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase (MGMT). Expression of MGMT is silenced by promoter methylation in approximately half of GBM tumors, and clinical studies have shown that elevated MGMT protein levels or lack of MGMT promoter methylation is associated with TMZ resistance in some, but not all, GBM tumors. In thi...

  2. Multidrug-induced erythema multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, S R; Karakaya, G; Erkin, G; Kalyoncu, A F

    2007-01-01

    Adverse skin reactions to drugs are frequent, with rates of reaction to many commonly used drugs exceeding 1%. We describe a 29-year-old woman admitted with a history of itching, rash, vesicles on her hands and soles, and edema on her tongue and oropharynx after trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, methenamine anhydromethylene citrate, piroxicam, azithromycin, and ceftriaxone intake. Erythema multiforme (EM) was diagnosed by skin biopsy after oral challenge with piroxicam. EM lesions reappeared after oral challenge with levofloxacin. Although EM is quite common with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and there are some reports of EM appearing after intake of ciprofloxacin, it has rarely been attributed to piroxicam and no reports have identified levofloxacin as a cause. PMID:17583109

  3. Imatinib in combination with hydroxyurea versus hydroxyurea alone as oral therapy in patients with progressive pretreated glioblastoma resistant to standard dose temozolomide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dresemann, G.; Weller, M.; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann Maria;

    2010-01-01

    A randomized, multicenter, open-label, phase 3 study of patients with progressive, recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) for whom front-line therapy had failed was conducted. This study was designed to determine whether combination therapy with imatinib and hydroxyurea (HU) has superior antitumor...

  4. Case Report: Pregnancy in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/27s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Flechl

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a woman with relapsed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM who recently gave birth. She announced her pregnancy shortly after the sixth cycle of a dense regimen of temozolomide, prescribed for treating the first recurrence of glioblastoma. Three years ago, in April 2008, she had undergone gross total resection of a glioblastoma multiforme in the postcentral region of the right hemisphere and had subsequently received treatment according to the actual standard therapy consisting of radiotherapy up to 60 Gy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. The complete amount of temozolomide given before this pregnancy was 20.9 mg/m2. Nevertheless, she delivered a 1890 g child by caesarean section in the 32/6 week of pregnancy. The child showed no anomalies and is developing normally under close surveillance by paediatricians.

  5. Cystic hemangioblastoma of the brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agrawal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioblastomas are very highly vascular neoplasm with benign characteristics and; in comparison to cerebellar hemangioblastoma; cases of cystic hemangioblastoma of the brain stem are rare with only a few case reports available in the literature. We report the case of a 43-year-old-female with cystic hemagioblastoma of the brainstem managed successfully and review the relevant literature.

  6. Cystic hemangioblastoma of the brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Agrawal; Anand Kakani; Vagh, Sunita J; Hiwale, Kishore M; Gaurav Kolte

    2010-01-01

    Hemangioblastomas are very highly vascular neoplasm with benign characteristics and; in comparison to cerebellar hemangioblastoma; cases of cystic hemangioblastoma of the brain stem are rare with only a few case reports available in the literature. We report the case of a 43-year-old-female with cystic hemagioblastoma of the brainstem managed successfully and review the relevant literature.

  7. Inhibition of Autophagy by Chloroquine Enhances the Antitumor Efficacy of Sorafenib in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyu; Sun, Kangjian; Wang, Handong; Dai, Yuyuan

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and common brain tumor in adults. Sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor, has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis through inhibition of STAT3 signaling in glioblastoma cells and in intracranial gliomas. However, sorafenib also induces cell autophagy. Due to the dual roles of autophagy in tumor cell survival and death, the therapeutic effect of sorafenib on glioblastoma is uncertain. Here, we combined sorafenib treatment in GBM cells (U373 and LN229) and tumors with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. We found that blockage of autophagy further inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest the possibility of combination treatment with sorafenib and autophagy inhibitors for GBM. PMID:26971793

  8. Yes and PI3K bind CD95 to signal invasion of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleber, Susanne; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Wiestler, Benedict; Beisel, Alexandra; Gieffers, Christian; Hill, Oliver; Thiemann, Meinolf; Mueller, Wolf; Sykora, Jaromir; Kuhn, Andreas; Schreglmann, Nina; Letellier, Elisabeth; Zuliani, Cecilia; Klussmann, Stefan; Teodorczyk, Marcin; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Ganten, Tom M; Sültmann, Holger; Tüttenberg, Jochen; von Deimling, Andreas; Regnier-Vigouroux, Anne; Herold-Mende, Christel; Martin-Villalba, Ana

    2008-03-01

    Invasion of surrounding brain tissue by isolated tumor cells represents one of the main obstacles to a curative therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Here we unravel a mechanism regulating glioma infiltration. Tumor interaction with the surrounding brain tissue induces CD95 Ligand expression. Binding of CD95 Ligand to CD95 on glioblastoma cells recruits the Src family member Yes and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to CD95, which signal invasion via the glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta pathway and subsequent expression of matrix metalloproteinases. In a murine syngeneic model of intracranial GBM, neutralization of CD95 activity dramatically reduced the number of invading cells. Our results uncover CD95 as an activator of PI3K and, most importantly, as a crucial trigger of basal invasion of glioblastoma in vivo. PMID:18328427

  9. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae-Hee, E-mail: leedneo@gmail.com [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of VA (United States); Jung, Chang-Hwa [Division of Metabolism and Functionality Research, Korea Food Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong J. [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Park, Daeho, E-mail: daehopark@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  10. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway

  11. Successful Treatment of Intracranial Glioblastoma Xenografts With a Monoamine Oxidase B-Activated Pro-Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn A. Sharpe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The last major advance in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM was the introduction of temozolomide in 1999. Treatment with temozolomide following surgical debulking extends survival rate compared to radiotherapy and debulking alone. However, virtually all glioblastoma patients experience disease progression within 7 to 10 months. Although many salvage treatments, including bevacizumab, rechallenge with temozolomide, and other alkylating agents, have been evaluated, none of these clearly improves survival. Monoamine oxidase B (MAOB is highly expressed in glioblastoma cell mitochondria, and mitochondrial function is intimately tied to treatment-resistant glioblastoma progression. These glioblastoma properties provide a strong rationale for pursuing a MAOB-selective pro-drug treatment approach that, upon drug activation, targets glioblastoma mitochondria, especially mitochondrial DNA. MP-MUS is the lead compound in a family of pro-drugs designed to treat GBM that is converted into the mature, mitochondria-targeting drug, P+-MUS, by MAOB. We show that MP-MUS can successfully kill primary gliomas in vitro and in vivo mouse xenograft models.

  12. Brainstem evoked potentials in infantile spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ten patients with infantile spasms, brainstem evoked potentials and MRI examinations were performed to evaluate the brainstem involvement. The result of short latency somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) following the right median nerve stimulation revealed abnormal findings including the absence or low amplitudes of the waves below wave P3 and delayed central conduction time in 7 of the ten patients. The result of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) revealed abnormal findings including low amplitudes of wave V, prolonged interpeak latency of waves I-V and absence of the waves below wave IV in 5 of the ten patients. The result of the MRI examinations revealed various degrees of the brainstem atrophy in 6 of the ten patients, all of whom showed abnormal brainstem evoked potentials. The result of this study demonstrates that patients with infantile spasms are frequently associated with brainstem dysfunction and raises the possibility that brainstem atrophy might be a cause of infantile spasms. (author)

  13. Brainstem reflexes and brainstem auditory evoked responses in Huntington's chorea.

    OpenAIRE

    Bollen, E; Arts, R.J.; Roos, R A; van der Velde, E A; Buruma, O J

    1986-01-01

    Blink reflex, corneal reflex, jaw reflex, exteroceptive suppression in masseter muscles and brainstem auditory evoked potentials were measured in 20 patients with Huntington's chorea and 12 controls. A significantly increased latency of the second component of the homolateral and heterolateral blink reflex was found in the patient group as compared with the controls. The other investigations revealed no significant differences between patients and controls except for some facilitation of the ...

  14. miR-155 is up-regulated in primary and secondary glioblastoma and promotes tumour growth by inhibiting GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, Pietro I; D'Urso, Oscar F; Storelli, Carlo; Mallardo, Massimo; Gianfreda, Cosimo Damiano; Montinaro, Antonio; Cimmino, Antonia; Pietro, Caliandro; Marsigliante, Santo

    2012-07-01

    An altered expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes both to the development of cancer and to the progression of the disease. Malignant tumours and tumour cell lines have widespread deregulated expressions of miRNAs compared to normal tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression profiles of 340 mammalian miRNAs in 93 cases of multiform glioblastoma (primary and secondary glioblastoma tumours), by means of DNA microarrays. We show that the expression profiles of 10 miRNAs can distinguish primary from secondary glioblastoma types. Moreover, we found elevated miR-155 levels in primary and secondary glioblastoma tissues as well as in glioblastoma primary cultures. We hypothesised that γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor 1 (GABRA1) is a miR-155 target, and studied the correlation between miR-155 up-regulation and the GABRA1 protein in cultured glioblastoma cells by miRNA silencing. We show that a decrease in miR-155 expression to normal levels restores the expression of GABRA1, making glioblastoma cells sensitive to signals that inhibit cell proliferation mediated by GABRA1. In conclusion, the expression patterns of different miRNAs characterise primary and secondary glioblastomas. The aberrant overexpression of miR-155 contributes to the malignant phenotype of glioblastoma cells removing growth inhibition. PMID:22470130

  15. Differential profiling studies of N-linked glycoproteins in glioblastoma cancer stem cells upon treatment with γ-secretase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Lan; Liu, Yashu; He, Jintang; Flack, Callie G.; Talsma, Caroline E.; Crowley, Jessica G.; Muraszko, Karin M.; Fan, Xing; Lubman, David M

    2011-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Notch pathway blockade by γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) depletes cancer stem cells (CSCs) in Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) through reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis. However, the detailed mechanism by which the manipulation of Notch signal induces alterations on post-translational modifications such as glycosylation has not been investigated. Herein, we present a differential profiling work to detect the change of glycosylation pattern upon drug trea...

  16. O6-Methylguanine DNA methyltransferase protein expression in tumor cells predicts outcome of temozolomide therapy in glioblastoma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Pirker, Christine; Filipits, Martin; Lötsch, Daniela; Buchroithner, Johanna; Pichler, Josef; Silye, Rene; Weis, Serge; Micksche, Michael; Fischer, Johannes; Berger, Walter

    2009-01-01

    O6-Methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is implicated as a major predictive factor for treatment response to alkylating agents including temozolomide (TMZ) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. However, whether the MGMT status in GBM patients should be detected at the level of promoter methylation or protein expression is still a matter of debate. Here, we compared promoter methylation (by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction) and protein expression (by Western blot) in t...

  17. BMP2 sensitizes glioblastoma stem-like cells to Temozolomide by affecting HIF-1α stability and MGMT expression

    OpenAIRE

    Persano, L; Pistollato, F; Rampazzo, E; Della Puppa, A; Abbadi, S; Frasson, C; Volpin, F; S. Indraccolo; Scienza, R; G. Basso

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common brain tumour, characterized by a central and partially necrotic (i.e., hypoxic) core enriched in cancer stem cells (CSCs). We previously showed that the most hypoxic and immature (i.e., CSCs) GBM cells were resistant to Temozolomide (TMZ) in vitro, owing to a particularly high expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT), the most important factor associated to therapy resistance in GBM. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), and in...

  18. RM-05CASE OF GLIOBLASTOMA PATIENT TREATED WITH NovoTTF THERAPY AT RECURRENCE DEGENERATING TO SARCOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Majd, Pejman; O'Connell, Daniel; Kim, Ronald; Bota, Daniela; Carrillo, Jose

    2014-01-01

    NovoTTF treatment is an FDA approved treatment strategy for recurrent Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) management which employs alternating electric fields to the region of the malignant tumor through probes on the patient's head which is thought to improve time to disease progression of GBM via cell cycle mitosis disruption. A patient is described with recurrent GBM who had disease progression following initial standard surgical treatment and concomitant chemo-radiotherapy and was found to have...

  19. CS-04STAT3 INVOLVEMENT IN AN EMT-LIKE PROCESS IN GLIOBLASTOMA BRAIN TUMOR INITIATING CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Chesnelong, Charles; Luchman, Artee; Gregory Cairncross, J.; Weiss, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive subtype of brain tumour with a median survival of 15 months. Currently, GBM is managed by a combination of maximal safe resection followed by radiation and chemotherapy. However, GBM invariably recurs, highlighting the need to better delineate the basis of recurrent disease and develop novel more effective and targeted therapies. The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is abnormally active in GBM. A growing body of ev...

  20. Afatinib, an irreversible ErbB family blocker, with protracted temozolomide in recurrent glioblastoma: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Alshami, Jad; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Owen, Scott; Kavan, Petr; Gibson, Neil; Solca, Flavio; Cseh, Agnieszka; Reardon, David A.; Muanza, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    There are few effective treatments for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We present a patient with recurrent GBM who achieved a prolonged response to treatment with afatinib, an irreversible ErbB family blocker, plus temozolomide. A 58-year-old female patient was diagnosed with multifocal primary GBM. After surgical resection, first-line therapy comprised radiotherapy and temozolomide. Following disease progression after 3 temozolomide cycles, the patient entered a phase I/II clinical ...

  1. Lyme disease of the brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement typically causes local inflammation, most commonly meningitis, but rarely parenchymal brain involvement. We describe a patient who presented with clinical findings suggesting a brainstem process. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) suggested a brainstem neoplasm. Prior to biopsy, laboratory evaluation led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. Clinical and imaging abnormalities improved markedly following antimicrobial therapy. We describe Lyme disease involvement of the cerebellar peduncles with hypermetabolism on PET. Although MRI is the primary imaging modality for most suspected CNS pathology, the practical applications of PET continue to expand. (orig.)

  2. Lyme disease of the brainstem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalina, Peter [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Decker, Andrew [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Department of Neurology, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Kornel, Ezriel [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Halperin, John J. [North Shore University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Manhasset, NY (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement typically causes local inflammation, most commonly meningitis, but rarely parenchymal brain involvement. We describe a patient who presented with clinical findings suggesting a brainstem process. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) suggested a brainstem neoplasm. Prior to biopsy, laboratory evaluation led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. Clinical and imaging abnormalities improved markedly following antimicrobial therapy. We describe Lyme disease involvement of the cerebellar peduncles with hypermetabolism on PET. Although MRI is the primary imaging modality for most suspected CNS pathology, the practical applications of PET continue to expand. (orig.)

  3. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zanini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is a recently described tumor that occurs predominantly in the hypothalamic-chiasmatic region and is rarely found elsewhere. It has similar features as pilocytic astrocytomas, but has distinct histological characteristics and a poorer prognosis. A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is an aggressive tumor, and increased awareness is necessary with a suspect case. We present the first case of a pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem described after the newest World Health Organization classification of central nervous system tumors.

  4. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Antonio Zanini; Ducati Gustavo Luis; Roberto Colichio Gabarra; Adriana Yuki Mello; Ismael Augusto Lombardi; Flavio Ramalho Romero; Francisco Otavio Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is a recently described tumor that occurs predominantly in the hypothalamic-chiasmatic region and is rarely found elsewhere. It has similar features as pilocytic astrocytomas, but has distinct histological characteristics and a poorer prognosis. A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is an aggressive tumor, and increased awareness is necessary with a suspect case. We present the first case of a pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem described after the newest World Health...

  5. Brainstem evoked potentials in panic disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Knott, V J; Bakish, D; Barkley, J.

    1994-01-01

    Patient reports and laboratory tests support the notion that panic attacks are generated by stimulation of brainstem nuclei. Scalp-recorded brainstem auditory evoked potentials may serve as a unique measurement strategy for the noninvasive assessment of the role of brainstem functioning in panic disorder. Ipsilateral and contralateral BSAEP recordings were examined in response to separate left and right ear click stimulation in 28 patients with a diagnosis of panic disorder and in 18 normal c...

  6. Gamma Knife Treatment of Brainstem Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Halloran E.; Larson, Erik W.; Fairbanks, Robert K; Mackay, Alexander R.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Call, Jason A.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Ling, Benjamin C; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S; Ben Peressini; Lee, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The management of brainstem metastases is challenging. Surgical treatment is usually not an option, and chemotherapy is of limited utility. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a promising palliative treatment modality in these cases. The goal of this study is to assess our single institution experience treating brainstem metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). This retrospective chart review studied 41 patients with brainstem metastases treated with GKRS. The most common primary...

  7. Bayesian segmentation of brainstem structures in MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Bhatt, Priyanka;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to segment four brainstem structures (midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata and superior cerebellar peduncle) from 3D brain MRI scans. The segmentation method relies on a probabilistic atlas of the brainstem and its neighboring brain structures. To build the atlas, w...... is able to detect differential effects of AD on the brainstem structures. The method will be implemented as part of the popular neuroimaging package FreeSurfer....

  8. Brainstem haematoma due to presumed cryptic telangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, R S

    1986-01-01

    Three patients with primary brainstem haematoma are reported. The clinical presentation suggested an initial diagnosis of pontine tumour in two and demyelination in one patient. The subacute course is characteristic of brainstem haematoma due to presumed cryptic telangiectasia, the abnormal vessels being destroyed by the haemorrhage. These findings emphasise the importance of considering haematoma due to cryptic telangiectasia in the differential diagnosis of subacute brainstem lesions.

  9. Rapamycin-mediated mTOR inhibition attenuates survivin and sensitizes glioblastoma cells to radiation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arunkumar Anandharaj; Senthilkumar Cinghu; Woo-Yoon Park

    2011-01-01

    Survivin, an antiapoptotic protein, is elevated in most malignancies and attributes to radiation resistance in tumors including glioblastoma multiforme. The downregulation of survivin could sensitize glioblastoma ceils to radiation therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in attenuating survivin and enhancing the therapeutic efficacy for glioblastoma cells, and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Here we tested various concentrations of rapamycin (1-8 nM) in combination with radiation dose 4 Gy. Rapamycin effectively modulated the protein kinase B (Akt)/mTOR pathway by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR proteins, and this inhibition was further enhanced by radiation. The expression level of survivin was decreased in rapamycin pre-treatment glioblastoma ceils followed by radiation; meanwhile, the phosphorylation of H2A histone family member X (H2AX) at serine-139 (γ-H2AX) was increased, p21 protein was also induce on radiation with rapamycin pre-treatment, which enhanced G1 arrest and the accumulation of cells at G0/subG1 phase. Furthermore, the clonogenic cell survival assay revealed a significant dose-dependent decrease in the surviving fraction for all three cell lines pre-treated with rapamycin. Our studies demonstrated that targeting survivin may be an effective approach for radiosensitization of malignant glioblastoma.

  10. The role of IDH1 mutated tumour cells in secondary glioblastomas: an evolutionary game theoretical view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in clinical medicine have elucidated two significantly different subtypes of glioblastoma which carry very different prognoses, both defined by mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1). The mechanistic consequences of this mutation have not yet been fully clarified, with conflicting opinions existing in the literature; however, IDH-1 mutation may be used as a surrogate marker to distinguish between primary and secondary glioblastoma multiforme (sGBM) from malignant progression of a lower grade glioma. We develop a mathematical model of IDH-1 mutated secondary glioblastoma using evolutionary game theory to investigate the interactions between four different phenotypic populations within the tumor: autonomous growth, invasive, glycolytic, and the hybrid invasive/glycolytic cells. Our model recapitulates glioblastoma behavior well and is able to reproduce two recent experimental findings, as well as make novel predictions concerning the rate of invasive growth as a function of vascularity, and fluctuations in the proportions of phenotypic populations that a glioblastoma will experience under different microenvironmental constraints

  11. Auditory brainstem response in dolphins.

    OpenAIRE

    Ridgway, S. H.; Bullock, T H; Carder, D.A.; Seeley, R L; Woods, D.; Galambos, R

    1981-01-01

    We recorded the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in four dolphins (Tursiops truncatus and Delphinus delphis). The ABR evoked by clicks consists of seven waves within 10 msec; two waves often contain dual peaks. The main waves can be identified with those of humans and laboratory mammals; in spite of a much longer path, the latencies of the peaks are almost identical to those of the rat. The dolphin ABR waves increase in latency as the intensity of a sound decreases by only 4 microseconds/dec...

  12. Evaluation of a Novel Approach for Automatic Volume Determination of Glioblastomas Based on Several Manual Expert Segmentations

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Kuhnt, Daniela; Carl, Barbara; Kappus, Christoph; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant primary brain tumor and is one of the highest malignant human neoplasms. During the course of disease, the evaluation of tumor volume is an essential part of the clinical follow-up. However, manual segmentation for acquisition of tumor volume is a time-consuming process. In this paper, a new approach for the automatic segmentation and volume determination of glioblastomas (glioblastoma multiforme) is presented and evaluated. The approach uses a user-defined seed point inside the glioma to set up a directed 3D graph. The nodes of the graph are obtained by sampling along rays that are sent through the surface points of a polyhedron. After the graph has been constructed, the minimal s-t cut is calculated to separate the glioblastoma from the background. For evaluation, 12 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data sets were manually segmented slice by slice, by neurosurgeons with several years of experience in the resection of gliomas. Afterwards, the manual se...

  13. Erythema Multiforme Following Application of Hair Dye

    OpenAIRE

    Sankha Koley; Jyotirindranath Sarkar; Sanjiv Choudhary; Suparna Dhara; Manoj Choudhury

    2012-01-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute mucocutaneous hypersensitivity reaction with varying degrees of blistering and ulceration. Common causes of EM are herpes simplex virus infection, mycoplasma infection, drug hypersensitivity, vaccination and drug-virus interaction. EM induced by contact dermatitis is rare. Paraphenylene diamine, a common ingredient in many hair dyes, is well known to produce allergic contact dermatitis. We report a 35-year-old lady presenting with EM following severe conta...

  14. Surgical management of spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Krishna Shrestha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage is the spontaneous brainstem hemorrhage associated with long term hypertension but not having definite focal or objective lesion. It is a catastrophic event which has a poor prognosis and usually managed conservatively. It is not uncommon, especially in eastern Asian populations, accounting approximately for 10% of the intracerebral hemorrhage. Before the advent of computed tomography, the diagnosis of brainstem hemorrhage was usually based on the clinical picture or by autopsy and believed to be untreatable via surgery. The introduction of computed tomography permitted to categorize the subtypes of brainstem hemorrhage with more predicted outcome. Continuous ongoing developments in the stereotactic surgery and microsurgery have added more specific surgical management in these patients. However, whether to manage conservatively or promptly with surgical evacuation of hematoma is still a controversy. Studies have shown that an accurate prognostic assessment based on clinical and radiological features on admission is critical for establishing a reasonable therapeutic approach. Some authors have advocate conservative management, whereas others have suggested the efficacy of surgical treatment in brainstem hemorrhage. With the widening knowledge in microsurgical techniques as well as neuroimaging technology, there seems to have more optimistic hope of surgical management of spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage for better prognosis. Here we present five cases of severe spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage patients who had undergone surgery; and explore the possibilities of surgical management in patients with the spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage.

  15. Canine Butterfly Glioblastomas: A Neuroradiological Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmeisl, John H.; Clapp, Kemba; Pancotto, Theresa E.; Emch, Samantha; Robertson, John L.; Debinski, Waldemar

    2016-01-01

    In humans, high-grade gliomas may infiltrate across the corpus callosum resulting in bihemispheric lesions that may have symmetrical, winged-like appearances. This particular tumor manifestation has been coined a “butterfly” glioma (BG). While canine and human gliomas share many neuroradiological and pathological features, the BG morphology has not been previously reported in dogs. Here, we describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of BG in three dogs and review the potential differential diagnoses based on neuroimaging findings. All dogs presented for generalized seizures and interictal neurological deficits referable to multifocal or diffuse forebrain disease. MRI examinations revealed asymmetrical (2/3) or symmetrical (1/3), bihemispheric intra-axial mass lesions that predominantly affected the frontoparietal lobes that were associated with extensive perilesional edema, and involvement of the corpus callosum. The masses displayed heterogeneous T1, T2, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal intensities, variable contrast enhancement (2/3), and mass effect. All tumors demonstrated classical histopathological features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), including glial cell pseudopalisading, serpentine necrosis, microvascular proliferation as well as invasion of the corpus callosum by neoplastic astrocytes. Although rare, GBM should be considered a differential diagnosis in dogs with an MRI evidence of asymmetric or symmetric bilateral, intra-axial cerebral mass lesions with signal characteristics compatible with glioma.

  16. Reciprocal Supportive Interplay between Glioblastoma and Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenchao; Bao, Shideng, E-mail: baos@ccf.org [Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2014-03-26

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive type of primary brain malignancy. Failures of the traditional therapies in treating GBMs raise the urgent requirement to develop new approaches with more responsive targets. The phenomenon of the high infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) into GBMs has been observed for a long time. Regardless of the limited knowledge about TAMs, the high percentage of supportive TAM in GBM tumor mass makes it possible to be a good target for GBM treatment. In this review, we discussed the unique features of TAMs in GBMs, including their origin, the tumor-supportive properties, the secreted cytokines, and the relevant mechanisms. In addition, we tried to interpret the current understandings about the interplay between GBM cancer cells and TAMs. Finally, the translational studies of targeting TAMs were also described.

  17. Repurposing antipsychotics as glioblastoma therapeutics: Potentials and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, JIN-KU; NAM, DO-HYUN; LEE, JEONGWU

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most lethal primary brain tumor, with tragically little therapeutic progress over the last 30 years. Surgery provides a modest benefit, and GBM cells are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. Despite significant development of the molecularly targeting strategies, the clinical outcome of GBM patients remains dismal. The challenges inherent in developing effective GBM treatments have become increasingly clear, and include resistance to standard treatments, the blood-brain barrier, resistance of GBM stem-like cells, and the genetic complexity and molecular adaptability of GBM. Recent studies have collectively suggested that certain antipsychotics harbor antitumor effects and have potential utilities as anti-GBM therapeutics. In the present review, the anti-tumorigenic effects and putative mechanisms of antipsychotics, and the challenges for the potential use of antipsychotic drugs as anti-GBM therapeutics are reviewed. PMID:26893731

  18. Genetic and clinical characteristics of primary and secondary glioblastoma is associated with differential molecular subtype distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rui; Li, Hailin; Yan, Wei; Yang, Pei; Bao, Zhaoshi; Zhang, Chuanbao; Jiang, Tao; You, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is classified into primary (pGBM) or secondary (sGBM) based on clinical progression. However, there are some limits to this classification for insight into genetically and clinically distinction between pGBM and sGBM. The aim of this study is to characterize pGBM and sGBM associating with differential molecular subtype distribution. Whole transcriptome sequencing data was used to assess the distribution of molecular subtypes and genetic alterations in 88 pGBM and...

  19. Modeling invasion of brain tissue by glioblastoma cells: ECM alignment and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    A key stage in the development of highly malignant brain tumors (Glioblastoma Multiforme) is invasion of normal brain tissue by motile cells moving through a crowded, complex environment. Evidence from in vitro experiments suggests the cell motion is accompanied by considerable deformation and alignment of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) of the brain. In the case of breast cancer, alignment effects of this sort have been seen in vivo. We have modeled features of this system including stress confinement in the non-linear elasticity of the ECM and contact guidance of the cell motion.

  20. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •BSG are classified on MRI into diffuse low-grade, malignant, focal tectal and exophytic subtypes. •Their prognosis and treatment is variable and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. •This article illustrates the imaging of adult BSGs on MRI and FET-PET. •We also describe prognostic factors and the treatment options of these tumours. -- Abstract: Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as 18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography (18F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours

  1. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, Bela, E-mail: purohitbela@yahoo.co.in; Kamli, Ali A.; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •BSG are classified on MRI into diffuse low-grade, malignant, focal tectal and exophytic subtypes. •Their prognosis and treatment is variable and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. •This article illustrates the imaging of adult BSGs on MRI and FET-PET. •We also describe prognostic factors and the treatment options of these tumours. -- Abstract: Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as {sup 18}F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours.

  2. EG-02CORRELATION OF MGMT PROMOTER METHYLATION STATUS ANALYSIS USING 6 MS-MLPA PROBES AND CLINICAL RESPONSE OF TEMOZOLOMIDE IN GLIOBLASTOMA PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Fakkert, Michelle; de Leng, Wendy; de Weger, Roel; Willems, Stefan; Spliet, Wim; Van Hecke, Wim; De Vos, Filip

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: For patients diagnosed with Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation is an important predictive factor for treatment with temozolomide (TMZ). MGMT reverses the toxic effect of alkylating chemotherapies like TMZ, therefore absence of the MGMT protein, due to promoter hypermethylation, results in greater tumor response and prolonged survival. MGMT methylation status can be determined using Methylation Specific Multiplex Ligat...

  3. Treatment with Tumor-Treating Fields Therapy and Pulse Dose Bevacizumab in Patients with Bevacizumab-Refractory Recurrent Glioblastoma: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Ansstas, George; Tran, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bevacizumab-refractory recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) have a poor prognosis. We propose that instead of continuing on bevacizumab, patients should switch to treatment with Optune™, a novel antimitotic Tumor-Treating Fields (TTFields) therapy approved in the United States for newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM. This would reserve bevacizumab for subsequent disease progression. In this case series, we describe 8 patients with recurrent GBM who had disease progression on be...

  4. AT-12PHASE 1/2 STUDY OF TH-302, INVESTIGATIONAL HYPOXIA-ACTIVATED PRODRUG, AND BEVACIZUMAB IN PATIENTS WITH BEVACIZUMAB-REFRACTORY RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Andrew; Floyd, John (S.I.), 1572-1649; Eng, Clarence; Kroll, Stew; Fichtel, Lisa; Gruslova, Aleksandra; Lodi, Alessia; Tiziani, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia is implicated in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and greater hypoxic burden is associated with poorer outcomes in GBM. Treatment with bevacizumab (BEV) may increase intratumoral hypoxia. An ongoing phase 1/2 study (NCT01403610) investigates safety and activity of TH-302, an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug, combined with BEV in patients with BEV-refractory GBM. METHODS: Single center, dose-escalation, prospective study with 2:1 randomization to ...

  5. Air pollution is associated with brainstem auditory nuclei pathology and delayed brainstem auditory evoked potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; D’Angiulli, Amedeo; Kulesza, Randy J.; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Osnaya, Norma; Romero, Lina; Keefe, Sheyla; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane M.; Avila-Ramirez, Jose; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; González-González, Luis Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We assessed brainstem inflammation in children exposed to air pollutants by comparing brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) and blood inflammatory markers in children age 96.3± 8.5 months from highly polluted (n=34) versus a low polluted city (n=17). The brainstems of nine children with accidental deaths were also examined. Children from the highly polluted environment had significant delays in wave III (t(50)=17.038; p

  6. Erythema multiforme following application of hair dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankha Koley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema multiforme (EM is an acute mucocutaneous hypersensitivity reaction with varying degrees of blistering and ulceration. Common causes of EM are herpes simplex virus infection, mycoplasma infection, drug hypersensitivity, vaccination and drug-virus interaction. EM induced by contact dermatitis is rare. Paraphenylene diamine, a common ingredient in many hair dyes, is well known to produce allergic contact dermatitis. We report a 35-year-old lady presenting with EM following severe contact dermatitis to hair dye. So far as we know, this is the first report from India describing EM following contact dermatitis.

  7. Brainstem involvement in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The parieto-occipital region of the brain is most frequently and severely affected in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE. The basal ganglia, cerebellum and corpus callosum are less commonly involved. Brainstem involvement is rarely described in SSPE, and usually there is involvement of other regions of the brain. We describe a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with brain magnetic resonance imaging showing extensive brainstem involvement without significant involvement of other cortical structures. Though rarely described in SSPE, one should be aware of such brainstem and cerebellum involvement, and SSPE should be kept in mind when brainstem signal changes are seen in brain MRI with or without involvement of other regions of brain to avoid erroneous reporting.

  8. Detection of brainstem involvemetn in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gradient Refocusing Technique, which seppresses the influence of cerebrospinal fluis (GSF) and vascular motion artifact on MRI sensitivity, is applied combined with Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEPs) and median Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs) in the evaluation of the brainstem in 30 MS patients with clinical signs of involvement of this structure in order to reevaluate the sensitivity of these techniques. (Author). 2 refs.; 1 tab

  9. Immunological Evasion in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña-Maldonado, Roxana; Chávez-Cortez, Elda Georgina; Olascoaga-Arellano, Nora Karen; López-Mejía, Mariana; Maldonado-Leal, Fernando Manuel; Sotelo, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive tumor in Central Nervous System in adults. Among its features, modulation of immune system stands out. Although immune system is capable of detecting and eliminating tumor cells mainly by cytotoxic T and NK cells, tumor microenvironment suppresses an effective response through recruitment of modulator cells such as regulatory T cells, monocyte-derived suppressor cells, M2 macrophages, and microglia as well as secretion of immunomodulators including IL-6, IL-10, CSF-1, TGF-β, and CCL2. Other mechanisms that induce immunosuppression include enzymes as indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase. For this reason it is important to develop new therapies that avoid this immune evasion to promote an effective response against glioblastoma. PMID:27294132

  10. Immunological Evasion in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Magaña-Maldonado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most aggressive tumor in Central Nervous System in adults. Among its features, modulation of immune system stands out. Although immune system is capable of detecting and eliminating tumor cells mainly by cytotoxic T and NK cells, tumor microenvironment suppresses an effective response through recruitment of modulator cells such as regulatory T cells, monocyte-derived suppressor cells, M2 macrophages, and microglia as well as secretion of immunomodulators including IL-6, IL-10, CSF-1, TGF-β, and CCL2. Other mechanisms that induce immunosuppression include enzymes as indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase. For this reason it is important to develop new therapies that avoid this immune evasion to promote an effective response against glioblastoma.

  11. Biological Rationale for the Use of PPARγ Agonists in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley Patricia Ellis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is the most common primary intrinsic CNS tumour and has an extremely poor overall survival, despite advances in neurosurgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. There has been interesting preliminary evidence suggesting that patients receiving the group of anti-diabetic drugs known as PPARγ (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists have a lower incidence of glioma. The nuclear hormone receptor PPARγ has been found to be expressed in high grade gliomas, and its activation has been shown to have several antineoplastic effects on human and rat glioma cell lines, and in some instances an additional protective increase in antioxidant enzymes has been observed in normal astrocytes. At present, no clinical trials are underway with regards to treating glioma patients using PPARγ agonists, as Pioglitazone and Rosiglitazone are only FDA-approved for use in treatment of type-2 diabetes. This review presents the case for evaluating the potential of PPARγ agonists as novel adjuvants in the treatment of high grade glioma. We introduce the PPARγ pathway, PPARγ gene and its products and examine recent research in glioblastoma.

  12. Wnt inhibitory factor-1 regulates glioblastoma cell cycle and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Fang, Jiasheng; Yang, Zhuanyi; Chen, Fenghua; Liu, Jingfang; Wang, Yanjin

    2012-10-01

    Wnt proteins are powerful regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, and activation of the Wnt signalling pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of several types of human tumours. Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) acts as a Wnt antagonist and tumour suppressor. Previous studies have shown that reducing expression of the WIF-1 gene aberrantly activates Wnt signalling and induces the development of certain types of cancers. In the present study, we examined the expression of WIF-1 in human primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumours. Studies using semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that WIF-1 expression is lower in human GBM than in normal brain tissue. To clarify the role of WIF-1, we transfected U251 human glioblastoma-derived cells, which do not express WIF-1, with the pcDNA3.1-WIF1 vector to restore WIF-1 expression. The results of cell proliferation, colony formation and apoptosis assays, as well as flow cytometry, indicate that exogenous WIF-1 has no effect on U251 cell apoptosis, but does arrest cells at the G(0)/G(1) phase and inhibit cell growth. Collectively, our data suggest that WIF-1 is a potent inhibitor of GBM growth. PMID:22901505

  13. Targeting strategies on miRNA-21 and PDCD4 for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Jun Jie; Tang, Hong Ming; To, Shing Shun Tony

    2015-08-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are often deregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Downregulation of microRNA-21 (miR-21), especially in GBM, is responsible for increased apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation and invasion, increased G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, and reduced chemotherapeutic resistance to doxorubicin. Furthermore, it is a critical regulator of multiple downstream genes and signaling pathways involved in gliomagenesis. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is critical in mediating apoptosis in GBM, and is downregulated by miR-21, which may mediate the resistance of glioblastoma cells against chemotherapy or radiation via its target genes PDCD4. Evidence is mounting that how alterations of these miRNAs transcription factors provide initiation, maintenance, or progression of tumors. This review will focus on the roles of miRNAs family members (particularly miR-21 and its target gene PDCD4) in tumors like glioblastoma and new targeting strategies, as examples some new targeting therapeutic methods and molecular mechanisms of signal pathways in glioblastoma therapeutics, to give the reader the current trends of approach to target regulation of these miRNA and genes for future glioma therapies. PMID:26142886

  14. Overexpression of miR-100 inhibits cell proliferation, migration, and chemosensitivity in human glioblastoma through FGFR3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan YX

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yongxin Luan,1 Shuyan Zhang,1 Ling Zuo,2 Lixiang Zhou1 1Department of Neurosurgery, First Bethune Hospital of Jilin University, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Second Bethune Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China Background: Glioblastoma multiforme is one of the most deadly forms of brain cancer. We investigated the regulatory effects of microRNA-100 (miR-100 on cell proliferation, migration, and chemosensitivity in human glioblastoma. Methods: miR-100 expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in both glioblastoma cells and human tumors. Lentiviruses of miR-100 mimics and inhibitors were transfected into U251 and T98G cells. The regulatory effects of either overexpressing or downregulating miR-100 on glioblastoma were evaluated by a viability assay, growth assay, migration assay, chemosensitivity assay, and an in vivo tumor transplantation assay. Expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3, the bioinformatically predicted target of miR-100, was examined by Western blot in glioblastoma. FGFR3 was then ectopically overexpressed in U251 and T98G cells, and its effects on miR-100-mediated cancer regulation were evaluated by growth, migration, and chemosensitivity assays. Results: MiR-100 was markedly downregulated in both glioblastoma cell lines and human tumors. Overexpressing miR-100 through lentiviral transfection in U251 and T98G cells significantly inhibited cancer growth (both in vitro and in vivo and migration and increased chemosensitivity to cisplatin and 1, 3-bis (2-chloroethyl-l-nitrosourea, whereas downregulation of miR-100 had no effects on development of cancer. FGFR3 was directly regulated by miR-100 in glioblastoma. Ectopically overexpressing FGFR3 was able to ameliorate the anticancer effects of upregulation of miR-100 on glioblastoma growth, migration, and chemosensitivity. Conclusion: MiR-100 was generally downregulated in glioblastoma. Overexpressing mi

  15. Brainstem Circuits Regulating Gastric Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travagli, R. Alberto; Hermann, Gerlinda E.; Browning, Kirsteen N.; Rogers, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Brainstem parasympathetic circuits that modulate digestive functions of the stomach are comprised of afferent vagal fibers, neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and the efferent fibers originating in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). A large body of evidence has shown that neuronal communications between the NTS and the DMV are plastic and are regulated by the presence of a variety of neurotransmitters and circulating hormones as well as the presence, or absence, of afferent input to the NTS. These data suggest that descending central nervous system inputs as well as hormonal and afferent feedback resulting from the digestive process can powerfully regulate vago-vagal reflex sensitivity. This paper first reviews the essential “static” organization and function of vago-vagal gastric control neurocircuitry. We then present data on the opioidergic modulation of NTS connections with the DMV as an example of the “gating” of these reflexes, i.e., how neurotransmitters, hormones, and vagal afferent traffic can make an otherwise static autonomic reflex highly plastic. PMID:16460274

  16. IMAGING WHITE MATTER IN HUMAN BRAINSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A Ford

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The human brainstem is critical for the control of many life-sustaining functions, such as consciousness, respiration, sleep, and transfer of sensory and motor information between the brain and the spinal cord. Most of our knowledge about structure and organization of white and gray matter within the brainstem is derived from ex vivo dissection and histology studies. However, these methods cannot be applied to study structural architecture in live human participants. Tractography from diffusion-weighted MRI may provide valuable insights about white matter organization within the brainstem in vivo. However, this method presents technical challenges in vivo due to susceptibility artifacts, functionally dense anatomy, as well as pulsatile and respiratory motion. To investigate the limits of MR tractography, we present results from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI of an intact excised human brainstem performed at 11.1T using isotropic resolution of 0.333, 1, and 2 mm, with the latter reflecting resolution currently used clinically. At the highest resolution, the dense fiber architecture of the brainstem is evident, but the definition of structures degrades as resolution decreases. In particular, the inferred corticopontine/corticospinal tracts (CPT/CST, superior (SCP and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP, and medial lemniscus (ML pathways are clearly discernable and follow known anatomical trajectories at the highest spatial resolution. At lower resolutions, the CST/CPT, SCP, and MCP pathways are artificially enlarged due to inclusion of collinear and crossing fibers not inherent to these three pathways. The inferred ML pathways appear smaller at lower resolutions, indicating insufficient spatial information to successfully resolve smaller fiber pathways. Our results suggest that white matter tractography maps derived from the excised brainstem can be used to guide the study of the brainstem architecture using diffusion MRI in vivo.

  17. Prognostic factors for survival of patients with glioblastoma: Recursive partitioning analysis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Survival for patients with glioblastoma multiforme is short, and current treatments provide limited benefit. Therefore, there is interest in conducting phase 2 trials of experimental treatments in newly diagnosed patients. However, this requires historical data with which to compare the experimental therapies. Knowledge of prognostic markers would also allow stratification into risk groups for phase 3 randomized trials. In this retrospective study of 832 glioblastoma multiforme patients enrolled into prospective clinical trials at the time of initial diagnosis, we evaluated several potential prognostic markers for survival to establish risk groups. Analyses were done using both Cox proportional hazards modeling and recursive partitioning analyses. Initially, patients from 8 clinical trials, 6 of which included adjuvant chemotherapy, were included. Subsequent analyses excluded trials with interstitial brachytherapy, and finally included only nonbrachytherapy trials with planned adjuvant chemotherapy. The initial analysis defined 4 risk groups. The 2 lower risk groups included patients under the age of 40, the lowest risk group being young patients with tumor in the frontal lobe only. An intermediate-risk group included patients with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) >70, subtotal or total resection, and age between 40 and 65. The highest risk group included all patients over 65 and patients between 40 and 65 with either KPS < 80 or biopsy only. Subgroup analyses indicated that inclusion of adjuvant chemotherapy provides an increase in survival, although that improvement tends to be minimal for patients over age 65, for patients over age 40 with KPS less than 80, and for those treated with brachytherapy. PMID:15279715

  18. Intracerebral neurocysticercosis mimicking glioblastoma multiforme: a rare differential diagnosis in Central Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 47-year-old Greek man presented with a 4-week history of speech difficulties. CT and MRI revealed a low-density multilobulated cystic frontal mass with peripheral ring contrast enhancement adjacent to the sylvian fissure. Examination was normal. Blood tests revealed leucocytosis (16,000 cells/μl) and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (30/52). A malignant brain tumour was suspected and surgically removed. Histological examination disclosed intracerebral neurocysticercosis. (orig.)

  19. SU-C-BRE-03: Dual Compartment Mathematical Modeling of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Kupelian, P; Kaprealian, T; Selch, M; Low, D; Pajonk, F; Sheng, K [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the aggressive recurrence and radioresistence of GBM with a dual compartment tumor survival mathematical model based on intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The repopulation and differentiation responses to radiotherapy of a solid tumor were simulated using an Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE). To obtain the tumor radiobiological parameters, we assumed that a tumor consists of two subpopulations, each with its distinctive linear quadratic parameters. The dual compartment cell survival model was constructed as SF(D)=F × exp(-α{sub 1} D-β{sub 1}D{sup 2}) + (1-F) × exp(-α{sub 2}D-β{sub 2}D{sup 2}) for a single fraction of treatment, with F as the fraction of CSC, and α and β describing the radiological properties of each population. Robust least square fitting was performed on clonogenic survival data from one GBM (U373MG) and one NSCLC (H460) cell line. The fit parameters were then used in the ODE model to predict treatment outcome of various treatment schemes. Results: The fit parameters from GBM cell survival data were (F, α{sub 1}, β{sub 1}, α{sub 2}, β{sub 2})=(0.0396, 0.0801, 0.0006, 0.1363, 0.0279), exhibiting two populations with distinctive radiological properties, CSC more radioresistant than DCC. The GBM cell line exhibited significantly poorer tumor control than its single compartment model prediction and NSCLC, which responded well to hypofrationation. The increased radioresistance was due to rapid regrowth of the DCC compartment triggered by its depletion while maintaining a viable CSC population. The rapid regrowth can be reduced by treating dose fractions ≤ 2 Gy with a prolonged treatment period. Conclusion: The interaction between a radioresistant CSC compartment and DCC compartment can explain the poor clinical outcome of GBM after radiotherapy despite dose escalation and hypofractionation attempts. Lower dose fractions result in better treatment outcome but still eventually recurs. Dose escalation beyond 100 Gy and/or differentiation therapy will be vital in achieving GBM tumor control.

  20. Modeling the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme and Cancer Stem Cells with Ordinary Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen Abernathy; Jeremy Burke

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in cancer therapy and treatments, tumor recurrence is a common event in cancer patients. One explanation of recurrence is that cancer therapy focuses on treatment of tumor cells and does not eradicate cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are postulated to behave similar to normal stem cells in that their role is to maintain homeostasis. That is, when the population of tumor cells is reduced or depleted by treatment, CSCs will repopulate the tumor, causing recurrence. In this pa...

  1. Nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon have genotoxic effects on glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzmann, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Jagiełło, Joanna; Koziński, Rafał; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Grodzik, Marta; Lipińska, Ludwika; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, Andrè

    2014-01-01

    The carbon-based nanomaterial family consists of nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon, which may have a number of interactions with biological systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles comprised of pristine graphene, reduced graphene oxide, graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond in a U87 cell line. The scope of the work consisted of structural analysis of the nanoparticles using transmission electron microscopy, evaluation of cell morphology, and assessment of cell viability by Trypan blue assay and level of DNA fragmentation of U87 cells after 24 hours of incubation with 50 μg/mL carbon nanoparticles. DNA fragmentation was studied using single-cell gel electrophoresis. Incubation with nanoparticles containing the allotropes of carbon did not alter the morphology of the U87 cancer cells. However, incubation with pristine graphene and reduced graphene oxide led to a significant decrease in cell viability, whereas incubation with graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond led to a smaller decrease in cell viability. The results of a comet assay demonstrated that pristine graphene, reduced graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond caused DNA damage and were therefore genotoxic in U87 cells, whereas graphene oxide was not. PMID:24876774

  2. Nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon have genotoxic effects on glioblastoma multiforme cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinzmann, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta;

    2014-01-01

    the U87 cancer cells. However, incubation with pristine graphene and reduced graphene oxide led to a significant decrease in cell viability, whereas incubation with graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond led to a smaller decrease in cell viability. The results of a comet assay...... demonstrated that pristine graphene, reduced graphene oxide, graphite, and ultradispersed detonation diamond caused DNA damage and were therefore genotoxic in U87 cells, whereas graphene oxide was not. © 2014 Hinzmann et al.......The carbon-based nanomaterial family consists of nanoparticles containing allotropes of carbon, which may have a number of interactions with biological systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of nanoparticles comprised evaluation of cell morphology, and assessment of cell...

  3. Treating glioblastoma multiforme with selective high-dose liposomal doxorubicin chemotherapy induced by repeated focused ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang FY

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Feng-Yi Yang1, Ming-Che Teng1, Maggie Lu2, Hsiang-Fa Liang2, Yan-Ru Lee1, Chueh-Chuan Yen3, Muh-Lii Liang4,5, Tai-Tong Wong51Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 2Drug Delivery Laboratory, Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu, 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, 4Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, 5Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: High-dose tissue-specific delivery of therapeutic agents would be a valuable clinical strategy. We have previously shown that repeated transcranial focused ultrasound is able to increase the delivery of Evans blue significantly into brain tissue. The present study shows that repeated pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU can be used to deliver high-dose atherosclerotic plaque-specific peptide-1 (AP-1-conjugated liposomes selectively to brain tumors.Methods: Firefly luciferase (Fluc-labeled human GBM8401 glioma cells were implanted into NOD-scid mice. AP-1-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin or liposomal doxorubicin alone was administered followed by pulsed HIFU and the doxorubicin concentration in the treated brains quantified by fluorometer. Growth of the labeled glioma cells was monitored through noninvasive bioluminescence imaging and finally the brain tissue was histologically examined after sacrifice.Results: Compared with the control group, the animals treated with 5 mg/kg injections of AP-1 liposomal doxorubicin or untargeted liposomal doxorubicin followed by repeated pulsed HIFU not only showed significantly enhanced accumulation of drug at the sonicated tumor site but also a significantly elevated tumor-to-normal brain drug ratio (P < 0.001. Combining repeated pulsed HIFU with AP-1 liposomal doxorubicin or untargeted liposomal doxorubicin has similar antitumor effects.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that targeted or untargeted liposomal doxorubicin, followed by repeated pulsed HIFU, is a promising high-dose chemotherapy method that allows the desired brain tumor region to be targeted specifically.Keywords: repeated focused ultrasound, interleukin-4 receptor, blood-brain barrier, brain tumor, target drug delivery

  4. SU-C-BRE-03: Dual Compartment Mathematical Modeling of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To explore the aggressive recurrence and radioresistence of GBM with a dual compartment tumor survival mathematical model based on intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The repopulation and differentiation responses to radiotherapy of a solid tumor were simulated using an Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE). To obtain the tumor radiobiological parameters, we assumed that a tumor consists of two subpopulations, each with its distinctive linear quadratic parameters. The dual compartment cell survival model was constructed as SF(D)=F × exp(-α1 D-β1D2) + (1-F) × exp(-α2D-β2D2) for a single fraction of treatment, with F as the fraction of CSC, and α and β describing the radiological properties of each population. Robust least square fitting was performed on clonogenic survival data from one GBM (U373MG) and one NSCLC (H460) cell line. The fit parameters were then used in the ODE model to predict treatment outcome of various treatment schemes. Results: The fit parameters from GBM cell survival data were (F, α1, β1, α2, β2)=(0.0396, 0.0801, 0.0006, 0.1363, 0.0279), exhibiting two populations with distinctive radiological properties, CSC more radioresistant than DCC. The GBM cell line exhibited significantly poorer tumor control than its single compartment model prediction and NSCLC, which responded well to hypofrationation. The increased radioresistance was due to rapid regrowth of the DCC compartment triggered by its depletion while maintaining a viable CSC population. The rapid regrowth can be reduced by treating dose fractions ≤ 2 Gy with a prolonged treatment period. Conclusion: The interaction between a radioresistant CSC compartment and DCC compartment can explain the poor clinical outcome of GBM after radiotherapy despite dose escalation and hypofractionation attempts. Lower dose fractions result in better treatment outcome but still eventually recurs. Dose escalation beyond 100 Gy and/or differentiation therapy will be vital in achieving GBM tumor control

  5. P17.47COMPREHENSIVE PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF BEVACIZUMAB-RESISTANT GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufman, K.L.; Ly, L.; McKay, M.; Mallawaaratchy, D.M.; Mactier, S.; Crossett, B.; Molloy, M; Buckland, M.E.; McDonald, K. L.; Christopherson, R. I.

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that impair tumour angiogenesis, i.e. therapeutic antibody anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, bevacizumab (BEV), are becoming standard therapy for recurrent GBM, despite having no impact on overall survival times. Resistance to BEV is fatal, and mechanisms are largely unexplored. With access to exceedingly rare fresh-frozen serial GBM tumours, we performed comprehensive quantitative proteome analyses to identify important mechanisms of BEV escape and tumour recurrence. Tumour tiss...

  6. Early clinical experience of boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron. 10B, to sensitize tumor cells to irradiation by low energy (thermal) neutrons. The interaction of the 10B with a thermal neutron (neutron capture) causes the 10B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the 10B(n, α)7Li reaction are very damaging to cells but have a combined path length in tissue of approximately 14 μm, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to 10B-loaded cells

  7. VEGF-dependent mechanism of anti-angiogenic action of diamond nanoparticles in Glioblastoma Multiforme tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodzik, M.; Sawosz, E.; Wierzbicki, M.;

    2012-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal cancers dependent on angiogenesis. The concept of treating tumors by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis was first articulated almost 30 years ago. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis suppresses both tumor growth and metastasis. We determined the inhibition effect of di...

  8. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  9. Glioblastoma Multiforme Segmentation in MRI Data with a Balloon Inflation Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Zukić, Dženan; Bauer, Miriam H A; Kuhnt, Daniela; Carl, Barbara; Freisleben, Bernd; Kolb, Andreas; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors, evolving from the cerebral supportive cells. For clinical follow-up, the evaluation of the preoperative tumor volume is essential. Volumetric assessment of tumor volume with manual segmentation of its outlines is a time-consuming process that can be overcome with the help of computer-assisted segmentation methods. In this paper, a semi-automatic approach for World Health Organization (WHO) grade IV glioma segmentation is introduced that uses balloon inflation forces, and relies on the detection of high-intensity tumor boundaries that are coupled by using contrast agent gadolinium. The presented method is evaluated on 27 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets and the ground truth data of the tumor boundaries - for evaluation of the results - are manually extracted by neurosurgeons.

  10. Early clinical experience of boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel, D.D.; Bergland, R.; Capala, J. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron. {sup 10}B, to sensitize tumor cells to irradiation by low energy (thermal) neutrons. The interaction of the {sup 10}B with a thermal neutron (neutron capture) causes the {sup 10}B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction are very damaging to cells but have a combined path length in tissue of approximately 14 {mu}m, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to {sup 10}B-loaded cells.

  11. LIN28 Is Involved in Glioma Carcinogenesis and Predicts Outcomes of Glioblastoma Multiforme Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Rong; ZHOU, JINGXU; Chen, Chao; Xu, Tao; Yan, Yong; Ma, Yushui; Zheng, Zongli; Shen, Yiping; Lu, Yicheng; Fu, Da; Chen, Juxiang

    2014-01-01

    LIN28, an evolutionarily conversed RNA binding protein which can bind to the terminal loops of let-7 family microRNA precursors and block their processing to maturation, is highly expressed in several subsets of tumors that carry poor prognoses, such as ovarian carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, colon carcinoma and germ cell carcinoma. However, there has been no study on the expression of LIN28 in glioma tissues or their importance as a prognostic predictor of glioma patients. This study ai...

  12. LIN28 is involved in glioma carcinogenesis and predicts outcomes of glioblastoma multiforme patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Qin

    Full Text Available LIN28, an evolutionarily conversed RNA binding protein which can bind to the terminal loops of let-7 family microRNA precursors and block their processing to maturation, is highly expressed in several subsets of tumors that carry poor prognoses, such as ovarian carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, colon carcinoma and germ cell carcinoma. However, there has been no study on the expression of LIN28 in glioma tissues or their importance as a prognostic predictor of glioma patients. This study aimed to examine the expression of LIN28 in glioma and correlate the results to patient outcome. We found that LIN28 expression was significantly higher in the group of patients with a poor prognosis compared to patients with a good prognosis by gene microarray. Log-rank analysis showed patients with higher LIN28 expression level in tumor had a shorter progression-free survival and overall survival times compared to those with lower LIN28 expression level. Similar results were also obtained from the tissue microarray analysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed high LIN28 expression was an independent prognostic factor for a shorter progression-free survival and overall survival in GBM patients. Furthermore in vitro experiments showed that down-regulation of LIN28 in U251 and U373 cells caused cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, delayed cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and resulted in fewer colonies compared to controls. Summarily, our data provides a potential target for cancer therapy as an approach to overcome the poor options currently available for GBM patients.

  13. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-associated erythema multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsaku Imashuku

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a well-known correlation between Herpes simplex (HSV infection and erythema multiforme (EM. More recently, in Japan, it was found that Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cp may promote the development of EM. All cases of Cp infection-associated EM that had been diagnosed in our clinic over the past two years (from 2011 to 2012 were analyzed. Cp infection was diagnosed on the basis of a significant increase (>2.00 in anti-Cp IgM titers, as measured by the HITAZYME-ELISA test. There were 7 cases of Cp-EM, one male and 6 females. Median age was 13 years (range 3-29 years. It is recommended that the possible involvement of Cp infection, besides HSV or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections, should be considered in all cases of EM.

  14. Erythema multiforme caused by sildenafil in an HIV(+) subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsios, C

    2016-03-01

    Erythema multiforme is mainly caused by drug allergy and infections. This is the case of a HIV-positive, 49-year-old male, recently cured for syphilis, that presented erythema multiforme minor, five days after taking sildenafil. He had a fast recovery, only with the use of antihistamines. Cell-mediated allergy to sildenafil was confirmed six months later, with the use of patch-tests. PMID:26934741

  15. [Fisher Syndrome and Bickerstaff Brainstem Encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    Fisher syndrome has been regarded as a peculiar inflammatory neuropathy with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia, whereas Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis has been considered a pure central nervous system disease characterized by ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and consciousness disturbance. Both disorders share common features including preceding infection, albumin-cytological dissociation, and association with Guillain-Barré syndrome. The discovery of anti-GQ1b IgG antibodies further supports the view that the two disorders represent a single disease spectrum. The lesions in Fisher syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis are presumably determined by the expression of ganglioside GQ1b in the human peripheral and central nervous systems. Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis is likely to represent a variant of Fisher syndrome with central nervous system involvement. PMID:26560952

  16. Brainstem tumors: Current management and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo F Recinos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors arising in the brainstem comprise 10-20% of all pediatric central nervous system (CNS tumors and account for a small percentage in adults. The prognosis for these tumors was considered uniformly poor prior to the era of modern neuroimaging and the location was fraught with disaster being considered a ′no man′s land′ for neurosurgeons. Following the introduction of advanced imaging modalities and neurophysiological monitoring, striking progress has occurred in the management of these lesions. Brainstem tumors are presently classified based on their anatomic location, focality, and histopathology. This article reviews the current classification of brainstem tumors, current management options, and future directions in the treatment for these rare tumors.

  17. Negative growth regulation in a glioblastoma tumor cell line that conditionally expresses human wild-type p53.

    OpenAIRE

    Mercer, W E; Shields, M T; Amin, M; Sauve, G J; Appella, E; Romano, J W; Ullrich, S J

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the effect that human wild-type p53 (wt-p53) expression has on cell proliferation we constructed a recombinant plasmid, pM47, in which wt-p53 cDNA is under transcriptional control of the hormone-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter linked to the dominant biochemical selection marker gene Eco gpt. The pM47 plasmid was introduced into T98G cells derived from a human glioblastoma multiforme tumor, and a stable clonal cell line, GM47.23, was derived that conditionally expre...

  18. Temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma occurs by miRNA-9-targeted PTCH1, independent of sonic hedgehog level

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz, Jessian L.; Rodriguez-Cruz, Vivian; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Ligon, Keith L.; Greco, Steven J.; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal adult primary tumor of the brain, showed a link between Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) pathway in the resistance to temozolomide (TMZ). PTCH1, the SHH receptor, can tonically represses signaling by endocytosis. We asked how the decrease in PTCH1 in GBM cells could lead to TMZ-resistance. TMZ resistant GBM cells have increased PTCH1 mRNA and reduced protein. Knockdown of Dicer, a Type III RNAase, indicated that miRNAs can explain the decreased PT...

  19. Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma Cell Lines: Implication of MGMT, MMR, P-Glycoprotein and CD133 Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Perazzoli

    Full Text Available The use of temozolomide (TMZ has improved the prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme patients. However, TMZ resistance may be one of the main reasons why treatment fails. Although this resistance has frequently been linked to the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT it seems that this enzyme is not the only molecular mechanism that may account for the appearance of drug resistance in glioblastoma multiforme patients as the mismatch repair (MMR complex, P-glycoprotein, and/or the presence of cancer stem cells may also be implicated.Four nervous system tumor cell lines were used to analyze the modulation of MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation by TMZ treatment. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine was used to demethylate the MGMT promoter and O(6-benzylguanine to block GMT activity. In addition, MMR complex and P-glycoprotein expression were studied before and after TMZ exposure and correlated with MGMT expression. Finally, the effect of TMZ exposure on CD133 expression was analyzed.Our results showed two clearly differentiated groups of tumor cells characterized by low (A172 and LN229 and high (SF268 and SK-N-SH basal MGMT expression. Interestingly, cell lines with no MGMT expression and low TMZ IC50 showed a high MMR complex expression, whereas cell lines with high MGMT expression and high TMZ IC50 did not express the MMR complex. In addition, modulation of MGMT expression in A172 and LN229 cell lines was accompanied by a significant increase in the TMZ IC50, whereas no differences were observed in SF268 and SK-N-SH cell lines. In contrast, P-glycoprotein and CD133 was found to be unrelated to TMZ resistance in these cell lines.These results may be relevant in understanding the phenomenon of TMZ resistance, especially in glioblastoma multiforme patients laking MGMT expression, and may also aid in the design of new therapeutic strategies to improve the efficacy of TMZ in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

  20. The transcriptome and miRNome profiling of glioblastoma tissues and peritumoral regions highlights molecular pathways shared by tumors and surrounding areas and reveals differences between short-term and long-term survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Fazi, Barbara; Felsani, Armando; Grassi, Luigi; Moles, Anna; D'Andrea, Daniel; Toschi, Nicola; Sicari, Daria; De Bonis, Pasquale; Anile, Carmelo; Guerrisi, Maria Giovanna; Luca, Emilia; Farace, Maria Giulia; Maira, Giulio; Ciafré, Silvia Anna; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadliest primary brain tumor, driving patients to death within 15 months after diagnosis (short term survivors, ST), with the exception of a small fraction of patients (long term survivors, LT) surviving longer than 36 months. Here we present deep sequencing data showing that peritumoral (P) areas differ from healthy white matter, but share with their respective frankly tumoral (C) samples, a number of mRNAs and microRNAs representative of...

  1. Dopamine signaling: target in glioblastoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2014), 1116-1117. ISSN 1949-2553 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Dopamine signaling * glioblastoma * MAPK Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.359, year: 2014

  2. Nine-year interval recurrence after treatment of boron neutron capture therapy in a patient with glioblastoma: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been reported to be effective in the patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Median survival time (MST) of GBM patients treated with BNCT is approximately two years. GBM patients surviving 2 or 3 years are considered long-term survivors. In general, most recurrences are local and dissemination is rare. We report an unusual patient with three recurrences; the first and the second recurrences were local, and the third recurrence was dissemination nine years after BNCT. - Highlights: • A patients with glioblastoma mutliforme could be alive more than 9 years after BNCT. • BNCT may be effective for the local control of GBM. • The following TMZ and conventional radiation may be effective for prevention of CSF dissemination

  3. Central mechanisms II: pharmacology of brainstem pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolser, D C

    2009-01-01

    Following systemic administration, centrally acting antitussive drugs are generally assumed to act in the brainstem to inhibit cough. However, recent work in humans has raised the possibility of suprapontine sites of action for cough suppressants. For drugs that may act in the brainstem, the specific locations, types of neurones affected, and receptor specificities of the compounds represent important issues regarding their cough-suppressant actions. Two medullary areas that have received the most attention regarding the actions of antitussive drugs are the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) and the caudal ventrolateral respiratory column. Studies that have implicated these two medullary areas have employed both microinjection and in vitro recording methods to control the location of action of the antitussive drugs. Other brainstem regions contain neurones that participate in the production of cough and could represent potential sites of action of antitussive drugs. These regions include the raphe nuclei, pontine nuclei, and rostral ventrolateral medulla. Specific receptor subtypes have been associated with the suppression of cough at central sites, including 5-HT1A, opioid (mu, kappa, and delta), GABA-B, tachykinin neurokinin-1 (NK-1) and neurokinin-2, non-opioid (NOP-1), cannabinoid, dopaminergic, and sigma receptors. Aside from tachykinin NK-1 receptors in the NTS, relatively little is known regarding the receptor specificity of putative antitussive drugs in particular brainstem regions. Our understanding of the mechanisms of action of antitussive drugs would be significantly advanced by further work in this area. PMID:18825342

  4. Ondine′s curse after brainstem infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso Jose; Baiense Robson; Scalzaretto Ana; Neto Pedro; Teixeira de Gois Aecio; Ferraz Maria

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of acquired Ondine′s curse. The patient developed central sleep apnea syndrome named Ondine′s curse after a brainstem infarction. Lesions involving the descending medullocervical pathways that subserve automatic breathing can result in this syndrome.

  5. Neuromyelitis Optica Lesion Mimicking Brainstem Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl who presented with weakness of the left extremities and right sided sixth cranial nerve palsy had neuromyelitis optica (NMO mistaken for brainstem glioma on MRI, in a report from Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine,Seoul, Republic of KoreaNeuromyelitis Optica, Optic-Spinal Syndrome, Spectroscopy.

  6. Brainstem Encephalitis and ADEM Following Mumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestations of brainstem encephalitis (BSE with fever, decreased level of consciousness, and left facial and abducens paralysis developed 1 week after bilateral parotitis and mumps in a 4 year-old female child and were followed by symptoms of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM within 20 days of recovery from BSE.

  7. A cost-minimising analysis of standard radiotherapy and two experimental therapies in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Accelerated radiotherapy (ART) and intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) have been introduced in the primary treatment of glioblastoma. Our objective was to determine total treatment costs, hospitalisation time, and treatment outcome in these two experimental therapies compared to standard treatment. Materials and methods: In the time period 1985 to 1st May 1999, a total of 174 patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma multiforme were given postoperative radiotherapy according to three different treatment schedules at three different time intervals. A conventional regime of external radiotherapy (54 Gy/30 fractions) was given to 58 patients (group I), 75 patients were treated with ART (48 Gy/twice daily 30 fractions) (group II), and 41 patients were given ICBT (60 Gy/ten fractions) (group III). Treatment costs including surgery, hospital stay, hospital hotel stay, and radiotherapy were calculated. Results: The total mean costs employing the three treatment alternatives were calculated to $25,618 (group I), $23,442 (group II), and $14,534 (group III). Total mean stay in hospital for the whole primary treatment was 48.8, 41.6, and 19 days for groups I, II, and III respectively. Median survival figures were 16, 14, and 13 months for groups I, II, and III, respectively. Conclusions: The total cost of postoperative radiotherapy in glioblastoma is comparable to other health care services. ART did not improve the total treatment cost or influence the need for hospitalisation compared to standard treatment. ICBT seemed to have economic benefits with less need for hospitalisation

  8. Glioblastoma, brain metastases and soft tissue sarcoma of extremities: Candidate tumors for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    10B-concentration ratios between human glioblastoma multiforme (U87MG), sarcoma (S3) and melanoma (MV3) xenografted in nu/nu mice and selected normal tissues were investigated to test for preferential 10B-accumulation. Animals received BSH, BPA or both compounds sequentially. Mean 10B-concentration ratios between tumor and normal tissues above 2 were found indicating therapeutic ratios. In addition to glioblastoma, brain metastases and soft tissue sarcoma appear to be promising targets for future BNCT research. - Highlights: • BSH leads to high 10B concentration ratios between sarcoma, muscle and brain as well as between glioblastoma and brain. • The 10B concentration in tumors is quite low as is the 10B concentration ratio between tumors and blood. • BPA-f leads to 10B accumulation in tumors relative to blood and advantageous absolute 10B concentrations in tumors. • The 10B concentration ratios between tumors and brain and sarcoma and muscle, are modest. • The advantage of the sequential injection of both compounds is an enhanced intratumoral 10B concentration

  9. Expression of the neurotrophin receptors Trk A and Trk B in adult human astrocytoma and glioblastoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shashi Wadhwa; Tapas C Nag; Anupam Jindal; Rahul Kushwaha; Ashok K Mahapatra; Chitra Sarkar

    2003-03-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors of the Trk family play a critical role in proliferation, differentiation and survival of the developing neurons. There are reports on their expression in neoplasms too, namely, the primitive neuroectodermal tumours of childhood, and in adult astrocytic gliomas. The involvement of Trk receptors in tumour pathogenesis, if any, is not known. With this end in view, the present study has examined 10 tumour biopsy samples (identified as astrocytoma, pilocytic astrocytoma and glioblastoma) and peritumoral brain tissue of adult patients, for the presence of Trk A and Trk B receptors, by immunohistochemistry. The nature of the tumour samples was also confirmed by their immunoreactivity (IR) to glial fibrillary acidic protein. In the peritumoral brain tissue, only neurons showed IR for Trk A and Trk B. On the contrary, in the tumour sections, the IR to both receptors was localized in the vast majority of glia and capillary endothelium. There was an obvious pattern of IR in these gliomas: high levels of IR were present in the low-grade (type I and II) astrocytoma; whereas in the advanced malignant forms (WHO grade IV giant cell glioblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme) the IR was very weak. These findings suggest that Trk A and Trk B are involved in tumour pathogenesis, especially in the early stage, and may respond to signals that elicit glial proliferation, and thus contribute to progression towards malignancy.

  10. A Novel Molecular Diagnostic of Glioblastomas: Detection of an Extracellular Fragment of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase μ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Burden-Gulley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently found that normal human brain and low-grade astrocytomas express the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ and that the more invasive astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, downregulate full-length PTPμ expression. Loss of PTPμ expression in GBMs is due to proteolytic cleavage that generates an intracellular and potentially a cleaved and released extracellular fragment of PTPμ. Here, we identify that a cleaved extracellular fragment containing the domains required for PTPμ-mediated adhesion remains associated with GBM tumor tissue. We hypothesized that detection of this fragment would make an excellent diagnostic tool for the localization of tumor tissue within the brain. To this end, we generated a series of fluorescently tagged peptide probes that bind the PTPμ fragment. The peptide probes specifically recognize GBM cells in tissue sections of surgically resected human tumors. To test whether the peptide probes are able to detect GBM tumors in vivo, the PTPμ peptide probes were tested in both mouse flank and intracranial xenograft human glioblastoma tumor model systems. The glial tumors were molecularly labeled with the PTPμ peptide probes within minutes of tail vein injection using the Maestro FLEX In Vivo Imaging System. The label was stable for at least 3 hours. Together, these results indicate that peptide recognition of the PTPμ extracellular fragment provides a novel molecular diagnostic tool for detection of human glioblastomas. Such a tool has clear translational applications and may lead to improved surgical resections and prognosis for patients with this devastating disease.

  11. Natural history and management of brainstem gliomas in adults. A retrospective Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaggi, A; Fariselli, L; Milanesi, I; Lamperti, E; Silvani, A; Bizzi, A; Maccagnano, E; Trevisan, E; Laguzzi, E; Rudà, R; Boiardi, A; Soffietti, R

    2008-02-01

    Brainstem gliomas in adults are rare tumors, with heterogeneous clinical course; only a few studies in the MRI era describe the features in consistent groups of patients. In this retrospective study, we report clinical features at onset, imaging characteristics and subsequent course in a group of 34 adult patients with either histologically proven or clinico-radiologically diagnosed brainstem gliomas followed at two centers in Northern Italy. Of the patients 18 were male, 14 female, with a median age of 31. In 21 of the patients histology was obtained and in 20 it was informative (2 pilocytic astrocytoma, 9 low-grade astrocytoma, 8 anaplastic astrocytoma and 1 glioblastoma). Contrast enhancement at MRI was present in 14 patients. In all of the 9 patients who were investigated with MR spectroscopy, the Cho/NAA ratio was elevated at diagnosis. In 8 of the patients, an initial watch and wait policy was adopted, while 24 were treated shortly after diagnosis with either radiotherapy alone [4] or radiotherapy and chemotherapy [20] (mostly temozolomide). Only minor radiological responses were observed after treatments; in a significant proportion of patients (9 out of 15) clinical improvement during therapy occurred in the context of radiologically (MRI) stable disease. Grade III or IV myelotoxicity was observed in 6 patients. After a follow-up ranging from 9 to 180 months, all but 2 patients have progressed and 14 have died (12 for disease progression, 2 for pulmonary embolism). Median overall survival time was of 59 months. Investigation of putative prognostically relevant parameters showed that a short time between disease onset and diagnosis was related to a shorter survival. Compared with literature data, our study confirms the clinical and radiological heterogeneity of adult brainstem gliomas and underscores the need for multicenter trials in order to assess the efficacy of treatments in these tumors. PMID:18293027

  12. Calcium signaling orchestrates glioblastoma development: Facts and conjunctures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Catherine; Haeich, Jacques; Aulestia, Francisco J; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Miller, Andrew L; Néant, Isabelle; Webb, Sarah E; Schaeffer, Etienne; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Moreau, Marc

    2016-06-01

    While it is a relatively rare disease, glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is one of the more deadly adult cancers. Following current interventions, the tumor is never eliminated whatever the treatment performed; whether it is radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or surgery. One hypothesis to explain this poor outcome is the "cancer stem cell" hypothesis. This concept proposes that a minority of cells within the tumor mass share many of the properties of adult neural stem cells and it is these that are responsible for the growth of the tumor and its resistance to existing therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that Ca(2+) might also be an important positive regulator of tumorigenesis in GBM, in processes involving quiescence, maintenance, proliferation, or migration. Glioblastoma tumors are generally thought to develop by co-opting pathways that are involved in the formation of an organ. We propose that the cells initiating the tumor, and subsequently the cells of the tumor mass, must hijack the different checkpoints that evolution has selected in order to prevent the pathological development of an organ. In this article, two main points are discussed. (i) The first is the establishment of a so-called "cellular society," which is required to create a favorable microenvironment. (ii) The second is that GBM can be considered to be an organism, which fights to survive and develop. Since GBM evolves in a limited space, its only chance of development is to overcome the evolutionary checkpoints. For example, the deregulation of the normal Ca(2+) signaling elements contributes to the progression of the disease. Thus, by manipulating the Ca(2+) signaling, the GBM cells might not be killed, but might be reprogrammed toward a new fate that is either easy to cure or that has no aberrant functioning. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26826650

  13. BC3EE2,9B, a synthetic carbazole derivative, upregulates autophagy and synergistically sensitizes human GBM8901 glioblastoma cells to temozolomide

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHEN, CHIEN-MIN; SYU, JHIH-PU; WAY, TZONG-DER; HUANG, LI-JIAU; KUO, SHENG-CHU; LIN, CHUNG-TIEN; LIN, CHIH-LI

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most fatal form of human brain cancer. Although temozolomide (TMZ), an oral alkylating chemotherapeutic agent, improves the survival rate, the prognosis of patients with GBM remains poor. Naturally occurring carbazole alkaloids isolated from curry leaves (Murraya koenigii Spreng.) have been shown to possess a wide range of anticancer properties. However, the effects of carbazole derivatives on glioblastoma cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, anti-glioblastoma profiles of a series of synthetic carbazole derivatives were evaluated in vitro. The most promising derivative in this series was BC3EE2,9B, which showed significant anti-proliferative effects in GBM8401 and GBM8901 cells. BC3EE2,9B also triggered cell-cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1 stage, and suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion and migration. Furthermore, BC3EE2,9B induced autophagy-mediated cell death and synergistically sensitized GBM cells to TMZ cytotoxicity. The possible mechanism underlying BC3EE2,9B-induced autophagy may involve activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the attenuation of the Akt and mammalian target of the rapamycin downstream signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results provide molecular evidence for the mode of action governing the ability of BC3EE2,9B to sensitize drug-resistant glioblastoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent TMZ. PMID:26329365

  14. Auditory brain-stem responses in syphilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenhall, U; Roupe, G

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of auditory brain-stem electrical responses (BSER) provides an effective means of detecting lesions in the auditory pathways. In the present study the wave patterns were analysed in 11 patients with secondary or latent syphilis with no clinical symptoms referrable to the central nervous system and in two patients with congenital syphilis and general paralysis. Decreased amplitudes and prolonged latencies occurred frequently in patients with secondary and with advanced syphilis. This ...

  15. Novel multiform morphologies of hydroxyapatite: Synthesis and growth mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, I. Reeta; Sonia, S.; Viji, S.; Mangalaraj, D.; Viswanathan, C.; Ponpandian, N.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological evolution of materials becomes a prodigious challenge due to their key role in defining their functional properties and desired applications. Herein, we report the synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HAp) microstructures with multiform morphologies, such as spheres, cubes, hexagonal rods and nested bundles constructed from their respective nanoscale building blocks via a simple cost effective hydro/solvothermal method. A possible formation mechanism of diverse morphologies of HAp has been presented. Structural analysis based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirms the purity of the HAp microstructures. The multiform morphologies of HAp were corroborated by using Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM).

  16. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (pmechanisms responsible for the maintenance of persistent pain conditions thought to involve altered analgesic circuitry. PMID:26343321

  17. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  18. Emerging Biomarkers in Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Mairéad G.; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Mason, Warren P., E-mail: warren.mason@uhn.ca [Pencer Brain Tumor Centre, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2013-08-22

    Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain tumor, has few available therapies providing significant improvement in survival. Molecular signatures associated with tumor aggressiveness as well as with disease progression and their relation to differences in signaling pathways implicated in gliomagenesis have recently been described. A number of biomarkers which have potential in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy have been identified and along with imaging modalities could contribute to the clinical management of GBM. Molecular biomarkers including O(6)-methlyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomes 1p and 19q, loss of heterozygosity 10q, isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and 7 transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1 (ELTD1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor suppressor protein p53, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), p16INK4a gene, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), phospholipid metabolites, telomerase messenger expression (hTERT messenger ribonucleic acid [mRNA]), microRNAs (miRNAs), cancer stem cell markers and imaging modalities as potential biomarkers are discussed. Inclusion of emerging biomarkers in prospective clinical trials is warranted in an effort for more effective personalized therapy in the future.

  19. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Kristin J; Mehta, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the most aggressive of all human cancers. GBM tumors are highly infiltrative and relatively resistant to conventional therapies. Aggressive management of GBM using a combination of surgical resection, followed by fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival; however, GBM tumors recur in the majority of patients and the disease is most often fatal. There is a need to develop new treatment regimens and technological innovations to improve the overall survival of GBM patients. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of GBM has been explored and is controversial. SRS utilizes highly precise radiation techniques to allow dose escalation and delivery of ablative radiation doses to the tumor while minimizing dose to the adjacent normal structures. In some studies, SRS with concurrent chemotherapy has shown improved local control with acceptable toxicities in select GBM patients. However, because GBM is a highly infiltrative disease, skeptics argue that local therapies, such as SRS, do not improve overall survival. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding SRS in both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM, to describe SRS techniques, potential eligible SRS candidates, and treatment-related toxicities. In addition, this article will propose promising areas for future research for SRS in the treatment of GBM. PMID:26848407

  20. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review