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Sample records for brainstem circuitry regulating

  1. Brainstem circuitry regulating phasic activation of trigeminal motoneurons during REM sleep.

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    Christelle Anaclet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS is characterized by activation of the cortical and hippocampal electroencephalogram (EEG and atonia of non-respiratory muscles with superimposed phasic activity or twitching, particularly of cranial muscles such as those of the eye, tongue, face and jaw. While phasic activity is a characteristic feature of REMS, the neural substrates driving this activity remain unresolved. Here we investigated the neural circuits underlying masseter (jaw phasic activity during REMS. The trigeminal motor nucleus (Mo5, which controls masseter motor function, receives glutamatergic inputs mainly from the parvocellular reticular formation (PCRt, but also from the adjacent paramedian reticular area (PMnR. On the other hand, the Mo5 and PCRt do not receive direct input from the sublaterodorsal (SLD nucleus, a brainstem region critical for REMS atonia of postural muscles. We hypothesized that the PCRt-PMnR, but not the SLD, regulates masseter phasic activity during REMS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test our hypothesis, we measured masseter electromyogram (EMG, neck muscle EMG, electrooculogram (EOG and EEG in rats with cell-body specific lesions of the SLD, PMnR, and PCRt. Bilateral lesions of the PMnR and rostral PCRt (rPCRt, but not the caudal PCRt or SLD, reduced and eliminated REMS phasic activity of the masseter, respectively. Lesions of the PMnR and rPCRt did not, however, alter the neck EMG or EOG. To determine if rPCRt neurons use glutamate to control masseter phasic movements, we selectively blocked glutamate release by rPCRt neurons using a Cre-lox mouse system. Genetic disruption of glutamate neurotransmission by rPCRt neurons blocked masseter phasic activity during REMS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that (1 premotor glutamatergic neurons in the medullary rPCRt and PMnR are involved in generating phasic activity in the masseter muscles, but not phasic eye movements, during REMS; and (2

  2. Assembly of the auditory circuitry by a Hox genetic network in the mouse brainstem.

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    Maria Di Bonito

    Full Text Available Rhombomeres (r contribute to brainstem auditory nuclei during development. Hox genes are determinants of rhombomere-derived fate and neuronal connectivity. Little is known about the contribution of individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes to auditory sensorimotor circuitry. Here, we show that r4 contributes to functionally linked sensory and motor components, including the ventral nucleus of lateral lemniscus, posterior ventral cochlear nuclei (VCN, and motor olivocochlear neurons. Assembly of the r4-derived auditory components is involved in sound perception and depends on regulatory interactions between Hoxb1 and Hoxb2. Indeed, in Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 mutant mice the transmission of low-level auditory stimuli is lost, resulting in hearing impairments. On the other hand, Hoxa2 regulates the Rig1 axon guidance receptor and controls contralateral projections from the anterior VCN to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, a circuit involved in sound localization. Thus, individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes control the assembly of distinct functionally segregated sub-circuits in the developing auditory brainstem.

  3. Brainstem Circuits Regulating Gastric Function

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    Travagli, R. Alberto; Hermann, Gerlinda E.; Browning, Kirsteen N.; Rogers, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Brainstem parasympathetic circuits that modulate digestive functions of the stomach are comprised of afferent vagal fibers, neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and the efferent fibers originating in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). A large body of evidence has shown that neuronal communications between the NTS and the DMV are plastic and are regulated by the presence of a variety of neurotransmitters and circulating hormones as well as the presence, or absence, of afferent input to the NTS. These data suggest that descending central nervous system inputs as well as hormonal and afferent feedback resulting from the digestive process can powerfully regulate vago-vagal reflex sensitivity. This paper first reviews the essential “static” organization and function of vago-vagal gastric control neurocircuitry. We then present data on the opioidergic modulation of NTS connections with the DMV as an example of the “gating” of these reflexes, i.e., how neurotransmitters, hormones, and vagal afferent traffic can make an otherwise static autonomic reflex highly plastic. PMID:16460274

  4. Neural Circuitry of Impaired Emotion Regulation in Substance Use Disorders

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    Wilcox, Claire E.; Pommy, Jessica M.; Adinoff, Bryon

    2016-01-01

    Impaired emotion regulation contributes to the development and severity of substance use disorders (substance disorders). This review summarizes the literature on alterations in emotion regulation neural circuitry in substance disorders, particularly in relation to disorders of negative affect (without substance disorder), and it presents promising areas of future research. Emotion regulation paradigms during functional magnetic resonance imaging are conceptualized into four dimensions: affect intensity and reactivity, affective modulation, cognitive modulation, and behavioral control. The neural circuitry associated with impaired emotion regulation is compared in individuals with and without substance disorders, with a focus on amygdala, insula, and prefrontal cortex activation and their functional and structural connectivity. Hypoactivation of the rostral anterior cingulate cortex/ventromedial prefrontal cortex (rACC/vmPFC) is the most consistent finding across studies, dimensions, and clinical populations (individuals with and without substance disorders). The same pattern is evident for regions in the cognitive control network (anterior cingulate and dorsal and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices) during cognitive modulation and behavioral control. These congruent findings are possibly related to attenuated functional and/or structural connectivity between the amygdala and insula and between the rACC/vmPFC and cognitive control network. Although increased amygdala and insula activation is associated with impaired emotion regulation in individuals without substance disorders, it is not consistently observed in substance disorders. Emotion regulation disturbances in substance disorders may therefore stem from impairments in prefrontal functioning, rather than excessive reactivity to emotional stimuli. Treatments for emotion regulation in individuals without substance disorders that normalize prefrontal functioning may offer greater efficacy for substance disorders

  5. Phytochemical regulation of Fyn and AMPK signaling circuitry.

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    Lee, Chan Gyu; Koo, Ja Hyun; Kim, Sang Geon

    2015-12-01

    During the past decades, phytochemical terpenoids, polyphenols, lignans, flavonoids, and alkaloids have been identified as antioxidative and cytoprotective agents. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a kinase that controls redox-state and oxidative stress in the cell, and serves as a key molecule regulating energy metabolism. Many phytochemicals directly or indirectly alter the AMPK pathway in distinct manners, exerting catabolic metabolism. Some of them are considered promising in the treatment of metabolic diseases such as type II diabetes, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Another important kinase that regulates energy metabolism is Fyn kinase, a member of the Src family kinases that plays a role in various cellular responses such as insulin signaling, cell growth, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Phytochemical inhibition of Fyn leads to AMPK-mediated protection of the cell in association with increased antioxidative capacity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The kinases may work together to form a signaling circuitry for the homeostasis of energy conservation and expenditure, and may serve as targets of phytochemicals. This review is intended as a compilation of recent advancements in the pharmacological research of phytochemicals targeting Fyn and AMPK circuitry, providing information for the prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases and the accompanying tissue injuries. PMID:25951818

  6. Photoperiodic regulation of satiety mediating neuropeptides in the brainstem of the seasonal Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

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    Helwig, Michael; Archer, Zoë A; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Tups, Alexander; Mercer, Julian G; Klingenspor, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Central regulation of energy balance in seasonal mammals such as the Siberian hamster is dependent on the precise integration of short-term satiety information arising from the gastrointestinal tract with long-term signals on the status of available energy reserves (e.g. leptin) and prevailing photoperiod. Within the central nervous system, the brainstem nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) are major relay nuclei that transmit information from the gastrointestinal tract to higher forebrain centres. We extended studies on the seasonal programming of the hypothalamus to examine the effect of the photoperiod on neuropeptidergic circuitries of this gut-brain axis. In the NTS and PBN we performed gene expression and immunoreactivity (-ir) studies on selected satiety-related neuropeptides and receptors: alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, melanocortin-3 receptor, melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R), growth hormone secretagogue-receptor, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, preproglucagon (PPG), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY, galanin, neurotensin, and corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH). Gene expression of PPG and MC4-R, and -ir of CCK and GLP-1, in the NTS were up-regulated after 14 weeks in long-day photoperiod (16 h light:8 h dark) compared to short-days (8 h light:16 h dark), whereas CRH-ir and NT-ir were increased in short-days within the PBN. We suggest that brainstem neuroendocrine mechanisms contribute to the long-term regulation of body mass in the Siberian hamster by a photoperiod-related modulation of satiety signalling.

  7. Unraveling a new circuitry for sleep regulation in Parkinson's disease.

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    Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Lais S; Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Aurich, Mariana F; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are among the most disabling non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and basal ganglia are likely involved in these dysfunctions, as they are affected by neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and have a role in sleep regulation. To investigate this, we promoted a lesion in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus or substantia nigra pars compacta of male rats, followed by 24 h of REM sleep deprivation. Then, we administrated a dopaminergic D2 receptor agonist, antagonist or vehicle directly in the striatum. After a period of 24 h of sleep-wake recording, we observed that the ibotenic acid infusion in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus blocked the so-called sleep rebound effect mediated by REM sleep deprivation, which was reversed by striatal D2 receptors activation. Rotenone infusion in the substantia nigra pars compacta also blocked the sleep rebound, however, striatal D2 receptors activation did not reverse it. In addition, rotenone administration decreased the time spent in NREM sleep, which was corroborated by positive correlations between dopamine levels in both substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum and the time spent in NREM sleep. These findings suggest a new circuitry for sleep regulation in Parkinson's disease, involving the triad composed by pedunculopontine nucleus, substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum, evidencing a potential therapeutic target for the sleep disturbances associated to this pathology. PMID:27091486

  8. Sensitive Periods of Emotion Regulation: Influences of Parental Care on Frontoamygdala Circuitry and Plasticity.

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    Gee, Dylan G

    2016-09-01

    Early caregiving experiences play a central role in shaping emotional development, stress physiology, and refinement of limbic circuitry. Converging evidence across species delineates a sensitive period of heightened neuroplasticity when frontoamygdala circuitry is especially amenable to caregiver inputs early in life. During this period, parental buffering regulates emotional behaviors and stress physiology as emotion regulation circuitry continues to mature. By contrast, disorganized or poor quality caregiving has profound and lasting consequences on the maturation of frontoamygdala circuitry essential for emotion regulation, even following termination of this early life stressor (e.g., adoption from orphanage). This article highlights how interactions between caregiving experiences and the biological state of the developing brain have broad implications for long-term health. PMID:27589500

  9. Corticostriatal circuitry in regulating diseases characterized by intrusive thinking.

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    Kalivas, Benjamin C; Kalivas, Peter W

    2016-03-01

    Intrusive thinking triggers clinical symptoms in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Using drug addiction as an exemplar disorder sustained in part by intrusive thinking, we explore studies demonstrating that impairments in corticostriatal circuitry strongly contribute to intrusive thinking. Neuroimaging studies have long implicated this projection in cue-induced craving to use drugs, and preclinical models show that marked changes are produced at corticostriatal synapses in the nucleus accumbens during a relapse episode. We delineate an accumbens microcircuit that mediates cue-induced drug seeking becoming an intrusive event. This microcircuit harbors many potential therapeutic targets. We focus on preclinical and clinical studies, showing that administering N-acetylcysteine restores uptake of synaptic glutamate by astroglial glutamate transporters and thereby inhibits intrusive thinking. We posit that because intrusive thinking is a shared endophenotype in many disorders, N-acetylcysteine has positive effects in clinical trials for a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction, gambling, trichotillomania, and depression. PMID:27069381

  10. Neuroanatomy of cardiac activity-regulating circuitry : A transneuronal retrograde viral labelling study in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TerHorst, GJ; Hautvast, RWM; DeJongste, MJL; Korf, J

    1996-01-01

    The anatomy of cardiac activity-regulating circuitry was studied with retrograde transneuronal viral labelling after pseudorabies virus injections into different parts of the rat heart. Transection of the spinal cord at Th1 was used to reveal selectively the parasympathetic neuronal networks. Virus-

  11. Regulation of dietary choice by the decision-making circuitry

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    Rangel, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    To advance our understanding of how the brain makes food decisions, it is essential to combine knowledge from two fields that have not yet been well integrated: the neuro-computational basis of decision-making and the homeostatic regulators of feeding. This Review integrates these two literatures from a neuro-computational perspective, with an emphasis in describing the variables computed by different neural systems and how they affect dietary choice. We highlight what is unique about feeding...

  12. Regulating Critical Period Plasticity: Insight from the Visual System to Fear Circuitry for Therapeutic Interventions

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    Elisa M. Nabel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Early temporary windows of heightened brain plasticity called critical periods developmentally sculpt neural circuits and contribute to adult behavior. Regulatory mechanisms of visual cortex development –the preeminent model of experience-dependent critical period plasticity- actively limit adult plasticity and have proved fruitful therapeutic targets to reopen plasticity and rewire faulty visual system connections later in life. Interestingly, these molecular mechanisms have been implicated in the regulation of plasticity in other functions beyond vision. Applying mechanistic understandings of critical period plasticity in the visual cortex to fear circuitry may provide a conceptual framework for developing novel therapeutic tools to mitigate aberrant fear responses in post traumatic stress disorder. In this review, we turn to the model of experience-dependent visual plasticity to provide novel insights for the mechanisms regulating plasticity in the fear system. Fear circuitry, particularly fear memory erasure, also undergoes age-related changes in experience-dependent plasticity. We consider the contributions of molecular brakes that halt visual critical period plasticity to circuitry underlying fear memory erasure. A major molecular brake in the visual cortex, perineuronal net formation, recently has been identified in the development of fear systems that are resilient to fear memory erasure. The roles of other molecular brakes, myelin-related Nogo receptor signaling and Lynx family proteins– endogenous inhibitors for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, are explored in the context of fear memory plasticity. Such fear plasticity regulators, including epigenetic effects, provide promising targets for therapeutic interventions.

  13. Triglyceride sensing in the reward circuitry: A new insight in feeding behaviour regulation.

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    Cansell, Celine; Luquet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    In both developed and emerging countries, sedentary life style and over exposition to high energy dense foods has led to a thermodynamic imbalance and consequently obesity. Obesity often involves a behavioural component in which, similar to drugs abuse, compulsive consumption of palatable food rich in lipids and sugar drives energy intake far beyond metabolic demands. The hypothalamus is one of the primary integration sites of circulating energy-related signals like leptin or ghrelin and is therefore considered as one of the main central regulators of energy balance. However, food intake is also modulated by sensory inputs, such as tastes and odours, as well as by affective or emotional states. The mesolimbic pathway is well established as a key actor of the rewarding aspect of feeding. Particularly, the hedonic and motivational aspects of food are closely tied to the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) in striatal structure such as the Nucleus Accumbens (Nacc). In both rodent and humans several studies shows an attenuated activity of dopaminergic signal associated with obesity and there is evidence that consumption of palatable food per se leads to DA signalling alterations. Furthermore impaired cognition in obese mice is improved by selectively lowering triglycerides (TG) and intracerebroventricular administration of TG induces by itself acquisition impairment in several cognitive paradigms in normal body weight mice. Together, these observations raise the possibility that nutritional lipids, particularly TG, directly affect cognitive and reward processes by modulating the mesolimbic pathway and might contribute to the downward spiral of compulsive consumption of palatable food and obesity. This review is an attempt to capture recent evolution in the field that might point toward a direct action of nutritional lipid in the reward circuitry. PMID:26159487

  14. Brainstem Cavernous Angioma

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    ... in significant, and potentially life-threatening, symptoms. The nerves that transverse the brainstem control basic, involuntary functions such as respiration, gag reflex, heartbeat regulation, body temperature, pain and heat sensation, ...

  15. Role of basal ganglia in sleep-wake regulation: neural circuitry and clinical significance

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    Ramalingam Vetrivelan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Researchers over the last decade have made substantial progress towards understanding the roles of dopamine and the basal ganglia in the control of sleep-wake behavior. In this review, we outline recent advancements regarding dopaminergic modulation of sleep through the basal ganglia (BG and extra-BG sites. Our main hypothesis is that dopamine promotes sleep by its action on the D2 receptors in the BG and promotes wakefulness by its action on D1 and D2 receptors in the extra-BG sites. This hypothesis implicates dopamine depletion in the BG (such as in Parkinson’s disease in causing frequent nighttime arousal and overall insomnia. Furthermore, the arousal effects of psychostimulants (methamphetamine, cocaine and modafinil may be linked to the ventral periaquductal grey (vPAG dopaminergic circuitry targeting the extra-BG sleep-wake network.

  16. Regulation of the neural circuitry of emotion by compassion meditation: effects of meditative expertise.

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    Antoine Lutz

    Full Text Available Recent brain imaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI have implicated insula and anterior cingulate cortices in the empathic response to another's pain. However, virtually nothing is known about the impact of the voluntary generation of compassion on this network. To investigate these questions we assessed brain activity using fMRI while novice and expert meditation practitioners generated a loving-kindness-compassion meditation state. To probe affective reactivity, we presented emotional and neutral sounds during the meditation and comparison periods. Our main hypothesis was that the concern for others cultivated during this form of meditation enhances affective processing, in particular in response to sounds of distress, and that this response to emotional sounds is modulated by the degree of meditation training. The presentation of the emotional sounds was associated with increased pupil diameter and activation of limbic regions (insula and cingulate cortices during meditation (versus rest. During meditation, activation in insula was greater during presentation of negative sounds than positive or neutral sounds in expert than it was in novice meditators. The strength of activation in insula was also associated with self-reported intensity of the meditation for both groups. These results support the role of the limbic circuitry in emotion sharing. The comparison between meditation vs. rest states between experts and novices also showed increased activation in amygdala, right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ, and right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS in response to all sounds, suggesting, greater detection of the emotional sounds, and enhanced mentation in response to emotional human vocalizations for experts than novices during meditation. Together these data indicate that the mental expertise to cultivate positive emotion alters the activation of circuitries previously linked to empathy and theory of mind in

  17. Cannabinoid receptor 1 signaling in cardiovascular regulating nuclei in the brainstem: A review

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    Badr M. Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids elicit complex hemodynamic responses in experimental animals that involve both peripheral and central sites. Centrally administered cannabinoids have been shown to predominantly cause pressor response. However, very little is known about the mechanism of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R-centrally evoked pressor response. In this review, we provided an overview of the contemporary knowledge regarding the cannabinoids centrally elicited cardiovascular responses and the possible underlying signaling mechanisms. The current review focuses on the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM as the primary brainstem nucleus implicated in CB1R-evoked pressor response.

  18. Neural circuitry underlying the regulation of conditioned fear and its relation to extinction.

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    Delgado, Mauricio R; Nearing, Katherine I; Ledoux, Joseph E; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2008-09-11

    Recent efforts to translate basic research to the treatment of clinical disorders have led to a growing interest in exploring mechanisms for diminishing fear. This research has emphasized two approaches: extinction of conditioned fear, examined across species; and cognitive emotion regulation, unique to humans. Here, we sought to examine the similarities and differences in the neural mechanisms underlying these two paradigms for diminishing fear. Using an emotion regulation strategy, we examine the neural mechanisms of regulating conditioned fear using fMRI and compare the resulting activation pattern with that observed during classic extinction. Our results suggest that the lateral PFC regions engaged by cognitive emotion regulation strategies may influence the amygdala, diminishing fear through similar vmPFC connections that are thought to inhibit the amygdala during extinction. These findings further suggest that humans may have developed complex cognition that can aid in regulating emotional responses while utilizing phylogenetically shared mechanisms of extinction.

  19. Neural emotion regulation circuitry underlying anxiolytic effects of perceived control over pain.

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    Salomons, Tim V; Nusslock, Robin; Detloff, Allison; Johnstone, Tom; Davidson, Richard J

    2015-02-01

    Anxiolytic effects of perceived control have been observed across species. In humans, neuroimaging studies have suggested that perceived control and cognitive reappraisal reduce negative affect through similar mechanisms. An important limitation of extant neuroimaging studies of perceived control in terms of directly testing this hypothesis, however, is the use of within-subject designs, which confound participants' affective response to controllable and uncontrollable stress. To compare neural and affective responses when participants were exposed to either uncontrollable or controllable stress, two groups of participants received an identical series of stressors (thermal pain stimuli). One group ("controllable") was led to believe they had behavioral control over the pain stimuli, whereas another ("uncontrollable") believed they had no control. Controllable pain was associated with decreased state anxiety, decreased activation in amygdala, and increased activation in nucleus accumbens. In participants who perceived control over the pain, reduced state anxiety was associated with increased functional connectivity between each of these regions and ventral lateral/ventral medial pFC. The location of pFC findings is consistent with regions found to be critical for the anxiolytic effects of perceived control in rodents. Furthermore, interactions observed between pFC and both amygdala and nucleus accumbens are remarkably similar to neural mechanisms of emotion regulation through reappraisal in humans. These results suggest that perceived control reduces negative affect through a general mechanism involved in the cognitive regulation of emotion. PMID:25208742

  20. FMRP regulates multipolar to bipolar transition affecting neuronal migration and cortical circuitry.

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    La Fata, Giorgio; Gärtner, Annette; Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Dresselaers, Tom; Dawitz, Julia; Poorthuis, Rogier B; Averna, Michele; Himmelreich, Uwe; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Achsel, Tilmann; Dotti, Carlos G; Bagni, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Deficiencies in fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) are the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS), with symptoms manifesting during infancy and early childhood. Using a mouse model for FXS, we found that Fmrp regulates the positioning of neurons in the cortical plate during embryonic development, affecting their multipolar-to-bipolar transition (MBT). We identified N-cadherin, which is crucial for MBT, as an Fmrp-regulated target in embryonic brain. Furthermore, spontaneous network activity and high-resolution brain imaging revealed defects in the establishment of neuronal networks at very early developmental stages, further confirmed by an unbalanced excitatory and inhibitory network. Finally, reintroduction of Fmrp or N-cadherin in the embryo normalized early postnatal neuron activity. Our findings highlight the critical role of Fmrp in the developing cerebral cortex and might explain some of the clinical features observed in patients with FXS, such as alterations in synaptic communication and neuronal network connectivity. PMID:25402856

  1. Neural emotion regulation circuitry underlying anxiolytic effects of perceived control over pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Tim V; Nusslock, Robin; Detloff, Allison; Johnstone, Tom; Davidson, Richard J

    2015-02-01

    Anxiolytic effects of perceived control have been observed across species. In humans, neuroimaging studies have suggested that perceived control and cognitive reappraisal reduce negative affect through similar mechanisms. An important limitation of extant neuroimaging studies of perceived control in terms of directly testing this hypothesis, however, is the use of within-subject designs, which confound participants' affective response to controllable and uncontrollable stress. To compare neural and affective responses when participants were exposed to either uncontrollable or controllable stress, two groups of participants received an identical series of stressors (thermal pain stimuli). One group ("controllable") was led to believe they had behavioral control over the pain stimuli, whereas another ("uncontrollable") believed they had no control. Controllable pain was associated with decreased state anxiety, decreased activation in amygdala, and increased activation in nucleus accumbens. In participants who perceived control over the pain, reduced state anxiety was associated with increased functional connectivity between each of these regions and ventral lateral/ventral medial pFC. The location of pFC findings is consistent with regions found to be critical for the anxiolytic effects of perceived control in rodents. Furthermore, interactions observed between pFC and both amygdala and nucleus accumbens are remarkably similar to neural mechanisms of emotion regulation through reappraisal in humans. These results suggest that perceived control reduces negative affect through a general mechanism involved in the cognitive regulation of emotion.

  2. Large-scale rewiring of innate immunity circuitry and microRNA regulation during initial rice blast infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ze-Yuan; Xia, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Yu, Yang; Li, Quan-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Chan; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Wang, Cong-Ying; Zhu, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Chen, Yue-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is a recurrent fungal disease, and resistance to fungal infection is a complex trait. Therefore, a comprehensive examination of rice transcriptome and its variation during fungal infection is necessary to understand the complex gene regulatory networks. In this study, adopting Next-Generation Sequencing we profiled the transcriptomes and microRNAomes of rice varieties, one susceptible and the other resistant to M. oryzae, at multiple time points during the fungal infection. Our results revealed a substantial variation in the plant transcriptome and microRNAome as well as change to rice innate immunity during fungal infection. A number of putative R gene candidates were identified from a perturbed rice transcriptome analysis. The expression of genes and non-coding RNA molecules changed in both fungal resistant and susceptible plants during M. oryzae invasion discovered distinct pathways triggered in the susceptible and resistant plants. In addition, a number of fungus genes in the susceptible and resistant plants were constantly expressed at different time points, suggesting that they were likely to be the potential AVR genes. Our results revealed large-scale rewiring of innate immunity circuitry and microRNA regulation during initial rice blast infection, which would help to develop more robust blast-resistant rice plants. PMID:27150822

  3. Brainstem disconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Curtis; Jocson, Jennifer; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.

    2009-01-01

    Brainstem disconnection is a very rare neonatal abnormality, with only seven cases reported. We report a unique case of a neonate who presented at delivery with hypertonia, dysmorphic facial features, and respiratory distress, as well as numerous musculoskeletal and genitourinary abnormalities. MRI of the brain showed disconnection between the pons and medulla with cerebellar hypoplasia and absent cerebellar peduncles. It aided in the description of the neurological and vascular anomalies ass...

  4. Brainstem disconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, Curtis; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L. [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Jocson, Jennifer [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Brainstem disconnection is a very rare neonatal abnormality, with only seven cases reported. We report a unique case of a neonate who presented at delivery with hypertonia, dysmorphic facial features, and respiratory distress, as well as numerous musculoskeletal and genitourinary abnormalities. MRI of the brain showed disconnection between the pons and medulla with cerebellar hypoplasia and absent cerebellar peduncles. It aided in the description of the neurological and vascular anomalies associated with this diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Regulation of the galanin system in the brainstem and hypothalamus by electroconvulsive stimulation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, S H

    2011-01-01

    Induction of seizures by electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) is amongst the most efficacious treatments for major depression. However, the working mechanism by which ECS exerts its antidepressant effects remains elusive. The galanin system is regulated by ECS in seizure-prone brain regions and ha...

  6. Eyelid Opening with Trigeminal Proprioceptive Activation Regulates a Brainstem Arousal Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Hama, Yuki; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    and appeared to induce rapid oxygen consumption in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and to rapidly produce deoxyhemoglobin to regulate physiological arousal. Thus, eyelid opening with trigeminal proprioceptive evocation may activate the ventromedial prefrontal cortex via the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus and locus coeruleus.

  7. Eyelid Opening with Trigeminal Proprioceptive Activation Regulates a Brainstem Arousal Mechanism.

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    Kiyoshi Matsuo

    innervated sweat glands and appeared to induce rapid oxygen consumption in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and to rapidly produce deoxyhemoglobin to regulate physiological arousal. Thus, eyelid opening with trigeminal proprioceptive evocation may activate the ventromedial prefrontal cortex via the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus and locus coeruleus.

  8. Brainstem thyrotropin-releasing hormone regulates food intake through vagal-dependent cholinergic stimulation of ghrelin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Yan; Go, Vay Liang W; Toy, Natalie; Li, Tei; Wang, Yu; Song, Moon K; Reeve, Joseph R; Liu, Yanyun; Yang, Hong

    2006-12-01

    The brainstem is essential for mediating energetic response to starvation. Brain stem TRH is synthesized in caudal raphe nuclei innervating brainstem and spinal vagal and sympathetic motor neurons. Intracisternal injection (ic) of a stable TRH analog RX77368 (7.5-25 ng) dose-dependently stimulated solid food intake by 2.4- to 3-fold in freely fed rats, an effect that lasted for 3 h. By contrast, RX77368 at 25 ng injected into the lateral ventricle induced a delayed and insignificant orexigenic effect only in the first hour. In pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, RX77368 (50 ng) ic induced a significant bipeak increase in serum total ghrelin levels from the basal of 8.7+/-1.7 ng/ml to 13.4+/-2.4 ng/ml at 30 min and 14.5+/-2.0 ng/ml at 90 min, which was prevented by either bilateral vagotomy (-60 min) or atropine pretreatment (2 mg/kg, -30 min) but magnified by bilateral adrenalectomy (-60 min). TRH analog ic-induced food intake in freely fed rats was abolished by either peripheral atropine or ghrelin receptor antagonist (D-Lys-3)-GHRP-6 (10 micromol/kg) or ic Y1 receptor antagonist 122PU91 (10 nmol/5 microl). Brain stem TRH mRNA and TRH receptor 1 mRNA increased by 57-58 and 33-35% in 24- and 48-h fasted rats and returned to the fed levels after a 3-h refeeding. Natural food intake in overnight fasted rats was significantly reduced by ic TRH antibody, ic Y1 antagonist, and peripheral atropine. These data establish a physiological role of brainstem TRH in vagal-ghrelin-mediated stimulation of food intake, which involves interaction with brainstem Y1 receptors.

  9. PKC signaling regulates drug resistance of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans via circuitry comprised of Mkc1, calcineurin, and Hsp90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantelle L LaFayette

    Full Text Available Fungal pathogens exploit diverse mechanisms to survive exposure to antifungal drugs. This poses concern given the limited number of clinically useful antifungals and the growing population of immunocompromised individuals vulnerable to life-threatening fungal infection. To identify molecules that abrogate resistance to the most widely deployed class of antifungals, the azoles, we conducted a screen of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds. Three out of seven hits that abolished azole resistance of a resistant mutant of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a clinical isolate of the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans were inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC, which regulates cell wall integrity during growth, morphogenesis, and response to cell wall stress. Pharmacological or genetic impairment of Pkc1 conferred hypersensitivity to multiple drugs that target synthesis of the key cell membrane sterol ergosterol, including azoles, allylamines, and morpholines. Pkc1 enabled survival of cell membrane stress at least in part via the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK cascade in both species, though through distinct downstream effectors. Strikingly, inhibition of Pkc1 phenocopied inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 or its client protein calcineurin. PKC signaling was required for calcineurin activation in response to drug exposure in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, Pkc1 and calcineurin independently regulate drug resistance via a common target in C. albicans. We identified an additional level of regulatory control in the C. albicans circuitry linking PKC signaling, Hsp90, and calcineurin as genetic reduction of Hsp90 led to depletion of the terminal MAPK, Mkc1. Deletion of C. albicans PKC1 rendered fungistatic ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors fungicidal and attenuated virulence in a murine model of systemic candidiasis. This work establishes a new role for PKC signaling in drug resistance, novel circuitry through which

  10. NPR-9, a Galanin-Like G-Protein Coupled Receptor, and GLR-1 Regulate Interneuronal Circuitry Underlying Multisensory Integration of Environmental Cues in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason C Campbell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available C. elegans inhabit environments that require detection of diverse stimuli to modulate locomotion in order to avoid unfavourable conditions. In a mammalian context, a failure to appropriately integrate environmental signals can lead to Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and epilepsy. Provided that the circuitry underlying mammalian sensory integration can be prohibitively complex, we analyzed nematode behavioral responses in differing environmental contexts to evaluate the regulation of context dependent circuit reconfiguration and sensorimotor control. Our work has added to the complexity of a known parallel circuit, mediated by interneurons AVA and AIB, that integrates sensory cues and is responsible for the initiation of backwards locomotion. Our analysis of the galanin-like G-protein coupled receptor NPR-9 in C. elegans revealed that upregulation of galanin signaling impedes the integration of sensory evoked neuronal signals. Although the expression pattern of npr-9 is limited to AIB, upregulation of the receptor appears to impede AIB and AVA circuits to broadly prevent backwards locomotion, i.e. reversals, suggesting that these two pathways functionally interact. Galanin signaling similarly plays a broadly inhibitory role in mammalian models. Moreover, our identification of a mutant, which rarely initiates backwards movement, allowed us to interrogate locomotory mechanisms underlying chemotaxis. In support of the pirouette model of chemotaxis, organisms that did not exhibit reversal behavior were unable to navigate towards an attractant peak. We also assessed ionotropic glutamate receptor GLR-1 cell-specifically within AIB and determined that GLR-1 fine-tunes AIB activity to modify locomotion following reversal events. Our research highlights that signal integration underlying the initiation and fine-tuning of backwards locomotion is AIB and NPR-9 dependent, and has demonstrated the suitability of C. elegans for analysis of multisensory integration

  11. NPR-9, a Galanin-Like G-Protein Coupled Receptor, and GLR-1 Regulate Interneuronal Circuitry Underlying Multisensory Integration of Environmental Cues in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jason C.; Polan-Couillard, Lauren F.; Chin-Sang, Ian D.; Bendena, William G.

    2016-01-01

    C. elegans inhabit environments that require detection of diverse stimuli to modulate locomotion in order to avoid unfavourable conditions. In a mammalian context, a failure to appropriately integrate environmental signals can lead to Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and epilepsy. Provided that the circuitry underlying mammalian sensory integration can be prohibitively complex, we analyzed nematode behavioral responses in differing environmental contexts to evaluate the regulation of context dependent circuit reconfiguration and sensorimotor control. Our work has added to the complexity of a known parallel circuit, mediated by interneurons AVA and AIB, that integrates sensory cues and is responsible for the initiation of backwards locomotion. Our analysis of the galanin-like G-protein coupled receptor NPR-9 in C. elegans revealed that upregulation of galanin signaling impedes the integration of sensory evoked neuronal signals. Although the expression pattern of npr-9 is limited to AIB, upregulation of the receptor appears to impede AIB and AVA circuits to broadly prevent backwards locomotion, i.e. reversals, suggesting that these two pathways functionally interact. Galanin signaling similarly plays a broadly inhibitory role in mammalian models. Moreover, our identification of a mutant, which rarely initiates backwards movement, allowed us to interrogate locomotory mechanisms underlying chemotaxis. In support of the pirouette model of chemotaxis, organisms that did not exhibit reversal behavior were unable to navigate towards an attractant peak. We also assessed ionotropic glutamate receptor GLR-1 cell-specifically within AIB and determined that GLR-1 fine-tunes AIB activity to modify locomotion following reversal events. Our research highlights that signal integration underlying the initiation and fine-tuning of backwards locomotion is AIB and NPR-9 dependent, and has demonstrated the suitability of C. elegans for analysis of multisensory integration and sensorimotor

  12. The homeostatic regulation of REM sleep: A role for localized expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; Knapp, Clifford M; Koul-Tiwari, Richa; Barnes, Abigail

    2015-10-01

    Homeostatic regulation of REM sleep plays a key role in neural plasticity and deficits in this process are implicated in the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie this homeostatic regulation process. This study examined the hypothesis that, during selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD), increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in REM sleep regulating areas is critical for the development of homeostatic drive for REM sleep, as measured by an increase in the number of REM sleep transitions. Rats were assigned to RSD, non-sleep deprived (BSL), or total sleep deprivation (TSD) groups. Physiological recordings were obtained from cortical, hippocampal, and pontine EEG electrodes over a 6h period, in which sleep deprivation occurred during the first 3h. In the RSD, but not the other conditions, homeostatic drive for REM sleep increased progressively. BDNF protein expression was significantly greater in the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) and subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) in the RSD as compared to the TSD and BSL groups, areas that regulate REM sleep, but not in the medial preoptic area, which regulates non-REM sleep. There was a significant positive correlation between RSD-induced increases in number of REM sleep episodes and increased BDNF expression in the PPT and SubCD. These increases positively correlated with levels of homeostatic drive for REM sleep. These results, for the first time, suggest that selective RSD-induced increased expression of BDNF in the PPT and SubCD are determinant factors in the development of the homeostatic drive for REM sleep.

  13. Role of serotonin transporter inhibition in the regulation of tryptophan hydroxylase in brainstem raphe nuclei: time course and regional specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGillivray, L; Lagrou, L M; Reynolds, K B; Rosebush, P I; Mazurek, M F

    2010-12-01

    Drugs that selectively inhibit the serotonin transporter (SERT) are widely prescribed for treatment of depression and a range of anxiety disorders. We studied the time course of changes in tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in four raphe nuclei after initiation of two different SERT inhibitors, citalopram and fluoxetine. In the first experiment, groups of Sprague-Dawley rats received daily meals of rice pudding either alone (n=9) or mixed with citalopram 5 mg/kg/day (n=27). Rats were sacrificed after 24 h, 7 days or 28 days of treatment. Sections of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), median raphe nucleus (MRN), raphe magnus nucleus (RMN) and caudal linear nucleus (CLN) were processed for TPH immunohistochemistry. Citalopram induced a significant reduction in DRN TPH-positive cell counts at 24 h (41%), 7 days (38%) and 28 days (52%). Similar reductions in TPH-positive cell counts were also observed at each timepoint in the MRN and in the RMN. In the MRN, citalopram resulted in significant reductions at 24 h (26%), 7 days (16%) and 28 days (23%). In the RMN, citalopram induced significant reductions of TPH-positive cell counts at 24 h (45%), 7 days (34%) and 28 days (43%). By contrast, no significant differences between control and treatment groups were observed in the CLN at any of the time points that we studied. To investigate whether these changes would occur with other SERT inhibitors, we conducted a second experiment, this time with a 28-day course of fluoxetine. As was observed with citalopram, fluoxetine induced significant reductions of TPH cell counts in the DRN (39%), MRN (38%) and RMN (41%), with no significant differences in the CLN. These results indicate that SERT inhibition can alter the regulation of TPH, the rate limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis. This persistent and regionally specific downregulation of serotonin biosynthesis may account for some of the clinical withdrawal symptoms associated with drugs that inhibit SERT.

  14. Pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the first report of pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma, infiltrating midbrain, and medulla oblongata. The report details clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical steps. As this entity is exceedingly uncommon, the overall epidemiology, prognosis, and long-term outcome remain far from established.

  15. Tyrosine hydroxylase is short-term regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in PC12 cells and hypothalamic and brainstem neurons from spontaneously hypertensive rats: possible implications in hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia A Congo Carbajosa

    Full Text Available Aberrations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS are implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamines biosynthesis, is involved in hypertension development. In this study we investigated whether UPS regulated TH turnover in PC12 cells and hypothalamic and brainstem neurons from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and whether this system was impaired in hypertension. PC12 cells were exposed to proteasome or lysosome inhibitors and TH protein level evaluated by Western blot. Lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, induced an increase of 86 ± 15% in TH levels after 30 min of incubation, then it started to decrease up to 6 h to reach control levels and finally it rose up to 35.2 ± 8.5% after 24 h. Bafilomycin, a lysosome inhibitor, did not alter TH protein levels during short times, but it increased TH by 92 ± 22% above basal after 6 h treatment. Before degradation proteasome substrates are labeled by conjugation with ubiquitin. Efficacy of proteasome inhibition on TH turnover was evidenced by accumulation of ubiquitinylated TH after 30 min. Further, the inhibition of proteasome increased the quantity of TH phosphorylated at Ser40, which is essential for TH activity, by 2.7 ± 0.3 fold above basal. TH protein level was upregulated in neurons from hypothalami and brainstem of SHR when the proteasome was inhibited during 30 min, supporting that neuronal TH is also short-term regulated by the proteasome. Since the increased TH levels reported in hypertension may result from proteasome dysfunction, we evaluate proteasome activity. Proteasome activity was significantly reduced by 67 ± 4% in hypothalamic and brainstem neurons from SHR while its protein levels did not change. Present findings show that TH is regulated by the UPS. The impairment in proteasome activity observed in SHR neurons may be one of the causes of the increased TH protein levels reported in hypertension.

  16. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequier, Laurance; Horton, Stephen B; McMullan, D Michael; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit is made of a number of components that have been customized to provide adequate tissue oxygen delivery in patients with severe cardiac and/or respiratory failure for a prolonged period of time (days to weeks). A standard extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit consists of a mechanical blood pump, gas-exchange device, and a heat exchanger all connected together with circuit tubing. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits can vary from simple to complex and may include a variety of blood flow and pressure monitors, continuous oxyhemoglobin saturation monitors, circuit access sites, and a bridge connecting the venous access and arterial infusion limbs of the circuit. Significant technical advancements have been made in the equipment available for short- and long-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation applications. Contemporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits have greater biocompatibility and allow for more prolonged cardiopulmonary support time while minimizing the procedure-related complications of bleeding, thrombosis, and other physiologic derangements, which were so common with the early application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Modern era extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry and components are simpler, safer, more compact, and can be used across a wide variety of patient sizes from neonates to adults. PMID:23735989

  17. Panic and the brainstem: clues from neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Giampaolo; Guerriero, Giuseppe; Brambilla, Paolo; Caldirola, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    One of the most influential theories has conceived unexpected panic attack (PA) as a primal defensive reaction to threat within the internal milieu of the body. This theory is based on findings suggesting the involvement of dysfunctional respiratory regulation and/or abnormally sensitive central neural network of carbon dioxide (CO2)/hydrogen ion (H+) chemoreception in PA. Thus, unexpected PA may be related to phylogenetically older brain structures, including the brainstem areas, which process basic functions related to the organism's internal milieu. The brainstem represents a crucial area for homeostatic regulation, including chemoreception and cardio-respiratory control. In addition, the midbrain dorsal periaqueductal gray may be involved in the unconditioned defense reactions to proximal threats, including internal physical stimuli. Our aim was to specifically consider the potential involvement of the brainstem in panic disorder (PD) by a comprehensive review of the available neuroimaging studies. Available data are limited and potentially affected by several limitations. However, preliminary evidence of a role of the brainstem in PD can be found and, secondly, the brainstem serotonergic system seems to be involved in panic modulation with indications of both altered serotonergic receptors and 5-HT transporter bindings. In conclusion, our review suggests that the brainstem may be involved in psychopathology of PD and supports the relevant role of subcortical serotonergic system in panic pathogenesis. PMID:24923341

  18. Cystic hemangioblastoma of the brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agrawal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioblastomas are very highly vascular neoplasm with benign characteristics and; in comparison to cerebellar hemangioblastoma; cases of cystic hemangioblastoma of the brain stem are rare with only a few case reports available in the literature. We report the case of a 43-year-old-female with cystic hemagioblastoma of the brainstem managed successfully and review the relevant literature.

  19. Cystic hemangioblastoma of the brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Agrawal; Anand Kakani; Vagh, Sunita J; Hiwale, Kishore M; Gaurav Kolte

    2010-01-01

    Hemangioblastomas are very highly vascular neoplasm with benign characteristics and; in comparison to cerebellar hemangioblastoma; cases of cystic hemangioblastoma of the brain stem are rare with only a few case reports available in the literature. We report the case of a 43-year-old-female with cystic hemagioblastoma of the brainstem managed successfully and review the relevant literature.

  20. Activity Dependent Regulation of Inhibitory Circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition controls information flow through a neural circuit by modulating synaptic integration, restricting action potentials, and coordinating the activity of ensembles of neurons. These functions are mediated by a diverse array of inhibitory neuron subtypes that synapse on defined domains of a postsynaptic neuron. Activity-dependent transcription controls inhibitory synapse number and function, but how this transcription program affects the inhibitory inputs that form on di...

  1. Brainstem reflexes and brainstem auditory evoked responses in Huntington's chorea.

    OpenAIRE

    Bollen, E; Arts, R.J.; Roos, R A; van der Velde, E A; Buruma, O J

    1986-01-01

    Blink reflex, corneal reflex, jaw reflex, exteroceptive suppression in masseter muscles and brainstem auditory evoked potentials were measured in 20 patients with Huntington's chorea and 12 controls. A significantly increased latency of the second component of the homolateral and heterolateral blink reflex was found in the patient group as compared with the controls. The other investigations revealed no significant differences between patients and controls except for some facilitation of the ...

  2. Lyme disease of the brainstem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalina, Peter [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Decker, Andrew [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Department of Neurology, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Kornel, Ezriel [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Halperin, John J. [North Shore University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Manhasset, NY (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement typically causes local inflammation, most commonly meningitis, but rarely parenchymal brain involvement. We describe a patient who presented with clinical findings suggesting a brainstem process. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) suggested a brainstem neoplasm. Prior to biopsy, laboratory evaluation led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. Clinical and imaging abnormalities improved markedly following antimicrobial therapy. We describe Lyme disease involvement of the cerebellar peduncles with hypermetabolism on PET. Although MRI is the primary imaging modality for most suspected CNS pathology, the practical applications of PET continue to expand. (orig.)

  3. Lyme disease of the brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement typically causes local inflammation, most commonly meningitis, but rarely parenchymal brain involvement. We describe a patient who presented with clinical findings suggesting a brainstem process. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) suggested a brainstem neoplasm. Prior to biopsy, laboratory evaluation led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. Clinical and imaging abnormalities improved markedly following antimicrobial therapy. We describe Lyme disease involvement of the cerebellar peduncles with hypermetabolism on PET. Although MRI is the primary imaging modality for most suspected CNS pathology, the practical applications of PET continue to expand. (orig.)

  4. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Francisco Otavio; Lombardi, Ismael Augusto; Mello, Adriana Yuki; Romero, Flavio Ramalho; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio; Zanini, Marco Antonio

    2013-04-15

    A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is a recently described tumor that occurs predominantly in the hypothalamic-chiasmatic region and is rarely found elsewhere. It has similar features as pilocytic astrocytomas, but has distinct histological characteristics and a poorer prognosis. A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is an aggressive tumor, and increased awareness is necessary with a suspect case. We present the first case of a pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem described after the newest World Health Organization classification of central nervous system tumors.

  5. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zanini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is a recently described tumor that occurs predominantly in the hypothalamic-chiasmatic region and is rarely found elsewhere. It has similar features as pilocytic astrocytomas, but has distinct histological characteristics and a poorer prognosis. A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is an aggressive tumor, and increased awareness is necessary with a suspect case. We present the first case of a pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem described after the newest World Health Organization classification of central nervous system tumors.

  6. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Antonio Zanini; Ducati Gustavo Luis; Roberto Colichio Gabarra; Adriana Yuki Mello; Ismael Augusto Lombardi; Flavio Ramalho Romero; Francisco Otavio Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is a recently described tumor that occurs predominantly in the hypothalamic-chiasmatic region and is rarely found elsewhere. It has similar features as pilocytic astrocytomas, but has distinct histological characteristics and a poorer prognosis. A pilomyxoid astrocytoma is an aggressive tumor, and increased awareness is necessary with a suspect case. We present the first case of a pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the brainstem described after the newest World Health...

  7. Gamma Knife Treatment of Brainstem Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Halloran E.; Larson, Erik W.; Fairbanks, Robert K; Mackay, Alexander R.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Call, Jason A.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Ling, Benjamin C; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S; Ben Peressini; Lee, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The management of brainstem metastases is challenging. Surgical treatment is usually not an option, and chemotherapy is of limited utility. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a promising palliative treatment modality in these cases. The goal of this study is to assess our single institution experience treating brainstem metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). This retrospective chart review studied 41 patients with brainstem metastases treated with GKRS. The most common primary...

  8. Brainstem haematoma due to presumed cryptic telangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, R S

    1986-01-01

    Three patients with primary brainstem haematoma are reported. The clinical presentation suggested an initial diagnosis of pontine tumour in two and demyelination in one patient. The subacute course is characteristic of brainstem haematoma due to presumed cryptic telangiectasia, the abnormal vessels being destroyed by the haemorrhage. These findings emphasise the importance of considering haematoma due to cryptic telangiectasia in the differential diagnosis of subacute brainstem lesions.

  9. Bayesian segmentation of brainstem structures in MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Bhatt, Priyanka;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to segment four brainstem structures (midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata and superior cerebellar peduncle) from 3D brain MRI scans. The segmentation method relies on a probabilistic atlas of the brainstem and its neighboring brain structures. To build the atlas, we...... combined a dataset of 39 scans with already existing manual delineations of the whole brainstem and a dataset of 10 scans in which the brainstem structures were manually labeled with a protocol that was specifically designed for this study. The resulting atlas can be used in a Bayesian framework to segment...... the brainstem structures in novel scans. Thanks to the generative nature of the scheme, the segmentation method is robust to changes in MRI contrast or acquisition hardware. Using cross validation, we show that the algorithm can segment the structures in previously unseen T1 and FLAIR scans with great accuracy...

  10. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, Bela, E-mail: purohitbela@yahoo.co.in; Kamli, Ali A.; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •BSG are classified on MRI into diffuse low-grade, malignant, focal tectal and exophytic subtypes. •Their prognosis and treatment is variable and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. •This article illustrates the imaging of adult BSGs on MRI and FET-PET. •We also describe prognostic factors and the treatment options of these tumours. -- Abstract: Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as {sup 18}F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours.

  11. Neurochemical organization of the vestibular brainstem in the common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizer, Joan S; Paolone, Nicholas A; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R

    2013-11-01

    Chimpanzees are one of the closest living relatives of humans. However, the cognitive and motor abilities of chimpanzees and humans are quite different. The fact that humans are habitually bipedal and chimpanzees are not implies different uses of vestibular information in the control of posture and balance. Furthermore, bipedal locomotion permits the development of fine motor skills of the hand and tool use in humans, suggesting differences between species in the structures and circuitry for manual control. Much motor behavior is mediated via cerebro-cerebellar circuits that depend on brainstem relays. In this study, we investigated the organization of the vestibular brainstem in chimpanzees to gain insight into whether these structures differ in their anatomy from humans. We identified the four nuclei of vestibular nuclear complex in the chimpanzee and also looked at several other precerebellar structures. The size and arrangement of some of these nuclei differed between chimpanzees and humans, and also displayed considerable inter-individual variation. We identified regions within the cytoarchitectonically defined medial vestibular nucleus visualized by immunoreactivity to the calcium-binding proteins calretinin and calbindin as previously shown in other species including human. We have found that the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis, which is identified in the human but not in macaque monkeys, is present in the chimpanzee brainstem. However, the arcuate nucleus, which is present in humans, was not found in chimpanzees. The present study reveals major differences in the organization of the vestibular brainstem among Old World anthropoid primate species. Furthermore, in chimpanzees, as well as humans, there is individual variability in the organization of brainstem nuclei. PMID:23179862

  12. Air pollution is associated with brainstem auditory nuclei pathology and delayed brainstem auditory evoked potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; D’Angiulli, Amedeo; Kulesza, Randy J.; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Osnaya, Norma; Romero, Lina; Keefe, Sheyla; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane M.; Avila-Ramirez, Jose; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; González-González, Luis Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We assessed brainstem inflammation in children exposed to air pollutants by comparing brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) and blood inflammatory markers in children age 96.3± 8.5 months from highly polluted (n=34) versus a low polluted city (n=17). The brainstems of nine children with accidental deaths were also examined. Children from the highly polluted environment had significant delays in wave III (t(50)=17.038; p

  13. Brainstem involvement in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The parieto-occipital region of the brain is most frequently and severely affected in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE. The basal ganglia, cerebellum and corpus callosum are less commonly involved. Brainstem involvement is rarely described in SSPE, and usually there is involvement of other regions of the brain. We describe a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with brain magnetic resonance imaging showing extensive brainstem involvement without significant involvement of other cortical structures. Though rarely described in SSPE, one should be aware of such brainstem and cerebellum involvement, and SSPE should be kept in mind when brainstem signal changes are seen in brain MRI with or without involvement of other regions of brain to avoid erroneous reporting.

  14. Detection of brainstem involvemetn in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gradient Refocusing Technique, which seppresses the influence of cerebrospinal fluis (GSF) and vascular motion artifact on MRI sensitivity, is applied combined with Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEPs) and median Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs) in the evaluation of the brainstem in 30 MS patients with clinical signs of involvement of this structure in order to reevaluate the sensitivity of these techniques. (Author). 2 refs.; 1 tab

  15. Interface Electronic Circuitry for an Electronic Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Buehler, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Electronic circuitry has been developed to serve as an interface between an electronic tongue and digital input/output boards in a laptop computer that is used to control the tongue and process its readings. Electronic tongues can be used for a variety of purposes, including evaluating water quality, analyzing biochemicals, analyzing biofilms, and measuring electrical conductivities of soils.

  16. GLIA DETERMINE THE COURSE OF BDNF-MEDIATED DENDRITOGENESIS AND PROVIDE A SOLUBLE INHIBITORY CUE TO DENDRITIC GROWTH IN THE BRAINSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Jessica L.; Brown, Alexandra L; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory control neurons in the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) undergo dramatic expansion of dendritic arbors during the early postnatal period, when functional remodeling takes place within the NTS circuitry. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of morphological maturation of NTS neurons are largely unknown. Our previous studies point to the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is abundantly expressed by NTS-projecting primary sensory neur...

  17. IMAGING WHITE MATTER IN HUMAN BRAINSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A Ford

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The human brainstem is critical for the control of many life-sustaining functions, such as consciousness, respiration, sleep, and transfer of sensory and motor information between the brain and the spinal cord. Most of our knowledge about structure and organization of white and gray matter within the brainstem is derived from ex vivo dissection and histology studies. However, these methods cannot be applied to study structural architecture in live human participants. Tractography from diffusion-weighted MRI may provide valuable insights about white matter organization within the brainstem in vivo. However, this method presents technical challenges in vivo due to susceptibility artifacts, functionally dense anatomy, as well as pulsatile and respiratory motion. To investigate the limits of MR tractography, we present results from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI of an intact excised human brainstem performed at 11.1T using isotropic resolution of 0.333, 1, and 2 mm, with the latter reflecting resolution currently used clinically. At the highest resolution, the dense fiber architecture of the brainstem is evident, but the definition of structures degrades as resolution decreases. In particular, the inferred corticopontine/corticospinal tracts (CPT/CST, superior (SCP and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP, and medial lemniscus (ML pathways are clearly discernable and follow known anatomical trajectories at the highest spatial resolution. At lower resolutions, the CST/CPT, SCP, and MCP pathways are artificially enlarged due to inclusion of collinear and crossing fibers not inherent to these three pathways. The inferred ML pathways appear smaller at lower resolutions, indicating insufficient spatial information to successfully resolve smaller fiber pathways. Our results suggest that white matter tractography maps derived from the excised brainstem can be used to guide the study of the brainstem architecture using diffusion MRI in vivo.

  18. Optogenetic dissection of medial prefrontal cortex circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danai eRiga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC is critically involved in numerous cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habit formation, working memory and long-term memory. Moreover, through its dense interconnectivity with subcortical regions (e.g. thalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus, the mPFC is thought to exert top-down executive control over the processing of aversive and appetitive stimuli. Because the mPFC has been implicated in the processing of a wide range of cognitive and emotional stimuli, it is thought to function as a central hub in the brain circuitry mediating symptoms of psychiatric disorders. New optogenetics technology enables anatomical and functional dissection of mPFC circuitry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. This provides important novel insights in the contribution of specific neuronal subpopulations and their connectivity to mPFC function in health and disease states. In this review, we present the current knowledge obtained with optogenetic methods concerning mPFC function and dysfunction and integrate this with findings from traditional intervention approaches used to investigate the mPFC circuitry in animal models of cognitive processing and psychiatric disorders.

  19. The Development of Micromachined Gyroscope Structure and Circuitry Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunzhu Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys micromachined gyroscope structure and circuitry technology. The principle of micromachined gyroscopes is first introduced. Then, different kinds of MEMS gyroscope structures, materials and fabrication technologies are illustrated. Micromachined gyroscopes are mainly categorized into micromachined vibrating gyroscopes (MVGs, piezoelectric vibrating gyroscopes (PVGs, surface acoustic wave (SAW gyroscopes, bulk acoustic wave (BAW gyroscopes, micromachined electrostatically suspended gyroscopes (MESGs, magnetically suspended gyroscopes (MSGs, micro fiber optic gyroscopes (MFOGs, micro fluid gyroscopes (MFGs, micro atom gyroscopes (MAGs, and special micromachined gyroscopes. Next, the control electronics of micromachined gyroscopes are analyzed. The control circuits are categorized into typical circuitry and special circuitry technologies. The typical circuitry technologies include typical analog circuitry and digital circuitry, while the special circuitry consists of sigma delta, mode matching, temperature/quadrature compensation and novel special technologies. Finally, the characteristics of various typical gyroscopes and their development tendency are discussed and investigated in detail.

  20. The Development of Micromachined Gyroscope Structure and Circuitry Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dunzhu; Yu, Cheng; Kong, Lun

    2014-01-01

    This review surveys micromachined gyroscope structure and circuitry technology. The principle of micromachined gyroscopes is first introduced. Then, different kinds of MEMS gyroscope structures, materials and fabrication technologies are illustrated. Micromachined gyroscopes are mainly categorized into micromachined vibrating gyroscopes (MVGs), piezoelectric vibrating gyroscopes (PVGs), surface acoustic wave (SAW) gyroscopes, bulk acoustic wave (BAW) gyroscopes, micromachined electrostatically suspended gyroscopes (MESGs), magnetically suspended gyroscopes (MSGs), micro fiber optic gyroscopes (MFOGs), micro fluid gyroscopes (MFGs), micro atom gyroscopes (MAGs), and special micromachined gyroscopes. Next, the control electronics of micromachined gyroscopes are analyzed. The control circuits are categorized into typical circuitry and special circuitry technologies. The typical circuitry technologies include typical analog circuitry and digital circuitry, while the special circuitry consists of sigma delta, mode matching, temperature/quadrature compensation and novel special technologies. Finally, the characteristics of various typical gyroscopes and their development tendency are discussed and investigated in detail. PMID:24424468

  1. The development of micromachined gyroscope structure and circuitry technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dunzhu; Yu, Cheng; Kong, Lun

    2014-01-01

    This review surveys micromachined gyroscope structure and circuitry technology. The principle of micromachined gyroscopes is first introduced. Then, different kinds of MEMS gyroscope structures, materials and fabrication technologies are illustrated. Micromachined gyroscopes are mainly categorized into micromachined vibrating gyroscopes (MVGs), piezoelectric vibrating gyroscopes (PVGs), surface acoustic wave (SAW) gyroscopes, bulk acoustic wave (BAW) gyroscopes, micromachined electrostatically suspended gyroscopes (MESGs), magnetically suspended gyroscopes (MSGs), micro fiber optic gyroscopes (MFOGs), micro fluid gyroscopes (MFGs), micro atom gyroscopes (MAGs), and special micromachined gyroscopes. Next, the control electronics of micromachined gyroscopes are analyzed. The control circuits are categorized into typical circuitry and special circuitry technologies. The typical circuitry technologies include typical analog circuitry and digital circuitry, while the special circuitry consists of sigma delta, mode matching, temperature/quadrature compensation and novel special technologies. Finally, the characteristics of various typical gyroscopes and their development tendency are discussed and investigated in detail.

  2. Mapping of mitochondrial ferritin in the brainstem of Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingchun; Yang, Hongkuan; Guan, Hongpeng; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Zhao, Shiguang; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt), a recently-studied iron storage protein, which we suspect is an important defense against oxidative stress in neurons and elsewhere. The 242-amino acid FtMt precursor protein is cleaved to mature protein (of molecular weight about 22-kDa) in the mitochondrial matrix. Compared with the ubiquitously expressed traditional ferritin (H-ferritin and L-ferritin), FtMt has been found in fewer locations including the testis, heart and brain. Previous studies have reported that the expression of FtMt in mouse and human brain is predominantly localized to neurons and partly to glial cells, and FtMt exerts protective effects on neurons by maintaining normal function and regulates apoptosis in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. To find out the function of FtMt in neurodegenerative disease, we had a novel antibody made against human FtMt and characterized it via Western blot analysis, immunoabsorption testing, and double immunofluorescence histochemistry. Then we used this new FtMt antibody to map the distribution of FtMt in the monkey brainstem. We demonstrated widespread distribution of FtMt immunoreactivity throughout the monkey brainstem, with variable staining intensity. FtMt immunoreactivity was observed in the extrapyramidal system, sensory trigeminal nerve nuclei, some motor nuclei including ambiguous nucleus, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and hypoglossal nucleus, and some dorsal column nuclei such as the gracile nucleus and cuneate nucleus. In addition, double immunohistochemical stainings confirmed that FtMt immunoreactivity was co-localized with catecholaminergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (63.64%), substantia nigra pars compacta (69.18%), and ventral tegmental area (56.89%). The distribution of FtMt which we found in the brainstem implies possible involvement of FtMt in several physiological mechanisms, especially in the catecholaminergic neurons, and the possibility of significant involvement in neurodegenerative

  3. Central mechanisms II: pharmacology of brainstem pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolser, D C

    2009-01-01

    Following systemic administration, centrally acting antitussive drugs are generally assumed to act in the brainstem to inhibit cough. However, recent work in humans has raised the possibility of suprapontine sites of action for cough suppressants. For drugs that may act in the brainstem, the specific locations, types of neurones affected, and receptor specificities of the compounds represent important issues regarding their cough-suppressant actions. Two medullary areas that have received the most attention regarding the actions of antitussive drugs are the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) and the caudal ventrolateral respiratory column. Studies that have implicated these two medullary areas have employed both microinjection and in vitro recording methods to control the location of action of the antitussive drugs. Other brainstem regions contain neurones that participate in the production of cough and could represent potential sites of action of antitussive drugs. These regions include the raphe nuclei, pontine nuclei, and rostral ventrolateral medulla. Specific receptor subtypes have been associated with the suppression of cough at central sites, including 5-HT1A, opioid (mu, kappa, and delta), GABA-B, tachykinin neurokinin-1 (NK-1) and neurokinin-2, non-opioid (NOP-1), cannabinoid, dopaminergic, and sigma receptors. Aside from tachykinin NK-1 receptors in the NTS, relatively little is known regarding the receptor specificity of putative antitussive drugs in particular brainstem regions. Our understanding of the mechanisms of action of antitussive drugs would be significantly advanced by further work in this area. PMID:18825342

  4. Brainstem Encephalitis and ADEM Following Mumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestations of brainstem encephalitis (BSE with fever, decreased level of consciousness, and left facial and abducens paralysis developed 1 week after bilateral parotitis and mumps in a 4 year-old female child and were followed by symptoms of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM within 20 days of recovery from BSE.

  5. Neuromyelitis Optica Lesion Mimicking Brainstem Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl who presented with weakness of the left extremities and right sided sixth cranial nerve palsy had neuromyelitis optica (NMO mistaken for brainstem glioma on MRI, in a report from Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine,Seoul, Republic of KoreaNeuromyelitis Optica, Optic-Spinal Syndrome, Spectroscopy.

  6. Ondine′s curse after brainstem infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso Jose; Baiense Robson; Scalzaretto Ana; Neto Pedro; Teixeira de Gois Aecio; Ferraz Maria

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of acquired Ondine′s curse. The patient developed central sleep apnea syndrome named Ondine′s curse after a brainstem infarction. Lesions involving the descending medullocervical pathways that subserve automatic breathing can result in this syndrome.

  7. Brainstem metabotropic glutamate receptors reduce food intake and activate dorsal pontine and medullar structures after peripheral bacterial lipopolysaccharide administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaskiel, Léa; Paul, Flora; Gerstberger, Rüdiger; Hübschle, Thomas; Konsman, Jan Pieter

    2016-08-01

    During infection-induced inflammation food intake is reduced. Vagal and brainstem pathways are important both in feeding regulation and immune-to-brain communication. Glutamate is released by vagal afferent terminals in the nucleus of the solitary tract and by its neurons projecting to the parabrachial nuclei. We therefore studied the role of brainstem glutamate receptors in spontaneous food intake of healthy animals and during sickness-associated hypophagia after peripheral administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides or interleukin-1beta. Brainstem group I and II metabotropic, but not ionotropic, glutamate receptor antagonism increased food intake both in saline- and lipopolysaccharide-treated rats. In these animals, expression of the cellular activation marker c-Fos in the lateral parabrachial nuclei and lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the nucleus of the solitary tract rostral to the area postrema were suppressed. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors did not colocalize with c-Fos or neurons regulating gastric function in these structures. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were, however, found on raphé magnus neurons that were part of the brainstem circuit innervating the stomach and on trigeminal and hypoglossal motor neurons. In conclusion, our findings show that brainstem metabotropic glutamate receptors reduce food intake and activate the lateral parabrachial nuclei as well as the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract after peripheral bacterial lipopolysaccharide administration. They also provide insight into potential group I metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent brainstem circuits mediating these effects. PMID:27016016

  8. A Neurophysiological Approach for Evaluating Noise-Induced Sleep Disturbance: Calculating the Time Constant of the Dynamic Characteristics in the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junta Tagusari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic sleep disturbance induced by traffic noise is considered to cause environmental sleep disorder, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and other stress-related diseases. However, noise indices for the evaluation of sleep disturbance are not based on the neurophysiological process of awakening regulated by the brainstem. In this study, through the neurophysiological approach, we attempted (1 to investigate the thresholds of awakening due to external stimuli in the brainstem; (2 to evaluate the dynamic characteristics in the brainstem and (3 to verify the validity of existing noise indices. Using the mathematical Phillips–Robinson model, we obtained thresholds of awakening in the brainstem for different durations of external stimuli. The analysis revealed that the brainstem seemed insensitive to short stimuli and that the response to external stimuli in the brainstem could be approximated by a first-order lag system with a time constant of 10–100 s. These results suggest that the brainstem did not integrate sound energy as external stimuli, but neuroelectrical signals from auditory nerve. To understand the awakening risk accumulated in the brainstem, we introduced a new concept of “awakening potential” instead of sound energy.

  9. Static DC to DC Power Conditioning-Active Ripple Filter, 1 MHZ DC to DC Conversion, and Nonlinear Analysis. Ph.D. Thesis; [voltage regulation and conversion circuitry for spacecraft power supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, W. A., III

    1973-01-01

    Dc to dc static power conditioning systems on unmanned spacecraft have as their inputs highly fluctuating dc voltages which they condition to regulated dc voltages. These input voltages may be less than or greater than the desired regulated voltages. The design of two circuits which address specific problems in the design of these power conditioning systems and a nonlinear analysis of one of the circuits are discussed. The first circuit design is for a nondissipative active ripple filter which uses an operational amplifier to amplify and cancel the sensed ripple voltage. A dc to dc converter operating at a switching frequency of 1 MHz is the second circuit discussed. A nonlinear analysis of the type of dc to dc converter utilized in designing the 1 MHz converter is included.

  10. Auditory brain-stem responses in syphilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenhall, U; Roupe, G

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of auditory brain-stem electrical responses (BSER) provides an effective means of detecting lesions in the auditory pathways. In the present study the wave patterns were analysed in 11 patients with secondary or latent syphilis with no clinical symptoms referrable to the central nervous system and in two patients with congenital syphilis and general paralysis. Decreased amplitudes and prolonged latencies occurred frequently in patients with secondary and with advanced syphilis. This ...

  11. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  12. Optogenetic deconstruction of sleep-wake circuitry in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Adamantidis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available How does the brain regulate the sleep-wake cycle? What are the temporal codes of sleep- and wake-promoting neural circuits? How do these circuits interact with each other across the light/dark cycle? Over the past few decades, many studies from a variety of disciplines have made substantial progress in answering these fundamental questions. For example, neurobiologists have identified multiple, redundant wake-promoting circuits in the brainstem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain. Sleep-promoting circuits have been found in the preoptic area and hypothalamus. One of the greatest challenges in recent years has been to selectively record and manipulate these sleep-wake centers in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution. Recent developments in microbial opsin-based neuromodulation tools, collectively referred to as “optogenetics,” have provided a novel method to demonstrate causal links between neural activity and specific behaviors. Here, we propose to use optogenetics as a fundamental tool to probe the necessity, sufficiency, and connectivity of defined neural circuits in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness.

  13. Mapping the brain's metaphor circuitry: metaphorical thought in everyday reason

    OpenAIRE

    Lakoff, George

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the basics of metaphorical thought and language from the perspective of Neurocognition, the integrated interdisciplinary study of how conceptual thought and language work in the brain. The paper outlines a theory of metaphor circuitry and discusses how everyday reason makes use of embodied metaphor circuitry.

  14. Semiconductors can be tested without removing them from circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, B. C.

    1966-01-01

    Oscilloscope, with specially developed test circuitry, quickly checks semiconductors without removing them from the circuitry. For transistors, approximate gain and linearity, as well as PNP or NPN determinations are made. When testing diodes, open or short circuits, and reverse polarity show up plainly.

  15. Involvement of a chromatin modifier in response to mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP)-induced Sertoli cell injury: Probably an indirect action via the regulation of NFκB/FasL circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shiwei [Department of Urology, 174th Hospital of PLA, Fujian 361001 (China); Dong, Yushu [Department of Neurosurgery, 463rd Hospital of PLA, Shenyang 110042 (China); Xu, Chun; Jiang, Liming; Chen, Yongjie; Jiang, Cheng [Department of Urology, 174th Hospital of PLA, Fujian 361001 (China); Hou, Wugang, E-mail: gangwuhou@163.com [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Li, Wei, E-mail: liweipepeyato@163.com [Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •MTA1 expression is upregulated in SCs upon MEHP treatment. •Knockdown of MTA1 in SCs impairs the MEHP-induced NFκB signaling activation. •Knockdown of MTA1 inhibits recruitment of NFκB onto FasL promoter in MEHP-treated SCs. -- Abstract: The Fas/FasL signaling pathway, controlled by nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) at the transcriptional level, is critical for triggering germ cell apoptosis in response to mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP)-induced Sertoli cell (SC) injury, but the exact regulation mechanism remain unknown. Here, we discovered that expression level of Metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1), a component of the Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex, was upregulated in SCs during the early recovery after MEHP exposure. This expression change was in line with the dynamic changes in germ cell apoptosis in response to MEHP treatment. Furthermore, a knockdown of MTA1 by RNAi in SCs was found to impair the MEHP-induced early activation of NFκB pathway and abolish the recruitment of NFκB onto FasL promoter, which consequently diminished the MEHP-triggered FasL induction. Considering that Fas/FasL is a well characterized apoptosis initiating signaling during SCs injury, our results point to a potential “switch on” effect of MTA1, which may govern the activation of NFκB/FasL cascade in MEHP-insulted SCs. Overall, the MTA1/NFκB/FasL circuit may serve as an important defensive/repairing mechanism to help to control the germ cell quality after SCs injury.

  16. Brainstem: neglected locus in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea T Grinberg

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with protein TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP. Neuropathologically, NDs are characterized by abnormal intracellular and extracellular protein deposits and by disease-specific neuronal death. Practically all terminal stages of NDs are clinically associated with dementia. Therefore, major attention was directed to protein deposits and neuron loss in supratentorial (telencephalic brain regions in the course of NDs. This was also true for PD, although the pathological hallmark of PD is degeneration of pigmented neurons of the brainstem’s substantia nigra. However, PD pathophysiology was explained by dopamine depletion in the telencephalic basal ganglia due to insufficiency and degeneration of the projection neurons located in substantia nigra. In a similar line of argumentation AD- and FTLD-related clinical deficits were exclusively explained by supratentorial allo- and neocortical laminar neuronal necrosis. Recent comprehensive studies in AD and PD early stages found considerable and unexpected involvement of brainstem nuclei, which could have the potential to profoundly change our present concepts on origin, spread, and early clinical diagnosis of these diseases. In contrast with PD and AD, few studies addressed brainstem involvement in the course of the different types of FTLD-TDP. Some of the results, including ours, disclosed a higher and more widespread pathology than anticipated. The present review will focus mainly on the impact of brainstem changes during the course of the most frequent NDs including PD, AD, and FTLD-TDP, with special emphasis on the need for more comprehensive research on FTLDs.

  17. Gut-brain peptides in corticostriatal-limbic circuitry and alcohol use disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Vadnie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Peptides synthesized in endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal tract and neurons are traditionally considered regulators of metabolism, energy intake, and appetite. However, recent work has demonstrated that many of these peptides act on corticostriatal-limbic circuitry and, in turn, regulate addictive behaviors. Given that alcohol is a source of energy and an addictive substance, it is not surprising that increasing evidence supports a role for gut-brain peptides specifically in alcohol use disorders (AUD. In this review, we discuss the effects of several gut-brain peptides on alcohol-related behaviors and the potential mechanisms by which these gut-brain peptides may interfere with alcohol-induced changes in corticostriatal-limbic circuitry. This review provides a summary of current knowledge on gut-brain peptides focusing on five peptides: neurotensin, glucagon-like peptide 1, ghrelin, substance P, and neuropeptide Y. Our review will be helpful to develop novel therapeutic targets for AUD.

  18. Repetitive Diving in Trained Rats Still Increases Fos Production in Brainstem Neurons after Bilateral Sectioning of the Anterior Ethmoidal Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul F Mcculloch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was designed to investigate the role of the anterior ethmoidal nerve (AEN during repetitive trained diving in rats, with specific attention to activation of afferent and efferent brainstem nuclei that are part of this reflexive response. The AEN innervates the nose and nasal passages and is thought to be an important component of the afferent limb of the diving response. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (N=24 were trained to swim and dive through a 5 m underwater maze. Some rats (N=12 had bilateral sectioning of the AEN, others a Sham surgery (N=12. Twelve rats (6 AEN cut and 6 Sham had 24 post-surgical dive trials over 2 hrs to activate brainstem neurons to produce Fos, a neuronal activation marker. Remaining rats were non-diving controls. Diving animals had significantly more Fos-positive neurons than non-diving animals in the caudal pressor area, ventral medullary dorsal horn, ventral paratrigeminal nucleus, nucleus tractus solitarius, rostral ventrolateral medulla, Raphe nuclei, A5, Locus Coeruleus, and Kölliker-Fuse area. There were no significant differences in brainstem Fos labeling in rats diving with and without intact AENs. Thus the AENs are not required for initiation of the diving response. Other nerve(s that innervate the nose and nasal passages, and/or suprabulbar activation of brainstem neurons, may be responsible for the pattern of neuronal activation observed during repetitive trained diving in rats. These results help define the central neuronal circuitry of the mammalian diving response.

  19. Brainstem nutrient sensing in the nucleus of the solitary tract inhibits feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Blouet, Clemence; Schwartz, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Direct detection of circulating nutrients by the central nervous system has been implicated in the regulation of energy balance, and the mediobasal hypothalamus is considered the primary sensing site mediating these effects. Neurons sensitive to energy-related signals have also been identified outside the hypothalamus, particularly within the caudomedial nucleus of the solitary tract (cmNTS) in brainstem, but the consequences of direct NTS nutrient detection on energy balance remain poorly ch...

  20. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the subthalamic microlesion and stimulation effects in Parkinson's disease: Indications of a principal role of the brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Holiga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During implantation of deep-brain stimulation (DBS electrodes in the target structure, neurosurgeons and neurologists commonly observe a “microlesion effect” (MLE, which occurs well before initiating subthalamic DBS. This phenomenon typically leads to a transitory improvement of motor symptoms of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD. Mechanisms behind MLE remain poorly understood. In this work, we exploited the notion of ranking to assess spontaneous brain activity in PD patients examined by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in response to penetration of DBS electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus. In particular, we employed a hypothesis-free method, eigenvector centrality (EC, to reveal motor-communication-hubs of the highest rank and their reorganization following the surgery; providing a unique opportunity to evaluate the direct impact of disrupting the PD motor circuitry in vivo without prior assumptions. Penetration of electrodes was associated with increased EC of functional connectivity in the brainstem. Changes in connectivity were quantitatively related to motor improvement, which further emphasizes the clinical importance of the functional integrity of the brainstem. Surprisingly, MLE and DBS were associated with anatomically different EC maps despite their similar clinical benefit on motor functions. The DBS solely caused an increase in connectivity of the left premotor region suggesting separate pathophysiological mechanisms of both interventions. While the DBS acts at the cortical level suggesting compensatory activation of less affected motor regions, the MLE affects more fundamental circuitry as the dysfunctional brainstem predominates in the beginning of PD. These findings invigorate the overlooked brainstem perspective in the understanding of PD and support the current trend towards its early diagnosis.

  1. 76 FR 79215 - Certain Semiconductor Chips With Dram Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips With Dram Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same... importation of certain semiconductor chips with DRAM circuitry, and modules and products containing same by... after importation of certain semiconductor chips with DRAM circuitry, and modules and...

  2. MRI findings of multiple sclerosis involving the brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe MRI findings of multiple sclerosis involving the brainstem. Among 35 cases of clinically definite multiple sclerosis, the authors retrospectively analysed 20 in which the brainstem was involved. MR images were analysed with regard to involvement sites in the brainstem or other locations, signal intensity, multiplicity, shape, enhancement pattern, and contiguity of brainstem lesions with cisternal or ventricular CSF space. The brainstem was the only site of involvement in five cases (25%), while simultaneous involvement of the brainstem and other sites was observed in 15 cases (75%). No case involved only the midbrain or medulla oblongata, and simultaneous involvement of the midbrain, pons and medulla oblongata was noted in 12 cases (60%). The most frequently involved region of the brainstem was the medulla oblongata (n=13; 90%), followed by the pons (n=17; 85%) and the midbrain (n=16; 80%). Compared with normal white matter, brainstem lesions showed low signal intensity on T1 weighted images, and high signal intensity on T2 weighted, proton density weighted, and FLAIR images. In 17 cases (85%), multiple intensity was observed, and the shape of lesions varied: oval, round, elliptical, patchy, crescentic, confluent or amorphous were seen on axial MR images, and in 14 cases (82%), coronal or sagittal scanning showed that lesions were long and tubular. Contiguity between brainstem lesions and cisternal or ventricular CSF space was seen in all cases (100%) involving midbrain (16/16) and medulla oblongata (18/18) and in 15 of 17 (88%) involving the pons. Contrast enhancement was apparent in 7 of 12 cases (58%). In the brainstem, MRI demonstrated partial or total contiguity between lesions and cisternal or ventricular CSF space, and coronal or sagittal images showed that lesions were long and tubuler

  3. Involvement of cAMP-PKA pathway in group Ⅱ metabotropic glutamate receptors-mediated regulation of respiratory rhythm from neonatal rat brainstem slice%cAMP-PKA通路参与Ⅱ组代谢性谷氨酸受体对新生鼠离体延髓脑片呼吸节律性放电的调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑奇辉; 李国才; 程静; 方芳; 吴中海

    2011-01-01

    本研究旨在探讨cAMP-PKA通路在Ⅱ组代谢性谷氨酸受体对离体延髓脑片呼吸节律性放电的影响中的作用.制作新生大鼠离体延髓脑片标本,主要包含延髓面神经后核内侧区(medial region of the nucleus retrofacialis,mNRF),并完整保留舌下神经根,以改良Kreb's液(modified Kreb's solution,MKS)恒温灌流脑片,用吸附电极记录舌下神经根呼吸节律性放电活动(respiratory rhythmical discharge activity,RRDA).待放电活动稳定后,第1组灌流Ⅱ组代谢性谷氨酸受体特异性拮抗剂(2S)-a-ethylglutamic acid(EGLU)10 min,第2组先给予cAMP-PKA通路激动剂Forskolin灌流10 min,而后MKS洗脱至正常,灌流cAMP-PKA通路抑制剂Rp-cyclic 3',5'-hydrogen phosphorothioate adenosine triethylammonium salt(Rp-cAMPS)10 min,第3组首先给予Rp-cAMPS 10 min,洗脱后联合Rp-cAMPS+EGLU持续灌流10 min,记录各组各时间点RRDA的变化.结果显示,给予Ⅱ组代谢性谷氨酸受体拮抗剂EGLU后,呼吸周期(respiratory cycle,RC)缩短,放电积分幅度(integral amplitude,IA)和吸气时程(inspiratory time,TI)没有变化;Forskolin兴奋呼吸,缩短RC,增加IA,延长TI;Rp-cAMPS则延长RC,降低IA,缩短TI;并且cAMP-PKA通路被阻断之后,EGLU缩短RC的效应也被抑制.这些结果提示在离体延髓水平上,cAMP-PKA通路参与了Ⅱ组代谢性谷氨酸受体对脑片呼吸节律性放电的调节.%The study aims to identify the role of cAMP-PKA pathway in the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs)-mediated regulation of respiratory rhythm from the brainstem slice. Neonatal (aged 0-3 d) Sprague-Dawley rats of either sex were used. The brainstem slice containing the medial region of the nucleus retrofacialis (mNRF) and the hypoglossal nerve rootlets was prepared, and the surgical procedure was performed in the modified Kreb's solution (MK.S) with continuous carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2) bubbling, and ended in 3 min. Respiratory rhythmical discharge activity

  4. Nanocantilever based mass sensor integrated with cmos circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Zachary James; Abadal, G.; Campabadal, F; Figueras, E.; Esteve, J.; Verd, J.; Perez-Murano, F.; Borrise, X.; Nilsson, S. G.; Miximov, I.; Montelius, L.; Barniol, N.; Boisen, Anja

    2003-01-01

    We have demonstrated the successful integration of a cantilever based mass detector with standard CMOS circuitry. The purpose of the circuitry is to facilitate the readout of the cantilever's deflection in order to measure resonant frequency shifts of the cantilever. The principle and design of the mass detector are presented showing that miniaturization of such cantilever based resonant devices leads to highly sensitive mass sensors, which have the potential to detect single molecules. The d...

  5. Circuitry, systems and methods for detecting magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, Dale K [Shelley, ID; Spencer, David F [Idaho Falls, ID; Roybal, Lyle G [Idaho Falls, ID; Rohrbaugh, David T [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-09-14

    Circuitry for detecting magnetic fields includes a first magnetoresistive sensor and a second magnetoresistive sensor configured to form a gradiometer. The circuitry includes a digital signal processor and a first feedback loop coupled between the first magnetoresistive sensor and the digital signal processor. A second feedback loop which is discrete from the first feedback loop is coupled between the second magnetoresistive sensor and the digital signal processor.

  6. Changes of brainstem auditory and somatosensory evoked

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jian

    2000-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the characteristics and clinical value of evoked potentials in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy. Methods: Brainstem auditory, and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 6 patients, and compared with the results of CT scan. Results: All of the 6 patients had abnormal results of BAEP and MNSEP. The main abnormal parameters in BAEP were latency prolongation in wave I, inter-peak latency prolongation in Ⅰ-Ⅲ and Ⅰ-Ⅴ. The abnormal features of MNSEP were low amplitude and absence of wave N9, inter-Peak latency prolongation in Ng-N13 and N13-N20, but no significant change of N20 amplitude. The results also revealed that abnormal changes in BAEP and MNSEP were earlier than that in CT. Conclusion: The detection of BAEP and MNSEP in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy might early reveal the abnormality of conductive function in nervous system and might be a useful method in diagnosis.

  7. Isolated Brainstem Involvement in Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarkan Ergün

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinical and radiologic entity characterized by headache, variable mental status, epilepsy, visual disturbances, and typical transient changes in the posterior cerebral perfusion. Parieto-occipital region the most commonly involved site. Less commonly, brainstem, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are involved besides the supratentorial white matter areas. However, isolated brainstem involvement is very rare. We here present a case of isolated brainstem involvement in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome which was diagnosed by diffusion-weighted MR imaging.

  8. Enterovirus 71 Brainstem Encephalitis and Cognitive and Motor Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Follow-up studies were conducted in 63 previously healthy children with enterovirus 71 brainstem encephalitis (49 stage II, 7 stage Ilia, and 7 stage Illb at National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.

  9. The role of astrocytes in the sevoflurane-mediated regulation of respiratory rhythm from the medulla oblongata brainstem slice%星形胶质细胞在七氟醚抑制节律性呼吸中的关键作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王迎斌; 王书宝; 黄生辉; 张荣智; 郑奇辉; 耿智隆

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨星形胶质细胞在七氟醚对呼吸中枢抑制过程中是否发挥关键作用.方法 制作新生SD大鼠延髓脑片(包含延髓面神经后核内侧区),完整保留舌下神经根,用吸附电极记录舌下神经根的呼吸节律性放电.实验分为6组(n=8):对照组、七氟醚组、二氢卡因酸盐(DHK)组、L-蛋氨酸亚砜亚胺(MS)组、MS+DHK组、七氟醚+DHK组,分别通过生物机能学记录系统记录舌下神经根呼吸节律放电(RRDA),分析呼吸周期(RC)、吸气时程(IT)、吸气放电积分幅度(IA).结果 七氟醚对舌下神经根RRDA有抑制作用,RC延长了53.7%,IT缩短了15.5%,IA降低了19.4%.谷氨酸转运体拮抗剂DHK能够明显兴奋呼吸输出形式,表现为RC缩短26.7%,IA增高6.9%,IT变化不明显.胶质细胞代谢抑制剂MS对RRDA表现为抑制,RC延长31.8%,IT缩短26.4%,IA降低15.5%;在联合应用MS+DHK后对RRDA的影响不明显,七氟醚对RRDA的抑制作用能够被DHK所逆转.结论 在离体延髓脑片上星形胶质细胞能够参与基本节律性呼吸的发生,在七氟醚对呼吸中枢的抑制作用中发挥重要作用.%Objective The effect of astrocytes in the sevoflurane (SEV) mediated regulation of respiratory rhythm from the brainstem slice was identified.Methods Neonatal (aged 0~3 d)Sprague-Dawley rats of either sex were used.The brainstem slice containing the medial region of the nucleus retrofacialis and the hypoglossal nerve rootlets was prepared and the surgical procedure was performed in the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) with continuous carbogen (95%O2 and 5% CO2),and ended in 3 min.Respiratory rhythmical discharge activity (RRDA) of the hypoglossal nerve rootlets was recorded by suction electrode.The experiment was divided into 6 groups and treated for 10 min with ACSF,SEV(5%),dihydrokinate (DHK,300 μmol/L),L-methionine sulfoximine (MS,50 μmol/L),MS (50 μmol/L) + DHK (300 μmol/L),SEV (5%) +DHK (300

  10. Brainstem cysticercose simulating cystic tumor lesion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter O. Arruda

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the case of a 37 year-old man with a solitary cysticercus cyst in the brainstem (pons successfully removed through a suboccipital craniectomy. Surgery in neurocysticercosis has been indicated in patients with hydrocephalus and/or large cystic lesions. Cystic lesions in the brainstem and spinal cord may have indication for surgery for two reasons: (1 diagnosis; and (2 treatment. Aspects related to differential diagnosis and therapeutic alternatives are discussed.

  11. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis.

  12. Functional characterization of obesogenic neural circuitries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boender, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity can be characterized as a disorder in which affected individuals fail to properly regulate the balance between energy intake and expenditure. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified over 30 genetic variants that associate with increased body weight and thus provide clues on

  13. Brain circuitry outside the synaptic cleft

    OpenAIRE

    Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Alexander E Dityatev

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence suggests that astroglia, and possibly microglia, play an important part in regulating synaptic networking of the brain. It has also emerged that extracellular matrix (ECM) structures that enwrap synaptic connections can generate molecular signals affecting both neuronal and glial activity. Thus it appears that the mechanism of information processing in the brain, which has hitherto been associated almost exclusively with neural circuits, could also invo...

  14. Nanocantilever based mass sensor integrated with cmos circuitry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Zachary James; Abadal, G.; Campabadal, F.;

    2003-01-01

    We have demonstrated the successful integration of a cantilever based mass detector with standard CMOS circuitry. The purpose of the circuitry is to facilitate the readout of the cantilever's deflection in order to measure resonant frequency shifts of the cantilever. The principle and design...... to solve the problem, namely freeze-drying and resist-assisted release. The fabrication results of cantilevers defined by laser and E-beam lithography are shown. Finally, an AFM based characterization setup is presented and the electrical characterization of a laser-defined cantilever fully integrated...

  15. Brainstem node for loss of consciousness due to GABA(A) receptor-active anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minert, Anne; Devor, Marshall

    2016-01-01

    The molecular agents that induce loss of consciousness during anesthesia are classically believed to act by binding to cognate transmembrane receptors widely distributed in the CNS and critically suppressing local processing and network connectivity. However, previous work has shown that microinjection of anesthetics into a localized region of the brainstem mesopontine tegmentum (MPTA) rapidly and reversibly induces anesthesia in the absence of global spread. This implies that functional extinction is determined by neural pathways rather than vascular distribution of the anesthetic agent. But does clinical (systemic-induced) anesthesia employ MPTA-linked circuitry? Here we show that cell-selective lesioning of the MPTA in rats does not, in itself, induce anesthesia or coma. However, it increases the systemic dose of pentobarbital required to induce anesthesia, in a manner proportional to the extent of the lesion. Such lesions also affect emergence, extending the duration of anesthesia. Off-target and sham lesions were ineffective. Combined with the prior microinjection data, we conclude that drug delivery to the MPTA is sufficient to induce loss-of-consciousness and that neurons in this locus are necessary for anesthetic induction at clinically relevant doses. Together, the results support an architecture for anesthesia with the MPTA serving as a key node in an endogenous network of dedicated pathways that switch between wake and unconsciousness. As such, the MPTA might also play a role in syncope, concussion and sleep.

  16. Auditory Brainstem Response Improvements in Hyperbillirubinemic Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Farzaneh Zamiri; Manchaiah, Vinaya; Lotfi, Yones

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hyperbillirubinemia in infants have been associated with neuronal damage including in the auditory system. Some researchers have suggested that the bilirubin-induced auditory neuronal damages may be temporary and reversible. This study was aimed at investigating the auditory neuropathy and reversibility of auditory abnormalities in hyperbillirubinemic infants. Subjects and Methods The study participants included 41 full term hyperbilirubinemic infants (mean age 39.24 days) with normal birth weight (3,200-3,700 grams) that admitted in hospital for hyperbillirubinemia and 39 normal infants (mean age 35.54 days) without any hyperbillirubinemia or other hearing loss risk factors for ruling out maturational changes. All infants in hyperbilirubinemic group had serum bilirubin level more than 20 milligram per deciliter and undergone one blood exchange transfusion. Hearing evaluation for each infant was conducted twice: the first one after hyperbilirubinemia treatment and before leaving hospital and the second one three months after the first hearing evaluation. Hearing evaluations included transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) screening and auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold tracing. Results The TEOAE and ABR results of control group and TEOAE results of the hyperbilirubinemic group did not change significantly from the first to the second evaluation. However, the ABR results of the hyperbilirubinemic group improved significantly from the first to the second assessment (p=0.025). Conclusions The results suggest that the bilirubin induced auditory neuronal damage can be reversible over time so we suggest that infants with hyperbilirubinemia who fail the first hearing tests should be reevaluated after 3 months of treatment. PMID:27144228

  17. Early GABAergic circuitry in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Kirischuk, Sergei; Sinning, Anne; Kilb, Werner

    2014-06-01

    In the cerebral cortex GABAergic signaling plays an important role in regulating early developmental processes, for example, neurogenesis, migration and differentiation. Transient cell populations, namely Cajal-Retzius in the marginal zone and thalamic input receiving subplate neurons, are integrated as active elements in transitory GABAergic circuits. Although immature pyramidal neurons receive GABAergic synaptic inputs already at fetal stages, they are integrated into functional GABAergic circuits only several days later. In consequence, GABAergic synaptic transmission has only a minor influence on spontaneous network activity during early corticogenesis. Concurrent with the gradual developmental shift of GABA action from excitatory to inhibitory and the maturation of cortical synaptic connections, GABA becomes more important in synchronizing neuronal network activity.

  18. The origin of behavioral bursts in decision-making circuitry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Sorribes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available From ants to humans, the timing of many animal behaviors comes in bursts of activity separated by long periods of inactivity. Recently, mathematical modeling has shown that simple algorithms of priority-driven behavioral choice can result in bursty behavior. To experimentally test this link between decision-making circuitry and bursty dynamics, we have turned to Drosophila melanogaster. We have found that the statistics of intervals between activity periods in endogenous activity-rest switches of wild-type Drosophila are very well described by the Weibull distribution, a common distribution of bursty dynamics in complex systems. The bursty dynamics of wild-type Drosophila walking activity are shown to be determined by this inter-event distribution alone and not by memory effects, thus resembling human dynamics. Further, using mutant flies that disrupt dopaminergic signaling or the mushroom body, circuitry implicated in decision-making, we show that the degree of behavioral burstiness can be modified. These results are thus consistent with the proposed link between decision-making circuitry and bursty dynamics, and highlight the importance of using simple experimental systems to test general theoretical models of behavior. The findings further suggest that analysis of bursts could prove useful for the study and evaluation of decision-making circuitry.

  19. Spinal-, brainstem- and cerebrally mediated responses at- and below-level of a spinal cord contusion in rats: evaluation of pain-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baastrup, Cathrine; Maersk-Moller, Camilla Charlotte; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2010-12-01

    Pain is a frequent consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) which may profoundly impair the patients' quality of life. Valid experimental models and methods are therefore desirable in the search for better treatments. Usually, experimental pain assays depend on stimulus-evoked withdrawal responses; however, this spinal-mediated reflex response may be particularly problematic when evaluating below-level SCI pain due to the development of hyperactive reflex circuitries. In this study, we applied and compared assays measuring cold (acetone), static (von Frey filaments), and dynamic mechanical (soft brush) hypersensitivity at different levels of the neuroaxis at and below the level of injury in a rat model of SCI. We induced an experimental SCI (MASCIS 25 mm weight-drop) and evaluated the development of spinal reflexes (withdrawal), spinal-brainstem-spinal reflexes (licking, guarding, struggling, vocalizing, jumping, and biting) and cerebral-dependent behavior (place escape/avoidance paradigm (PEAP)). We demonstrated increased brainstem reflexes and cerebrally mediated aversive reactions to stimuli applied at the level of SCI, suggesting development of at-level evoked pain behavior. Furthermore, stimulation below-level increased innate reflex responses without increasing brainstem reflexes or aversive behavior in the PEAP, suggesting development of the spasticity syndrome rather than pain-like behavior. While spinal reflex measures are acceptable for studying changes in the spinal reflex pathways and spinal cord, they are not suited as nociceptive behavioral measures. Measuring brainstem organized responses eliminates the bias associated with the spastic syndrome, but pain requires cortical involvement. Methods depending on cortical structures, as the PEAP, are therefore optimal endpoints in animal models of central pain. PMID:20863621

  20. Vestibular myogenic and acoustical brainstem evoked potentials in neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Korepina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the inspection of acoustical cortex and brainstem EP in neurologic, otoneurologic and audiologic practice recently start to use so-called vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP. It is shown, that at ear stimulation by a loud sound and record of sterno-cleidomastoid contraction is possible to estimate function of the inferior vestibular nerve and vestibulospinal pathways, a sacculo-cervical reflex. In article some methodical and clinical questions of application of these kinds are presented. Combine research acoustic brainstem EP and VEMP allows to confirm effectively lesions of acoustical and vestibular ways at brainstem. The conclusion becomes, that this kind of inspection is important for revealing demielinisation and defeats in vestibulospinal tract, that quite often happens at MS, and at estimation of efficiency of treatment

  1. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials Suggest a Role for the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus in Tinnitus

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Jianwen Wendy; Herrmann, Barbara S.; Levine, Robert A.; Melcher, Jennifer R.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated elevated spontaneous and sound-evoked brainstem activity in animal models of tinnitus, but data on brainstem function in people with this common clinical condition are sparse. Here, auditory nerve and brainstem function in response to sound was assessed via auditory brainstem responses (ABR) in humans with tinnitus and without. Tinnitus subjects showed reduced wave I amplitude (indicating reduced auditory nerve activity) but enhanced wave V (reflecting eleva...

  2. 76 FR 72214 - Certain Semiconductor Chips with DRAM Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same Receipt...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips with DRAM Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same Receipt... Commission has received a complaint entitled In Re Certain Semiconductor Chips with DRAM Circuitry, and... importation of certain semiconductor chips with dram circuitry, and modules and products containing same....

  3. Separate circuitries encode the hedonic and nutritional values of sugar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Luis A; Han, Wenfei; Zhang, Xiaobing; Ferreira, Tatiana L; Perez, Isaac O; Shammah-Lagnado, Sara J; van den Pol, Anthony N; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2016-03-01

    Sugar exerts its potent reinforcing effects via both gustatory and post-ingestive pathways. It is, however, unknown whether sweetness and nutritional signals engage segregated brain networks to motivate ingestion. We found in mice that separate basal ganglia circuitries mediated the hedonic and nutritional actions of sugar. During sugar intake, suppressing hedonic value inhibited dopamine release in ventral, but not dorsal, striatum, whereas suppressing nutritional value inhibited dopamine release in dorsal, but not ventral, striatum. Consistently, cell-specific ablation of dopamine-excitable cells in dorsal, but not ventral, striatum inhibited sugar's ability to drive the ingestion of unpalatable solutions. Conversely, optogenetic stimulation of dopamine-excitable cells in dorsal, but not ventral, striatum substituted for sugar in its ability to drive the ingestion of unpalatable solutions. Our data indicate that sugar recruits a distributed dopamine-excitable striatal circuitry that acts to prioritize energy-seeking over taste quality.

  4. Neural circuitry of stress-induced insomnia in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, Georgina; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Saper, Clifford B.

    2008-01-01

    Sleep architecture is often disturbed following a stressful event; nevertheless, little is known about the brain circuitry responsible for the sleep perturbations induced by stress. We exposed rats to a psychological stressor (cage exchange) that initially causes an acute stress response, but several hours later generates a pattern of sleep disturbances similar to that observed in stress-induced insomnia in humans: increased sleep latency, decreased nREM and REM sleep, increased fragmentation...

  5. The Origin of Behavioral Bursts in Decision-Making Circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Sorribes; Armendariz, Beatriz G.; Diego Lopez-Pigozzi; Cristina Murga; de Polavieja, Gonzalo G.

    2011-01-01

    From ants to humans, the timing of many animal behaviors comes in bursts of activity separated by long periods of inactivity. Recently, mathematical modeling has shown that simple algorithms of priority-driven behavioral choice can result in bursty behavior. To experimentally test this link between decision-making circuitry and bursty dynamics, we have turned to Drosophila melanogaster. We have found that the statistics of intervals between activity periods in endogenous activity-rest switche...

  6. Functional neuroimaging of the oculomotor brainstem network in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzenbold, Walter; Lindig, Tobias; Himmelbach, Marc

    2011-08-01

    The cortical systems involved in eye movement control in humans have been investigated extensively using fMRI. In contrast, there is virtually no data concerning the functional status of the human oculomotor brainstem nuclei. This lack of evidence has usually been explained by technical constraints of EPI based imaging and anatomical characteristics of the brainstem. Against this assumption, we successfully localised nuclei of the oculomotor system using high-resolution fMRI based on standard EPI sequences in a group of healthy subjects executing reflexive horizontal saccades. A random-effects group analysis revealed task-related BOLD increases in the superior colliculus, the oculomotor nucleus, the abducens nucleus and in the paramedian pontine reticular formation. This group analysis was complemented by individual positive findings in up to 94% of single subject analyses. A visual control paradigm led to increased signal levels in the superior colliculus consistent with its visual properties but no corresponding signal changes in other brainstem nuclei. These results are consistent with findings in animal studies and demonstrate the feasibility to detect BOLD signal increases associated with oculomotor tasks even in the human brainstem using conventional EPI imaging techniques. PMID:21640192

  7. Brainstem death: A comprehensive review in Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanwate, Anant Dattatray

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, the cardiopulmonary definition of death lost its significance in favor of brain death. Brain death is a permanent cessation of all functions of the brain in which though individual organs may function but lack of integrating function of the brain, lack of respiratory drive, consciousness, and cognition confirms to the definition that death is an irreversible cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole. In spite of medical and legal acceptance globally, the concept of brain death and brain-stem death is still unclear to many. Brain death is not promptly declared due to lack of awareness and doubts about the legal procedure of certification. Many brain dead patients are kept on life supporting systems needlessly. In this comprehensive review, an attempt has been made to highlight the history and concept of brain death and brain-stem death; the anatomical and physiological basis of brain-stem death, and criteria to diagnose brain-stem death in India.

  8. Brainstem death: A comprehensive review in Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Dattatray Dhanwate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, the cardiopulmonary definition of death lost its significance in favor of brain death. Brain death is a permanent cessation of all functions of the brain in which though individual organs may function but lack of integrating function of the brain, lack of respiratory drive, consciousness, and cognition confirms to the definition that death is an irreversible cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole. In spite of medical and legal acceptance globally, the concept of brain death and brain-stem death is still unclear to many. Brain death is not promptly declared due to lack of awareness and doubts about the legal procedure of certification. Many brain dead patients are kept on life supporting systems needlessly. In this comprehensive review, an attempt has been made to highlight the history and concept of brain death and brain-stem death; the anatomical and physiological basis of brain-stem death, and criteria to diagnose brain-stem death in India.

  9. Stability and plasticity of auditory brainstem function across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoe, Erika; Krizman, Jennifer; Anderson, Samira; Kraus, Nina

    2015-06-01

    The human auditory brainstem is thought to undergo rapid developmental changes early in life until age ∼2 followed by prolonged stability until aging-related changes emerge. However, earlier work on brainstem development was limited by sparse sampling across the lifespan and/or averaging across children and adults. Using a larger dataset than past investigations, we aimed to trace more subtle variations in auditory brainstem function that occur normally from infancy into the eighth decade of life. To do so, we recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to a click stimulus and a speech syllable (da) in 586 normal-hearing healthy individuals. Although each set of ABR measures (latency, frequency encoding, response consistency, nonstimulus activity) has a distinct developmental profile, across all measures developmental changes were found to continue well past age 2. In addition to an elongated developmental trajectory and evidence for multiple auditory developmental processes, we revealed a period of overshoot during childhood (5-11 years old) for latency and amplitude measures, when the latencies are earlier and the amplitudes are greater than the adult value. Our data also provide insight into the capacity for experience-dependent auditory plasticity at different stages in life and underscore the importance of using age-specific norms in clinical and experimental applications. PMID:24366906

  10. Modeling auditory evoked brainstem responses to transient stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James;

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative model is presented that describes the formation of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to tone pulses, clicks and rising chirps as a function of stimulation level. The model computes the convolution of the instantaneous discharge rates using the “humanized” nonlinear auditory-nerve ...

  11. Stance disturbance in multiple sclerosis: brainstem lesions and posturographic assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schalek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Background. Balance disorders are commonly evidenced during the course of multiple sclerosis (MS. The aim of this study is to report characteristics of MS patient stance control disorders, measured by means of posturography and related to the brainstem lesions.

    Methods. Thirty-eight patients affected by MS, mildly to moderately disable according to Kurtzke’s Expanded Disability Status Scale, underwent a complete clinical neurological and vestibular evaluation and brain MRI scanning. All patients were then tested on a static posturography platform (Tetrax, Israel in four conditions: eyes open and closed standing on a firm surface and on a foam pad.

    Results. Clinical and/or MRI evidence of brainstem involvement was observed in 55.3 % of patients. When brainstem lesion was detected, Fourier analysis showed a typical pattern characterized by inversion of the  0- 0.1 Hz and  0.1 - 0.25 Hz. frequency bands.

    Conclusions. MS leads to pervasive postural disturbances in the majority of subjects, including the visuo-vestibular loops and proprioception involving vestibulo-spinal pathways in at least 55.3 % of patients. Our results may also suggest the presence of Fourier inversion in patients with brainstem lesions.


  12. Brainstem ischemic stroke after to Bothrops atrox snakebite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Carlos A

    2016-09-15

    We report case of a 48 years old woman bitten on her right foot by a Bothrops atrox viper. As a result, she developed a severe coagulopathy which improved with application of polyvalent antivenom. Four days after bite she suffered a devastating brainstem ischemic stroke. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:27527269

  13. Preparation and Culture of Chicken Auditory Brainstem Slices

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Jason T.; Seidl, Armin H.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Barria, Andres

    2011-01-01

    The chicken auditory brainstem is a well-established model system that has been widely used to study the anatomy and physiology of auditory processing at discreet periods of development 1-4 as well as mechanisms for temporal coding in the central nervous system 5-7.

  14. A rabbit model of graded primary mechanical injury to brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Yong-min

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To introduce a new animal model of graded mechanical primary brainstem injury (BSI. Methods: Altogether 45 rabbits were subjected to BSI by type II biological impact machine designed by the Third Military Medical University. The animals were divided into 4 experimental groups (n=10 and 1 control group (n=5 ac-cording to different magnitudes of impact pressure imposed on the occipital nodule: Group 1, 500-520 kPa; Group 2, 520-540 kPa; Group 3, 540-560 kPa; Group 4, 560-580 kPa and Group 5, 0 kPa with 20 kPa increase in each grade. The im-pact depth was a constant 0.5 cm. After injury, the clinical symptoms and signs as well as pathological changes were observed. Results: Rabbits in Group 1 revealed mild physiologi-cal reaction of BSI. They had localized cerebral contusion with punctate hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH was limited to the peripheral tissues at the impact area. In Group 2, obvious physiological reaction was observed. Local pathological lesions reached the superfi-cial layer of brainstem tissues; focal hemorrhage and girdle-shaped SAH in basilar pon were observed under microscope. In Group 3, BSI was more severe with a long respiratory depression. Pathological lesions reached the inner portion of brainstem with massive hemorrhage and the whole brainstem was wrapped by subarachnoid hematoma. In Group 4, most rabbits died due to severe BSI. Pathological lesions deepened to the central brainstem with wide patho-logical change, rapture of the medulla oblongata central canal. Group 5 was the control group, with normal brainstem structure and no lesion observed. Conclusion: This model successfully simulates differ-ent levels of brainstem mechanical injury and clearly shows the subsequent pathological changes following injury. It takes two external parameters (impact pressure and depth and has a similar injury mechanism to clinical accelerating BSI. Moreover it is reproducible and stable, thus being be

  15. Deciphering the transcriptional circuitry of microRNA genes expressed during human monocytic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer Ulf

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are immune cells involved in various biological processes including host defence, homeostasis, differentiation, and organogenesis. Disruption of macrophage biology has been linked to increased pathogen infection, inflammation and malignant diseases. Differential gene expression observed in monocytic differentiation is primarily regulated by interacting transcription factors (TFs. Current research suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs degrade and repress translation of mRNA, but also may target genes involved in differentiation. We focus on getting insights into the transcriptional circuitry regulating miRNA genes expressed during monocytic differentiation. Results We computationally analysed the transcriptional circuitry of miRNA genes during monocytic differentiation using in vitro time-course expression data for TFs and miRNAs. A set of TF→miRNA associations was derived from predicted TF binding sites in promoter regions of miRNA genes. Time-lagged expression correlation analysis was utilised to evaluate the TF→miRNA associations. Our analysis identified 12 TFs that potentially play a central role in regulating miRNAs throughout the differentiation process. Six of these 12 TFs (ATF2, E2F3, HOXA4, NFE2L1, SP3, and YY1 have not previously been described to be important for monocytic differentiation. The remaining six TFs are CEBPB, CREB1, ELK1, NFE2L2, RUNX1, and USF2. For several miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-424, and miR-17-92, we show how their inferred transcriptional regulation impacts monocytic differentiation. Conclusions The study demonstrates that miRNAs and their transcriptional regulatory control are integral molecular mechanisms during differentiation. Furthermore, it is the first study to decipher on a large-scale, how miRNAs are controlled by TFs during human monocytic differentiation. Subsequently, we have identified 12 candidate key controllers of miRNAs during this differentiation process.

  16. The Structural, Functional and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eNieuwenhuys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Wilhelm His (1891, 1893 the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature. Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this ‘four-functional-zones’ concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1 the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2 the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centres (superior and inferior olives. Nevertheless the ‘functional zonal model’ has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioural profiles, as ‘local hypertrophies’ of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units.

  17. Age-related changes in hypocretin (orexin) immunoreactivity in the cat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian Hua; Sampogna, Sharon; Morales, Francisco R; Chase, Michael H

    2002-03-15

    Terminals of hypothalamic hypocretin-containing neurons are observed within brainstem nuclei involved in the control of sleep and wakefulness. Because aged humans, cats and other species exhibit changes in sleep and wakefulness in old age, we were interested in examining age-related changes in hypocretin/orexin projections to the following brainstem regions which are associated with the regulation of sleep and wakefulness: the dorsal raphe nucleus, the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, the pedunculo-pontine tegmental nucleus and the locus coeruleus. Based upon the results of immunohistochemical determinations, in all the regions examined, round or oval "spot-like" structures were observed in aged cats. Many of these "spot-like" structures resembled enlarged varicosities of a nature that would be expected to disrupt hypocretin neurotransmission. In addition, a site-specific decrease in immunostaining was observed in the locus coeruleus in old cats compared with adult controls; this result likely reflects a decrease in the number of labeled fibers, which indicates that there occurs a degeneration of hypocretinergic function in conjunction with old age. The proceeding changes may account for some of sleep-wake disturbance which are observed in aged animals as well as elderly humans. PMID:11879811

  18. Neuronal differentiation and extensive migration of human neural precursor cells following co-culture with rat auditory brainstem slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Novozhilova

    Full Text Available Congenital or acquired hearing loss is often associated with a progressive degeneration of the auditory nerve (AN in the inner ear. The AN is composed of processes and axons of the bipolar spiral ganglion neurons (SGN, forming the connection between the hair cells in the inner ear cochlea and the cochlear nuclei (CN in the brainstem (BS. Therefore, replacement of SGNs for restoring the AN to improve hearing function in patients who receive a cochlear implantation or have severe AN malfunctions is an attractive idea. A human neural precursor cell (HNPC is an appropriate donor cell to investigate, as it can be isolated and expanded in vitro with maintained potential to form neurons and glia. We recently developed a post-natal rodent in vitro auditory BS slice culture model including the CN and the central part of the AN for initial studies of candidate cells. Here we characterized the survival, distribution, phenotypic differentiation, and integration capacity of HNPCs into the auditory circuitry in vitro. HNPC aggregates (spheres were deposited adjacent to or on top of the BS slices or as a monoculture (control. The results demonstrate that co-cultured HNPCs compared to monocultures (1 survive better, (2 distribute over a larger area, (3 to a larger extent and in a shorter time-frame form mature neuronal and glial phenotypes. HNPC showed the ability to extend neurites into host tissue. Our findings suggest that the HNPC-BS slice co-culture is appropriate for further investigations on the integration capacity of HNPCs into the auditory circuitry.

  19. Implementing size-optimal discrete neural networks require analog circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiu, V.

    1998-12-01

    This paper starts by overviewing results dealing with the approximation capabilities of neural networks, as well as bounds on the size of threshold gate circuits. Based on a constructive solution for Kolmogorov`s superpositions the authors show that implementing Boolean functions can be done using neurons having an identity transfer function. Because in this case the size of the network is minimized, it follows that size-optimal solutions for implementing Boolean functions can be obtained using analog circuitry. Conclusions and several comments on the required precision are ending the paper.

  20. Silent Synapse-Based Circuitry Remodeling in Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to cocaine, and likely other drugs of abuse, generates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor-silent glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus accumbens. These immature synaptic contacts evolve after drug withdrawal to redefine the neurocircuital properties. These results raise at least three critical questions: (1) what are the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate drug-induced generation of silent synapses; (2) how are neurocircuits remodeled upon generation and evolution of drug-generated silent synapses; and (3) what behavioral consequences are produced by silent synapse-based circuitry remodeling? This short review analyzes related experimental results, and extends them to some speculations. PMID:26721952

  1. From Fibonacci to the mathematics of cows and quantum circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fibonacci sequence is a famously well-known integer sequence from the thirteenth century which has transcended its original motivation. It possesses many interested and varied applications within architecture, engineering and science. Less well known is the Narayana sequence which itself has interesting and wide-ranging Fibonacci-type connections. In this paper, we shall recall Narayana's original motivation that gives rise to the sequence bearing his name. We also provide an interesting application of this sequence to the construction to quantum gate circuitry used in quantum computation

  2. Non-Invasive Mapping of Human Trigeminal Brainstem Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Knudsen, Jamie; ANDERSON, Julie; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2008-01-01

    The human trigeminal system mediates facial pain and somatosensory processing. The anatomic location of neuronal substrates and axonal pathways of the trigeminal system have previously been characterized with conventional in vitro methods. The present investigation implemented diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography to first segment the peripheral trigeminal circuitry; trigeminal nerve branches (ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular nerves), ganglion and nerve root. Subse...

  3. Circadian Gene Circuitry Predicts Hyperactive Behavior in a Mood Disorder Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Hagihara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, causes swings in mood and activity levels at irregular intervals. Such changes are difficult to predict, and their molecular basis remains unknown. Here, we use infradian (longer than a day cyclic activity levels in αCaMKII (Camk2a mutant mice as a proxy for such mood-associated changes. We report that gene-expression patterns in the hippocampal dentate gyrus could retrospectively predict whether the mice were in a state of high or low locomotor activity (LA. Expression of a subset of circadian genes, as well as levels of cAMP and pCREB, possible upstream regulators of circadian genes, were correlated with LA states, suggesting that the intrinsic molecular circuitry changes concomitant with infradian oscillatory LA. Taken together, these findings shed light onto the molecular basis of how irregular biological rhythms and behavior are controlled by the brain.

  4. Circadian Gene Circuitry Predicts Hyperactive Behavior in a Mood Disorder Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Hideo; Horikawa, Tomoyasu; Nakamura, Hironori K; Umemori, Juzoh; Shoji, Hirotaka; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-03-29

    Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, causes swings in mood and activity levels at irregular intervals. Such changes are difficult to predict, and their molecular basis remains unknown. Here, we use infradian (longer than a day) cyclic activity levels in αCaMKII (Camk2a) mutant mice as a proxy for such mood-associated changes. We report that gene-expression patterns in the hippocampal dentate gyrus could retrospectively predict whether the mice were in a state of high or low locomotor activity (LA). Expression of a subset of circadian genes, as well as levels of cAMP and pCREB, possible upstream regulators of circadian genes, were correlated with LA states, suggesting that the intrinsic molecular circuitry changes concomitant with infradian oscillatory LA. Taken together, these findings shed light onto the molecular basis of how irregular biological rhythms and behavior are controlled by the brain. PMID:27028761

  5. Hemicrania continua secondary to an ipsilateral brainstem lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Marcelo M; Andrade-Valença, Luciana P A; da Silva, Wilson Farias; Dodick, David W

    2007-03-01

    We describe a 47-year-old woman with a 3-year history of a continuum mild-moderate right-side headache, with exacerbations, associated with stabbing volleys of pain on right orbit-temporal region (10/10) and right eye ptosis and lacrimation with conjunctival injection. The pain was completely abolished with indomethacin (100 mg per day). The diagnosis of hemicrania continua was made according to the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria. The headache presentation was precipitated by a stroke and a right-side brainstem lesion was present at magnetic resonance imaging. This case report shows anatomoclinical evidence of the involvement of brainstem structures on the pathophysiology of hemicrania continua.

  6. EVALUATION OF BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED POTENTIAL IN MIGRAINE PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmiya R, Vinodha R

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is worldwide common, chronic, Neurovascular disorder, characterized by attacks of severe headache and an Aura involving neurologic symptoms. Its pathogenesis was incompletely understood whether of cortical or brainstem origin. Aim: The present study was undertaken to investigate brainstem auditory functions in Migraine patients. Materials and Methods: The subjects were recruited based on International Headache Society classification for Migraine. Subjects with episodes of headache for at least 2yrs, 2 attacks per month in last quarter year were included in the study. Forty subjects (16 Migraine with Aura & 24 cases – Migraine without aura & forty age / sex matched controls were selected. Brainstem auditory evoked potential was recorded using 4-Channel polygraph (Neuro perfect plus. Electrodes were placed according to 10 – 20 electrode placement system. Auditory stimulus in the form of click sound is delivered through the headphones. Clicks were delivered at a rate of 8-10 /sec. The intensity of the stimulus is set at 30db. About 100 averages were recorded. BAEP waveforms – Wave I, III & V latencies and the interpeak latencies were measured. The results were analysed statistically using student‘t’ test. Results: BAEP recording shows significant prolongation in latencies of Wave I, III & V and the Interpeak latency (IPL I-III, III-V & I-V in Migraine with aura. In Migraine without aura, there was significant prolongation of Wave I, III & V and III-V & I-VIPL (P<0.05. Conclusion: Prolongation suggests that there is involvement of brainstem structures in Migraine, thus BAEP can be used as an effective tool in evaluation of Migraine.

  7. Adaptive hypofractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for a large brainstem metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Georges Sinclair; Jiri Bartek; Heather Martin; Pierre Barsoum; Ernest Dodoo

    2016-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate how adaptive hypofractionated radiosurgery by gamma knife (GK) can be successfully utilized to treat a large brainstem metastasis - a novel approach to a challenging clinical situation. Case Description: A 42-year-old woman, diagnosed with metastatic nonsmall cell lung cancer in July 2011, initially treated with chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, developed multiple brain metastases March 2013, with subsequent whole brain radiotherapy , after which a ma...

  8. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldonate, J; Mercuri, C; Reta, J; Biurrun, J; Bonell, C; Gentiletti, G; Escobar, S; Acevedo, R [Laboratorio de Ingenieria en Rehabilitacion e Investigaciones Neuromusculares y Sensoriales (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Ruta 11 - Km 10, Oro Verde, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  9. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldonate, J.; Mercuri, C.; Reta, J.; Biurrun, J.; Bonell, C.; Gentiletti, G.; Escobar, S.; Acevedo, R.

    2007-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  10. Functional imaging of the human brainstem during somatosensory input and autonomic output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Anthony Henderson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half a century, many experimental animal investigations have explored the role of various brainstem regions in a variety of conditions. Despite the accumulation of a considerable body of knowledge in primarily anaesthetized preparations, relatively few investigations have explored brainstem function in awake humans. It is important that human brainstem function is explored given that many neurological conditions, from obstructive sleep apnea, chronic pain and hypertension, likely involve significant changes in the processing of information within the brainstem. Recent advances in the collection and processing of magnetic resonance images, has resulted in the possibility of exploring brainstem activity changes in awake healthy individuals and in those with various clinical conditions. We and others have begun to explore changes in brainstem activity in humans during a number of challenges, including during cutaneous and muscle pain, as well as during challenges that evoke increases in sympathetic activity. More recently we have successfully recorded sympathetic nerve activity concurrently with fMRI of the brainstem, which will allow us, for the first time to explore brainstem sites directly responsible for conditions such as hypertension. Since many conditions will involve changes in brainstem function and structure, defining brainstem changes will likely result in a greater ability to develop more effective treatment regimes.

  11. Mapping of neurokinin-like immunoreactivity in the human brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narvaez Jose

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, we have studied the distribution of immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies containing neurokinin in the adult human brainstem with no prior history of neurological or psychiatric disease. Results Clusters of immunoreactive cell bodies and high densities of neurokinin-immunoreactive fibers were located in the periaqueductal gray, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and in the reticular formation of the medulla, pons and mesencephalon. Moreover, immunoreactive cell bodies were found in the inferior colliculus, the raphe obscurus, the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, and in the midline of the anterior medulla oblongata. In general, immunoreactive fibers containing neurokinin were observed throughout the whole brainstem. In addition to the nuclei mentioned above, the highest densities of such immunoreactive fibers were located in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, the lateral reticular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the superior colliculus, the substantia nigra, the nucleus ambiguus, the gracile nucleus, the cuneate nucleus, the motor hypoglossal nucleus, the medial and superior vestibular nuclei, the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi and the interpeduncular nucleus. Conclusion The widespread distribution of immunoreactive structures containing neurokinin in the human brainstem indicates that neurokinin might be involved in several physiological mechanisms, acting as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator.

  12. A rabbit model of graded primary mechanical injury to brainstem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong-min; WANG Xiao-wei; XUE Hai-bin; XIA Peng; LI Hong-wei; DAI Guo-xin; JI Xiao-yuan; ZHAO Hui; YIN Zhi-yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To introduce a new animal model of graded mechanical primary brainstem injury (BSI).Methods:Altogether 45 rabbits were subjected to BSI by type Ⅱ biological impact machine designed by the Third Military Medical University.The animals were divided into 4 experimental groups (n=10) and 1 control group (n=5) according to different magnitudes of impact pressure imposed on the occipital nodule:Group 1,500-520 kPa; Group 2,520-540 kPa; Group 3,540-560 kPa; Group 4,560-580 kPa and Group 5,0 kPa with 20 kPa increase in each grade.The impact depth was a constant 0.5 cm.After injury,the clinical symptoms and signs as well as pathological changes were observed.Results:Rabbits in Group 1 revealed mild physiological reaction of BSI.They had localized cerebral contusion with punctate hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was limited to the peripheral tissues at the impact area.In Group 2,obvious physiological reaction was observed.Local pathological lesions reached the superficial layer ofbrainstem tissues; focal hemorrhage and girdleshaped SAH in basilar pon were observed under microscope.In Group 3,BSI was more severe with a long respiratory depression.Pathological lesions reached the inner portion of brainstem with massive hemorrhage and the whole brainstem was wrapped by subarachnoid hematoma.In Group 4,most rabbits died due to severe BSI.Pathological lesions deepened to the central brainstem with wide pathological change,rapture of the medulla oblongata central canal.Group 5 was the control group,with normal brainstem structure and no lesion observed.Conclusion:This model successfully simulates different levels ofbrainstem mechanical injury and clearly shows the subsequent pathological changes following injury.It takes two external parameters (impact pressure and depth) and has a similar injury mechanism to clinical accelerating BSI.Moreover it is reproducible and stable,thus being beneficial for exploring pathophysiological mechanism,diagnosis and

  13. Intrinsic brainstem schwannoma – A rare clinical entity and a histological enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraparenchymal schwannomas arising in the brainstem are very rare, and only eight cases have been reported in literature till now. We report an intraparenchymal brainstem schwannoma presenting with the classical clinical presentation of an intrinsic brainstem lesion, and discuss its clinicoradiological characteristics and histological origins. We highlight the importance of an intraoperative frozen section diagnosis in such cases. Intraoperative tissue diagnosis significantly may alter the surgical strategy, which should be aimed at near total intracapsular decompression of the schwannoma.

  14. Focusing on optic tectum circuitry through the lens of genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevin Linda M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The visual pathway is tasked with processing incoming signals from the retina and converting this information into adaptive behavior. Recent studies of the larval zebrafish tectum have begun to clarify how the 'micro-circuitry' of this highly organized midbrain structure filters visual input, which arrives in the superficial layers and directs motor output through efferent projections from its deep layers. The new emphasis has been on the specific function of neuronal cell types, which can now be reproducibly labeled, imaged and manipulated using genetic and optical techniques. Here, we discuss recent advances and emerging experimental approaches for studying tectal circuits as models for visual processing and sensorimotor transformation by the vertebrate brain.

  15. New materials strategies for creating hybrid electronic circuitry (Presentation Video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Tobin J.

    2013-09-01

    This lecture focuses on the challenging design and realization of new materials for creating unconventional electronic circuitry. Fabrication methodologies to achieve these goals include high-throughput, large-area printing techniques. Materials design topics to be discussed include: 1. Rationally designed high-mobility p- and n-type organic semiconductors for printed organic CMOS, 2. Polycrystalline and amorphous oxide semiconductors for transparent and mechanically flexible electronics, 3) Self-assembled and printable high-k nanodielectrics enabling ultra-large capacitance, low leakage, high breakdown fields, minimal trapped interfacial charge, and device radiation hardness. 4) Combining these materials sets to fabricate a variety of high-performance thin-film transistor-based devices.

  16. Low Power/Low Voltage Interface Circuitry for Capacitive Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furst, Claus Efdmann

    This thesis focuses mainly on low power/low voltage interface circuits, implemented in CMOS, for capacitive sensors. A brief discussion of demands and possibilities for analog signal processing in the future is presented. Techniques for low power design is presented. This is done by analyzing power...... consumption of different amplifier topologies. Next, low power features of different amplifier types are analyzed on transistor level. A brief comparison of SI circuits for low power applications vs. SC circuits is presented. Methodologies for low voltage design is presented. This is followed by a collection...... power consumption. It is shown that the Sigma-Delta modulator is advantageous when embedded in a feedback loop with a mechanical sensor. Here a micro mechanical capacitive microphone. Feedback and detection circuitry for a capacitive microphone is presented. Practical implementations of low power...

  17. Arithmetic and local circuitry underlying dopamine prediction errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Neir; Bukwich, Michael; Rao, Vinod; Hemmelder, Vivian; Tian, Ju; Uchida, Naoshige

    2015-09-10

    Dopamine neurons are thought to facilitate learning by comparing actual and expected reward. Despite two decades of investigation, little is known about how this comparison is made. To determine how dopamine neurons calculate prediction error, we combined optogenetic manipulations with extracellular recordings in the ventral tegmental area while mice engaged in classical conditioning. Here we demonstrate, by manipulating the temporal expectation of reward, that dopamine neurons perform subtraction, a computation that is ideal for reinforcement learning but rarely observed in the brain. Furthermore, selectively exciting and inhibiting neighbouring GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) neurons in the ventral tegmental area reveals that these neurons are a source of subtraction: they inhibit dopamine neurons when reward is expected, causally contributing to prediction-error calculations. Finally, bilaterally stimulating ventral tegmental area GABA neurons dramatically reduces anticipatory licking to conditioned odours, consistent with an important role for these neurons in reinforcement learning. Together, our results uncover the arithmetic and local circuitry underlying dopamine prediction errors.

  18. The anorectic actions of the TGFβ cytokine MIC-1/GDF15 require an intact brainstem area postrema and nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Wang-Wei Tsai

    Full Text Available Macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1/GDF15 modulates food intake and body weight under physiological and pathological conditions by acting on the hypothalamus and brainstem. When overexpressed in disease, such as in advanced cancer, elevated serum MIC-1/GDF15 levels lead to an anorexia/cachexia syndrome. To gain a better understanding of its actions in the brainstem we studied MIC-1/GDF15 induced neuronal activation identified by induction of Fos protein. Intraperitoneal injection of human MIC-1/GDF15 in mice activated brainstem neurons in the area postrema (AP and the medial (m portion of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, which did not stain with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. To determine the importance of these brainstem nuclei in the anorexigenic effect of MIC-1/GDF15, we ablated the AP alone or the AP and the NTS. The latter combined lesion completely reversed the anorexigenic effects of MIC-1/GDF15. Altogether, this study identified neurons in the AP and/or NTS, as being critical for the regulation of food intake and body weight by MIC-1/GDF15.

  19. Metal Chelation as a Powerful Strategy to Probe Cellular Circuitry Governing Fungal Drug Resistance and Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averette, Anna F.; Lee, Soo Chan; Kim, Taeyup; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Robbins, Nicole; Heitman, Joseph; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to sense host-relevant cues and coordinate cellular responses, which enable virulence and drug resistance. Defining circuitry controlling these traits opens new opportunities for chemical diversity in therapeutics, as the cognate inhibitors are rarely explored by conventional screening approaches. This has great potential to address the pressing need for new therapeutic strategies for invasive fungal infections, which have a staggering impact on human health. To explore this approach, we focused on a leading human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, and screened 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds to identify those that potentiate the activity of echinocandins, which are front-line therapeutics that target fungal cell wall synthesis. We identified 19 compounds that enhance activity of the echinocandin caspofungin against an echinocandin-resistant clinical isolate, with the broad-spectrum chelator DTPA demonstrating the greatest synergistic activity. We found that DTPA increases susceptibility to echinocandins via chelation of magnesium. Whole genome sequencing of mutants resistant to the combination of DTPA and caspofungin identified mutations in the histidine kinase gene NIK1 that confer resistance to the combination. Functional analyses demonstrated that DTPA activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase Hog1, and that NIK1 mutations block Hog1 activation in response to both caspofungin and DTPA. The combination has therapeutic relevance as DTPA enhanced the efficacy of caspofungin in a mouse model of echinocandin-resistant candidiasis. We found that DTPA not only reduces drug resistance but also modulates morphogenesis, a key virulence trait that is normally regulated by environmental cues. DTPA induced filamentation via depletion of zinc, in a manner that is contingent upon Ras1-PKA signaling, as well as the transcription factors Brg1 and Rob1. Thus, we establish a new mechanism by which metal chelation

  20. Deciphering the transcriptional circuitry of microRNA genes expressed during human monocytic differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2009-12-10

    Background: Macrophages are immune cells involved in various biological processes including host defence, homeostasis, differentiation, and organogenesis. Disruption of macrophage biology has been linked to increased pathogen infection, inflammation and malignant diseases. Differential gene expression observed in monocytic differentiation is primarily regulated by interacting transcription factors (TFs). Current research suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) degrade and repress translation of mRNA, but also may target genes involved in differentiation. We focus on getting insights into the transcriptional circuitry regulating miRNA genes expressed during monocytic differentiation. Results: We computationally analysed the transcriptional circuitry of miRNA genes during monocytic differentiation using in vitro time-course expression data for TFs and miRNAs. A set of TF?miRNA associations was derived from predicted TF binding sites in promoter regions of miRNA genes. Time-lagged expression correlation analysis was utilised to evaluate the TF?miRNA associations. Our analysis identified 12 TFs that potentially play a central role in regulating miRNAs throughout the differentiation process. Six of these 12 TFs (ATF2, E2F3, HOXA4, NFE2L1, SP3, and YY1) have not previously been described to be important for monocytic differentiation. The remaining six TFs are CEBPB, CREB1, ELK1, NFE2L2, RUNX1, and USF2. For several miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-424, and miR-17-92), we show how their inferred transcriptional regulation impacts monocytic differentiation. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that miRNAs and their transcriptional regulatory control are integral molecular mechanisms during differentiation. Furthermore, it is the first study to decipher on a large-scale, how miRNAs are controlled by TFs during human monocytic differentiation. Subsequently, we have identified 12 candidate key controllers of miRNAs during this differentiation process. 2009 Schmeier et al; licensee Bio

  1. SPARCL1-containing neurons in the human brainstem and sensory ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Naoya; Sato, Tadasu; Yajima, Takehiro; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sato, Ayumi; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Shimada, Yusuke; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is a member of the osteonectin family of proteins. In this study, immunohistochemistry for SPARCL1 was performed to obtain its distribution in the human brainstem, cervical spinal cord, and sensory ganglion. SPARCL1-immunoreactivity was detected in neuronal cell bodies including perikarya and proximal dendrites, and the neuropil. The motor nuclei of the IIIrd, Vth, VIth, VIIth, IXth, Xth, XIth, and XIIth cranial nerves and spinal nerves contained many SPARCL1-immunoreactive (-IR) neurons with medium-sized to large cell bodies. Small and medium-sized SPARCL1-IR neurons were distributed in sensory nuclei of the Vth, VIIth, VIIIth, IXth, and Xth cranial nerves. In the medulla oblongata, the dorsal column nuclei also had small to medium-sized SPARCL1-IR neurons. In addition, SPARCL1-IR neurons were detected in the nucleus of the trapezoid body and pontine nucleus within the pons and the arcuate nucleus in the medulla oblongata. In the cervical spinal cord, the ventral horn contained some SPARCL1-IR neurons with large cell bodies. These findings suggest that SPARCL1-containing neurons function to relay and regulate motor and sensory signals in the human brainstem. In the dorsal root (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG), primary sensory neurons contained SPARCL1-immunoreactivity. The proportion of SPARCL1-IR neurons in the TG (mean ± SD, 39.9 ± 2.4%) was higher than in the DRG (30.6 ± 2.1%). SPARCL1-IR neurons were mostly medium-sized to large (mean ± SD, 1494.5 ± 708.3 μm(2); range, 320.4-4353.4 μm(2)) in the DRG, whereas such neurons were of various cell body sizes in the TG (mean ± SD, 1291.2 ± 532.8 μm(2); range, 209.3-4326.4 μm(2)). There appears to be a SPARCL1-containing sensory pathway in the ganglion and brainstem of the spinal and trigeminal nervous systems. PMID:27357901

  2. Brainstem and limbic encephalitis with paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussawi, Khaled; Lin, David J; Matiello, Marcelo; Chew, Sheena; Morganstern, Daniel; Vaitkevicius, Henrikas

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of disorders associated with anti-neuromyelitis optica (NMO) antibody is being extended to include infrequent instances associated with cancer. We describe a patient with brainstem and limbic encephalitis from NMO-immunoglobulin G in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the context of newly diagnosed breast cancer. The neurological features markedly improved with excision of her breast cancer and immune suppressive therapy. This case further broadens the NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD) by an association between NMOSD and cancer and raises the question of coincidental occurrence and the appropriate circumstances to search for a tumor in certain instances of NMO.

  3. Stereotactic LINAC radiosurgery for the treatment of brainstem cavernomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuetsch, M.; El Majdoub, F.; Hoevels, M.; Sturm, V.; Maarouf, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-04-15

    Background: The management of deep-seated cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) is still controversial. Although surgery remains the treatment of choice in patients with recurrent hemorrhage, patients with CCMs located in the brainstem are in many cases not eligible for resection due to high procedure-related morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the long-term outcome of LINAC radiosurgery (LINAC-RS) for the treatment of brainstem CCMs. Patients and methods: Between December 1992 and March 2008, 14 patients (6 men, 8 women) harboring brainstem CCMs underwent LINAC-RS. Pretreatment neuroimaging showed no associated developmental venous angiomas (DVAs) in any of our patients. Prior to treatment, all patients suffered at least from one symptomatic hemorrhage (median 1.8, range 1-3). A median follow-up of 7.1 years (range 2.0-16.8 years) could be obtained in 12 patients. We applied a median tumor surface dose of 13.9 Gy (range 11-18 Gy; median tumor volume 1.6 ml, range 0.4-4.3 ml). Results: Following LINAC-RS, neurological outcome improved in 4 (33.3%) and remained unchanged in 8 patients (66.7%). Rebleeding with subsequent transient neurological status deterioration occurred in 4 patients (33.3%), leading to additional surgical resection in 2 patients (16.7%). The corresponding annual hemorrhage rate was 4.8% (4/82.8 patient-years). Adverse radiation effects (ARE, defined by perilesional hyperintensity on T{sub 2}-weighted MR images) were revealed in 3 patients (25%), leading to transient neurological deficits in 2 patients (16.7%). There were no procedure-related complications leading to either permanent morbidity or mortality. Conclusion: Our results support the role of LINAC-RS as an efficient and safe treatment to significantly reduce the annual hemorrhage rate in patients suffering from brainstem CCMs not eligible to microsurgery. Compared with radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), the intervention-related morbidity is higher. (orig.)

  4. Mapping the Brain’s Metaphor Circuitry:Is Abstract Thought Metaphorical Thought?

    OpenAIRE

    George eLakoff

    2014-01-01

    An overview of the basics of metaphorical thought and language from the perspective of Neurocognition, the integrated interdisciplinary study of how conceptual thought and language work in the brain. The paper outlines a theory of metaphor circuitry and discusses how everyday reason makes use of embodied metaphor circuitry.

  5. Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnden, Leighton R.; Kwiatek, Richard; Crouch, Benjamin; Burnet, Richard; Del Fante, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Autonomic changes are often associated with the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but their pathogenetic role is unclear and brain imaging investigations are lacking. The vasomotor centre and, through it, nuclei in the midbrain and hypothalamus play a key role in autonomic nervous system regulation of steady state blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). In this exploratory cross-sectional study, BP and HR, as indicators of autonomic function, were correlated with volumetric and T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (T1w and T2w) brain MRI in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC). Steady state BP (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) and HR in two postures were extracted from 24 h blood pressure monitoring. We performed (1) MRI versus autonomic score interaction-with-group regressions to detect locations where regression slopes differed in the CFS and NC groups (collectively indicating abnormality in CFS), and (2) MRI regressions in the CFS and NC groups alone to detect additional locations with abnormal correlations in CFS. Significant CFS regressions were repeated controlling for anxiety and depression (A&D). Abnormal regressions were detected in nuclei of the brainstem vasomotor centre, midbrain reticular formation and hypothalamus, but also in limbic nuclei involved in stress responses and in prefrontal white matter. Group comparisons of CFS and NC did not find MRI differences in these locations. We propose therefore that these regulatory nuclei are functioning correctly, but that two-way communication between them is impaired in CFS and this affects signalling to/from peripheral effectors/sensors, culminating in inverted or magnified correlations. This single explanation for the diverse abnormal correlations detected here consolidates the conclusion for a brainstem/midbrain nerve conduction deficit inferred earlier (Barnden et al., 2015). Strong correlations were also detected in isolated NC regressions. PMID:27114901

  6. Phase transitions in the common brainstem and related systems investigated by nonstationary time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertz, M; Vandenhouten, R; Grebe, R; Langhorst, P

    2000-01-14

    Neuronal activities of the reticular formation (RF) of the lower brainstem and the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS, first relay station of baroreceptor afferents) were recorded together in the anesthized dog with related parameters of EEG, respiration and cardiovascular system. The RF neurons are part of the common brainstem system (CBS) which participates in regulation and coordination of cardiovascular, respiratory, somatomotor systems, and vigilance. Multiple time series of these physiological subsystems yield useful information about internal dynamic coordination of the organism. Essential problems are nonlinearity and instationarity of the signals, due to the dynamic complexity of the systems. Several time-resolving methods are presented to describe nonlinear dynamic couplings in the time course, particularly during phase transitions. The methods are applied to the recorded signals representing the complex couplings of the physiological subsystems. Phase transitions in these systems are detected by recurrence plots of the instationary signals. The pointwise transinformation and the pointwise conditional coupling divergence are measures of the mutual interaction of the subsystems in the state space. If the signals show marked rhythms, instantaneous frequencies and their shiftings are demonstrated by time frequency distributions, and instantaneous phase differences show couplings of oscillating subsystems. Transient signal components are reconstructed by wavelet packet time selective transient reconstruction. These methods are useful means for analyzing coupling characteristics of the complex physiological system, and detailed analyses of internal dynamic coordination of subsystems become possible. During phase transitions of the functional organization (a) the rhythms of the central neuronal activities and the peripheral systems are altered, (b) changes in the coupling between CBS neurons and cardiovascular signals, respiration and the EEG, and (c) between NTS

  7. Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leighton R. Barnden

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic changes are often associated with the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, but their pathogenetic role is unclear and brain imaging investigations are lacking. The vasomotor centre and, through it, nuclei in the midbrain and hypothalamus play a key role in autonomic nervous system regulation of steady state blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR. In this exploratory cross-sectional study, BP and HR, as indicators of autonomic function, were correlated with volumetric and T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (T1w and T2w brain MRI in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC. Steady state BP (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure and HR in two postures were extracted from 24 h blood pressure monitoring. We performed (1 MRI versus autonomic score interaction-with-group regressions to detect locations where regression slopes differed in the CFS and NC groups (collectively indicating abnormality in CFS, and (2 MRI regressions in the CFS and NC groups alone to detect additional locations with abnormal correlations in CFS. Significant CFS regressions were repeated controlling for anxiety and depression (A&D. Abnormal regressions were detected in nuclei of the brainstem vasomotor centre, midbrain reticular formation and hypothalamus, but also in limbic nuclei involved in stress responses and in prefrontal white matter. Group comparisons of CFS and NC did not find MRI differences in these locations. We propose therefore that these regulatory nuclei are functioning correctly, but that two-way communication between them is impaired in CFS and this affects signalling to/from peripheral effectors/sensors, culminating in inverted or magnified correlations. This single explanation for the diverse abnormal correlations detected here consolidates the conclusion for a brainstem/midbrain nerve conduction deficit inferred earlier (Barnden et al., 2015. Strong correlations were also detected in isolated NC regressions.

  8. A computational framework for ultrastructural mapping of neural circuitry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Anderson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Circuitry mapping of metazoan neural systems is difficult because canonical neural regions (regions containing one or more copies of all components are large, regional borders are uncertain, neuronal diversity is high, and potential network topologies so numerous that only anatomical ground truth can resolve them. Complete mapping of a specific network requires synaptic resolution, canonical region coverage, and robust neuronal classification. Though transmission electron microscopy (TEM remains the optimal tool for network mapping, the process of building large serial section TEM (ssTEM image volumes is rendered difficult by the need to precisely mosaic distorted image tiles and register distorted mosaics. Moreover, most molecular neuronal class markers are poorly compatible with optimal TEM imaging. Our objective was to build a complete framework for ultrastructural circuitry mapping. This framework combines strong TEM-compliant small molecule profiling with automated image tile mosaicking, automated slice-to-slice image registration, and gigabyte-scale image browsing for volume annotation. Specifically we show how ultrathin molecular profiling datasets and their resultant classification maps can be embedded into ssTEM datasets and how scripted acquisition tools (SerialEM, mosaicking and registration (ir-tools, and large slice viewers (MosaicBuilder, Viking can be used to manage terabyte-scale volumes. These methods enable large-scale connectivity analyses of new and legacy data. In well-posed tasks (e.g., complete network mapping in retina, terabyte-scale image volumes that previously would require decades of assembly can now be completed in months. Perhaps more importantly, the fusion of molecular profiling, image acquisition by SerialEM, ir-tools volume assembly, and data viewers/annotators also allow ssTEM to be used as a prospective tool for discovery in nonneural systems and a practical screening methodology for neurogenetics. Finally

  9. A Computational Framework for Ultrastructural Mapping of Neural Circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R; Jones, Bryan W; Yang, Jia-Hui; Shaw, Marguerite V; Watt, Carl B; Koshevoy, Pavel; Spaltenstein, Joel; Jurrus, Elizabeth; UV, Kannan; Whitaker, Ross T; Mastronarde, David; Tasdizen, Tolga; Marc, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Circuitry mapping of metazoan neural systems is difficult because canonical neural regions (regions containing one or more copies of all components) are large, regional borders are uncertain, neuronal diversity is high, and potential network topologies so numerous that only anatomical ground truth can resolve them. Complete mapping of a specific network requires synaptic resolution, canonical region coverage, and robust neuronal classification. Though transmission electron microscopy (TEM) remains the optimal tool for network mapping, the process of building large serial section TEM (ssTEM) image volumes is rendered difficult by the need to precisely mosaic distorted image tiles and register distorted mosaics. Moreover, most molecular neuronal class markers are poorly compatible with optimal TEM imaging. Our objective was to build a complete framework for ultrastructural circuitry mapping. This framework combines strong TEM-compliant small molecule profiling with automated image tile mosaicking, automated slice-to-slice image registration, and gigabyte-scale image browsing for volume annotation. Specifically we show how ultrathin molecular profiling datasets and their resultant classification maps can be embedded into ssTEM datasets and how scripted acquisition tools (SerialEM), mosaicking and registration (ir-tools), and large slice viewers (MosaicBuilder, Viking) can be used to manage terabyte-scale volumes. These methods enable large-scale connectivity analyses of new and legacy data. In well-posed tasks (e.g., complete network mapping in retina), terabyte-scale image volumes that previously would require decades of assembly can now be completed in months. Perhaps more importantly, the fusion of molecular profiling, image acquisition by SerialEM, ir-tools volume assembly, and data viewers/annotators also allow ssTEM to be used as a prospective tool for discovery in nonneural systems and a practical screening methodology for neurogenetics. Finally, this framework

  10. Risk factors of postoperative pulmonary complications following elective craniotomy for patients with tumors of the brainstem or adjacent to the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hui; Dang, Bin-Wen

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the risk factors of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) of elective craniotomy for patients presenting with brainstem tumors or tumors adjacent to the brainstem. A total of 162 consecutive patients with a brainstem tumor or adjacent brainstem tumor undergoing elective craniotomy were included and monitored. Potential risk factors were identified by data collection and monitoring of the PPCs, as well as the performance of single factor analysis (using the χ(2) test). In addition, the independent risk factors of PPCs were screened by logistic analysis. A total of 39 cases of PPC were included in the current study, with an incidence rate of 23.9%. The analysis indicated that smoking history, previous pulmonary diseases, an American Society of Anesthesiologists classification >II and partial tumor resection were risk factors of PPC following an elective craniotomy. Smoking history and partial tumor resection were identified to be independent risk factors of PPCs. PMID:25202352

  11. Transcerebellar stereotactic biopsy for brainstem lesions in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purav Patel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem lesions are pathologically heterogeneous. Pre-operative radiological diagnoses prove to be wrong in 10 to 20% of cases. It is therefore imperative to have a tissue diagnosis for appropriate therapeutic measures. We report a series of 24 patients (14 males, ten females, age range: 6-17 years CT guided stereotactic biopsy for brain stem lesions approached via the suboccipital transcerebellar route in semi sitting position with principle used to violate only one pial plane with the biopsy probe not entering the ventral surface of the cerebellum. The inclusion and exclusion criteria with detailed material and method are discussed. Histological diagnosis was established in 23 patients (96% with no procedure-related mortality. Our results indicate that stereotaxic approach to brain-stem lesions provides a high yield of positive histological diagnoses with a low incidence of morbidity. Awake CT-guided stereotactic biopsy via the suboccipital transcerebellar route in a semi-sitting position is a safe, reliable, and effective method for brainstem lesions that can obtain adequate tissue for histological diagnosis, thus providing each patient with the best available treatment.

  12. Brainstem auditory evoked potential abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharat Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus represents a syndrome complex in which multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system, are affected. Aim: The study was conducted to determine the changes in the brainstem auditory evoked potentials in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 126 diabetic males, aged 35-50 years, and 106 age-matched, healthy male volunteers. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were recorded and the results were analyzed statistically using student′s unpaired t-test. The data consisted of wave latencies I, II, III, IV, V and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V, separately for both ears. Results: The latency of wave IV was significantly delayed only in the right ear, while the latency of waves III, V and interpeak latencies III-V, I-V showed a significant delay bilaterally in diabetic males. However, no significant difference was found between diabetic and control subjects as regards to the latency of wave IV unilaterally in the left ear and the latencies of waves I, II and interpeak latency I-III bilaterally. Conclusion: Diabetes patients have an early involvement of central auditory pathway, which can be detected with fair accuracy with auditory evoked potential studies.

  13. The Role of the Auditory Brainstem in Processing Linguistically-Relevant Pitch Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, the brainstem has been neglected as a part of the brain involved in language processing. We review recent evidence of language-dependent effects in pitch processing based on comparisons of native vs. nonnative speakers of a tonal language from electrophysiological recordings in the auditory brainstem. We argue that there is enhancing…

  14. Effects of Hyperbilirubinemia on Auditory Brainstem Response of Neonates Treated with Phototherapy

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    Negin Salehi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion:  The results of this study underline the importance of the Auditory Brainstem Response Test as an efficient tool for monitoring the auditory brainstem pathway in neonates who are at risk of neurotoxicity and for diagnosing the earliest stages of auditory damage caused by high levels of bilirubin.

  15. Comparison of sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and evoked potentials in the detection of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison was made of the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and the combined use of Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential and Median Somatosensory Evoked Potential in the detection of brainstem dysfunction in 54 multiple sclerosis patients. 10 refs.; 2 tabs

  16. Tractography of the brainstem in major depressive disorder using diffusion tensor imaging.

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    Yun Ju C Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The brainstem is the main region that innervates neurotransmitter release to the Hypothalamic-Pituitary Adrenal (HPA axis and fronto-limbic circuits, two key brain circuits found to be dysfunctional in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. However, the brainstem's role in MDD has only been evaluated in limited reports. Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, we investigated whether major brainstem white matter tracts that relate to these two circuits differ in MDD patients compared to healthy controls. METHODS: MDD patients (n = 95 and age- and gender-matched controls (n = 34 were assessed using probabilistic tractography of DTI to delineate three distinct brainstem tracts: the nigrostriatal tract (connecting brainstem to striatum, solitary tract (connecting brainstem to amygdala and corticospinal tract (connecting brainstem to precentral cortex. Fractional anisotropy (FA was used to measure the white matter integrity of these tracts, and measures were compared between MDD and control participants. RESULTS: MDD participants were characterized by a significant and specific decrease in white matter integrity of the right solitary tract (p<0.009 using independent t-test, which is a "bottom up" afferent pathway that connects the brainstem to the amygdala. This decrease was not related to symptom severity. CONCLUSIONS: The results provide new evidence to suggest that structural connectivity between the brainstem and the amygdala is altered in MDD. These results are interesting in light of predominant theories regarding amygdala-mediated emotional reactivity observed in functional imaging studies of MDD. The characterization of altered white matter integrity in the solitary tract in MDD supports the possibility of dysfunctional brainstem-amygdala connectivity impacting vulnerable circuits in MDD.

  17. Vagal nerve stimulation attenuates IL-6 and TNFα expression in respiratory regions of the developing rat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rhaya L; Murray, Samuel T; Camacho, David K; Wilson, Christopher G

    2016-07-15

    Pre-term infants are at greater risk for systemic infection due to an underdeveloped immune system. Airway infection results in immune up-regulation of early pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in the brainstem. Current treatment for neonatal infection involves antibiotic administration. We previously showed that LPS injected into the trachea of neonatal rats causes changes in breathing and in IL-1β expression in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and hypoglossal motor nucleus (XII). We hypothesize that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) instilled in the trachea also causes the up-regulation of IL-6 and TNFα in the brainstem autonomic control regions. To test this hypothesis we injected LPS into the trachea of rat pups (postnatal ages 10-12days) and then assessed changes in IL-6 and TNFα. Vagal nerve stimulation has been used in the treatment of many inflammatory disorders, including sepsis. Our experiments show that VNS attenuates the upregulation of IL-6 and TNFα caused by LPS and may be a viable alternative to antibiotics. PMID:27049312

  18. The impact of severity of hypertension on auditory brainstem responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdev Lal Goyal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory brainstem response is an objective electrophysiological method for assessing the auditory pathways from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. The aim of this study was to correlate and to assess the degree of involvement of peripheral and central regions of brainstem auditory pathways with increasing severity of hypertension, among the patients of essential hypertension. Method: This study was conducted on 50 healthy age and sex matched controls (Group I and 50 hypertensive patients (Group II. Later group was further sub-divided into - Group IIa (Grade 1 hypertension, Group IIb (Grade 2 hypertension, and Group IIc (Grade 3 hypertension, as per WHO guidelines. These responses/potentials were recorded by using electroencephalogram electrodes on a root-mean-square electromyography, EP MARC II (PC-based machine and data were statistically compared between the various groups by way of one-way ANOVA. The parameters used for analysis were the absolute latencies of Waves I through V, interpeak latencies (IPLs and amplitude ratio of Wave V/I. Result: The absolute latency of Wave I was observed to be significantly increased in Group IIa and IIb hypertensives, while Wave V absolute latency was highly significantly prolonged among Group IIb and IIc, as compared to that of normal control group. All the hypertensives, that is, Group IIa, IIb, and IIc patients were found to have highly significant prolonged III-V IPL as compared to that of normal healthy controls. Further, intergroup comparison among hypertensive patients revealed a significant prolongation of Wave V absolute latency and III-V IPL in Group IIb and IIc patients as compared to Group IIa patients. These findings suggest a sensory deficit along with synaptic delays, across the auditory pathways in all the hypertensives, the deficit being more markedly affecting the auditory processing time at pons to midbrain (IPL III-V region of auditory pathways among Grade 2 and 3

  19. Altered reward circuitry in the norepinephrine transporter knockout mouse.

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    Joseph J Gallagher

    Full Text Available Synaptic levels of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine are modulated by their respective plasma membrane transporters, albeit with a few exceptions. Monoamine transporters remove monoamines from the synaptic cleft and thus influence the degree and duration of signaling. Abnormal concentrations of these neuronal transmitters are implicated in a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including addiction, depression, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. This work concentrates on the norepinephrine transporter (NET, using a battery of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging techniques and histological correlates to probe the effects of genetic deletion of the norepinephrine transporter on brain metabolism, anatomy and functional connectivity. MRS recorded in the striatum of NET knockout mice indicated a lower concentration of NAA that correlates with histological observations of subtle dysmorphisms in the striatum and internal capsule. As with DAT and SERT knockout mice, we detected minimal structural alterations in NET knockout mice by tensor-based morphometric analysis. In contrast, longitudinal imaging after stereotaxic prefrontal cortical injection of manganese, an established neuronal circuitry tracer, revealed that the reward circuit in the NET knockout mouse is biased toward anterior portions of the brain. This is similar to previous results observed for the dopamine transporter (DAT knockout mouse, but dissimilar from work with serotonin transporter (SERT knockout mice where Mn(2+ tracings extended to more posterior structures than in wildtype animals. These observations correlate with behavioral studies indicating that SERT knockout mice display anxiety-like phenotypes, while NET knockouts and to a lesser extent DAT knockout mice display antidepressant-like phenotypic features. Thus, the mainly anterior activity detected with manganese-enhanced MRI in the DAT and NET knockout mice is likely

  20. The Neural Circuitry of Expertise: Perceptual Learning and Social Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHarre

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amongst the most significant questions we are confronted with today include the integration of the brain's micro-circuitry, our ability to build the complex social networks that underpin society and how our society impacts on our ecological environment. In trying to unravel these issues one place to begin is at the level of the individual: to consider how we accumulate information about our environment, how this information leads to decisions and how our individual decisions in turn create our social environment. While this is an enormous task, we may already have at hand many of the tools we need. This article is intended to review some of the recent results in neuro-cognitive research and show how they can be extended to two very specific types of expertise: perceptual expertise and social cognition. These two cognitive skills span a vast range of our genetic heritage. Perceptual expertise developed very early in our evolutionary history and is likely a highly developed part of all mammals' cognitive ability. On the other hand social cognition is most highly developed in humans in that we are able to maintain larger and more stable long term social connections with more behaviourally diverse individuals than any other species. To illustrate these ideas I will discuss board games as a toy model of social interactions as they include many of the relevant concepts: perceptual learning, decision-making, long term planning and understanding the mental states of other people. Using techniques that have been developed in mathematical psychology, I show that we can represent some of the key features of expertise using stochastic differential equations. Such models demonstrate how an expert's long exposure to a particular context influences the information they accumulate in order to make a decision.These processes are not confined to board games, we are all experts in our daily lives through long exposure to the many regularities of daily tasks and

  1. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal plasticity harnesses endocytic circuitries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio eScita

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability of cells to alter their phenotypic and morphological characteristics, known as cellular plasticity, is critical in embryonic development and adult tissue repair and contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases, such as organ fibrosis and cancer. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a type of cellular plasticity. This transition involves genetic and epigenetic changes as well as alterations in protein expression and posttranslational modifications. These changes result in reduced cell-cell adhesion, enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and altered organization of the cytoskeleton and of cell polarity. Among them, loss of cell polarity represents the nearly invariable feature of EMT that precedes the other traits or might even occur in their absence.Time-resolved proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of cells undergoing EMT recently identified thousands of changes in proteins involved in many cellular processes, including cell proliferation and motility, DNA repair, and – unexpectedly – membrane trafficking. These results have highlighted a picture of great complexity. First the EMT transition is not an all-or-none response but rather a gradual process. Second EMT events are dynamic and frequently reversible, involving cell-autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms. Endocytic circuitries have emerged as complex connectivity infrastructures for cellular networks required for the execution of different biological processes, with a primary role in the control of polarized functions. Thus, they may be relevant for controlling certain aspects of EMT. Here, by discussing a few paradigmatic cases, we will outline how endocytosis may be harnessed by the EMT process to promote dynamic changes in cellular identity, and to increase cellular flexibility and adaptation to microenvironmental cues, ultimately impacting on physiological and pathological processes

  2. Intensity of anxiety is modified via complex integrative stress circuitries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin P; Prince, Melissa A; Achua, Justin K; Robertson, James M; Anderson, Raymond T; Ronan, Patrick J; Summers, Cliff H

    2016-01-01

    Escalation of anxious behavior while environmentally and socially relevant contextual events amplify the intensity of emotional response produces a testable gradient of anxiety shaped by integrative circuitries. Apprehension of the Stress-Alternatives Model apparatus (SAM) oval open field (OF) is measured by the active latency to escape, and is delayed by unfamiliarity with the passageway. Familiar OF escape is the least anxious behavior along the continuum, which can be reduced by anxiolytics such as icv neuropeptide S (NPS). Social aggression increases anxiousness in the SAM, reducing the number of mice willing to escape by 50%. The apprehension accompanying escape during social aggression is diminished by anxiolytics, such as exercise and corticotropin releasing-factor receptor 1 (CRF1) antagonism, but exacerbated by anxiogenic treatment, like antagonism of α2-adrenoreceptors. What is more, the anxiolytic CRF1 and anxiogenic α2-adrenoreceptor antagonists also modify behavioral phenotypes, with CRF1 antagonism allowing escape by previously submissive animals, and α2-adrenoreceptor antagonism hindering escape in mice that previously engaged in it. Gene expression of NPS and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the central amygdala (CeA), as well as corticosterone secretion, increased concomitantly with the escalating anxious content of the mouse-specific anxiety continuum. The general trend of CeA NPS and BDNF expression suggested that NPS production was promoted by increasing anxiousness, and that BDNF synthesis was associated with learning about ever-more anxious conditions. The intensity gradient for anxious behavior resulting from varying contextual conditions may yield an improved conceptualization of the complexity of mechanisms producing the natural continuum of human anxious conditions, and potential therapies that arise therefrom. PMID:26555428

  3. The neural circuitry of expertise: perceptual learning and social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harré, Michael

    2013-12-17

    Amongst the most significant questions we are confronted with today include the integration of the brain's micro-circuitry, our ability to build the complex social networks that underpin society and how our society impacts on our ecological environment. In trying to unravel these issues one place to begin is at the level of the individual: to consider how we accumulate information about our environment, how this information leads to decisions and how our individual decisions in turn create our social environment. While this is an enormous task, we may already have at hand many of the tools we need. This article is intended to review some of the recent results in neuro-cognitive research and show how they can be extended to two very specific and interrelated types of expertise: perceptual expertise and social cognition. These two cognitive skills span a vast range of our genetic heritage. Perceptual expertise developed very early in our evolutionary history and is a highly developed part of all mammals' cognitive ability. On the other hand social cognition is most highly developed in humans in that we are able to maintain larger and more stable long term social connections with more behaviorally diverse individuals than any other species. To illustrate these ideas I will discuss board games as a toy model of social interactions as they include many of the relevant concepts: perceptual learning, decision-making, long term planning and understanding the mental states of other people. Using techniques that have been developed in mathematical psychology, I show that we can represent some of the key features of expertise using stochastic differential equations (SDEs). Such models demonstrate how an expert's long exposure to a particular context influences the information they accumulate in order to make a decision.These processes are not confined to board games, we are all experts in our daily lives through long exposure to the many regularities of daily tasks and social

  4. Abnormal ocular motility with brainstem and cerebellar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, T J; Bicknell, J M

    1978-01-01

    The disorders of ocular motility seen in association with brainstem or cerebellar disorders may point to rather specific anatomical or pathological correlations. Pontine gaze palsy reflects involvement of the pontine paramedian reticular formation. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia signifies a lesion in the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Skew deviation may result from a lesion anywhere in the posterior fossa. Ocular bobbing typically results from a pontine lesion. The Sylvian aqueduct syndrome is characteristic of involvement in the upper midbrain-pretectal region, usually a pinealoma. Cerebellar lesions may be manifested by gaze paresis, skew deviation, disturbances of saccadic or smooth pursuit movements, ocular myoclonus, or several characteristic forms of nystagmus. Familiarity with these disorders may be of great help to the physician dealing with a patient with a possible posterior fossa lesion.

  5. The brainstem efferent acoustic chiasm in pigmented and albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss, Stefan; Closhen-Gabrisch, Stefanie; Closhen, Christina

    2016-02-01

    The present study examined whether structural peculiarities in the brain-efferent pathway to the organ of Corti may underlie functional differences in hearing between pigmented and albino individuals of the same mammalian species. Pigmented Brown-Norway rats and albino Wistar rats received unilateral injections of an aqueous solution of the retrograde neuronal tracer Fluorogold (FG) into the scala tympani of the cochlea to identify olivocochlear neurons (OCN) in the brainstem superior olivary complex. After five days, brains were perfusion-fixed and brainstem sections were cut and analyzed with respect to retrogradely labeled neurons. Intrinsic neurons of the lateral system were located exclusively in the ipsilateral lateral superior olive (LSO) in both groups. Shell neurons surrounding the LSO and in periolivary regions, which made up only 5-8% of all OCN, were more often contralaterally located in albino than in pigmented animals. A striking difference was observed in the laterality of neurons of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) system, which provided more than one third of all OCN. These neurons, located in the rostral periolivary region and in the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body, were observed contralateral to 45% in pigmented and to 68% in albino animals. Our study, the first to compare the origin of the olivocochlear bundle in pigmented and albino rats, provides evidence for differences in the crossing pattern of the olivocochlear pathway. These were found predominantly in the MOC system providing the direct efferent innervation of cochlear outer hair cells. Our findings may account for the alterations in auditory perception observed in albino mammals including man. PMID:26657095

  6. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure.

  7. Apparatus, system and method for providing cryptographic key information with physically unclonable function circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Areno, Matthew

    2015-12-08

    Techniques and mechanisms for providing a value from physically unclonable function (PUF) circuitry for a cryptographic operation of a security module. In an embodiment, a cryptographic engine receives a value from PUF circuitry and based on the value, outputs a result of a cryptographic operation to a bus of the security module. The bus couples the cryptographic engine to control logic or interface logic of the security module. In another embodiment, the value is provided to the cryptographic engine from the PUF circuitry via a signal line which is distinct from the bus, where any exchange of the value by either of the cryptographic engine and the PUF circuitry is for communication of the first value independent of the bus.

  8. 77 FR 33240 - Certain Semiconductor Chips With DRAM Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... Memory (USA) Inc. of Sunnyvale, California (collectively, ``Elpida''). 76 FR 79215 (Dec. 21, 2011). The... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips With DRAM Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing...

  9. 78 FR 53159 - Certain Semiconductor Chips With Dram Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same: Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ..., California (collectively, ``Elpida''). 76 FR 79215 (Dec. 21, 2011). The complaint alleged violations of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips With Dram Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same:...

  10. 78 FR 24234 - Certain Semiconductor Chips With DRAM Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips With DRAM Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same; Notice..., which is a limited exclusion order barring the entry of unlicensed DRAM semiconductor chips...

  11. The brainstem pathologies of Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Seidel; Josefine, Mahlke; Siswanto, Sonny; Reijko, Krüger; Helmut, Heinsen; Georg, Auburger; Mohamed, Bouzrou; Grinberg, LT; Helmut, Wicht; Horst-Werner, Korf; Wilfred, den Dunnen; Udo, Rüb

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are among the human synucleinopathies, which share the neuropathological features of alpha-synuclein immunoreactive neuronal and/or glial aggregations, as well as progressive neuronal loss in select brain regions (e.g. dopaminergic substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, cholinergic pedunculopontine nucleus). Despite a number of studies about brainstem pathologies in PD and DLB, there is currently no detailed information available regarding the presence of alpha-synuclein immunoreactive inclusions (a) in the cranial nerve, precerebellar, vestibular and oculomotor brainstem nuclei and (b) in brainstem fiber tracts and oligodendroctyes. Therefore, we performed a detailed analysis of the alpha-synuclein immunoreactive inclusion pathologies in the brainstem nuclei (Lewy bodies, LB; Lewy neurites, LN; coiled bodies, CB) and fiber tracts (LN, CB) of clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed PD and DLB patients. As also reported in previous studies, LB and LN were most prevalent in the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, pedunculopontine and raphe nuclei, periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, parabrachial nuclei, reticular formation, prepositus hypoglossal, dorsal motor vagal, and solitary nuclei. However, we for the first time demonstrated LB and LN in all cranial nerve nuclei, premotor oculomotor, precerebellar and vestibular brainstem nuclei, as well as LN in all brainstem fiber tracts. CB were present in nearly all brainstem nuclei and brainstem fiber tracts containing LB and/or LN. These novel brainstem findings can account for or contribute to a large variety of less well-explained PD and DLB symptoms (e.g. gait and postural instability, impaired balance and postural reflexes, falls, ingestive and oculomotor dysfunctions), and point to the occurrence of disturbances of intra-axonal transport processes and a transneuronal spread of the underlying pathological processes of PD and

  12. THE NEURAL CIRCUITRY UNDERLYING REINSTATEMENT OF HEROIN-SEEKING BEHAVIOR IN AN ANIMAL MODEL OF RELAPSE

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, J. L.; GHEE, S.; SEE, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Reinstatement of extinguished drug-seeking has been utilized in the study of the neural substrates of relapse to drugs of abuse, particularly cocaine. However, limited studies have examined the circuitry that drives the reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior in the presence of conditioned cues, or by heroin itself. In order to test the hypothesis that the circuitry underlying reinstatement in heroin-experienced animals would show overlapping, yet distinct differences from cocaine-experience...

  13. Hybrid gate dielectric materials for unconventional electronic circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Young-Geun; Everaerts, Ken; Hersam, Mark C; Marks, Tobin J

    2014-04-15

    Recent advances in semiconductor performance made possible by organic π-electron molecules, carbon-based nanomaterials, and metal oxides have been a central scientific and technological research focus over the past decade in the quest for flexible and transparent electronic products. However, advances in semiconductor materials require corresponding advances in compatible gate dielectric materials, which must exhibit excellent electrical properties such as large capacitance, high breakdown strength, low leakage current density, and mechanical flexibility on arbitrary substrates. Historically, conventional silicon dioxide (SiO2) has dominated electronics as the preferred gate dielectric material in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated transistor circuitry. However, it does not satisfy many of the performance requirements for the aforementioned semiconductors due to its relatively low dielectric constant and intransigent processability. High-k inorganics such as hafnium dioxide (HfO2) or zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) offer some increases in performance, but scientists have great difficulty depositing these materials as smooth films at temperatures compatible with flexible plastic substrates. While various organic polymers are accessible via chemical synthesis and readily form films from solution, they typically exhibit low capacitances, and the corresponding transistors operate at unacceptably high voltages. More recently, researchers have combined the favorable properties of high-k metal oxides and π-electron organics to form processable, structurally well-defined, and robust self-assembled multilayer nanodielectrics, which enable high-performance transistors with a wide variety of unconventional semiconductors. In this Account, we review recent advances in organic-inorganic hybrid gate dielectrics, fabricated by multilayer self-assembly, and their remarkable synergy with unconventional semiconductors. We first discuss the principals and functional

  14. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90’s functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  15. Regional differences in age-related lipofuscin accumulation in the female hamster brainstem.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, P.O.; Kortekaas, R.; Weerd, H. de; Veening, J.G.; Want, J.J. van der

    2012-01-01

    Lipofuscin accumulation is a characteristic feature of senescent postmitotic neuronal cells but estrogen may have protecting effects by inhibiting its formation. In the present ultrastructural study, lipofuscin accumulation was studied in 2 estrogen-alpha-receptive brainstem areas: nucleus pararetro

  16. Herpetic brainstem encephalitis: report of a post-mortem case studied electron microscopically and immunohisiochemically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eymard Homem Pitella

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available A post-mortem examined case of herpetic brainstem encephalitis is presented. Clinically, the patient had cephalea followed by ataxia, drowsiness and multiple palsies of some cranial nerves, developing into death in eight days. The pathologic examination of the brain showed necrotizing encephalitis in multiple foci limited to the brainstem, more distinctly in the pons and medula oblongata. The technique of immunoperoxidase revealed rare glial cells with intranuclear immunoreactivity for herpes antigen. Rare viral particles with the morphological characteristics of the herpesvirus were identified in the nuclei of neurons in 10% formol fixed material. This is the second reported case of herpetic brainstem encephalitis confirmed by post-mortem examination. The pathway used by the virus to reach the central nervous system and its posterior dissemination to the oral cavity, the orbitofrontal region and the temporal lobes as well as to the brainstem, after a period of latency and reactivation, are discussed.

  17. Effects of Hyperbilirubinemia on Auditory Brainstem Response of Neonates Treated with Phototherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi, Negin; Bagheri, Fereshte; Ramezani Farkhani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most common pathologies in neonates is hyperbilirubinemia, which is a good marker for damage to the central nervous system. The sensitivity of the auditory system to bilirubin has been previously documented, with much discrepancy in its effects on Auditory Brainstem Response results. Thus the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of hyperbilirubinemia on Auditory Brainstem Response of neonates treated with phototherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-two t...

  18. Prodominant hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy with supratentorial involvement: Case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hee; Park, Sung Tae; Lim, Hyun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Tae; Cha, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brainstem and cerebellar edema are uncommon in association with typical supratentorial changes. We experienced three cases of atypical hypertensive encephalopathy involving brainstem and cerebellum as well as cerebral white matter, which showed characteristic alternating linear bright and low signals in the pons, the so-called 'stripe sign'. We report these cases here with a brief literature review.

  19. The brainstem pathologies of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Kay; Mahlke, Josefine; Siswanto, Sonny; Krüger, Reijko; Heinsen, Helmut; Auburger, Georg; Bouzrou, Mohamed; Grinberg, Lea T; Wicht, Helmut; Korf, Horst-Werner; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Rüb, Udo

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are among the human synucleinopathies, which show alpha-synuclein immunoreactive neuronal and/or glial aggregations and progressive neuronal loss in selected brain regions (eg, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, pedunculopontine nucleus). Despite several studies about brainstem pathologies in PD and DLB, there is currently no detailed information available regarding the presence of alpha-synuclein immunoreactive inclusions (i) in the cranial nerve, precerebellar, vestibular and oculomotor brainstem nuclei and (ii) in brainstem fiber tracts and oligodendroctyes. Therefore, we analyzed the inclusion pathologies in the brainstem nuclei (Lewy bodies, LB; Lewy neurites, LN; coiled bodies, CB) and fiber tracts (LN, CB) of PD and DLB patients. As reported in previous studies, LB and LN were most prevalent in the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, pedunculopontine and raphe nuclei, periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, parabrachial nuclei, reticular formation, prepositus hypoglossal, dorsal motor vagal and solitary nuclei. Additionally we were able to demonstrate LB and LN in all cranial nerve nuclei, premotor oculomotor, precerebellar and vestibular brainstem nuclei, as well as LN in all brainstem fiber tracts. CB were present in nearly all brainstem nuclei and brainstem fiber tracts containing LB and/or LN. These findings can contribute to a large variety of less well-explained PD and DLB symptoms (eg, gait and postural instability, impaired balance and postural reflexes, falls, ingestive and oculomotor dysfunctions) and point to the occurrence of disturbances of intra-axonal transport processes and transneuronal spread of the underlying pathological processes of PD and DLB along anatomical pathways. PMID:24995389

  20. Cognitive and affective disturbances following focal brainstem lesions: a review and report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'aes, Tine; Mariën, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Although insights in cerebellar neurocognition and affect are continuously growing, little is known about the role of the brainstem in cognitive and behavioural processing. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the brainstem is an inherent functional part of the cerebellocerebral network subserving cognition and affect, and that isolated brainstem damage may cause a constellation of symptoms closely resembling the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) following cerebellar pathology. In order to investigate these premises, the available literature on cognitive and affective disturbances following brainstem lesions was critically reviewed starting from the pioneer descriptions in the 1950s till June 2012. Three personal cases were added to a study group of 75 cases with isolated vascular brainstem damage. In a cohort of 30 patients that allowed construction of anatomoclinical correlations in a reliable way, a range of cognitive and behavioural symptoms, typically associated with impairment of cortical or limbic areas, were identified. Executive dysfunction, attentional deficits and a decline in general intellectual capacity represent the most common cognitive findings, but memory, visuospatial skills, language and praxis may be impaired as well. Almost half of the cases presented with behavioural or affective changes. Analysis of SPECT findings indicates that functional suppression of frontal, parietal and to a lesser extent also the temporal areas are common phenomena after isolated brainstem stroke. As reflected by diaschisis affecting the cerebellocerebral network, a loss of excitatory input from the brainstem to the cerebellum and cerebrum may induce disruption of several cortical regions as well as emotional control centres resulting in and a constellation of symptoms closely resembling the CCAS. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying brainstem-induced cognitive and affective disturbances is discussed. PMID:25520275

  1. Brainstem infarction in a patient with internal carotid dissection and persistent trigeminal artery: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most commonly described fetal anastomosis between the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations. Case presentation We report a 42-year-old patient presenting with internal carotid dissection, and imaging features of brainstem infarction. Conclusion Based on the imaging studies we presume occlusive carotid dissection with extensive thrombosis within a persistent trigeminal artery as the cause of this brainstem ischemia. PMID:20598138

  2. Brainstem infarction in a patient with internal carotid dissection and persistent trigeminal artery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iancu Daniela

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primitive trigeminal artery (PTA is the most commonly described fetal anastomosis between the carotid and vertebrobasilar circulations. Case presentation We report a 42-year-old patient presenting with internal carotid dissection, and imaging features of brainstem infarction. Conclusion Based on the imaging studies we presume occlusive carotid dissection with extensive thrombosis within a persistent trigeminal artery as the cause of this brainstem ischemia.

  3. A CASE REPORT OF ISOLATED BRAINSTEM TUBERCULOMA WITHOUT ANY FOCAL NEUOLOGIC DEFICIT

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh; De Rahul

    2015-01-01

    : A 7 yr. old girl presented with headache and vomitings. Investigations showed brainstem tuberculoma at the level of pons. Isolated presentation of tuberculoma of braistem is rare. In this report, it was aimed to present isolated brainstem tuberculoma without any focal neulogic deficit and other systemic involvement or past or family history of tuberculosis and importance of neuroimaging in diagnosing tuberculoma even in the absence of neulogic defcit.

  4. A CASE REPORT OF ISOLATED BRAINSTEM TUBERCULOMA WITHOUT ANY FOCAL NEUOLOGIC DEFICIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : A 7 yr. old girl presented with headache and vomitings. Investigations showed brainstem tuberculoma at the level of pons. Isolated presentation of tuberculoma of braistem is rare. In this report, it was aimed to present isolated brainstem tuberculoma without any focal neulogic deficit and other systemic involvement or past or family history of tuberculosis and importance of neuroimaging in diagnosing tuberculoma even in the absence of neulogic defcit.

  5. Expression and significance of sonic hedgehog signaling pathway-related components in brainstem and supratentorial astrocytomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN Yu; HAO Shu-yu; TIAN Yong-ji; ZHANG Jun-ting; WU Zhen; WAN Hong; LI Jun-hua; JIANG Jian; ZHANG Li-wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that abnormal activation of the sonic hedgehog pathway is closely related to tumorigenesis in central nervous system.This study aimed to investigate the role of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in the occurrence of brainstem and supratentorial glioma.Methods Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of sonic hedgehog-related components in 5 specimens of normal brain tissue,10 of grade Ⅱ brainstem glioma,and 10 of grade Ⅱ supratentorial glioma.The significance of differences between two groups was determined using the Mann-Whitney U test or the two-sample test according to the results of normality distribution tests.Results The mRNA expression levels of sonic hedgehog-related genes were higher in brainstem astrocytomas than in supratentorial astrocytomas and normal brain tissue.The level of protein patched homolog 1 (PTCH1) was significantly higher in brainstem astrocytomas than in supratentorial astrocytomas and normal brain tissue (P <0.01).Immunohistochemistry semi-quantitative analysis was consistent with the qRT-PCR result that PTCH1 expression was increased significantly in brainstem astrocytomas at the protein level (P <0.05).Conclusions Enhanced PTCH1 expression and activation of the sonic hedgehog pathway are involved in brainstem glioma.This may be related to the difference in malignant biological behavior between brainstem and hemispheric glioma,and could be an ideal therapeutic target in brainstem glioma.

  6. Lifelong expression of apolipoprotein D in the human brainstem: correlation with reduced age-related neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Navarro

    Full Text Available The lipocalin apolipoprotein D (Apo D is upregulated in peripheral nerves following injury and in regions of the central nervous system, such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, during aging and progression of certain neurological diseases. In contrast, few studies have examined Apo D expression in the brainstem, a region necessary for survival and generally less prone to age-related degeneration. We measured Apo D expression in whole human brainstem lysates by slot-blot and at higher spatial resolution by quantitative immunohistochemistry in eleven brainstem nuclei (the 4 nuclei of the vestibular nuclear complex, inferior olive, hypoglossal nucleus, oculomotor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, and Roller`s nucleus. In contrast to cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, apolipoprotein D was highly expressed in brainstem tissue from subjects (N = 26, 32-96 years of age with no history of neurological disease, and expression showed little variation with age. Expression was significantly stronger in somatomotor nuclei (hypoglossal, oculomotor, facial than visceromotor or sensory nuclei. Both neurons and glia expressed Apo D, particularly neurons with larger somata and glia in the periphery of these brainstem centers. Immunostaining was strongest in the neuronal perinuclear region and absent in the nucleus. We propose that strong brainstem expression of Apo D throughout adult life contributes to resistance against neurodegenerative disease and age-related degeneration, possibly by preventing oxidative stress and ensuing lipid peroxidation.

  7. A transversely isotropic viscoelastic constitutive equation for brainstem undergoing finite deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xinguo; Zhu, Qiliang; Lanir, Yoram; Margulies, Susan S

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to define the constitutive response of brainstem undergoing finite shear deformation. Brainstem was characterized as a transversely isotropic viscoelastic material and the material model was formulated for numerical implementation. Model parameters were fit to shear data obtained in porcine brainstem specimens undergoing finite shear deformation in three directions: parallel, perpendicular, and cross sectional to axonal fiber orientation and determined using a combined approach of finite element analysis (FEA) and a genetic algorithm (GA) optimizing method. The average initial shear modulus of brainstem matrix of 4-week old pigs was 12.7 Pa, and therefore the brainstem offers little resistance to large shear deformations in the parallel or perpendicular directions, due to the dominant contribution of the matrix in these directions. The fiber reinforcement stiffness was 121.2 Pa, indicating that brainstem is anisotropic and that axonal fibers have an important role in the cross-sectional direction. The first two leading relative shear relaxation moduli were 0.8973 and 0.0741, respectively, with corresponding characteristic times of 0.0047 and 1.4538 s, respectively, implying rapid relaxation of shear stresses. The developed material model and parameter estimation technique are likely to find broad applications in neural and orthopaedic tissues. PMID:17154695

  8. Type-dependent irreversible stochastic spin models for genetic regulatory networks at the level of promotion-inhibition circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe an approach to model genetic regulatory networks at the level of promotion-inhibition circuitry through a class of stochastic spin models that includes spatial and temporal density fluctuations in a natural way. The formalism can be viewed as an agent-based model formalism with agent behaviour ruled by a classical spin-like pseudo-Hamiltonian playing the role of a local, individual objective function. A particular but otherwise generally applicable choice for the microscopic transition rates of the models also makes them of independent interest. To illustrate the formalism, we investigate (by Monte Carlo simulations) some stationary state properties of the repressilator, a synthetic three-gene network of transcriptional regulators that possesses oscillatory behaviour.

  9. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with lead exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia de Freitas Alvarenga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Earlier studies have demonstrated an auditory effect of lead exposure in children, but information on the effects of low chronic exposures needs to be further elucidated. Objective: To investigate the effect of low chronic exposures of the auditory system in children with a history of low blood lead levels, using an auditory electrophysiological test. Methods: Contemporary cross-sectional cohort. Study participants underwent tympanometry, pure tone and speech audiometry, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials, with blood lead monitoring over a period of 35.5 months. The study included 130 children, with ages ranging from 18 months to 14 years, 5 months (mean age 6 years, 8 months ± 3 years, 2 months. Results: The mean time-integrated cumulative blood lead index was 12 µg/dL (SD ± 5.7, range:2.433. All participants had hearing thresholds equal to or below 20 dBHL and normal amplitudes of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. No association was found between the absolute latencies of waves I, III, and V, the interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, and I-V, and the cumulative lead values. Conclusion: No evidence of toxic effects from chronic low lead exposures was observed on the auditory function of children living in a lead contaminated area.

  10. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide excites medial pontine reticular formation neurons in the brainstem rapid eye movement sleep-induction zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Reiner, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although it has long been known that microinjection of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF) induces a state that resembles rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, it is likely that other transmitters contribute to mPRF regulation of behavioral states. A key...... candidate is the peptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), which innervates the mPRF and induces REM sleep when injected into this region of the brainstem. To begin understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we examined the effects of VIP on mPRF cells using whole-cell patch...... conclude that VIP excites mPRF neurons by activation of a sodium current. This effect is mediated at least in part by G-protein stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, and protein kinase A. These data suggest that VIP may play a physiological role in REM induction by its actions on mPRF neurons....

  11. The clinic discuss of prognosis and treatment or brainstem infarction combined coma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Junying; Wanglei; YinShimin; Zheng Yishan; Shijie Qu; Zhanfen

    2000-01-01

    Objective Discuss the relationship between the position, bound of brainstem infarction and .consciousness clog,determinan the prognosis and curative effect. Background and Methods Total brainstem infarction 14 patients,9 male and 5 female,43 to 80 years old.all patients had been checked by CT or MRI,brainstem foliun scanning 6 cases,checked by MRI 8 canes micbrain infarction 2 cases,pon infarction 5 cases,medulla infasction 7 cases the midbrain infarction were rise rapid,inmediately coma,the mydrasis in defect side,opposite body mucsle tension heighten.then both lower limbs straight,both pathology sign masculine.the two cases are all alive .tocked-in syndrom has appeared in 1 case of pon infarction ,and died of combined illness 1 year later. 1 case defect affect centrum of breath and hearlbeat, coma,breath rhythm malajustment,breath stop.threr were no consciousness clog in the other 3 cases ,vertigo,force head position to trouble side, nystagmus, trouble side face hypalgesia,and all cureed .2 cases of medulla infarction appeared quactriplegia ,swallow hardness,anarthriad and so on, 5 others were hemi Watlenberg syndrom,all wcre cured. Results and Discussion coma or no in brainstem infaciton was related with position.it is reparted that midbrain infarction coma was 7.6 persent of brainstem infarction. consciousness clog is distinctness which defect position in midbrain lateral-back, pon ventro defect, not involved ARAS ,lwas locked-in synxdom. brainstem infarction combined combined with freedom breath clog,in medulla was 16.1percent,midorain was 1 1.6 percent, pons ws 83.96 percent the prognosis was.all right in lightly brainsterm infarction, lf involved in both medulla, ventro pon,the prognosis was bad, and lose quadriplegia. CT brainstern foliun scanning would enhanced scanning lay, and helpful for chech up the pathological chanoes of brainstem.

  12. Brainstem auditory-evoked potential in Boxer dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Isa Poci Palumbo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem auditory-evoked potential (BAEP has been widely used for different purposes in veterinary practice and is commonly used to identify inherited deafness and presbycusis. In this study, 43 Boxer dogs were evaluated using the BAEP. Deafness was diagnosed in 3 dogs (2 bilateral and 1 unilateral allowing the remaining 40 Boxers to be included for normative data analysis including an evaluation on the influence of age on the BAEP. The animals were divided into 2 groups of 20 Boxers each based on age. The mean age was 4.54 years (range, 1-8 in group I, and 9.83 years (range, 8.5-12 in group II. The mean latency for I, III, and V waves were 1.14 (±0.07, 2.64 (±0.11, and 3.48 (±0.10 ms in group I, and 1.20 (±0.12, 2.73 (±0.15, and 3.58 (±0.22 ms in group II, respectively. The mean inter-peak latencies for the I-III, III-V and I-V intervals were 1.50 (±0.15, 0.84 (±0.15, and 2.34 (±0.11 ms in group I, and 1.53 (±0.16, 0.85 (±0.15, and 2.38 (±0.19 ms in group II, respectively. Latencies of waves I and III were significant different between group I and II. For the I-III, III-V and I-V intervals, no significant differences were observed between the 2 groups. As far as we know, this is the first normative study of BAEP obtained from Boxer dogs.

  13. Brainstem auditory-evoked potentials in two meditative mental states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Practicing mental repetition of "OM" has been shown to cause significant changes in the middle latency auditory-evoked potentials, which suggests that it facilitates the neural activity at the mesencephalic or diencephalic levels. Aims: The aim of the study was to study the brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP in two meditation states based on consciousness, viz. dharana, and dhyana. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects were selected, with ages ranging from 20 to 55 years (M=29.1; ±SD=6.5 years who had a minimum of 6 months experience in meditating "OM". Each subject was assessed in four sessions, i.e. two meditation and two control sessions. The two control sessions were: (i ekagrata, i.e. single-topic lecture on meditation and (ii cancalata, i.e. non-targeted thinking. The two meditation sessions were: (i dharana, i.e. focusing on the symbol "OM" and (ii dhyana, i.e. effortless single-thought state "OM". All four sessions were recorded on four different days and consisted of three states, i.e. pre, during and post. Results: The present results showed that the wave V peak latency significantly increased in cancalata, ekagrata and dharana, but no change occurred during the dhyana session. Conclusions: These results suggested that information transmission along the auditory pathway is delayed during cancalata, ekagrata and dharana, but there is no change during dhyana. It may be said that auditory information transmission was delayed at the inferior collicular level as the wave V corresponds to the tectum.

  14. EVALUATION OF AUDITORY & BRAINSTEM RESPONSES IN HYPERBILIRUBINEMIC INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Jaundice is a common finding in neonates affecting 70% of term and 80% of preterm neonates during the first week of life. So the objective of this study is to evaluate auditory and brainstem responses in hyper bilirubinemic infants and to see if there is any statistically significant increase in latencies of wave I and V waves. To initiate rehabilitative procedure as early in life as possible a screening method to detect auditory disabilities in hyper bilirubinemic infants is of great importance. So the present study is done to know the incidence of hearing loss in hyper bilirubinemic infants & to evaluate the waves I and V in those subjects. METHODS: 45 Infants with hyper bilirubinemia>12mg% & with no other risk factor who visited pediatric OPD of Bapuji Child Health Centre were evaluated using RMS EMG. EP MARK –II machine. Latencies of Waves I and V and interpeak latency of I-V were recorded. RESULTS: On one sample t-test, latency of wave I and IPL I-V were significantly increased (p-value <0.001, latency of V was prolonged which was statistically significant (p-value <0.01. Hearing impairment in the affected infants and complete deafness where none of the waves were recorded signify that it is a risk factor for deafness. CONCLUSION: Since hyper bilirubinemia is a risk factor for hearing impairment, their hearing screening by BERA at the earliest will help in their earliest initiation of rehabilitation when the brain is sensitive to the development of speech & language.

  15. Localization of the brainstem GABAergic neurons controlling paradoxical (REM sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sapin

    Full Text Available Paradoxical sleep (PS is a state characterized by cortical activation, rapid eye movements and muscle atonia. Fifty years after its discovery, the neuronal network responsible for the genesis of PS has been only partially identified. We recently proposed that GABAergic neurons would have a pivotal role in that network. To localize these GABAergic neurons, we combined immunohistochemical detection of Fos with non-radioactive in situ hybridization of GAD67 mRNA (GABA synthesis enzyme in control rats, rats deprived of PS for 72 h and rats allowed to recover after such deprivation. Here we show that GABAergic neurons gating PS (PS-off neurons are principally located in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and the dorsal part of the deep mesencephalic reticular nucleus immediately ventral to it (dDpMe. Furthermore, iontophoretic application of muscimol for 20 min in this area in head-restrained rats induced a strong and significant increase in PS quantities compared to saline. In addition, we found a large number of GABAergic PS-on neurons in the vlPAG/dDPMe region and the medullary reticular nuclei known to generate muscle atonia during PS. Finally, we showed that PS-on neurons triggering PS localized in the SLD are not GABAergic. Altogether, our results indicate that multiple populations of PS-on GABAergic neurons are distributed in the brainstem while only one population of PS-off GABAergic neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDpMe region exist. From these results, we propose a revised model for PS control in which GABAergic PS-on and PS-off neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDPMe region play leading roles.

  16. Circuitry Linking the Csr and Stringent Response Global Regulatory Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Patterson-Fortin, Laura M.; Christopher A Vakulskas; Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Potrykus, Katarzyna; Vinella, Daniel; Camacho, Martha I.; Fields, Joshua A.; Thompson, Stuart A.; Georgellis, Dimitris; Cashel, Michael; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2011-01-01

    CsrA protein regulates important cellular processes by binding to target mRNAs and altering their translation and/or stability. In Escherichia coli, CsrA binds to sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC, which sequester CsrA and antagonize its activity. Here, mRNAs for relA, spoT and dksA of the stringent response system were found among 721 different transcripts that copurified with CsrA. Many of the transcripts that copurified with CsrA were previously determined to respond to ppGpp and/or DksA. We examined m...

  17. Neural Emotion Regulation Circuitry Underlying Anxiolytic Effects of Perceived Control Over Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Salomons, Tim V.; Nusslock, Robin; Detloff, Allison; Johnstone, Tom; Davidson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Anxiolytic effects of perceived control have been observed across species. In humans, neuroimaging studies have suggested that perceived control and cognitive reappraisal reduce negative affect through similar mechanisms. An important limitation of extant neuroimaging studies of perceived control in terms of directly testing this hypothesis, however, is the use of within subjects-designs, which confound participants' affective response to controllable and uncontrollable stress. To compare neu...

  18. Morphogenetic Circuitry Regulating Growth and Development in the Dimorphic Pathogen Penicillium marneffei

    OpenAIRE

    Kylie J Boyce; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei is an emerging human-pathogenic fungus endemic to Southeast Asia. Like a number of other fungal pathogens, P. marneffei exhibits temperature-dependent dimorphic growth and grows in two distinct cellular morphologies, hyphae at 25°C and yeast cells at 37°C. Hyphae can differentiate to produce the infectious agents, asexual spores (conidia), which are inhaled into the host lung, where they are phagocytosed by pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Within macrophages, conidia germ...

  19. Cpeb4-mediated translational regulatory circuitry controls terminal erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-09-29

    While we have considerable understanding of the transcriptional networks controlling mammalian cell differentiation, our knowledge of posttranscriptional regulatory events is very limited. Using differentiation of primary erythroid cells as a model, we show that the sequence-specific mRNA-binding protein Cpeb4 is strongly induced by the erythroid-important transcription factors Gata1 and Tal1 and is essential for terminal erythropoiesis. By interacting with the translation initiation factor eIF3, Cpeb4 represses the translation of a large set of mRNAs, including its own mRNA. Thus, transcriptional induction and translational repression combine to form a negative feedback loop to control Cpeb4 protein levels within a specific range that is required for terminal erythropoiesis. Our study provides an example of how translational control is integrated with transcriptional regulation to precisely control gene expression during mammalian cell differentiation.

  20. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjimichael, Christiana; Chanoumidou, Konstantina; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Papamatheakis, Joseph; Kretsovali, Androniki

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal transducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors (cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research framework for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we h...

  1. Sex differences in the neurobiology of fear conditioning and extinction: a preliminary fMRI study of shared sex differences with stress-arousal circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebron-Milad Kelimer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and brain-stem subregions are implicated in fear conditioning and extinction, and are brain regions known to be sexually dimorphic. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate sex differences in brain activity in these regions during fear conditioning and extinction. Methods Subjects were 12 healthy men comparable to 12 healthy women who underwent a 2-day experiment in a 3 T MR scanner. Fear conditioning and extinction learning occurred on day 1 and extinction recall occurred on day 2. The conditioned stimuli were visual cues and the unconditioned stimulus was a mild electric shock. Skin conductance responses (SCR were recorded throughout the experiment as an index of the conditioned response. fMRI data (blood-oxygen-level-dependent [BOLD] signal changes were analyzed using SPM8. Results Findings showed no significant sex differences in SCR during any experimental phases. However, during fear conditioning, there were significantly greater BOLD-signal changes in the right amygdala, right rostral anterior cingulate (rACC and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC in women compared with men. In contrast, men showed significantly greater signal changes in bilateral rACC during extinction recall. Conclusions These results indicate sex differences in brain activation within the fear circuitry of healthy subjects despite similar peripheral autonomic responses. Furthermore, we found that regions where sex differences were previously reported in response to stress, also exhibited sex differences during fear conditioning and extinction.

  2. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Ling

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  3. CMOS instrumentation amplifier with offset cancellation circuitry and high PSRR for low power application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the design and development of a CMOS instrumentation amplifier for biomedical application. The instrumentation amplifier possesses a very high power-supply rejection ratio (PSRR) and is able to operate at single supply voltage for low power application with improved performance compared to existing work. It also has a full CMOS implementation of offset cancellation circuitry. (author)

  4. Non-contact structural damage detection using magnetic admittance approach with circuitry tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Tang, J.

    2010-03-01

    One limitation of piezoelectric impedance/admittance approach is that the sensor is permanently fixed after it is bonded/embedded into the mechanical structure to be monitored. Recently, the magnetic transducer, which is essentially an electrical coil inserted with a permanent magnet, is explored for impedance/admittance-based damage detection. Since there is no direct contact between the magnetic sensor and the host structure, the magnetic impedance/admittance approach is capable of online health monitoring of structures with complicated geometries and boundaries. Also, the magnetic impedance/admittance sensor is moveable above the structure surface, which may reduce the number of sensors needed to cover a large structural area. In an earlier study a new magnetic impedance sensing scheme with circuitry integration is proposed, which can greatly enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and amplify the damage induced admittance change. In this research, we systematically study the sensor location on the performance of the magnetic impedance/admittance-based damage detection scheme with circuitry integration. By examining the resonant peaks in the circuitry impedance curves, the damage-induced change of circuitry admittance and the two-way magneto-mechanical coupling, the different amplification effects of the magnetic sensor on the dynamical responses around mechanical modes is investigated. The criteria of tuning the capacitance of the tunable capacitor to achieve significantly amplified admittance changes in a wide frequency range are also developed. Correlated numerical and experimental studies are carried out to validate our proposed tuning criteria.

  5. Oxytocin reduces neural activity in the pain circuitry when seeing pain in others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Peter A.; Montoya, Estrella R.; Hermans, Erno J.; Keysers, Christian; van Honk, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Our empathetic abilities allow us to feel the pain of others. This phenomenon of vicarious feeling arises because the neural circuitry of feeling pain and seeing pain in others is shared. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) is considered a robust facilitator of empathy, as intranasal OXT studies have re

  6. 78 FR 41079 - Certain Semiconductor Chips With Dram Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Tokyo, Japan and Elpida Memory (USA) Inc. of Sunnyvale, California ] (collectively, ``Elpida''). 76 FR... Commission's action. See Presidential Memorandum of July 21, 2005, 70 FR 43251 (July 26, 2005). During this... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips With Dram Circuitry, and Modules and Products Containing Same...

  7. Co-localization of hypocretin-1 and hypocretin-2 in the cat hypothalamus and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Sampogna, Sharon; Morales, Francisco R; Chase, Michael H

    2002-08-01

    Hypocretin-1 (hcrt-1) and hypocretin-2 (hcrt-2) are two recently discovered hypothalamic neuropeptides. In the present study, using double immunofluorescent techniques, the co-localization of hcrt-1 and hcrt-2 was examined in neuronal soma and fibers/terminals located, respectively, in the cat hypothalamus and brainstem. In the hypothalamus, all hcrt-1 positive neuronal soma also displayed hcrt-2 immunoreactivity. In the brainstem, both hcrt-1 and hcrt-2 antibodies labeled the same fibers/terminals, indicating that hcrt-1 and hcrt-2 co-localize not only in the neuronal soma (hypothalamus) but also in their fibers/terminals (brainstem). If both peptides are released following neuronal activity, then the distinct effects of these peptides in the brain are likely to depend on the types of postsynaptic receptors that are activated. PMID:12182950

  8. Immunohistochemical localization of glutamate transporter EAAC1 in the brainstem of adult rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fu-xing; LIU Tao; ZHAO Jing-wei; LI Jin-lian; DONG Yu-lin; LI Ji-shuo

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the distribution of EAAC1, a subtype of glutamate transporters, in the brainstem of adult rat. Methods: Immunocytochemical staining with avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method was employed. Results:EAAC1 was widely distributed throughout the brainstem. In many regions, the EAAC1-like immunoreactivity was primarily distributed in the neuropil. Cell body staining was observed in the prepositus hypoglossal nucleus, external cortex of the inferior colliculus, red nucleus, substantia nigra, mesencephalic raphe nuclei, ventral tegmental nucleus, superior olivary complex, nucleus of the trapezoid body, cochlear nucleus, sensory trigeminal complex, Barrington's nucleus,trigeminal motor nucleus, parabrachial nuclei, dorsal nucleus of vagus, hypoglossal nucleus, locus coeruleus, lateral and superior vestibular nuclei, lateral paragigantocellular nucleus and dorsal paragigantocellular nucleus. Conclusion: Glutamate transporter EAAC 1 is widely distributed throughout the brainstem of adult rat, which may play an important role in excitatory activities of the neurons induced by glutamate.

  9. Flupirtine inhibits calcitonin-gene related peptide release from rat brainstem in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, Giuseppe; Greco, Maria Cristina; Capuano, Alessandro; Guerriero, Giuseppe; Currò, Diego; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2012-01-11

    We have previously shown that the nonopioid analgesic flupirtine possesses analgesic activity in the orofacial formalin test in vivo in the rat. However, this paradigm does not allow to distinguish between central and peripheral site of action of the drug. In this study we used a recently characterized in vitro model, consisting in acute rat brainstem explants, to investigate whether flupirtine analgesia may be, at least in part, attributed to interference with neurotransmission between the first and the second order neurons of the trigeminal system, occurring within the brainstem. We used acute rat brainstem explants; CGRP released into the incubation medium was taken as a marker of CGRP release from central terminals of trigeminal ganglion afferent neurons within the brainstem. CGRP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay under basal conditions or in the presence of flupirtine, alone or with putative antagonist XE-991. We found that flupirtine inhibits in a concentration-dependent manner both basal and capsaicin-stimulated CGRP release from rat brainstem. This effect is mimicked by the flupirtine analogue retigabine, and is counteracted by the Kv7 blocker XE-991. These findings provide in vitro evidence that the analgesic activity of flupirtine may be related to interference with pain neurotransmission at the brainstem level. Pharmacological data suggests that such effect is related to opening of Kv7 channels on first-order neuronal nerve ending, and the subsequent inhibition of neurotransmitter release, since the effect is mimicked by the Kv7 opener retigabine and is counteracted by the Kv7 blocker XE-991. PMID:22155095

  10. The application of diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion tensor tractography in the perionerative assessment of tumors involving brainstem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭翠萍

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of diffusion tensor imaging(DTI)and diffusion tensor tractography(DTT)in assessment of Corticospinal tract(CST)and medial lemniscus(ML)in tumors involving brainstem.Methods A total of 35 cases with pathologically confirmed tumors involving brainstem were collected,and 35 volunteers

  11. Functional Ear (A)Symmetry in Brainstem Neural Activity Relevant to Encoding of Voice Pitch: A Precursor for Hemispheric Specialization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Ananthakrishnan, Saradha; Bidelman, Gavin M.; Smalt, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Pitch processing is lateralized to the right hemisphere; linguistic pitch is further mediated by left cortical areas. This experiment investigates whether ear asymmetries vary in brainstem representation of pitch depending on linguistic status. Brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) were elicited by monaural stimulation of the left and…

  12. Evidence for Atypical Auditory Brainstem Responses in Young Children with Suspected Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Daphne Ari-Even; Muchnik, Chava; Shabtai, Esther; Hildesheimer, Minka; Henkin, Yael

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to characterize the auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) of young children with suspected autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and compare them with the ABRs of children with language delay and with clinical norms. Method: The ABRs of 26 children with suspected ASDs (21 males, five females; mean age 32.5 mo) and an age-…

  13. Increased astrocytic expression of metallothioneins I + II in brainstem of adult rats treated with 6-aminonicotinamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Hidalgo, Juan; Moos, Torben

    1997-01-01

    were observed. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) to serum albumin was compromised in the entire brainstem. The astrocytic expression of MT-I + II could reflect the brains needs to scavenge metal ions released from either damaged cells or plasma proteins entering the brain due to the injured BBB, as well...

  14. Demonstration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-like immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Matsuyama, T.; Strosberg, A.D.; Traber, J.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein (mAChR) in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem was described by using a monoclonal antibody (M35) raised against mAChR purified from bovine forebrain homogenates. A method is investigated for light microscopic (LM) and electronmicroscop

  15. BRAIN-STEM INFLUENCES ON BICEPS REFLEX ACTIVITY AND MUSCLE TONE IN THE ANESTHETIZED RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JUCH, PJW; SCHAAFSMA, A; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1992-01-01

    This study analyzes the effect of electrical stimulation of the locus coeruleus (LC) and adjacent brainstem structures on the tonic reflex (TVR), the tonic stretch reflex (TSR) and on muscle tone (MT) in anaesthetized rat. Increases in TVR. TSR and MT of the m. biceps were evoked from regions rostra

  16. Survival with concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy in pediatric brainstem glioma with relation to the tumor volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shachi Jain Taran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brainstem gliomas account for approximately 25% of all posterior fossa tumors. In pediatric age group, it constitutes about 10% of all brain tumors. Brainstem glioma is an aggressive and lethal type of malignancy with poor outcome despite all treatments. Aim: We studied the incidence and treatment outcome in pediatric patients with brainstem glioma depending on their tumor volume presenting in our institution in last 5 years. Brain tumors comprised 2.95% of all cancers and brainstem gliomas were 8% of all brain tumors. Materials and Methods: Nine pediatric patients were included in this analysis, who were treated with localized external radiotherapy 54–59.4 Gy along with temozolomide 75 mg/m2 during the whole course of radiotherapy. Results: The median survival in all these patients was 20 months and the overall 2 years survival is 44.4% (4/9. The median survival of patients with primary disease volume <40cc is 26 months whereas when the volume is more than 40cc the median survival is 13.5 months as calculated by Chi-square test. Conclusion: As this study includes a small number of patients with unknown histology and treated on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging findings, no definite opinion can be given as some patients may have a low-grade tumor. More studies are required to establish the relation of size of the tumor with survival.

  17. Normal development of brainstem in childhood. Measurement of the area on mid-sagittal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developmental abnormality of brainstem is shown in pediatric patients with mental retardation, autism, periventricular leukomalacia, neurodegenerative disease, and so on. Our purpose here is to clarify the normal developmental pattern of the brainstem. We measured the area of tectum, midbrain tegmentum, pons, basis pontis and pontine tegmentum on mid-sagittal MR images in 111 children (newborn to 20 year old). Different growth patterns were shown in all parts of the brainstem. Tectum showed a subtle increase in area from the newborn to adult period, while midbrain tegmentum and pontine tegmenturn showed a mild and gradual increase in area. Pons and pontine tegmentum showed a rapid and prominent increase in area from newborn to infant period and gradual increase in area until the adult period. These different growth patterns seemed to be consistent with differences in the myelination cycles of the neuronal fibers, maturation of the nuclei and proliferation of glial cells in each part of the brainstem. Mid-sagittal MR imaging of the head is accurate and reproducible and is used conveniently in routine head MR study, making it very useful for the diagnosis of many central nervous diseases and anomalies. We believe that this new milestone provided in this study will be helpful in distinguishing normal children from those that have neurodegenerative disorders. (author)

  18. Prenatal valproic acid exposure disrupts tonotopic c-Fos expression in the rat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiel, A; Kulesza, R J

    2016-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by difficulties in communication and social interactions, restricted, repetitive behaviors and sensory abnormalities. Notably, the vast majority of individuals with ASD experience some degree of auditory dysfunction and we have recently reported consistent hypoplasia and dysmorphology in auditory brainstem centers in individuals with ASD. Prenatal exposure to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) is associated with an increased risk of ASD. In rodents, prenatal exposure to VPA is employed as an animal model of ASD and is associated with a number of anatomical, physiological and behavioral deficits, including hypoplasia and dysmorphology of auditory brainstem centers. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that such dysmorphology in VPA-exposed animals would translate into abnormal neuronal activity in brainstem circuits and irregular tonotopic maps. Herein, we have subjected control and VPA-exposed animals to 4- or 16-kHz tones and examined neuronal activation with immunohistochemistry for c-Fos. After these exposures, we identified significantly more c-Fos-positive neurons in the auditory brainstem of VPA-exposed animals. Additionally, we observed a larger dispersion of c-Fos-positive neurons and shifted tonotopic bands in VPA-exposed rats. We interpret these findings to suggest hyper-responsiveness to sounds and disrupted mapping of sound frequencies after prenatal VPA exposure. Based on these findings, we suggest that such abnormal patterns of activation may play a role in auditory processing deficits in ASD. PMID:27094734

  19. Auditory Brainstem Response to Complex Sounds Predicts Self-Reported Speech-in-Noise Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of the auditory brainstem response to complex sounds (cABR) to predict subjective ratings of speech understanding in noise on the Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ; Gatehouse & Noble, 2004) relative to the predictive ability of the Quick Speech-in-Noise test (QuickSIN; Killion, Niquette,…

  20. Leaky RyR2 channels unleash a brainstem spreading depolarization mechanism of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Isamu; Wehrens, Xander H T; Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2016-08-16

    Cardiorespiratory failure is the most common cause of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Genetic autopsies have detected "leaky" gain-of-function mutations in the ryanodine receptor-2 (RyR2) gene in both SUDEP and sudden cardiac death cases linked to catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that feature lethal cardiac arrhythmias without structural abnormality. Here we find that a human leaky RyR2 mutation, R176Q (RQ), alters neurotransmitter release probability in mice and significantly lowers the threshold for spreading depolarization (SD) in dorsal medulla, leading to cardiorespiratory collapse. Rare episodes of sinus bradycardia, spontaneous seizure, and sudden death were detected in RQ/+ mutant mice in vivo; however, when provoked, cortical seizures frequently led to apneas, brainstem SD, cardiorespiratory failure, and death. In vitro studies revealed that the RQ mutation selectively strengthened excitatory, but not inhibitory, synapses and facilitated SD in both the neocortex as well as brainstem dorsal medulla autonomic microcircuits. These data link defects in neuronal intracellular calcium homeostasis to the vulnerability of central autonomic brainstem pathways to hypoxic stress and implicate brainstem SD as a previously unrecognized site and mechanism contributing to premature death in individuals with leaky RYR2 mutations. PMID:27482086

  1. Modelling the level-dependent latency of the auditory brainstem response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James;

    2011-01-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) are used for both clinical and research purposes to objectively assess human hearing. A prominent feature of the transient evoked ABR is the level-dependent latency of the distinct peaks in its waveform. The latency of the most prominent peak, wave-V, is about 8...

  2. Prenatal valproic acid exposure disrupts tonotopic c-Fos expression in the rat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiel, A; Kulesza, R J

    2015-12-17

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by difficulties with communication and social interactions, restricted, repetitive behaviors and sensory abnormalities. Additionally, the vast majority of subjects with ASD suffer some degree of auditory dysfunction and we have previously identified significant hypoplasia and dysmorphology in auditory brainstem centers in individuals with ASD. Prenatal exposure to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) is associated with an increased risk of ASD. In rodents, prenatal exposure to VPA is utilized as an animal model of ASD and is associated with a number of anatomical, physiological and behavioral deficits, including hypoplasia and dysmorphology in the auditory brainstem. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that such dysmorphology in VPA-exposed animals would translate into abnormal activity in brainstem circuits and irregular tonotopic maps. Herein, we have subjected control and VPA-exposed animals to 4 or 16 kHz tones and examined neuronal activation with immunohistochemistry for c-Fos. After these sound exposures, we found significantly more c-Fos-positive neurons in the auditory brainstem of VPA-exposed animals. Further, we found a larger dispersion of c-Fos-positive neurons and shifted tonotopic bands in VPA-exposed rats. We interpret these findings to suggest hyper-responsiveness to sounds and disrupted mapping of sound frequencies after prenatal VPA exposure. Based on these findings, we suggest that such abnormal patterns of activation may play a role in auditory processing deficits in ASD. PMID:26518464

  3. Paediatric brain-stem gliomas: MRI, FDG-PET and histological grading correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Kim, In-One; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Moon, Sung Gyu; Kim, Tae Jung; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Chi, Je Geun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea); Wang, Kyu-Chang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea); Chung, June Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    MRI and FDG-PET may predict the histological grading of paediatric brain-stem gliomas. To assess MRI findings and metabolic imaging using FDG-PET of brain-stem gliomas based on histological grading. Included in the study were 20 paediatric patients (age 3-14 years, mean 8.2 years) with brain-stem glioma (five glioblastomas, ten anaplastic astrocytomas and five low-grade astrocytomas). MR images were assessed for the anatomical site of tumour origin, focality, pattern of tumour growth, and enhancement. All glioblastomas were located in the pons and showed diffuse pontine enlargement with focally exophytic features. Eight anaplastic astrocytomas were located in the pons and demonstrated diffuse pontine enlargement without exophytic features. Low-grade astrocytomas were located in the pons, midbrain or medulla and showed focally exophytic growth features and peripheral enhancement. In 12 patients in whom FDG-PET was undertaken, glioblastomas showed hypermetabolic or hypometabolic lesions, anaplastic astrocytomas showed no metabolic change or hypometabolic lesions and low-grade astrocytomas showed hypometabolism compared with the cerebellum. MRI findings correlated well with histological grading of brain-stem gliomas and MRI may therefore predict the histological grading. FDG-PET may be helpful in differentiating between anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastomas among high-grade tumours. (orig.)

  4. Ventilation induced apnea and its effect on dorsal brainstem inspiratory neurones in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Balnave, Ron J.; Chow, Chin M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of mechanical ventilation (MV) on inherent breathing and on dorsal brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) respiratory cell function. In pentobarbitone-anaesthetised rats, application of MV at combined high frequencies and volumes (representing

  5. Distribution of Neurotensin and Somatostatin-28 (1-12) in the Minipig Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M L; Vecino, E; Coveñas, R

    2016-08-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, an in depth study has been carried out for the first time on the distribution of fibres and cell bodies containing neurotensin and somatostatin-28 (1-12) (SOM) in the minipig brainstem. The animals used were not treated with colchicine. The distribution of neurotensin- and SOM-immunoreactive fibres was seen to be quite similar and was moderate in the minipig brainstem: a close anatomical relationship between both neuropeptides was observed. The distribution of cell bodies containing neurotensin or SOM was quite different and restricted. Cell bodies containing neurotensin were found in four brainstem nuclei: nucleus centralis raphae, nucleus dorsalis raphae, in the pars centralis of the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini and in the nucleus ventralis raphae. Cell bodies containing SOM were found in six nuclei/regions of the brainstem: nucleus ambiguus, nucleus dorsalis motorius nervi vagus, formatio reticularis, nucleus parabrachialis medialis, nucleus reticularis lateralis and nucleus ventralis raphae. According to the observed anatomical distribution of the immunoreactive structures containing neurotensin or SOM, the peptides could be involved in sleep-waking, nociceptive, gustatory, motor, respiratory and autonomic mechanisms. PMID:26250798

  6. The human premotor oculomotor brainstem system - can it help to understand oculomotor symptoms in Huntington's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, U.; Heinsen, H.; Brunt, E. R.; Landwehrmeyer, B.; Den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Gierga, K.; Deller, T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in oculomotor research has enabled new insights into the functional neuroanatomy of the human premotor oculomotor brainstem network. In the present review, we provide an overview of its functional neuroanatomy and summarize the broad range of oculomotor dysfunctions that may occur in

  7. Surgical considerations for ′intrinsic′ brainstem gliomas: Proposal of a modification in classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brainstem gliomas are highly heterogeneous tumors both in their clinical manifestation and in their pathology. Despite significant advances in the surgery for brainstem gliomas many aspects of this pathology are still unclear Objective: To evaluate the clinical, radiological and surgical outcome of 40 focal ′intrinsic′ brainstem gliomas and propose a surgical strategy-oriented classification. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 focal ′intrinsic′ ("expanding variety" tumors have been operated over a period of 8.5-years (January 1998-June 2007. Our criteria included patients with (1 well-defined gadolinium enhancing tumor; (2 relatively long duration of symptoms (> six months and (3 good neurological functional status and independent for all activities of daily living. The cutoff size of 2 cm was not rigidly adhered to. Results: The ′intrinsic′ brainstem tumors were classified into three types: Expanding, diffuse infiltrative and pure ventral varieties. Only patients with expanding variety of brainstem gliomas were subjected to surgery, mean age 19.2 years (range 4-55 years and male to female ration mean: 3:2. The tumor location included pons (n=19, midbrain (n=13 and medulla (n=8. Surgical approaches included midline suboccipital (n=28, retromastoid (n=7, subtemporal (n=3 and supracerebellar-infratentorial (n=2. Thirty-two cases with ′diffuse infiltrative′ and ′pure ventral′ variety were given radiotherapy only. Histology pathology revealed pilocytic variety (n=10, Grade II (n=17 and Grade III (n=13. There was one death in the surgical series (due to aspiration. Complications included meningitis (n=2, wound infection (n=1, chest infection (n=5 and transient mutism (n=1. Follow-up ranged from 3-68 months. Overall, 36 improved /remained same and three worsened in their clinical status at the time of discharge. Conclusion: The surgical management of intrinsic brainstem tumors presents a surgical challenge; radical

  8. Epsilon-Near-Zero Photonics Wires for Mid-Infrared Optical Lumped Circuitry

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Runyu; Zhong, Yujun; Podolskiy, Viktor; Wasserman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    There has been recent interest in the development of optical analogues of lumped element circuitry, where optical elements act as effective optical inductors, capacitors, and resistors. Such optical circuitry requires the photonic equivalent of electrical wires, structures able carry optical frequency signals to and from the lumped circuit elements while simultaneously maintaining signal carrier wavelengths much larger than the size of the lumped elements. Here we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of hybrid metal/doped-semiconductor 'photonic wires' operating at optical frequencies with effective indices of propagation near-zero. Our samples are characterized by polarization and angle-dependent FTIR spectroscopy and modeled by finite element methods and rigorous coupled wave analysis. We demonstrate coupling to such photonic wires from free space, and show the effective wavelength of the excited mode to be approximately an order of magnitude larger than the free-space wavelength of our...

  9. Renewal of safety circuitry on a zero-energy research reactor using microprocessor units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional hard-wired safety-circuitry of the zero-energy research reactor at the Central Electricity Generating Board's Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories is being replaced by microprocessor-based units. The Paper describes how levels of reliability that are necessary for safety circuitry have been achieved by the use of two entirely different guard line systems based on a Motorola 6800 microprocessor and an Intel 8085A microprocessor. The two systems operate in parallel and either will trip the reactor. Each has been programmed by a different programmer using different philosophies. The two units and the test programme involving over 106 simulated guard line trips are described. An overall reliability of better than 10-6 per annum is claimed. (author)

  10. Alternative oblique head CT scanning technique reduces bone artifact and improves interpretability of brainstem anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Douglas Kampondeni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem pathology due to infections, infarcts and tumors are common in developing countries, but neuroimaging technology in these resource-poor settings is often limited to single slice, and occasionally spiral, CT. Unlike multislice CT and MRI, single slice and spiral CT are compromised by bone artifacts in the posterior fossa due to the dense petrous bones, often making imaging of the brainstem non-diagnostic. With appropriate head positioning, the petrous ridges can be avoided with 40˚ sagittal oblique scans parallel to either petrous ridge. We describe an alternative sagittal oblique scanning technique that significantly reduces brainstem CT artifacts thereby improving clarity of anatomy. With Inst­itutional Ethical approval, 13 adult patients were enrolled (5 males; 39%. All patients had routine axial brain CT and sagittal oblique scans with no lesions found. Images were read by 2 readers who gave a score for amount of artefact and clarity of structures in the posterior fossa. The mean artifact score was higher for routine axial images compared to sagittal oblique (2.92 vs. 1.23; P<0.0001. The mean anatomical certainty scores for the brainstem were significantly better in the sagittal oblique views compared to routine axial (1.23 vs. 2.77; P<0.0001. No difference was found between the two techniques with respect to the fourth ventricle or the cerebellum (axial vs. sag oblique: 1.15 vs. 1.27; P=0.37. When using single slice CT, the sagittal oblique scanning technique is valuable in improving clarity of anatomy in the brainstem if axial images are non-diagnostic due to bone artifacts.

  11. Slitrk5 deficiency impairs corticostriatal circuitry and leads to obsessive-compulsive–like behaviors in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Shmelkov, Sergey V.; Hormigo, Adília; Jing, Deqiang; Proenca, Catia C.; Bath, Kevin G.; Milde, Till; Shmelkov, Evgeny; Kushner, Jared S; Baljevic, Muhamed; Dincheva, Iva; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Gale, Nicholas W.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Ninan, Ipe

    2010-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common psychiatric disorder defined by the presence of obsessive thoughts and repetitive compulsive actions, and it often encompasses anxiety and depressive symptoms1,2. Recently, the corticostriatal circuitry has been implicated in the pathogenesis of OCD3,4. However, the etiology, pathophysiology and molecular basis of OCD remain unknown. Several studies indicate that the pathogenesis of OCD has a genetic component5–8. Here we demonstrate that loss o...

  12. Resetting Transcription Factor Control Circuitry toward Ground-State Pluripotency in Human

    OpenAIRE

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Guo, Ge; Loos, Remco; Nichols, Jennifer; Ficz, Gabriella; Krueger, Felix; Oxley, David; Santos, Fatima; Clarke, James; Mansfield, William; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Current human pluripotent stem cells lack the transcription factor circuitry that governs the ground state of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). Here, we report that short-term expression of two components, NANOG and KLF2, is sufficient to ignite other elements of the network and reset the human pluripotent state. Inhibition of ERK and protein kinase C sustains a transgene-independent rewired state. Reset cells self-renew continuously without ERK signaling, are phenotypically stable, a...

  13. Online contributions of auditory feedback to neural activity in avian song control circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Sakata, Jon T.; Michael S. Brainard

    2008-01-01

    Birdsong, like human speech, relies critically on auditory feedback to provide information about the quality of vocalizations. Although the importance of auditory feedback to vocal learning is well established, whether and how feedback signals influence vocal premotor circuitry has remained obscure. Previous studies in singing birds have not detected changes to vocal premotor activity following perturbations of auditory feedback, leading to the hypothesis that contributions of feedback to voc...

  14. Vasopressin Modulates Medial Prefrontal Cortex-Amygdala Circuitry During Emotion Processing in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Zink, Caroline F.; Stein, Jason L; Kempf, Lucas; Hakimi, Shabnam; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The neuropeptide, vasopressin, is a modulator of mammalian social behavior and emotion, particularly fear, aggression, and anxiety. In humans, the neural circuitry underlying behavioral effects of vasopressin is unknown. Using a double-blind crossover administration of 40 IU vasopressin or placebo and functional MRI during processing of facial emotions in healthy male volunteers, we show that vasopressin specifically reduces differential activation in the subgenual cingulate cortex. Structura...

  15. Cortico-limbic circuitry and the airways: Insights from functional neuroimaging of respiratory afferents and efferents

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Karleyton C.

    2010-01-01

    After nearly two decades of active research, functional neuroimaging has demonstrated utility in the identification of cortical, limbic, and paralimbic (cortico-limbic) brain regions involved in respiratory control and respiratory perception. Before the recent boon of human neuroimaging studies, the location of the principal components of respiratory-related cortico-limbic circuitry had been unknown and their function had been poorly understood. Emerging neuroimaging evidence in both healthy ...

  16. NeuroArray: A Universal Interface for Patterning and Interrogating Neural Circuitry with Single Cell Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays...

  17. Stress, trauma and PTSD: translational insights into the core synaptic circuitry and its modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Maxwell R; Hatton, Sean N; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Evidence is considered as to whether behavioral criteria for diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are applicable to that of traumatized animals and whether the phenomena of acquisition, extinction and reactivation of fear behavior in animals are also successfully applicable to humans. This evidence suggests an affirmative answer in both cases. Furthermore, the deficits in gray matter found in PTSD, determined with magnetic resonance imaging, are also observed in traumatized animals, lending neuropsychological support to the use of animals to probe what has gone awry in PTSD. Such animal experiments indicate that the core synaptic circuitry mediating behavior following trauma consists of the amygdala, ventral-medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, all of which are modulated by the basal ganglia. It is not clear if this is the case in PTSD as the observations using fMRI are equivocal and open to technical objections. Nevertheless, the effects of the basal ganglia in controlling glutamatergic synaptic transmission through dopaminergic and serotonergic synaptic mechanisms in the core synaptic circuitry provides a ready explanation for why modifying these mechanisms delays extinction in animal models and predisposes towards PTSD. In addition, changes of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the core synaptic circuitry have significant effects on acquisition and extinction in animal experiments with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the BDNF gene predisposing to PTSD. PMID:25985955

  18. Reward circuitry dysfunction in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders and genetic syndromes: animal models and clinical findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dichter Gabriel S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review summarizes evidence of dysregulated reward circuitry function in a range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders and genetic syndromes. First, the contribution of identifying a core mechanistic process across disparate disorders to disease classification is discussed, followed by a review of the neurobiology of reward circuitry. We next consider preclinical animal models and clinical evidence of reward-pathway dysfunction in a range of disorders, including psychiatric disorders (i.e., substance-use disorders, affective disorders, eating disorders, and obsessive compulsive disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders (i.e., schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, Tourette’s syndrome, conduct disorder/oppositional defiant disorder, and genetic syndromes (i.e., Fragile X syndrome, Prader–Willi syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and Rett syndrome. We also provide brief overviews of effective psychopharmacologic agents that have an effect on the dopamine system in these disorders. This review concludes with methodological considerations for future research designed to more clearly probe reward-circuitry dysfunction, with the ultimate goal of improved intervention strategies.

  19. Endogenous Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius Tonically Regulates Synaptic and Autonomic Function

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Catharine G.; Hasser, Eileen M.; Kunze, Diana L.; Katz, David M.; Kline, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, are highly expressed in the nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS), the principal target of cardiovascular primary afferent input to the brainstem. However, little is known about the role of BDNF signaling in nTS in cardiovascular homeostasis. We examined whether BDNF in nTS modulates cardiovascular function in vivo and regulates synaptic and/or neuronal activity in isolated brainstem slices. Microinjection of BDNF into the rat medial...

  20. Cannabinoid receptor 1 signaling in cardiovascular regulating nuclei in the brainstem: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Badr M. Ibrahim; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids elicit complex hemodynamic responses in experimental animals that involve both peripheral and central sites. Centrally administered cannabinoids have been shown to predominantly cause pressor response. However, very little is known about the mechanism of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R)-centrally evoked pressor response. In this review, we provided an overview of the contemporary knowledge regarding the cannabinoids centrally elicited cardiovascular responses and the possible un...

  1. Transient isolated brainstem symptoms preceding posterior circulation stroke: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Nicola LM; Simoni, Michela; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Transient isolated brainstem symptoms (eg, isolated vertigo, dysarthria, diplopia) are not consistently classified as transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and data for prognosis are limited. If some of these transient neurological attacks (TNAs) are due to vertebrobasilar ischaemia, then they should be common during the days and weeks preceding posterior circulation strokes. We aimed to assess the frequency of TNAs before vertebrobasilar ischaemic stroke. Methods We studied all potential ischaemic events during the 90 days preceding an ischaemic stroke in patients ascertained within a prospective, population-based incidence study in Oxfordshire, UK (Oxford Vascular Study; 2002–2010) and compared rates of TNA preceding vertebrobasilar stroke versus carotid stroke. We classified the brainstem symptoms isolated vertigo, vertigo with non-focal symptoms, isolated double vision, transient generalised weakness, and binocular visual disturbance as TNAs in the vertebrobasilar territory; atypical amaurosis fugax and limb-shaking as TNAs in the carotid territory; and isolated slurred speech, migraine variants, transient confusion, and hemisensory tingling symptoms as TNAs in uncertain territory. Findings Of the 1141 patients with ischaemic stroke, vascular territory was categorisable in 1034 (91%) cases, with 275 vertebrobasilar strokes and 759 carotid strokes. Isolated brainstem TNAs were more frequent before a vertebrobasilar stroke (45 of 275 events) than before a carotid stroke (10 of 759; OR 14·7, 95% CI 7·3–29·5, p<0·0001), particularly during the preceding 2 days (22 of 252 before a vertebrobasilar stroke vs two of 751 before a carotid stroke, OR 35·8, 8·4–153·5, p<0·0001). Of all 59 TNAs preceding (median 4 days, IQR 1–30) vertebrobasilar stroke, only five (8%) fulfilled the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) criteria for TIA. The other 54 cases were isolated vertigo (n=23), non-NINDS binocular visual

  2. Neurodegenerative changes in the brainstem and olfactory bulb in people older than 50 years old: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Hehn de Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in life expectancy in Brazil, concerns have grown about the most prevalent diseases in elderly people. Among these diseases are neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Protein deposits related to the development of these diseases can pre-date the symptomatic phases by years. The tau protein is particularly interesting: it might be found in the brainstem and olfactory bulb long before it reaches the limbic cortex, at which point symptoms occur. Of the 14 brains collected in this study, the tau protein was found in the brainstems of 10 (71.42% and in olfactory bulbs of 3 out 11. Of the 7 individuals who had a final diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, 6 presented tau deposits in some region of the brainstem. Our data support the idea of the presence of tau protein in the brainstem and olfactory bulb in the earliest stages of AD.

  3. Hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy involving deep supratentorial regions: does only blood pressure matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ho Park

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 42-year-old female patient who presented with high arterial blood pressure of 245/150 mmHg and hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy that involved the brainstem and extensive supratentorial deep gray and white matter. The lesions were nearly completely resolved several days after stabilization of the arterial blood pressure. Normal diffusion-weighted imaging findings and high apparent diffusion coefficient values suggested that the main pathomechanism was vasogenic edema owing to severe hypertension. On the basis of a literature review, the absolute value of blood pressure or whether the patient can control his/her blood pressure seems not to be associated with the degree of the lesions evident on magnetic resonance imaging. It remains to be determined if the acceleration rate and the duration of elevated arterial blood pressure might play a key role in the development of the hypertensive encephalopathy pattern.

  4. Stress-induced increases in brainstem amino acid levels are prevented by chronic sodium hydrosulfide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warenycia, M W; Kombian, S B; Reiffenstein, R J

    1990-01-01

    Neurotransmitter amino acid levels were measured in select brain regions of rats and mice after chronic treatment with sublethal doses of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). Brainstem aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, taurine and GABA levels increased in chronically but not acutely saline-treated rats. These increases may have been due to stress from frequent handling, and were prevented by chronic NaHS treatment (7.5 mg/kg ip every 8 hr for 3 consecutive days). In contrast, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine increased in female but not in male ICR mouse brainstems after once daily treatment with 7.0 mg/kg NaHS for 5 consecutive days. These effects of NaHS may indicate chronic low level H2S neurotoxicity. Differences between chronic and acute treatments, female and male responses, and treatment paradigms may complicate interpretations of such toxicity studies.

  5. Prolonged dysphagia due to Listeria-rhombencephalitis with brainstem abscess and acute polyradiculoneuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiatacz, Tomasz; Kowalik, Maciej Michal; Hlebowicz, Maria

    2006-06-01

    We report a case of previously healthy student with acute rhombencephalitis and brainstem abscess caused by Listeria monocytogenes. The disease begun with uncharacteristic prodromal symptoms of gastrointestinal infection followed by headache and vertigo. After hospital admission the patient rapidly deteriorated, presenting pronounced dysphagia and respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. The diagnosis was established upon clinical symptoms of infection, brainstem involvement, typical MRI findings and positive for L. monocytogenes blood culture. Infection was complicated by acute, demyelinating neuropathy, diagnosed upon clinical symptoms of frail palsy confirmed by ENG. Initially introduced empirical doxycyclin/ceftriaxon treatment was subsequently changed to targeted ampicillin/gentamycin therapy, mechanical ventilation, intravenous human immunoglobulin treatment, tracheostomy and endoscopic gastrostomy. Prolonged dysphagia resolved after rehabilitation. After one year the patient remains well with only slight dysmetria. PMID:16260041

  6. Effect of Infant Prematurity on Auditory Brainstem Response at Preschool Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hasani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm birth is a risk factor for a number of conditions that requires comprehensive examination. Our study was designed to investigate the impact of preterm birth on the processing of auditory stimuli and brain structures at the brainstem level at a preschool age.   Materials and Methods: An auditory brainstem response (ABR test was performed with low rates of stimuli in 60 children aged 4 to 6 years. Thirty subjects had been born following a very preterm labor or late-preterm labor and 30 control subjects had been born following a full-term labor.   Results: Significant differences in the ABR test result were observed in terms of the inter-peak intervals of the I–III and III–V waves, and the absolute latency of the III wave (P

  7. Motor-circuit communication matrix from spinal cord to brainstem neurons revealed by developmental origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Chiara; Esposito, Maria Soledad; Sigrist, Markus; Arber, Silvia

    2014-01-30

    Accurate motor-task execution relies on continuous comparison of planned and performed actions. Motor-output pathways establish internal circuit collaterals for this purpose. Here we focus on motor collateral organization between spinal cord and upstream neurons in the brainstem. We used a newly developed mouse genetic tool intersectionally with viruses to uncover the connectivity rules of these ascending pathways by capturing the transient expression of neuronal subpopulation determinants. We reveal a widespread and diverse network of spinal dual-axon neurons, with coincident input to forelimb motor neurons and the lateral reticular nucleus (LRN) in the brainstem. Spinal information to the LRN is not segregated by motor pool or neurotransmitter identity. Instead, it is organized according to the developmental domain origin of the progenitor cells. Thus, excerpts of most spinal information destined for action are relayed to supraspinal centers through exquisitely organized ascending connectivity modules, enabling precise communication between command and execution centers of movement.

  8. A Review of the Clinical Outcomes for Patients Diagnosed with Brainstem Metastasis and Treated with Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Lamm, Andrew F.; Elaimy, Ameer L.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Demakas, John J.; Barton S. Cooke; Lee, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Only 3%–5% of all brain metastases are located in the brainstem. We present a comprehensive review of the clinical outcomes from modern studies that treated patients with brainstem metastasis using either a Gamma Knife or a linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery. The median survival time of patients was compared to better understand what clinical or treatment factors are predictive of improved survival. This information can then be utilized to optimize patient care. The data sugge...

  9. Analysis of the mechanisms of rabbit's brainstem hemorrhage complicated with irritable changes in the alvine mucous membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Long Jin; Yang Zheng; Hai-Ming Shen; Wen-Li Jing; Zhao-Qiang Zhang; Jian-Zhong Huang; Qing-Lin Tan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes in the pressure of the lateral ventricle during acute brainstem hemorrhage and the changes of neural discharge of vagus nerve under the load of intracranial hypertension, so as to analyze their effects on the congestive degree of intestinal mucous membrane and the morphologic changes of intestinal mucous membrane.METHODS: An operation was made to open the skull to obtain an acute brainstem hemorrhage animal model.Microcirculatory microscope photography device and video recording system were used to determine the changes continuously in the caliber of jejunal mesenteric artery during brainstem hemorrhage and the changes with time in the congestion of jejunal mucosal villi. We used HE stain morphology to analyze the changes of duodenal mucosal villi. A recording electrode was used to calculate and measure the electric discharge activities of cervical vagus nerve.RESULTS: (1) We observed that the pressure of lateral cerebral ventricle increased transiently during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (2) The caliber of the jejunal mesenteric artery increased during brainstem hemorrhage.Analysis of red color coordinate values indicated transient increase in the congestion of jejunal mucous membrane during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (3) Through the analysis of the pathologic slice, we found enlarged blood vessels, stagnant blood, and transudatory red blood cells in the duodenal submucous layer; (4) Electric discharge of vagus nerve increased and sporadic hemorrhage spots occurred in duodenal mucous and submucous layer, when the lateral ventricle was under pressure.CONCLUSION: Brainstem hemorrhage could causeintracranial hypertension, which would increase the neural discharge of vagus nerve and cause the transient congestion of jejunal mucous membrane. It could cause hyperemia and diffused hemorrhage in the duodenal submucous layer 48 h after brainstem hemorrhage.

  10. Analysis of the mechanisms of rabbit’s brainstem hemorrhage complicated with irritable changes in the alvine mucous membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue-Long; Zheng, Yang; Shen, Hai-Ming; Jing, Wen-Li; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Huang, Jian-Zhong; Tan, Qing-Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes in the pressure of the lateral ventricle during acute brainstem hemorrhage and the changes of neural discharge of vagus nerve under the load of intracranial hypertension, so as to analyze their effects on the congestive degree of intestinal mucous membrane and the morphologic changes of intestinal mucous membrane. METHODS: An operation was made to open the skull to obtain an acute brainstem hemorrhage animal model. Microcirculatory microscope photography device and video recording system were used to determine the changes continuously in the caliber of jejunal mesenteric artery during brainstem hemorrhage and the changes with time in the congestion of jejunal mucosal villi. We used HE stain morphology to analyze the changes of duodenal mucosal villi. A recording electrode was used to calculate and measure the electric discharge activities of cervical vagus nerve. RESULTS: (1) We observed that the pressure of lateral cerebral ventricle increased transiently during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (2) The caliber of the jejunal mesenteric artery increased during brainstem hemorrhage. Analysis of red color coordinate values indicated transient increase in the congestion of jejunal mucous membrane during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (3) Through the analysis of the pathologic slice, we found enlarged blood vessels, stagnant blood, and transudatory red blood cells in the duodenal submucous layer; (4) Electric discharge of vagus nerve increased and sporadic hemorrhage spots occurred in duodenal mucous and submucous layer, when the lateral ventricle was under pressure. CONCLUSION: Brainstem hemorrhage could cause intracranial hypertension, which would increase the neural discharge of vagus nerve and cause the transient congestion of jejunal mucous membrane. It could cause hyperemia and diffused hemorrhage in the duodenal submucous layer 48 h after brainstem hemorrhage. PMID:15786536

  11. Differential sensitivity of brainstem vs cortical astrocytes to changes in pH reveals functional regional specialization of astroglia

    OpenAIRE

    Kasimov, V.; Larina, O; C Castaldo; Marina, N; Patrushev, M; Kasparov, Sergey; Gourine, A.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes might function as brain interoceptors capable of detecting different (chemo)sensory modalities and transmitting sensory information to the relevant neural networks controlling vital functions. For example, astrocytes which reside near the ventral surface of the brainstem (central respiratory chemosensitive area) respond to physiological decreases in pH with vigorous elevations in intracellular Ca2+ and release of ATP. ATP transmits astroglial excitation to the brainstem respiratory...

  12. Prescription dose and fractionation predict improved survival after stereotactic radiotherapy for brainstem metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Leeman Jonathan E; Clump David A; Wegner Rodney E; Heron Dwight E; Burton Steven A; Mintz Arlan H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Brainstem metastases represent an uncommon clinical presentation that is associated with a poor prognosis. Treatment options are limited given the unacceptable risks associated with surgical resection in this location. However, without local control, symptoms including progressive cranial nerve dysfunction are frequently observed. The objective of this study was to determine the outcomes associated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery (SR...

  13. Retrospective analysis of 104 histologically proven adult brainstem gliomas: clinical symptoms, therapeutic approaches and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult brainstem gliomas are rare primary brain tumors (<2% of gliomas). The goal of this study was to analyze clinical, prognostic and therapeutic factors in a large series of histologically proven brainstem gliomas. Between 1997 and 2007, 104 patients with a histologically proven brainstem glioma were retrospectively analyzed. Data about clinical course of disease, neuropathological findings and therapeutic approaches were analyzed. The median age at diagnosis was 41 years (range 18-89 years), median KPS before any operative procedure was 80 (range 20-100) and median survival for the whole cohort was 18.8 months. Histopathological examinations revealed 16 grade I, 31 grade II, 42 grade III and 14 grade IV gliomas. Grading was not possible in 1 patient. Therapeutic concepts differed according to the histopathology of the disease. Median overall survival for grade II tumors was 26.4 months, for grade III tumors 12.9 months and for grade IV tumors 9.8 months. On multivariate analysis the relative risk to die increased with a KPS ≤ 70 by factor 6.7, with grade III/IV gliomas by the factor 1.8 and for age ≥ 40 by the factor 1.7. External beam radiation reduced the risk to die by factor 0.4. Adult brainstem gliomas present with a wide variety of neurological symptoms and postoperative radiation remains the cornerstone of therapy with no proven benefit of adding chemotherapy. Low KPS, age ≥ 40 and higher tumor grade have a negative impact on overall survival

  14. Differences in Brainstem Fiber Tract Response to Radiation: A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Li, Yimei; Feng, Tianshu [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Gajjar, Amar [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Ogg, Robert J.; Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation-induced changes in white matter tracts are uniform across the brainstem. Methods and Materials: We analyzed serial diffusion tensor imaging data, acquired before radiation therapy and over 48 to 72 months of follow-up, from 42 pediatric patients (age 6-20 years) with medulloblastoma. FSL software (FMRIB, Oxford, UK) was used to calculate fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial, radial, and mean diffusivities. For a consistent identification of volumes of interest (VOIs), the parametric maps of each patient were transformed to a standard brain space (MNI152), on which we identified VOIs including corticospinal tract (CST), medial lemniscus (ML), transverse pontine fiber (TPF), and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) at the level of pons. Temporal changes of DTI parameters in VOIs were compared using a linear mixed effect model. Results: Radiation-induced white matter injury was marked by a decline in FA after treatment. The decline was often accompanied by decreased axial diffusivity, increased radial diffusivity, or both. This implied axonal damage and demyelination. We observed that the magnitude of the changes was not always uniform across substructures of the brainstem. Specifically, the changes in DTI parameters for TPF were more pronounced than in other regions (P<.001 for FA) despite similarities in the distribution of dose. We did not find a significant difference among CST, ML, and MCP in these patients (P>.093 for all parameters). Conclusions: Changes in the structural integrity of white matter tracts, assessed by DTI, were not uniform across the brainstem after radiation therapy. These results support a role for tract-based assessment in radiation treatment planning and determination of brainstem tolerance.

  15. Brainstem structures are primarily affected in an experimental model of severe scorpion envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidine, Patrícia Alves Maia; Cash, Diana; Drumond, Luciana Estefani; de Souza E Rezende, Gustavo Henrique; Massensini, André Ricardo; Williams, Steve Charles Rees; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Mesquita, Michel Bernanos Soares

    2014-01-01

    Severe scorpion envenoming (SSE) is more frequent in children and is characterized by systemic dysfunctions with a mortality rate of up to 9%. Recent evidence shows that the central nervous system (CNS) plays a key role in triggering the cascade of symptoms present in SSE. The age-dependent role of the CNS in SSE lethality may be summarized in 3 hypotheses: (1) the shown increased blood brain barrier permeability of infants to the toxins would especially and primarily compromise neurovegetative control areas, (2) the neurons within these areas have high affinity to the toxins, and (3) the neurovascular interaction is such that SSE metabolically compromises proper function of toxin-targeted areas. A pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging paradigm was used to evaluate localized hemodynamic changes in relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) for 30 min after the injection of TsTX, the most lethal toxin from the venom of the Tityus serrulatus scorpion. The brainstem showed significant rCBV reduction 1 min after TsTX administration, whereas rostral brain areas had delayed increase in rCBV (confirmed by laser Doppler measurements of cortical cerebral blood flow). Moreover, metabolic activity by 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography showed the highest relative increase at the brainstem. To test whether TsTX has high affinity to brainstem neurons, the lateral ventricle was injected with Alexa Fluor 568 TsTX. Although some neurons showed intense fluorescence, the labeling pattern suggests that specific neurons were targeted. Altogether, these results suggest that brainstem areas involved in neurovegetative control are most likely within the primary structures triggering the cascade of symptoms present in SSE. PMID:24105889

  16. Frequency difference beyond behavioral limen reflected by frequency following response of human auditory Brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qin; Gong, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study investigated whether the frequency-following response (FFR) of the auditory brainstem can represent individual frequency-discrimination ability. Method We measured behavioral frequency-difference limens (FDLs) in normal hearing young adults. Then FFRs were evoked by two pure tones, whose frequency difference was no larger than behavioral FDL. Discrimination of FFRs to individual frequencies was conducted as the neural representation of stimulus frequency differenc...

  17. Compressive brainstem deformation resulting from subdural hygroma after neurosurgery: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Shu-qing; WANG Ji-sheng; JI Nan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Acute and chronic subdural hygromas are common postoperative clinical complications of ventricular shunting, arachnoid cyst marsupialization and arachnoid cyst resection.1 This article introduces a case of subdural hygroma after resection of a space-occupying lesion in the left lateral ventricle that resulted in compressive brainstem deformation and reviewed the recent related literature. The conclusion is that in related surgical procedures, prevention of rapid cerebrospinal fluid loss and excessive fluctuations in intracranial pressure are especially important.

  18. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Källstrand, Johan; Olsson, Olle; Nehlstedt, Sara Fristedt; Ling, Mia; Nielzén, Sören

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS). Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16), schizophrenic patients (n = 16) and attention defici...

  19. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Nielzen, Soren

    2010-01-01

    Johan Källstrand1, Olle Olsson2, Sara Fristedt Nehlstedt1, Mia Ling Sköld1, Sören Nielzén21SensoDetect AB, Lund, Sweden; 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, SwedenAbstract: Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by forward...

  20. Brainstem Regions Involved in the Expiration Reflex. A c-fos Study in Anesthetized Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Poliacek, Ivan; Halasova, Erika; Jakus, Jan; Murin, Peter; Barani, Helena; Stransky, Albert; Bolser, Donald C.

    2007-01-01

    Expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was employed to localize brainstem neuronal populations functionally related to the expiration reflex (ER). Twelve spontaneously breathing, non-decerebrate, pentobarbital anesthetized cats were used. The level of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in 6 animals with repetitive ERs mechanically induced from the glottis (296±9 ERs) was compared to FLI in 6 control non-stimulated cats. Respiratory rate, arterial blood pre...

  1. Proposed Toxic and Hypoxic Impairment of a Brainstem Locus in Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Woody R. McGinnis; Tapan Audhya; Stephen M. Edelson

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological findings implicate site-specific impairment of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in autism. This invites hypothetical consideration of a large role for this small brainstem structure as the basis for seemingly disjointed behavioral and somatic features of autism. The NTS is the brain’s point of entry for visceral afference, its relay for vagal reflexes, and its integration center for autonomic control of circulatory, immunological, gastrointestinal, and laryngeal fun...

  2. The neural circuitry underlying reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior in an animal model of relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J L; Ghee, S; See, R E

    2008-01-24

    Reinstatement of extinguished drug-seeking has been utilized in the study of the neural substrates of relapse to drugs of abuse, particularly cocaine. However, limited studies have examined the circuitry that drives the reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior in the presence of conditioned cues, or by heroin itself. In order to test the hypothesis that the circuitry underlying reinstatement in heroin-experienced animals would show overlapping, yet distinct differences from cocaine-experienced animals, we used transient inhibition of several cortical, striatal, and limbic brain regions during reinstatement of heroin-seeking produced by heroin-paired cues, or by a single priming dose of heroin. Rats lever pressed for i.v. heroin discretely paired with a conditioned stimulus (CS) during daily 3-h sessions for a period of 2 weeks, followed by daily extinction of lever responding. Subsequent reinstatement of heroin-seeking was measured as lever responding in the absence of heroin reinforcement. The first set of reinstatement tests involved response-contingent CS presentations following bilateral intracranial infusion of either a combination of GABA receptor agonists (baclofen-muscimol, B/M) or vehicle (saline) into one of 13 different brain regions. The second set of reinstatement tests involved a single heroin injection (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.) following either B/M or vehicle infusions. Our results showed that vehicle-infused animals reinstated to both CS presentations and a priming injection of heroin, while B/M inactivation of several areas known to be important for the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking also attenuated heroin-seeking in response to CS presentations and/or a priming dose of heroin. However, as predicted, inactivation of areas previously shown to not affect cocaine-seeking significantly attenuated heroin-seeking, supporting the hypothesis that the circuitry underlying the reinstatement of heroin-seeking is more diffusely distributed than that for cocaine

  3. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  4. Long-term Survival after Resection of HER2+ Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma Metastasis to the Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Al-Wala; Zaidi, Hasan A; Awad, Al-Homam; Spetzler, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is a common site of metastatic spread from neoplasms in distant organs, including breast, bone, and lung. The decision to surgically treat these metastatic lesions is often challenging, especially in the setting of systemic disease or when eloquent brain regions are involved. Treating metastatic disease in the brainstem can be technically difficult, and in many institutions, considered a contraindication to surgical intervention, given the relatively high risk of new postoperative neurological deficits. Herein, we report a case of metastatic ductal carcinoma of the breast with spread to the pontine-medullary junction that was treated with aggressive surgical resection and chronic hormonal therapy. After surgical excision of the brainstem lesion, the patient remained asymptomatic and was maintained on trastuzumab therapy over a 10-year follow-up period, with no radiographic or clinical evidence of recurrent disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient treated for a solitary metastasis to the brainstem with long-term survival. PMID:26929889

  5. Impact of monaural frequency compression on binaural fusion at the brainstem level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Isabelle; Kohl, Manuel C; Hannemann, Ronny; Kornagel, Ulrich; Strauss, Daniel J; Corona-Strauss, Farah I

    2015-08-01

    A classical objective measure for binaural fusion at the brainstem level is the so-called β-wave of the binaural interaction component (BIC) in the auditory brainstem response (ABR). However, in some cases it appeared that a reliable detection of this component still remains a challenge. In this study, we investigate the wavelet phase synchronization stability (WPSS) of ABR data for the analysis of binaural fusion and compare it to the BIC. In particular, we examine the impact of monaural nonlinear frequency compression on binaural fusion. As the auditory system is tonotopically organized, an interaural frequency mismatch caused by monaural frequency compression could negatively effect binaural fusion. In this study, only few subjects showed a detectable β-wave and in most cases only for low ITDs. However, we present a novel objective measure for binaural fusion that outperforms the current state-of-the-art technique (BIC): the WPSS analysis showed a significant difference between the phase stability of the sum of the monaurally evoked responses and the phase stability of the binaurally evoked ABR. This difference could be an indicator for binaural fusion in the brainstem. Furthermore, we observed that monaural frequency compression could indeed effect binaural fusion, as the WPSS results for this condition vary strongly from the results obtained without frequency compression.

  6. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasu Kallakuri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s of blast overpressure (OP induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Materials and Methods: Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Results: Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to blast OP. Conclusions: Prominent axonal injury changes following the blast OP exposure in brainstem and cervical spinal WM tracts underscores the need for careful evaluation of blast induced injury changes and associated symptoms. NF-L immunocytochemistry can be considered as an additional tool to assess the blast OP induced axonal injury.

  7. Microwave technology for waste management applications including disposition of electronic circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicks, G.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.; Folz, D.C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of selected components. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. Applications of microwave energy for environmental remediation will be discussed. Emphasized will be a newly developed microwave process designed to treat discarded electronic circuitry and reclaim the precious metals within for reuse.

  8. Present state of power electronics circuitry and perspectives of its development

    OpenAIRE

    Sokol, Evgeny; Goncharov, Yuriy

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted mainly to the circuitry, because element base is a big independent issue. Let us say a few words about terminology. A modern converter can be rarely represented as a simple device like “rectifier”, “inverter” etc. It usually consists of the combination of several units, performing elementary functions. For such multistage units it makes sense to use a definition of converter “technology”, keeping in mind some actions with electric current for a certain purpose. It is si...

  9. Microwave technology for waste management applications including disposition of electronic circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of selected components. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. Applications of microwave energy for environmental remediation will be discussed. Emphasized will be a newly developed microwave process designed to treat discarded electronic circuitry and reclaim the precious metals within for reuse

  10. Pain relief produces negative reinforcement through activation of mesolimbic reward-valuation circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Y; Okun, Alec; Qu, Chaoling; Eyde, Nathan; Ci, Shuang; Ossipov, Michael H; King, Tamara; Fields, Howard L; Porreca, Frank

    2012-12-11

    Relief of pain is rewarding. Using a model of experimental postsurgical pain we show that blockade of afferent input from the injury with local anesthetic elicits conditioned place preference, activates ventral tegmental dopaminergic cells, and increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Importantly, place preference is associated with increased activity in midbrain dopaminergic neurons and blocked by dopamine antagonists injected into the nucleus accumbens. The data directly support the hypothesis that relief of pain produces negative reinforcement through activation of the mesolimbic reward-valuation circuitry.

  11. Microwave Technology for Waste Management Applications Including Disposition of Electronic Circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of waste management and environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of hazardous components into leach resistant forms. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from the undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. One application of special interest is the treatment of discarded electronic circuitry using a new hybrid microwave treatment process and subsequent reclamation of the precious metals within

  12. Emotional Processing following Cortical and Subcortical Brain Damage: Contribution of the Fronto-Striatal Circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Breitenstein

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the differential contribution of cortical and subcortical brain structures in emotional processing by comparing patients with focal cortical lesions (n = 32 to those with primarily subcortical dysregulation of the basal ganglia (Parkinson’s disease n = 14. A standardized measure of emotional perception (Tübingen Affect Battery was used. Only patients in the more advanced stages of Parkinson’s disease and patients with focal damage to the (right frontal lobe differed significantly from controls in both facial expression and affective prosody recognition. The findings imply involvement of the fronto-striatal circuitry in emotional processing.

  13. Processing Complex Sounds Passing through the Rostral Brainstem: The New Early Filter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, John E.; Campbell, Tom A.

    2016-01-01

    The rostral brainstem receives both “bottom-up” input from the ascending auditory system and “top-down” descending corticofugal connections. Speech information passing through the inferior colliculus of elderly listeners reflects the periodicity envelope of a speech syllable. This information arguably also reflects a composite of temporal-fine-structure (TFS) information from the higher frequency vowel harmonics of that repeated syllable. The amplitude of those higher frequency harmonics, bearing even higher frequency TFS information, correlates positively with the word recognition ability of elderly listeners under reverberatory conditions. Also relevant is that working memory capacity (WMC), which is subject to age-related decline, constrains the processing of sounds at the level of the brainstem. Turning to the effects of a visually presented sensory or memory load on auditory processes, there is a load-dependent reduction of that processing, as manifest in the auditory brainstem responses (ABR) evoked by to-be-ignored clicks. Wave V decreases in amplitude with increases in the visually presented memory load. A visually presented sensory load also produces a load-dependent reduction of a slightly different sort: The sensory load of visually presented information limits the disruptive effects of background sound upon working memory performance. A new early filter model is thus advanced whereby systems within the frontal lobe (affected by sensory or memory load) cholinergically influence top-down corticofugal connections. Those corticofugal connections constrain the processing of complex sounds such as speech at the level of the brainstem. Selective attention thereby limits the distracting effects of background sound entering the higher auditory system via the inferior colliculus. Processing TFS in the brainstem relates to perception of speech under adverse conditions. Attentional selectivity is crucial when the signal heard is degraded or masked: e

  14. Processing Complex Sounds Passing through the Rostral Brainstem: The New Early Filter Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, John E; Campbell, Tom A

    2016-01-01

    The rostral brainstem receives both "bottom-up" input from the ascending auditory system and "top-down" descending corticofugal connections. Speech information passing through the inferior colliculus of elderly listeners reflects the periodicity envelope of a speech syllable. This information arguably also reflects a composite of temporal-fine-structure (TFS) information from the higher frequency vowel harmonics of that repeated syllable. The amplitude of those higher frequency harmonics, bearing even higher frequency TFS information, correlates positively with the word recognition ability of elderly listeners under reverberatory conditions. Also relevant is that working memory capacity (WMC), which is subject to age-related decline, constrains the processing of sounds at the level of the brainstem. Turning to the effects of a visually presented sensory or memory load on auditory processes, there is a load-dependent reduction of that processing, as manifest in the auditory brainstem responses (ABR) evoked by to-be-ignored clicks. Wave V decreases in amplitude with increases in the visually presented memory load. A visually presented sensory load also produces a load-dependent reduction of a slightly different sort: The sensory load of visually presented information limits the disruptive effects of background sound upon working memory performance. A new early filter model is thus advanced whereby systems within the frontal lobe (affected by sensory or memory load) cholinergically influence top-down corticofugal connections. Those corticofugal connections constrain the processing of complex sounds such as speech at the level of the brainstem. Selective attention thereby limits the distracting effects of background sound entering the higher auditory system via the inferior colliculus. Processing TFS in the brainstem relates to perception of speech under adverse conditions. Attentional selectivity is crucial when the signal heard is degraded or masked: e.g., speech in

  15. Robust Machine Learning-Based Correction on Automatic Segmentation of the Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yi Wang

    Full Text Available Automated segmentation is a useful method for studying large brain structures such as the cerebellum and brainstem. However, automated segmentation may lead to inaccuracy and/or undesirable boundary. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether SegAdapter, a machine learning-based method, is useful for automatically correcting large segmentation errors and disagreement in anatomical definition. We further assessed the robustness of the method in handling size of training set, differences in head coil usage, and amount of brain atrophy. High resolution T1-weighted images were acquired from 30 healthy controls scanned with either an 8-channel or 32-channel head coil. Ten patients, who suffered from brain atrophy because of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, were scanned using the 32-channel head coil. The initial segmentations of the cerebellum and brainstem were generated automatically using Freesurfer. Subsequently, Freesurfer's segmentations were both manually corrected to serve as the gold standard and automatically corrected by SegAdapter. Using only 5 scans in the training set, spatial overlap with manual segmentation in Dice coefficient improved significantly from 0.956 (for Freesurfer segmentation to 0.978 (for SegAdapter-corrected segmentation for the cerebellum and from 0.821 to 0.954 for the brainstem. Reducing the training set size to 2 scans only decreased the Dice coefficient ≤0.002 for the cerebellum and ≤ 0.005 for the brainstem compared to the use of training set size of 5 scans in corrective learning. The method was also robust in handling differences between the training set and the test set in head coil usage and the amount of brain atrophy, which reduced spatial overlap only by <0.01. These results suggest that the combination of automated segmentation and corrective learning provides a valuable method for accurate and efficient segmentation of the cerebellum and brainstem, particularly in large

  16. Testing the connections within face processing circuitry in Capgras delusion with diffusion imaging tractography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Bobes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Capgras delusion (CD patients are capable of recognizing familiar faces, they present a delusional belief that some relatives have been replaced by impostors. CD has been explained as a selective disruption of a pathway processing affective values of familiar faces. To test the integrity of connections within face processing circuitry, diffusion tensor imaging was performed in a CD patient and 10 age-matched controls. Voxel-based morphometry indicated gray matter damage in right frontal areas. Tractography was used to examine two important tracts of the face processing circuitry: the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF and the inferior longitudinal (ILF. The superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF and commissural tracts were also assessed. CD patient did not differ from controls in the commissural fibers, or the SLF. Right and left ILF, and right IFOF were also equivalent to those of controls. However, the left IFOF was significantly reduced respect to controls, also showing a significant dissociation with the ILF, which represents a selective impairment in the fiber-tract connecting occipital and frontal areas. This suggests a possible involvement of the IFOF in affective processing of faces in typical observers and in covert recognition in some cases with prosopagnosia.

  17. Testing the connections within face processing circuitry in Capgras delusion with diffusion imaging tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobes, Maria A; Góngora, Daylin; Valdes, Annette; Santos, Yusniel; Acosta, Yanely; Fernandez Garcia, Yuriem; Lage, Agustin; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Although Capgras delusion (CD) patients are capable of recognizing familiar faces, they present a delusional belief that some relatives have been replaced by impostors. CD has been explained as a selective disruption of a pathway processing affective values of familiar faces. To test the integrity of connections within face processing circuitry, diffusion tensor imaging was performed in a CD patient and 10 age-matched controls. Voxel-based morphometry indicated gray matter damage in right frontal areas. Tractography was used to examine two important tracts of the face processing circuitry: the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) and the inferior longitudinal (ILF). The superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and commissural tracts were also assessed. CD patient did not differ from controls in the commissural fibers, or the SLF. Right and left ILF, and right IFOF were also equivalent to those of controls. However, the left IFOF was significantly reduced respect to controls, also showing a significant dissociation with the ILF, which represents a selective impairment in the fiber-tract connecting occipital and frontal areas. This suggests a possible involvement of the IFOF in affective processing of faces in typical observers and in covert recognition in some cases with prosopagnosia.

  18. Resetting transcription factor control circuitry toward ground-state pluripotency in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Guo, Ge; Loos, Remco; Nichols, Jennifer; Ficz, Gabriella; Krueger, Felix; Oxley, David; Santos, Fatima; Clarke, James; Mansfield, William; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin

    2014-09-11

    Current human pluripotent stem cells lack the transcription factor circuitry that governs the ground state of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). Here, we report that short-term expression of two components, NANOG and KLF2, is sufficient to ignite other elements of the network and reset the human pluripotent state. Inhibition of ERK and protein kinase C sustains a transgene-independent rewired state. Reset cells self-renew continuously without ERK signaling, are phenotypically stable, and are karyotypically intact. They differentiate in vitro and form teratomas in vivo. Metabolism is reprogrammed with activation of mitochondrial respiration as in ESC. DNA methylation is dramatically reduced and transcriptome state is globally realigned across multiple cell lines. Depletion of ground-state transcription factors, TFCP2L1 or KLF4, has marginal impact on conventional human pluripotent stem cells but collapses the reset state. These findings demonstrate feasibility of installing and propagating functional control circuitry for ground-state pluripotency in human cells. PMID:25215486

  19. Microstructural abnormalities in subcortical reward circuitry of subjects with major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne J Blood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies of major depressive disorder (MDD have focused on abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex and medial temporal regions. There has been little investigation in MDD of midbrain and subcortical regions central to reward/aversion function, such as the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra (VTA/SN, and medial forebrain bundle (MFB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the microstructural integrity of this circuitry using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI in 22 MDD subjects and compared them with 22 matched healthy control subjects. Fractional anisotropy (FA values were increased in the right VT and reduced in dorsolateral prefrontal white matter in MDD subjects. Follow-up analysis suggested two distinct subgroups of MDD patients, which exhibited non-overlapping abnormalities in reward/aversion circuitry. The MDD subgroup with abnormal FA values in VT exhibited significantly greater trait anxiety than the subgroup with normal FA values in VT, but the subgroups did not differ in levels of anhedonia, sadness, or overall depression severity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that MDD may be associated with abnormal microstructure in brain reward/aversion regions, and that there may be at least two subtypes of microstructural abnormalities which each impact core symptoms of depression.

  20. Brainstem projections of neurons located in various subdivisions of the dorsolateral hypothalamic area – an anterograde tract-tracing study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rege Sugárka Papp

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The projections from the dorsolateral hypothalamic area (DLH to the lower brainstem have been investigated by using biotinylated dextran amine (BDA, an anterograde tracer in rats. The DLH can be divided into 3 areas (dorsomedial hypothalamus, perifornical area, lateral hypothalamic area, and further subdivided into 8 subdivisions. After unilateral stereotaxic injections of BDA into individual DLH subdivisions, the correct sites of injections were controlled histologically, and the distribution patterns of BDA-positive fibers were mapped on serial sections between the hypothalamus and spinal cord in 22 rats. BDA-labeled fibers were observable over 100 different brainstem areas, nuclei or subdivisions. Injections into the 8 DLH subdivisions established distinct topographical patterns. In general, the density of labeled fibers was low in the lower brainstem. High density of fibers was seen only 4 of the 116 areas: in the lateral and ventrolateral parts of the periaqueductal gray, the Barrington’s and the pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei. All of the biogenic amine cell groups in the lower brainstem (9 noradrenaline, 3 adrenaline and 9 serotonin cell groups received labeled fibers, some of them from all, or at least 7 DLH subdivisions, mainly from perifornical and ventral lateral hypothalamic neurons. Some of the tegmental nuclei and nuclei of the reticular formation were widely innervated, although the density of the BDA-labeled fibers was generally low. No definitive descending BDA-positive pathway, but long-run solitaire BDA-labeled fibers were seen in the lower brainstem. These descending fibers joined some of the large tracts or fasciculi in the brainstem. The distribution pattern of BDA-positive fibers of DLH origin throughout the lower brainstem was comparable to patterns of previously published orexin- or melanin-concentrating hormone-immunoreactive fibers with somewhat differences.

  1. Catecholaminergic innervation of central and peripheral auditory circuitry varies with reproductive state in female midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Forlano

    Full Text Available In seasonal breeding vertebrates, hormone regulation of catecholamines, which include dopamine and noradrenaline, may function, in part, to modulate behavioral responses to conspecific vocalizations. However, natural seasonal changes in catecholamine innervation of auditory nuclei is largely unexplored, especially in the peripheral auditory system, where encoding of social acoustic stimuli is initiated. The plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, has proven to be an excellent model to explore mechanisms underlying seasonal peripheral auditory plasticity related to reproductive social behavior. Recently, we demonstrated robust catecholaminergic (CA innervation throughout the auditory system in midshipman. Most notably, dopaminergic neurons in the diencephalon have widespread projections to auditory circuitry including direct innervation of the saccule, the main endorgan of hearing, and the cholinergic octavolateralis efferent nucleus (OE which also projects to the inner ear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that gravid, reproductive summer females show differential CA innervation of the auditory system compared to non-reproductive winter females. We utilized quantitative immunofluorescence to measure tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH-ir fiber density throughout central auditory nuclei and the sensory epithelium of the saccule. Reproductive females exhibited greater density of TH-ir innervation in two forebrain areas including the auditory thalamus and greater density of TH-ir on somata and dendrites of the OE. In contrast, non-reproductive females had greater numbers of TH-ir terminals in the saccule and greater TH-ir fiber density in a region of the auditory hindbrain as well as greater numbers of TH-ir neurons in the preoptic area. These data provide evidence that catecholamines may function, in part, to seasonally modulate the sensitivity of the inner ear and, in turn, the appropriate behavioral response to reproductive acoustic

  2. Parametric study of dielectric loaded surface plasmon polariton add-drop filters for hybrid silicon/plasmonic optical circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereux, A.; Hassan, K.; Weeber, J.-C.; Djellali, N.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Tsilipakos, O.; Pitilakis, A.; Kriezis, E.; Papaioannou, S.; Vyrsokinos, K.; Pleros, N.; Tekin, T.; Baus, M.; Kalavrouziotis, D.; Giannoulis, G.; Avramopoulos, H.

    2011-01-01

    Surface plasmons polaritons are electromagnetic waves propagating along the surface of a conductor. Surface plasmons photonics is a promising candidate to satisfy the constraints of miniaturization of optical interconnects. This contribution reviews an experimental parametric study of dielectric loaded surface plasmon waveguides ring resonators and add-drop filters within the perspective of the recently suggested hybrid technology merging plasmonic and silicon photonics on a single board (European FP7 project PLATON "Merging Plasmonic and Silicon Photonics Technology towards Tb/s routing in optical interconnects"). Conclusions relevant for dielectric loaded surface plasmon switches to be integrated in silicon photonic circuitry will be drawn. They rely on the opportunity offered by plasmonic circuitry to carry optical signals and electric currents through the same thin metal circuitry. The heating of the dielectric loading by the electric current enables to design low foot-print thermo-optical switches driving the optical signal flow.

  3. Distribution of serotonin 5-HT1A-binding sites in the brainstem and the hypothalamus, and their roles in 5-HT-induced sleep and ingestive behaviors in rock pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Tiago Souza; Krüger, Jéssica; Melleu, Fernando Falkenburger; Herold, Christina; Zilles, Karl; Poli, Anicleto; Güntürkün, Onur; Marino-Neto, José

    2015-12-15

    Serotonin 1A receptors (5-HT1ARs), which are widely distributed in the mammalian brain, participate in cognitive and emotional functions. In birds, 5-HT1ARs are expressed in prosencephalic areas involved in visual and cognitive functions. Diverse evidence supports 5-HT1AR-mediated 5-HT-induced ingestive and sleep behaviors in birds. Here, we describe the distribution of 5-HT1ARs in the hypothalamus and brainstem of birds, analyze their potential roles in sleep and ingestive behaviors, and attempt to determine the involvement of auto-/hetero-5-HT1ARs in these behaviors. In 6 pigeons, the anatomical distribution of [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding in the rostral brainstem and hypothalamus was examined. Ingestive/sleep behaviors were recorded (1h) in 16 pigeons pretreated with MM77 (a heterosynaptic 5-HT1AR antagonist; 23 or 69 nmol) for 20 min, followed by intracerebroventricular ICV injection of 5-HT (N:8; 150 nmol), 8-OH-DPAT (DPAT, a 5-HT1A,7R agonist, 30 nmol N:8) or vehicle. 5-HT- and DPAT-induced sleep and ingestive behaviors, brainstem 5-HT neuronal density and brain 5-HT content were examined in 12 pigeons, pretreated by ICV with the 5-HT neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) or vehicle (N:6/group). The distribution of brainstem and diencephalic c-Fos immunoreactivity after ICV injection of 5-HT, DPAT or vehicle (N:5/group) into birds provided with or denied access to water is also described. 5-HT1ARs are concentrated in the brainstem 5-HTergic areas and throughout the periventricular hypothalamus, preoptic nuclei and circumventricular organs. 5-HT and DPAT produced a complex c-Fos expression pattern in the 5-HT1AR-enriched preoptic hypothalamus and the circumventricular organs, which are related to drinking and sleep regulation, but modestly affected c-Fos expression in 5-HTergic neurons. The 5-HT-induced ingestivebehaviors and the 5-HT- and DPAT-induced sleep behaviors were reduced by MM77 pretreatment. 5,7-DHT increased sleep per se, decreased tryptophan

  4. Characteristics of brainstem auditory evoked potentials of students studying folk dance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxiang Li; Yuzhen Zhu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous experiments have demonstrated that brainstem auditory evoked potential is affected by exercise,exercise duration,and frequency. OBJECTIVE:Comparing the brainstem auditory evoked potential of students studying folk dance to students studying other subjects.DESIGN:Observational contrast study. SETTING:Physical Education College,Shandong Normal University PARTICIPANTS:Fifty-five female students were enrolled at Shandong Normal University between September and December in 2005,including 21 students that studied folk dance and 34 students that studied other subjects.The age of the folk dance students averaged(19±1)years and dance training length was(6.0 ±1.5)years.The students that studied other subjects had never taken part in dance training or other physical training,and their age averaged(22±1)years,body height averaged(162±5)cm,body mass averaged(51 ±6)kg.All subjects had no prior ear disease or history of other neurological disorders.All students provided informed consent for the experimental project. METHODS:The neural electricity tester,NDI-200(Shanghai Poseidon Medical Electronic Instrument Factory)was used to examine and record Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values of the subjects during silence,as well as to transversally analyze the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values.The electrode positions were cleaned and degreased with soapy water,followed by ethanol.The selected bipolar electrodes were situated on the head:recording electrodes were placed at the Baihui acupoint,and the reference electrode was placed at the mastoid of the measured ear,with grounding electrodes in the center of the forehead.Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values were elicited by monaural stimulation of a "click" though an earphone; the other ear was sheltered by the white noise.The click intensity was 102 db,the stimulation frequency was 30 Hz,the bandpass filters were 1 000-3 000 Hz,the sensitivity was 5 μV,and a total of 2 000 sweeps were

  5. Huntington's disease (HD): degeneration of select nuclei, widespread occurrence of neuronal nuclear and axonal inclusions in the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, Udo; Hentschel, Matthias; Stratmann, Katharina; Brunt, Ewout; Heinsen, Helmut; Seidel, Kay; Bouzrou, Mohamed; Auburger, Georg; Paulson, Henry; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Lange, Herwig; Korf, Horst-Werner; den Dunnen, Wilfred

    2014-04-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive polyglutamine disease that leads to a severe striatal and layer-specific neuronal loss in the cerebral neo-and allocortex. As some of the clinical symptoms (eg, oculomotor dysfunctions) suggested a degeneration of select brainstem nuclei, we performed a systematic investigation of the brainstem of eight clinically diagnosed and genetically confirmed HD patients. This post-mortem investigation revealed a consistent neuronal loss in the substantia nigra, pontine nuclei, reticulotegmental nucleus of the pons, superior and inferior olives, in the area of the excitatory burst neurons for horizontal saccades, raphe interpositus nucleus and vestibular nuclei. Immunoreactive intranuclear neuronal inclusions were present in all degenerated and apparently spared brainstem nuclei and immunoreactive axonal inclusions were observed in all brainstem fiber tracts of the HD patients. Degeneration of brainstem nuclei can account for a number of less well-understood clinical HD symptoms (ie, cerebellar, oculomotor and vestibular symptoms), while the formation of axonal aggregates may represent a crucial event in the cascades of pathological events leading to neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:24779419

  6. Enterovirus 71 can directly infect the brainstem via cranial nerves and infection can be ameliorated by passive immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Soon Hao; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2014-11-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71)-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease may be complicated by encephalomyelitis. We investigated EV71 brainstem infection and whether this infection could be ameliorated by passive immunization in a mouse model. Enterovirus 71 was injected into unilateral jaw/facial muscles of 2-week-old mice, and hyperimmune sera were given before or after infection. Harvested tissues were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and viral titration. In unimmunized mice, viral antigen and RNA were detected within 24 hours after infection only in ipsilateral cranial nerves, motor trigeminal nucleus, reticular formation, and facial nucleus; viral titers were significantly higher in the brainstem than in the spinal cord samples. Mice given preinfection hyperimmune serum showed a marked reduction of ipsilateral viral antigen/RNA and viral titers in the brainstem in a dose-dependent manner. With optimum hyperimmune serum given after infection, brainstem infection was significantly reduced in a time-dependent manner. A delay in disease onset and a reduction of disease severity and mortality were also observed. Thus, EV71 can directly infect the brainstem, including the medulla, via cranial nerves, most likely by retrograde axonal transport. This may explain the sudden cardiorespiratory collapse in human patients with fatal encephalomyelitis. Moreover, our results suggest that passive immunization may still benefit EV71-infected patients who have neurologic complications.

  7. Tactile modulation of whisking via the brainstem loop: statechart modeling and experimental validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Sherman

    Full Text Available Rats repeatedly sweep their facial whiskers back and forth in order to explore their environment. Such explorative whisking appears to be driven by central pattern generators (CPGs that operate independently of direct sensory feedback. Nevertheless, whisking can be modulated by sensory feedback, and it has been hypothesized that some of this modulation already occurs within the brainstem. However, the interaction between sensory feedback and CPG activity is poorly understood. Using the visual language of statecharts, a dynamic, bottom-up computerized model of the brainstem loop of the whisking system was built in order to investigate the interaction between sensory feedback and CPG activity during whisking behavior. As a benchmark, we used a previously quantified closed-loop phenomenon of the whisking system, touched-induced pump (TIP, which is thought to be mediated by the brainstem loop. First, we showed that TIPs depend on sensory feedback, by comparing TIP occurrence in intact rats with that in rats whose sensory nerve was experimentally cut. We then inspected several possible feedback mechanisms of TIPs using our model. The model ruled out all hypothesized mechanisms but one, which adequately simulated the corresponding motion observed in the rat. Results of the simulations suggest that TIPs are generated via sensory feedback that activates extrinsic retractor muscles in the mystacial pad. The model further predicted that in addition to the touching whisker, all whiskers found on the same side of the snout should exhibit a TIP. We present experimental results that confirm the predicted movements in behaving rats, establishing the validity of the hypothesized interaction between sensory feedback and CPG activity we suggest here for the generation of TIPs in the whisking system.

  8. Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N. G.; Tang, F.; Corcoran, M. L.; Fox, R. A.; Man, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    In studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (beta-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.

  9. Broadband Energy Harvesting Using a Metamaterial Resonator Embedded With Non-Foster Impedance Circuitry

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and implantable biomedical devices need efficient power and data transfer with very low profile antennas. We propose a low profile electrically small antenna for near-field wireless power and data telemetry employing a metamaterial Split Ring Resonator (SRR) antenna. SRRs can be designed for operation over wide frequencies from RF to visible. However, they are inherently narrowband making them sensitive to component mismatch with respect to external transmit antenna. Here we propose an embedding of a non-foster impedance circuitry into the metamaterial SRR structure that imparts conjugate negative complex impedance to this resonator antenna thereby increasing the effective bandwidth and thus overcoming the fundamental limit for efficient signal coupling. We demonstrate the concept through extensive numerical simulations and a prototype system at the board level using discrete off-the-shelf components and printed circuit SRR antenna at 500 MHz. We show that the power trans...

  10. Radiation-Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Jr., Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ericson, Milton Nance [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bobrek, Miljko [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blalock, Benjamin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    As the recent accident at Fukushima Daiichi so vividly demonstrated, telerobotic technologies capable of withstanding high radiation environments need to be readily available to enable operations, repair, and recovery under severe accident scenarios where human entry is extremely dangerous or not possible. Telerobotic technologies that enable remote operation in high dose rate environments have undergone revolutionary improvement over the past few decades. However, much of this technology cannot be employed in nuclear power environments due the radiation sensitivity of the electronics and the organic insulator materials currently in use. This is the final report of the activities involving the NEET 2 project Radiation Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays. We present a detailed functional block diagram of the proposed data acquisition system, the thought process leading to technical decisions, the implemented system, and the tested results from the systems. This system will be capable of monitoring at least three parameters of importance to nuclear reactor monitoring: temperature, radiation level, and pressure.

  11. The role of BDNF in depression on the basis of its location in the neural circuitry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui YU; Zhe-yu CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and life-threatening forms of mental illnesses and the neural circuitry underlying depression remains incompletely understood. Most attention in the field has focused on hippocampal and frontal cortical regions for their roles in depression and antidepressant action. While these regions no doubt play important roles in the mental illness, there is compelling evi-dence that other brain regions are also involved. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is broadly expressed in the developing and adult mammalian brain and has been implicated in development, neural regeneration, synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Recently BDNF has been shown to play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression, however there are con-troversial reports about the effects of BDNF on depression. Here, we present an overview of the current knowledge concerning BDNF actions and associated intracellular signaling in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAc) and amygdala as their rela-tion to depression.

  12. Neuroimaging of Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases of the Pediatric Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar involvement by infectious-inflammatory conditions is rare in children. Most patients present with acute ataxia, and are typically previously healthy, young (often preschool) children. Viral involvement is the most common cause and ranges from acute postinfectious ataxia to acute cerebellitis MR imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of patients suspected of harboring inflammatory-infectious involvement of the cerebellum and brainstem. Knowledge of the imaging features of these disorders and technical competence on pediatric MR imaging are necessary for a correct interpretation of findings, which in turn prompts further management.

  13. Painful tonic spasms and brainstem involvement in a patient with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Filip, Corina; Ungureanu, Aurelian; Cernuşcă-Miţaru, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system classically characterized by optic neuritis and severe myelitis. New diagnostic criteria defined neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder as limited forms of NMO or diverse neurologic presentations in the presence of specific antiaquaporin-4 antibodies. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman admitted in our department for recurrent attacks of optic neuritis, tetraparesis with severe painful tonic spasms of the left limbs and brainstem involvement. Painful tonic spasms have been described as movement disorders associated with multiple sclerosis, but a growing number of reports describe them in cases of NMO.

  14. Comparison of cochlear delay estimates using otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, James; Pigasse, Gilles; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Different attempts have been made to directly measure frequency specific basilar membrane (BM) delays in animals, e.g., laser velocimetry of BM vibrations and auditory nerve fiber recordings. The present study uses otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to estimate B...... and synaptic delays. This allows a comparison between individual OAE and BM delays over a large frequency range in the same subjects, and offers support to the theory that OAEs are reflected from a tonotopic place and carried back to the cochlear base via a reverse traveling wave....

  15. Brainstem hemorrhage following clipping of anterior communicating aneurysm: Is lumbar drain responsible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindom Kakati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote brainstem hemorrhage is an extremely rare complication following supratentorial surgery. We describe here a 55-year-old patient with ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm, who underwent an uneventful clipping of the aneurysm, and had a lumbar drainage intra-operatively to facilitate brain relaxation. In the postoperative period, he developed pontomesencephalic hemorrhage, and had a fatal outcome. The potential causative factors are discussed, and the relevant literature reviewed. This is probably the first reported case of this complication in the literature.

  16. Neuroimaging of Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases of the Pediatric Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar involvement by infectious-inflammatory conditions is rare in children. Most patients present with acute ataxia, and are typically previously healthy, young (often preschool) children. Viral involvement is the most common cause and ranges from acute postinfectious ataxia to acute cerebellitis MR imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of patients suspected of harboring inflammatory-infectious involvement of the cerebellum and brainstem. Knowledge of the imaging features of these disorders and technical competence on pediatric MR imaging are necessary for a correct interpretation of findings, which in turn prompts further management. PMID:27423804

  17. "Liking" and "wanting" linked to Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS): hypothesizing differential responsivity in brain reward circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Gardner, Eliot; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Gold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to resolve controversy regarding the causal contributions of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) systems to reward, we evaluate the three main competing explanatory categories: "liking,"learning," and "wanting" [1]. That is, DA may mediate (a) the hedonic impact of reward (liking), (b) learned predictions about rewarding effects (learning), or (c) the pursuit of rewards by attributing incentive salience to reward-related stimuli (wanting). We evaluate these hypotheses, especially as they relate to the Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS), and we find that the incentive salience or "wanting" hypothesis of DA function is supported by a majority of the evidence. Neuroimaging studies have shown that drugs of abuse, palatable foods, and anticipated behaviors such as sex and gaming affect brain regions involving reward circuitry, and may not be unidirectional. Drugs of abuse enhance DA signaling and sensitize mesolimbic mechanisms that evolved to attribute incentive salience to rewards. Addictive drugs have in common that they are voluntarily selfadministered, they enhance (directly or indirectly) dopaminergic synaptic function in the nucleus accumbens (NAC), and they stimulate the functioning of brain reward circuitry (producing the "high" that drug users seek). Although originally believed simply to encode the set point of hedonic tone, these circuits now are believed to be functionally more complex, also encoding attention, reward expectancy, disconfirmation of reward expectancy, and incentive motivation. Elevated stress levels, together with polymorphisms of dopaminergic genes and other neurotransmitter genetic variants, may have a cumulative effect on vulnerability to addiction. The RDS model of etiology holds very well for a variety of chemical and behavioral addictions. PMID:22236117

  18. Neuroanatomical circuitry associated with exploratory eye movement in schizophrenia: a voxel-based morphometric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Qiu

    Full Text Available Schizophrenic patients present abnormalities in a variety of eye movement tasks. Exploratory eye movement (EEM dysfunction appears to be particularly specific to schizophrenia. However, the underlying mechanisms of EEM dysfunction in schizophrenia are not clearly understood. To assess the potential neuroanatomical substrates of EEM, we recorded EEM performance and conducted a voxel-based morphometric analysis of gray matter in 33 schizophrenic patients and 29 well matched healthy controls. In schizophrenic patients, decreased responsive search score (RSS and widespread gray matter density (GMD reductions were observed. Moreover, the RSS was positively correlated with GMD in distributed brain regions in schizophrenic patients. Furthermore, in schizophrenic patients, some brain regions with neuroanatomical deficits overlapped with some ones associated with RSS. These brain regions constituted an occipito-tempro-frontal circuitry involved in visual information processing and eye movement control, including the left calcarine cortex [Brodmann area (BA 17], the left cuneus (BA 18, the left superior occipital cortex (BA 18/19, the left superior frontal gyrus (BA 6, the left cerebellum, the right lingual cortex (BA 17/18, the right middle occipital cortex (BA19, the right inferior temporal cortex (BA 37, the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46 and bilateral precentral gyri (BA 6 extending to the frontal eye fields (FEF, BA 8. To our knowledge, we firstly reported empirical evidence that gray matter loss in the occipito-tempro-frontal neuroanatomical circuitry of visual processing system was associated with EEM performance in schizophrenia, which may be helpful for the future effort to reveal the underlying neural mechanisms for EEM disturbances in schizophrenia.

  19. Trigeminal-Rostral Ventromedial Medulla circuitry is involved in orofacial hyperalgesia contralateral to tissue injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies have shown that complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA-induced masseter inflammation and microinjection of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β into the subnucleus interpolaris/subnucleus caudalis transition zone of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vi/Vc can induce contralateral orofacial hyperalgesia in rat models. We have also shown that contralateral hyperalgesia is attenuated with a lesion of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM, a critical site of descending pain modulation. Here we investigated the involvement of the RVM-Vi/Vc circuitry in mediating contralateral orofacial hyperalgesia after an injection of CFA into the masseter muscle. Results Microinjection of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (5 nmol, n=6 into the ipsilateral Vi/Vc attenuated the CFA-induced contralateral hyperalgesia but not the ipsilateral hyperalgesia. Intra-RVM post-treatment injection of the NK1 receptor antagonists, RP67580 (0.5-11.4 nmol and L-733,060 (0.5-11.4 nmol, attenuated CFA-induced bilateral hyperalgesia and IL-1β induced bilateral hyperalgesia. Serotonin depletion in RVM neurons prior to intra-masseter CFA injection prevented the development of contralateral hyperalgesia 1–3 days after CFA injection. Inhibition of 5-HT3 receptors in the contralateral Vi/Vc with direct microinjection of the select 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, Y-25130 (2.6-12.9 nmol, attenuated CFA-induced contralateral hyperalgesia. Lesions to the ipsilateral Vc prevented the development of ipsilateral hyperalgesia but did not prevent the development of contralateral hyperalgesia. Conclusions These results suggest that the development of CFA-induced contralateral orofacial hyperalgesia is mediated through descending facilitatory mechanisms of the RVM-Vi/Vc circuitry.

  20. The Impact of Emotional States on Cognitive Control Circuitry and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexandra O; Dellarco, Danielle V; Breiner, Kaitlyn; Helion, Chelsea; Heller, Aaron S; Rahdar, Ahrareh; Pedersen, Gloria; Chein, Jason; Dyke, Jonathan P; Galvan, Adriana; Casey, B J

    2016-03-01

    Typically in the laboratory, cognitive and emotional processes are studied separately or as a stream of fleeting emotional stimuli embedded within a cognitive task. Yet in life, thoughts and actions often occur in more lasting emotional states of arousal. The current study examines the impact of emotions on actions using a novel behavioral paradigm and functional neuroimaging to assess cognitive control under sustained states of threat (anticipation of an aversive noise) and excitement (anticipation of winning money). Thirty-eight healthy adult participants were scanned while performing an emotional go/no-go task with positive (happy faces), negative (fearful faces), and neutral (calm faces) emotional cues, under threat or excitement. Cognitive control performance was enhanced during the excited state relative to a nonarousing control condition. This enhanced performance was paralleled by heightened activity of frontoparietal and frontostriatal circuitry. In contrast, under persistent threat, cognitive control was diminished when the valence of the emotional cue conflicted with the emotional state. Successful task performance in this conflicting emotional condition was associated with increased activity in the posterior cingulate cortex, a default mode network region implicated in complex processes such as processing emotions in the context of self and monitoring performance. This region showed positive coupling with frontoparietal circuitry implicated in cognitive control, providing support for a role of the posterior cingulate cortex in mobilizing cognitive resources to improve performance. These findings suggest that emotional states of arousal differentially modulate cognitive control and point to the potential utility of this paradigm for understanding effects of situational and pathological states of arousal on behavior. PMID:26601909

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi disrupts thymic homeostasis by altering intrathymic and systemic stress-related endocrine circuitries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailin Lepletier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that experimental infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is associated with changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Increased glucocorticoid (GC levels are believed to be protective against the effects of acute stress during infection but result in depletion of CD4(+CD8(+ thymocytes by apoptosis, driving to thymic atrophy. However, very few data are available concerning prolactin (PRL, another stress-related hormone, which seems to be decreased during T. cruzi infection. Considering the immunomodulatory role of PRL upon the effects caused by GC, we investigated if intrathymic cross-talk between GC and PRL receptors (GR and PRLR, respectively might influence T. cruzi-induced thymic atrophy. Using an acute experimental model, we observed changes in GR/PRLR cross-activation related with the survival of CD4(+CD8(+ thymocytes during infection. These alterations were closely related with systemic changes, characterized by a stress hormone imbalance, with progressive GC augmentation simultaneously to PRL reduction. The intrathymic hormone circuitry exhibited an inverse modulation that seemed to counteract the GC-related systemic deleterious effects. During infection, adrenalectomy protected the thymus from the increase in apoptosis ratio without changing PRL levels, whereas an additional inhibition of circulating PRL accelerated the thymic atrophy and led to an increase in corticosterone systemic levels. These results demonstrate that the PRL impairment during infection is not caused by the increase of corticosterone levels, but the opposite seems to occur. Accordingly, metoclopramide (MET-induced enhancement of PRL secretion protected thymic atrophy in acutely infected animals as well as the abnormal export of immature and potentially autoreactive CD4(+CD8(+ thymocytes to the periphery. In conclusion, our findings clearly show that Trypanosoma cruzi subverts mouse thymus homeostasis by altering intrathymic and

  2. Population calcium imaging of spontaneous respiratory and novel motor activity in the facial nucleus and ventral brainstem in newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Karin; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-01-01

    and in the facial nucleus. In Fluo-8AM loaded brainstem-spinal cord preparations, respiratory activity on cervical nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventrolateral brainstem surface. Individual ventrolateral neurons at the level of the parafacial respiratory group showed perfect or partial...... synchrony with respiratory nerve bursts. In brainstem-spinal cord preparations, cut at the level of the mid-facial nucleus, calcium signals were recorded in the dorsal, lateral and medial facial subnuclei during respiratory activity. Strong activity initiated in the dorsal subnucleus, followed by activity...... in lateral and medial subnuclei. Whole-cell recordings from facial motoneurons showed weak respiratory drives, and electrical field potential recordings confirmed respiratory drive to particularly the dorsal and lateral subnuclei. Putative facial premotoneurons showed respiratory-related calcium signals...

  3. Injections of urocortin 1 into the basolateral amygdala induce anxiety-like behavior and c-Fos expression in brainstem serotonergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, F; Lightman, S L; Shekhar, A; Lowry, C A

    2006-01-01

    The amygdala plays a key role in emotional processing and anxiety-related physiological and behavioral responses. Previous studies have shown that injections of the anxiety-related neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor or the related neuropeptide urocortin 1 into the region of the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus induce anxiety-like behavior in several behavioral paradigms. Brainstem serotonergic systems in the dorsal raphe nucleus and median raphe nucleus may be part of a distributed neural system that, together with the basolateral amygdala, regulates acute and chronic anxiety states. We therefore investigated the effect of an acute bilateral injection of urocortin 1 into the basolateral amygdala on behavior in the social interaction test and on c-Fos expression within serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus and median raphe nucleus. Male rats were implanted with bilateral cannulae directed at the region of the basolateral amygdala; 72 h after surgery, rats were injected with urocortin 1 (50 fmol/100 nl) or vehicle (100 nl of 1% bovine serum albumin in distilled water). Thirty minutes after injection, a subgroup of rats from each experimental group was exposed to the social interaction test; remaining animals were left in the home cage. Two hours after injection rats were perfused with paraformaldehyde and brains were removed and processed for immunohistochemistry. Acute injection of urocortin 1 had anxiogenic effects in the social interaction test, reducing total interaction time without affecting locomotor activity or exploratory behavior. These behavioral effects were associated with increases in c-Fos expression within brainstem serotonergic neurons. In home cage rats and rats exposed to the social interaction test, urocortin 1 treatment increased the number of c-Fos-immunoreactive serotonergic neurons within subdivisions of both the dorsal raphe nucleus and median raphe nucleus. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the

  4. Brainstem frequency-following response recorded from one vertical and three horizontal electrode derivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, G C; Bagasan, B; Sulahian, J

    2001-02-01

    The human brainstem frequency-following response reflects neural activity to periodic auditory stimuli. Responses were simultaneously recorded from one vertically oriented and three horizontally oriented electrode derivations. Nine participants each received a total of 16,000 tone repetitions, 4,000 for each of four stimulus frequencies: 222, 266, 350, and 450 Hz. The responses were digitally filtered, quantified by correlation and spectral analysis, and statistically evaluated by repeated measure analysis of variance. While the various horizontal derivation responses did not differ from each other in latency (values tightly clustered around M= 2.60 msec.), the vertical derivation response occurred significantly later (M=4.38 msec.). The smaller latency for the horizontal responses suggests an origin within the acoustic nerve, while the larger latency for the vertical response suggests a central brainstem origin. The largest response amplitude resulted from gold "tiptrode" electrodes placed in each auditory meatus, suggesting that this electrode derivation provided the most accurate (noninvasive) assessment of short-latency events originating at the level of the auditory nerve. PMID:11322612

  5. Sedation of children for auditory brainstem response using ketamine-midazolam-atropine combination - a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocskai, Tímea; Németh, Adrienne; Bogár, Lajos; Pytel, József

    2013-12-01

    Authors investigated sedation quality in children for auditory brainstem response testing. Two-hundred and seventy-six sedation procedures were retrospectively analyzed using recorded data focusing on efficacy of sedation and complications. Intramuscular ketamine-midazolam-atropine combination was administered on sedation preceded by narcotic suppository as pre-medication. On using the combination vital parameters remained within normal range, the complication rate was minimal. Pulse rate, arterial blood pressure and pulse oxymetry readings were stable, hypoventilation developed in 4, apnoea in none of the cases, post-sedation agitation occurred in 3 and nausea and/or vomiting in 2 cases. Repeated administration of narcotic agent was necessary in a single case only. Our practice is suitable for the sedation assisting hearing examinations in children. It has no influence on the auditory brainstem testing, the conditions necessary for the test can be met entirely with minimal side-effects. Our practice provides a more lasting sedation time in children during the examination hence there is no need for the repetition of the narcotics.

  6. Hearing outcomes after loss of brainstem auditory evoked potentials during microvascular decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Krishnaiah, Balaji; Habeych, Miguel E; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Crammond, Donald J

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to study the pre-operative characteristics, intra-operative changes and post-operative hearing outcomes in patients after complete loss of wave V of the brainstem auditory evoked potential. We retrospectively analyzed the brainstem auditory evoked potential data of 94 patients who underwent microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm at our institute. Patients were divided into two groups - those with and those without loss of wave V. The differences between the two groups and outcomes were assessed using t-test and chi-squared tests. In our study 23 (24%) patients out of 94 had a complete loss of wave V, with 11 (48%) patients experiencing transient loss and 12 (52%) patients experiencing permanent loss. The incidence of hearing loss in patients with no loss of wave V was 5.7% and 26% in patients who did experience wave V loss. The incidence of hearing change in patients with no loss of wave V was 12.6% and 30.43% in patients who did experience wave V loss. Loss of wave V during the procedure or at the end of procedure significantly increases the odds of hearing loss. Hearing change is a significant under-reported clinical condition after microvascular decompression in patients who have loss of wave V.

  7. c-Fos expression in rat brainstem following intake of sucrose or saccharin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Chen; Jianqun Yan; Jinrong Li; Bo Lv; Xiaolin Zhao

    2011-01-01

    To examine whether the activation of brainstem neurons during intake of a sweet tastant is due to orosensory signals or post-ingestive factors,we compared the distribution of c-Fos-like immunoreactivity (c-FLI)in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) and parabrachial nucleus (PBN) of brainstem following ingestion of 0.25M sucrose or 0.005 M saccharin solutions.Immunopositive neurons were localized mainly in the middle zone of the PBN and four rostral-caudal subregions of the NST.Intake of sucrose increased the number of FLI neurons in almost every subnucleus of the PBN (F(2,13) =7.610,P =0.023),in addition to the caudal NST at the level of the area postrema (F(2,13) =10.777,P =0.003) and the NST intermediate zone (F(2,13) =7.193,P =0.014).No significantincrease in the number of c-Fos positive neurons was detected in response to saccharin ingestion,although there was a trend towards a modest increase in a few select NST and PBN nuclei.These results suggest that the PBN and NST may be involved in sweet taste perception and modulation of sweet tastant intake,but the significantlyenhanced intensity of Fos expression induced by sucrose indicates that PBN/NST neuronal activity is driven by the integrated effects of sweet taste sensation and post-ingestive signals.

  8. Developmental neuropathology of brainstem respiratory centers in unexplained stillbirth: What's the meaning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Ferrero, Stefano; Matturri, Luigi; Roncati, Luca; Pusiol, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Stillbirth is one of the most stressful life events affecting over 3 million pregnancies per year throughout the world. An accurate autopsy of the stillborn fetus, including the placenta and umbilical cord examination, should be performed promptly after delivery. A thorough maternal history also should be taken, including exposures to risk factors. In many cases a death cause, attributable to fetal, maternal, or placental pathology, is clearly identified. However, in 50% or more of cases the cause remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to highlight possible developmental alterations of the autonomic nervous system in unexplained stillbirths to provide an explanation of the pathogenetic mechanism of their death. We conducted a careful neuropathological study of the brainstem, where the main vital centers are located, in 85 unexplained stillbirths and 52 age-matched controls died of known cause. Information on the maternal lifestyle, including the smoking habit, was collected in all cases. Hypodevelopment of neuronal centers involved in breathing control, all connected together in a "respiratory network", precisely hypoplasia of the facial/parafacial complex, Kölliker-Fuse nucleus, pre-Bötzinger nucleus and intermediolateral nucleus, were frequently observed in unexplained deaths, significantly related to maternal cigarette smoking. We support the hypothesis of a strong action of maternal smoking during pregnancy on the development of brainstem respiratory nuclei and suggest an explanation of the high incidence of the respiratory network alterations in unexplained fetal death, when breathing not represents a vital function. PMID:27477774

  9. Neonatal brainstem function and 4-month arousal-modulated attention are jointly associated with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ira L; Gardner, Judith M; Karmel, Bernard Z; Phan, Ha T T; Kittler, Phyllis; Gomez, Tina Rovito; Gonzalez, Maripaz G; Lennon, Elizabeth M; Parab, Santosh; Barone, Anthony

    2013-02-01

    The authors evaluated the contribution of initially abnormal neonatal auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and 4-month arousal-modulated attention visual preference to later autism spectrum disorder (ASD) behaviors in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) graduates. A longitudinal study design was used to compare NICU graduates with normal ABRs (n = 28) to those with initially abnormal ABRs (n = 46) that later resolved. At 4 months postterm age, visual preference (measured after feeding) for a random check pattern flashing at 1, 3, or 8 Hz and gestational age (GA) served as additional predictors. Outcome measures were PDD Behavior Inventory (PDDBI) scores at 3.4 years (standard deviation = 1.2), and developmental quotients (DQ) obtained around the same age with the Griffiths Mental Development Scales (GMDS). Preferences for higher rates of stimulation at 4 months were highly correlated with PDDBI scores (all P-values measure most associated with a diagnosis of autism. For those with abnormal ABRs, increases in preference for higher rates of stimulation as infants were linked to nonlinear increases in severity of ASD at 3 years and to an ASD diagnosis. Abnormal ABRs were associated with later reports of repetitive and ritualistic behaviors irrespective of 4-month preference for stimulation. The joint occurrence of initially abnormal neonatal ABRs and preference for more stimulation at 4 months, both indices of early brainstem dysfunction, may be a marker for the development of autism in this cohort. PMID:23165989

  10. Comparison of Auditory Brainstem Response in Noise Induced Tinnitus and Non-Tinnitus Control Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassem Mohammadkhani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Tinnitus is an unpleasant sound which can cause some behavioral disorders. According to evidence the origin of tinnitus is not only in peripheral but also in central auditory system. So evaluation of central auditory system function is necessary. In this study Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were compared in noise induced tinnitus and non-tinnitus control subjects.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study is conducted in 60 cases in two groups including of 30 noise induced tinnitus and 30 non-tinnitus control subjects. ABRs were recorded ipsilateraly and contralateraly and their latencies and amplitudes were analyzed.Results: Mean interpeak latencies of III-V (p= 0.022, I-V (p=0.033 in ipsilatral electrode array and mean absolute latencies of IV (p=0.015 and V (p=0.048 in contralatral electrode array were significantly increased in noise induced tinnitus group relative to control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded from that there are some decrease in neural transmission time in brainstem and there are some sign of involvement of medial nuclei in olivery complex in addition to lateral lemniscus.

  11. Short GSM mobile phone exposure does not alter human auditory brainstem response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuróczy György

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are about 1.6 billion GSM cellular phones in use throughout the world today. Numerous papers have reported various biological effects in humans exposed to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones. The aim of the present study was to advance our understanding of potential adverse effects of the GSM mobile phones on the human hearing system. Methods Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR was recorded with three non-polarizing Ag-AgCl scalp electrodes in thirty young and healthy volunteers (age 18–26 years with normal hearing. ABR data were collected before, and immediately after a 10 minute exposure to 900 MHz pulsed electromagnetic field (EMF emitted by a commercial Nokia 6310 mobile phone. Fifteen subjects were exposed to genuine EMF and fifteen to sham EMF in a double blind and counterbalanced order. Possible effects of irradiation was analyzed by comparing the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after genuine/sham EMF exposure. Results Paired sample t-test was conducted for statistical analysis. Results revealed no significant differences in the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after 10 minutes of genuine/sham EMF exposure. Conclusion The present results suggest that, in our experimental conditions, a single 10 minute exposure of 900 MHz EMF emitted by a commercial mobile phone does not produce measurable immediate effects in the latency of auditory brainstem waves I, III and V.

  12. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Källstrand

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Johan Källstrand1, Olle Olsson2, Sara Fristedt Nehlstedt1, Mia Ling Sköld1, Sören Nielzén21SensoDetect AB, Lund, Sweden; 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, SwedenAbstract: Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS. Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16, schizophrenic patients (n = 16 and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients (n = 16, respectively, of matching age and gender. The results showed that the AS subjects exhibited abnormally low activity in the early part of their ABRs that distinctly separated them from the three control groups. Specifically, wave III amplitudes were significantly lower in the AS group than for all the control groups in the forward masking condition (P < 0.005, which was not the case in the baseline condition. Thus, electrophysiological measurements of ABRs to complex sound stimuli (eg, forward masking may lead to a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiology of AS. Future studies may further point to specific ABR characteristics in AS individuals that separate them from individuals diagnosed with other neurodevelopmental diseases.Keywords: asperger syndrome, auditory brainstem response, forward masking, psychoacoustics

  13. Neuron class-specific requirements for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in critical period development of calcium signaling in learning and memory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Caleb A; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-05-01

    Neural circuit optimization occurs through sensory activity-dependent mechanisms that refine synaptic connectivity and information processing during early-use developmental critical periods. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), the gene product lost in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), acts as an activity sensor during critical period development, both as an RNA-binding translation regulator and channel-binding excitability regulator. Here, we employ a Drosophila FXS disease model to assay calcium signaling dynamics with a targeted transgenic GCaMP reporter during critical period development of the mushroom body (MB) learning/memory circuit. We find FMRP regulates depolarization-induced calcium signaling in a neuron-specific manner within this circuit, suppressing activity-dependent calcium transients in excitatory cholinergic MB input projection neurons and enhancing calcium signals in inhibitory GABAergic MB output neurons. Both changes are restricted to the developmental critical period and rectified at maturity. Importantly, conditional genetic (dfmr1) rescue of null mutants during the critical period corrects calcium signaling defects in both neuron classes, indicating a temporally restricted FMRP requirement. Likewise, conditional dfmr1 knockdown (RNAi) during the critical period replicates constitutive null mutant defects in both neuron classes, confirming cell-autonomous requirements for FMRP in developmental regulation of calcium signaling dynamics. Optogenetic stimulation during the critical period enhances depolarization-induced calcium signaling in both neuron classes, but this developmental change is eliminated in dfmr1 null mutants, indicating the activity-dependent regulation requires FMRP. These results show FMRP shapes neuron class-specific calcium signaling in excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in developing learning/memory circuitry, and that FMRP mediates activity-dependent regulation of calcium signaling specifically during the early

  14. Neuron class-specific requirements for Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in critical period development of calcium signaling in learning and memory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Caleb A; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-05-01

    Neural circuit optimization occurs through sensory activity-dependent mechanisms that refine synaptic connectivity and information processing during early-use developmental critical periods. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), the gene product lost in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), acts as an activity sensor during critical period development, both as an RNA-binding translation regulator and channel-binding excitability regulator. Here, we employ a Drosophila FXS disease model to assay calcium signaling dynamics with a targeted transgenic GCaMP reporter during critical period development of the mushroom body (MB) learning/memory circuit. We find FMRP regulates depolarization-induced calcium signaling in a neuron-specific manner within this circuit, suppressing activity-dependent calcium transients in excitatory cholinergic MB input projection neurons and enhancing calcium signals in inhibitory GABAergic MB output neurons. Both changes are restricted to the developmental critical period and rectified at maturity. Importantly, conditional genetic (dfmr1) rescue of null mutants during the critical period corrects calcium signaling defects in both neuron classes, indicating a temporally restricted FMRP requirement. Likewise, conditional dfmr1 knockdown (RNAi) during the critical period replicates constitutive null mutant defects in both neuron classes, confirming cell-autonomous requirements for FMRP in developmental regulation of calcium signaling dynamics. Optogenetic stimulation during the critical period enhances depolarization-induced calcium signaling in both neuron classes, but this developmental change is eliminated in dfmr1 null mutants, indicating the activity-dependent regulation requires FMRP. These results show FMRP shapes neuron class-specific calcium signaling in excitatory vs. inhibitory neurons in developing learning/memory circuitry, and that FMRP mediates activity-dependent regulation of calcium signaling specifically during the early

  15. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in a case of 'Manto syndrome', or spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disertori, B; Ducati, A; Piazza, M; Pavani, M

    1982-12-01

    A case of spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome observed for over 18 months is presented and discussed. Maximal head rotation (determining backward gaze) was associated with compression of the brachial plexus between the scaleni muscles and motor, sensory and trophic troubles in the hand. This new syndrome is called after the diviner Manto, quoted by Dante Alighieri in his 'Divina Commedia' (Inferno, XX, 52-56). The etiology was ascribed to subacute toxic effects of methylparathion. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEPs) demonstrated severe brainstem involvement, maximal in the mesencephalic structures. Clinical and neurophysiological data improved on treatment with L-5-hydroxytryptophan. Finally, BAEPs returned to normal.

  16. SU-E-T-225: It Is Necessary to Contouring the Brainstem On MRI Images in Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, G; Liu, C; Liu, C [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the error in contouring the brainstem for patients with head and neck cancer who underwent radiotherapy based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. Methods: 20 brain tumor and 17 nasopharyngeal cancer patients were randomly selected. Each patient underwent MR and CT scanning. For each patient, one observer contoured the brainstem on CT and MR images for 10 times, and 10 observers from five centers delineated the brainstem on CT and MR images only one time. The inter- and intra-observers volume and outline variations were compared. Results: The volumes of brainstem contoured by inter- and intra-observers on CT and MR images were similar (p>0.05). The reproducibility of contouring brainstem on MR images was better than that on CT images (p<0.05) for both inter- and intra-observer variability. The inter- and intra-observer for contouring on CT images reached mean values of 0.81±0.05 (p>0.05) and of 0.85±0.05 (p>0.05), respectively, while on MR images these respective values were 0.90±0.05 (p>0.05) and 0.92±0.04 (p>0.05). Conclusion: Contouring the brainstem on MR images was more accurate and reproducible than that on CT images. Precise information might be more helpful for protecting the brainstem radiation injury the patients whose lesion were closed to brainstem.

  17. Brain Circuitry Supporting Multi-Organ Autonomic Outflow in Response to Nausea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclocco, Roberta; Kim, Jieun; Garcia, Ronald G; Sheehan, James D; Beissner, Florian; Bianchi, Anna M; Cerutti, Sergio; Kuo, Braden; Barbieri, Riccardo; Napadow, Vitaly

    2016-02-01

    While autonomic outflow is an important co-factor of nausea physiology, central control of this outflow is poorly understood. We evaluated sympathetic (skin conductance level) and cardiovagal (high-frequency heart rate variability) modulation, collected synchronously with functional MRI (fMRI) data during nauseogenic visual stimulation aimed to induce vection in susceptible individuals. Autonomic data guided analysis of neuroimaging data, using a stimulus-based (analysis windows set by visual stimulation protocol) and percept-based (windows set by subjects' ratings) approach. Increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic modulation was associated with robust and anti-correlated brain activity in response to nausea. Specifically, greater autonomic response was associated with reduced fMRI signal in brain regions such as the insula, suggesting an inhibitory relationship with premotor brainstem nuclei. Interestingly, some sympathetic/parasympathetic specificity was noted. Activity in default mode network and visual motion areas was anti-correlated with parasympathetic outflow at peak nausea. In contrast, lateral prefrontal cortical activity was anti-correlated with sympathetic outflow during recovery, soon after cessation of nauseogenic stimulation. These results suggest divergent central autonomic control for sympathetic and parasympathetic response to nausea. Autonomic outflow and the central autonomic network underlying ANS response to nausea may be an important determinant of overall nausea intensity and, ultimately, a potential therapeutic target.

  18. Cognitive outcomes among survivors of focal low-grade brainstem tumors diagnosed in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kellie N; Ashford, Jason M; Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S; Klimo, Paul; Merchant, Thomas E; Billups, Catherine A; Conklin, Heather M

    2016-09-01

    Pediatric focal low-grade brainstem tumors are associated with excellent prognosis. Surgical resection and conformal radiation therapy are front-line treatment options; radiation therapy (RT) serves as an excellent treatment for disease progression. Given high survival rates and limited research regarding functional outcomes, the current study examined neurocognitive outcomes in a group of low-grade brainstem glioma survivors. Forty-three survivors of focal low-grade brainstem gliomas underwent neurocognitive assessment (58 % male; median = 6.9 years at diagnosis; median = 14.9 years at latest assessment). Treatment included combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and RT with 70 % ultimately receiving RT. Neurocognitive outcomes were evaluated through retrospective chart review. Intellectual and academic performance were significantly different from normative expectations (full scale IQ = 86.5 ± 16.8; reading comprehension = 91.3 ± 16.4; math reasoning = 88.2 ± 18.9; reference group = 100 ± 15). Further, the percentage performing below average exceeded the expected 16 % in the normative sample (full scale IQ = 43 %; reading comprehension = 37 %; math reasoning = 50 %). Mean parent ratings did not reflect concerns regarding internalizing and externalizing behaviors or executive functioning (internalizing = 54.9 ± 12.7; externalizing = 51.6 ± 14.6, global executive composite = 57.1 ± 16.0; reference group = 50 ± 10); however, the proportion with clinically elevated scores was higher than the expected 16 % (internalizing = 42 %; externalizing = 26 %; global executive composite = 38 %). Mean performance fell below average for visual-motor coordination (81.8 ± 13.2) and parent ratings of adaptive functioning (73.4 ± 24.2), with 65 and 62 % falling outside the average range, respectively. There were no significant differences between

  19. Prescription dose and fractionation predict improved survival after stereotactic radiotherapy for brainstem metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeman Jonathan E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brainstem metastases represent an uncommon clinical presentation that is associated with a poor prognosis. Treatment options are limited given the unacceptable risks associated with surgical resection in this location. However, without local control, symptoms including progressive cranial nerve dysfunction are frequently observed. The objective of this study was to determine the outcomes associated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery (SRT/SRS of brainstem metastases. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 38 tumors in 36 patients treated with SRT/SRS between February 2003 and December 2011. Treatment was delivered with the Cyberknife™ or Trilogy™ radiosurgical systems. The median age of patients was 62 (range: 28–89. Primary pathologies included 14 lung, 7 breast, 4 colon and 11 others. Sixteen patients (44% had received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT prior to SRT/SRS; ten had received prior SRT/SRS at a different site (28%. The median tumor volume was 0.94 cm3 (range: 0.01-4.2 with a median prescription dose of 17 Gy (range: 12–24 delivered in 1–5 fractions. Results Median follow-up for the cohort was 3.2 months (range: 0.4-20.6. Nineteen patients (52% had an MRI follow-up available for review. Of these, one patient experienced local failure corresponding to an actuarial 6-month local control of 93%. Fifteen of the patients with available follow-up imaging (79% experienced intracranial failure outside of the treatment volume. The median time to distant intracranial failure was 2.1 months. Six of the 15 patients with distant intracranial failure (40% had received previous WBRT. The actuarial overall survival rates at 6- and 12-months were 27% and 8%, respectively. Predictors of survival included Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA score, greater number of treatment fractions, and higher prescription dose. Three patients experienced acute treatment-related toxicity consisting of

  20. Characteristics of multiple sclerosis patient stance control disorders, measured by means of posturography and related to brainstem lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Alpini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Balance disorders are commonly observed during the course of multiple sclerosis (MS. The aim of this study is to report characteristics of MS patient stance control disorders, measured by means of posturography and related to the brainstem lesions. Thirty-eight patients affected by MS, mildly to moderately disable according to Kurtzke’s Expanded Disability Status Scale, underwent a complete clinical neurological and vestibular evaluation and brain MRI scanning. All patients were then tested on a static posturography platform (Tetrax, Israel in four conditions: eyes open and eyes closed standing on a firm surface and on a foam pad. Clinical and/or magnetic resonance imaging evidence of brainstem involvement was observed in 55.3% of patients. When brainstem lesion was detected, Fourier analysis showed a typical pattern characterized by inversion of the 0- 0.1 Hz and 0.1-0.25 Hz frequency bands. In conclusion, MS leads to pervasive postural disturbances in the majority of subjects, including the visuo-vestibular loops and proprioception involving vestibulospinal pathways in at least 55.3% of patients. Our results may also suggest the presence of Fourier inversion in patients with brainstem lesions.

  1. Interactions between Brainstem Noradrenergic Neurons and the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Modulating Memory for Emotionally Arousing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Erin C.; Williams, Cedric L.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens shell (NAC) receives axons containing dopamine-[beta]-hydroxylase that originate from brainstem neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Recent findings show that memory enhancement produced by stimulating NTS neurons after learning may involve interactions with the NAC. However, it is unclear whether these…

  2. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fobe, Lisete Pessoa de Oliveira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: lispessoa@yahoo.com

    1999-12-01

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  3. Organization of the auditory brainstem in a lizard, Gekko gecko. I. Auditory nerve, cochlear nuclei, and superior olivary nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Y. Z.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Carr, C. E.

    2012-01-01

    We used tract tracing to reveal the connections of the auditory brainstem in the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko). The auditory nerve has two divisions, a rostroventrally directed projection of mid- to high best-frequency fibers to the nucleus angularis (NA) and a more dorsal and caudal projection of low...

  4. Cross-Domain Effects of Music and Language Experience on the Representation of Pitch in the Human Auditory Brainstem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M.; Gandour, Jackson T.; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan

    2011-01-01

    Neural encoding of pitch in the auditory brainstem is known to be shaped by long-term experience with language or music, implying that early sensory processing is subject to experience-dependent neural plasticity. In language, pitch patterns consist of sequences of continuous, curvilinear contours; in music, pitch patterns consist of relatively…

  5. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  6. Implementation of a nation-wide automated auditory brainstem response hearing screening programme in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straaten, H.L.M. van; Hille, E.T.M.; Kok, J.H.; Verkerk, P.H.; Baerts, W.; Bunkers, C.M.; Smink, E.W.A.; Elburg, R.M. van; Kleine, M.J.K. de; Ilsen, A.; Maingay-Visser, A.P.G.F.; Vries, L.S. de; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: As part of a future national neonatal hearing screening programme in the Netherlands, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) hearing screening was implemented in seven neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The objective was to evaluate key outcomes of this programme: participation rate,

  7. Musicians and Tone-Language Speakers Share Enhanced Brainstem Encoding but Not Perceptual Benefits for Musical Pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M.; Gandour, Jackson T.; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral and neurophysiological transfer effects from music experience to language processing are well-established but it is currently unclear whether or not linguistic expertise (e.g., speaking a tone language) benefits music-related processing and its perception. Here, we compare brainstem responses of English-speaking musicians/non-musicians…

  8. Effect of sex and rate of stimulus on auditory brainstem responses of children with history of preterm birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara hasani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Preterm birth is one of the risk factors need comprehensive audiological assessment. In this study, the effect of sex and rate of stimulation on response of children with history of preterm birth was investigated by auditory brainstem response (ABR. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using convinience sampling. Click-evoked a uditory brainstem response test with both low (21.1 c/s and high (51.1 c/s stimulus rates was recorded in 30 children with a history of preterm birth and 30 ones with history of term labor, as controls. Results: Significant differences were observed in inter-peak latencies of I-III in both rates, III-V in the low rate, I-V in the high rate, and absolute latency of III wave between high and low stimulus rates (p<0.05 for all. Rate of stimulus affect on auditory brainstem response of preterm birth group was more than controls. Sex also affected on some parameters of auditory brainstem response test. Conclusion: Preterm birth group showed longer latencies than normal group in both rates. Rate of stimulus had significant effect on results of children with history of preterm birth compared normal group. These findings may reflect the negative effect of preterm birth on neural synchronization function in response to transient stimuli.

  9. Radiation-Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Jr., Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ericson, Milton Nance [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bobrek, Miljko [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blalock, Benjamin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    As the recent accident at Fukushima Daiichi so vividly demonstrated, telerobotic technologies capable of withstanding high radiation environments need to be readily available to enable operations, repair, and recovery under severe accident scenarios where human entry is extremely dangerous or not possible. Telerobotic technologies that enable remote operation in high dose rate environments have undergone revolutionary improvement over the past few decades. However, much of this technology cannot be employed in nuclear power environments due the radiation sensitivity of the electronics and the organic insulator materials currently in use. This is the final report of the activities involving the NEET 2 project Radiation Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays [1]. We present a detailed functional block diagram of the proposed data acquisition system, the thought process leading to technical decisions, the implemented system, and the tested results from the systems. This system will be capable of monitoring at least three parameters of importance to nuclear reactor monitoring: temperature, radiation level, and pressure.

  10. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  11. Integrated plasmonic circuitry on a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPolin, Cillian P. T.; Bouillard, Jean-Sebastien; Vilain, Sebastien; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Dickson, Wayne; O'Connor, Daniel; Wurtz, Gregory A.; Justice, John; Corbett, Brian; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2016-08-01

    Integrated plasmonic sources and detectors are imperative in the practical development of plasmonic circuitry for bio- and chemical sensing, nanoscale optical information processing, as well as transducers for high-density optical data storage. Here we show that vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be employed as an on-chip, electrically pumped source or detector of plasmonic signals, when operated in forward or reverse bias, respectively. To this end, we experimentally demonstrate surface plasmon polariton excitation, waveguiding, frequency conversion and detection on a VCSEL-based plasmonic platform. The coupling efficiency of the VCSEL emission to waveguided surface plasmon polariton modes has been optimized using asymmetric plasmonic nanostructures. The plasmonic VCSEL platform validated here is a viable solution for practical realizations of plasmonic functionalities for various applications, such as those requiring sub-wavelength field confinement, refractive index sensitivity or optical near-field transduction with electrically driven sources, thus enabling the realization of on-chip optical communication and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  12. The neural circuitry of visual artistic production and appreciation: A proposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambar Chakravarty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nondominant inferior parietal lobule is probably a major "store house" of artistic creativity. The ventromedial prefrontal lobe (VMPFL is supposed to be involved in creative cognition and the dorsolateral prefrontal lobe (DLPFL in creative output. The conceptual ventral and dorsal visual system pathways likely represent the inferior and superior longitudinal fasciculi. During artistic production, conceptualization is conceived in the VMPFL and the executive part is operated through the DLFPL. The latter transfers the concept to the visual brain through the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF, relaying on its path to the parietal cortex. The conceptualization at VMPFL is influenced by activity from the anterior temporal lobe through the uncinate fasciculus and limbic system pathways. The final visual image formed in the visual brain is subsequently transferred back to the DLPFL through the SLF and then handed over to the motor cortex for execution. During art appreciation, the image at the visual brain is transferred to the frontal lobe through the SLF and there it is matched with emotional and memory inputs from the anterior temporal lobe transmitted through the uncinate fasiculus. Beauty is perceived at the VMPFL and transferred through the uncinate fasciculus to the hippocampo-amygdaloid complex in the anterior temporal lobe. The limbic system (Papez circuit is activated and emotion of appreciation is evoked. It is postulated that in practice the entire circuitry is activated simultaneously.

  13. Spectrotemporal sound preferences of neighboring inferior colliculus neurons: implications for local circuitry and processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen eChen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How do local circuits in the inferior colliculus (IC process and transform spectral and temporal sound information? Using a four-tetrode array we examined the functional properties of the IC and metrics of its micro circuitry by recording neural activity from neighboring single neurons in the cat. Spectral and temporal response preferences were compared for neurons found on the same and adjacent tetrodes, as well as across distant recording sites. We found that neighboring neurons had similar preferences while neurons recorded across distant sites were less similar. Best frequency was the most correlated parameter between neighboring neurons and best frequency differences exhibited unique clustering at ~0.3 octave intervals, indicative of the frequency band lamina. Other spectral and temporal parameters of the receptive fields were more similar for neighboring neurons than for those at distant sites and the receptive field similarity was larger for neurons with small differences in best frequency. Furthermore, correlated firing was stronger for neighboring neuron pairs and increased with proximity and decreasing best frequency difference. Thus although response selectivities are quite diverse in the IC, spectral and temporal preference within a local microcircuit are functionally quite similar. This suggests a scheme where local circuits are organized into zones that are specialized for processing distinct spectrotemporal cues.

  14. CONDITIONING AND PROTECTION CIRCUITRY FOR EXTERNAL MODULATION OF A PREPROGRAMMED GYROTRON CATHODE VOLTAGE COMMAND WAVEFORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PONCE,D; FERRON,J.R; LEGG,R.A

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The modulating voltages applied to the DIII-D gyrotrons are controlled by reference signals which are synthesized by arbitrary waveform generators.These generators allow ECH operators to pre-program reference waveforms consisting of ramps, flat tops, and various modulation shapes. This capability is independent of the DIII-D central timing and waveform facilities, which provides the ECH operators operational flexibility. The waveform generators include an amplitude modulation input, providing a means to control the pre-programmed waveform externally. This input is being used to allow the DIII-D plasma control system (PCS) to control gyrotron power in response top selected feedback signals. As the PCS control signal could potentially modulate the gyrotrons beyond operational limits or otherwise in a manner leading to recalcitrant rf generation, the control signal is conditioned so that its effect upon the ECH pre-programmed reference waveform is limited by conditions set by the ECH operators. The design of the circuitry which restricts the range over which the PCS control signal may modulate the reference waveform will be discussed. Test and DIII-D experimental results demonstrating the utility and effectiveness of gyrotron power modulated by the PCS will be presented.

  15. Integrated plasmonic circuitry on a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPolin, Cillian P. T.; Bouillard, Jean-Sebastien; Vilain, Sebastien; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Dickson, Wayne; O'Connor, Daniel; Wurtz, Gregory A.; Justice, John; Corbett, Brian; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated plasmonic sources and detectors are imperative in the practical development of plasmonic circuitry for bio- and chemical sensing, nanoscale optical information processing, as well as transducers for high-density optical data storage. Here we show that vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be employed as an on-chip, electrically pumped source or detector of plasmonic signals, when operated in forward or reverse bias, respectively. To this end, we experimentally demonstrate surface plasmon polariton excitation, waveguiding, frequency conversion and detection on a VCSEL-based plasmonic platform. The coupling efficiency of the VCSEL emission to waveguided surface plasmon polariton modes has been optimized using asymmetric plasmonic nanostructures. The plasmonic VCSEL platform validated here is a viable solution for practical realizations of plasmonic functionalities for various applications, such as those requiring sub-wavelength field confinement, refractive index sensitivity or optical near-field transduction with electrically driven sources, thus enabling the realization of on-chip optical communication and lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:27491686

  16. Ultralow-Noise Atomic-Scale Structures for Quantum Circuitry in Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Saquib; Weber, Bent; Thompson, Daniel W; Simmons, Michelle Y; Ghosh, Arindam

    2016-09-14

    The atomically precise doping of silicon with phosphorus (Si:P) using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) promises ultimate miniaturization of field effect transistors. The one-dimensional (1D) Si:P nanowires are of particular interest, retaining exceptional conductivity down to the atomic scale, and are predicted as interconnects for a scalable silicon-based quantum computer. Here, we show that ultrathin Si:P nanowires form one of the most-stable electrical conductors, with the phenomenological Hooge parameter of low-frequency noise being as low as ≈10(-8) at 4.2 K, nearly 3 orders of magnitude lower than even carbon-nanotube-based 1D conductors. A in-built isolation from the surface charge fluctuations due to encapsulation of the wires within the epitaxial Si matrix is the dominant cause for the observed suppression of noise. Apart from quantum information technology, our results confirm the promising prospects for precision-doped Si:P structures in atomic-scale circuitry for the 11 nm technology node and beyond. PMID:27525390

  17. Super-Resolution Mapping of Neuronal Circuitry With an Index-Optimized Clearing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Tsen Ke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution imaging deep inside tissues has been challenging, as it is extremely sensitive to light scattering and spherical aberrations. Here, we report an optimized optical clearing agent for high-resolution fluorescence imaging (SeeDB2. SeeDB2 matches the refractive indices of fixed tissues to that of immersion oil (1.518, thus minimizing both light scattering and spherical aberrations. During the clearing process, fine morphology and fluorescent proteins were highly preserved. SeeDB2 enabled super-resolution microscopy of various tissue samples up to a depth of >100 μm, an order of magnitude deeper than previously possible under standard mounting conditions. Using this approach, we demonstrate accumulation of inhibitory synapses on spine heads in NMDA-receptor-deficient neurons. In the fly medulla, we found unexpected heterogeneity in axon bouton orientations among Mi1 neurons, a part of the motion detection circuitry. Thus, volumetric super-resolution microscopy of cleared tissues is a powerful strategy in connectomic studies at synaptic levels.

  18. Preclinical Biosafety Evaluation of Genetically Modified Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Clinical Applications to Brainstem Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ah; Yun, Jun-Won; Joo, Kyeung Min; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kwak, Pil Ae; Lee, Young Eun; You, Ji-Ran; Kwon, Euna; Kim, Woo Ho; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2016-06-15

    Stem-cell based gene therapy is a promising novel therapeutic approach for inoperable invasive tumors, including brainstem glioma. Previously, we demonstrated the therapeutic potential of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSC) genetically engineered to express a secreted form of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL) against brainstem glioma. However, safety concerns should be comprehensively investigated before clinical applications of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL. At first, we injected stereotactically low (1.2 × 10(5) cells/18 μL), medium (2.4 × 10(5)/18 μL), or high dose (3.6 × 10(5)/18 μL) of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL into the brainstems of immunodeficient mice reflecting the plan of the future clinical trial. Local toxicity, systemic toxicity, secondary tumor formation, and biodistribution of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL were investigated. Next, presence of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was confirmed in the brain and major organs at 4, 9, and 14 weeks in brainstem glioma-bearing mice. In the 15-week subchronic toxicity test, no serious adverse events in terms of body weight, food consumption, clinical symptom, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weight, and histopathology were observed. In the 26-week tumorigenicity test, hAT-MSC.sTRAIL made no detectable tumors, whereas positive control U-87 MG cells made huge tumors in the brainstem. No remaining hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed in any organs examined, including the brainstem at 15 or 26 weeks. In brainstem glioma-bearing mice, injected hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed, but gradually decreased over time in the brain. The mRNA of human specific GAPDH and TRAIL was not detected in all major organs. These results indicate that the hAT-MSC.sTRAIL could be applicable to the future clinical trials in terms of biosafety.

  19. Preclinical Biosafety Evaluation of Genetically Modified Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Clinical Applications to Brainstem Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ah; Yun, Jun-Won; Joo, Kyeung Min; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kwak, Pil Ae; Lee, Young Eun; You, Ji-Ran; Kwon, Euna; Kim, Woo Ho; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2016-06-15

    Stem-cell based gene therapy is a promising novel therapeutic approach for inoperable invasive tumors, including brainstem glioma. Previously, we demonstrated the therapeutic potential of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSC) genetically engineered to express a secreted form of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL) against brainstem glioma. However, safety concerns should be comprehensively investigated before clinical applications of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL. At first, we injected stereotactically low (1.2 × 10(5) cells/18 μL), medium (2.4 × 10(5)/18 μL), or high dose (3.6 × 10(5)/18 μL) of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL into the brainstems of immunodeficient mice reflecting the plan of the future clinical trial. Local toxicity, systemic toxicity, secondary tumor formation, and biodistribution of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL were investigated. Next, presence of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was confirmed in the brain and major organs at 4, 9, and 14 weeks in brainstem glioma-bearing mice. In the 15-week subchronic toxicity test, no serious adverse events in terms of body weight, food consumption, clinical symptom, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weight, and histopathology were observed. In the 26-week tumorigenicity test, hAT-MSC.sTRAIL made no detectable tumors, whereas positive control U-87 MG cells made huge tumors in the brainstem. No remaining hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed in any organs examined, including the brainstem at 15 or 26 weeks. In brainstem glioma-bearing mice, injected hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed, but gradually decreased over time in the brain. The mRNA of human specific GAPDH and TRAIL was not detected in all major organs. These results indicate that the hAT-MSC.sTRAIL could be applicable to the future clinical trials in terms of biosafety. PMID:27151205

  20. Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE) in childhood: rapid resolution after intravenous immunoglobulins treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, P; Le Pira, A; Greco, F; Vitaliti, G; Smilari, P L; Parano, E; Falsaperla, R

    2014-01-01

    Three young patients with Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE) are reported. Some weeks following an upper tract infection, the children after a short period of recovery, showed acute onset of symmetric weakness of the lower limbs with difficulty in standing by and walking. The distal muscle weakness had a rapid progression with involvement of the cranial nerve, and then with severe impairment of the consciousness till to coma in one of the three children. BBE is a rare and often underdiagnosed affection in childhood. Common neuro-immune pathogenesis, overlap of clinical signs and strict correlation among BBE with Fisher syndrome and Guillain-Barrè syndrome lead to think that these affections represent an unique spectrum with different central and peripheral involvement. In these children, treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins resulted in a progressive and rapid resolution of the clinical features. PMID:25268095

  1. Anatomy of brain-stem white-matter tracts shown by diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We acquired high-resolution MRI and anisotropically diffusion-weighted images (DWI) with direction-selective gradients of the brain stem in 20 healthy volunteers, to identify brain-stem structures such as white-matter tracts and nuclei which show diffusion anisotropy. After averaging and superposition of individual cuts, the images were projected onto appropriate plates of the Schaltenbrand and Wahren anatomical atlas. We identified 20 structures - white-matter tracts and some nuclei - with high contrast. The direction of fibres could be determined as areas of increased (parallel to) or decreased diffusion (perpendicular to the gradient). This study may contribute to understanding of the functional anatomy of the brain stem. (orig.)

  2. A case of overlapping Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis and Guillain-Barré syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-sheng; TANG Ying; WANG Ye

    2006-01-01

    Objective: There is no report on Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE) patients in China. We here report the first case of BBE in China. Methods: Clinical features, results of electromyography, electroencephalography (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination were studied to clarify the characteristics of this syndrome.Results: A 44-year-old man presented himself at our inpatient department with somnolence and dizziness as his initial symptoms.He developed multiple cranial nerves paralysis especially internal and external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and tetraparesis within 1 week. His condition rapidly deteriorated, and he experienced coma. Electromyography showed indications of peripheral nerve dysfunction, electroencephalography revealed loss of basic rhythm, MRI demonstrated high-intensity abnormalities on T2-weighted images of medulla oblongata, and CSF albuminocytological dissociation was defined abnormally as high protein. Ten similar clinically; BBE and FS were proposed to be the variant of GBS.

  3. MRI and associated clinical characteristics of EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis in children with hand-foot-mouth disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hongwu; Gan, Yungen [Shenzhen Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shenzhen (China); Wen, Feiqiu [Shenzhen Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurology, Shenzhen (China); Huang, Wenxian [Shenzhen Children' s Hospital, Department of Respiratory, Shenzhen (China)

    2012-06-15

    This study was conducted to investigate MRI and associated clinical characteristics of brainstem encephalitis induced by enterovirus 71 (EV71) in children with hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD). We analyzed clinical and imaging data from 42 HFMD cases with EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis. All patients underwent plain and enhanced MRI cranial scans and were placed into one of two groups according to MRI enhancement results, an enhanced group or a nonenhanced group. Thirty-two cases were positive on MRI exam. The primary location of the lesion for brainstem encephalitis was the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata (32 cases), followed by the cerebellar dentate nucleus (8 cases), midbrain (5 cases), and thalamus (2 cases). Plain T1-weighted images showed isointense or hypointense signals, and T2-weighted images showed isointense and hyperintense signals. Enhanced MRI scans showed that 12 cases had slight to moderate enhancement; 4 of these were normal on plain scan. The time from MRI examination to disease onset was statistically different between the enhanced (n = 12) and nonenhanced (n = 21) groups with a mean of 7.67 days (SD = 1.07) vs 11.95 days (SD = 5.33), respectively. The most common neurological symptoms for brainstem encephalitis were myoclonus and tremor. The greater the area of affected brain, the more severe the clinical symptoms were. The locations of EV71-induced HFMD-associated brainstem encephalitis lesions are relatively specific. Enhanced MRI scans could also identify the lesions missed by early plain scans. MRI scans can provide important information for clinical evaluation and treatment. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brainstem Volumes, Plaques, and Surface Area in the Occipital Regions of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine brainstem volumes, number of plaques, and surface areas in the occipital lobes of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), and to investigate whether there is any correlation between brainstem volume and the number/surface areas of plaque in the occipital lobes. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained on 14 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 13 secondary progressive (SP) MS patients and 26 female control subjects. The Cavalieri method was used by modern design stereology to measure brainstem volume. The point-counting grid was used to evaluate sclerotic plaque surface areas in the occipital lobe. The number of plaques in the imaging section was calculated. Results: Brainstem volumes for RR and SP with multiple sclerosis and control subjects were 3647 mm3 , 3515 mm3 , and 4517 mm3 , respectively. Mean number of plaques in the right-left occipital lobe was found to be 2.7-3.4 in RR-MS and 5.2-2.8 in SP-MS. Mean plaque surface area in the right-left occipital lobe was determined to be 58.52-88.24 mm2 in RR MS and 124.3-64.82 mm2 in SP MS. Brainstem volumes were significantly reduced in both groups of patients with MS compared to controls ( P <0.01). Conclusion: Magnetic-resonance-estimated volume and surface area values in multiple sclerosis may facilitate our understanding of the clinical situation of patients and provide a simple index for evaluating therapeutic efficiency

  5. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brainstem Volumes, Plaques, and Surface Area in the Occipital Regions of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alper, F.; Kantarci, M.; Altunkaynak, E.; Varoglu, A. O.; Karaman, A.; Oral, E.; Okur, A. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Histology, Neurology and Embryology, Psychiatry

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To determine brainstem volumes, number of plaques, and surface areas in the occipital lobes of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), and to investigate whether there is any correlation between brainstem volume and the number/surface areas of plaque in the occipital lobes. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained on 14 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 13 secondary progressive (SP) MS patients and 26 female control subjects. The Cavalieri method was used by modern design stereology to measure brainstem volume. The point-counting grid was used to evaluate sclerotic plaque surface areas in the occipital lobe. The number of plaques in the imaging section was calculated. Results: Brainstem volumes for RR and SP with multiple sclerosis and control subjects were 3647 mm{sup 3} , 3515 mm{sup 3} , and 4517 mm{sup 3} , respectively. Mean number of plaques in the right-left occipital lobe was found to be 2.7-3.4 in RR-MS and 5.2-2.8 in SP-MS. Mean plaque surface area in the right-left occipital lobe was determined to be 58.52-88.24 mm{sup 2} in RR MS and 124.3-64.82 mm{sup 2} in SP MS. Brainstem volumes were significantly reduced in both groups of patients with MS compared to controls ( P <0.01). Conclusion: Magnetic-resonance-estimated volume and surface area values in multiple sclerosis may facilitate our understanding of the clinical situation of patients and provide a simple index for evaluating therapeutic efficiency.

  6. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative status disruption in brainstem of weaned rats: Immediate response to maternal protein restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Diorginis José Soares; da Silva Pedroza, Anderson Apolônio; Braz, Glauber Ruda Feitoza; da Silva-Filho, Reginaldo Correia; Lima, Talitta Arruda; Fernandes, Mariana Pinheiro; Doi, Sonia Q; Lagranha, Claudia Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction has been postulated as an important mechanism associated to a number of cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. One of the hypotheses is that this is caused by the metabolic challenge generated by the mismatch between prenatal predicted and postnatal reality. Perinatal low-protein diet produces several effects that are manifested in the adult animal, including altered sympathetic tone, increased arterial blood pressure and oxidative stress in the brainstem. The majority of the studies related to nutritional programming postulates that the increased risk levels for non-communicable diseases are associated with the incompatibility between prenatal and postnatal environment. However, little is known about the immediate effects of maternal protein restriction on the offspring's brainstem. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that a maternal low-protein diet causes tissue damage immediately after exposure to the nutritional insult that can be assessed in the brainstem of weaned offspring. In this regard, a series of assays was conducted to measure the mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress biomarkers in the brainstem, which is the brain structure responsible for the autonomic cardiovascular control. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed ad libitum with normoprotein (NP; 17% casein) or low-protein (LP; 8% casein) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation periods. At weaning, the male offsprings were euthanized and the brainstem was quickly removed to assess the mitochondria function, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane electric potential (ΔΨm), oxidative biomarkers, antioxidant defense and redox status. Our data demonstrated that perinatal LP diet induces an immediate mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the protein restriction induced a marked increase in ROS production, with a decrease in antioxidant defense and redox status. Altogether, our findings suggest that LP-fed animals may be at

  7. MRI and associated clinical characteristics of EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis in children with hand-foot-mouth disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to investigate MRI and associated clinical characteristics of brainstem encephalitis induced by enterovirus 71 (EV71) in children with hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD). We analyzed clinical and imaging data from 42 HFMD cases with EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis. All patients underwent plain and enhanced MRI cranial scans and were placed into one of two groups according to MRI enhancement results, an enhanced group or a nonenhanced group. Thirty-two cases were positive on MRI exam. The primary location of the lesion for brainstem encephalitis was the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata (32 cases), followed by the cerebellar dentate nucleus (8 cases), midbrain (5 cases), and thalamus (2 cases). Plain T1-weighted images showed isointense or hypointense signals, and T2-weighted images showed isointense and hyperintense signals. Enhanced MRI scans showed that 12 cases had slight to moderate enhancement; 4 of these were normal on plain scan. The time from MRI examination to disease onset was statistically different between the enhanced (n = 12) and nonenhanced (n = 21) groups with a mean of 7.67 days (SD = 1.07) vs 11.95 days (SD = 5.33), respectively. The most common neurological symptoms for brainstem encephalitis were myoclonus and tremor. The greater the area of affected brain, the more severe the clinical symptoms were. The locations of EV71-induced HFMD-associated brainstem encephalitis lesions are relatively specific. Enhanced MRI scans could also identify the lesions missed by early plain scans. MRI scans can provide important information for clinical evaluation and treatment. (orig.)

  8. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Brainstem Lesions in the Autopsy Cases with Severe Motor and Intellectual Disabilities Showing Sudden Unexplained Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masaharu; Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    It is known that patients with severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID) showed sudden unexplained death (SUD), in which autopsy failed to identify causes of death. Although the involvement of brainstem dysfunction is speculated, the detailed neuropathological analysis still remains to be performed. In order to clarify pathogenesis, we investigated the brainstem functions in autopsy cases of SMID showing SUD. We immunohistochemically examined expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase, tryptophan hydroxylase, substance P, methionine-enkephalin, and c-fos in the serial sections of the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata in eight SUD cases and seven controls, having neither unexplained death nor pathological changes in the brain. Expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase were reduced in two of eight cases, and those of substance P and/or methionine-enkephalin were augmented in the pons and medulla oblongata in seven of eight cases, including the aforementioned two cases, when compared with those in controls. The hypoglossal nucleus and/or the dorsal vagal nucleus demonstrated increased neuronal immunoreactivity for c-fos in seven of eight cases, although there was no neuronal loss or gliosis in both the nuclei. Controls rarely showed immunoreactivity for c-fos in the medulla oblongata. These data suggest the possible involvement of brainstem dysfunction in SUD in patients with SMID, and consecutive neurophysiological evaluation of brainstem functions, such as all-night polysomnography and blink reflex, may be useful for the prevention of SUD, because some parameters in the neurophysiological examination are known to be related to the brainstem catecholamine neurons and the spinal tract nucleus of trigeminal nerve. PMID:27445960

  9. Magnetic field changes activate the trigeminal brainstem complex in a migratory bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyers, Dominik; Zapka, Manuela; Hoffmeister, Mara; Wild, John Martin; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2010-05-18

    The upper beak of birds, which contains putative magnetosensory ferro-magnetic structures, is innervated by the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (V1). However, because of the absence of replicable neurobiological evidence, a general acceptance of the involvement of the trigeminal nerve in magnetoreception is lacking in birds. Using an antibody to ZENK protein to indicate neuronal activation, we here document reliable magnetic activation of neurons in and near the principal (PrV) and spinal tract (SpV) nuclei of the trigeminal brainstem complex, which represent the two brain regions known to receive primary input from the trigeminal nerve. Significantly more neurons were activated in PrV and in medial SpV when European robins (Erithacus rubecula) experienced a magnetic field changing every 30 seconds for a period of 3 h (CMF) than when robins experienced a compensated, zero magnetic field condition (ZMF). No such differences in numbers of activated neurons were found in comparison structures. Under CMF conditions, sectioning of V1 significantly reduced the number of activated neurons in and near PrV and medial SpV, but not in lateral SpV or in the optic tectum. Tract tracing of V1 showed spatial proximity and regional overlap of V1 nerve endings and ZENK-positive (activated) neurons in SpV, and partly in PrV, under CMF conditions. Together, these results suggest that magnetic field changes activate neurons in and near the trigeminal brainstem complex and that V1 is necessary for this activation. We therefore suggest that V1 transmits magnetic information to the brain in this migratory passerine bird.

  10. Impact of head immobilization position on dose distribution in patients of brainstem glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of patient position (supine and prone on conventional bilateral field, three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment plans in patients of brainstem glioma with a view to exploring the possibility of avoiding beam entry through immobilization accessories. Methods: Five patients of brainstem glioma were immobilized and scanned in supine and prone positions with a combination of head rest and thermoplastic cast. Each patient was planned with three techniques: (i 2-fields bilateral (ii 3-fields 3DCRT, and (iii 5-fields IMRT. Plan quality was analyzed in terms of planning target volume (PTV coverage and dose to various critical organs at risk (OAR for both the supine and prone treatment positions. Results: In case of bilateral fields (parallel opposed planning, the PTV coverage and dose to the OAR were almost similar for both the supine and prone positions. In 3DCRT plan, although the PTV coverage and dose to critical structures were comparable for both the supine and prone position, dose to cochlea was lower for the prone position plan. A modest decrease in maximum dose to optic nerves and mean dose to temporal lobes were also observed for the prone position plan. In IMRT plans, the PTV coverage and homogeneity were comparable in both the supine and prone positions. Reduction in average maximum and mean doses to all OARs with functional subunit (FSU in series and parallel respectively was observed in the IMRT plan for prone position when compared to the supine position.Conclusion: Supine and prone positions resulted in almost similar dose distribution in all the three techniques applied. At some instances, the prone position showed better normal tissues sparing when compared to supine. Moreover, prone position is more likely to avoid attenuation due to immobilization devices and uncertainty in dose calculation under large

  11. The role of the auditory brainstem in processing musically relevant pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging work has shed light on the cerebral architecture involved in processing the melodic and harmonic aspects of music. Here, recent evidence is reviewed illustrating that subcortical auditory structures contribute to the early formation and processing of musically relevant pitch. Electrophysiological recordings from the human brainstem and population responses from the auditory nerve reveal that nascent features of tonal music (e.g., consonance/dissonance, pitch salience, harmonic sonority) are evident at early, subcortical levels of the auditory pathway. The salience and harmonicity of brainstem activity is strongly correlated with listeners' perceptual preferences and perceived consonance for the tonal relationships of music. Moreover, the hierarchical ordering of pitch intervals/chords described by the Western music practice and their perceptual consonance is well-predicted by the salience with which pitch combinations are encoded in subcortical auditory structures. While the neural correlates of consonance can be tuned and exaggerated with musical training, they persist even in the absence of musicianship or long-term enculturation. As such, it is posited that the structural foundations of musical pitch might result from innate processing performed by the central auditory system. A neurobiological predisposition for consonant, pleasant sounding pitch relationships may be one reason why these pitch combinations have been favored by composers and listeners for centuries. It is suggested that important perceptual dimensions of music emerge well before the auditory signal reaches cerebral cortex and prior to attentional engagement. While cortical mechanisms are no doubt critical to the perception, production, and enjoyment of music, the contribution of subcortical structures implicates a more integrated, hierarchically organized network underlying music processing within the brain. PMID:23717294

  12. THE EFFECTS OF SALICYLATE ON AUDITORY EVOKED POTENTIAL AMPLITWDE FROM THE AUDITORY CORTEX AND AUDITORY BRAINSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Sawka; SUN Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus has often been studied using salicylate in animal models as they are capable of inducing tempo-rary hearing loss and tinnitus. Studies have recently observed enhancement of auditory evoked responses of the auditory cortex (AC) post salicylate treatment which is also shown to be related to tinnitus like behavior in rats. The aim of this study was to observe if enhancements of the AC post salicylate treatment are also present at structures in the brainstem. Four male Sprague Dawley rats with AC implanted electrodes were tested for both AC and auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings pre and post 250 mg/kg intraperitone-al injections of salicylate. The responses were recorded as the peak to trough amplitudes of P1-N1 (AC), ABR wave V, and ABR waveⅡ. AC responses resulted in statistically significant enhancement of ampli-tude at 2 hours post salicylate with 90 dB stimuli tone bursts of 4, 8, 12, and 20 kHz. Wave V of ABR re-sponses at 90 dB resulted in a statistically significant reduction of amplitude 2 hours post salicylate and a mean decrease of amplitude of 31%for 16 kHz. WaveⅡamplitudes at 2 hours post treatment were signifi-cantly reduced for 4, 12, and 20 kHz stimuli at 90 dB SPL. Our results suggest that the enhancement chang-es of the AC related to salicylate induced tinnitus are generated superior to the level of the inferior colliculus and may originate in the AC.

  13. The role of the auditory brainstem in processing musically-relevant pitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin M. Bidelman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging work has shed light on the cerebral architecture involved in processing the melodic and harmonic aspects of music. Here, recent evidence is reviewed illustrating that subcortical auditory structures contribute to the early formation and processing of musically-relevant pitch. Electrophysiological recordings from the human brainstem and population responses from the auditory nerve reveal that nascent features of tonal music (e.g., consonance/dissonance, pitch salience, harmonic sonority are evident at early, subcortical levels of the auditory pathway. The salience and harmonicity of brainstem activity is strongly correlated with listeners’ perceptual preferences and perceived consonance for the tonal relationships of music. Moreover, the hierarchical ordering of pitch intervals/chords described by the Western music practice and their perceptual consonance is well-predicted by the salience with which pitch combinations are encoded in subcortical auditory structures. While the neural correlates of consonance can be tuned and exaggerated with musical training, they persist even in the absence of musicianship or long-term enculturation. As such, it is posited that the structural foundations of musical pitch might result from innate processing performed by the central auditory system. A neurobiological predisposition for consonant, pleasant sounding pitch relationships may be one reason why these pitch combinations have been favored by composers and listeners for centuries. It is suggested that important perceptual dimensions of music emerge well before the auditory signal reaches cerebral cortex and prior to attentional engagement. While cortical mechanisms are no doubt critical to the perception, production, and enjoyment of music, the contribution of subcortical structures implicates a more integrated, hierarchically organized network underlying music processing within the brain.

  14. Auditory Rehabilitation in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Auditory Brainstem Implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Min Wang; Zhi-Jun Yang; Fu Zhao; Bo Wang; Xing-Chao Wang; Pei-Ran Qu; Pi-Nan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Background:The auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) have been used to treat deafness for patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 and nontumor patients.The lack of an appropriate animal model has limited the study of improving hearing rehabilitation by the device.This study aimed to establish an animal model of ABI in adult rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta).Methods:Six adult rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) were included.Under general anesthesia,a multichannel ABI was implanted into the lateral recess of the fourth ventricle through the modified suboccipital-retrosigmoid (RS) approach.The electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) waves were tested to ensure the optimal implant site.After the operation,the EABR and computed tomography (CT) were used to test and verify the effectiveness via electrophysiology and anatomy,respectively.The subjects underwent behavioral observation for 6 months,and the postoperative EABR was tested every two weeks from the 1st month after implant surgery.Result:The implant surgery lasted an average of 5.2 h,and no monkey died or sacrificed.The averaged latencies of peaks Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅳ were 1.27,2.34 and 3.98 ms,respectively in the ABR.One-peak EABR wave was elicited in the operation,and one-or two-peak waves were elicited during the postoperative period.The EABR wave latencies appeared to be constant under different stimulus intensities;however,the amplitudes increased as the stimulus increased within a certain scope.Conclusions:It is feasible and safe to implant ABIs in rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) through a modified suboccipital RS approach,and EABR and CT are valid tools for animal model establishment.In addition,this model should be an appropriate animal model for the electrophysiological and behavioral study of rhesus macaque monkey with ABI.

  15. Activation of Brainstem Pro-opiomelanocortin Neurons Produces Opioidergic Analgesia, Bradycardia and Bradypnoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, Stefan; Hill, Rob; Balthasar, Nina; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are widely used medicinally as analgesics and abused for hedonic effects, actions that are each complicated by substantial risks such as cardiorespiratory depression. These drugs mimic peptides such as β-endorphin, which has a key role in endogenous analgesia. The β-endorphin in the central nervous system originates from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Relatively little is known about the NTSPOMC neurons but their position within the sensory nucleus of the vagus led us to test the hypothesis that they play a role in modulation of cardiorespiratory and nociceptive control. The NTSPOMC neurons were targeted using viral vectors in a POMC-Cre mouse line to express either opto-genetic (channelrhodopsin-2) or chemo-genetic (Pharmacologically Selective Actuator Modules). Opto-genetic activation of the NTSPOMC neurons in the working heart brainstem preparation (n = 21) evoked a reliable, titratable and time-locked respiratory inhibition (120% increase in inter-breath interval) with a bradycardia (125±26 beats per minute) and augmented respiratory sinus arrhythmia (58% increase). Chemo-genetic activation of NTSPOMC neurons in vivo was anti-nociceptive in the tail flick assay (latency increased by 126±65%, pmelanocortin receptor antagonist). The NTSPOMC neurons were found to project to key brainstem structures involved in cardiorespiratory control (nucleus ambiguus and ventral respiratory group) and endogenous analgesia (periaqueductal gray and midline raphe). Thus the NTSPOMC neurons may be capable of tuning behaviour by an opioidergic modulation of nociceptive, respiratory and cardiac control. PMID:27077912

  16. Somatosensory brainstem, thalamus, and cortex of the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Eva K; Turner, Emily C; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-06-15

    Pinnipeds (sea lions, seals, and walruses) are notable for many reasons, including their ape-sized brains, their adaptation to a coastal niche that combines mastery of the sea with strong ties to land, and the remarkable abilities of their trigeminal whisker system. However, little is known about the central nervous system of pinnipeds. Here we report on the somatosensory areas of the nervous system of the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). Using stains for Nissl, cytochrome oxidase, and vesicular glutamate transporters, we investigated the primary somatosensory areas in the brainstem, thalamus, and cortex in one sea lion pup and the external anatomy of the brain in a second pup. We find that the sea lion's impressive array of whiskers is matched by a large trigeminal representation in the brainstem with well-defined parcellation that resembles the barrelettes found in rodents but scaled upward in size. The dorsal column nuclei are large and distinct. The ventral posterior nucleus of the thalamus has divisions, with a large area for the presumptive head representation. Primary somatosensory cortex is located in the neocortex just anterior to the main vertical fissure, and precisely locating it as we do here is useful for comparing the highly gyrified pinniped cortex with that of other carnivores. To our knowledge this work is the first comprehensive report on the central nervous system areas for any sensory system in a pinniped. The results may be useful both in the veterinary setting and for comparative studies related to brain evolution. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1957-1975, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878587

  17. Gap prepulse inhibition and auditory brainstem evoked potentials as objective measures for tinnitus in guinea pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eDehmel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus or ringing of the ears is a subjective phantom sensation necessitating behavioral models that objectively demonstrate the existence and quality of the tinnitus sensation. The gap detection test uses the acoustic startle response elicited by loud noise pulses and its gating or suppression by preceding sub-startling prepulses. Gaps in noise bands serve as prepulses, assuming that ongoing tinnitus masks the gap and results in impaired gap detection. This test has shown its reliability in rats, mice, and gerbils. No data exists for the guinea pig so far, although gap detection is similar across mammals and the acoustic startle response is a well-established tool in guinea pig studies of psychiatric disorders and in pharmacological studies. Here we investigated the startle behavior and prepulse inhibition (PPI of the guinea pig and showed that guinea pigs have a reliable startle response that can be suppressed by 15 ms gaps embedded in narrow noise bands preceding the startle noise pulse. After recovery of auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds from a unilateral noise over-exposure centered at 7 kHz, guinea pigs showed diminished gap-induced reduction of the startle response in frequency bands between 8 and 18 kHz. This suggests the development of tinnitus in frequency regions that showed a temporary threshold shift (TTS after noise over-exposure. Changes in discharge rate and synchrony, two neuronal correlates of tinnitus, should be reflected in altered ABR waveforms, which would be useful to objectively detect tinnitus and its localization to auditory brainstem structures. Therefore we analyzed latencies and amplitudes of the first five ABR waves at suprathreshold sound intensities and correlated ABR abnormalities with the results of the behavioral tinnitus testing. Early ABR wave amplitudes up to N3 were increased for animals with tinnitus possibly stemming from hyperactivity and hypersynchrony underlying the tinnitus percept.

  18. Plasticity in the brainstem vagal circuits controlling gastric motor function triggered by corticotropin releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Babic, Tanja; Toti, Luca; Holmes, Gregory M; Coleman, F Holly; Travagli, R Alberto

    2014-10-15

    Stress impairs gastric emptying, reduces stomach compliance and induces early satiety via vagal actions. We have shown recently that the ability of the anti-stress neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) to modulate vagal brainstem circuits undergoes short-term plasticity via alterations in cAMP levels subsequent to vagal afferent fibre-dependent activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the OXT-induced gastric response undergoes plastic changes in the presence of the prototypical stress hormone, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). Whole cell patch clamp recordings showed that CRF increased inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmission to identified corpus-projecting dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones. In naive brainstem slices, OXT perfusion had no effect on inhibitory synaptic transmission; following exposure to CRF (and recovery from its actions), however, re-application of OXT inhibited GABAergic transmission in the majority of neurones tested. This uncovering of the OXT response was antagonized by pretreatment with protein kinase A or adenylate cyclase inhibitors, H89 and di-deoxyadenosine, respectively, indicating a cAMP-mediated mechanism. In naive animals, OXT microinjection in the dorsal vagal complex induced a NO-mediated corpus relaxation. Following CRF pretreatment, however, microinjection of OXT attenuated or, at times reversed, the gastric relaxation which was insensitive to l-NAME but was antagonized by pretreatment with a VIP antagonist. Immunohistochemical analyses of vagal motoneurones showed an increased number of oxytocin receptors present on GABAergic terminals of CRF-treated or stressed vs. naive rats. These results indicate that CRF alters vagal inhibitory circuits that uncover the ability of OXT to modulate GABAergic currents and modifies the gastric corpus motility response to OXT. PMID:25128570

  19. Eating in mice with gastric bypass surgery causes exaggerated activation of brainstem anorexia circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumphrey, Michael B.; Hao, Zheng; Townsend, R. Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M.; Münzberg, Heike; Morrison, Christopher C.; Ye, Jianping; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective Obesity and metabolic diseases are at an alarming level globally and increasingly affect children and adolescents. Gastric bypass and other bariatric surgeries have proven remarkably successful and are increasingly performed worldwide. Reduced desire to eat and changes in eating behavior and food choice account for most of the initial weight loss and diabetes remission after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms of altered gut-brain communication are unknown. Subjects/Methods To explore the potential involvement of a powerful brainstem anorexia pathway centered around the lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) we measured meal-induced neuronal activation by means of c-Fos immunohistochemistry in a new high-fat diet-induced obese mouse model of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) at 10 and 40 days after RYGB or sham surgery. Results Voluntary ingestion of a meal 10 days after RYGB, but not after sham surgery, strongly and selectively activates calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons in the external lPBN as well as neurons in the nucleus tractus solitaries, area postrema, and medial amygdala. At 40 days after surgery, meal-induced activation in all these areas was greatly diminished and did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The neural activation pattern and dynamics suggest a role of the brainstem anorexia pathway in the early effects of RYGB on meal size and food intake that may lead to adaptive neural and behavioral changes involved in the control of food intake and body weight at a lower level. However, selective inhibition of this pathway will be required for a more causal implication. PMID:26984418

  20. Retrosigmoid Craniotomy for Auditory Brainstem Implantation in Adult Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Sidharth V; Herrmann, Barbara; Barker, Fred G; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    Objective To report our technique and experience using a retrosigmoid craniotomy approach for auditory brainstem implantation (ABI) placement in adult neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Single-center study, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Participants All NF2 patients who underwent evaluation at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital from 2009 to 2013 were reviewed. Six cases of retrosigmoid craniotomy for ABI surgery in five adult NF2 patients were identified. The clinical history, operative course, and outcomes in these patients were reviewed. Main Outcome Measures Postoperative complications and audiological outcomes. Results Indications for ABI surgery were profound hearing loss associated with growth or treatment of bilateral vestibular schwannomas. In all cases, a retrosigmoid craniotomy was performed for tumor resection and ABI placement without complication. Electrode placement was confirmed intraoperatively using electrical-evoked auditory brainstem responses. The ABI was activated in the awake patient 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively. Audiological testing was used to evaluate sound detection and speech perception with the ABI. There were no cases of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion Retrosigmoid craniotomy is a safe and effective means to provide access to the cochlear nucleus for ABI placement following tumor resection in the adult NF2 patient. Preliminary data indicate that this approach has few complications while offering benefits for hearing. The retrosigmoid craniotomy should be considered a reasonable alternative to the traditional translabyrinthine approach for placement of the ABI in deaf patients who are not candidates for the cochlear implant. PMID:27054058

  1. Novel Circuitry Configuration with Paired-Cell Erase Operation for High-Density 90-nm Embedded Resistive Random Access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Tsunoda, Koji; Aoki, Masaki; Sugiyama, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    We propose a novel circuitry configuration for high-density 90-nm embedded resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The memory cells are operated at 2 V, and a small memory cell size of 6F2 consisting of a 1.2-V standard transistor and a resistive junction (1T-1R) is designed, where F is the feature size. The unique circuitry configuration is that each pair of source-lines connects to each source-line selective gate. Therefore, erasing is done by a pair of cells in turn in the whole sector, while the reading or programming is done by a random accessing operation. We simulated the ReRAM circuit for read and write operations with SPICE. As a result, we found that 5-ns high-speed read access was obtained in the 256-word lines (WLs) × 256-bit lines (BLs) and that the SET/RESET operation was stable.

  2. Apollo experience report: Detection and minimization of ignition hazards from water/glycol contamination of silver-clad electrical circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    The potential flammability hazard when a water/glycol solution contacts defectively insulated silver-clad copper circuitry or electrical components carrying a direct current is described. The chemical reactions and means for detecting them are explained. Methods for detecting and cleaning contaminated areas and the use of inhibitors to arrest chemical reactivity are also explained. Preventive measures to minimize hazards are given. Photomicrographs of the chemical reactions occurring on silver clad wires are also included.

  3. Oxytocin Treatment, Circuitry, and Autism: A Critical Review of the Literature Placing Oxytocin Into the Autism Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Adam J; Hickie, Ian B

    2016-02-01

    Observed impairment in reciprocal social interaction is a diagnostic hallmark of autism spectrum disorders. There is no effective medical treatment for these problems. Psychological treatments remain costly, time intensive, and developmentally sensitive for efficacy. In this review, we explore the potential of oxytocin-based therapies for social impairments in autism. Evidence shows that acute oxytocin administration improves numerous markers critical to the social circuitry underlying social deficits in autism. Oxytocin may optimize these circuits and enhance reward, motivation, and learning to improve therapeutic outcomes. Despite this, the current evidence of therapeutic benefit from extended oxytocin treatment remains very limited. We highlight complexity in crossing from the laboratory to the autism clinical setting in evaluation of this therapeutic. We discuss a clinical trial approach that provides optimal opportunity for therapeutic response by using personalized methods that better target specific circuitry to define who will obtain benefit, at what stage of development, and the optimal delivery approach for circuitry manipulation. For the autism field, the therapeutic challenges will be resolved by a range of treatment strategies, including greater focus on specific interventions, such as oxytocin, that have a strong basis in the fundamental neurobiology of social behavior. More sophisticated and targeted clinical trials utilizing such approaches are now required, placing oxytocin into the autism context.

  4. Effects of direct social experience on trust decisions and neural reward circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic S. Fareri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The human striatum is integral for reward-processing and supports learning by linking experienced outcomes with prior expectations. Recent endeavors implicate the striatum in processing outcomes of social interactions, such as social approval/rejection, as well as in learning reputations of others. Interestingly, social impressions often influence our behavior with others during interactions. Information about an interaction partner’s moral character acquired from biographical information hinders updating of expectations after interactions via top down modulation of reward circuitry. An outstanding question is whether initial impressions formed through experience similarly modulate the ability to update social impressions at the behavioral and neural level. We investigated the role of experienced social information on trust behavior and reward-related BOLD activity. Participants played a computerized ball tossing game with three fictional partners manipulated to be perceived as good, bad or neutral. Participants then played an iterated trust game as investors with these same partners while undergoing fMRI. Unbeknownst to participants, partner behavior in the trust game was random and unrelated to their ball-tossing behavior. Participants’ trust decisions were influenced by their prior experience in the ball tossing game, investing less often with the bad partner compared to the good and neutral. Reinforcement learning models revealed that participants were more sensitive to updating their beliefs about good and bad partners when experiencing outcomes consistent with initial experience. Increased striatal and anterior cingulate BOLD activity for positive versus negative trust game outcomes emerged, which further correlated with model-derived prediction-error (PE learning signals. These results suggest that initial impressions formed from direct social experience can be continually shaped by consistent information through reward learning

  5. The banana code – Natural blend processing in the olfactory circuitry of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eSchubert

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Odor information is predominantly perceived as complex odor blends. For Drosophila melanogaster one of the most attractive blends is emitted by an over-ripe banana. To analyze how the fly’s olfactory system processes natural blends we combined the experimental advantages of gas chromatography and functional imaging (GC-I. In this way, natural banana compounds were presented successively to the fly antenna in close to natural occurring concentrations. This technique allowed us to identify the active odor components, use these compounds as stimuli and measure odor-induced Ca2+ signals in input and output neurons of the Drosophila antennal lobe (AL, the first olfactory neuropil. We demonstrate that mixture interactions of a natural blend are very rare and occur only at the AL output level resulting in a surprisingly linear blend representation. However, the information regarding single components is strongly modulated by the olfactory circuitry within the AL leading to a higher similarity between the representation of individual components and the banana blend. This observed modulation might tune the olfactory system in a way to distinctively categorize odor components and improve the detection of suitable food sources. Functional GC-I thus enables analysis of virtually any unknown natural odorant blend and its components in their relative occurring concentrations and allows characterization of neuronal responses of complete neural assemblies. This technique can be seen as a valuable complementary method to classical GC/electrophysiology techniques, and will be a highly useful tool in future investigations of insect-insect and insect-plant chemical interactions.

  6. Flexible thin film circuitry enabling ubiquitous electronics via post-fabrication customization (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Brian

    2015-09-01

    For decades, the electronics industry has been accurately described by Moore's Law, where the march towards increasing density and smaller feature sizes has enabled continuous cost reductions and performance improvements. With flexible electronics, this perpetual scaling is not foreseen to occur. Instead, the industry will be dominated by Wright's Law, first proposed in 1936, where increasing demand for high volumes of product will drive costs down. We have demonstrated thin film based circuitry compatible with flexible substrates with high levels of functionality designed for such a high volume industry. This includes a generic 8-bit microprocessor totaling more than 3.5k TFTs operating at 2.1 kHz. We have also developed a post fabrication programming technique via inkjet printing of conductive spots to form a one-time programmable instruction generator, allowing customization of the processor for a specific task. The combination demonstrates the possibility to achieve the high volume production of identical products necessary to reap the benefits promised by Wright's Law, while still retaining the individualization necessary for application differentiation. This is of particular importance in the area of item level identification via RFID, where low cost and individualized identification are necessary. Remotely powered RFID tags have been fabricated using an oxide semiconductor based TFT process. This process is compatible with the post-fabrication printing process to detail individual identification codes, with the goal of producing low cost, high volume flexible tags. The goal is to produce tags compatible with existing NFC communication protocols in order to communicate with readers that are already ubiquitous in the market.

  7. Regulation of body fat mass by the gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schéle, Erik; Grahnemo, Louise; Anesten, Fredrik;

    2016-01-01

    New insight suggests gut microbiota as a component in energy balance. However, the underlying mechanisms by which gut microbiota can impact metabolic regulation is unclear. A recent study from our lab shows, for the first time, a link between gut microbiota and energy balance circuitries...

  8. Enhanced auditory brainstem response and parental bonding style in children with gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizuka Seino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The electrophysiological properties of the brain and influence of parental bonding in childhood irritable bowel syndrome (IBS are unclear. We hypothesized that children with chronic gastrointestinal (GI symptoms like IBS may show exaggerated brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP responses and receive more inadequate parental bonding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Children aged seven and their mothers (141 pairs participated. BAEP was measured by summation of 1,000 waves of the electroencephalogram triggered by 75 dB click sounds. The mothers completed their Children's Somatization Inventory (CSI and Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI. CSI results revealed 66 (42% children without GI symptoms (controls and 75 (58% children with one or more GI symptoms (GI group. The III wave in the GI group (median 4.10 interquartile range [3.95-4.24] ms right, 4.04 [3.90-4.18] ms left had a significantly shorter peak latency than controls (4.18 [4.06-4.34] ms right, p = 0.032, 4.13 [4.02-4.24] ms left, p = 0.018. The female GI group showed a significantly shorter peak latency of the III wave (4.00 [3.90-4.18] ms than controls (4.18 [3.97-4.31] ms, p = 0.034 in the right side. BAEP in the male GI group did not significantly differ from that in controls. GI scores showed a significant correlation with the peak latency of the III wave in the left side (rho = -0.192, p = 0.025. The maternal care PBI scores in the GI group (29 [26]-[33] were significantly lower than controls (31 [28.5-33], p = 0.010, while the maternal over-protection PBI scores were significantly higher in the GI group (16 [12]-[17] than controls (13 [10.5-16], p = 0.024. Multiple regression analysis in females also supported these findings. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that children with chronic GI symptoms have exaggerated brainstem responses to environmental stimuli and inadequate parental behaviors aggravate these symptoms.

  9. Radiation-Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays. Report 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Jr, Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shelton, Jacob H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ericson, Milton Nance [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blalock, Benjamin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    As the recent accident at Fukushima Daiichi so vividly demonstrated, telerobotic technologies capable of withstanding high radiation environments need to be readily available to enable operations, repair, and recovery under severe accident scenarios when human entry is extremely dangerous or not possible. Telerobotic technologies that enable remote operation in high dose rate environments have undergone revolutionary improvement over the past few decades. However, much of this technology cannot be employed in nuclear power environments because of the radiation sensitivity of the electronics and the organic insulator materials currently in use. This is a report of the activities involving Task 3 of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) 2 project Radiation Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays [1]. Evaluation of the performance of the system for both pre- and post-irradiation as well as operation at elevated temperature will be performed. Detailed performance of the system will be documented to ensure the design meets requirements prior to any extended evaluation. A suite of tests will be developed which will allow evaluation before and after irradiation and during temperature. Selection of the radiation exposure facilities will be determined in the early phase of the project. Radiation exposure will consist of total integrated dose (TID) up to 200 kRad or above with several intermediate doses during test. Dose rates will be in various ranges determined by the facility that will be used with a target of 30 kRad/hr. Many samples of the pre-commercial devices to be used will have been tested in previous projects to doses of at least 300 kRad and temperatures up to 125C. The complete systems will therefore be tested for performance at intermediate doses. Extended temperature testing will be performed up to the limit of the commercial sensors. The test suite performed at each test point will consist of operational testing of the three basic

  10. DEVELOPING ‘STANDARD NOVEL ‘VAD’ TECHNIQUE’ AND ‘NOISE FREE SIGNALS’ FOR SPEECH AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES FOR HUMAN SUBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ranganadh Narayanam*

    2016-01-01

    In this research as a first step we have concentrated on collecting non-intra cortical EEG data of Brainstem Speech Evoked Potentials from human subjects in an Audiology Lab in University of Ottawa. The problems we have considered are the most advanced and most essential problems of interest in Auditory Neural Signal Processing area in the world: The first problem is the Voice Activity Detection (VAD) in Speech Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR); The second problem is to identify the best De-...

  11. Effects of cigarette smoke exposure on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits {alpha}7 and {beta}2 in the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) brainstem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaalani, Rita, E-mail: rita.machaalani@sydney.edu.au [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Say, Meichien [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Waters, Karen A. [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    It is postulated that nicotine, as the main neurotoxic constituent of cigarette smoke, influences SIDS risk through effects on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brainstem nuclei that control respiration and arousal. This study compared {alpha}7 and {beta}2 nAChR subunit expression in eight nuclei of the caudal and rostral medulla and seven nuclei of the pons between SIDS (n = 46) and non-SIDS infants (n = 14). Evaluation for associations with known SIDS risk factors included comparison according to whether infants had a history of exposure to cigarette smoke in the home, and stratification for sleep position and gender. Compared to non-SIDS infants, SIDS infants had significantly decreased {alpha}7 in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (cNTS), gracile and cuneate nuclei, with decreased {beta}2 in the cNTS and increased {beta}2 in the facial. When considering only the SIDS cohort: 1-cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased {alpha}7 in the vestibular nucleus and increased {beta}2 in the rostral dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, rNTS and Cuneate, 2-there was a gender interaction for {alpha}7 in the gracile and cuneate, and {beta}2 in the cNTS and rostral arcuate nucleus, and 3-there was no effect of sleep position on {alpha}7, but prone sleep was associated with decreased {beta}2 in three nuclei of the pons. In conclusion, SIDS infants demonstrate differences in expression of {alpha}7 and {beta}2 nAChRs within brainstem nuclei that control respiration and arousal, which is independent on prior history of cigarette smoke exposure, especially for the NTS, with additional differences for smoke exposure ({beta}2), gender ({alpha}7 and {beta}2) and sleep position ({beta}2) evident. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 'normal' response to smoke exposure is decreased {alpha}7 and {beta}2 in certain nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIDS infants have decreased {alpha}7 in cNTS, Grac and Cun. Black

  12. A neonate with hand, foot, and mouth disease complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema:A complete recovery

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Shi-jie; Wang, Dong-Xuan; Dai, Chun-Lai; Wu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with serious complications and fatal cases have been reported over the last decade worldwide. The authors report a rare case of HFMD in a neonate complicated with brainstem encephalitis and pulmonary edema. She had fever, lethargy, dyspnea. Physical examination revealed shock signs, fine rales on both lungs, absent Moro reflex. The patient had a rapidly progressive course with seizures, coma, no spontaneous breathing, chemosis. There were some vesicles on ...

  13. Identifying the Threshold of Iron Deficiency in the Central Nervous System of the Rat by the Auditory Brainstem Response

    OpenAIRE

    Greminger, Allison R.; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot

    2015-01-01

    The deleterious effects of anemia on auditory nerve (AN) development have been well investigated; however, we have previously reported that significant functional consequences in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) can also occur as a consequence of marginal iron deficiency (ID). As the ABR has widespread clinical use, we evaluated the ability of this electrophysiological method to characterize the threshold of tissue ID in rats by examining the relationship between markers of tissue ID and...

  14. Detection of Perinatal Cytomegalovirus Infection and Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Belgian Infants by Measurement of Automated Auditory Brainstem Response▿

    OpenAIRE

    Verbeeck, Jannick; Van Kerschaver, Erwin; Wollants, Elke; Beuselinck, Kurt; Stappaerts, Luc; Van Ranst, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Since auditory disability causes serious problems in the development of speech and in the total development of a child, it is crucial to diagnose possible hearing impairment as soon as possible after birth. This study evaluates the neonatal hearing screening program in Flanders, Belgium. The auditory ability of 118,438 babies was tested using the automated auditory brainstem response. We selected 194 babies with indicative hearing impairment and 332 matched controls to investigate the associa...

  15. Induction of brain CYP2E1 by chronic ethanol treatment and related oxidative stress in hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanol is one of the most commonly abused substances, and oxidative stress is an important causative factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is involved in ethanol metabolism in the brain. This study investigates the role of brain CYP2E1 in the susceptibility of certain brain regions to ethanol neurotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were intragastrically treated with ethanol (3.0 g/kg, 30 days). CYP2E1 protein, mRNA expression, and catalytic activity in various brain regions were respectively assessed by immunoblotting, quantitative quantum dot immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR, and LC–MS. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed using a laser confocal scanning microscope. The hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem were selectively damaged after ethanol treatment, indicated by both lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and histopathological analysis. Ethanol markedly increased the levels of CYP2E1 protein, mRNA expression, and activity in the hippocampus and cerebellum. CYP2E1 protein and activity were significantly increased by ethanol in the brainstem, with no change in mRNA expression. ROS levels induced by ethanol paralleled the enhanced CYP2E1 proteins in the hippocampus, granular layer and white matter of cerebellum as well as brainstem. Brain CYP2E1 activity was positively correlated with the damage to the hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem. These results suggest that the selective sensitivity of brain regions to ethanol neurodegeneration may be attributed to the regional and cellular-specific induction of CYP2E1 by ethanol. The inhibition of CYP2E1 levels may attenuate ethanol-induced oxidative stress via ROS generation.

  16. Agmatine promotes expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in brainstem facial nucleus in the rat facial nerve injury model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fang; Wenlong Luo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that agmatine can reduce inhibition of neuronal regeneration by increasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of morphine-dependent rats. The hypothesis that agmatine exerts similar effects on facial nerve injury deserves further analysis.OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of peritoneal agmatine injection on BDNF levels in the rat brainstem after facial nerve injury.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A controlled animal experiment was performed at the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing University of Medical Sciences (Chongqing, China), between October and December in 2007.MATERIALS: Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control, a lesion, and an agmatine treatment group, with eight rats in each group. Bilateral facial nerve anastomosis was induced in the lesion and agmatine treatment groups, while the control group remained untreated. A rat BDNF Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit was used to measure BDNF levels in the brainstem facial nucleus.METHODS: Starting on the day of lesion, the agmatine group received a peritoneal injection of 100 mg/kg agmatine, once per day, for a week, whereas rats in the lesion group received saline injections.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: BDNF levels in the brainstem containing facial nucleus were measured by ELISA.RESULTS: Twenty-four rats were included in the final analysis without any loss. Two weeks after lesion, BDNF levels were significantly higher in the lesion group than in the control group (P<0.01). A significant increase was noted in the agmatine group compared to the lesion group (P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Agmatine can substantially increase BDNF levels in the rat brainstem after facial nerve injury.

  17. Noise-Induced “Toughening” Effect in Wistar Rats: Enhanced Auditory Brainstem Responses Are Related to Calretinin and Nitric Oxide Synthase Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Juan C.; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Gabaldón-Ull, María C.; Jareño-Flores, Tania; Miller, Josef M.; Juiz, José M.

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate conditioning noise exposure may reduce a subsequent noise-induced threshold shift. Although this “toughening” effect helps to protect the auditory system from a subsequent traumatic noise exposure, the mechanisms that regulate this protective process are not fully understood yet. Accordingly, the goal of the present study was to characterize physiological processes associated with “toughening” and to determine their relationship to metabolic changes in the cochlea and cochlear nucleus (CN). Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were evaluated in Wistar rats before and after exposures to a sound conditioning protocol consisting of a broad-band white noise of 118 dB SPL for 1 h every 72 h, four times. After the last ABR evaluation, animals were perfused and their cochleae and brains removed and processed for the activity markers calretinin (CR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Toughening was demonstrated by a progressively faster recovery of the threshold shift, as well as wave amplitudes and latencies over time. Immunostaining revealed an increase in CR and nNOS levels in the spiral ganglion, spiral ligament, and CN in noise-conditioned rats. Overall, these results suggest that the protective mechanisms of the auditory toughening effect initiate in the cochlea and extend to the central auditory system. Such phenomenon might be in part related to an interplay between CR and nitric oxide signaling pathways, and involve an increased cytosolic calcium buffering capacity induced by the noise conditioning protocol. PMID:27065815

  18. NOISE-INDUCED TOUGHENING EFFECT IN WISTAR RATS: ENHANCED AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES ARE RELATED TO CALRETININ AND NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE UPREGULATION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos eAlvarado

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate conditioning noise exposure may reduce a subsequent noise-induced threshold shift. Although this toughening effect helps to protect the auditory system from a subsequent traumatic noise exposure, the mechanisms that regulate this protective process are not fully understood yet. Accordingly, the goal of the present study was to characterize physiological processes associated with ‘toughening’ and to determine their relationship to metabolic changes in the cochlea and cochlear nucleus (CN. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were evaluated in Wistar rats before and after exposures to a sound conditioning protocol consisting of a broad-band white noise of 118 dB SPL for 1h every 72h, 4 times. After the last ABR evaluation, animals were perfused and their cochleae and brains removed and processed for the activity markers calretinin (CR and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. Toughening was demonstrated by a progressively faster recovery of the threshold shift, as well as wave amplitudes and latencies over time. Immunostaining revealed an increase in CR and nNOS levels in the spiral ganglion, spiral ligament and CN in noise-conditioned rats. Overall, these results suggest that the protective mechanisms of the auditory toughening effect initiate in the cochlea and extend to the central auditory system. Such phenomenon might be in part related to an interplay between CR and nitric oxide signalling pathways, and involve an increased cytosolic calcium buffering capacity induced by the noise conditioning protocol.

  19. Early postnatal development of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) expression, TRH receptor binding, and TRH responses in neurons of rat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, D A; Viana, F; Kanter, R K; Szymeczek-Seay, C L; Berger, A J; Millhorn, D E

    1994-02-01

    typical manner, suggesting that expression of the TRH-sensitive conductance is also developmentally regulated. Together, these data indicate that the TRH raphe neuronal system of the rat brainstem is not fully mature at the time of birth but develops over the first few postnatal weeks. This was true of levels of TRH mRNA in caudal raphe nuclei, density of TRH-IR fibers and 3H-methyl-TRH binding in nXII, and also the manner and magnitude of electrophysiological responses of HMs to exogenously applied TRH. PMID:8301363

  20. Auditory Brainstem Response Wave Amplitude Characteristics as a Diagnostic Tool in Children with Speech Delay with Unknown Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Abadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Speech delay with an unknown cause is a problem among children. This diagnosis is the last differential diagnosis after observing normal findings in routine hearing tests. The present study was undertaken to determine whether auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli are different between normally developing children and children suffering from delayed speech with unknown causes. In this cross-sectional study, we compared click auditory brainstem responses between 261 children who were clinically diagnosed with delayed speech with unknown causes based on normal routine auditory test findings and neurological examinations and had >12 months of speech delay (case group and 261 age- and sex-matched normally developing children (control group. Our results indicated that the case group exhibited significantly higher wave amplitude responses to click stimuli (waves I, III, and V than did the control group (P=0.001. These amplitudes were significantly reduced after 1 year (P=0.001; however, they were still significantly higher than those of the control group (P=0.001. The significant differences were seen regardless of the age and the sex of the participants. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups considering the latency of waves I, III, and V. In conclusion, the higher amplitudes of waves I, III, and V, which were observed in the auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli among the patients with speech delay with unknown causes, might be used as a diagnostic tool to track patients’ improvement after treatment.

  1. Difficult diagnosis of brainstem glioblastoma multiforme in a woman: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Brainstem gliomas are rare in adults. They most commonly occur in the pons and are most likely to be high-grade lesions. The diagnosis of a high-grade brainstem glioma is usually reached due to the presentation of rapidly progressing brainstem, cranial nerve and cerebellar symptoms. These symptoms do, however, overlap with a variety of other central nervous system disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the radiographic modality of choice, but can still be misleading. Case presentation A 48-year-old Caucasian woman presented with headache and vomiting followed by cerebellar signs and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were suggestive of a demyelinating process, but the patient failed to respond to therapy. Her condition rapidly progressed and she died. At autopsy, a high-grade invasive pontine tumor was identified. Histological evaluation revealed glioblastoma multiforme. Conclusion While pontine gliomas are rare in adults, those that do occur tend to be high-grade and rapidly progressive. Progression of symptoms from non-specific findings of headache and vomiting to rapid neurological deterioration, as occurred in our patient, is common in glioblastoma multiforme. While radiographic findings are often suggestive of the underlying pathology, this case represents the possibility of glioblastoma multiforme presenting as a deceptively benign appearing lesion.

  2. Fos expression in tyrosine hydroxylase-containing neurons in rat brainstem after visceral noxious stimulation: an immunohistochemical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Han; Yu-Fei Zhang; Yun-Qing Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To prove that neurons in the different structures of the brainstem that express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) are involved in the transmission and modulation of visceral or somatic nociceptive information in rat.METHODS: Immunohistochemical double-staining method was used to co-localize TH and Fos expression in neurons of the rat brainstem in visceral or subcutaneous noxious stimulation models.RESULTS: Neurons co-expressing TH/Fos were observed in lateral reticular nucleus (LRT), rostroventrolateral reticular nucleus (RVL), solitary tract nucleus (SOL), locus coeruleus (LC), A5, A7 neuronal groups and ventrolateral subdivision of the periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) in both models. But the proportion and number of the double-labeled neurons responding to the two noxious stimuli were significantly different in the LRT, RVL and LC nuclei. The proportion and number of the TH/Fos double-labeled neurons in the visceral pain model were smaller than that in the subcutaneous pain model. However, in the case of SOL, they were similar in the two models.CONCLUSION: Differences of Fos expression in TH immunoreactive neurons in animals after visceral and somatic noxious stimulation indicate that the mechanisms of the transmission and modulation of visceral nociceptive information in the brainstem may be different from that of somatic nociceptive information.

  3. Auditory Brainstem Response Wave Amplitude Characteristics as a Diagnostic Tool in Children with Speech Delay with Unknown Causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Susan; Khanbabaee, Ghamartaj; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2016-09-01

    Speech delay with an unknown cause is a problem among children. This diagnosis is the last differential diagnosis after observing normal findings in routine hearing tests. The present study was undertaken to determine whether auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli are different between normally developing children and children suffering from delayed speech with unknown causes. In this cross-sectional study, we compared click auditory brainstem responses between 261 children who were clinically diagnosed with delayed speech with unknown causes based on normal routine auditory test findings and neurological examinations and had >12 months of speech delay (case group) and 261 age- and sex-matched normally developing children (control group). Our results indicated that the case group exhibited significantly higher wave amplitude responses to click stimuli (waves I, III, and V) than did the control group (P=0.001). These amplitudes were significantly reduced after 1 year (P=0.001); however, they were still significantly higher than those of the control group (P=0.001). The significant differences were seen regardless of the age and the sex of the participants. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups considering the latency of waves I, III, and V. In conclusion, the higher amplitudes of waves I, III, and V, which were observed in the auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli among the patients with speech delay with unknown causes, might be used as a diagnostic tool to track patients' improvement after treatment. PMID:27582591

  4. On the Relevance of Natural Stimuli for the Study of Brainstem Correlates: The Example of Consonance Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Cousineau

    Full Text Available Some combinations of musical tones sound pleasing to Western listeners, and are termed consonant, while others sound discordant, and are termed dissonant. The perceptual phenomenon of consonance has been traced to the acoustic property of harmonicity. It has been repeatedly shown that neural correlates of consonance can be found as early as the auditory brainstem as reflected in the harmonicity of the scalp-recorded frequency-following response (FFR. "Neural Pitch Salience" (NPS measured from FFRs-essentially a time-domain equivalent of the classic pattern recognition models of pitch-has been found to correlate with behavioral judgments of consonance for synthetic stimuli. Following the idea that the auditory system has evolved to process behaviorally relevant natural sounds, and in order to test the generalizability of this finding made with synthetic tones, we recorded FFRs for consonant and dissonant intervals composed of synthetic and natural stimuli. We found that NPS correlated with behavioral judgments of consonance and dissonance for synthetic but not for naturalistic sounds. These results suggest that while some form of harmonicity can be computed from the auditory brainstem response, the general percept of consonance and dissonance is not captured by this measure. It might either be represented in the brainstem in a different code (such as place code or arise at higher levels of the auditory pathway. Our findings further illustrate the importance of using natural sounds, as a complementary tool to fully-controlled synthetic sounds, when probing auditory perception.

  5. [Intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, dose constraint for normal tissue: Cochlea vestibular apparatus and brainstem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimas, V; Thariat, J; Graff-Cailleau, P; Boisselier, P; Pointreau, Y; Pommier, P; Montbarbon, X; Laude, C; Racadot, S

    2016-10-01

    Modern techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have been proven to significantly decrease the dose delivered to the cochleovestibular apparatus, limiting consecutive toxicity especially for sensorineural hearing loss. However, recent data still report a 42% rate of radio-induced hypoacusia underscoring the need to protect the cochleovestibular apparatus. Due to the small size of the cochlea, a precise dose-volume analysis could not be performed, and recommendations only refer to the mean dose. Confusing factors such as age, concomitant chemotherapy, primary site and tumor stage should be taken into account at the time of treatment planning. (Non-coplanar) VMAT and tomotherapy have been proven better at sparing the cochlea in comparison with 3D CRT. Brainstem radio-induced injuries were poorly studied because of their infrequency and the difficulty of distinguishing between necrosis and tumor progression in the case of a primary tumor located at the base of skull. The following toxicities have been described: brainstem focal radionecrosis, cognitive disorders without dementia, cranial nerve injuries and sensori motor disability. Maximal dose to the brainstem should be kept to fractionation. This dose could be exceeded (no more than 10mL should receive more than 59Gy), provided this hot spot is located in the peripheral area of the organ. PMID:27614519

  6. A novel method of brainstem auditory evoked potentials using complex verbal stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia N Kouni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The click and tone-evoked auditory brainstem responses are widely used in clinical practice due to their consistency and predictability. More recently, the speech-evoked responses have been used to evaluate subcortical processing of complex signals, not revealed by responses to clicks and tones. Aims: Disyllable stimuli corresponding to familiar words can induce a pattern of voltage fluctuations in the brain stem resulting in a familiar waveform, and they can yield better information about brain stem nuclei along the ascending central auditory pathway. Materials and Methods: We describe a new method with the use of the disyllable word "baba" corresponding to English "daddy" that is commonly used in many other ethnic languages spanning from West Africa to the Eastern Mediterranean all the way to the East Asia. Results: This method was applied in 20 young adults institutionally diagnosed as dyslexic (10 subjects or light dyslexic (10 subjects who were matched with 20 sex, age, education, hearing sensitivity, and IQ-matched normal subjects. The absolute peak latencies of the negative wave C and the interpeak latencies of A-C elicited by verbal stimuli "baba" were found to be significantly increased in the dyslexic group in comparison with the control group. Conclusions: The method is easy and helpful to diagnose abnormalities affecting the auditory pathway, to identify subjects with early perception and cortical representation abnormalities, and to apply the suitable therapeutic and rehabilitation management.

  7. Correlation between auditory brainstem recordings and morphology as seen through the scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultcrantz, M.

    1988-09-01

    Pregnant CBA/CBA mice were exposed to 0.5, 1 and 2 Grey (Gy), (1 Gy = 100 rad) in single doses with whole body gamma-irradiation on the 12th, 13th and 16th gestational days, respectively. The animals were tested at an age of one month for vestibular and cochlear function. Thereafter the inner ears were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. A morphological analysis with cytocochleograms was performed. Morphological changes in the vestibular part showed gross malformations in the cristae ampullares. Hair cells of type I seemed to be more severely changed than hair cells type II. The macula utriculi also showed malformations of the otoconia. All these changes were more pronounced when the irradiation was given early during pregnancy and with the highest doses used, except the otoconia which were more injured when irradiated day 16 of gestation. No disturbances of the equilibrium reflexes were noted. In the cochlea a dose-dependent, time-related damage pattern was demonstrated with pathological changes of outer (OHC) and inner (IHC) hair cells. When tested electrophysiologically for auditory function with auditory brainstem recordings (ABR), elevated thresholds were revealed different in shape depending on when during pregnancy irradiation took place. A good correlation existed between the morphological changes as seen in the cytocochleograms and the functional changes documented with the ABR.

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging of the inferior colliculus and brainstem auditory-evoked potentials in preterm infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, Milla; Lehtonen, Liisa; Lapinleimu, Helena [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology and Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Johansson, Reijo [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Turku (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, Satu K. [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Turku (Finland); Kujari, Harry [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Pathology, Turku (Finland); Haataja, Leena [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Turku (Finland)

    2009-08-15

    Preterm and low-birth-weight infants have an increased risk of sensorineural hearing loss. Brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP) are an effective method to detect subtle deficits in impulse conduction in the auditory pathway. Abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been shown to be associated with perinatal white-matter injury and reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) has been reported in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. To evaluate the possibility of a correlation between BAEP and DTI of the inferior colliculus in preterm infants. DTI at term age and BAEP measurements were performed on all very-low-birth-weight or very preterm study infants (n=56). FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the inferior colliculus were measured from the DTI. Shorter BAEP wave I, III, and V latencies and I-III and I-V intervals and higher wave V amplitude correlated with higher FA of the inferior colliculus. The association between the DTI findings of the inferior colliculus and BAEP responses suggests that DTI can be used to assess the integrity of the auditory pathway in preterm infants. (orig.)

  9. Childhood Sjögren syndrome presenting as acute brainstem encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yoriko; Takenouchi, Toshiki; Narabayashi, Atsushi; Ohara, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Takahashi, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by dry mouth and eyes, known as sicca symptoms. The exact spectrum of neurological involvement, especially of the central nervous system, in childhood Sjögren syndrome has not been well defined. We report a girl who presented with acute febrile brainstem encephalitis. In retrospect, she had exhibited a preceding history of recurrent conjunctivitis and strong halitosis that could be considered as sicca symptoms. The histopathology results of a minor salivary biopsy, the presence of anti-SSA/Ro antibody, and keratoconjunctivitis confirmed the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome. Commonly observed features in previously reported patients with childhood Sjögren syndrome and central nervous system complications have included fever at the time of neurologic presentation, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, abnormal neuroimaging, and positivity for several specific antibodies. In children presenting with unknown acute febrile encephalopathy, Sjögren syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially when sicca symptoms are present. PMID:26006751

  10. The representation of conspecific sounds in the auditory brainstem of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Lidia Eva; Ladich, Friedrich

    2003-07-01

    Temporal patterns of sounds are thought to be the most important carriers of acoustic information in teleost fishes. In order to investigate how conspecific sounds are processed by the auditory system, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by conspecific sounds were recorded in five species of teleosts. In the catfishes Platydoras costatus and Pimelodus pictus, the loach Botia modesta and the labyrinth fish Trichopsis vittata, all of which are hearing specialists, each pulse within the sounds elicited a separate brainwave that closely followed the temporal structure. The ABRs of P. costatus and B. modesta also represent amplitude patterns of conspecific sounds. By contrast, ABRs of the sunfish Lepomis gibbosus, a hearing non-specialist, consisted of long series of waves that could not be attributed to specific sound pulses. A more detailed analysis, however, indicated that each stimulus pulse contributed to the compound ABR waveform. Spectral analysis of low-pitched drumming sounds of P. pictus and corresponding ABRs showed peaks in the ABR spectra at the harmonics of the sound. Our results indicate that, besides temporal patterns, amplitude fluctuations and the frequency content of sounds can be represented in the auditory system and help the fish to extract important information for acoustic communication. PMID:12771172

  11. Development of a Chirp Stimulus PC-Based Auditory Brainstem Response Audiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali AL-Afsaa

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing losses during infancy and childhood have many negative future effects and impacts on the child life and productivity. The earlier detection of hearing losses, the earlier medical intervention and then the greater benefit of remediation will be. During this research a PC-based audiometer is designed and, currently, the audiometer prototype is in its final development steps. It is based on the auditory brainstem response (ABR method. Chirp stimuli instead of traditional click stimuli will be used to invoke the ABR signal. The stimulus is designed to synchronize the hair cells movement when it spreads out over the cochlea. In addition to the available hardware utilization (PC and PCI board, the efforts confined to design and implement a hardware prototype and to develop a software package that enables the system to behave as ABR audiometer. By using such a method and chirp stimulus, it is expected to be able to detect hearing impairment (sensorineural in the first few days of the life and conduct hearing test at low frequency of stimulus. Currently, the intended chirp stimulus has been successfully generated and the implemented module is able to amplify a signal (on the order of ABR signal to a recordable level. Moreover, a NI-DAQ data acquisition board has been chosen to implement the PC-prototype interface.

  12. Eye movement prediction by oculomotor plant Kalman filter with brainstem control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oleg V.KOMOGORTSEV; Javed I.KHAN

    2009-01-01

    Our work addresses one of the core issues related to Human Computer Interaction (HCI) systems that use eye gaze as an input.This issue is the sensor,transmission and other delays that exist in any eye tracker-based system,reducing its performance.A delay effect can be compensated by an accurate prediction of the eye movement trajectories.This paper introduces a mathematical model of the human eye that uses anatomical properties of the Human Visual System to predict eye movement trajectories.The eye mathematical model is transformed into a Kalman filter form to provide continuous eye position signal prediction during all eye movement types.The model presented in this paper uses brainstem control properties employed during transitions between fast (saccade) and slow (fixations,pursuit) eye movements.Results presented in this paper indicate that the proposed eye model in a Kalman filter form improves the accuracy of eye move-ment prediction and is capable of a real-time performance.In addition to the HCI systems with the direct eye gaze input,the proposed eye model can be immediately applied for a bit-rate/computational reduction in real-time gaze-contingent systems.

  13. Correlation between auditory brainstem recordings and morphology as seen through the scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregnant CBA/CBA mice were exposed to 0.5, 1 and 2 Grey (Gy), (1 Gy = 100 rad) in single doses with whole body gamma-irradiation on the 12th, 13th and 16th gestational days, respectively. The animals were tested at an age of one month for vestibular and cochlear function. Thereafter the inner ears were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. A morphological analysis with cytocochleograms was performed. Morphological changes in the vestibular part showed gross malformations in the cristae ampullares. Hair cells of type I seemed to be more severely changed than hair cells type II. The macula utriculi also showed malformations of the otoconia. All these changes were more pronounced when the irradiation was given early during pregnancy and with the highest doses used, except the otoconia which were more injured when irradiated day 16 of gestation. No disturbances of the equilibrium reflexes were noted. In the cochlea a dose-dependent, time-related damage pattern was demonstrated with pathological changes of outer (OHC) and inner (IHC) hair cells. When tested electrophysiologically for auditory function with auditory brainstem recordings (ABR), elevated thresholds were revealed different in shape depending on when during pregnancy irradiation took place. A good correlation existed between the morphological changes as seen in the cytocochleograms and the functional changes documented with the ABR

  14. INFLUENCE OF ACUPUNCTURE ("JIN'S SAN ZHEN") ON BRAINSTEM EVOKED POTENTIALS IN MENTAL RETARDATION CHILDREN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Qing; MA Ruiling; JIN Rui

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of acupuncture ("JIN's San Zhen") on infantile mental retardation (MR) .Methods: 44 cases of MR children were attributed to treatment group and 39 normal children to control group.P3(event-related potential) and brainstem evoked potentials were used as the indexes. Acupoints "Si-shen Zhen","Head Zhi San Zhen", "Hand Zhi San Zhen", "Foot Zhi San Zhen" were punctured with filiform needles, and stimulated by manipulating the needle once every 5 minutes with uniform reinforcing-reducing method. The treatment was conducted once daily, 6 times every week, with 4 months being a therapeutic course. Results: In comparison with normal children, the latency of P3 was longer and its amplitude lower in MR children. After 4 months' acupuncture treatment,the latency was shortened and the amplitude increased significantly in comparison with pre-treatment ( P<0.01,0.05). Results of the total inteiiigence quotient (TIQ) evaluation showed a 70.3% coincidence rate compared with improvement of P3. Conclusion: Changes of P3 and BAEP(brain auditory evoked potential) after acupuncture treatment may be related to the effect of "JIN's San Zhen" in bettering clinical symptoms and signs of MR infantile patients.

  15. Large-scale synchronized activity in the embryonic brainstem and spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eMomose-Sato

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the developing central nervous system, spontaneous activity appears well before the brain responds to external sensory inputs. One of the earliest activities is observed in the hindbrain and spinal cord, which is detected as rhythmic electrical discharges of cranial and spinal motoneurons or oscillations of Ca2+- and voltage-related optical signals. Shortly after the initial expression, the spontaneous activity appearing in the hindbrain and spinal cord exhibits a large-scale correlated wave that propagates over a wide region of the central nervous system, maximally extending to the lumbosacral cord and to the forebrain. In this review, we describe several aspects of this synchronized activity by focusing on the basic properties, development, origin, propagation pattern, pharmacological characteristics, and possible mechanisms underlying the generation of the activity. These profiles differ from those of the respiratory and locomotion pattern generators observed in the mature brainstem and spinal cord, suggesting that the wave is primordial activity that appears during a specific period of embryonic development and plays some important roles in the development of the central nervous system.

  16. Proposed Toxic and Hypoxic Impairment of a Brainstem Locus in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woody R. McGinnis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological findings implicate site-specific impairment of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS in autism. This invites hypothetical consideration of a large role for this small brainstem structure as the basis for seemingly disjointed behavioral and somatic features of autism. The NTS is the brain’s point of entry for visceral afference, its relay for vagal reflexes, and its integration center for autonomic control of circulatory, immunological, gastrointestinal, and laryngeal function. The NTS facilitates normal cerebrovascular perfusion, and is the seminal point for an ascending noradrenergic system that modulates many complex behaviors. Microvascular configuration predisposes the NTS to focal hypoxia. A subregion—the “pNTS”—permits exposure to all blood-borne neurotoxins, including those that do not readily transit the blood-brain barrier. Impairment of acetylcholinesterase (mercury and cadmium cations, nitrates/nitrites, organophosphates, monosodium glutamate, competition for hemoglobin (carbon monoxide, nitrates/nitrites, and higher blood viscosity (net systemic oxidative stress are suggested to potentiate microcirculatory insufficiency of the NTS, and thus autism.

  17. Disrupted Structural and Functional Connectivity in Prefrontal-Hippocampus Circuitry in First-Episode Medication-Naive Adolescent Depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Geng

    Full Text Available Evidence implicates abnormalities in prefrontal-hippocampus neural circuitry in major depressive disorder (MDD. This study investigates the potential disruptions in prefrontal-hippocampus structural and functional connectivity, as well as their relationship in first-episode medication-naïve adolescents with MDD in order to investigate the early stage of the illness without confounds of illness course and medication exposure.Diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI data were acquired from 26 first-episode medication-naïve MDD adolescents and 31 healthy controls (HC. Fractional anisotropy (FA values of the fornix and the prefrontal-hippocampus functional connectivity was compared between MDD and HC groups. The correlation between the FA value of fornix and the strength of the functional connectivity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC region showing significant differences between the two groups was identified.Compared with the HC group, adolescent MDD group had significant lower FA values in the fornix, as well as decreased functional connectivity in four PFC regions. Significant negative correlations were observed between fornix FA values and functional connectivity from hippocampus to PFC within the HC group. There was no significant correlation between the fornix FA and the strength of functional connectivity within the adolescent MDD group.First-episode medication-naïve adolescent MDD showed decreased structural and functional connectivity as well as deficits of the association between structural and functional connectivity shown in HC in the PFC-hippocampus neural circuitry. These findings suggest that abnormal PFC-hippocampus neural circuitry may present in the early onset of MDD and play an important role in the neuropathophysiology of MDD.

  18. Determining the Control Circuitry of Redox Metabolism at the Genome-Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Federowicz, Stephen; Kim, Donghyuk; Ebrahim, Ali;

    2014-01-01

    -scale metabolic model to show that ArcA and Fnr regulate >80% of total metabolic flux and 96% of differential gene expression across fermentative and nitrate respiratory conditions. Based on the data, we propose a feedforward with feedback trim regulatory scheme, given the extensive repression of catabolic genes...... that are regulated during electron acceptor shifts. Here we propose a qualitative model that accounts for the full breadth of regulated genes by detailing how two global transcription factors (TFs), ArcA and Fnr of E. coli, sense key metabolic redox ratios and act on a genome-wide basis to regulate anabolic......, catabolic, and energy generation pathways. We first fill gaps in our knowledge of this transcriptional regulatory network by carrying out ChIP-chip and gene expression experiments to identify 463 regulatory events. We then interfaced this reconstructed regulatory network with a highly curated genome...

  19. Wired for behavior: from development to function of innate limbic system circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Katie eSokolowski; Corbin, Joshua G.

    2012-01-01

    The limbic system of the brain regulates a number of behaviors that are essential for the survival of all vertebrate species including humans. The limbic system predominantly controls appropriate responses to stimuli with social, emotional or motivational salience, which includes innate behaviors such as mating, aggression and defense. Activation of circuits regulating these innate behaviors begins in the periphery with sensory stimulation (primarily via the olfactory system in rodents), and ...

  20. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors. PMID:27739523

  1. Left-right asymmetry defect in the hippocampal circuitry impairs spatial learning and working memory in iv mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Goto

    Full Text Available Although left-right (L-R asymmetry is a fundamental feature of higher-order brain function, little is known about how asymmetry defects of the brain affect animal behavior. Previously, we identified structural and functional asymmetries in the circuitry of the mouse hippocampus resulting from the asymmetrical distribution of NMDA receptor GluR ε2 (NR2B subunits. We further examined the ε2 asymmetry in the inversus viscerum (iv mouse, which has randomized laterality of internal organs, and found that the iv mouse hippocampus exhibits right isomerism (bilateral right-sidedness in the synaptic distribution of the ε2 subunit, irrespective of the laterality of visceral organs. To investigate the effects of hippocampal laterality defects on higher-order brain functions, we examined the capacity of reference and working memories of iv mice using a dry maze and a delayed nonmatching-to-position (DNMTP task, respectively. The iv mice improved dry maze performance more slowly than control mice during acquisition, whereas the asymptotic level of performance was similar between the two groups. In the DNMTP task, the iv mice showed poorer accuracy than control mice as the retention interval became longer. These results suggest that the L-R asymmetry of hippocampal circuitry is critical for the acquisition of reference memory and the retention of working memory.

  2. Lateral hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and ventral pallidum roles in eating and hunger: interactions between homeostatic and reward circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Charles Castro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the neural bases of eating behavior, hunger, and reward has consistently implicated the lateral hypothalamus (LH and its interactions with mesocorticolimbic circuitry, such as mesolimbic dopamine projections to nucleus accumbens (NAc and ventral pallidum (VP, in controlling motivation to eat. The NAc and VP play special roles in mediating the hedonic impact (‘liking’ and motivational incentive salience (‘wanting’ of food rewards, and their interactions with LH help permit regulatory hunger/satiety modulation of food motivation and reward. Here, we review some progress that has been made regarding this circuitry and its functions: the identification of localized anatomical hedonic hotspots within NAc and VP for enhancing hedonic impact; interactions of NAc/VP hedonic hotspots with specific LH signals such as orexin; an anterior-posterior gradient of sites in NAc shell for producing intense appetitive eating versus intense fearful reactions; and anatomically distributed appetitive functions of dopamine and mu opioid signals in NAc shell and related structures. Such findings help improve our understanding of NAc, VP, and LH interactions in mediating affective and motivation functions, including ‘liking’ and ‘wanting’ for food rewards.

  3. The melanocortin-4 receptor is expressed in enteroendocrine L cells and regulates the release of peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide 1 in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panaro, Brandon L; Tough, Iain R; Engelstoft, Maja S;

    2014-01-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is expressed in the brainstem and vagal afferent nerves and regulates a number of aspects of gastrointestinal function. Here we show that the receptor is also diffusely expressed in cells of the gastrointestinal system, from stomach to descending colon. Furtherm......The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is expressed in the brainstem and vagal afferent nerves and regulates a number of aspects of gastrointestinal function. Here we show that the receptor is also diffusely expressed in cells of the gastrointestinal system, from stomach to descending colon...

  4. Auditory brainstem responses to clicks and tone bursts in C57 BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimemi, P; Santarelli, R; Selmo, A; Mammano, F

    2014-08-01

    In auditory research, hearing function of mouse mutants is assessed in vivo by evoked potential recording. Evaluation of the response parameters should be performed with reference to the evoked responses recorded from wild-type mice. This study reports normative data calculated on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) obtained from 20 wild-type C57 BL/6J mice at a postnatal age between 21 and 45 days. Acoustic stimuli consisted tone bursts at 8, 14, 20, 26, 32 kHz, and clicks. Each stimulus was delivered in free field at stimulation intensity starting from a maximum of 100 dB peak equivalent SPL (dB peSPL) at decreasing steps of 10 dB with a repetition rate of 13/sec. Evoked responses were recorded by needle electrodes inserted subcutaneously. At high intensity stimulation, five response waveforms, each consisting of a positive peak and a subsequent negative valley, were identified within 7 msec, and were labelled with sequential capital Roman numerals from I to V. Peak IV was the most robust and stable at low intensities for both tone burst and click stimuli, and was therefore utilized to estimate hearing thresholds. Both latencies and amplitudes of ABR peaks showed good reproducibility with acceptable standard deviations. Mean wave IV thresholds measured across all animals ranged from a maximum of 23 dB peSPL for clicks to a minimum of 7 dB peSPL for 20 kHz-tone burst stimuli. Statistical analysis of the distribution of latencies and amplitudes of peaks from I to V performed for each stimulus type yielded a normative data set which was utilised to obtain the most consistent fitting-curve model. This could serve as a reference for further studies on murine models of hearing loss.

  5. [Brainstem auditory evoked potentials and somatosensory evoked potentials in Chiari malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncho, Dulce; Poca, María A; Minoves, Teresa; Ferré, Alejandro; Rahnama, Kimia; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2013-06-16

    Introduccion. La malformacion de Chiari (MC) incluye una serie de anomalias congenitas que tienen como comun denominador la ectopia de las amigdalas del cerebelo por debajo del foramen magno, lo que puede condicionar fenomenos compresivos del troncoencefalo, la medula espinal alta y los nervios craneales, alterando las respuestas de los potenciales evocados auditivos del tronco cerebral (PEATC) y de los potenciales evocados somatosensoriales (PESS). Sin embargo, las indicaciones de ambas exploraciones en las MC han sido motivo de estudio en un numero limitado de publicaciones, centradas en series cortas y heterogeneas de pacientes. Objetivo. Revisar los hallazgos de los PEATC y los PESS en los estudios publicados en pacientes con MC tipo 1 (MC-1) o tipo 2 (MC-2), y su indicacion en el diagnostico, tratamiento y seguimiento, especialmente en la MC-1. Desarrollo. Es un estudio de revision realizado mediante analisis de los estudios publicados en Medline desde 1966, localizados mediante PubMed, utilizando combinaciones de las palabras clave 'Chiari malformation', 'Arnold-Chiari malformation', 'Chiari type 1 malformation', 'Arnold-Chiari type 1 malformation', 'evoked potentials', 'brainstem auditory evoked potentials' y 'somatosensory evoked potentials', asi como informacion de pacientes con MC-1 valorados en los servicios de neurocirugia y neurofisiologia clinica del Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron. Conclusiones. Los hallazgos mas comunes de los PESS son la reduccion en la amplitud cortical para el nervio tibial posterior, la reduccion o ausencia del potencial cervical del nervio mediano y el aumento del intervalo N13-N20. En el caso de los PEATC, los hallazgos mas frecuentes descritos son el aumento del intervalo I-V y la alteracion periferica o coclear.

  6. The Neural Code for Motor Control in the Cerebellum and Oculomotor Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisanguanthum, Kris S; Joshua, Mati; Medina, Javier F; Bialek, William; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    A single extra spike makes a difference. Here, the size of the eye velocity in the initiation of smooth eye movements in the right panel depends on whether a cerebellar Purkinje cell discharges 3 (red), 4 (green), 5 (blue), or 6 (black) spikes in the 40-ms window indicated by the gray shading in the rasters on the left. Spike trains are rich in information that can be extracted to guide behaviors at millisecond time resolution or across longer time intervals. In sensory systems, the information usually is defined with respect to the stimulus. Especially in motor systems, however, it is equally critical to understand how spike trains predict behavior. Thus, our goal was to compare systematically spike trains in the oculomotor system with eye movement behavior on single movements. We analyzed the discharge of Purkinje cells in the floccular complex of the cerebellum, floccular target neurons in the brainstem, other vestibular neurons, and abducens neurons. We find that an extra spike in a brief analysis window predicts a substantial fraction of the trial-by-trial variation in the initiation of smooth pursuit eye movements. For Purkinje cells, a single extra spike in a 40 ms analysis window predicts, on average, 0.5 SDs of the variation in behavior. An optimal linear estimator predicts behavioral variation slightly better than do spike counts in brief windows. Simulations reveal that the ability of single spikes to predict a fraction of behavior also emerges from model spike trains that have the same statistics as the real spike trains, as long as they are driven by shared sensory inputs. We think that the shared sensory estimates in their inputs create correlations in neural spiking across time and across each population. As a result, one or a small number of spikes in a brief time interval can predict a substantial fraction of behavioral variation.

  7. Wired for behavior: from development to function of innate limbic system circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie eSokolowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The limbic system of the brain regulates a number of behaviors that are essential for the survival of all vertebrate species including humans. The limbic system predominantly controls appropriate responses to stimuli with social, emotional or motivational salience, which includes innate behaviors such as mating, aggression and defense. Activation of circuits regulating these innate behaviors begins in the periphery with sensory stimulation (primarily via the olfactory system in rodents, and is then processed in the brain by a set of delineated structures that primarily includes the amygdala and hypothalamus. While the basic neuroanatomy of these connections is well established, much remains unknown about how information is processed within innate circuits and how genetic hierarchies regulate development and function of these circuits. Utilizing innovative technologies including channel rhodopsin-based circuit manipulation and genetic manipulation in rodents, recent studies have begun to answer these central questions. In this article we review the current understanding of how limbic circuits regulate sexually dimorphism and how these circuits are established and shaped during pre- and post-natal development. We also discuss how understanding developmental processes of innate circuit formation may inform behavioral alterations observed in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, which are characterized by limbic system dysfunction.

  8. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7 Tesla fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N.; Hamalainen, Matti S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Object To map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we utilized the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7 Tesla fMRI compared to 3 Tesla and the time efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1 mm-isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). Results The delineated Pearson’s correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Conclusion Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson’s disease and other motor disorders. PMID:27126248

  9. Relationship between structural brainstem and brain plasticity and lower-limb training in spinal cord injury: a longitudinal pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eVilliger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitative training has shown to improve significantly motor outcomes and functional walking capacity in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI. However, whether performance improvements during rehabilitation relate to brain plasticity or whether it is based on functional adaptation of movement strategies remain uncertain. This study assessed training improvement-induced structural brain plasticity in chronic iSCI patients using longitudinal MRI.We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM to analyze longitudinal brain volume changes associated with intensive virtual reality (VR-augmented lower limb training in nine traumatic iSCI patients. The MRI data was acquired before and after a 4-week training period (16-20 training sessions. Before training, voxel-based morphometry (VBM and voxel-based cortical thickness (VBCT assessed baseline morphometric differences in nine iSCI patients compared to 14 healthy controls. The intense VR-augmented training of limb control improved significantly balance, walking speed, ambulation, and muscle strength in patients. Retention of clinical improvements was confirmed by the 3-4 months follow-up. In patients relative to controls, reductions in VBM of white matter volume within the brainstem and cerebellum and VBCT showed cortical thinning in the primary motor cortex. Over time, TBM revealed significant improvement-induced increases in the left middle temporal and occipital gyrus, left temporal pole and fusiform gyrus, both hippocampi, cerebellum, corpus callosum, and brainstem in iSCI patients. This study demonstrates structural plasticity at the cortical and brainstem level as a consequence of VR-augmented training in iSCI patients. These structural changes may serve as neuroimaging biomarkers of VR-augmented lower limb neurorehabilitation in addition to performance measures to detect improvements in rehabilitative training.

  10. Relationship between structural brainstem and brain plasticity and lower-limb training in spinal cord injury: a longitudinal pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Michael; Grabher, Patrick; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kiper, Daniel; Curt, Armin; Bolliger, Marc; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina; Kollias, Spyros; Eng, Kynan; Freund, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitative training has shown to improve significantly motor outcomes and functional walking capacity in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). However, whether performance improvements during rehabilitation relate to brain plasticity or whether it is based on functional adaptation of movement strategies remain uncertain. This study assessed training improvement-induced structural brain plasticity in chronic iSCI patients using longitudinal MRI. We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to analyze longitudinal brain volume changes associated with intensive virtual reality (VR)-augmented lower limb training in nine traumatic iSCI patients. The MRI data was acquired before and after a 4-week training period (16–20 training sessions). Before training, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and voxel-based cortical thickness (VBCT) assessed baseline morphometric differences in nine iSCI patients compared to 14 healthy controls. The intense VR-augmented training of limb control improved significantly balance, walking speed, ambulation, and muscle strength in patients. Retention of clinical improvements was confirmed by the 3–4 months follow-up. In patients relative to controls, VBM revealed reductions of white matter volume within the brainstem and cerebellum and VBCT showed cortical thinning in the primary motor cortex. Over time, TBM revealed significant improvement-induced volume increases in the left middle temporal and occipital gyrus, left temporal pole and fusiform gyrus, both hippocampi, cerebellum, corpus callosum, and brainstem in iSCI patients. This study demonstrates structural plasticity at the cortical and brainstem level as a consequence of VR-augmented training in iSCI patients. These structural changes may serve as neuroimaging biomarkers of VR-augmented lower limb neurorehabilitation in addition to performance measures to detect improvements in rehabilitative training. PMID:25999842

  11. Auditory brain-stem response, CT and MR imaging in a family with classical type Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A family in which 5 males in successive generations were clinically suspected to be affected with the classical X-linked recessive form of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is presented. Two brothers and their maternal uncle were examined by one of the author (MS). In two brothers, aged 3 years and 2 years, the disease became obvious within a month after birth with nystagmus and head tremor. Head control and sitting were achieved at the age of 18 months at which time they began to speak. They could not stand nor walk without support. They had dysmetria, weakness and hyper-reflexia of lower extremities, and mild mental retardation. Their maternal uncle, aged 37 years, showed psychomotor retardation from birth and subsequently developed spastic paraplegia. He had been able to walk with crutches until adolescence. He had dysmetria, scanning speech, athetoid posture of fingers and significant intellectual deficits. Auditory brainstem response in both brothers revealed well defined waves I and II, low amplitude wave III and an absence of all subsequent components. CT demonstrated mild cerebral atrophy in the elder brother and was normal in the younger brother, but in their uncle, CT showed atrophy of the brainstem, cerebellum and cerebrum, and low density of the white matter of the centrum semiovale. MRI was performed in both brothers. Although the brainstem, the internal capsule and the thalamus were myelinated, the myelination in the subcortical white matter was restricted to periventricular regions on IR sequence scans. On SE sequence, the subcortical white matter was imaged as a brighter area than the cerebral cortex. These results demonstrate that the degree of myelination in these patients was roughly equal to that of 3-to 6-month old infants. (J.P.N.)

  12. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Brown, Emery N; Kinney, Hannah C; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-12-01

    Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7 Tesla scanner equipped with multi-channel receive-coil array, which provided high magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity, and a multi-contrast (diffusion fractional anisotropy and T2-weighted) echo-planar-imaging approach, which provided complementary contrasts for Bn anatomy with matched geometric distortions and resolution. Through a combined examination of 1.3 mm(3) multi-contrast anatomical images acquired in healthy human adults, we semi-automatically generated in vivo probabilistic Bn labels of the ascending arousal (median and dorsal raphe), autonomic (raphe magnus, periaqueductal gray), and motor (inferior olivary nuclei, two subregions of the substantia nigra compatible with pars compacta and pars reticulata, two subregions of the red nucleus, and, in the diencephalon, two subregions of the subthalamic nucleus) systems. These labels constitute a first step toward the development of an in vivo neuroimaging template of Bn in standard space to facilitate future clinical and research investigations of human brainstem function and pathology. Proof-of-concept clinical use of this template is demonstrated in a minimally conscious patient with traumatic brainstem hemorrhages precisely localized to the raphe Bn involved in arousal. PMID:26066023

  13. AT1a Receptor Has Interacted with Angiotensin-converting Enzymes 2 mRNA Expression in Mouse Brainstem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanyi Lin; Shuguang Lin

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To examine in vivo interactions between angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) AT1a receptor (AT1aR),angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACE) and ACE2 using small hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene-silencing methods in mice brainstem nucleus ttactus solitarius (NTS).Methods C57BL mice (n=8) were used as animal model.Method of microinjection in the nucleus of NTS was adopted.After ten days,mice were killed and their brain tissue were fixed and sectioned.The expression levels of AT1 aR,ACE and ACE2 mRNA at both sides of NTS were examined by in situ hybridization.Based on compared t-test,the changing for mRNA expression was examined.Results After the expression of AT1aR mRNA was significantly inhibited (61.6%±6.8% ) by AT1aR-shRNA,it was associated with decreases in ACE2 mRNA expression from (1.05±0.12) μCi/mg to (0.74±0.09) μCi/mg (29.0%±14.5%,P<0.01) on the same side of the brainstem.ACE mRNA expression was consistent at both sides (0.50 μCi/mg±0.09 μCi/mg and 0.53 μCi/mg±0.08 μCi/mg),with insignificant difference (P>0.05).Condusions The gene silencing result showed that there were interactions between brainstem AT1aR and ACE2.ACE mRNA expression was not altered by RNA interference treatment at AT1aR.

  14. A CREB-Sirt1-Hes1 Circuitry Mediates Neural Stem Cell Response to Glucose Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Fusco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis plays increasingly recognized roles in brain homeostasis and repair and is profoundly affected by energy balance and nutrients. We found that the expression of Hes-1 (hairy and enhancer of split 1 is modulated in neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs by extracellular glucose through the coordinated action of CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein and Sirt-1 (Sirtuin 1, two cellular nutrient sensors. Excess glucose reduced CREB-activated Hes-1 expression and results in impaired cell proliferation. CREB-deficient NSCs expanded poorly in vitro and did not respond to glucose availability. Elevated glucose also promoted Sirt-1-dependent repression of the Hes-1 promoter. Conversely, in low glucose, CREB replaced Sirt-1 on the chromatin associated with the Hes-1 promoter enhancing Hes-1 expression and cell proliferation. Thus, the glucose-regulated antagonism between CREB and Sirt-1 for Hes-1 transcription participates in the metabolic regulation of neurogenesis.

  15. A CREB-Sirt1-Hes1 Circuitry Mediates Neural Stem Cell Response to Glucose Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Salvatore; Leone, Lucia; Barbati, Saviana Antonella; Samengo, Daniela; Piacentini, Roberto; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Toietta, Gabriele; Spinelli, Matteo; McBurney, Michael; Pani, Giovambattista; Grassi, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis plays increasingly recognized roles in brain homeostasis and repair and is profoundly affected by energy balance and nutrients. We found that the expression of Hes-1 (hairy and enhancer of split 1) is modulated in neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs) by extracellular glucose through the coordinated action of CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein) and Sirt-1 (Sirtuin 1), two cellular nutrient sensors. Excess glucose reduced CREB-activated Hes-1 expression and results in impaired cell proliferation. CREB-deficient NSCs expanded poorly in vitro and did not respond to glucose availability. Elevated glucose also promoted Sirt-1-dependent repression of the Hes-1 promoter. Conversely, in low glucose, CREB replaced Sirt-1 on the chromatin associated with the Hes-1 promoter enhancing Hes-1 expression and cell proliferation. Thus, the glucose-regulated antagonism between CREB and Sirt-1 for Hes-1 transcription participates in the metabolic regulation of neurogenesis. PMID:26804914

  16. Neonatal hearing screening of high-risk infants using automated auditory brainstem response: a retrospective analysis of referral rates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGurgan, I J

    2013-10-07

    The past decade has seen the widespread introduction of universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) programmes worldwide. Regrettably, such a programme is only now in the process of nationwide implementation in the Republic of Ireland and has been largely restricted to one screening modality for initial testing; namely transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of employing a different screening protocol which utilises an alternative initial test, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), on referral rates to specialist audiology services.

  17. Anesthesia mumps resulting in temporary facial nerve paralysis after the auditory brainstem implantation in a 3-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdek, Ali; Bayır, Ömer; Işık, Murat Eray; Tatar, Emel Çadallı; Saylam, Güleser; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    An acute transient sialadenitis of the major salivary glands in the early postoperative period is called 'anesthesia mumps'. It has been reported in different surgical procedures especially in neurosurgical procedures. Anesthesia mumps develops very fast after the extubation period but it usually regresses with no sequelae within a few hours. However, sometimes serious complication can occur such as respiratory distress. In this report, we present a 3-year-old girl with an anesthesia mumps and facial palsy occurring after successful auditory brainstem implantation and we discuss the cause and the management of this rare complication in this report.

  18. Brain Tumor Therapy-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing Brainstem Measured With Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To characterize therapy-induced changes in normal-appearing brainstems of childhood brain tumor patients by serial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 109 DTI studies from 20 brain tumor patients, aged 4 to 23 years, with normal-appearing brainstems included in the treatment fields. Those with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (n = 10) received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (23.4–39.6 Gy) and a cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy to the primary site, followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy. Patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 10) received erlotinib during and after irradiation (54–59.4 Gy). Parametric maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were computed and spatially registered to three-dimensional radiation dose data. Volumes of interest included corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and the pons. Serving as an age-related benchmark for comparison, 37 DTI studies from 20 healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 25 years, were included in the analysis. Results: The median DTI follow-up time was 3.5 years (range, 1.6–5.0 years). The median mean dose to the pons was 56 Gy (range, 7–59 Gy). Three patterns were seen in longitudinal FA and apparent diffusion coefficient changes: (1) a stable or normal developing time trend, (2) initial deviation from normal with subsequent recovery, and (3) progressive deviation without evidence of complete recovery. The maximal decline in FA often occurred 1.5 to 3.5 years after the start of radiation therapy. A full recovery time trend could be observed within 4 years. Patients with incomplete recovery often had a larger decline in FA within the first year. Radiation dose alone did not predict long-term recovery patterns. Conclusions: Variations existed among individual patients after therapy in longitudinal evolution of brainstem white matter injury and recovery. Early response

  19. Cochlear Responses and Auditory Brainstem Response Functions in Adults with Auditory Neuropathy/ Dys-Synchrony and Individuals with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Physiologic measures of cochlear and auditory nerve function may be of assis¬tance in distinguishing between hearing disorders due primarily to auditory nerve impairment from those due primarily to cochlear hair cells dysfunction. The goal of present study was to measure of co-chlear responses (otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response in some adults with auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony and subjects with normal hearing. Materials and Methods: Patients were 16 adults (32 ears in age range of 14-30 years with auditory neu¬ropathy/ dys-synchrony and 16 individuals in age range of 16-30 years from both sexes. The results of transient otoacoustic emissions, cochlear microphonics and auditory brainstem response measures were compared in both groups and the effects of age, sex, ear and degree of hearing loss were studied. Results: The pure-tone average was 48.1 dB HL in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony group and the fre¬quency of low tone loss and flat audiograms were higher among other audiogram's shapes. Transient oto¬acoustic emissions were shown in all auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony people except two cases and its average was near in both studied groups. The latency and amplitude of the biggest reversed co-chlear microphonics response were higher in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients than control peo¬ple significantly. The correlation between cochlear microphonics amplitude and degree of hearing loss was not significant, and age had significant effect in some cochlear microphonics measures. Audi-tory brainstem response had no response in auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony patients even with low stim¬uli rates. Conclusion: In adults with speech understanding worsen than predicted from the degree of hearing loss that suspect to auditory neuropathy/ dys-synchrony, the frequency of low tone loss and flat audiograms are higher. Usually auditory brainstem response is absent in

  20. Determining the control circuitry of redox metabolism at the genome-scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Federowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining how facultative anaerobic organisms sense and direct cellular responses to electron acceptor availability has been a subject of intense study. However, even in the model organism Escherichia coli, established mechanisms only explain a small fraction of the hundreds of genes that are regulated during electron acceptor shifts. Here we propose a qualitative model that accounts for the full breadth of regulated genes by detailing how two global transcription factors (TFs, ArcA and Fnr of E. coli, sense key metabolic redox ratios and act on a genome-wide basis to regulate anabolic, catabolic, and energy generation pathways. We first fill gaps in our knowledge of this transcriptional regulatory network by carrying out ChIP-chip and gene expression experiments to identify 463 regulatory events. We then interfaced this reconstructed regulatory network with a highly curated genome-scale metabolic model to show that ArcA and Fnr regulate >80% of total metabolic flux and 96% of differential gene expression across fermentative and nitrate respiratory conditions. Based on the data, we propose a feedforward with feedback trim regulatory scheme, given the extensive repression of catabolic genes by ArcA and extensive activation of chemiosmotic genes by Fnr. We further corroborated this regulatory scheme by showing a 0.71 r(2 (p<1e-6 correlation between changes in metabolic flux and changes in regulatory activity across fermentative and nitrate respiratory conditions. Finally, we are able to relate the proposed model to a wealth of previously generated data by contextualizing the existing transcriptional regulatory network.

  1. Function and evolution of the long noncoding RNA circuitry orchestrating X-chromosome inactivation in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Giulia; Rougeulle, Claire

    2016-09-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a chromosome-wide regulatory process that ensures dosage compensation for X-linked genes in Theria. XCI is established during early embryogenesis and is developmentally regulated. Different XCI strategies exist in mammalian infraclasses and the regulation of this process varies also among closely related species. In Eutheria, initiation of XCI is orchestrated by a cis-acting locus, the X-inactivation center (Xic), which is particularly enriched in genes producing long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Among these, Xist generates a master transcript that coats and propagates along the future inactive X-chromosome in cis, establishing X-chromosome wide transcriptional repression through interaction with several protein partners. Other lncRNAs also participate to the regulation of X-inactivation but the extent to which their function has been maintained in evolution is still poorly understood. In Metatheria, Xist is not conserved, but another, evolutionary independent lncRNA with similar properties, Rsx, has been identified, suggesting that lncRNA-mediated XCI represents an evolutionary advantage. Here, we review current knowledge on the interplay of X chromosome-encoded lncRNAs in ensuring proper establishment and maintenance of chromosome-wide silencing, and discuss the evolutionary implications of the emergence of species-specific lncRNAs in the control of XCI within Theria. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:702-722. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1359 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27173581

  2. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christiana; Hadjimichael; Konstantina; Chanoumidou; Natalia; Papadopoulou; Panagiota; Arampatzi; Joseph; Papamatheakis; Androniki; Kretsovali

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells(ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal trans-ducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors(cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research frame-work for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we highlight current results on biomarkers, gene signatures, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators that are common in embryonic and cancer stem cells. We discuss their role in determining the cell phenotype and finally, their potential use to design next generation biological and pharmaceutical approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer therapies.

  3. CyberKnife radiosurgery for brainstem metastases: Management and outcomes and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Szu-Hao; Murovic, Judith; Wallach, Jonathan; Cui, Guosheng; Soltys, Scott G; Gibbs, Iris C; Chang, Steven D

    2016-03-01

    To our knowledge this paper is the first to use recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) for brainstem metastasis (BSM) patient outcomes, after CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS; Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA); nine similar previous publications used mainly Gamma Knife radiosurgery (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). Retrospective chart reviews from 2006-2013 of 949 CKRS-treated brain metastasis patients showed 54 BSM patients (5.7%): 35 RPA Class II (65%) and 19 Class III (35%). There were 30 women (56%) and 24 men (44%). The median age was 59 years (range 36-80) and median follow-up was 5 months (range 1-52). Twenty-three patients (43%) had lung carcinoma BSM and 12 (22%) had breast cancer BSM. Fifty-four RPA Class II and III BSM patients had a median overall survival (OS) of 5 months, and for each Class 8 and 2 months, respectively. Of 36 RPA Class II and III patients with available symptoms (n=31) and findings (n=33), improvement/stability occurred in the majority for symptoms (86%) and findings (92%). Of 35 cases, 28 (80%) achieved BSM local control (LC); 13/14 with breast histology (93%) and 10/13 with lung histology (77%). All six RPA Class II and III patients with controlled extracranial systemic disease (ESD) experienced LC. Median tumor volume was 0.14 cm(3); of 34 RPA Class II and III cases, 26 LC patients had a 0,13 cm(3) median tumor volume while it was 0.27 cm(3) in the eight local failures. Of 35 cases, single session equivalent dosages less than the median (n=13), at the 17.9 Gy median (n=5) and greater than the median (n=17) had BSM LC in 10 (77%), four (80%) and 14 cases (82%), respectively. Univariate analysis showed Karnofsky Performance Score, RPA Class and ESD-control predicted OS. CKRS is useful for RPA Class II and III BSM patients with effective clinical and local BSM control.

  4. Respiratory activity in the facial nucleus in an in vitro brainstem of tadpole, Rana catesbeiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao G-S; Kubin, L; Galante, R J; Fishman, A P; Pack, A I

    1996-04-15

    1. In studies of the central neural control of breathing, little advantage has been taken of comparative approaches. We have developed an in vitro brainstem preparation using larval Rana catesbeiana which generates two rhythmic neural activities characteristic of lung and gill ventilation. Based on the pattern of the facial (VII) nerve activity both lung and gill rhythm-related respiratory cycles were divided into three distinct phases. The purpose of this study was to characterize and classify membrane potential trajectories of respiratory motoneurons in the VII nucleus at intermediate stages (XII-XVII) of development. 2. Seventy-five respiratory-modulated neurons were recorded intracellularly within the facial motor nucleus region. Their resting membrane potential was between -40 and -80 mV. Sixty of them were identified as VII motoneurons and fifteen were non-antidromically activated. Membrane potentials of fifty-six of the seventy-five neurons were modulated with both lung (5-27 mV) and gill rhythms (3-15 mV) and the remaining nineteen neurons had only a modulation with lung rhythmicity (6-23 mV). No cells with gill modulation alone were observed. 3. All of the cells modulated with lung rhythmicity had only phase-bound depolarizing or hyperpolarizing membrane potential swings which could be categorized into four distinct patterns. In contrast, of the fifty-six cells modulated with gill rhythmicity, thirty-two were phasically depolarized during distinct phases of the gill cycle (four patterns were distinguished), whereas the remaining twenty-four were phase spanning with two distinct patterns. The magnitudes of lung and gill modulations were proportionally related to each other in the cells modulated with both rhythms. 4. In all sixteen neurons studied, a reduction or a reversal of phasic inhibitory inputs during a portion of the lung or gill respiratory cycle was observed following a negative current or chloride ion (Cl-) injection. The phasic membrane

  5. Hippocampal - brainstem connectivity associated with vagal modulation after an intense exercise intervention in healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Juergen Bär

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractRegular physical exercise leads increased vagal modulation of the cardiovascular system. A combination of peripheral and central processes has been proposed to underlie this adaptation. However, specific changes in the central autonomic network have not been described in human in more detail. We hypothesized that the anterior hippocampus known to be influenced by regular physical activity might be involved in the development of increased vagal modulation after a 6 weeks high intensity intervention in young healthy men (exercise group: n=17, control group: n=17. In addition to the determination of physical capacity before and after the intervention, we used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and synchronic heart rate variability assessment.We detected a significant increase of the power output at the anaerobic threshold of 11.4% (p<0.001, the maximum power output Pmax of 11.2% (p<0.001, and VO2max adjusted for body weight of 4.7% (p<0.001 in the exercise group (EG. Comparing baseline (T0 and post-exercise (T1 values of parasympathetic modulation of the exercise group, we observed a trend for a decrease in heart rate (p<0.06 and a significant increase of vagal modulation as indicated by RMSSD (p<0.026 during resting state. In the whole brain analysis, we found that the connectivity pattern of the right anterior hippocampus (aHC was specifically altered to the ventromedial anterior cortex, the dorsal striatum and to the dorsal vagal complex (DVC in the brainstem. Moreover, we only observed a highly significant negative correlation between increased RMSSD after exercise and decreased functional connectivity from the right aHC to DVC (r=-0.69, p=0.003. This indicates that increased vagal modulation was associated with functional connectivity between aHC and the dorsal vagal complex.In conclusion, our findings suggest that exercise associated changes in anterior hippocampal function might be involved in increased vagal

  6. Brainstem glycinergic neurons and their activation during active (rapid eye movement) sleep in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, F R; Sampogna, S; Rampon, C; Luppi, P H; Chase, M H

    2006-09-29

    It is well established that, during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, somatic motoneurons are subjected to a barrage of inhibitory synaptic potentials that are mediated by glycine. However, the source of this inhibition, which is crucial for the maintenance and preservation of REM sleep, has not been identified. Consequently, the present study was undertaken to determine in cats the location of the glycinergic neurons, that are activated during active sleep, and are responsible for the postsynaptic inhibition of motoneurons that occurs during this state. For this purpose, a pharmacologically-induced state of active sleep (AS-carbachol) was employed. Antibodies against glycine-conjugated proteins were used to identify glycinergic neurons and immunocytochemical techniques to label the Fos protein were employed to identify activated neurons. Two distinct populations of glycinergic neurons that expressed c-fos were distinguished. One population was situated within the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) and nucleus magnocellularis (Mc) in the rostro-ventral medulla; this group of neurons extended caudally to the ventral portion of the nucleus paramedianus reticularis (nPR). Forty percent of the glycinergic neurons in the NRGc and Mc and 25% in the nPR expressed c-fos during AS-carbachol. A second population was located in the caudal medulla adjacent to the nucleus ambiguus (nAmb), wherein 40% of the glycinergic cells expressed c-fos during AS-carbachol. Neither population of glycinergic cells expressed c-fos during quiet wakefulness or quiet (non-rapid eye movement) sleep. We suggest that the population of glycinergic neurons in the NRGc, Mc, and nPR participates in the inhibition of somatic brainstem motoneurons during active sleep. These neurons may also be responsible for the inhibition of sensory and other processes during this state. It is likely that the group of glycinergic neurons adjacent to the nucleus ambiguus (nAmb) is responsible for the active

  7. The effect of lead on brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹朝春; 赵正言; 唐兰芳; 陈志敏; 杜立中

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether lead affects brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) in low-to-moderate lead exposed children. Methods BAEPs were recorded from 114 asymptomatic children aged 1-6 years. Average values were calculated for peak latency (PL) and amplitude (Amp). Whole blood lead (PbB) levels were assessed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Based on their PbB levels, subjects were divided into low lead (PbB<100 μg/L) and high lead subgroups (PbB ≥100 μg/L). Results The PbB levels of the 114 subjects ranged from 32.0 to 380.0 μg/L in a positively skewed distribution. The median of PbB levels was 90.0 μg/L while the arithmetic average was 88.0 μg/L. Of the subjects, 43.0% (49/114) had levels equal to or greater than 100 μg/L. Bilateral PLs Ⅰ, Ⅴ, and Ⅲ of the left ear in the high lead subgroup were significantly longer than those in the low lead subgroup (P<0.05). A positive correlation was found between PbB levels and bilateral PLs Ⅰ, Ⅴ and Ⅲ of the left ear (P<0.05), after controlling for age and gender as confounding factors. A significant and positive correlation between PbB levels and PL Ⅰ of the left ear, even when PbB levels were lower than 100 μg/L, in the low subgroup (r=0.295, P=0.019) was also found.Conclusions Lead poisoning in children younger than 6 years old is a very serious problem to which close attention should be paid. The indications that lead prolongs partial PLs may imply that lead, even at PbB levels lower than 100 μg/L, impairs both the peripheral and the central portions of the auditory system. BAEPs may be a sensitive detector of subclinical lead exposure effects on the nervous system in children.

  8. Graded and discontinuous EphA-ephrinB expression patterns in the developing auditory brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Matthew M; Harris, J Aaron; Brubaker, Donald Q; Klotz, Caitlyn A; Gabriele, Mark L

    2016-05-01

    Eph-ephrin interactions guide topographic mapping and pattern formation in a variety of systems. In contrast to other sensory pathways, their precise role in the assembly of central auditory circuits remains poorly understood. The auditory midbrain, or inferior colliculus (IC) is an intriguing structure for exploring guidance of patterned projections as adjacent subdivisions exhibit distinct organizational features. The central nucleus of the IC (CNIC) and deep aspects of its neighboring lateral cortex (LCIC, Layer 3) are tonotopically-organized and receive layered inputs from primarily downstream auditory sources. While less is known about more superficial aspects of the LCIC, its inputs are multimodal, lack a clear tonotopic order, and appear discontinuous, terminating in modular, patch/matrix-like distributions. Here we utilize X-Gal staining approaches in lacZ mutant mice (ephrin-B2, -B3, and EphA4) to reveal EphA-ephrinB expression patterns in the nascent IC during the period of projection shaping that precedes hearing onset. We also report early postnatal protein expression in the cochlear nuclei, the superior olivary complex, the nuclei of the lateral lemniscus, and relevant midline structures. Continuous ephrin-B2 and EphA4 expression gradients exist along frequency axes of the CNIC and LCIC Layer 3. In contrast, more superficial LCIC localization is not graded, but confined to a series of discrete ephrin-B2 and EphA4-positive Layer 2 modules. While heavily expressed in the midline, much of the auditory brainstem is devoid of ephrin-B3, including the CNIC, LCIC Layer 2 modular fields, the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL), as well as much of the superior olivary complex and cochlear nuclei. Ephrin-B3 LCIC expression appears complementary to that of ephrin-B2 and EphA4, with protein most concentrated in presumptive extramodular zones. Described tonotopic gradients and seemingly complementary modular/extramodular patterns suggest Eph

  9. Atlas-based automatic segmentation of MR images: Validation study on the brainstem in radiotherapy context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Brain tumor radiotherapy requires the volume measurements and the localization of several individual brain structures. Any tool that can assist the physician to perform the delineation would then be of great help. Among segmentation methods, those that are atlas-based are appealing because they are able to segment several structures simultaneously, while preserving the anatomy topology. This study aims to evaluate such a method in a clinical context. Methods and materials: The brain atlas is made of two three-dimensional (3D) volumes: the first is an artificial 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); the second consists of the segmented structures in this artificial MRI. The elastic registration of the artificial 3D MRI against a patient 3D MRI dataset yields an elastic transformation that can be applied to the labeled image. The elastic transformation is obtained by minimizing the sum of the square differences of the image intensities and derived from the optical flow principle. This automatic delineation (AD) enables the mapping of the segmented structures onto the patient MRI. Parameters of the AD have been optimized on a set of 20 patients. Results are obtained on a series of 6 patients' MRI. A comprehensive validation of the AD has been conducted on performance of atlas-based segmentation in a clinical context with volume, position, sensitivity, and specificity that are compared by a panel of seven experimented physicians for the brain tumor treatments. Results: Expert interobserver volume variability ranged from 16.70 cm3 to 41.26 cm3. For patients, the ratio of minimal to maximal volume ranged from 48% to 70%. Median volume varied from 19.47 cm3 to 27.66 cm3 and volume of the brainstem calculated by AD varied from 17.75 cm3 to 24.54 cm3. Medians of experts ranged, respectively, for sensitivity and specificity, from 0.75 to 0.98 and from 0.85 to 0.99. Median of AD were, respectively, 0.77 and 0.97. Mean of experts ranged, respectively, from 0.78 to 0

  10. Electroencephalogram and brainstem auditory evoked potential in 539 patients with central coordination disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijia Zhang; Hua Yan; Paoqiu Wang; Jihong Hu; Hongtao Zhou; Rong Qin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroencephalogram (EEG) and brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) are objective non-invasive means of measuring brain electrophysiology.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the value of EEG and BAEP in early diagnosis, treatment and prognostic evaluation of central coordination disorder.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This case analysis study was performed at the Rehabilitation Center of Hunan Children's Hospital from January 2002 to January 2006.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 593 patients with severe central coordination disorder, comprising 455 boys and 138 girls, aged 1--6 months were enrolled for this study.METHODS: EEG was monitored using electroencephalography. BAEP was recorded using a Keypoint electromyogram device. Intelligence was tested by professionals using the Gesell scale.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) The rate of abnormal EEG and BAEP, (2) correlation of abnormalities of EEG and BAEP with associated injuries, (3) correlation of abnormalities of EEG and BAEP with high risk factors.RESULTS: The rate of abnormal EEG was 68.6% (407/593 patients), and was increased in patients who also had mental retardation (P < 0.05). The rate of abnormal BAEP was 21.4% (127/593 patients). These 127 patients included 67 patients (52.8%) with peripheral auditory damage and 60 patients (47.2%) with central and mixed auditory damage. The rate of abnormal BAEP was significantly increased in patients who also had mental retardation (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that asphyxia (P < 0.05), jaundice,preterm delivery, low birth weight and the umbilical cord around the neck were closely correlated with abnormal EEG in patients with central coordination disorder. Intracranial hemorrhage, jaundice (P < 0.05),low birth weight and intrauterine infection (P < 0.05) were closely correlated with abnormal BAEP in patients with central coordination disorder.CONCLUSION: Central coordination disorder is often associated with abnormal EEG and BAEP. The rate of EEG or BAEP abnormality

  11. Programmable scan/read circuitry for charge coupled device imaging detectors. [spcecraft attitude control and star trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, P. M.; Smilowitz, K.

    1984-01-01

    A circuit for scanning and outputting the induced charges in a solid state charge coupled device (CCD) image detector is disclosed in an image detection system for use in a spacecraft attitude control system. The image detection system includes timing control circuitry for selectively controlling the output of the CCD detector so that video outputs are provided only with respect to induced charges corresponding to predetermined sensing element lines of the CCD detector. The timing control circuit and the analog to digital converter are controlled by a programmed microprocessor which defines the video outputs to be converted and further controls the timing control circuit so that no video outputs are provided during the delay associated with analog to digital conversion.

  12. Our first decade of experience in deep brain stimulation of the brainstem: elucidating the mechanism of action of stimulation of the ventrolateral pontine tegmentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Paolo; Vilela Filho, Osvaldo; Viselli, Fabio; Insola, Angelo; Sposato, Stefano; Vitale, Flora; Scarnati, Eugenio

    2016-07-01

    The region of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) has been proposed as a novel target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat levodopa resistant symptoms in motor disorders. Recently, the anatomical organization of the brainstem has been revised and four new distinct structures have been represented in the ventrolateral pontine tegmentum area in which the PPTg was previously identified. Given this anatomical reassessment, and considering the increasing of our experience, in this paper we revisit the value of DBS applied to that area. The reappraisal of clinical outcomes in the light of this revisitation may also help to understand the consequences of DBS applied to structures located in the ventrolateral pontine tegmentum, apart from the PPTg. The implantation of 39 leads in 32 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD, 27 patients) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, four patients) allowed us to reach two major conclusions. The first is that the results of the advancement of our technique in brainstem DBS matches the revision of brainstem anatomy. The second is that anatomical and functional aspects of our findings may help to explain how DBS acts when applied in the brainstem and to identify the differences when it is applied either in the brainstem or in the subthalamic nucleus. Finally, in this paper we discuss how the loss of neurons in brainstem nuclei occurring in both PD and PSP, the results of intraoperative recording of somatosensory evoked potentials, and the improvement of postural control during DBS point toward the potential role of ascending sensory pathways and/or other structures in mediating the effects of DBS applied in the ventrolateral pontine tegmentum region. PMID:26865208

  13. Characteristics of brainstem auditory evoked potential of neonates with mild or moderate hyperbilirubinemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) has been widely used to evaluate the functional integrity and development of injured auditory system and brain, especially to objectively evaluate the function of auditory system and brain stem of very young babies, such as neonates and sick babies.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of BAEP of neonates with hyperbilirubinemia, and to investigate the relationship of bilirubin concentration and BAEP.DESIGN: An observation experiment.SETTING: Department of Pediatrics, the 309 Clinical Division, General Hospital of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-eight neonates with mild or moderate hyperbilirubinemia exhibiting jaundice within 24 hours after born, who received the treatment in the Department of Pediatrics, the 309 Clinical Division, General Hospital of Chinese PLA between January 2004 and May 2007, were recruited in this study. The involved neonates, 31 boys and 27 girls, had gestational age of 37 to 46 weeks. They had no history of birth asphyxia, and were scored 8 to 10 points when born. Written informed consents of examination and treatment were obtained from the guardians of the neonates. This study was approved by the Hospital Ethics Committee. According to serum total bilirubin value, the neonates were assigned into 3 groups: low-concentration bilirubin group (n =16), moderate-concentration bilirubin group (n =27) and high-concentration bilirubin group (n =15). According to mean daily bilirubin increase, the subjects were sub-assigned into bilirubin rapid increase group (n =39) and bilirubin slow increase group (n =19).METHODS: After admission, all the neonates received drug treatment. Meanwhile, their 116 ears were examined with a myoelectricity evoked potential equipment (KEYPOINT) in latency, wave duration,amplitude and wave shape differentiation of each wave of BAEP. BAEP abnormal type was observed and abnormal rate of BAEP was calculated.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Abnormal rate and abnormal type of BAEP

  14. Topological characteristics of brainstem lesions in clinically definite and clinically probable cases of multiple sclerosis: An MRI-study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disseminated lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres and confluent lesions at the borders of the lateral ventricles as seen on MRI are both considered acceptable paraclinical evidence for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Similar changes are, however, also found in vascular diseases of the brain. We therefore aimed at identifying those additional traits in the infratentorial region, which in our experience are not frequently found in cerebrovascular pathology. We evaluated MR brain scans of 68 patients and found pontine lesions in 71% of cases with a clinically definite diagnosis (17 out of 24) and in 33% of cases with a probable diagnosis (14 out of 43). Lesions in the medulla oblongata were present in 50% and 16%, respectively, and in the midbrain in 25% and 7%, respectively. With rare exceptions all brainstem lesions were contiguous with the cisternal or ventricular cerebrospinal fluid spaces. In keeping with post-mortem reports the morphological spectrum ranged from large confluent patches to solitary, well delineated paramedian lesions or discrete linings of the cerebrospinal fluid border zones and were most clearly depicted from horizontal and sagittal T2 weighted SE-sequences. If there is a predilection for the outer or inner surfaces of the brainstem, such lesions can be considered an additional typical feature of multiple sclerosis and can be more reliably weighted as paraclinical evidence for a definite diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Altered GABAA receptor expression in brainstem nuclei and SUDEP in Gabrg2(+/Q390X) mice associated with epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Geqing; P Pourali, Sarah; Warner, Timothy A; Zhang, Chun-Qing; L Macdonald, Robert; Kang, Jing-Qiong

    2016-07-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause for death in individuals with epilepsy. The frequency of SUDEP correlates with the severity of epilepsies and lack of response to antiepileptic drug treatment, but the underlying mechanisms of SUDEP have not been elucidated fully. GABRG2(Q390X) is a mutation associated with the epileptic encephalopathy Dravet syndrome (DS) and with genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) in patients. The Gabrg2(+/Q390X) knockin (KI) mouse phenocopies the major features of DS and GEFS+ and has SUDEP throughout life. The Gabrg2(+/-) knockout (KO) mouse is associated with infrequent absence seizures and represents a model of mild absence epilepsy syndrome without increased mortality. To explore the basis for SUDEP in DS and GEFS+, we compared mutant γ2 subunit and wild-type α1 and β2/3 subunit expression in mice in brainstem nuclei associated with respiratory function including the solitary tract, pre-Botzinger complex and Kolliker-Fuse nuclei. We found that synaptic GABAA receptors were reduced while intracellular nonfunctional γ2(Q390X) subunits were increased in the heterozygous DS and GEFS+ KI mice, but not in the heterozygous absence epilepsy KO mice. Given the critical role of these nuclei in cardiorespiratory function, it is likely the impaired GABAergic transmission and neuronal dysfunction in these brainstem nuclei are involved in the cardiorespiratory collapse in SUDEP. The study provides novel mechanistic insights into cardiorespiratory failure of SUDEP. PMID:27131289

  16. Brainstem auditory evoked response characteristics in normal-hearing subjects with chronic tinnitus and in non-tinnitus group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadman Nemati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: While most of the people with tinnitus have some degrees of hearing impairment, a small percent of patients admitted to ear, nose and throat clinics or hearing evaluation centers are those who complain of tinnitus despite having normal hearing thresholds. This study was performed to better understanding of the reasons of probable causes of tinnitus and to investigate possible changes in the auditory brainstem function in normal-hearing patients with chronic tinnitus.Methods: In this comparative cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study, 52 ears (26 with and 26 without tinnitus were examined. Components of the auditory brainstem response (ABR including wave latencies and wave amplitudes were determined in the two groups and analyzed using appropriate statistical methods.Results: The mean differences between the absolute latencies of waves I, III and V was less than 0.1 ms between the two groups that was not statistically significant. Also, the interpeak latency values of waves I-III, III-V and I-V in both groups had no significant difference. Only, the V/I amplitude ratio in the tinnitus group was significantly higher (p=0.04.Conclusion: The changes observed in amplitude of waves, especially in the latter ones, can be considered as an indication of plastic changes in neuronal activity and its possible role in generation of tinnitus in normal-hearing patients.

  17. Effects of 12 months continuous positive airway pressure on sympathetic activity related brainstem function and structure in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Anthony Henderson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA during normoxic daytime wakefulness. Increased MSNA is a precursor to hypertension and elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms underlying the high MSNA in OSA are not well understood. In this study we used concurrent microneurography and magnetic resonance imaging to explore MSNA-related brainstem activity changes and anatomical changes in 15 control and 15 subjects with OSA prior to and following 6 and 12 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment. We found that 6 and 12 months of CPAP treatment significantly reduced the elevated resting MSNA in individuals with OSA. Furthermore, this MSNA reduction was associated with restoration of MSNA-related activity and structural changes in the medullary raphe, rostral ventrolateral medulla, dorsolateral pons and ventral midbrain. This restoration occurred after 6 months of CPAP treatment and was maintained following 12 months CPAP. These findings show that continual CPAP treatment is an effective long-term treatment for elevated MNSA likely due to its effects on restoring brainstem structure and function.

  18. Cochlear and brainstem audiologic findings in normal hearing tinnitus subjects in comparison with non-tinnitus control group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadman Nemati

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While most tinnitus cases have some degree of hearing impairment, a small percent of the patients admitted to Ear, Nose and Throat Clinics or Hearing Evaluation Centers are those who complain of tinnitus despite having normal hearing thresholds. Present study was performed in order to better understanding of the probable causes of tinnitus and to investigate possible changes in the cochlear and auditory brainstem function in normal hearing patients with chronic tinnitus. Altogether, 63 ears (31 ears with tinnitus and 32 ears without tinnitus were examined. The prevalence of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and characteristics of the auditory brainstem response components including wave latencies and wave amplitudes was determined in the two groups and analyzed with appropriate statistical methods. There was no difference between the prevalence of transient evoked emissions in the two groups. The mean difference between absolute latencies of waves I, III and V was less than 0.1 ms between the two groups that were not statistically significant. Also, the interpeak latency values of I-III, III-V and I-V in both groups had no significant difference. Only the V/I amplitude ratio in the tinnitus group was significantly larger than the other group (p =0.04. The changes observed in amplitude of waves, especially in the later ones, can be considered as an Audiologic finding in normal hearing tinnitus subjects and its possible role in generation of tinnitus in these patients must be investigated.

  19. Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, M. E.; Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, K.;

    2012-01-01

    between body mass index and the 5-HT4R density bilaterally in the two reward ‘hot spots’ nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum, and additionally in the left hippocampal region and orbitofrontal cortex.These findings suggest that the 5-HT4R is critically involved in reward circuits that regulate people......The neurobiology underlying obesity is not fully understood. The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is established as a satiety-generating signal, but its rewarding role in feeding is less well elucidated. From animal experiments there is now evidence that the 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) is involved...... in food intake, and that pharmacological or genetic manipulation of the receptor in reward-related brain areas alters food intake.Here, we used positron emission tomography in humans to examine the association between cerebral 5-HT4Rs and common obesity.We found in humans a strong positive association...

  20. Risperidone and Divalproex Differentially Engage the Fronto-Striato-Temporal Circuitry in Pediatric Mania: A Pharmacological Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, Mani N.; Passarotti, Alessandra M.; Fitzgerald, Jacklynn M.; Wegbreit, Ezra; Sweeney, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined the impact of risperidone and divalproex on affective and working memory circuitry in patients with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). Method: This was a six-week, double-blind, randomized trial of risperidone plus placebo versus divalproex plus placebo for patients with mania (n = 21; 13.6 [plus or minus] 2.5…

  1. Multiple types of cerebellar target neurons and their circuitry in the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Minyoung; Moghadam, Setareh H; Sekirnjak, Chris; Bagnall, Martha W; Kolkman, Kristine E; Jacobs, Richard; Faulstich, Michael; du Lac, Sascha

    2011-07-27

    The cerebellum influences behavior and cognition exclusively via Purkinje cell synapses onto neurons in the deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. In contrast with the rich information available about the organization of the cerebellar cortex and its synaptic inputs, relatively little is known about microcircuitry postsynaptic to Purkinje cells. Here we examined the cell types and microcircuits through which Purkinje cells influence an oculomotor behavior controlled by the cerebellum, the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, which involves only two eye muscles. Using a combination of anatomical tracing and electrophysiological recordings in transgenic mouse lines, we identified several classes of neurons in the medial vestibular nucleus that receive Purkinje cell synapses from the cerebellar flocculus. Glycinergic and glutamatergic flocculus target neurons (FTNs) with somata densely surrounded by Purkinje cell terminals projected axons to the ipsilateral abducens and oculomotor nuclei, respectively. Of three additional types of FTNs that were sparsely innervated by Purkinje cells, glutamatergic and glycinergic neurons projected to the contralateral and ipsilateral abducens, respectively, and GABAergic neurons projected to contralateral vestibular nuclei. Densely innervated FTNs had high spontaneous firing rates and pronounced postinhibitory rebound firing, and were physiologically homogeneous, whereas the intrinsic excitability of sparsely innervated FTNs varied widely. Heterogeneity in the molecular expression, physiological properties, and postsynaptic targets of FTNs implies that Purkinje cell activity influences the neural control of eye movements in several distinct ways. These results indicate that the cerebellum regulates a simple reflex behavior via at least five different cell types that are postsynaptic to Purkinje cells.

  2. Sex differences in the neurobiology of fear conditioning and extinction: a preliminary fMRI study of shared sex differences with stress-arousal circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Lebron-Milad Kelimer; Abbs Brandon; Milad Mohammed R; Linnman Clas; Rougemount-Bücking Ansgar; Zeidan Mohammed A; Holt Daphne J; Goldstein Jill M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and brain-stem subregions are implicated in fear conditioning and extinction, and are brain regions known to be sexually dimorphic. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate sex differences in brain activity in these regions during fear conditioning and extinction. Methods Subjects were 12 healthy men comparable to 12 healthy women who underwent a 2-day experiment in a 3 T MR scanner. Fear...

  3. An optimized method for measuring hypocretin-1 peptide in the mouse brain reveals differential circadian regulation of hypocretin-1 levels rostral and caudal to the hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justinussen, Jessica; Holm, A; Kornum, B R

    2015-01-01

    as does prepro-hypocretin mRNA in the hypothalamus. However, in midbrain and brainstem tissue caudal to the hypothalamus, there was less circadian fluctuation and a tendency for higher levels during the light phase. These data suggest that regulation of the hypocretin system differs between brain areas....

  4. Spontaneous and artificial lesions of magnocellular reticular formation of brainstem deteriorate avoidance learning in senescence-accelerated mouse SAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, H; Akiguchi, I; Ohta, A; Yagi, N; Hosokawa, M; Takeda, T

    1998-04-27

    The role of the magnocellular reticular formation (MGRF) of the brainstem on learning and memory was examined in memory-deficient mice with spontaneous spongy degeneration in the brainstem (senescence-accelerated mouse, SAMP8) and control mice (accelerated-senescence resistant mouse, SAMR 1). SAMP8 showed spontaneous age-related impairment of learning and memory, as determined by passive and active avoidance responses. The deficits of learning and memory function in passive avoidance performances began at two months of age and increased with ageing. In the brains of SAMP8 at one month of age and older, spongy degeneration was mainly observed in the brainstem, while no vacuoles were evident in SAMR1 control (normal ageing mouse) brains in the age range tested (up to 12 months). The vacuolization in SAMP8 was marked in the MGRF, especially in the dorsomedial MGRF. Quantitative analysis of the vacuolization showed that the total area and number of vacuoles in the MGRF increased with age, and they were affected by the degree of deficits in learning and memory. The latency 24 h after footshock in passive avoidance tests decreased with the increase in total area and number of vacuoles in MGRF. The number of shocks in active avoidance tests increased with the increase in total number and area of vacuoles. Thus, learning and memory ability in passive and active avoidance responses deteriorated with enlargement in the vacuolated area in MGRF, and it was assumed that MGRF (especially, the dorsomedial part) possesses functions related to learning and memory. To confirm this notion, behavior and memory tests (passive avoidance and active avoidance tests, open field tests and shock sensitivity measurements) were carried out in SAMR1 mice, whose bilateral dorsomedial MGRF was destroyed electrolytically (MGRF-lesioned mice). The MGRF-lesioned mice showed no difference from sham mice in sensory threshold or open field activity; however, there was severe deterioration in passive

  5. Leukoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation (LBSL): Assessment of the involved white matter tracts by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, Hassan [Department of Radiology, Benha University (Egypt); Wafaie, Ahmed, E-mail: a_wafaie@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Cairo University (Egypt); Abdelfattah, Sherif [Department of Radiology, Cairo University (Egypt); Farid, Tarek [Pediatric Department, Egyptian National Research Center (Egypt)

    2014-01-15

    Background and purpose: Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation (LBSL) is a recently identified autosomal recessive disorder with early onset of symptoms and slowly progressive pyramidal, cerebellar and dorsal column dysfunction. LBSL is characterized by distinct white matter abnormalities and selective involvement of brainstem and spinal cord tracts. The purpose of this study is to assess the imaging features of the involved white matter tracts in cases of LBSL by MRI. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging features of the selectively involved white matter tracts in sixteen genetically proven cases of leukoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and elevated brain lactate (LBSL). All patients presented with slowly progressive cerebellar sensory ataxia with spasticity and dorsal column dysfunction. MRI of the brain and spine using 1.5 T machine and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) on the abnormal white matter were done to all patients. The MRI and MRS data sets were analyzed according to lesion location, extent, distribution and signal pattern as well as metabolite values and ratios in MRS. Laboratory examinations ruled out classic leukodystrophies. Results: In all cases, MRI showed high signal intensity in T2-weighted and FLAIR images within the cerebral subcortical, periventricular and deep white matter, posterior limbs of internal capsules, centrum semiovale, medulla oblongata, intraparenchymal trajectory of trigeminal nerves and deep cerebellar white matter. In the spine, the signal intensity of the dorsal column and lateral cortico-spinal tracts were altered in all patients. The subcortical U fibers, globi pallidi, thalami, midbrain and transverse pontine fibers were spared in all cases. In 11 cases (68.8%), the signal changes were inhomogeneous and confluent whereas in 5 patients (31.2%), the signal abnormalities were spotty. MRI also showed variable

  6. Cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia in a child with a partial monosomy for the short arm of chromosome 5 and partial trisomy for the short arm of chromosome 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, W F M; Hofstee, Y; Drejer, G F; Beverstock, G C; Oosterwijk, J C

    1995-01-01

    A child with hypoplasia of the cerebellum and brainstem in association with an unbalanced translocation, resulting in a partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 and a partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 10, is described. A balanced translocation was present in his mother and mate

  7. Age-dependent changes in the midsized neurofilament subunit in sensory-motor systems of the cat brainstem: an immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J H; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    2000-05-01

    This study documents age-related changes in the immunoreactivity of the medium-molecular weight subunit of neurofilaments in sensory and motor neurons in the brainstem of the cat. In old age, there was a clear decrease in immunoreactivity in the following brainstem sensory and motor nuclei: sensory trigeminal, gracile, cuneate, and facial motor. Only a few neuronal perikarya and dendrites were labeled in these nuclei in old cats; moreover, when present, the labeling was weak. In contrast, in adult cats, these nuclei contained intensely stained neuronal perikarya and dendrites. In other sensory and motor nuclei of the brainstem, there was an obvious age-related increase in the immunoreactivity of the medium-molecular weight subunit of neurofilaments in the perikarya. Despite different patterns of age-related alterations in immunoreactivity within perikarya and dendrites in distinct brainstem regions, most sensory and motor axons in old cats were smaller than those in adult cats. A decrease in the medium-molecular weight neurofilament subunit in the dendrites may be the basis for the dendritic atrophy that has been shown to occur in sensory nuclei in old animals. The decrease in axonal size is likely to be one of the causes of the decrease in axonal conduction velocity, in these neurons, that was reported in our previous studies. PMID:10819310

  8. Age-related hearing loss in dogs : Diagnosis with Brainstem-Evoked Response Audiometry and Treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Haar, G.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common cause of acquired hearing impairment in dogs. Diagnosis requires objective electrophysiological tests (brainstem evoked response audiometry [BERA]) evaluating the entire audible frequency range in dogs. In our laboratory a method was developed to de

  9. Regulation of Bacterial Virulence by Csr (Rsm) Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Potts, Anastasia H.; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M. M.; Romeo, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional...

  10. Age-related alterations in immunoreactivity of the midsized neurofilament subunit in the brainstem reticular formation of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J H; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1997-09-19

    In the present study, we compared the immunoreactivity of the midsized subunit of neurofilaments (NF-M) in the brainstem reticular formation of adult and old cats. There was a dramatic decrease in immunoreactivity in most reticular nuclei in the old cats. The most obvious reduction in these regions occurred in dendritic arborizations. In contrast, a small number of nuclei showed a slight increase in immunoreactivity in the aged animals. The age-related changes in immunoreactivity indicate that there is an alteration of NF-M content in reticular neurons and their processes in old age. Such changes in NF-M content may be the basis for the alterations in the morphology of reticular neurons in aged animals. PMID:9374292

  11. In-air hearing of a diving duck: A comparison of psychoacoustic and auditory brainstem response thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sara E; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Carr, Catherine E

    2016-05-01

    Auditory sensitivity was measured in a species of diving duck that is not often kept in captivity, the lesser scaup. Behavioral (psychoacoustics) and electrophysiological [the auditory brainstem response (ABR)] methods were used to measure in-air auditory sensitivity, and the resulting audiograms were compared. Both approaches yielded audiograms with similar U-shapes and regions of greatest sensitivity (2000-3000 Hz). However, ABR thresholds were higher than psychoacoustic thresholds at all frequencies. This difference was least at the highest frequency tested using both methods (5700 Hz) and greatest at 1000 Hz, where the ABR threshold was 26.8 dB higher than the behavioral measure of threshold. This difference is commonly reported in studies involving many different species. These results highlight the usefulness of each method, depending on the testing conditions and availability of the animals. PMID:27250191

  12. In vitro delineation of human brain-stem anatomy using a small resonator: correlation with macroscopic and histological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to investigate the potential of an experimental animal coil using a commercial MRI unit to delineate the anatomical structure of the human brain stem. Three formaldehyde-fixed brain-stem specimens were examined by MRI and sectioned perpendicular to their longitudinal axis. The images were compared with gross anatomy and myelin-stained histological sections. Fibre tracts and nuclei which were not evident on examination of the unstained specimen were readily identified by MRI. Due to its inherent grey/white matter contrast, MRI with a high-resolution coil delineates anatomical structures in a way comparable to the myelin-stained histological sections. However, pigmented structures, readily visible on examination of the unstained specimen were discernible on neither MRI nor on myelin-stained sections. The excellent anatomical detail and grey/white matter contrast provided by these images could make MRI a useful adjunct to the pathologist investigating brain disease. (orig.)

  13. Recording of electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses (E-ABR) with an integrated stimulus generator in Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmer, Andreas; Peter, Otto; Baumann, Uwe

    2008-08-30

    Electrical auditory brainstem responses (E-ABRs) of subjects with cochlear implants are used for monitoring the physiologic responses of early signal processing of the auditory system. Additionally, E-ABR measurements allow the diagnosis of retro-cochlear diseases. Therefore, E-ABR should be available in every cochlear implant center as a diagnostic tool. In this paper, we introduce a low-cost setup designed to perform an E-ABR as well as a conventional ABR for research purposes. The distributable form was developed with Matlab and the Matlab Compiler (The Mathworks Inc.). For the ABR, only a PC with a soundcard, conventional system headphones, and an EEG pre-amplifier are necessary; for E-ABR, in addition, an interface to the cochlea implant is required. For our purposes, we implemented an interface for the Combi 40+/Pulsar implant (MED-EL, Innsbruck).

  14. Neuromelanin, neurotransmitter status and brainstem location determine the differential vulnerability of catecholaminergic neurons to mitochondrial DNA deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elstner Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletions of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA accumulate to high levels in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc in normal aging and in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Human nigral neurons characteristically contain the pigment neuromelanin (NM, which is believed to alter the cellular redox-status. The impact of neuronal pigmentation, neurotransmitter status and brainstem location on the susceptibility to mtDNA damage remains unclear. We quantified mtDNA deletions (ΔmtDNA in single pigmented and non-pigmented catecholaminergic, as well as non-catecholaminergic neurons of the human SNc, the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the locus coeruleus (LC, using laser capture microdissection and single-cell real-time PCR. Results In healthy aged individuals, ΔmtDNA levels were highest in pigmented catecholaminergic neurons (25.2 ± 14.9%, followed by non-pigmented catecholamergic (18.0 ± 11.2% and non-catecholaminergic neurons (12.3 ± 12.3%; p Conclusions Catecholaminergic brainstem neurons are differentially susceptible to mtDNA damage. Pigmented dopaminergic neurons of the SNc show the highest ΔmtDNA levels, possibly explaining the exceptional vulnerability of the nigro-striatal system in PD and aging. Although loss of pigmented noradrenergic LC neurons also is an early feature of PD pathology, mtDNA levels are not elevated in this nucleus in healthy controls. Thus, ΔmtDNA are neither an inevitable consequence of catecholamine metabolism nor a universal explanation for the regional vulnerability seen in PD.

  15. Autopsy Findings of Brainstem in Head Trauma in Comparison with CT Scan Findings in Brain Trauma Ward in Tabriz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeri Bavil Moslem

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is now the primary diagnostic method for head trauma because of its ability to demonstrate the nature, extent, sites, and multiplicity of brain injuries. Although there have been numerous reports on the CT findings of most types of intracranial injury, the findings in brainstem injury have not been well described. This study aimed at comparing the autopsy findings of brainstem in head trauma in comparison with CT scan results. Two hundred patients with head trauma, who expired after a period of time of hospitalization, were assessed in a diagnostic value study. Brain stem involvement was determined by autopsy as well as CT scanning of the brain during their hospitalization. The results of the two methods were compared with each other, emphasizing on the type and location of probable lesions in the brain stem. Considering the autopsy as the method of the choice, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of CT scan in brain stem lesions of patients with head trauma were calculated. The effect of primary cause of head trauma, survival time and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS were evaluated, as well. Brain stem lesions were detected in 39 (19.5% patients in autopsy. However, CT scan revealed brain stem lesions in 23(11.5% cases. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of CT scan was 59%, 100%, 100% and 91% respectively. The most common lesions of the brain stem region were as contusion of pons (8.5%, medulla (5% and midbrain (4.5%. There were 6 (3% cases of ponto-medullary junction tearing and 1 (0.5% case of cervico-medullary junction tearing. CT scan is a specific method of evaluating patients with probable brain stem injuries after head trauma, but low sensitivity limits its efficacy. Our results are in conformity with the reports in the literature.

  16. Three-channel Lissajous' trajectories of auditory brainstem evoked potentials: contribution of fast and slow components to planar segment formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, H; Bleich, N; Feingold, K

    1990-01-01

    Three-Channel Lissajous' Trajectories (3CLT) of Auditory Brainstem Evoked Potentials (ABEP) to clicks were obtained after finite impulse response filtering in three frequency bands. These bands were chosen to replicate the widely used passband (100-3000 Hz) and to selectively enhance the definition of the 'pedestal' (10-240 Hz) or the first, third and fifth components (240-483 Hz). Quantitative measures of 3CLT were calculated to describe apex latencies, planar segment orientations, durations, trajectory amplitude peaks and their latencies. In addition, dipole moments at the latencies of apical points along 3-CLT were calculated. The planarity of ABEP 3-CLT segments persisted after selective enhancement of the 'pedestal' or the first, third and fifth components. These results rule out the suggestion that planarity of ABEP segments results from the interaction of the 'pedestal' with the superimposed faster components. These results demonstrate summation of 3-CLT planar segments ('a' 'c' and 'e' with the 'pedestal') to form new segments (wide-band 'a', 'c' and 'e'). With the exception of 'c', planar segments and the equivalent dipole moments associated with apexes did not change orientations across passbands. The effects of passband on the orientation of planar segment 'c' and the dipole moment of its apex are explained by its superimposition on the 'pedestal' in the wide-band records. A similar analysis of ABEP to clicks as compared to low-frequency stimuli (high-pass masked clicks) revealed no change in planarity nor in plane parameters. These results are compatible with the suggestion that the generators of the first, third and fifth ABEP components are curved fiber tracts. The planarity of the slow 'pedestal' may be due to the summation of slow synaptic potentials in auditory brainstem nuclei. These findings indicate that the generators of ABEP are composites that may be separated by selective lesion studies. PMID:2312411

  17. Development and distribution of PAG-immunoreactive neurons in the central pathway of trigeminal proprioception of the rat brainstem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG You-wang; LI Jin-lian

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the development and distribution of phosphate-activated glutaminase like immunoreactive (PAG-LI) neurons in the central pathway of trigeminal proprioception of the rat brainstem.Methods: The immunohistochemitry techniques were used. Results: (1) At embryonic day 17 (E17), PAGLI neurons were initially observed in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Vme). All PAG-LI neurons were large round neurons with moderate immunostaining. The immunoreactivity grew intense and attained adultlike pattern at P10. (2) Not until postnatal day 10 (P10) did a few PAG-LI neurons appear in the area ventral to the motor trigeminal nucleus (AVM) and area dorsal to the superior olivery nucleus (ADO), and not until P12 in the dorsomedial part of the subnucleus oralis of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vodm) and dorsomedial part of the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus (Vpdm). As development proceeded, more and more neurons in them were immunostained, and some PAG-LI neurons were detected in the lateral reticular formation adjacent to the Vodm(LRF)and the caudolateral part of the supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup-CL) at P21.Conclusion: In the central pathway of trigeminal proprioception of the rat brainstem, PAG-LI neurons appeared during two stages: The first stage from E17 to P10, PAG-LI neurons appeared in the Vme and reached adult-like pattern; the second stage from P10 to P21, PAG-LI neurons appeared in the Vodm, LRF,Vpdm, Vsup-CL, ADO, AVM and gradually reached adult-like pattern. This might be relative to the establishment of jaw movement patterns.

  18. Changes in Pain Processing in the Spinal Cord and Brainstem after Spinal Cord Injury Characterized by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroman, Patrick W; Khan, Hamza S; Bosma, Rachel L; Cotoi, Andrea I; Leung, Roxanne; Cadotte, David W; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has a number of devastating consequences, including high prevalence of chronic pain and altered pain sensitivity. The causes of altered pain states vary depending on the injury and are difficult to diagnose and treat. A better understanding of pain mechanisms after SCI is expected to lead to better diagnostic capabilities and improved treatments. We therefore applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brainstem and spinal cord in a group of participants with previous traumatic SCI to characterize changes in pain processing as a result of their injuries. The same thermal stimulus was applied to the medial palm (C8 dermatome) as a series of repeated brief noxious thermal pulses in a group of 16 participants with a cervical (n = 14) and upper thoracic (n = 2) injuries. Functional MRI of the brainstem and spinal cord was used to determine the neuronal activity evoked by the noxious stimulation, and connectivity between regions was characterized with structural equation modeling (SEM). The results show that pain ratings, the location and magnitude of blood oxygenation-level dependent fMRI results, and connectivity assessed with SEM varied widely across participants. However, the results varied in relation to the perceived pain and the level/severity of injuries, particularly in terms of hypothalamus connectivity with other regions, and descending modulation via the periaqueductal gray matter-rostral ventromedial medulla-cord pathway. The results, therefore, appear to provide sensitive indicators of each individual's pain response, and information about the mechanisms of altered pain sensitivity. The ability to characterize changes in pain processing in individuals with SCI represents a significant technological advance. PMID:26801315

  19. Brain-stem auditory evoked responses during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: Predicting post-operative hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramnarayan Ramachandran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The importance of brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring in reducing hearing loss during microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia is now accepted. However the extent of the changes in the pattern of these potentials and the safe limits to which these changes are relevant in reducing postoperative hearing loss have not been established. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify these changes and relate these to the postoperative hearing loss. Settings and Design: This study was done at the Walton Centre for neurology and neurosurgery, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The study was designed to give a measure of the change in the wave pattern following microvascular decompression and relate it to postoperative hearing loss. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients undergoing microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia had preoperative and postoperative hearing assessments and intraoperative brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square tests. Results: It was found that the wave V latency was increased by more than 0.9ms in nine patients, eight of whom suffered significant postoperative hearing loss as demonstrated by audiometry. It was also seen that progressive decrease in amplitude of wave V showed progressive hearing loss with 25% loss when amplitude fell by 50 and 100% loss when wave V was lost completely. However most of the patients did not have a clinically manifest hearing loss. Conclusions: A per-operative increase in the latency of wave V greater than 0.9 ms and a fall of amplitude of wave V of more than 50% indicates a risk to hearing.

  20. Evaluation of auditory brain-stem evoked response in middle: Aged type 2 diabetes mellitus with normal hearing subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debadatta Mahallik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is commonly metabolic disorders of carbohydrate in which blood glucose levels are abnormally high due to relative or absolute insulin deficiency. In addition, it is characterized by abnormal metabolism of fat, protein resulting from insulin deficit or insulin action, or both. There are two broad categories of DM are designated as type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes is due to predominantly insulin resistance with relative insulin deficiency noninsulin-dependent DM. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than insulin-dependent DM. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess, if there is any abnormality in neural conduction in auditory brain-stem pathway in type 2 DM patients having normal hearing sensitivity when compared to age-matched healthy populations. Materials and Methods: This study included middle - aged 25 subjects having normal hearing with diabetes type 2 mellitus. All were submitted to the full audiological history taking, otological examination, basic audiological evaluation and auditory brain-stem response audiometry which was recorded in both ears, followed by calculation of the absolute latencies of wave I, III and V, as well as interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, I-V. Results: Type 2 DM patients showed significant prolonged absolute latencies of I, III (P = 0.001 and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V in left ear (P = 0.001 and absolute latencies of I, V (P = 0.001, interpeak latencies III-V was statistically significant in right ear. Conclusions: The prolonged absolute latencies and interpeak latencies suggests abnormal neural firing synchronization or in the transmission in the auditory pathways in normal hearing type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  1. When the sense of smell meets emotion: anxiety-state-dependent olfactory processing and neural circuitry adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusemark, Elizabeth A; Novak, Lucas R; Gitelman, Darren R; Li, Wen

    2013-09-25

    Phylogenetically the most ancient sense, olfaction is characterized by a unique intimacy with the emotion system. However, mechanisms underlying olfaction-emotion interaction remain unclear, especially in an ever-changing environment and dynamic internal milieu. Perturbing the internal state with anxiety induction in human subjects, we interrogated emotion-state-dependent olfactory processing in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Following anxiety induction, initially neutral odors become unpleasant and take longer to detect, accompanied by augmented response to these odors in the olfactory (anterior piriform and orbitofrontal) cortices and emotion-relevant pregenual anterior cingulate cortex. In parallel, the olfactory sensory relay adapts with increased anxiety, incorporating amygdala as an integral step via strengthened (afferent or efferent) connections between amygdala and all levels of the olfactory cortical hierarchy. This anxiety-state-dependent neural circuitry thus enables cumulative infusion of limbic affective information throughout the olfactory sensory progression, thereby driving affectively charged olfactory perception. These findings could constitute an olfactory etiology model of emotional disorders, as exaggerated emotion-olfaction interaction in negative mood states turns innocuous odors aversive, fueling anxiety and depression with rising ambient sensory stress.

  2. A low-cost dielectric spectroscopic system using metamaterial open horn-ring resonator-inspired BSF and detection circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Ratnesh; Patel, Piyush N.

    2016-07-01

    The sensitivity in a lower microwave band dielectric spectroscopic system is relatively less compared to that of millimeter wave and terahertz system. This work reports modeling and development of an epsilon-negative metamaterial resonator-inspired microwave band-stop filter as a prototype device and its detection circuitry for the spectroscopic analysis of dielectric samples in S-band. The device structure consists of a diamond-shaped patch with a complementary open split horn-ring resonator, fabricated on a Neltech substrate of relative permittivity ( ɛ r = 3.2). The measured transmission coefficient at 2.2 GHz and simulated result at 2.24 GHz demonstrate an excellent accuracy in the device fabrication. A low-cost connector-type microwave signal detection system was assembled for the real-time transduction of device signal into an equivalent DC voltage. Further, a single channel cavity developed using polydimethylsiloxane was placed over the resonator gap for analyzing the perturbation effect of electric field intensity on the resonance and circuit output DC level for different dielectric samples under test. The performed calibrations show linearity up to 82.5 % in the device response.

  3. Emotional regulation: implications for the psychobiology of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J

    2008-03-01

    A range of studies have contributed to understanding the psychobiology of emotional regulation. Functional imaging studies have demonstrated that cortico-limbic circuitry plays an important role in mediating processes such as reappraisal and suppression. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may be important in conscious reframing, while ventromedial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex may be particularly important in emotion evaluation. Gene variants and early environments impact underlying emotional regulation and its neurobiology. It may be hypothesized that during interventions such as psychotherapy there are improvements in emotional regulation, together with the normalization of related psychobiological mechanisms.

  4. Fluctuating Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Expression in Brainstem Norepinephrine Neurons through the Rat Estrous Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haywood, S.A.; Simonian, S.X.; Beek, van der E.M.; Bicknell, R.J.; Herbison, A.E.

    1999-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) neurons within the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS; A2 neurons) and ventrolateral medulla (A1 neurons) represent gonadal steroid-dependent components of several neural networks regulating reproduction. Previous studies have shown that both A1 and A2 neurons express estrogen recept

  5. Predicting clinical outcome from reward circuitry function and white matter structure in behaviorally and emotionally dysregulated youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocci, M A; Bebko, G; Versace, A; Fournier, J C; Iyengar, S; Olino, T; Bonar, L; Almeida, J R C; Perlman, S B; Schirda, C; Travis, M J; Gill, M K; Diwadkar, V A; Forbes, E E; Sunshine, J L; Holland, S K; Kowatch, R A; Birmaher, B; Axelson, D; Horwitz, S M; Frazier, T W; Arnold, L E; Fristad, M A; Youngstrom, E A; Findling, R L; Phillips, M L

    2016-09-01

    Behavioral and emotional dysregulation in childhood may be understood as prodromal to adult psychopathology. Additionally, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers reflecting underlying neuropathological processes that predict clinical/behavioral outcomes in youth. We aimed to identify such biomarkers in youth with behavioral and emotional dysregulation in the Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms (LAMS) study. We examined neuroimaging measures of function and white matter in the whole brain using 80 youth aged 14.0 (s.d.=2.0) from three clinical sites. Linear regression using the LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator) method for variable selection was used to predict severity of future behavioral and emotional dysregulation measured by the Parent General Behavior Inventory-10 Item Mania Scale (PGBI-10M)) at a mean of 14.2 months follow-up after neuroimaging assessment. Neuroimaging measures, together with near-scan PGBI-10M, a score of manic behaviors, depressive behaviors and sex, explained 28% of the variance in follow-up PGBI-10M. Neuroimaging measures alone, after accounting for other identified predictors, explained ~1/3 of the explained variance, in follow-up PGBI-10M. Specifically, greater bilateral cingulum length predicted lower PGBI-10M at follow-up. Greater functional connectivity in parietal-subcortical reward circuitry predicted greater PGBI-10M at follow-up. For the first time, data suggest that multimodal neuroimaging measures of underlying neuropathologic processes account for over a third of the explained variance in clinical outcome in a large sample of behaviorally and emotionally dysregulated youth. This may be an important first step toward identifying neurobiological measures with the potential to act as novel targets for early detection and future therapeutic interventions. PMID:26903272

  6. Predicting clinical outcome from reward circuitry function and white matter structure in behaviorally and emotionally dysregulated youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocci, Michele A.; Bebko, Genna; Versace, Amelia; Fournier, Jay C.; Iyengar, Satish; Olino, Thomas; Bonar, Lisa; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Perlman, Susan B.; Schirda, Claudiu; Travis, Michael J.; Gill, Mary Kay; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Forbes, Erika E.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Holland, Scott K; Kowatch, Robert A.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Horwitz, Sarah M.; Frazier, Thomas W.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Fristad, Mary. A; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Findling, Robert L.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral and emotional dysregulation in childhood may be understood as prodromal to adult psychopathology. Additionally, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers reflecting underlying neuropathological processes that predict clinical/behavioral outcomes in youth. We aimed to identify such biomarkers in youth with behavioral and emotional dysregulation in the Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms (LAMS) study. We examined neuroimaging measures of function and white matter in the whole brain using 80 youth aged 14.0(sd=2.0) from 3 clinical sites. Linear regression using the LASSO method for variable selection was used to predict severity of future behavioral and emotional dysregulation [measured by the Parent General Behavior Inventory-10 Item Mania Scale (PGBI-10M)] at a mean of 14.2 months follow-up after neuroimaging assessment. Neuroimaging measures, together with near-scan PGBI-10M, a score of manic behaviors, depressive behaviors, and sex, explained 28% of the variance in follow-up PGBI-10M. Neuroimaging measures alone, after accounting for other identified predictors, explained approximately one-third of the explained variance, in follow-up PGBI-10M. Specifically, greater bilateral cingulum length predicted lower PGBI-10M at follow-up. Greater functional connectivity in parietal-subcortical reward circuitry predicted greater PGBI-10M at follow-up. For the first time, data suggest that multimodal neuroimaging measures of underlying neuropathologic processes account for over a third of the explained variance in clinical outcome in a large sample of behaviorally and emotionally dysregulated youth. This may be an important first step toward identifying neurobiological measures with the potential to act as novel targets for early detection and future therapeutic interventions. PMID:26903272

  7. Identification of CNS neural circuitry involved in the innervation of C7 spinal nerve: a viral transsynaptic tracing study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Hai-feng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Contralateral C7 spinal nerve transfer is a useful operation for the treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion. The recovery of the independent function at the ipsilateral side, however, depends on neural circuitry reorganization in the central nervous system (CNS. This study tried to locate the CNS neuronal elements involved in the innervation of C7 spinal nerve. Method: Pseudorabies virus (PRV, TK/gG-, 2 祃, which expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP, was injected into the left C7 spinal nerve in 20 adult Sprague Dawley rats. After rats survived for 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 36 h, the C1-C7 segments of the spinal cord and brain were processed using a polyclonal immunohistochemical antibody against PRV. Results: PRV-labeled neurons were found mainly in gray matter of the C1-C7 segments of the spinal cord and at the following structures of the brain: lateral vestibular nucleus, lateral paragigantocellular nucleus, A5 cells, red nucleus, primary and secondary motor cortexes, primary and secondary somatosensory cortexes. Although located bilaterally, the PRV-labeled neurons existed predominantly in the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord and the contralateral side of the brain at 6-12 h after injection (p.i.. The number of PRV-labeled neurons in the CNS was increasing with rat抯 survival time and the distribution of these neurons turned bilateral with no obvious dominance to either side at 24 h and 36 h (p.i.. Conclusion: By use of transsynaptic tracing technique with PRV, the anatomically connected set of neurons, which modulates the activity of C7 spinal nerve, is located successfully in the CNS. Key words: Brachial plexus; Innervation; Spinal nerves; Central nervous system

  8. Identification of CNS neural circuitry involved in the innervation of C7 spinal nerve: a viral transsynaptic tracing study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hai-feng; CHEN Liang; GU Yu-dong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Contralateral C7 spinal nerve transfer is a useful operation for the treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion. The recovery of the independent function at the ipsilateral side, however, depends on neural circuitry reorganization in the central nervous system (CNS).This study tried to locate the CNS neuronal elements involved in the innervation ofC7 spinal nerve.Method: Pseudorabies virus (PRV, TK/gG-,2 μl), which expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP), was injected into the left C7 spinal nerve in 20 adult Sprague Dawley rats.After rats survived for 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 36 h, the C1-C7segments of the spinal cord and brain were processed using a polyclonal immunohistochemical antibody against PRV.Results: PRV-labeled neurons were found mainly in gray matter of the C1-C7 segments of the spinal cord and at the following structures of the brain: lateral vestibular nucleus, lateral paragigantocellular nucleus, A5 cells, red nucleus, primary and secondary motor cortexes, primary and secondary somatosensory cortexes. Although located bilaterally, the PRV-labeled neurons existed predominantly in the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord and the contralateral side of the brain at 6-12 h after injection (p.i.). The number of PRV-labeled neurons in the CNS was increasing with rat's survival time and the distribution of these neurons turned bilateral with no obvious dominance to either side at 24 h and 36 h (p.i.).Conclusion: By use of transsynaptic tracing technique with PRV, the anatomically connected set of neurons,which modulates the activity of C7 spinal nerve, is located successfully in the CNS.

  9. Urotensin II modulates rapid eye movement sleep through activation of brainstem cholinergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Sánchez-Alavez, Manuel;

    2005-01-01

    dorsal tegmental nuclei. This distribution suggests that the UII system is involved in functions regulated by acetylcholine, such as the sleep-wake cycle. Here, we tested the hypothesis that UII influences cholinergic PPT neuron activity and alters rapid eye movement (REM) sleep patterns in rats. Local...... administration of UII into the PPT nucleus increases REM sleep without inducing changes in the cortical blood flow. Intracerebroventricular injection of UII enhances both REM sleep and wakefulness and reduces slow-wave sleep 2. Intracerebroventricular, but not local, administration of UII increases cortical...... synaptic transmission because it persisted in the presence of TTX and antagonists of ionotropic glutamate, GABA, and glycine receptors. Collectively, these results suggest that UII plays a role in the regulation of REM sleep independently of its cerebrovascular actions by directly activating cholinergic...

  10. Determinants of body weight regulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehlecke, Milene; Canani, Luis Henrique; Silva, Lucas Oliveira Junqueira E; Trindade, Manoel Roberto Maciel; Friedman, Rogerio; Leitão, Cristiane Bauermann

    2016-04-01

    Body weight is regulated by the ability of hypothalamic neurons to orchestrate behavioral, endocrine and autonomic responses via afferent and efferent pathways to the brainstem and the periphery. Weight maintenance requires a balance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Although several components that participate in energy homeostasis have been identified, there is a need to know in more detail their actions as well as their interactions with environmental and psychosocial factors in the development of human obesity. In this review, we examine the role of systemic mediators such as leptin, ghrelin and insulin, which act in the central nervous system by activating or inhibiting neuropeptide Y, Agouti-related peptide protein, melanocortin, transcript related to cocaine and amphetamine, and others. As a result, modifications in energy homeostasis occur through regulation of appetite and energy expenditure. We also examine compensatory changes in the circulating levels of several peripheral hormones after diet-induced weight loss. PMID:26910628

  11. 原发性脑干出血临床分析%Clinical analysis of primary brainstem hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄婷婷; 韩杰

    2015-01-01

    发性脑干出血临床结局的关键指标。%Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of primary brainstem hemorrhage and factors that affect clinical ending .Methods One hundred and fifty-three patients′clinical data of primary-brainstem-hemorrhage who were treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University and the People′s Liberation Army 210 Hospital during October 2011 to October 2014 were collected.The clinical characteristics of different age groups were compared by variance -analysis, the affecting factors of clinical ending were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression .Results (1)Female′s age[59(51,77) years old] was significantly higher than male′s[56(47,62)years old],there was statistical significance (Z=-2.404,P =0.016).(2)In each age group,incidence rates of male was higher than female ,incidence of female was increasing with age,there was statistical significance (χ2 =10.996,P=0.004 ).(3)There was statistically significant in bad habit of smoking ,drinking among the age groups (χ2 =11.008 ,P=0.004;χ2 =8.175,P=0.017).(4)There were statistically significant in fibrin(Fib) in each age group(F=5.282,P=0.006).(5)The difference of Glasgow coma scale (GCS)scores in age groups were statistically significant when first time in hospital (χ2 =8.276 , P =0.016 ) .( 6 ) The treatment effects in three age groups were statistically significant(χ2 =9.263,P =0.010).(7)Univariate analysis:age,the amount of bleeding, breaking into the ventricle or not,GCS score,neurological deficit scale (NDS) score,intervening time from onset to treatment , blood glucose , blood pressure and the first symptoms of primary brainstem hemorrhage associated the clinical ending .Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the bleeding ,GCS score, NDS score and the first symptom factors of primary brainstem hemorrhage clinical ending ,but not independent factors.Conclusion The occurrence of primary brainstem hemorrhage is more

  12. Gap prepulse inhibition and auditory brainstem-evoked potentials as objective measures for tinnitus in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmel, Susanne; Eisinger, Daniel; Shore, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus or ringing of the ears is a subjective phantom sensation necessitating behavioral models that objectively demonstrate the existence and quality of the tinnitus sensation. The gap detection test uses the acoustic startle response elicited by loud noise pulses and its gating or suppression by preceding sub-startling prepulses. Gaps in noise bands serve as prepulses, assuming that ongoing tinnitus masks the gap and results in impaired gap detection. This test has shown its reliability in rats, mice, and gerbils. No data exists for the guinea pig so far, although gap detection is similar across mammals and the acoustic startle response is a well-established tool in guinea pig studies of psychiatric disorders and in pharmacological studies. Here we investigated the startle behavior and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the guinea pig and showed that guinea pigs have a reliable startle response that can be suppressed by 15 ms gaps embedded in narrow noise bands preceding the startle noise pulse. After recovery of auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds from a unilateral noise over-exposure centered at 7 kHz, guinea pigs showed diminished gap-induced reduction of the startle response in frequency bands between 8 and 18 kHz. This suggests the development of tinnitus in frequency regions that showed a temporary threshold shift (TTS) after noise over-exposure. Changes in discharge rate and synchrony, two neuronal correlates of tinnitus, should be reflected in altered ABR waveforms, which would be useful to objectively detect tinnitus and its localization to auditory brainstem structures. Therefore, we analyzed latencies and amplitudes of the first five ABR waves at suprathreshold sound intensities and correlated ABR abnormalities with the results of the behavioral tinnitus testing. Early ABR wave amplitudes up to N3 were increased for animals with tinnitus possibly stemming from hyperactivity and hypersynchrony underlying the tinnitus percept. Animals that did not

  13. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Treatment for Metastatic Melanoma of the Trigeminal Nerve and Brainstem: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Halloran E.; Larson, Erik W.; Fairbanks, Robert K; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Call, Jason A.; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S; Lee, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    Objective and Importance. Brainstem metastases (BSMs) are uncommon but serious complications of some cancers. They cause significant neurological deficit, and options for treatment are limited. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for BSMs that prolongs survival and can preserve or in some cases improve neurological function. This case illustrates the use of repeated SRS, specifically Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for management of a unique bra...

  14. A rapid form of activity-dependent recovery from short-term synaptic depression in the intensity pathway of the auditory brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    MacLeod, Katrina M.; Horiuchi, Timothy K.

    2011-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity acts as a time- and firing rate-dependent filter that mediates the transmission of information across synapses. In the avian auditory brainstem, specific forms of plasticity are expressed at different terminals of the same auditory nerve fibers and contribute to the divergence of acoustic timing and intensity information. To identify key differences in the plasticity properties, we made patch-clamp recordings from neurons in the cochlear nucleus responsible for ...

  15. Neurological Deterioration after Decompressive Suboccipital Craniectomy in a Patient with a Brainstem-compressing Thrombosed Giant Aneurysm of the Vertebral Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woosung; Choo, Yeon Soo; Kim, Yong Bae

    2016-01-01

    We experienced a case of neurological deterioration after decompressive suboccipital craniectomy (DSC) in a patient with a brainstem-compressing thrombosed giant aneurysm of the vertebral artery (VA). A 60-year-old male harboring a thrombosed giant aneurysm (about 4 cm) of the right vertebral artery presented with quadriparesis. We treated the aneurysm by endovascular coil trapping of the right VA and expected the aneurysm to shrink slowly. After 7 days, however, he suffered aggravated symptoms as his aneurysm increased in size due to internal thrombosis. The medulla compression was aggravated, and so we performed DSC with C1 laminectomy. After the third post-operative day, unfortunately, his neurologic symptoms were more aggravated than in the pre-DSC state. Despite of conservative treatment, neurological symptoms did not improve, and microsurgical aneurysmectomy was performed for the medulla decompression. Unfortunately, the post-operative recovery was not as good as anticipated. DSC should not be used to release the brainstem when treating a brainstem-compressing thrombosed giant aneurysm of the VA.

  16. Assessment of the corticospinal tract alterations before and after resection of brainstem lesions using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and tractography at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovanlikaya, Ilhami, E-mail: ilk2002@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Firat, Zeynep [Department of Radiology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Kovanlikaya, Arzu [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Ulug, Aziz M. [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yeditepe University, Istanbul (Turkey); Cihangiroglu, M. Mutlu [Department of Radiology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); John, Majnu [Department of Public Health, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Bingol, Canan Aykut; Ture, Ugur [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Diffusion Tensor Tractography (DTT) on the corticospinal tract alterations due to space occupying lesions in the brainstem before and after surgical resection. Pre- and post-surgical DTI data were acquired in 14 patients undergoing surgical resection of brainstem lesions. Patterns of corticospinal tract (CST) alteration on DTT were compared with the neurological exams of the patients pre- and post-operatively. DTT, especially in 3D movie format, seemed very helpful for evaluating the relationship of the lesions with the corticospinal tracts for surgical approach. None of the patients developed additional motor deficit related to surgery except one patient who presented with cerebellar ataxia after surgery. All of the patients with normal CST on DTT presented without motor deficit on neurological exam. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of DTT before surgery were 100%, 63.6%, 42.9% and 100%, and the corresponding values after surgery were 100%, 96%, 75% and 100% respectively. Although it has low specificity before surgery, DTT is a potentially useful technique in evaluating the effects of brainstem lesions and surgical resection on the relevant corticospinal tracts with high negative predictive value and higher specificity after surgery.

  17. INFLUENCE OF ACUPUNCTURE (“JIN‘S SAN ZHEN”) ON BRAINSTEM EVOKED POTENTIALS IN MENTAL RETARDATION CHILDREN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁青; 马瑞玲; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of acupuncture(“JIN's San Zhen”)on infantile mental retardation (MR).Methods:44 cases of MR children were attributed to treatment group and 3 normal children to control group.P3(event-related potential) and brainstem evoked potentials were used as the indexes.Acupoints “Si-shen Zhen”,“Head Zhi San Zhen”,“Hand Zhi San Zhen”,“Foot Zhi San Zhen” were unctured with filiform needles,and stimulated by manipulating the needle once every 5minutes with uniform reinforcing-reducing method.The treatment was conducted once daily,6 times every week,with 4 months being a therapeutic course.Results:In comparison with normal children,the latency of P3 was longer and its amplitude lower in MR children.After 4 months' acupuncture treatment,the latency was shortened and the smplitude increased significantly in comparison with pre-treatment (P<0.01,0.05).Results of the total intelligence quotient(TIQ) evaluation showed a 70.3% coincidence rate compared with improvement of P3.Conclusion:Changes of P3 and BAEP(brain auditory evoked potential) after acupuncture treatment may be related to the effect of “JIN's San Zhen” in bettering clinical symptoms and signs of MR infantile patients.

  18. Saccule contribution to immediate early gene induction in the gerbil brainstem with posterior canal galvanic or hypergravity stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshburn, T H; Kaufman, G D; Purcell, I M; Perachio, A A

    1997-06-27

    Immunolabeling patterns of the immediate early gene-related protein Fos in the gerbil brainstem were studied following stimulation of the sacculus by both hypergravity and galvanic stimulation. Head-restrained, alert animals were exposed to a prolonged (1 h) inertial vector of 2 G (19.6 m/s2) head acceleration directed in a dorso-ventral head axis to maximally stimulate the sacculus. Fos-defined immunoreactivity was quantified, and the results compared to a control group. The hypergravity stimulus produced Fos immunolabeling in the dorsomedial cell column (dmcc) of the inferior olive independently of other subnuclei. Similar dmcc labeling was induced by a 30 min galvanic stimulus of up to -100 microA applied through a stimulating electrode placed unilaterally on the bony labyrinth overlying the posterior canal (PC). The pattern of vestibular afferent firing activity induced by this galvanic stimulus was quantified in anesthetized gerbils by simultaneously recording from Scarpa's ganglion. Only saccular and PC afferent neurons exhibited increases in average firing rates of 200-300%, suggesting a pattern of current spread involving only PC and saccular afferent neurons at this level of stimulation. These results suggest that alteration in saccular afferent firing rates are sufficient to induce Fos-defined genomic activation of the dmcc, and lend further evidence to the existence of a functional vestibulo-olivary-cerebellar pathway of adaptation to novel gravito-inertial environments.

  19. Postnatal nicotine effects on the expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the developing piglet hippocampus and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandarajah, Arunnjah; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Postnatal exposure to cigarette smoke during infancy is associated with increased number of respiratory illnesses, impaired pulmonary function, and the occurrence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). It is also associated with reduced cognitive functioning and attention deficits in childhood. Nicotine, the major neurotoxic component of cigarette smoke, induces its actions by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Using a piglet model of postnatal nicotine exposure, we studied the immunohistochemical expression of nAChR subunits α2, α3, α4, α5, α7, α9, β1 and β2 in the brainstem medulla and the hippocampus, given the role of these structures in cardiorespiratory control and cognition, respectively. We compared piglets exposed postnatally to 2mg/kg/day nicotine for 14 days (n=14: 7 males: 7 females) to controls (n=14: 7 males: 7 females). In the hippocampus, decreased expression was seen for α3 in CA1 (p=0.017), α9 in CA1 (pnicotine in the developing brain, and the implications are discussed. PMID:26440997

  20. Non-familial degenerative disease and atrophy of brainstem and cerebellum. Clinical and CT data in 47 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, A; Meerwaldt, J D; van Dongen, K J; Mulder, P G; Busch, H F

    1990-03-01

    We studied the clinical features of 47 patients with a non-hereditary degenerative disease and with atrophy of brainstem or cerebellum or both in CT scanning. There was no relation between the CT findings and duration or severity of the disease, nor with the kind of the neurological signs which comprised ataxia, a hypokinetic rigid syndrome, oculomotor abnormalities, upper and lower motor neuron signs, orthostatic hypotension and dementia. The 2 main diagnoses were olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), or a combination of OPCA and striatonigral degeneration (SND). The differential diagnosis with Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy was discussed. We concluded, that a CT scan is warranted in all cases of suspected Parkinson's disease, especially in those without tremor, and in cases of motoneuron disease with broad-based gait. In our patients with mainly hypokinesia and rigidity, levodopa treatment had no or brief beneficial effects. If ataxia predominated, OPCA appeared the most sensible diagnosis; if a hypokinetic-rigid syndrome predominated, the diagnoses SND plus OPCA appeared the most suitable. We assessed the degree of atrophy on CT subjectively, because an interobserver study of 60 normal CT scans, did not produce reliable measurements.

  1. Relating the variability of tone-burst otoacoustic emission and auditory brainstem response latencies to the underlying cochlear mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Sarah; Shera, Christopher A.

    2015-12-01

    Forward and reverse cochlear latency and its relation to the frequency tuning of the auditory filters can be assessed using tone bursts (TBs). Otoacoustic emissions (TBOAEs) estimate the cochlear roundtrip time, while auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to the same stimuli aim at measuring the auditory filter buildup time. Latency ratios are generally close to two and controversy exists about the relationship of this ratio to cochlear mechanics. We explored why the two methods provide different estimates of filter buildup time, and ratios with large inter-subject variability, using a time-domain model for OAEs and ABRs. We compared latencies for twenty models, in which all parameters but the cochlear irregularities responsible for reflection-source OAEs were identical, and found that TBOAE latencies were much more variable than ABR latencies. Multiple reflection-sources generated within the evoking stimulus bandwidth were found to shape the TBOAE envelope and complicate the interpretation of TBOAE latency and TBOAE/ABR ratios in terms of auditory filter tuning.

  2. Prediction of Human's Ability in Sound Localization Based on the Statistical Properties of Spike Trains along the Brainstem Auditory Pathway

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    Ram Krips

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The minimum audible angle test which is commonly used for evaluating human localization ability depends on interaural time delay, interaural level differences, and spectral information about the acoustic stimulus. These physical properties are estimated at different stages along the brainstem auditory pathway. The interaural time delay is ambiguous at certain frequencies, thus confusion arises as to the source of these frequencies. It is assumed that in a typical minimum audible angle experiment, the brain acts as an unbiased optimal estimator and thus the human performance can be obtained by deriving optimal lower bounds. Two types of lower bounds are tested: the Cramer-Rao and the Barankin. The Cramer-Rao bound only takes into account the approximation of the true direction of the stimulus; the Barankin bound considers other possible directions that arise from the ambiguous phase information. These lower bounds are derived at the output of the auditory nerve and of the superior olivary complex where binaural cues are estimated. An agreement between human experimental data was obtained only when the superior olivary complex was considered and the Barankin lower bound was used. This result suggests that sound localization is estimated by the auditory nuclei using ambiguous binaural information.

  3. Identifying the threshold of iron deficiency in the central nervous system of the rat by the auditory brainstem response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Allison R; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot

    2015-01-01

    The deleterious effects of anemia on auditory nerve (AN) development have been well investigated; however, we have previously reported that significant functional consequences in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) can also occur as a consequence of marginal iron deficiency (ID). As the ABR has widespread clinical use, we evaluated the ability of this electrophysiological method to characterize the threshold of tissue ID in rats by examining the relationship between markers of tissue ID and severity of ABR latency defects. To generate various levels of ID, female Long-Evans rats were exposed to diets containing sufficient, borderline, or deficient iron (Fe) concentrations throughout gestation and offspring lifetime. We measured hematological indices of whole body iron stores in dams and offspring to assess the degree of ID. Progression of AN ID in the offspring was measured as ferritin protein levels at different times during postnatal development to complement ABR functional measurements. The severity of ABR deficits correlated with the level of Fe restriction in each diet. The sufficient Fe diet did not induce AN ID and consequently did not show an impaired ABR latency response. The borderline Fe diet, which depleted AN Fe stores but did not cause systemic anemia resulted in significantly increased ABR latency isolated to Peak I.The low Fe diet, which induced anemia and growth retardation, significantly increased ABR latencies of Peaks I to IV. Our findings indicate that changes in the ABR could be related to various degrees of ID experienced throughout development. PMID:25732706

  4. Changes in neuronal activity and gene expression in guinea-pig auditory brainstem after unilateral partial hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S; Mulders, W H A M; Rodger, J; Robertson, D

    2009-03-31

    Spontaneous neural hyperactivity in the central auditory pathway is often associated with deafness, the most common form of which is partial hearing loss. We quantified both peripheral hearing loss and spontaneous activity in single neurons of the contralateral inferior colliculus in a guinea-pig model 1 week after a unilateral partial deafness induced by cochlear mechanical lesion. We also measured mRNA levels of candidate genes in the same animals using quantitative real-time PCR. Spontaneous hyperactivity was most marked in the frequency region of the peripheral hearing loss. Expression of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), GABA-A receptor subunit alpha-1 (GABRA1), and potassium channel subfamily K member 15 (KCNK15) was decreased ipsilaterally in the cochlear nucleus and bilaterally in the inferior colliculus. A member of RAB family of small GTPase (RAB3A) was decreased in both ipsilateral cochlear nucleus and contralateral inferior colliculus. RAB3 GTPase activating protein subunit 1 (RAB3GAP1) and glycine receptor subunit alpha-1 (GLRA1) were reduced ipsilaterally in the cochlear nucleus only. These results suggest that a decrease in inhibitory neurotransmission and an increase in membrane excitability may contribute to elevated neuronal spontaneous activity in the auditory brainstem following unilateral partial hearing loss. PMID:19356697

  5. Saccule contribution to immediate early gene induction in the gerbil brainstem with posterior canal galvanic or hypergravity stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshburn, T. H.; Kaufman, G. D.; Purcell, I. M.; Perachio, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Immunolabeling patterns of the immediate early gene-related protein Fos in the gerbil brainstem were studied following stimulation of the sacculus by both hypergravity and galvanic stimulation. Head-restrained, alert animals were exposed to a prolonged (1 h) inertial vector of 2 G (19.6 m/s2) head acceleration directed in a dorso-ventral head axis to maximally stimulate the sacculus. Fos-defined immunoreactivity was quantified, and the results compared to a control group. The hypergravity stimulus produced Fos immunolabeling in the dorsomedial cell column (dmcc) of the inferior olive independently of other subnuclei. Similar dmcc labeling was induced by a 30 min galvanic stimulus of up to -100 microA applied through a stimulating electrode placed unilaterally on the bony labyrinth overlying the posterior canal (PC). The pattern of vestibular afferent firing activity induced by this galvanic stimulus was quantified in anesthetized gerbils by simultaneously recording from Scarpa's ganglion. Only saccular and PC afferent neurons exhibited increases in average firing rates of 200-300%, suggesting a pattern of current spread involving only PC and saccular afferent neurons at this level of stimulation. These results suggest that alteration in saccular afferent firing rates are sufficient to induce Fos-defined genomic activation of the dmcc, and lend further evidence to the existence of a functional vestibulo-olivary-cerebellar pathway of adaptation to novel gravito-inertial environments.

  6. A study of brainstem evoked response audiometry in high-risk infants and children under 10 years of age

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    Ramanathan Thirunavukarasu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the hearing threshold and find the incidence of hearing loss in infants and children belonging to high-risk category and analyze the common risk factors. Subjects and Methods: Totally, 125 infants and children belonging to high-risk category were subjected to brainstem evoked response audiometry. Clicks were given at the rate of 11.1 clicks/s. Totally, 2000 responses were averaged. The intensity at which wave V just disappears was established as hearing the threshold. Degree of impairment and risk factors were analyzed. Results: Totally, 44 (35.2% were found to have sensorineural hearing loss. Totally, 30 children with hearing loss (68% belonged to age group 1-5 years. Consanguineous marriage was the most commonly associated risk factor. Majority (34 had profound hearing loss. Conclusion: Newborn screening is mandatory to identify hearing loss in the prelinguistic period to reduce the burden of handicap in the community. The need of the hour is health education and genetic counseling to decrease the hereditary hearing loss, as hearing impairment due to perinatal factors has reduced due to recent medical advancements.

  7. Translational Repression of NhaR, a Novel Pathway for Multi-Tier Regulation of Biofilm Circuitry by CsrA

    OpenAIRE

    Pannuri, Archana; Yakhnin, Helen; Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Edwards, Adrianne N.; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2012-01-01

    The RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA) represses biofilm formation in several proteobacterial species. In Escherichia coli, it represses the production of the polysaccharide adhesin poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PGA) by binding to the pgaABCD mRNA leader, inhibiting pgaA translation, and destabilizing this transcript. In addition, CsrA represses genes responsible for the synthesis of cyclic di-GMP, an activator of PGA production. Here we determined that CsrA also represses NhaR, a LysR-type...

  8. The role of food intake regulating peptides in cardiovascular regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulášková, B; Maletínská, L; Zicha, J; Kuneš, J

    2016-11-15

    Obesity is a risk factor that worsens cardiovascular events leading to higher morbidity and mortality. However, the exact mechanisms of relation between obesity and cardiovascular events are unclear. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that pharmacological therapy for obesity has great potential to improve some cardiovascular problems. Therefore, it is important to determine the common mechanisms regulating both food intake and blood pressure. Several hormones produced by peripheral tissues work together with neuropeptides involved in the regulation of both food intake and blood pressure. Anorexigenic (food intake lowering) hormones such as leptin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin cooperate with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated peptide as well as prolactin-releasing peptide. Curiously their collective actions result in increased sympathetic activity, especially in the kidney, which could be one of the factors responsible for the blood pressure increases seen in obesity. On the other hand, orexigenic (food intake enhancing) peptides, especially ghrelin released from the stomach and acting in the brain, cooperates with orexins, neuropeptide Y, melanin-concentrating hormone and galanin, which leads to decreased sympathetic activity and blood pressure. This paradox should be intensively studied in the future. Moreover, it is important to know that the hypothalamus together with the brainstem seem to be major structures in the regulation of food intake and blood pressure. Thus, the above mentioned regions might be essential brain components in the transmission of peripheral signals to the central effects. In this short review, we summarize the current information on cardiovascular effects of food intake regulating peptides.

  9. Regulatory Circuitry of the CsrA/CsrB and BarA/UvrY Systems of Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Wang, Xin; Weilbacher, Thomas; Pernestig, Anna-Karin; Melefors, Öjar; Georgellis, Dimitris; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The global regulator CsrA (carbon storage regulator) is an RNA binding protein that coordinates central carbon metabolism, activates flagellum biosynthesis and motility, and represses biofilm formation in Escherichia coli. CsrA activity is antagonized by the untranslated RNA CsrB, to which it binds and forms a globular ribonucleoprotein complex. CsrA indirectly activates csrB transcription, in an apparent autoregulatory mechanism. In the present study, we elucidate the intermediate regulatory...

  10. Processamento auditivo e potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco cerebral (BERA Auditory precessing and auditory brainstem response (ABR

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    Marcela Pfeiffer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar relação existente entre os potenciais auditivos de tronco cerebral e a avaliação comportamental do processamento auditivo. MÉTODOS: foi realizada em um grupo de 60 meninas residentes de Paraíba do Sul na idade de nove a 12 anos com limiares tonais dentro dos padrões de normalidade e timpanometria tipo A com presença dos reflexos acústicos. Os testes utilizados para a avaliação comportamental do processamento auditivo foram: avaliação simplificada do processamento auditivo, teste de fala no ruído, teste de dissílabos alternados e teste dicótico não verbal. Após a avaliação do processamento auditivo, as crianças foram subdivididas em dois grupos, G1 (sem alteração no processamento auditivo e G2 (com alteração no processamento auditivo e submetidas aos potenciais auditivos de tronco cerebral. Os parâmetros utilizados na comparação dos dois grupos foram: latência absoluta das ondas I, III e V; latência interpicos das ondas I-III, I-V, III-V; diferença interaural da latência interpico I-V; e diferença interaural da latência da onda V. RESULTADOS: foram encontradas diferenças estatísticas nos parâmetros de latência interpico das ondas I-V na orelha esquerda (p=0,009, diferença interaural da latência interpico de ondas I-V (p=0,020 e diferença da latência interpico de ondas I e V da orelha direita para a esquerda entre os grupos G1 e G2 (p=0,025. CONCLUSÃO: foi possível encontrar relação dos potenciais evocados auditivos de tronco cerebral com a avaliação comportamental do processamento auditivo nos parâmetros de latência interpico entre as ondas I e V da orelha esquerda e diferença interaural da latência interpico I-V na orelha esquerda.PURPOSE: to investigate the correlation of auditory brainstem response (ABR and behavioral auditory processing evaluation. METHODS: sixty girls, from Paraíba do Sul, ranging from 9 to 12-year-old were evaluated. In order to take part in the study

  11. Postnatal loss of brainstem serotonin neurones compromises the ability of neonatal rats to survive episodic severe hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Kevin J; Hewitt, Julie C; Li, Aihua; Daubenspeck, John A; Nattie, Eugene E

    2011-11-01

    Pet-1(-/-) mice with a prenatal, genetically induced loss of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) neurones are compromised in their ability to withstand episodic environmental anoxia via autoresuscitation. Given the prenatal role of 5-HT neurones in the development of neural networks, here we ask if a postnatal loss of 5-HT neurones also compromises autoresuscitation. We treated neonatal rat pups at postnatal day (P)2-3 with an intra-cisternal injection of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT; ~40 μg; n = 8) to pharmacologically lesion the 5-HT system, or vehicle (control; n = 14). At P7-10 we exposed unanaesthetized treated and control pups to 15 episodes of environmental anoxia (97% N(2), 3% CO(2)). Medullary 5-HT content was reduced 80% by 5,7-DHT treatment (P rate (V(O(2))), ventilatory equivalent (V(E)/V(O(2))), heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV) and arterial haemoglobin saturation (S(aO(2))) were no different in 5-HT-deficient pups compared to controls. However, only 25% of 5-HT-deficient pups survived all 15 episodes of environmental anoxia, compared to 79% of control littermates (P = 0.007). High mortality of 5,7-DHT-treated pups was associated with delayed onset of gasping (P pups this increase occurred immediately prior to death. We conclude that a postnatal loss of brainstem 5-HT content compromises autoresuscitation in response to environmental anoxia. This report provides new evidence in rat pups that 5-HT neurones serve a physiological role in autoresuscitation. Our data may be relevant to understanding the aetiology of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), in which there is medullary 5-HT deficiency and in some cases evidence of severe hypoxia and failed autoresuscitation. PMID:21911619

  12. Analysis of brain-stem auditory evoked potential and visual evoked potential in patients with Parkinson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiaorong Deng; Jianzhong Deng; Yanmin Zhao; Xiaohai Yan; Pin Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the development of neuroelectrophysiology, it had been identified that all kinds of evoked potentials might reflect the functional status of corresponding pathway. Evoked potentials recruited in the re search of PD, it can be known whether other functional pathway of nervous system is impaired. OBJECTIVE: To observe whether brainstem auditory and visual passageway are impaired in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), and compare with non-PD patients concurrently. DESIGN: A non-randomized concurrent controlled observation. SETTINGS: Henan Provincial Tumor Hospital; Anyang District Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two cases of PD outpatients and inpatients, who registered in the Department of Neurology, Anyang District Hospital from October 1997 to February 2006, were enrolled as the PD group, including 20 males and 12 females, aged 50-72 years old. Inclusive criteria: In accordance with the diagnostic criteria of PD recommended by the dyskinesia and PD group of neurology branch of Chinese Medical Association. Patients with diseases that could cause Parkinson syndrome were excluded by CT scanning or MRI examination. Meanwhile, 30 cases with non-neurological disease were selected from the Department of Internal Medicine of our hospital as the control group, including 19 males and 11 females, aged 45-70 years old. Including criteria: Without history of neurological disease or psychiatric disease; showing normal image on CT. And PD, Parkinson syndrome and Parkinsonism-plus were excluded by professional neurologist. All the patients were informed and agreed with the examination and clinical observation. METHODS: The electrophysiological examination and clinical observation of the PD patients and controls were conducted. The Reporter type 4-channel evoked potential machine (Italy) was used to check brain-stem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Why to be examined was explained to test taker. BAEP recording electrode was plac

  13. SUMO: regulating the regulator

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    Bossis Guillaume

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Post-translational modifiers of the SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier family have emerged as key regulators of protein function and fate. While the past few years have seen an enormous increase in knowledge on SUMO enzymes, substrates, and consequences of modification, regulation of SUMO conjugation is far from being understood. This brief review will provide an overview on recent advances concerning (i the interplay between sumoylation and other post-translational modifications at the level of individual targets and (ii global regulation of SUMO conjugation and deconjugation.

  14. Localization of CGRP receptor components and receptor binding sites in rhesus monkey brainstem: A detailed study using in situ hybridization, immunofluorescence, and autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Gaspar, Renee C; Roberts, Rhonda; Chen, Tsing-Bau; Zeng, Zhizhen; Villarreal, Stephanie; Edvinsson, Lars; Salvatore, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging studies have revealed that certain brainstem areas are activated during migraine attacks. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is associated with activation of the trigeminovascular system and transmission of nociceptive information and plays a key role in migraine pathophysiology. Therefore, to elucidate the role of CGRP, it is critical to identify the regions within the brainstem that process CGRP signaling. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence were performed to detect mRNA expression and define cellular localization of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1), respectively. To define CGRP receptor binding sites, in vitro autoradiography was performed with [(3)H]MK-3207 (a CGRP receptor antagonist). CLR and RAMP1 mRNA and protein expression were detected in the pineal gland, medial mammillary nucleus, median eminence, infundibular stem, periaqueductal gray, area postrema, pontine raphe nucleus, gracile nucleus, spinal trigeminal nucleus, and spinal cord. RAMP1 mRNA expression was also detected in the posterior hypothalamic area, trochlear nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, medial lemniscus, pontine nuclei, vagus nerve, inferior olive, abducens nucleus, and motor trigeminal nucleus; protein coexpression of CLR and RAMP1 was observed in these areas via immunofluorescence. [(3)H]MK-3207 showed high binding densities concordant with mRNA and protein expression. The present study suggests that several regions in the brainstem may be involved in CGRP signaling. Interestingly, we found receptor expression and antagonist binding in some areas that are not protected by the blood-brain barrier, which suggests that drugs inhibiting CGRP signaling may not be able to penetrate the central nervous system to antagonize receptors in these brain regions. PMID:26105175

  15. Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis, Miller Fisher syndrome and Guillain-Barré syndrome overlap in an asthma patient with negative anti-ganglioside antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Han Chongyu; Wang Yuan; Jia Jianping; Ji Xunming; Fredrickson Vance; Ding Yuchuan; Sun Wei; Xu Jia; Sun Yong-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis (BBE), together with Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) were considered to form a continuous clinical spectrum. An anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome has been proposed to underlie the common pathophysiology for the three disorders; however, other studies have found a positive anti-GM1 instead of anti-GQ1b antibody. Case presentation Here we report a 20-year-old male patient with overlapping BBE, MFS and GBS. The pat...

  16. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult with Involvement of the Calvarium, Cerebral Cortex and Brainstem: Discussion of Pathophysiology and Rationale for the Use of Intravenous Immune Globulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardis, Christopher; Aung, Thandar; Shapiro, William; Fortune, John; Coons, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in a 64-year-old male who presented with symptoms and signs of brain involvement, including seizures and hypopituitarism. The diagnosis was confirmed with a biopsy of a lytic skull lesion. The disease affecting the bone showed no sign of progression following a short course of cladribine. Signs of temporal lobe involvement led to an additional biopsy, which showed signs of nonspecific neurodegeneration and which triggered status epilepticus. Lesions noted in the brainstem were typical for the paraneoplastic inflammation reported in this condition. These lesions improved after treatment with cladribine. They remained stable while on treatment with intravenous immune globulin. PMID:25873887

  17. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult with Involvement of the Calvarium, Cerebral Cortex and Brainstem: Discussion of Pathophysiology and Rationale for the Use of Intravenous Immune Globulin

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    Christopher Dardis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in a 64-year-old male who presented with symptoms and signs of brain involvement, including seizures and hypopituitarism. The diagnosis was confirmed with a biopsy of a lytic skull lesion. The disease affecting the bone showed no sign of progression following a short course of cladribine. Signs of temporal lobe involvement led to an additional biopsy, which showed signs of nonspecific neurodegeneration and which triggered status epilepticus. Lesions noted in the brainstem were typical for the paraneoplastic inflammation reported in this condition. These lesions improved after treatment with cladribine. They remained stable while on treatment with intravenous immune globulin.

  18. Activation of Nesfatin-1-Containing Neurones in the Hypothalamus and Brainstem by Peripheral Administration of Anorectic Hormones and Suppression of Feeding via Central Nesfatin-1 in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, R; So, M; Motojima, Y; Matsuura, T; Yoshimura, M; Hashimoto, H; Yamamoto, Y; Kusuhara, K; Ueta, Y

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral anorectic hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, cholecystokinin (CCK)-8 and leptin, suppress food intake. The newly-identified anorectic neuropeptide, nesfatin-1, is synthesised in both peripheral tissues and the central nervous system, particularly by various nuclei in the hypothalamus and brainstem. In the present study, we examined the effects of i.p. administration of GLP-1 and CCK-8 and co-administrations of GLP-1 and leptin at subthreshold doses as confirmed by measurement of food intake, on nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (-IR) neurones in the hypothalamus and brainstem of rats by Fos immunohistochemistry. Intraperitoneal administration of GLP-1 (100 μg/kg) caused significant increases in the number of nesfatin-1-IR neurones expressing Fos-immunoreactivity in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), the area postrema (AP) and the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) but not in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), the arcuate nucleus (ARC) or the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). On the other hand, i.p. administration of CCK-8 (50 μg/kg) resulted in marked increases in the number of nesfatin-1-IR neurones expressing Fos-immunoreactivity in the SON, PVN, AP and NTS but not in the ARC or LHA. No differences in the percentage of nesfatin-1-IR neurones expressing Fos-immunoreactivity in the nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem were observed between rats treated with saline, GLP-1 (33 μg/kg) or leptin. However, co-administration of GLP-1 (33 μg/kg) and leptin resulted in significant increases in the number of nesfatin-1-IR neurones expressing Fos-immunoreactivity in the AP and the NTS. Furthermore, decreased food intake induced by GLP-1, CCK-8 and leptin was attenuated significantly by pretreatment with i.c.v. administration of antisense nesfatin-1. These results indicate that nesfatin-1-expressing neurones in the brainstem may play an important role in sensing peripheral levels of GLP-1 and leptin in addition to CCK-8, and also suppress food intake in

  19. Early recognition and treatment of children with severe brainstem encephalitis%小儿重症脑干脑炎的早期识别及治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李会影

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨重症脑干脑炎患儿的临床特点,对其诊断及治疗方法进行分析。方法随机选取许昌市中心医院2012年9月至2014年5月收治的重症脑干脑炎患儿24例,对患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析,对其临床特征、诊断方法及治疗方法进行总结分析。结果本研究部分患儿存在面部神经麻痹或外展神经麻痹表现,个别患儿出现单侧肢体麻痹,其中70.83%表现为单侧脑神经受累,62.50%表现为单侧锥体束征;多数患儿存在不同程度的脑脊液改变表现,91.67%患儿均表现为脑电图异常。结论小儿重症脑干脑炎是一种急危重症,应加强对其临床特征、诊治规律的认识,以有效控制患儿病情的发展,保障患儿的生命安全。%Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of children with severe brainstem encephalitis and analyze its diagnosis and treatment methods. Methods Twenty-four children with severe brainstem encephalitis were ran-domly selected from September 2012 to May 2014 in Xuchang central hospital. Clinical data of children with severe brain-stem were retrospectively analyzed. And the clinical features, diagnostic methods and treatment methods were summarized and analyzed. Results In this study, most of sick children all existed facial nerve paralysis or abducent nerve paralysis, of the children, 70. 83% of unilateral cranial nerve involvement, 62. 50% of unilateral pyramid sign. Most children had differ-ent degrees of cerebrospinal fluid changes, and 91. 67% of children showed abnormal ECG. Conclusions Severe brainstem encephalitis of children is a kind of emergency and severe disease. We should strengthen its clinical features and regularities of diagnosis and treatment to control development of children’ s conditions effectively and ensure children’ s life safety.

  20. Effects of septal nucleus lesion on dopamine D2 receptor expression in the prefrontal lobe, striatum, and brainstem in a rat model of schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Li; Shuande Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been demonstrated that the septal nucleus is involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Based on autopsies of schizophrenia patients, studies have shown a reduced number of septal nucleus neurons and gila. In addition, experimental rat models of schizophrenia have shown increased dopamine receptor D2 binding sites in the basal ganglia, septal nuclei, and substantia nigra. Previous studies have demonstrated that the septal nucleus modulates dopamine metabolic disorder and dopamine D2 receptor balance.OBJECTIVE: Dopamine D2 receptor expression in a rat model of schizophrenia, combined with antipsychotic drugs, was analyzed in the prefrontal lobe, striatum, and brainstem. In situ hybridization was used to observe the effects of stereotactic septal nucleus lesions on dopamine D2 receptor expression in the brains of methylamphetamine-treated rats. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal experiment was performed in the Laboratory of General Institute of Psychosurgery, Third Hospital of Chinese PLA from November 2005 to June 2006. MATERIALS: A total of 120 healthy, adult Sprague Dawley rats, weighing approximately 200 g, were included. Methylamphetamine (Sigma, USA) and an in situ hybridization detection kit for dopamine D2 receptor (Boster, China) were also used for this study. METHODS: All rats were randomly allocated to the following 4 groups, with 30 rats in each group: normal control, simple administration, septal nucleus lesion, and sham-operated groups. In the normal control group, rats were not administered or lesioned. In the remaining 3 groups, rats were intraperitoneally administered 10 mg/kg methylamphetamine, once per day, for 15 successive days to establish a schizophrenia model. Following successful model establishment, rats from the septal nucleus lesion group were subjected to stereotactic septal nucleus lesions. The cranial bone was exposed in rats from the sham-operated group, and the septal nucleus was not