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Sample records for brain-machine interface instructed

  1. A brain-machine interface instructed by direct intracortical microstimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E O'Doherty

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs establish direct communications between the brain and artificial actuators. As such, they hold considerable promise for restoring mobility and communication in patients suffering from severe body paralysis. To achieve this end, future BMIs must also provide a means for delivering sensory signals from the actuators back to the brain. Prosthetic sensation is needed so that neuroprostheses can be better perceived and controlled. Here we show that a direct intracortical input can be added to a BMI to instruct rhesus monkeys in choosing the direction of reaching movements generated by the BMI. Somatosensory instructions were provided to two monkeys operating the BMI using either: (a vibrotactile stimulation of the monkey’s hands or (b multi-channel intracortical microstimulation (ICMS delivered to the primary somatosensory cortex (S1 in one monkey and posterior parietal cortex (PP in the other. Stimulus delivery was contingent on the position of the computer cursor: the monkey placed it in the center of the screen to receive machine-brain recursive input. After two weeks of training, the same level of proficiency in utilizing somatosensory information was achieved with ICMS of S1 as with the stimulus delivered to the hand skin. ICMS of PP was not effective. These results indicate that direct, bi-directional communication between the brain and neuroprosthetic devices can be achieved through the combination of chronic multi-electrode recording and microstimulation of S1. We propose that in the future, bidirectional BMIs incorporating ICMS may become an effective paradigm for sensorizing neuroprosthetic devices.

  2. Unsupervised adaptation of brain machine interface decoders

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    Tayfun eGürel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of neural decoders can degrade over time due to nonstationarities in the relationship between neuronal activity and behavior. In this case, brain-machine interfaces (BMI require adaptation of their decoders to maintain high performance across time. One way to achieve this is by use of periodical calibration phases, during which the BMI system (or an external human demonstrator instructs the user to perform certain movements or behaviors. This approach has two disadvantages: (i calibration phases interrupt the autonomous operation of the BMI and (ii between two calibration phases the BMI performance might not be stable but continuously decrease. A better alternative would be that the BMI decoder is able to continuously adapt in an unsupervised manner during autonomous BMI operation, i.e. without knowing the movement intentions of the user. In the present article, we present an efficient method for such unsupervised training of BMI systems for continuous movement control. The proposed method utilizes a cost function derived from neuronal recordings, which guides a learning algorithm to evaluate the decoding parameters. We verify the performance of our adaptive method by simulating a BMI user with an optimal feedback control model and its interaction with our adaptive BMI decoder. The simulation results show that the cost function and the algorithm yield fast and precise trajectories towards targets at random orientations on a 2-dimensional computer screen. For initially unknown and nonstationary tuning parameters, our unsupervised method is still able to generate precise trajectories and to keep its performance stable in the long term. The algorithm can optionally work also with neuronal error signals instead or in conjunction with the proposed unsupervised adaptation.

  3. Brain Machine Interfaces for Robotic Control in Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will study the application of a brain machine interface (BMI) to enable crew to remotely operate and monitor robots from inside a flight vehicle, habitat...

  4. Future developments in brain-machine interface research

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    Mikhail A. Lebedev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprosthetic devices based on brain-machine interface technology hold promise for the restoration of body mobility in patients suffering from devastating motor deficits caused by brain injury, neurologic diseases and limb loss. During the last decade, considerable progress has been achieved in this multidisciplinary research, mainly in the brain-machine interface that enacts upper-limb functionality. However, a considerable number of problems need to be resolved before fully functional limb neuroprostheses can be built. To move towards developing neuroprosthetic devices for humans, brain-machine interface research has to address a number of issues related to improving the quality of neuronal recordings, achieving stable, long-term performance, and extending the brain-machine interface approach to a broad range of motor and sensory functions. Here, we review the future steps that are part of the strategic plan of the Duke University Center for Neuroengineering, and its partners, the Brazilian National Institute of Brain-Machine Interfaces and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL Center for Neuroprosthetics, to bring this new technology to clinical fruition.

  5. A Wireless 32-Channel Implantable Bidirectional Brain Machine Interface.

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    Su, Yi; Routhu, Sudhamayee; Moon, Kee S; Lee, Sung Q; Youm, WooSub; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    All neural information systems (NIS) rely on sensing neural activity to supply commands and control signals for computers, machines and a variety of prosthetic devices. Invasive systems achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by eliminating the volume conduction problems caused by tissue and bone. An implantable brain machine interface (BMI) using intracortical electrodes provides excellent detection of a broad range of frequency oscillatory activities through the placement of a sensor in direct contact with cortex. This paper introduces a compact-sized implantable wireless 32-channel bidirectional brain machine interface (BBMI) to be used with freely-moving primates. The system is designed to monitor brain sensorimotor rhythms and present current stimuli with a configurable duration, frequency and amplitude in real time to the brain based on the brain activity report. The battery is charged via a novel ultrasonic wireless power delivery module developed for efficient delivery of power into a deeply-implanted system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo tests on a behaving primate to record the local field potential (LFP) oscillation and stimulate the target area at the same time.

  6. What turns assistive into restorative brain-machine interfaces?

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    Alireza Gharabaghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMI may support motor impaired patients during activities of daily living by controlling external devices such as prostheses (assistive BMI. Moreover, BMIs are applied in conjunction with robotic orthoses for rehabilitation of lost motor function via neurofeedback training (restorative BMI. Using assistive BMI in a rehabilitation context does not automatically turn them into restorative devices. This perspective article suggests key features of restorative BMI and provides the supporting evidence:In summary, BMI may be referred to as restorative tools when demonstrating subsequently (i operant learning and progressive evolution of specific brain states/dynamics, (ii correlated modulations of functional networks related to the therapeutic goal, (iii subsequent improvement in a specific task, and (iv an explicit correlation between the modulated brain dynamics and the achieved behavioral gains. Such findings would provide the rationale for translating BMI-based interventions into clinical settings for reinforcement learning and motor rehabilitation following stroke.

  7. Brain-machine interface: the challenge of neuroethics.

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    Demetriades, Andreas K; Demetriades, Christina K; Watts, Colin; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2010-10-01

    The burning question surrounding the use of Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) devices is not merely whether they should be used, but how widely they should be used, especially in view of some ethical implications that arise concerning the social and legal aspects of human life. As technology advances, it can be exploited to affect the quality of life. Since the effects of BMIs can be both positive and negative, it is imperative to address the issue of the ethics surrounding them. This paper presents the ways in which BMIs can be used and focuses on the ethical concerns to which neuroscience is thus exposed. The argument put forward supports the use of BMIs solely for purposes of medical treatment, and invites the legal framing of this.

  8. What Turns Assistive into Restorative Brain-Machine Interfaces?

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    Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) may support motor impaired patients during activities of daily living by controlling external devices such as prostheses (assistive BMI). Moreover, BMIs are applied in conjunction with robotic orthoses for rehabilitation of lost motor function via neurofeedback training (restorative BMI). Using assistive BMI in a rehabilitation context does not automatically turn them into restorative devices. This perspective article suggests key features of restorative BMI and provides the supporting evidence: In summary, BMI may be referred to as restorative tools when demonstrating subsequently (i) operant learning and progressive evolution of specific brain states/dynamics, (ii) correlated modulations of functional networks related to the therapeutic goal, (iii) subsequent improvement in a specific task, and (iv) an explicit correlation between the modulated brain dynamics and the achieved behavioral gains. Such findings would provide the rationale for translating BMI-based interventions into clinical settings for reinforcement learning and motor rehabilitation following stroke. PMID:27790085

  9. Modular particle filtering FPGA hardware architecture for brain machine interfaces.

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    Mountney, John; Obeid, Iyad; Silage, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    As the computational complexities of neural decoding algorithms for brain machine interfaces (BMI) increase, their implementation through sequential processors becomes prohibitive for real-time applications. This work presents the field programmable gate array (FPGA) as an alternative to sequential processors for BMIs. The reprogrammable hardware architecture of the FPGA provides a near optimal platform for performing parallel computations in real-time. The scalability and reconfigurability of the FPGA accommodates diverse sets of neural ensembles and a variety of decoding algorithms. Throughput is significantly increased by decomposing computations into independent parallel hardware modules on the FPGA. This increase in throughput is demonstrated through a parallel hardware implementation of the auxiliary particle filtering signal processing algorithm.

  10. Brain-machine interfaces for real-time speech synthesis.

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    Guenther, Frank H; Brumberg, Jonathan S

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on studies involving brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that provide near-instantaneous audio feedback from a speech synthesizer to the BMI user. In one study, neural signals recorded by an intracranial electrode implanted in a speech-related region of the left precentral gyrus of a human volunteer suffering from locked-in syndrome were transmitted wirelessly across the scalp and used to drive a formant synthesizer, allowing the user to produce vowels. In a second, pilot study, a neurologically normal user was able to drive the formant synthesizer with imagined movements detected using electroencephalography. Our results support the feasibility of neural prostheses that have the potential to provide near-conversational synthetic speech for individuals with severely impaired speech output.

  11. Biomimetic Brain Machine Interfaces for the Control of Movement

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    Fagg, Andrew H.; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; de Lafuente, Victor; Moxon, Karen A.; Nemati, Shamim; Rebesco, James M.; Romo, Ranulfo; Solla, Sara A.; Reimer, Jake; Tkach, Dennis; Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Miller, Lee E.

    2008-01-01

    Quite recently, it has become possible to use signals recorded simultaneously from large numbers of cortical neurons for real-time control. Such brain machine interfaces (BMIs) have allowed animal subjects and human patients to control the position of a computer cursor or robotic limb under the guidance of visual feedback. Although impressive, such approaches essentially ignore the dynamics of the musculoskeletal system, and they lack potentially critical somatosensory feedback. In this mini-symposium, we will initiate a discussion of systems that more nearly mimic the control of natural limb movement. The work that we will describe is based on fundamental observations of sensorimotor physiology that have inspired novel BMI approaches. We will focus on what we consider to be three of the most important new directions for BMI development related to the control of movement. (1) We will present alternative methods for building decoders, including structured, nonlinear models, the explicit incorporation of limb state information, and novel approaches to the development of decoders for paralyzed subjects unable to generate an output signal. (2) We will describe the real-time prediction of dynamical signals, including joint torque, force, and EMG, and the real-time control of physical plants with dynamics like that of the real limb. (3) We will discuss critical factors that must be considered to incorporate somatosensory feedback to the BMI user, including its potential benefits, the differing representations of sensation and perception across cortical areas, and the changes in the cortical representation of tactile events after spinal injury. PMID:17978021

  12. A chronic generalized bi-directional brain-machine interface

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    Rouse, A. G.; Stanslaski, S. R.; Cong, P.; Jensen, R. M.; Afshar, P.; Ullestad, D.; Gupta, R.; Molnar, G. F.; Moran, D. W.; Denison, T. J.

    2011-06-01

    A bi-directional neural interface (NI) system was designed and prototyped by incorporating a novel neural recording and processing subsystem into a commercial neural stimulator architecture. The NI system prototype leverages the system infrastructure from an existing neurostimulator to ensure reliable operation in a chronic implantation environment. In addition to providing predicate therapy capabilities, the device adds key elements to facilitate chronic research, such as four channels of electrocortigram/local field potential amplification and spectral analysis, a three-axis accelerometer, algorithm processing, event-based data logging, and wireless telemetry for data uploads and algorithm/configuration updates. The custom-integrated micropower sensor and interface circuits facilitate extended operation in a power-limited device. The prototype underwent significant verification testing to ensure reliability, and meets the requirements for a class CF instrument per IEC-60601 protocols. The ability of the device system to process and aid in classifying brain states was preclinically validated using an in vivo non-human primate model for brain control of a computer cursor (i.e. brain-machine interface or BMI). The primate BMI model was chosen for its ability to quantitatively measure signal decoding performance from brain activity that is similar in both amplitude and spectral content to other biomarkers used to detect disease states (e.g. Parkinson's disease). A key goal of this research prototype is to help broaden the clinical scope and acceptance of NI techniques, particularly real-time brain state detection. These techniques have the potential to be generalized beyond motor prosthesis, and are being explored for unmet needs in other neurological conditions such as movement disorders, stroke and epilepsy.

  13. Brain-machine interfaces for space applications-research, technological development, and opportunities.

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    Summerer, Leopold; Izzo, Dario; Rossini, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in brain research and brain-machine interfaces suggest these devices could play a central role in future generation computer interfaces. Successes in the use of brain machine interfaces for patients affected by motor paralysis, as well as first developments of games and gadgets based on this technology have matured the field and brought brain-machine interfaces to the brink of more general usability and eventually of opening new markets. In human space flight, astronauts are the most precious "payload" and astronaut time is extremely valuable. Astronauts operate under difficult and unusual conditions since the absence of gravity renders some of the very simple tasks tedious and cumbersome. Therefore, computer interfaces are generally designed for safety and functionality. All improvements and technical aids to enhance their functionality and efficiency, while not compromising safety or overall mass requirements, are therefore of great interest. Brain machine interfaces show some interesting properties in this respect. It is however not obvious that devices developed for functioning on-ground can be used as hands-free interfaces for astronauts. This chapter intends to highlight the research directions of brain machine interfaces with the perceived highest potential impact on future space applications, and to present an overview of the long-term plans with respect to human space flight. We conclude by suggesting research and development steps considered necessary to include brain-machine interface technology in future architectures for human space flight.

  14. What limits the performance of current invasive Brain Machine Interfaces?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gytis eBaranauskas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a brain-machine interface (BMI or a computer-brain interface is simple: BMI creates a communication pathway for a direct control by brain of an external device. In reality BMIs are very complex devices and only recently the increase in computing power of microprocessors enabled a boom in BMI research that continues almost unabated to this date, the high point being the insertion of electrode arrays into the brains of 5 human patients in a clinical trial run by Cyberkinetics with few other clinical tests still in progress. Meanwhile several EEG-based BMI devices (non-invasive BMIs were launched commercially. Modern electronics and dry electrode technology made possible to drive the cost of some of these devices below few hundred dollars. However, the initial excitement of the direct control by brain waves of a computer or other equipment is dampened by large efforts required for learning, high error rates and slow response speed. All these problems are directly related to low information transfer rates typical for such EEG-based BMIs. In invasive BMIs employing multiple electrodes inserted into the brain one may expect much higher information transfer rates than in EEG-based BMIs because, in theory, each electrode provides an independent information channel. However, although invasive BMIs require more expensive equipment and have ethical problems related to the need to insert electrodes in the live brain, such financial and ethical costs are often not offset by a dramatic improvement in the information transfer rate. Thus the main topic of this review is why in invasive BMIs an apparently much larger information content obtained with multiple extracellular electrodes does not translate into much higher rates of information transfer? This paper explores possible answers to this question by concluding that more research on what movement parameters are encoded by neurons in motor cortex is needed before we can enjoy the next

  15. What limits the performance of current invasive brain machine interfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, Gytis

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a brain-machine interface (BMI) or a computer-brain interface is simple: BMI creates a communication pathway for a direct control by brain of an external device. In reality BMIs are very complex devices and only recently the increase in computing power of microprocessors enabled a boom in BMI research that continues almost unabated to this date, the high point being the insertion of electrode arrays into the brains of 5 human patients in a clinical trial run by Cyberkinetics with few other clinical tests still in progress. Meanwhile several EEG-based BMI devices (non-invasive BMIs) were launched commercially. Modern electronics and dry electrode technology made possible to drive the cost of some of these devices below few hundred dollars. However, the initial excitement of the direct control by brain waves of a computer or other equipment is dampened by large efforts required for learning, high error rates and slow response speed. All these problems are directly related to low information transfer rates typical for such EEG-based BMIs. In invasive BMIs employing multiple electrodes inserted into the brain one may expect much higher information transfer rates than in EEG-based BMIs because, in theory, each electrode provides an independent information channel. However, although invasive BMIs require more expensive equipment and have ethical problems related to the need to insert electrodes in the live brain, such financial and ethical costs are often not offset by a dramatic improvement in the information transfer rate. Thus the main topic of this review is why in invasive BMIs an apparently much larger information content obtained with multiple extracellular electrodes does not translate into much higher rates of information transfer? This paper explores possible answers to this question by concluding that more research on what movement parameters are encoded by neurons in motor cortex is needed before we can enjoy the next generation BMIs.

  16. A glucose fuel cell for implantable brain-machine interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin I Rapoport

    Full Text Available We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing 3.4 μW cm(-2 steady-state power and up to 180 μW cm(-2 peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, employing semiconductor fabrication techniques, and is therefore well suited for manufacture together with integrated circuits on a single silicon wafer. Thus, it can help enable implantable microelectronic systems with long-lifetime power sources that harvest energy from their surrounds. The fuel reactions are mediated by robust, solid state catalysts. Glucose is oxidized at the nanostructured surface of an activated platinum anode. Oxygen is reduced to water at the surface of a self-assembled network of single-walled carbon nanotubes, embedded in a Nafion film that forms the cathode and is exposed to the biological environment. The catalytic electrodes are separated by a Nafion membrane. The availability of fuel cell reactants, oxygen and glucose, only as a mixture in the physiologic environment, has traditionally posed a design challenge: Net current production requires oxidation and reduction to occur separately and selectively at the anode and cathode, respectively, to prevent electrochemical short circuits. Our fuel cell is configured in a half-open geometry that shields the anode while exposing the cathode, resulting in an oxygen gradient that strongly favors oxygen reduction at the cathode. Glucose reaches the shielded anode by diffusing through the nanotube mesh, which does not catalyze glucose oxidation, and the Nafion layers, which are permeable to small neutral and cationic species. We demonstrate computationally that the natural recirculation of cerebrospinal fluid around the human brain theoretically permits glucose energy harvesting at a rate on the order of at least 1 mW with no adverse physiologic effects. Low-power brain-machine interfaces can thus potentially benefit from having their implanted units

  17. Brain-Machine Interface in chronic stroke rehabilitation: A controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos-Murguialday, A.; Brötz, D.; Rea, M.; Laër, L.; Yilmaz, O.; Brasil, F.L.; Liberati, G.; Curado, M.R.; Garcia Cossio, E.; Vyziotis, A.; Cho, W.; Agostini, M.; Soares, E.; Soekadar, S.; Caria, A.; Cohen, L.G.; Birbaumer, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chronic stroke patients with severe hand weakness respond poorly to rehabilitation efforts. Here, we evaluated efficacy of daily brain-machine interface (BMI) training to increase the hypothesized beneficial effects of physiotherapy alone in patients with severe paresis in a double-blind s

  18. Neuro-robotics from brain machine interfaces to rehabilitation robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Artemiadis

    2014-01-01

    Neuro-robotics is one of the most multidisciplinary fields of the last decades, fusing information and knowledge from neuroscience, engineering and computer science. This book focuses on the results from the strategic alliance between Neuroscience and Robotics that help the scientific community to better understand the brain as well as design robotic devices and algorithms for interfacing humans and robots. The first part of the book introduces the idea of neuro-robotics, by presenting state-of-the-art bio-inspired devices. The second part of the book focuses on human-machine interfaces for pe

  19. Wireless communication links for brain-machine interface applications

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    Larson, L.

    2016-05-01

    Recent technological developments have given neuroscientists direct access to neural signals in real time, with the accompanying ability to decode the resulting information and control various prosthetic devices and gain insight into deeper aspects of cognition. These developments - along with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease and the possible use of electro-stimulation for other maladies - leads to the conclusion that the widespread use electronic brain interface technology is a long term possibility. This talk will summarize the various technical challenges and approaches that have been developed to wirelessly communicate with the brain, including technology constraints, dc power limits, compression and data rate issues.

  20. A bidirectional brain-machine interface connecting alert rodents to a dynamical system.

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    Boi, Fabio; Semprini, Marianna; Mussa Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Panzeri, Stefano; Vato, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel experimental framework that implements a bidirectional brain-machine interface inspired by the operation of the spinal cord in vertebrates that generates a control policy in the form of a force field. The proposed experimental set-up allows connecting the brain of freely moving rats to an external device. We tested this apparatus in a preliminary experiment with an alert rat that used the interface for acquiring a food reward. The goal of this approach to bidirectional interfaces is to explore the role of voluntary neural commands in controlling a dynamical system represented by a small cart moving on vertical plane and connected to a water/pellet dispenser.

  1. A 128-Channel Extreme Learning Machine-Based Neural Decoder for Brain Machine Interfaces.

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    Chen, Yi; Yao, Enyi; Basu, Arindam

    2016-06-01

    Currently, state-of-the-art motor intention decoding algorithms in brain-machine interfaces are mostly implemented on a PC and consume significant amount of power. A machine learning coprocessor in 0.35- μm CMOS for the motor intention decoding in the brain-machine interfaces is presented in this paper. Using Extreme Learning Machine algorithm and low-power analog processing, it achieves an energy efficiency of 3.45 pJ/MAC at a classification rate of 50 Hz. The learning in second stage and corresponding digitally stored coefficients are used to increase robustness of the core analog processor. The chip is verified with neural data recorded in monkey finger movements experiment, achieving a decoding accuracy of 99.3% for movement type. The same coprocessor is also used to decode time of movement from asynchronous neural spikes. With time-delayed feature dimension enhancement, the classification accuracy can be increased by 5% with limited number of input channels. Further, a sparsity promoting training scheme enables reduction of number of programmable weights by ≈ 2X.

  2. Toward an autonomous brain machine interface: integrating sensorimotor reward modulation and reinforcement learning.

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    Marsh, Brandi T; Tarigoppula, Venkata S Aditya; Chen, Chen; Francis, Joseph T

    2015-05-13

    For decades, neurophysiologists have worked on elucidating the function of the cortical sensorimotor control system from the standpoint of kinematics or dynamics. Recently, computational neuroscientists have developed models that can emulate changes seen in the primary motor cortex during learning. However, these simulations rely on the existence of a reward-like signal in the primary sensorimotor cortex. Reward modulation of the primary sensorimotor cortex has yet to be characterized at the level of neural units. Here we demonstrate that single units/multiunits and local field potentials in the primary motor (M1) cortex of nonhuman primates (Macaca radiata) are modulated by reward expectation during reaching movements and that this modulation is present even while subjects passively view cursor motions that are predictive of either reward or nonreward. After establishing this reward modulation, we set out to determine whether we could correctly classify rewarding versus nonrewarding trials, on a moment-to-moment basis. This reward information could then be used in collaboration with reinforcement learning principles toward an autonomous brain-machine interface. The autonomous brain-machine interface would use M1 for both decoding movement intention and extraction of reward expectation information as evaluative feedback, which would then update the decoding algorithm as necessary. In the work presented here, we show that this, in theory, is possible.

  3. Habit learning and brain-machine interfaces (BMI): a tribute to Valentino Braitenberg's "Vehicles".

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    Birbaumer, Niels; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2014-10-01

    Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMI) allow manipulation of external devices and computers directly with brain activity without involvement of overt motor actions. The neurophysiological principles of such robotic brain devices and BMIs follow Hebbian learning rules as described and realized by Valentino Braitenberg in his book "Vehicles," in the concept of a "thought pump" residing in subcortical basal ganglia structures. We describe here the application of BMIs for brain communication in totally locked-in patients and argue that the thought pump may extinguish-at least partially-in those people because of extinction of instrumentally learned cognitive responses and brain responses. We show that Pavlovian semantic conditioning may allow brain communication even in the completely paralyzed who does not show response-effect contingencies. Principles of skill learning and habit acquisition as formulated by Braitenberg are the building blocks of BMIs and neuroprostheses.

  4. Brain-Machine Interfacing Control of Whole-Body Humanoid Motion

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    Karim eBouyarmane

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose to tackle in this paper the problem of controlling whole-body humanoid robot behavior through non-invasive brain-machine interfacing (BMI, motivated by the perspective of mapping human motor control strategies to human-like mechanical avatar. Our solution is based on the adequate reduction of the controllable dimensionality of a high-DOF humanoid motion in line with the state-of-the-art possibilities of non-invasive BMI technologies, leaving the complement subspace part of the motion to be planned and executed by an autonomous humanoid whole-body motion planning and control framework. The results are shown in full physics-based simulation of a 36-degree-of-freedom humanoid motion controlled by a user through EEG-extracted brain signals generated with motor imagery task.

  5. Common Spatio-Time-Frequency Patterns for Motor Imagery-Based Brain Machine Interfaces

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    Hiroshi Higashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For efficient decoding of brain activities in analyzing brain function with an application to brain machine interfacing (BMI, we address a problem of how to determine spatial weights (spatial patterns, bandpass filters (frequency patterns, and time windows (time patterns by utilizing electroencephalogram (EEG recordings. To find these parameters, we develop a data-driven criterion that is a natural extension of the so-called common spatial patterns (CSP that are known to be effective features in BMI. We show that the proposed criterion can be optimized by an alternating procedure to achieve fast convergence. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively extract discriminative features for a motor imagery-based BMI.

  6. An implantable VLSI architecture for real time spike sorting in cortically controlled Brain Machine Interfaces.

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    Aghagolzadeh, Mehdi; Zhang, Fei; Oweiss, Karim

    2010-01-01

    Brain Machine Interface (BMI) systems demand real-time spike sorting to instantaneously decode the spike trains of simultaneously recorded cortical neurons. Real-time spike sorting, however, requires extensive computational power that is not feasible to implement in implantable BMI architectures, thereby requiring transmission of high-bandwidth raw neural data to an external computer. In this work, we describe a miniaturized, low power, programmable hardware module capable of performing this task within the resource constraints of an implantable chip. The module computes a sparse representation of the spike waveforms followed by "smart" thresholding. This cascade restricts the sparse representation to a subset of projections that preserve the discriminative features of neuron-specific spike waveforms. In addition, it further reduces telemetry bandwidth making it feasible to wirelessly transmit only the important biological information to the outside world, thereby improving the efficiency, practicality and viability of BMI systems in clinical applications.

  7. FPGA implementation of hardware processing modules as coprocessors in brain-machine interfaces.

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    Wang, Dong; Hao, Yaoyao; Zhu, Xiaoping; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Yiwen; Chen, Yaowu; Chen, Weidong; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2011-01-01

    Real-time computation, portability and flexibility are crucial for practical brain-machine interface (BMI) applications. In this work, we proposed Hardware Processing Modules (HPMs) as a method for accelerating BMI computation. Two HPMs have been developed. One is the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of spike sorting based on probabilistic neural network (PNN), and the other is the FPGA implementation of neural ensemble decoding based on Kalman filter (KF). These two modules were configured under the same framework and tested with real data from motor cortex recording in rats performing a lever-pressing task for water rewards. Due to the parallelism feature of FPGA, the computation time was reduced by several dozen times, while the results are almost the same as those from Matlab implementations. Such HPMs provide a high performance coprocessor for neural signal computation.

  8. Wireless brain-machine interface using EEG and EOG: brain wave classification and robot control

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    Oh, Sechang; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-04-01

    A brain-machine interface (BMI) links a user's brain activity directly to an external device. It enables a person to control devices using only thought. Hence, it has gained significant interest in the design of assistive devices and systems for people with disabilities. In addition, BMI has also been proposed to replace humans with robots in the performance of dangerous tasks like explosives handling/diffusing, hazardous materials handling, fire fighting etc. There are mainly two types of BMI based on the measurement method of brain activity; invasive and non-invasive. Invasive BMI can provide pristine signals but it is expensive and surgery may lead to undesirable side effects. Recent advances in non-invasive BMI have opened the possibility of generating robust control signals from noisy brain activity signals like EEG and EOG. A practical implementation of a non-invasive BMI such as robot control requires: acquisition of brain signals with a robust wearable unit, noise filtering and signal processing, identification and extraction of relevant brain wave features and finally, an algorithm to determine control signals based on the wave features. In this work, we developed a wireless brain-machine interface with a small platform and established a BMI that can be used to control the movement of a robot by using the extracted features of the EEG and EOG signals. The system records and classifies EEG as alpha, beta, delta, and theta waves. The classified brain waves are then used to define the level of attention. The acceleration and deceleration or stopping of the robot is controlled based on the attention level of the wearer. In addition, the left and right movements of eye ball control the direction of the robot.

  9. Creating new functional circuits for action via brain-machine interfaces.

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    Orsborn, Amy L; Carmena, Jose M

    2013-11-05

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are an emerging technology with great promise for developing restorative therapies for those with disabilities. BMIs also create novel, well-defined functional circuits for action that are distinct from the natural sensorimotor apparatus. Closed-loop control of BMI systems can also actively engage learning and adaptation. These properties make BMIs uniquely suited to study learning of motor and non-physical, abstract skills. Recent work used motor BMIs to shed light on the neural representations of skill formation and motor adaptation. Emerging work in sensory BMIs, and other novel interface systems, also highlight the promise of using BMI systems to study fundamental questions in learning and sensorimotor control. This paper outlines the interpretation of BMIs as novel closed-loop systems and the benefits of these systems for studying learning. We review BMI learning studies, their relation to motor control, and propose future directions for this nascent field. Understanding learning in BMIs may both elucidate mechanisms of natural motor and abstract skill learning, and aid in developing the next generation of neuroprostheses.

  10. Single-crystal cubic silicon carbide: an in vivo biocompatible semiconductor for brain machine interface devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frewin, Christopher L; Locke, Christopher; Saddow, Stephen E; Weeber, Edwin J

    2011-01-01

    Single crystal silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide band-gap semiconductor which has shown both bio- and hemo-compatibility [1-5]. Although single crystalline SiC has appealing bio-sensing potential, the material has not been extensively characterized. Cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) has superior in vitro biocompatibility compared to its hexagonal counterparts [3, 5]. Brain machine interface (BMI) systems using implantable neuronal prosthetics offer the possibility of bi-directional signaling, which allow sensory feedback and closed loop control. Existing implantable neural interfaces have limited long-term reliability, and 3C-SiC may be a material that may improve that reliability. In the present study, we investigated in vivo 3C-SiC biocompatibility in the CNS of C56BL/6 mice. 3C-SiC was compared against the known immunoreactive response of silicon (Si) at 5, 10, and 35 days. The material was examined to detect CD45, a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) expressed by activated microglia and macrophages. The 3C-SiC surface revealed limited immunoresponse and significantly reduced microglia compared to Si substrate.

  11. Optimal space-time precoding of artificial sensory feedback through mutichannel microstimulation in bi-directional brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, John; Liu, Jianbo; Aghagolzadeh, Mehdi; Oweiss, Karim

    2012-12-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) aim to restore lost sensorimotor and cognitive function in subjects with severe neurological deficits. In particular, lost somatosensory function may be restored by artificially evoking patterns of neural activity through microstimulation to induce perception of tactile and proprioceptive feedback to the brain about the state of the limb. Despite an early proof of concept that subjects could learn to discriminate a limited vocabulary of intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) patterns that instruct the subject about the state of the limb, the dynamics of a moving limb are unlikely to be perceived by an arbitrarily-selected, discrete set of static microstimulation patterns, raising questions about the generalization and the scalability of this approach. In this work, we propose a microstimulation protocol intended to activate optimally the ascending somatosensory pathway. The optimization is achieved through a space-time precoder that maximizes the mutual information between the sensory feedback indicating the limb state and the cortical neural response evoked by thalamic microstimulation. Using a simplified multi-input multi-output model of the thalamocortical pathway, we show that this optimal precoder can deliver information more efficiently in the presence of noise compared to suboptimal precoders that do not account for the afferent pathway structure and/or cortical states. These results are expected to enhance the way microstimulation is used to induce somatosensory perception during sensorimotor control of artificial devices or paralyzed limbs.

  12. The PennBMBI: Design of a General Purpose Wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Subei, Basheer; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a general purpose wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface (BMBI) system is presented. The system integrates four battery-powered wireless devices for the implementation of a closed-loop sensorimotor neural interface, including a neural signal analyzer, a neural stimulator, a body-area sensor node and a graphic user interface implemented on the PC end. The neural signal analyzer features a four channel analog front-end with configurable bandpass filter, gain stage, digitization resolution, and sampling rate. The target frequency band is configurable from EEG to single unit activity. A noise floor of 4.69 μVrms is achieved over a bandwidth from 0.05 Hz to 6 kHz. Digital filtering, neural feature extraction, spike detection, sensing-stimulating modulation, and compressed sensing measurement are realized in a central processing unit integrated in the analyzer. A flash memory card is also integrated in the analyzer. A 2-channel neural stimulator with a compliance voltage up to ± 12 V is included. The stimulator is capable of delivering unipolar or bipolar, charge-balanced current pulses with programmable pulse shape, amplitude, width, pulse train frequency and latency. A multi-functional sensor node, including an accelerometer, a temperature sensor, a flexiforce sensor and a general sensor extension port has been designed. A computer interface is designed to monitor, control and configure all aforementioned devices via a wireless link, according to a custom designed communication protocol. Wireless closed-loop operation between the sensory devices, neural stimulator, and neural signal analyzer can be configured. The proposed system was designed to link two sites in the brain, bridging the brain and external hardware, as well as creating new sensory and motor pathways for clinical practice. Bench test and in vivo experiments are performed to verify the functions and performances of the system.

  13. A Review of fMRI as a Tool for Enhancing Eeg-Based Brain-Machine Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Barrios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human-robot interaction has been going stronger and stronger, up to find a notorious level on brain-machines interfaces. This assistive technology offers a great hope for patients suffering severe neuromuscular disorders. Starting from the current limitations hindering its extensive application outside the research laboratories, this paper reviews findings and prospects on functional magnetic resonance imaging showing how fMRI can help to overcome those limitations, while playing a key role on improving the development of brain-machine interfaces based on electroencephalography. The different types of derived benefits for this interfaces, as well as the different kinds of impact on their components, are presented under a field classification that reveals the distinctive roles that fMRI can play on the present context. The review concludes that fMRI provides complementary knowledge of immediate application, and that a greater profit could be obtained from the own EEG signal by integrating both neuroimaging modalities.

  14. A Brain-Machine Interface Operating with a Real-Time Spiking Neural Network Control Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethier, Julie; Nuyujukian, Paul; Eliasmith, Chris; Stewart, Terry; Elassaad, Shauki A; Shenoy, Krishna V; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Motor prostheses aim to restore function to disabled patients. Despite compelling proof of concept systems, barriers to clinical translation remain. One challenge is to develop a low-power, fully-implantable system that dissipates only minimal power so as not to damage tissue. To this end, we implemented a Kalman-filter based decoder via a spiking neural network (SNN) and tested it in brain-machine interface (BMI) experiments with a rhesus monkey. The Kalman filter was trained to predict the arm's velocity and mapped on to the SNN using the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF). A 2,000-neuron embedded Matlab SNN implementation runs in real-time and its closed-loop performance is quite comparable to that of the standard Kalman filter. The success of this closed-loop decoder holds promise for hardware SNN implementations of statistical signal processing algorithms on neuromorphic chips, which may offer power savings necessary to overcome a major obstacle to the successful clinical translation of neural motor prostheses.

  15. A four-dimensional virtual hand brain-machine interface using active dimension selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Adam G.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) traditionally rely on a fixed, linear transformation from neural signals to an output state-space. In this study, the assumption that a BMI must control a fixed, orthogonal basis set was challenged and a novel active dimension selection (ADS) decoder was explored. Approach. ADS utilizes a two stage decoder by using neural signals to both (i) select an active dimension being controlled and (ii) control the velocity along the selected dimension. ADS decoding was tested in a monkey using 16 single units from premotor and primary motor cortex to successfully control a virtual hand avatar to move to eight different postures. Main results. Following training with the ADS decoder to control 2, 3, and then 4 dimensions, each emulating a grasp shape of the hand, performance reached 93% correct with a bit rate of 2.4 bits s-1 for eight targets. Selection of eight targets using ADS control was more efficient, as measured by bit rate, than either full four-dimensional control or computer assisted one-dimensional control. Significance. ADS decoding allows a user to quickly and efficiently select different hand postures. This novel decoding scheme represents a potential method to reduce the complexity of high-dimension BMI control of the hand.

  16. Craniux: A LabVIEW-Based Modular Software Framework for Brain-Machine Interface Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D. Degenhart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents “Craniux,” an open-access, open-source software framework for brain-machine interface (BMI research. Developed in LabVIEW, a high-level graphical programming environment, Craniux offers both out-of-the-box functionality and a modular BMI software framework that is easily extendable. Specifically, it allows researchers to take advantage of multiple features inherent to the LabVIEW environment for on-the-fly data visualization, parallel processing, multithreading, and data saving. This paper introduces the basic features and system architecture of Craniux and describes the validation of the system under real-time BMI operation using simulated and real electrocorticographic (ECoG signals. Our results indicate that Craniux is able to operate consistently in real time, enabling a seamless work flow to achieve brain control of cursor movement. The Craniux software framework is made available to the scientific research community to provide a LabVIEW-based BMI software platform for future BMI research and development.

  17. Learning to control a brain-machine interface for reaching and grasping by primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Carmena

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Reaching and grasping in primates depend on the coordination of neural activity in large frontoparietal ensembles. Here we demonstrate that primates can learn to reach and grasp virtual objects by controlling a robot arm through a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMIc that uses multiple mathematical models to extract several motor parameters (i.e., hand position, velocity, gripping force, and the EMGs of multiple arm muscles from the electrical activity of frontoparietal neuronal ensembles. As single neurons typically contribute to the encoding of several motor parameters, we observed that high BMIc accuracy required recording from large neuronal ensembles. Continuous BMIc operation by monkeys led to significant improvements in both model predictions and behavioral performance. Using visual feedback, monkeys succeeded in producing robot reach-and-grasp movements even when their arms did not move. Learning to operate the BMIc was paralleled by functional reorganization in multiple cortical areas, suggesting that the dynamic properties of the BMIc were incorporated into motor and sensory cortical representations.

  18. Craniux: a LabVIEW-based modular software framework for brain-machine interface research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhart, Alan D; Kelly, John W; Ashmore, Robin C; Collinger, Jennifer L; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Weber, Douglas J; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents "Craniux," an open-access, open-source software framework for brain-machine interface (BMI) research. Developed in LabVIEW, a high-level graphical programming environment, Craniux offers both out-of-the-box functionality and a modular BMI software framework that is easily extendable. Specifically, it allows researchers to take advantage of multiple features inherent to the LabVIEW environment for on-the-fly data visualization, parallel processing, multithreading, and data saving. This paper introduces the basic features and system architecture of Craniux and describes the validation of the system under real-time BMI operation using simulated and real electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals. Our results indicate that Craniux is able to operate consistently in real time, enabling a seamless work flow to achieve brain control of cursor movement. The Craniux software framework is made available to the scientific research community to provide a LabVIEW-based BMI software platform for future BMI research and development.

  19. Maximum correntropy based attention-gated reinforcement learning designed for brain machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbao; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Wang, Yiwen; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Principe, Jose C; Hongbao Li; Fang Wang; Qiaosheng Zhang; Shaomin Zhang; Yiwen Wang; Xiaoxiang Zheng; Principe, Jose C; Wang, Yiwen; Principe, Jose C; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Li, Hongbao; Wang, Fang

    2016-08-01

    Reinforcement learning is an effective algorithm for brain machine interfaces (BMIs) which interprets the mapping between neural activities with plasticity and the kinematics. Exploring large state-action space is difficulty when the complicated BMIs needs to assign credits over both time and space. For BMIs attention gated reinforcement learning (AGREL) has been developed to classify multi-actions for spatial credit assignment task with better efficiency. However, the outliers existing in the neural signals still make interpret the neural-action mapping difficult. We propose an enhanced AGREL algorithm using correntropy as a criterion, which is more insensitive to noise. Then the algorithm is tested on the neural data where the monkey is trained to do the obstacle avoidance task. The new method converges faster during the training period, and improves from 44.63% to 68.79% on average in success rate compared with the original AGREL. The result indicates that the combination of correntropy criterion and AGREL can reduce the effect of the outliers with better performance when interpreting the mapping between neural signal and kinematics.

  20. A brain-machine-muscle interface for restoring hindlimb locomotion after complete spinal transection in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monzurul Alam

    Full Text Available A brain-machine interface (BMI is a neuroprosthetic device that can restore motor function of individuals with paralysis. Although the feasibility of BMI control of upper-limb neuroprostheses has been demonstrated, a BMI for the restoration of lower-limb motor functions has not yet been developed. The objective of this study was to determine if gait-related information can be captured from neural activity recorded from the primary motor cortex of rats, and if this neural information can be used to stimulate paralysed hindlimb muscles after complete spinal cord transection. Neural activity was recorded from the hindlimb area of the primary motor cortex of six female Sprague Dawley rats during treadmill locomotion before and after mid-thoracic transection. Before spinal transection there was a strong association between neural activity and the step cycle. This association decreased after spinal transection. However, the locomotive state (standing vs. walking could still be successfully decoded from neural recordings made after spinal transection. A novel BMI device was developed that processed this neural information in real-time and used it to control electrical stimulation of paralysed hindlimb muscles. This system was able to elicit hindlimb muscle contractions that mimicked forelimb stepping. We propose this lower-limb BMI as a future neuroprosthesis for human paraplegics.

  1. Cortical modulations increase in early sessions with brain-machine interface.

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    Miriam Zacksenhouse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During planning and execution of reaching movements, the activity of cortical motor neurons is modulated by a diversity of motor, sensory, and cognitive signals. Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs extract part of these modulations to directly control artificial actuators. However, cortical modulations that emerge in the novel context of operating the BMI are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we analyzed the changes in neuronal modulations that occurred in different cortical motor areas as monkeys learned to use a BMI to control reaching movements. Using spike-train analysis methods we demonstrate that the modulations of the firing-rates of cortical neurons increased abruptly after the monkeys started operating the BMI. Regression analysis revealed that these enhanced modulations were not correlated with the kinematics of the movement. The initial enhancement in firing rate modulations declined gradually with subsequent training in parallel with the improvement in behavioral performance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the enhanced modulations are related to computational tasks that are significant especially in novel motor contexts. Although the function and neuronal mechanism of the enhanced cortical modulations are open for further inquiries, we discuss their potential role in processing execution errors and representing corrective or explorative activity. These representations are expected to contribute to the formation of internal models of the external actuator and their decoding may facilitate BMI improvement.

  2. Quantifying the role of motor imagery in brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesotti, Silvia; Bassolino, Michela; Serino, Andrea; Bleuler, Hannes; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-04-01

    Despite technical advances in brain machine interfaces (BMI), for as-yet unknown reasons the ability to control a BMI remains limited to a subset of users. We investigate whether individual differences in BMI control based on motor imagery (MI) are related to differences in MI ability. We assessed whether differences in kinesthetic and visual MI, in the behavioral accuracy of MI, and in electroencephalographic variables, were able to differentiate between high- versus low-aptitude BMI users. High-aptitude BMI users showed higher MI accuracy as captured by subjective and behavioral measurements, pointing to a prominent role of kinesthetic rather than visual imagery. Additionally, for the first time, we applied mental chronometry, a measure quantifying the degree to which imagined and executed movements share a similar temporal profile. We also identified enhanced lateralized μ-band oscillations over sensorimotor cortices during MI in high- versus low-aptitude BMI users. These findings reveal that subjective, behavioral, and EEG measurements of MI are intimately linked to BMI control. We propose that poor BMI control cannot be ascribed only to intrinsic limitations of EEG recordings and that specific questionnaires and mental chronometry can be used as predictors of BMI performance (without the need to record EEG activity).

  3. Brain machine interfaces combining microelectrode arrays with nanostructured optical biochemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Gonzalez, Timothy; Ghafer-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Chodavarapu, Vamsy; Musallam, Sam; Andrews, Mark

    2009-02-01

    Neural microelectrodes are an important component of neural prosthetic systems which assist paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. These microelectrodes are also used in clinical settings to localize the locus of seizure initiation in epilepsy or to stimulate sub-cortical structures in patients with Parkinson's disease. In neural prosthetic systems, implanted microelectrodes record the electrical potential generated by specific thoughts and relay the signals to algorithms trained to interpret these thoughts. In this paper, we describe novel elongated multi-site neural electrodes that can record electrical signals and specific neural biomarkers and that can reach depths greater than 8mm in the sulcus of non-human primates (monkeys). We hypothesize that additional signals recorded by the multimodal probes will increase the information yield when compared to standard probes that record just electropotentials. We describe integration of optical biochemical sensors with neural microelectrodes. The sensors are made using sol-gel derived xerogel thin films that encapsulate specific biomarker responsive luminophores in their nanostructured pores. The desired neural biomarkers are O2, pH, K+, and Na+ ions. As a prototype, we demonstrate direct-write patterning to create oxygen-responsive xerogel waveguide structures on the neural microelectrodes. The recording of neural biomarkers along with electrical activity could help the development of intelligent and more userfriendly neural prosthesis/brain machine interfaces as well as aid in providing answers to complex brain diseases and disorders.

  4. A brain-machine interface enables bimanual arm movements in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifft, Peter J; Shokur, Solaiman; Li, Zheng; Lebedev, Mikhail A; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2013-11-06

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are artificial systems that aim to restore sensation and movement to paralyzed patients. So far, BMIs have enabled only one arm to be moved at a time. Control of bimanual arm movements remains a major challenge. We have developed and tested a bimanual BMI that enables rhesus monkeys to control two avatar arms simultaneously. The bimanual BMI was based on the extracellular activity of 374 to 497 neurons recorded from several frontal and parietal cortical areas of both cerebral hemispheres. Cortical activity was transformed into movements of the two arms with a decoding algorithm called a fifth-order unscented Kalman filter (UKF). The UKF was trained either during a manual task performed with two joysticks or by having the monkeys passively observe the movements of avatar arms. Most cortical neurons changed their modulation patterns when both arms were engaged simultaneously. Representing the two arms jointly in a single UKF decoder resulted in improved decoding performance compared with using separate decoders for each arm. As the animals' performance in bimanual BMI control improved over time, we observed widespread plasticity in frontal and parietal cortical areas. Neuronal representation of the avatar and reach targets was enhanced with learning, whereas pairwise correlations between neurons initially increased and then decreased. These results suggest that cortical networks may assimilate the two avatar arms through BMI control. These findings should help in the design of more sophisticated BMIs capable of enabling bimanual motor control in human patients.

  5. Improving brain-machine interface performance by decoding intended future movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Francis R.; Suminski, Aaron J.; Fagg, Andrew H.; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. A brain-machine interface (BMI) records neural signals in real time from a subject's brain, interprets them as motor commands, and reroutes them to a device such as a robotic arm, so as to restore lost motor function. Our objective here is to improve BMI performance by minimizing the deleterious effects of delay in the BMI control loop. We mitigate the effects of delay by decoding the subject's intended movements a short time lead in the future. Approach. We use the decoded, intended future movements of the subject as the control signal that drives the movement of our BMI. This should allow the user's intended trajectory to be implemented more quickly by the BMI, reducing the amount of delay in the system. In our experiment, a monkey (Macaca mulatta) uses a future prediction BMI to control a simulated arm to hit targets on a screen. Main Results. Results from experiments with BMIs possessing different system delays (100, 200 and 300 ms) show that the monkey can make significantly straighter, faster and smoother movements when the decoder predicts the user's future intent. We also characterize how BMI performance changes as a function of delay, and explore offline how the accuracy of future prediction decoders varies at different time leads. Significance. This study is the first to characterize the effects of control delays in a BMI and to show that decoding the user's future intent can compensate for the negative effect of control delay on BMI performance.

  6. Training of a leaning agent for navigation--inspired by brain-machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tadashi; Nishino, Daisuke

    2006-04-01

    The design clue for the remote control of a mobile robot is inspired by the Talwar's brain-machine interface technology for remotely training and controlling rats. Our biologically inspired autonomous robot control consciousness-based architecture (CBA) is used for the remote control of a robot as a substitute for a rat. CBA is a developmental hierarchy model of the relationship between consciousness and behavior, including a training algorithm. This training algorithm computes a shortcut path to a goal using a cognitive map created based on behavior obstructions during a single successful trial. However, failures in reaching the goal due to errors of the vision and dead reckoning sensors require human intervention to improve autonomous navigation. A human operator remotely intervenes in autonomous behaviors in two ways: low-level intervention in reflexive actions and high-level ones in the cognitive map. Experiments are conducted to test CBA functions for intervention with a joystick for a Khepera robot navigating from the center of a square obstacle with an open side toward a goal. Their statistical results show that both human interventions, especially high-level ones, are effective in drastically improving the success rate of autonomous detours.

  7. A bidirectional brain-machine interface algorithm that approximates arbitrary force-fields.

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    Alessandro Vato

    Full Text Available We examine bidirectional brain-machine interfaces that control external devices in a closed loop by decoding motor cortical activity to command the device and by encoding the state of the device by delivering electrical stimuli to sensory areas. Although it is possible to design this artificial sensory-motor interaction while maintaining two independent channels of communication, here we propose a rule that closes the loop between flows of sensory and motor information in a way that approximates a desired dynamical policy expressed as a field of forces acting upon the controlled external device. We previously developed a first implementation of this approach based on linear decoding of neural activity recorded from the motor cortex into a set of forces (a force field applied to a point mass, and on encoding of position of the point mass into patterns of electrical stimuli delivered to somatosensory areas. However, this previous algorithm had the limitation that it only worked in situations when the position-to-force map to be implemented is invertible. Here we overcome this limitation by developing a new non-linear form of the bidirectional interface that can approximate a virtually unlimited family of continuous fields. The new algorithm bases both the encoding of position information and the decoding of motor cortical activity on an explicit map between spike trains and the state space of the device computed with Multi-Dimensional-Scaling. We present a detailed computational analysis of the performance of the interface and a validation of its robustness by using synthetic neural responses in a simulated sensory-motor loop.

  8. Implications of the Dependence of Neuronal Activity on Neural Network States for the Design of Brain-Machine Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Panzeri, Stefano; Safaai, Houman; De Feo, Vito; Vato, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stim...

  9. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eZacksenhouse

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal.

  10. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamini, Miri; Zacksenhouse, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus, we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal.

  11. Assessment of brain-machine interfaces from the perspective of people with paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blabe, Christine H.; Gilja, Vikash; Chestek, Cindy A.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Anderson, Kim D.; Henderson, Jaimie M.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. One of the main goals of brain-machine interface (BMI) research is to restore function to people with paralysis. Currently, multiple BMI design features are being investigated, based on various input modalities (externally applied and surgically implantable sensors) and output modalities (e.g. control of computer systems, prosthetic arms, and functional electrical stimulation systems). While these technologies may eventually provide some level of benefit, they each carry associated burdens for end-users. We sought to assess the attitudes of people with paralysis toward using various technologies to achieve particular benefits, given the burdens currently associated with the use of each system. Approach. We designed and distributed a technology survey to determine the level of benefit necessary for people with tetraplegia due to spinal cord injury to consider using different technologies, given the burdens currently associated with them. The survey queried user preferences for 8 BMI technologies including electroencephalography, electrocorticography, and intracortical microelectrode arrays, as well as a commercially available eye tracking system for comparison. Participants used a 5-point scale to rate their likelihood to adopt these technologies for 13 potential control capabilities. Main Results. Survey respondents were most likely to adopt BMI technology to restore some of their natural upper extremity function, including restoration of hand grasp and/or some degree of natural arm movement. High speed typing and control of a fast robot arm were also of interest to this population. Surgically implanted wireless technologies were twice as ‘likely’ to be adopted as their wired equivalents. Significance. Assessing end-user preferences is an essential prerequisite to the design and implementation of any assistive technology. The results of this survey suggest that people with tetraplegia would adopt an unobtrusive, autonomous BMI system for both

  12. Analysis of neural activity in human motor cortex -- Towards brain machine interface system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secundo, Lavi

    The discovery of directional tuned neurons in the primary motor cortex has advanced motor research in several domains. For instance, in the area of brain machine interface (BMI), researchers have exploited the robust characteristic of tuned motor neurons to allow monkeys to learn control of various machines. In the first chapter of this work we examine whether this phenomena can be observed using the less invasive method of recording electrocorticographic signals (ECoG) from the surface of a human's brain. Our findings reveal that individual ECoG channels contain complex movement information about the neuronal population. While some ECoG channels are tuned to hand movement direction (direction specific channels), others are associated to movement but do not contain information regarding movement direction (non-direction specific channels). More specifically, directionality can vary temporally and by frequency within one channel. In addition, a handful of channels contain no significant information regarding movement at all. These findings strongly suggest that directional and non-directional regions of cortex can be identified with ECoG and provide solutions to decoding movement at the signal resolution provided by ECoG. In the second chapter we examine the influence of movement context on movement reconstruction accuracy. We recorded neuronal signals recorded from electro-corticography (ECoG) during performance of cued- and self-initiated movements. ECoG signals were used to train a reconstruction algorithm to reconstruct continuous hand movement. We found that both cued- and self-initiated movements could be reconstructed with similar accuracy from the ECoG data. However, while an algorithm trained on the cued task could reconstruct performance on a subsequent cued trial, it failed to reconstruct self-initiated arm movement. The same task-specificity was observed when the algorithm was trained with self-initiated movement data and tested on the cued task. Thus

  13. On the design of robotic hands for brain-machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoky; Afshar, Pedram; Oh, Michael

    2006-05-15

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) is the latest solution to a lack of control for paralyzed or prosthetic limbs. In this paper the authors focus on the design of anatomical robotic hands that use BMI as a critical intervention in restorative neurosurgery and they justify the requirement for lower-level neuromusculoskeletal details (relating to biomechanics, muscles, peripheral nerves, and some aspects of the spinal cord) in both mechanical and control systems. A person uses his or her hands for intimate contact and dexterous interactions with objects that require the user to control not only the finger endpoint locations but also the forces and the stiffness of the fingers. To recreate all of these human properties in a robotic hand, the most direct and perhaps the optimal approach is to duplicate the anatomical musculoskeletal structure. When a prosthetic hand is anatomically correct, the input to the device can come from the same neural signals that used to arrive at the muscles in the original hand. The more similar the mechanical structure of a prosthetic hand is to a human hand, the less learning time is required for the user to recreate dexterous behavior. In addition, removing some of the nonlinearity from the relationship between the cortical signals and the finger movements into the peripheral controls and hardware vastly simplifies the needed BMI algorithms. (Nonlinearity refers to a system of equations in which effects are not proportional to their causes. Such a system could be difficult or impossible to model.) Finally, if a prosthetic hand can be built so that it is anatomically correct, subcomponents could be integrated back into remaining portions of the user's hand at any transitional locations. In the near future, anatomically correct prosthetic hands could be used in restorative neurosurgery to satisfy the user's needs for both aesthetics and ease of control while also providing the highest possible degree of dexterity.

  14. An Improved Unscented Kalman Filter Based Decoder for Cortical Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Simin; Li, Jie; Li, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) seek to connect brains with machines or computers directly, for application in areas such as prosthesis control. For this application, the accuracy of the decoding of movement intentions is crucial. We aim to improve accuracy by designing a better encoding model of primary motor cortical activity during hand movements and combining this with decoder engineering refinements, resulting in a new unscented Kalman filter based decoder, UKF2, which improves upon our previous unscented Kalman filter decoder, UKF1. The new encoding model includes novel acceleration magnitude, position-velocity interaction, and target-cursor-distance features (the decoder does not require target position as input, it is decoded). We add a novel probabilistic velocity threshold to better determine the user's intent to move. We combine these improvements with several other refinements suggested by others in the field. Data from two Rhesus monkeys indicate that the UKF2 generates offline reconstructions of hand movements (mean CC 0.851) significantly more accurately than the UKF1 (0.833) and the popular position-velocity Kalman filter (0.812). The encoding model of the UKF2 could predict the instantaneous firing rate of neurons (mean CC 0.210), given kinematic variables and past spiking, better than the encoding models of these two decoders (UKF1: 0.138, p-v Kalman: 0.098). In closed-loop experiments where each monkey controlled a computer cursor with each decoder in turn, the UKF2 facilitated faster task completion (mean 1.56 s vs. 2.05 s) and higher Fitts's Law bit rate (mean 0.738 bit/s vs. 0.584 bit/s) than the UKF1. These results suggest that the modeling and decoder engineering refinements of the UKF2 improve decoding performance. We believe they can be used to enhance other decoders as well.

  15. A wireless brain-machine interface for real-time speech synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank H Guenther

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs involving electrodes implanted into the human cerebral cortex have recently been developed in an attempt to restore function to profoundly paralyzed individuals. Current BMIs for restoring communication can provide important capabilities via a typing process, but unfortunately they are only capable of slow communication rates. In the current study we use a novel approach to speech restoration in which we decode continuous auditory parameters for a real-time speech synthesizer from neuronal activity in motor cortex during attempted speech. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Neural signals recorded by a Neurotrophic Electrode implanted in a speech-related region of the left precentral gyrus of a human volunteer suffering from locked-in syndrome, characterized by near-total paralysis with spared cognition, were transmitted wirelessly across the scalp and used to drive a speech synthesizer. A Kalman filter-based decoder translated the neural signals generated during attempted speech into continuous parameters for controlling a synthesizer that provided immediate (within 50 ms auditory feedback of the decoded sound. Accuracy of the volunteer's vowel productions with the synthesizer improved quickly with practice, with a 25% improvement in average hit rate (from 45% to 70% and 46% decrease in average endpoint error from the first to the last block of a three-vowel task. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support the feasibility of neural prostheses that may have the potential to provide near-conversational synthetic speech output for individuals with severely impaired speech motor control. They also provide an initial glimpse into the functional properties of neurons in speech motor cortical areas.

  16. Using reinforcement learning to provide stable brain-machine interface control despite neural input reorganization.

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    Eric A Pohlmeyer

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interface (BMI systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder's neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings. These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled.

  17. Designing Closed-Loop Brain-Machine Interfaces Using Model Predictive Control

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    Gautam Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs are broadly defined as systems that establish direct communications between living brain tissue and external devices, such as artificial arms. By sensing and interpreting neuronal activities to actuate an external device, BMI-based neuroprostheses hold great promise in rehabilitating motor disabled subjects, such as amputees. In this paper, we develop a control-theoretic analysis of a BMI-based neuroprosthetic system for voluntary single joint reaching task in the absence of visual feedback. Using synthetic data obtained through the simulation of an experimentally validated psycho-physiological cortical circuit model, both the Wiener filter and the Kalman filter based linear decoders are developed. We analyze the performance of both decoders in the presence and in the absence of natural proprioceptive feedback information. By performing simulations, we show that the performance of both decoders degrades significantly in the absence of the natural proprioception. To recover the performance of these decoders, we propose two problems, namely tracking the desired position trajectory and tracking the firing rate trajectory of neurons which encode the proprioception, in the model predictive control framework to design optimal artificial sensory feedback. Our results indicate that while the position trajectory based design can only recover the position and velocity trajectories, the firing rate trajectory based design can recover the performance of the motor task along with the recovery of firing rates in other cortical regions. Finally, we extend our design by incorporating a network of spiking neurons and designing artificial sensory feedback in the form of a charged balanced biphasic stimulating current.

  18. Selective visual attention to drive cognitive brain machine interfaces: from concepts to neurofeedback and rehabilitation applications

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    Elaine eAstrand

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain Machine Interfaces (BMI using motor cortical activity to drive an external effector like a screen cursor or a robotic arm have seen enormous success and proven their great rehabilitation potential. An emerging parallel effort is now directed to BMIs controlled by endogenous cognitive activity, also called cognitive BMIs. While more challenging, this approach opens new dimensions to the rehabilitation of cognitive disorders. In the present work, we focus on BMIs driven by visuospatial attention signals and we provide a critical review of these studies in the light of the accumulated knowledge about the psychophysics, anatomy and neurophysiology of visual spatial attention. Importantly, we provide a unique comparative overview of the several studies, ranging from noninvasive to invasive human and non-human primates studies, that decode attention-related information from ongoing neuronal activity. We discuss these studies in the light of the challenges attention-driven cognitive BMIs have to face. In a second part of the review, we discuss past and current attention-based neurofeedback studies, describing both the covert effects of neurofeedback onto neuronal activity and its overt behavioral effects. Importantly, we compare neurofeedback studies based on the amplitude of cortical activity to studies based on the enhancement of cortical information content. Last, we discuss several lines of future research and applications for attention-driven cognitive BCIs, including the rehabilitation of cognitive deficits, restored communication in locked-in patients, and open-field applications for enhanced cognition in normal subjects. The core motivation of this work is the key idea that the improvement of current cognitive BMIs for therapeutic and open field applications needs to be grounded in a proper interdisciplinary understanding of the physiology of the cognitive function of interest, be it spatial attention, working memory or any other

  19. An Improved Unscented Kalman Filter Based Decoder for Cortical Brain-Machine Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Simin; Li, Jie; Li, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) seek to connect brains with machines or computers directly, for application in areas such as prosthesis control. For this application, the accuracy of the decoding of movement intentions is crucial. We aim to improve accuracy by designing a better encoding model of primary motor cortical activity during hand movements and combining this with decoder engineering refinements, resulting in a new unscented Kalman filter based decoder, UKF2, which improves upon our previous unscented Kalman filter decoder, UKF1. The new encoding model includes novel acceleration magnitude, position-velocity interaction, and target-cursor-distance features (the decoder does not require target position as input, it is decoded). We add a novel probabilistic velocity threshold to better determine the user's intent to move. We combine these improvements with several other refinements suggested by others in the field. Data from two Rhesus monkeys indicate that the UKF2 generates offline reconstructions of hand movements (mean CC 0.851) significantly more accurately than the UKF1 (0.833) and the popular position-velocity Kalman filter (0.812). The encoding model of the UKF2 could predict the instantaneous firing rate of neurons (mean CC 0.210), given kinematic variables and past spiking, better than the encoding models of these two decoders (UKF1: 0.138, p-v Kalman: 0.098). In closed-loop experiments where each monkey controlled a computer cursor with each decoder in turn, the UKF2 facilitated faster task completion (mean 1.56 s vs. 2.05 s) and higher Fitts's Law bit rate (mean 0.738 bit/s vs. 0.584 bit/s) than the UKF1. These results suggest that the modeling and decoder engineering refinements of the UKF2 improve decoding performance. We believe they can be used to enhance other decoders as well. PMID:28066170

  20. Biomimetic rehabilitation engineering: the importance of somatosensory feedback for brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruchoud, David; Pisotta, Iolanda; Carda, Stefano; Murray, Micah M.; Ionta, Silvio

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) re-establish communication channels between the nervous system and an external device. The use of BMI technology has generated significant developments in rehabilitative medicine, promising new ways to restore lost sensory-motor functions. However and despite high-caliber basic research, only a few prototypes have successfully left the laboratory and are currently home-deployed. Approach. The failure of this laboratory-to-user transfer likely relates to the absence of BMI solutions for providing naturalistic feedback about the consequences of the BMI’s actions. To overcome this limitation, nowadays cutting-edge BMI advances are guided by the principle of biomimicry; i.e. the artificial reproduction of normal neural mechanisms. Main results. Here, we focus on the importance of somatosensory feedback in BMIs devoted to reproducing movements with the goal of serving as a reference framework for future research on innovative rehabilitation procedures. First, we address the correspondence between users’ needs and BMI solutions. Then, we describe the main features of invasive and non-invasive BMIs, including their degree of biomimicry and respective advantages and drawbacks. Furthermore, we explore the prevalent approaches for providing quasi-natural sensory feedback in BMI settings. Finally, we cover special situations that can promote biomimicry and we present the future directions in basic research and clinical applications. Significance. The continued incorporation of biomimetic features into the design of BMIs will surely serve to further ameliorate the realism of BMIs, as well as tremendously improve their actuation, acceptance, and use.

  1. Alpha band functional connectivity correlates with the performance of brain-machine interfaces to decode real and imagined movements

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    Hisato eSugata

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain signals recorded from the primary motor cortex (M1 are known to serve a significant role in coding the information brain-machine interfaces (BMIs need to perform real and imagined movements, and also to form several functional networks with motor association areas. However, whether functional networks between M1 and other brain regions, such as these motor association areas, are related to performance of BMIs is unclear. To examine the relationship between functional connectivity and performance of BMIs, we analyzed the correlation coefficient between performance of neural decoding and functional connectivity over the whole brain using magnetoencephalography. Ten healthy participants were instructed to execute or imagine three simple right upper limb movements. To decode the movement type, we extracted 40 virtual channels in the left M1 via the beamforming approach, and used them as a decoding feature. In addition, seed-based functional connectivities of activities in the alpha band during real and imagined movements were calculated using imaginary coherence. Seed voxels were set as the same virtual channels in M1. After calculating the imaginary coherence in individuals, the correlation coefficient between decoding accuracy and strength of imaginary coherence was calculated over the whole brain. The significant correlations were distributed mainly to motor association areas for both real and imagined movements. These regions largely overlapped with brain regions that had significant connectivity to M1. Our results suggest that use of the strength of functional connectivity between M1 and motor association areas has the potential to improve the performance of BMIs to perform real and imagined movements.

  2. A real-time brain-machine interface combining motor target and trajectory intent using an optimal feedback control design.

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    Shanechi, Maryam M; Williams, Ziv M; Wornell, Gregory W; Hu, Rollin C; Powers, Marissa; Brown, Emery N

    2013-01-01

    Real-time brain-machine interfaces (BMI) have focused on either estimating the continuous movement trajectory or target intent. However, natural movement often incorporates both. Additionally, BMIs can be modeled as a feedback control system in which the subject modulates the neural activity to move the prosthetic device towards a desired target while receiving real-time sensory feedback of the state of the movement. We develop a novel real-time BMI using an optimal feedback control design that jointly estimates the movement target and trajectory of monkeys in two stages. First, the target is decoded from neural spiking activity before movement initiation. Second, the trajectory is decoded by combining the decoded target with the peri-movement spiking activity using an optimal feedback control design. This design exploits a recursive Bayesian decoder that uses an optimal feedback control model of the sensorimotor system to take into account the intended target location and the sensory feedback in its trajectory estimation from spiking activity. The real-time BMI processes the spiking activity directly using point process modeling. We implement the BMI in experiments consisting of an instructed-delay center-out task in which monkeys are presented with a target location on the screen during a delay period and then have to move a cursor to it without touching the incorrect targets. We show that the two-stage BMI performs more accurately than either stage alone. Correct target prediction can compensate for inaccurate trajectory estimation and vice versa. The optimal feedback control design also results in trajectories that are smoother and have lower estimation error. The two-stage decoder also performs better than linear regression approaches in offline cross-validation analyses. Our results demonstrate the advantage of a BMI design that jointly estimates the target and trajectory of movement and more closely mimics the sensorimotor control system.

  3. A real-time brain-machine interface combining motor target and trajectory intent using an optimal feedback control design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam M Shanechi

    Full Text Available Real-time brain-machine interfaces (BMI have focused on either estimating the continuous movement trajectory or target intent. However, natural movement often incorporates both. Additionally, BMIs can be modeled as a feedback control system in which the subject modulates the neural activity to move the prosthetic device towards a desired target while receiving real-time sensory feedback of the state of the movement. We develop a novel real-time BMI using an optimal feedback control design that jointly estimates the movement target and trajectory of monkeys in two stages. First, the target is decoded from neural spiking activity before movement initiation. Second, the trajectory is decoded by combining the decoded target with the peri-movement spiking activity using an optimal feedback control design. This design exploits a recursive Bayesian decoder that uses an optimal feedback control model of the sensorimotor system to take into account the intended target location and the sensory feedback in its trajectory estimation from spiking activity. The real-time BMI processes the spiking activity directly using point process modeling. We implement the BMI in experiments consisting of an instructed-delay center-out task in which monkeys are presented with a target location on the screen during a delay period and then have to move a cursor to it without touching the incorrect targets. We show that the two-stage BMI performs more accurately than either stage alone. Correct target prediction can compensate for inaccurate trajectory estimation and vice versa. The optimal feedback control design also results in trajectories that are smoother and have lower estimation error. The two-stage decoder also performs better than linear regression approaches in offline cross-validation analyses. Our results demonstrate the advantage of a BMI design that jointly estimates the target and trajectory of movement and more closely mimics the sensorimotor control system.

  4. A brain-machine interface for control of medically-induced coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Chemali, Jessica J; Liberman, Max; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N

    2013-10-01

    Medically-induced coma is a drug-induced state of profound brain inactivation and unconsciousness used to treat refractory intracranial hypertension and to manage treatment-resistant epilepsy. The state of coma is achieved by continually monitoring the patient's brain activity with an electroencephalogram (EEG) and manually titrating the anesthetic infusion rate to maintain a specified level of burst suppression, an EEG marker of profound brain inactivation in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with periods of quiescence or suppression. The medical coma is often required for several days. A more rational approach would be to implement a brain-machine interface (BMI) that monitors the EEG and adjusts the anesthetic infusion rate in real time to maintain the specified target level of burst suppression. We used a stochastic control framework to develop a BMI to control medically-induced coma in a rodent model. The BMI controlled an EEG-guided closed-loop infusion of the anesthetic propofol to maintain precisely specified dynamic target levels of burst suppression. We used as the control signal the burst suppression probability (BSP), the brain's instantaneous probability of being in the suppressed state. We characterized the EEG response to propofol using a two-dimensional linear compartment model and estimated the model parameters specific to each animal prior to initiating control. We derived a recursive Bayesian binary filter algorithm to compute the BSP from the EEG and controllers using a linear-quadratic-regulator and a model-predictive control strategy. Both controllers used the estimated BSP as feedback. The BMI accurately controlled burst suppression in individual rodents across dynamic target trajectories, and enabled prompt transitions between target levels while avoiding both undershoot and overshoot. The median performance error for the BMI was 3.6%, the median bias was -1.4% and the overall posterior probability of reliable control was 1 (95

  5. Minimizing data transfer with sustained performance in wireless brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorbergsson, Palmi Thor; Garwicz, Martin; Schouenborg, Jens; Johansson, Anders J

    2012-06-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) may be used to investigate neural mechanisms or to treat the symptoms of neurological disease and are hence powerful tools in research and clinical practice. Wireless BMIs add flexibility to both types of applications by reducing movement restrictions and risks associated with transcutaneous leads. However, since wireless implementations are typically limited in terms of transmission capacity and energy resources, the major challenge faced by their designers is to combine high performance with adaptations to limited resources. Here, we have identified three key steps in dealing with this challenge: (1) the purpose of the BMI should be clearly specified with regard to the type of information to be processed; (2) the amount of raw input data needed to fulfill the purpose should be determined, in order to avoid over- or under-dimensioning of the design; and (3) processing tasks should be allocated among the system parts such that all of them are utilized optimally with respect to computational power, wireless link capacity and raw input data requirements. We have focused on step (2) under the assumption that the purpose of the BMI (step 1) is to assess single- or multi-unit neuronal activity in the central nervous system with single-channel extracellular recordings. The reliability of this assessment depends on performance in detection and sorting of spikes. We have therefore performed absolute threshold spike detection and spike sorting with the principal component analysis and fuzzy c-means on a set of synthetic extracellular recordings, while varying the sampling rate and resolution, noise level and number of target units, and used the known ground truth to quantitatively estimate the performance. From the calculated performance curves, we have identified the sampling rate and resolution breakpoints, beyond which performance is not expected to increase by more than 1-5%. We have then estimated the performance of alternative

  6. Minimizing data transfer with sustained performance in wireless brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor Thorbergsson, Palmi; Garwicz, Martin; Schouenborg, Jens; Johansson, Anders J.

    2012-06-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) may be used to investigate neural mechanisms or to treat the symptoms of neurological disease and are hence powerful tools in research and clinical practice. Wireless BMIs add flexibility to both types of applications by reducing movement restrictions and risks associated with transcutaneous leads. However, since wireless implementations are typically limited in terms of transmission capacity and energy resources, the major challenge faced by their designers is to combine high performance with adaptations to limited resources. Here, we have identified three key steps in dealing with this challenge: (1) the purpose of the BMI should be clearly specified with regard to the type of information to be processed; (2) the amount of raw input data needed to fulfill the purpose should be determined, in order to avoid over- or under-dimensioning of the design; and (3) processing tasks should be allocated among the system parts such that all of them are utilized optimally with respect to computational power, wireless link capacity and raw input data requirements. We have focused on step (2) under the assumption that the purpose of the BMI (step 1) is to assess single- or multi-unit neuronal activity in the central nervous system with single-channel extracellular recordings. The reliability of this assessment depends on performance in detection and sorting of spikes. We have therefore performed absolute threshold spike detection and spike sorting with the principal component analysis and fuzzy c-means on a set of synthetic extracellular recordings, while varying the sampling rate and resolution, noise level and number of target units, and used the known ground truth to quantitatively estimate the performance. From the calculated performance curves, we have identified the sampling rate and resolution breakpoints, beyond which performance is not expected to increase by more than 1-5%. We have then estimated the performance of alternative

  7. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  8. Toward FRP-Based Brain-Machine Interfaces-Single-Trial Classification of Fixation-Related Potentials.

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    Andrea Finke

    Full Text Available The co-registration of eye tracking and electroencephalography provides a holistic measure of ongoing cognitive processes. Recently, fixation-related potentials have been introduced to quantify the neural activity in such bi-modal recordings. Fixation-related potentials are time-locked to fixation onsets, just like event-related potentials are locked to stimulus onsets. Compared to existing electroencephalography-based brain-machine interfaces that depend on visual stimuli, fixation-related potentials have the advantages that they can be used in free, unconstrained viewing conditions and can also be classified on a single-trial level. Thus, fixation-related potentials have the potential to allow for conceptually different brain-machine interfaces that directly interpret cortical activity related to the visual processing of specific objects. However, existing research has investigated fixation-related potentials only with very restricted and highly unnatural stimuli in simple search tasks while participant's body movements were restricted. We present a study where we relieved many of these restrictions while retaining some control by using a gaze-contingent visual search task. In our study, participants had to find a target object out of 12 complex and everyday objects presented on a screen while the electrical activity of the brain and eye movements were recorded simultaneously. Our results show that our proposed method for the classification of fixation-related potentials can clearly discriminate between fixations on relevant, non-relevant and background areas. Furthermore, we show that our classification approach generalizes not only to different test sets from the same participant, but also across participants. These results promise to open novel avenues for exploiting fixation-related potentials in electroencephalography-based brain-machine interfaces and thus providing a novel means for intuitive human-machine interaction.

  9. Toward FRP-Based Brain-Machine Interfaces-Single-Trial Classification of Fixation-Related Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Andrea; Essig, Kai; Marchioro, Giuseppe; Ritter, Helge

    2016-01-01

    The co-registration of eye tracking and electroencephalography provides a holistic measure of ongoing cognitive processes. Recently, fixation-related potentials have been introduced to quantify the neural activity in such bi-modal recordings. Fixation-related potentials are time-locked to fixation onsets, just like event-related potentials are locked to stimulus onsets. Compared to existing electroencephalography-based brain-machine interfaces that depend on visual stimuli, fixation-related potentials have the advantages that they can be used in free, unconstrained viewing conditions and can also be classified on a single-trial level. Thus, fixation-related potentials have the potential to allow for conceptually different brain-machine interfaces that directly interpret cortical activity related to the visual processing of specific objects. However, existing research has investigated fixation-related potentials only with very restricted and highly unnatural stimuli in simple search tasks while participant's body movements were restricted. We present a study where we relieved many of these restrictions while retaining some control by using a gaze-contingent visual search task. In our study, participants had to find a target object out of 12 complex and everyday objects presented on a screen while the electrical activity of the brain and eye movements were recorded simultaneously. Our results show that our proposed method for the classification of fixation-related potentials can clearly discriminate between fixations on relevant, non-relevant and background areas. Furthermore, we show that our classification approach generalizes not only to different test sets from the same participant, but also across participants. These results promise to open novel avenues for exploiting fixation-related potentials in electroencephalography-based brain-machine interfaces and thus providing a novel means for intuitive human-machine interaction.

  10. Brain Machine Interface: Analysis of segmented EEG Signal Classification Using Short-Time PCA and Recurrent Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hema

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain machine interface provides a communication channel between the human brain and an external device. Brain interfaces are studied to provide rehabilitation to patients with neurodegenerative diseases; such patients loose all communication pathways except for their sensory and cognitive functions. One of the possible rehabilitation methods for these patients is to provide a brain machine interface (BMI for communication; the BMI uses the electrical activity of the brain detected by scalp EEG electrodes. Classification of EEG signals extracted during mental tasks is a technique for designing a BMI. In this paper a BMI design using five mental tasks from two subjects were studied, a combination of two tasks is studied per subject. An Elman recurrent neural network is proposed for classification of EEG signals. Two feature extraction algorithms using overlapped and non overlapped signal segments are analyzed. Principal component analysis is used for extracting features from the EEG signal segments. Classification performance of overlapping EEG signal segments is observed to be better in terms of average classification with a range of 78.5% to 100%, while the non overlapping EEG signal segments show better classification in terms of maximum classifications.

  11. Motor cortical prediction of EMG: evidence that a kinetic brain-machine interface may be robust across altered movement dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, A; Krucoff, M O; Miller, L E

    2011-08-01

    During typical movements, signals related to both the kinematics and kinetics of movement are mutually correlated, and each is correlated to some extent with the discharge of neurons in the primary motor cortex (M1). However, it is well known, if not always appreciated, that causality cannot be inferred from correlations. Although these mutual correlations persist, their nature changes with changing postural or dynamical conditions. Under changing conditions, only signals directly controlled by M1 can be expected to maintain a stable relationship with its discharge. If one were to rely on noncausal correlations for a brain-machine interface, its generalization across conditions would likely suffer. We examined this effect, using multielectrode recordings in M1 as input to linear decoders of both end point kinematics (position and velocity) and proximal limb myoelectric signals (EMG) during reaching. We tested these decoders across tasks that altered either the posture of the limb or the end point forces encountered during movement. Within any given task, the accuracy of the kinematic predictions tended to be somewhat better than the EMG predictions. However, when we used the decoders developed under one task condition to predict the signals recorded under different postural or dynamical conditions, only the EMG decoders consistently generalized well. Our results support the view that M1 discharge is more closely related to kinetic variables like EMG than it is to limb kinematics. These results suggest that brain-machine interface applications using M1 to control kinetic variables may prove to be more successful than the more standard kinematic approach.

  12. Ultra-low-cost 3D gaze estimation: an intuitive high information throughput compliment to direct brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, W W; Faisal, A A

    2012-08-01

    Eye movements are highly correlated with motor intentions and are often retained by patients with serious motor deficiencies. Despite this, eye tracking is not widely used as control interface for movement in impaired patients due to poor signal interpretation and lack of control flexibility. We propose that tracking the gaze position in 3D rather than 2D provides a considerably richer signal for human machine interfaces by allowing direct interaction with the environment rather than via computer displays. We demonstrate here that by using mass-produced video-game hardware, it is possible to produce an ultra-low-cost binocular eye-tracker with comparable performance to commercial systems, yet 800 times cheaper. Our head-mounted system has 30 USD material costs and operates at over 120 Hz sampling rate with a 0.5-1 degree of visual angle resolution. We perform 2D and 3D gaze estimation, controlling a real-time volumetric cursor essential for driving complex user interfaces. Our approach yields an information throughput of 43 bits s(-1), more than ten times that of invasive and semi-invasive brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that are vastly more expensive. Unlike many BMIs our system yields effective real-time closed loop control of devices (10 ms latency), after just ten minutes of training, which we demonstrate through a novel BMI benchmark--the control of the video arcade game 'Pong'.

  13. Towards intelligent environments: an augmented reality-brain-machine interface operated with a see-through head-mount display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji eTakano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain-machine interface (BMI or brain-computer interface (BCI is a new interface technology that uses neurophysiological signals from the brain to control external machines or computers. This technology is expected to support daily activities, especially for persons with disabilities. To expand the range of activities enabled by this type of interface, here, we added augmented reality (AR to a P300-based BMI. In this new system, we used a see-through head-mount display (HMD to create control panels with flicker visual stimuli to support the user in areas close to controllable devices. When the attached camera detects an AR marker, the position and orientation of the marker are calculated, and the control panel for the pre-assigned appliance is created by the AR system and superimposed on the HMD. The participants were required to control system-compatible devices, and they successfully operated them without significant training. Online performance with the HMD was not different from that using an LCD monitor. Posterior and lateral (right or left channel selections contributed to operation of the AR-BMI with both the HMD and LCD monitor. Our results indicate that AR-BMI systems operated with a see-through HMD may be useful in building advanced intelligent environments.

  14. Controlling a Rehabilitation Robot with Brain-Machine Interface: An approach based on Independent Component Analysis and Multiple Kernel Learning

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    Yi-Hung Liu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from severe motor disabilities usually require assistance from other people when doing rehabilitation exercises, which causes the rehabilitation process to be time-consuming and inconvenient. Therefore, we propose an automatic feature extraction method for a brain-machine interface that allows patients to control a robot using their own brain waves. A brain–machine interface (BMI based on the P300 event-related potential (ERP, called Brain Controlled Rehabilitation System (BCRS, was developed to detect the intentions of patients. Using the BCRS, patients can communicate with the robot through their brain waves. However, deciding how to obtain an automatically extracted, useful EEG signal is a difficult and important problem for BMI research. In this paper, Independent Component Analysis – Multiple Kernel Learning (ICA-MKL is used to directly extract a useful signal and build the classification mode for BCRS. The results reveal that this method is useful for automatically extracting the P300 signal and the accuracy is better than MKL. In additional, the same method can be extended into any motor imaginary area and the accuracy of ICA-MKL for brain imaginary data is also good to removing eye-blink artifacts and the accuracy performance is also good.

  15. Development of an implantable wireless ECoG 128ch recording device for clinical brain machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kojiro; Hirata, Masayuki; Suzuki, Takafumi; Ando, Hiroshi; Ota, Yuki; Sato, Fumihiro; Morris, Shyne; Yoshida, Takeshi; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    Brain Machine Interface (BMI) is a system that assumes user's intention by analyzing user's brain activities and control devices with the assumed intention. It is considered as one of prospective tools to enhance paralyzed patients' quality of life. In our group, we especially focus on ECoG (electro-corti-gram)-BMI, which requires surgery to place electrodes on the cortex. We try to implant all the devices within the patient's head and abdomen and to transmit the data and power wirelessly. Our device consists of 5 parts: (1) High-density multi-electrodes with a 3D shaped sheet fitting to the individual brain surface to effectively record the ECoG signals; (2) A small circuit board with two integrated circuit chips functioning 128 [ch] analogue amplifiers and A/D converters for ECoG signals; (3) A Wifi data communication & control circuit with the target PC; (4) A non-contact power supply transmitting electrical power minimum 400[mW] to the device 20[mm] away. We developed those devices, integrated them, and, investigated the performance.

  16. Brain-machine interfaces for assistive smart homes: A feasibility study with wearable near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takeshi; Hirayama, Jun-Ichiro; Gupta, Pankaj; Moriya, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Shumpei; Ishikawa, Akihiro; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Ishii, Shin

    2015-08-01

    Smart houses for elderly or physically challenged people need a method to understand residents' intentions during their daily-living behaviors. To explore a new possibility, we here developed a novel brain-machine interface (BMI) system integrated with an experimental smart house, based on a prototype of a wearable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device, and verified the system in a specific task of controlling of the house's equipments with BMI. We recorded NIRS signals of three participants during typical daily-living actions (DLAs), and classified them by linear support vector machine. In our off-line analysis, four DLAs were classified at about 70% mean accuracy, significantly above the chance level of 25%, in every participant. In an online demonstration in the real smart house, one participant successfully controlled three target appliances by BMI at 81.3% accuracy. Thus we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using NIRS-BMI in real smart houses, which will possibly enhance new assistive smart-home technologies.

  17. A novel bioelectronic nose based on brain-machine interface using implanted electrode recording in vivo in olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qi; Du, Liping; Zhuang, Liujing; Li, Rong; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2013-11-15

    The mammalian olfactory system has merits of higher sensitivity, selectivity and faster response than current electronic nose system based on chemical sensor array. It is advanced and feasible to detect and discriminate odors by mammalian olfactory system. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel bioelectronic nose based on the brain-machine interface (BMI) technology for odor detection by in vivo electrophysiological measurements of olfactory bulb. In this work, extracellular potentials of mitral/tufted (M/T) cells in olfactory bulb (OB) were recorded by implanted 16-channel microwire electrode arrays. The odor-evoked response signals were analyzed. We found that neural activities of different neurons showed visible different firing patterns both in temporal features and rate features when stimulated by different small molecular odorants. The detection low limit is below 1 ppm for some specific odors. Odors were classified by an algorithm based on population vector similarity and support vector machine (SVM). The results suggested that the novel bioelectonic nose was sensitive to odorant stimuli. The best classifying accuracy was up to 95%. With the development of the BMI and olfactory decoding methods, we believe that this system will represent emerging and promising platforms for wide applications in medical diagnosis and security fields.

  18. A Brain-Machine Interface Based on ERD/ERS for an Upper-Limb Exoskeleton Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhichuan; Sun, Shouqian; Zhang, Sanyuan; Chen, Yumiao; Li, Chao; Chen, Shi

    2016-12-02

    To recognize the user's motion intention, brain-machine interfaces (BMI) usually decode movements from cortical activity to control exoskeletons and neuroprostheses for daily activities. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether self-induced variations of the electroencephalogram (EEG) can be useful as control signals for an upper-limb exoskeleton developed by us. A BMI based on event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) is proposed. In the decoder-training phase, we investigate the offline classification performance of left versus right hand and left hand versus both feet by using motor execution (ME) or motor imagery (MI). The results indicate that the accuracies of ME sessions are higher than those of MI sessions, and left hand versus both feet paradigm achieves a better classification performance, which would be used in the online-control phase. In the online-control phase, the trained decoder is tested in two scenarios (wearing or without wearing the exoskeleton). The MI and ME sessions wearing the exoskeleton achieve mean classification accuracy of 84.29% ± 2.11% and 87.37% ± 3.06%, respectively. The present study demonstrates that the proposed BMI is effective to control the upper-limb exoskeleton, and provides a practical method by non-invasive EEG signal associated with human natural behavior for clinical applications.

  19. Operant conditioning of a multiple degree-of-freedom brain-machine interface in a primate model of amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan; Southerland, Joshua; Vaidya, Mukta; Qian, Kai; Eleryan, Ahmed; Fagg, Andrew H; Sluzky, Marc; Oweiss, Karim; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Operant conditioning with biofeedback has been shown to be an effective method to modify neural activity to generate goal-directed actions in a brain-machine interface. It is particularly useful when neural activity cannot be mathematically mapped to motor actions of the actual body such as in the case of amputation. Here, we implement an operant conditioning approach with visual feedback in which an amputated monkey is trained to control a multiple degree-of-freedom robot to perform a reach-to-grasp behavior. A key innovation is that each controlled dimension represents a behaviorally relevant synergy among a set of joint degrees-of-freedom. We present a number of behavioral metrics by which to assess improvements in BMI control with exposure to the system. The use of non-human primates with chronic amputation is arguably the most clinically-relevant model of human amputation that could have direct implications for developing a neural prosthesis to treat humans with missing upper limbs.

  20. Implications of the dependence of neuronal activity on neural network states for the design of brain-machine interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano ePanzeri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brains. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately.

  1. Implications of the Dependence of Neuronal Activity on Neural Network States for the Design of Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzeri, Stefano; Safaai, Houman; De Feo, Vito; Vato, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state) that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brain. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately.

  2. Social Robots, Brain Machine Interfaces and Neuro/Cognitive Enhancers: Three Emerging Science and Technology Products through the Lens of Technology Acceptance Theories, Models and Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wolbring

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Social robotics, brain machine interfaces and neuro and cognitive enhancement products are three emerging science and technology products with wide-reaching impact for disabled and non-disabled people. Acceptance of ideas and products depend on multiple parameters and many models have been developed to predict product acceptance. We investigated which frequently employed technology acceptance models (consumer theory, innovation diffusion model, theory of reasoned action, theory of planned behaviour, social cognitive theory, self-determination theory, technology of acceptance model, Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology UTAUT and UTAUT2 are employed in the social robotics, brain machine interfaces and neuro and cognitive enhancement product literature and which of the core measures used in the technology acceptance models are implicit or explicit engaged with in the literature.

  3. Performance Measurement for Brain-Computer or Brain-Machine Interfaces: A Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David E.; Quitadamo, Lucia R.; Mainardi, Luca; Laghari, Khalil ur Rehman; Gao, Shangkai; Kindermans, Pieter-Jan; Simeral, John D.; Fazel-Rezai, Reza; Matteucci, Matteo; Falk, Tiago H.; Bianchi, Luigi; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Huggins, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) have the potential to be valuable clinical tools. However, the varied nature of BCIs, combined with the large number of laboratories participating in BCI research, makes uniform performance reporting difficult. To address this situation, we present a tutorial on performance measurement in BCI research. Approach A workshop on this topic was held at the 2013 International BCI Meeting at Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove, California. This manuscript contains the consensus opinion of the workshop members, refined through discussion in the following months and the input of authors who were unable to attend the workshop. Main Results Checklists for methods reporting were developed for both discrete and continuous BCIs. Relevant metrics are reviewed for different types of BCI research, with notes on their application to encourage uniform application between laboratories. Significance Graduate students and other researchers new to BCI research may find this tutorial a helpful introduction to performance measurement in the field. PMID:24838070

  4. Design of a Closed-Loop, Bidirectional Brain Machine Interface System With Energy Efficient Neural Feature Extraction and PID Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2016-12-16

    This paper presents a bidirectional brain machine interface (BMI) microsystem designed for closed-loop neuroscience research, especially experiments in freely behaving animals. The system-on-chip (SoC) consists of 16-channel neural recording front-ends, neural feature extraction units, 16-channel programmable neural stimulator back-ends, in-channel programmable closed-loop controllers, global analog-digital converters (ADC), and peripheral circuits. The proposed neural feature extraction units includes 1) an ultra low-power neural energy extraction unit enabling a 64-step natural logarithmic domain frequency tuning, and 2) a current-mode action potential (AP) detection unit with time-amplitude window discriminator. A programmable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller has been integrated in each channel enabling a various of closed-loop operations. The implemented ADCs include a 10-bit voltage-mode successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for the digitization of the neural feature outputs and/or local field potential (LFP) outputs, and an 8-bit current-mode SAR ADC for the digitization of the action potential outputs. The multi-mode stimulator can be programmed to perform monopolar or bipolar, symmetrical or asymmetrical charge balanced stimulation with a maximum current of 4 mA in an arbitrary channel configuration. The chip has been fabricated in 0.18 μ m CMOS technology, occupying a silicon area of 3.7 mm (2). The chip dissipates 56 μW/ch on average. General purpose low-power microcontroller with Bluetooth module are integrated in the system to provide wireless link and SoC configuration. Methods, circuit techniques and system topology proposed in this work can be used in a wide range of relevant neurophysiology research, especially closed-loop BMI experiments.

  5. Kinematic and neurophysiological consequences of an assisted-force-feedback brain-machine interface training: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eSilvoni

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In a proof-of-principle prototypical demonstration we describe a new type of brain-machine interface (BMI paradigm for upper limb motor training. The proposed technique allows a fast contingent and proportionally modulated stimulation of afferent proprioceptive and motor output neural pathways using operant learning.Continuous and immediate assisted-feedback of force proportional to rolandic rhythm oscillations during actual movements was employed and illustrated with a single case experiment. One hemiplegic patient was trained for two weeks coupling somatosensory brain oscillations with force field control during a robot mediated centre-out motor task whose execution approaches movements of everyday life. The robot facilitated actual movements adding a modulated force directed to the target, thus providing a non-delayed proprioceptive feedback. Neuro-electric, kinematic and motor-behavioural measures were recorded in pre- and post-assessments without force assistance. Patient’s healthy arm was used as control since neither a placebo control was possible nor other control conditions. We observed a generalized and significant kinematic improvement in the affected arm and a spatial accuracy improvement in both arms, together with an increase and focalization of the somatosensory rhythm changes used to provide assisted-force-feedback. The interpretation of the neurophysiological and kinematic evidences reported here is strictly related to the repetition of the motor-task and the presence of the assisted-force-feedback. Results are described as systematic observations only, without firm conclusions about the effectiveness of the methodology. In this prototypical view, the design of appropriate control conditions is discussed. This study presents a novel operant-learning-based BMI-application for motor training coupling brain oscillations and force feedback during an actual movement.

  6. Characterization of Artifacts produced by gel displacement on non-invasive Brain-Machine Interfaces during ambulation

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    Alvaro eCosta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available So far, Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs have been mainly used to study brain potentials during movement-free conditions. Recently, due to the emerging concern of improving rehabilitation therapies, these systems are also being used during gait experiments. Under this new condition, the evaluation of motion artifacts has become a critical point to assure the validity of the results obtained. Due to the high signal to noise ratio provided, the use of wet electrodes is a widely accepted technic to acquire electroencephalographic (EEG signals. To perform these recordings it is necessary to apply a conductive gel between the scalp and the electrodes. This work is focused on the study of gel displacements produced during ambulation and how they affect the amplitude of EEG signals. Data recorded during three ambulation conditions (gait training and one movement-free condition (BMI motor imagery task are compared to perform this study.Two phenomenons, manifested as unusual increases of the signals' amplitude, have been identified and characterized during this work. Results suggest that they are caused by abrupt changes on the conductivity between the electrode and the scalp due to gel displacement produced during ambulation and head movements. These artifacts significantly increase the Power Spectral Density (PSD of EEG recordings at all frequencies from 5 to 90 Hz, corresponding to the main bandwidth of electrocortical potentials. They should be taken into consideration before performing EEG recordings in order to asses the correct gel allocation and to avoid the use of electrodes on certain scalp areas depending on the experimental conditions.

  7. Coupling brain-machine interfaces with cortical stimulation for brain-state dependent stimulation: enhancing motor cortex excitability for neurorehabilitation

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    Alireza eGharabaghi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Motor recovery after stroke is an unsolved challenge despite intensive rehabilitation training programs. Brain stimulation techniques have been explored in addition to traditional rehabilitation training to increase the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex. This modulation of cortical excitability augments the response to afferent input during motor exercises, thereby enhancing skilled motor learning by long-term potentiation-like plasticity. Recent approaches examined brain stimulation applied concurrently with voluntary movements to induce more specific use-dependent neural plasticity during motor training for neurorehabilitation. Unfortunately, such approaches are not applicable for the many severely affected stroke patients lacking residual hand function. These patients require novel activity-dependent stimulation paradigms based on intrinsic brain activity. Here, we report on such brain state-dependent stimulation (BSDS combined with haptic feedback provided by a robotic hand orthosis. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and haptic feedback to the hand were controlled by sensorimotor desynchronization during motor-imagery and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in one healthy subject and one patient with severe hand paresis in the chronic phase after stroke. BSDS significantly increased the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex in both healthy and post-stroke conditions, an effect not observed in non-BSDS protocols. This feasibility study suggests that closing the loop between intrinsic brain state, cortical stimulation and haptic feedback provides a novel neurorehabilitation strategy for stroke patients lacking residual hand function, a proposal that warrants further investigation in a larger cohort of stroke patients.

  8. A confidence metric for using neurobiological feedback in actor-critic reinforcement learning based brain-machine interfaces

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    Noeline Wilhelmina Prins

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs can be used to restore function in people living with paralysis. Current BMIs require extensive calibration that increase the set-up times and external inputs for decoder training that may be difficult to produce in paralyzed individuals. Both these factors have presented challenges in transitioning the technology from research environments to activities of daily living (ADL. For BMIs to be seamlessly used in ADL, these issues should be handled with minimal external input thus reducing the need for a technician/caregiver to calibrate the system. Reinforcement Learning (RL based BMIs are a good tool to be used when there is no external training signal and can provide an adaptive modality to train BMI decoders. However, RL based BMIs are sensitive to the feedback provided to adapt the BMI. In actor-critic BMIs, this feedback is provided by the critic and the overall system performance is limited by the critic accuracy. In this work, we developed an adaptive BMI that could handle inaccuracies in the critic feedback in an effort to produce more accurate RL based BMIs. We developed a confidence measure, which indicated how appropriate the feedback is for updating the decoding parameters of the actor. The results show that with the new update formulation, the critic accuracy is no longer a limiting factor for the overall performance. We tested and validated the system on three different data sets: synthetic data generated by an Izhikevich neural spiking model, synthetic data with a Gaussian noise distribution, and data collected from a non-human primate engaged in a reaching task. All results indicated that the system with the critic confidence built in always outperformed the system without the critic confidence. Results of this study suggest the potential application of the technique in developing an autonomous BMI that does not need an external signal for training or extensive calibration.

  9. Ten-dimensional anthropomorphic arm control in a human brain-machine interface: difficulties, solutions, and limitations

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    Wodlinger, B.; Downey, J. E.; Tyler-Kabara, E. C.; Schwartz, A. B.; Boninger, M. L.; Collinger, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. In a previous study we demonstrated continuous translation, orientation and one-dimensional grasping control of a prosthetic limb (seven degrees of freedom) by a human subject with tetraplegia using a brain-machine interface (BMI). The current study, in the same subject, immediately followed the previous work and expanded the scope of the control signal by also extracting hand-shape commands from the two 96-channel intracortical electrode arrays implanted in the subject’s left motor cortex. Approach. Four new control signals, dictating prosthetic hand shape, replaced the one-dimensional grasping in the previous study, allowing the subject to control the prosthetic limb with ten degrees of freedom (three-dimensional (3D) translation, 3D orientation, four-dimensional hand shaping) simultaneously. Main results. Robust neural tuning to hand shaping was found, leading to ten-dimensional (10D) performance well above chance levels in all tests. Neural unit preferred directions were broadly distributed through the 10D space, with the majority of units significantly tuned to all ten dimensions, instead of being restricted to isolated domains (e.g. translation, orientation or hand shape). The addition of hand shaping emphasized object-interaction behavior. A fundamental component of BMIs is the calibration used to associate neural activity to intended movement. We found that the presence of an object during calibration enhanced successful shaping of the prosthetic hand as it closed around the object during grasping. Significance. Our results show that individual motor cortical neurons encode many parameters of movement, that object interaction is an important factor when extracting these signals, and that high-dimensional operation of prosthetic devices can be achieved with simple decoding algorithms. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01364480.

  10. Subject-specific modulation of local field potential spectral power during brain-machine interface control in primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Kelvin; Dangi, Siddharth; Orsborn, Amy L.; Gastpar, Michael C.; Carmena, Jose M.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have predominantly utilized spike activity as the control signal. However, an increasing number of studies have shown the utility of local field potentials (LFPs) for decoding motor related signals. Currently, it is unclear how well different LFP frequencies can serve as features for continuous, closed-loop BMI control. Approach. We demonstrate 2D continuous LFP-based BMI control using closed-loop decoder adaptation, which adapts decoder parameters to subject-specific LFP feature modulations during BMI control. We trained two macaque monkeys to control a 2D cursor in a center-out task by modulating LFP power in the 0-150 Hz range. Main results. While both monkeys attained control, they used different strategies involving different frequency bands. One monkey primarily utilized the low-frequency spectrum (0-80 Hz), which was highly correlated between channels, and obtained proficient performance even with a single channel. In contrast, the other monkey relied more on higher frequencies (80-150 Hz), which were less correlated between channels, and had greater difficulty with control as the number of channels decreased. We then restricted the monkeys to use only various sub-ranges (0-40, 40-80, and 80-150 Hz) of the 0-150 Hz band. Interestingly, although both monkeys performed better with some sub-ranges than others, they were able to achieve BMI control with all sub-ranges after decoder adaptation, demonstrating broad flexibility in the frequencies that could potentially be used for LFP-based BMI control. Significance. Overall, our results demonstrate proficient, continuous BMI control using LFPs and provide insight into the subject-specific spectral patterns of LFP activity modulated during control.

  11. Design and validation of a real-time spiking-neural-network decoder for brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethier, Julie; Nuyujukian, Paul; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Boahen, Kwabena

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Cortically-controlled motor prostheses aim to restore functions lost to neurological disease and injury. Several proof of concept demonstrations have shown encouraging results, but barriers to clinical translation still remain. In particular, intracortical prostheses must satisfy stringent power dissipation constraints so as not to damage cortex. Approach. One possible solution is to use ultra-low power neuromorphic chips to decode neural signals for these intracortical implants. The first step is to explore in simulation the feasibility of translating decoding algorithms for brain-machine interface (BMI) applications into spiking neural networks (SNNs). Main results. Here we demonstrate the validity of the approach by implementing an existing Kalman-filter-based decoder in a simulated SNN using the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF), a general method for mapping control algorithms onto SNNs. To measure this system’s robustness and generalization, we tested it online in closed-loop BMI experiments with two rhesus monkeys. Across both monkeys, a Kalman filter implemented using a 2000-neuron SNN has comparable performance to that of a Kalman filter implemented using standard floating point techniques. Significance. These results demonstrate the tractability of SNN implementations of statistical signal processing algorithms on different monkeys and for several tasks, suggesting that a SNN decoder, implemented on a neuromorphic chip, may be a feasible computational platform for low-power fully-implanted prostheses. The validation of this closed-loop decoder system and the demonstration of its robustness and generalization hold promise for SNN implementations on an ultra-low power neuromorphic chip using the NEF.

  12. Towards a naturalistic brain-machine interface: hybrid torque and position control allows generalization to novel dynamics.

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    Pratik Y Chhatbar

    Full Text Available Realization of reaching and grasping movements by a paralytic person or an amputee would greatly facilitate her/his activities of daily living. Towards this goal, control of a computer cursor or robotic arm using neural signals has been demonstrated in rodents, non-human primates and humans. This technology is commonly referred to as a Brain-Machine Interface (BMI and is achieved by predictions of kinematic parameters, e.g. position or velocity. However, execution of natural movements, such as swinging baseball bats of different weights at the same speed, requires advanced planning for necessary context-specific forces in addition to kinematic control. Here we show, for the first time, the control of a virtual arm with representative inertial parameters using real-time neural control of torques in non-human primates (M. radiata. We found that neural control of torques leads to ballistic, possibly more naturalistic movements than position control alone, and that adding the influence of position in a hybrid torque-position control changes the feedforward behavior of these BMI movements. In addition, this level of control was achievable utilizing the neural recordings from either contralateral or ipsilateral M1. We also observed changed behavior of hybrid torque-position control under novel external dynamic environments that was comparable to natural movements. Our results demonstrate that inclusion of torque control to drive a neuroprosthetic device gives the user a more direct handle on the movement execution, especially when dealing with novel or changing dynamic environments. We anticipate our results to be a starting point of more sophisticated algorithms for sensorimotor neuroprostheses, eliminating the need of fully automatic kinematic-to-dynamic transformations as currently used by traditional kinematic-based decoders. Thus, we propose that direct control of torques, or other force related variables, should allow for more natural

  13. Invasive brain-machine interfaces: a survey of paralyzed patients’ attitudes, knowledge and methods of information retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahr, Jacob; Schwartz, Christina; Heimbach, Bernhard; Aertsen, Ad; Rickert, Jörn; Ball, Tonio

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) are an emerging therapeutic option that can allow paralyzed patients to gain control over assistive technology devices (ATDs). BMI approaches can be broadly classified into invasive (based on intracranially implanted electrodes) and noninvasive (based on skin electrodes or extracorporeal sensors). Invasive BMIs have a favorable signal-to-noise ratio, and thus allow for the extraction of more information than noninvasive BMIs, but they are also associated with the risks related to neurosurgical device implantation. Current noninvasive BMI approaches are typically concerned, among other issues, with long setup times and/or intensive training. Recent studies have investigated the attitudes of paralyzed patients eligible for BMIs, particularly patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These studies indicate that paralyzed patients are indeed interested in BMIs. Little is known, however, about the degree of knowledge among paralyzed patients concerning BMI approaches or about how patients retrieve information on ATDs. Furthermore, it is not yet clear if paralyzed patients would accept intracranial implantation of BMI electrodes with the premise of decoding improvements, and what the attitudes of a broader range of patients with diseases such as stroke or spinal cord injury are towards this new kind of treatment. Approach. Using a questionnaire, we surveyed 131 paralyzed patients for their opinions on invasive BMIs and their attitude toward invasive BMI treatment options. Main results. The majority of the patients knew about and had a positive attitude toward invasive BMI approaches. The group of ALS patients was especially open to the concept of BMIs. The acceptance of invasive BMI technology depended on the improvements expected from the technology. Furthermore, the survey revealed that for paralyzed patients, the Internet is an important source of information on ATDs. Significance. Websites tailored to

  14. Control of an Ambulatory Exoskeleton with a Brain-Machine Interface for Spinal Cord Injury Gait Rehabilitation.

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    López-Larraz, Eduardo; Trincado-Alonso, Fernando; Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; Pérez-Nombela, Soraya; Del-Ama, Antonio J; Aranda, Joan; Minguez, Javier; Gil-Agudo, Angel; Montesano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The closed-loop control of rehabilitative technologies by neural commands has shown a great potential to improve motor recovery in patients suffering from paralysis. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) can be used as a natural control method for such technologies. BMI provides a continuous association between the brain activity and peripheral stimulation, with the potential to induce plastic changes in the nervous system. Paraplegic patients, and especially the ones with incomplete injuries, constitute a potential target population to be rehabilitated with brain-controlled robotic systems, as they may improve their gait function after the reinforcement of their spared intact neural pathways. This paper proposes a closed-loop BMI system to control an ambulatory exoskeleton-without any weight or balance support-for gait rehabilitation of incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The integrated system was validated with three healthy subjects, and its viability in a clinical scenario was tested with four SCI patients. Using a cue-guided paradigm, the electroencephalographic signals of the subjects were used to decode their gait intention and to trigger the movements of the exoskeleton. We designed a protocol with a special emphasis on safety, as patients with poor balance were required to stand and walk. We continuously monitored their fatigue and exertion level, and conducted usability and user-satisfaction tests after the experiments. The results show that, for the three healthy subjects, 84.44 ± 14.56% of the trials were correctly decoded. Three out of four patients performed at least one successful BMI session, with an average performance of 77.6 1 ± 14.72%. The shared control strategy implemented (i.e., the exoskeleton could only move during specific periods of time) was effective in preventing unexpected movements during periods in which patients were asked to relax. On average, 55.22 ± 16.69% and 40.45 ± 16.98% of the trials (for healthy subjects and

  15. The Two-Brains Hypothesis: Towards a guide for brain-brain and brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, G; Poznanski, R R; Cacha, L; Bercovich, D

    2015-09-01

    -brain, brain-computer and brain-robot engineering. As they grow even closer, these disciplines involve their own unique complexities, including direction by the laws of inductive physics. So the novel TBH hypothesis has wide fundamental implications, including those related to TMS. These require rethinking and renewed research engaging the fully complementary equivalence of mutual magnetic and electric field induction in the CNS and, within this context, a new mathematics of the brain to decipher higher cognitive operations not possible with current brain-brain and brain-machine interfaces. Bohr may now rest.

  16. Who Needs to Fit In? Who Gets to Stand Out? Communication Technologies Including Brain-Machine Interfaces Revealed from the Perspectives of Special Education School Teachers through an Ableism Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Lucy; Wolbring, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Some new and envisioned technologies such as brain machine interfaces (BMI) that are being developed initially for people with disabilities, but whose use can also be expanded to the general public have the potential to change body ability expectations of disabled and non-disabled people beyond the species-typical. The ways in which this dynamic…

  17. Review of Brain-Machine Interfaces Used in Neural Prosthetics with New Perspective on Somatosensory Feedback through Method of Signal Breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Gabriel W Vattendahl; Rynes, Mathew L; Kelliher, Zachary; Goodwin, Shikha Jain

    2016-01-01

    The brain-machine interface (BMI) used in neural prosthetics involves recording signals from neuron populations, decoding those signals using mathematical modeling algorithms, and translating the intended action into physical limb movement. Recently, somatosensory feedback has become the focus of many research groups given its ability in increased neural control by the patient and to provide a more natural sensation for the prosthetics. This process involves recording data from force sensitive locations on the prosthetics and encoding these signals to be sent to the brain in the form of electrical stimulation. Tactile sensation has been achieved through peripheral nerve stimulation and direct stimulation of the somatosensory cortex using intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). The initial focus of this paper is to review these principles and link them to modern day applications such as restoring limb use to those who lack such control. With regard to how far the research has come, a new perspective for the signal breakdown concludes the paper, offering ideas for more real somatosensory feedback using ICMS to stimulate particular sensations by differentiating touch sensors and filtering data based on unique frequencies.

  18. The Muscle Sensor for on-site neuroscience lectures to pave the way for a better understanding of brain-machine-interface research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Amane; Nagata, Osamu; Togawa, Morio; Sazi, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience is an expanding field of science to investigate enigmas of brain and human body function. However, the majority of the public have never had the chance to learn the basics of neuroscience and new knowledge from advanced neuroscience research through hands-on experience. Here, we report that we produced the Muscle Sensor, a simplified electromyography, to promote educational understanding in neuroscience. The Muscle Sensor can detect myoelectric potentials which are filtered and processed as 3-V pulse signals to shine a light bulb and emit beep sounds. With this educational tool, we delivered "On-Site Neuroscience Lectures" in Japanese junior-high schools to facilitate hands-on experience of neuroscientific electrophysiology and to connect their text-book knowledge to advanced neuroscience researches. On-site neuroscience lectures with the Muscle Sensor pave the way for a better understanding of the basics of neuroscience and the latest topics such as how brain-machine-interface technology could help patients with disabilities such as spinal cord injuries.

  19. Demonstration of a semi-autonomous hybrid brain-machine interface using human intracranial EEG, eye tracking, and computer vision to control a robotic upper limb prosthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, David P; Hotson, Guy; Katyal, Kapil D; Wester, Brock A; Fifer, Matthew S; McGee, Timothy G; Harris, Andrew; Johannes, Matthew S; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Ravitz, Alan D; Anderson, William S; Thakor, Nitish V; Crone, Nathan E

    2014-07-01

    To increase the ability of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) to control advanced prostheses such as the modular prosthetic limb (MPL), we are developing a novel system: the Hybrid Augmented Reality Multimodal Operation Neural Integration Environment (HARMONIE). This system utilizes hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics to allow users to identify an object (via eye tracking and computer vision) and initiate (via brain-control) a semi-autonomous reach-grasp-and-drop of the object by the MPL. Sequential iterations of HARMONIE were tested in two pilot subjects implanted with electrocorticographic (ECoG) and depth electrodes within motor areas. The subjects performed the complex task in 71.4% (20/28) and 67.7% (21/31) of trials after minimal training. Balanced accuracy for detecting movements was 91.1% and 92.9%, significantly greater than chance accuracies (p system improvements implemented for the second subject. Our hybrid-BMI design prevented all but one baseline false positive from initiating the system. The novel approach demonstrated in this proof-of-principle study, using hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics, addresses limitations of current BMIs.

  20. Brain-state classification and a dual-state decoder dramatically improve the control of cursor movement through a brain-machine interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Nicholas A.; Ruiz-Torres, Ricardo; Perreault, Eric J.; Miller, Lee E.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. It is quite remarkable that brain machine interfaces (BMIs) can be used to control complex movements with fewer than 100 neurons. Success may be due in part to the limited range of dynamical conditions under which most BMIs are tested. Achieving high-quality control that spans these conditions with a single linear mapping will be more challenging. Even for simple reaching movements, existing BMIs must reduce the stochastic noise of neurons by averaging the control signals over time, instead of over the many neurons that normally control movement. This forces a compromise between a decoder with dynamics allowing rapid movement and one that allows postures to be maintained with little jitter. Our current work presents a method for addressing this compromise, which may also generalize to more highly varied dynamical situations, including movements with more greatly varying speed. Approach. We have developed a system that uses two independent Wiener filters as individual components in a single decoder, one optimized for movement, and the other for postural control. We computed an LDA classifier using the same neural inputs. The decoder combined the outputs of the two filters in proportion to the likelihood assigned by the classifier to each state. Main results. We have performed online experiments with two monkeys using this neural-classifier, dual-state decoder, comparing it to a standard, single-state decoder as well as to a dual-state decoder that switched states automatically based on the cursor’s proximity to a target. The performance of both monkeys using the classifier decoder was markedly better than that of the single-state decoder and comparable to the proximity decoder. Significance. We have demonstrated a novel strategy for dealing with the need to make rapid movements while also maintaining precise cursor control when approaching and stabilizing within targets. Further gains can undoubtedly be realized by optimizing the performance of the

  1. Design and Optimization of an EEG-Based Brain Machine Interface (BMI) to an Upper-Limb Exoskeleton for Stroke Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Nikunj A; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Abibullaev, Berdakh; Artz, Edward J; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Blank, Amy A; French, James; Karmonik, Christof; Grossman, Robert G; O'Malley, Marcia K; Francisco, Gerard E; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting motor intent from brain activity of chronic stroke patients using an asynchronous electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain machine interface (BMI). Intent was inferred from movement related cortical potentials (MRCPs) measured over an optimized set of EEG electrodes. Successful intent detection triggered the motion of an upper-limb exoskeleton (MAHI Exo-II), to guide movement and to encourage active user participation by providing instantaneous sensory feedback. Several BMI design features were optimized to increase system performance in the presence of single-trial variability of MRCPs in the injured brain: (1) an adaptive time window was used for extracting features during BMI calibration; (2) training data from two consecutive days were pooled for BMI calibration to increase robustness to handle the day-to-day variations typical of EEG, and (3) BMI predictions were gated by residual electromyography (EMG) activity from the impaired arm, to reduce the number of false positives. This patient-specific BMI calibration approach can accommodate a broad spectrum of stroke patients with diverse motor capabilities. Following BMI optimization on day 3, testing of the closed-loop BMI-MAHI exoskeleton, on 4th and 5th days of the study, showed consistent BMI performance with overall mean true positive rate (TPR) = 62.7 ± 21.4% on day 4 and 67.1 ± 14.6% on day 5. The overall false positive rate (FPR) across subjects was 27.74 ± 37.46% on day 4 and 27.5 ± 35.64% on day 5; however for two subjects who had residual motor function and could benefit from the EMG-gated BMI, the mean FPR was quite low (< 10%). On average, motor intent was detected -367 ± 328 ms before movement onset during closed-loop operation. These findings provide evidence that closed-loop EEG-based BMI for stroke patients can be designed and optimized to perform well across multiple days without system recalibration.

  2. Design and optimization of an EEG-based brain machine interface (BMI to an upper-limb exoskeleton for stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikunj Arunkumar Bhagat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting motor intent from brain activity of chronic stroke patients using an asynchronous electroencephalography (EEG-based brain machine interface (BMI. Intent was inferred from movement related cortical potentials (MRCPs measured over an optimized set of EEG electrodes. Successful intent detection triggered the motion of an upper-limb exoskeleton (MAHI Exo-II, to guide movement and to encourage active user participation by providing instantaneous sensory feedback. Several BMI design features were optimized to increase system performance in the presence of single-trial variability of MRCPs in the injured brain: 1 an adaptive time window was used for extracting features during BMI calibration; 2 training data from two consecutive days were pooled for BMI calibration to increase robustness to handle the day-to-day variations typical of EEG, and 3 BMI predictions were gated by residual electromyography (EMG activity from the impaired arm, to reduce the number of false positives. This patient-specific BMI calibration approach can accommodate a broad spectrum of stroke patients with diverse motor capabilities. Following BMI optimization on day 3, testing of the closed-loop BMI-MAHI exoskeleton, on 4th and 5th days of the study, showed consistent BMI performance with overall mean true positive rate (TPR = 62.7 +/- 21.4 % on day 4 and 67.1 +/- 14.6 % on day 5. The overall false positive rate (FPR across subjects was 27.74 +/- 37.46 % on day 4 and 27.5 +/- 35.64 % on day 5; however for two subjects who had residual motor function and could benefit from the EMG-gated BMI, the mean FPR was quite low (< 10 %. On average, motor intent was detected -367 +/- 328 ms before movement onset during closed-loop operation. These findings provide evidence that closed-loop EEG-based BMI for stroke patients can be designed and optimized to perform well across multiple days without system recalibration.

  3. Interfaces for instructional use of simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoog, de Robert; Jong, de Ton; Vries, de Frits

    1991-01-01

    The learner interface is the component of an instructional system that mediates between a learner and the system. Two fundamentally different approaches for interfaces can be distinguished: conversational methapor and direct manipulation metaphor. Interfaces in both metaphors can be scaled on a dime

  4. User Interface Improvements in Computer-Assisted Instruction, the Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies user interface problems as they relate to computer-assisted instruction (CAI); reviews the learning theories and instructional theories related to CAI user interface; and presents potential CAI user interface improvements for research and development based on learning and instructional theory. Focuses on screen design improvements.…

  5. Brain state-dependent robotic reaching movement with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton: combining brain-machine interfacing and robotic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchle, Daniel; Vukelić, Mathias; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    While robot-assisted arm and hand training after stroke allows for intensive task-oriented practice, it has provided only limited additional benefit over dose-matched physiotherapy up to now. These rehabilitation devices are possibly too supportive during the exercises. Neurophysiological signals might be one way of avoiding slacking and providing robotic support only when the brain is particularly responsive to peripheral input. We tested the feasibility of three-dimensional robotic assistance for reaching movements with a multi-joint exoskeleton during motor imagery (MI)-related desynchronization of sensorimotor oscillations in the β-band. We also registered task-related network changes of cortical functional connectivity by electroencephalography via the imaginary part of the coherence function. Healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed similar patterns-but different aptitudes-of controlling the robotic movement. All participants in this pilot study with nine healthy subjects and two stroke patients achieved their maximum performance during the early stages of the task. Robotic control was significantly higher and less variable when proprioceptive feedback was provided in addition to visual feedback, i.e., when the orthosis was actually attached to the subject's arm during the task. A distributed cortical network of task-related coherent activity in the θ-band showed significant differences between healthy subjects and stroke patients as well as between early and late periods of the task. Brain-robot interfaces (BRIs) may successfully link three-dimensional robotic training to the participants' efforts and allow for task-oriented practice of activities of daily living with a physiologically controlled multi-joint exoskeleton. Changes of cortical physiology during the task might also help to make subject-specific adjustments of task difficulty and guide adjunct interventions to facilitate motor learning for functional restoration, a proposal that warrants

  6. Brain-state dependent robotic reaching movement with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton: combining brain-machine interfacing and robotic rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eBrauchle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available While robot-assisted arm and hand training after stroke allows for intensive task-oriented practice, it has provided only limited additional benefit over dose-matched physiotherapy up to now. These rehabilitation devices are possibly too supportive during the exercises. Neurophysiological signals might be one way of avoiding slacking and providing robotic support only when the brain is particularly responsive to peripheral input.We tested the feasibility of three-dimensional robotic assistance for reach-to-grasp movements with a multi-joint exoskeleton during motor imagery-related desynchronization of sensorimotor oscillations in the β-band only. We also registered task-related network changes of cortical functional connectivity by electroencephalography via the imaginary part of the coherence function.Healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed similar patterns – but different aptitudes – of controlling the robotic movement. All participants in this pilot study with nine healthy subjects and two stroke patients achieved their maximum performance during the early stages of the task. Robotic control was significantly higher and less variable when proprioceptive feedback was provided in addition to visual feedback, i.e. when the orthosis was actually attached to the subject’s arm during the task. A distributed cortical network of task-related coherent activity in the θ-band showed significant differences between healthy subjects and stroke patients as well as between early and late periods of the task.Brain-robot interfaces may successfully link three-dimensional robotic training to the participants’ efforts and allow for task-oriented practice of activities of daily living with a physiologically controlled multi-joint exoskeleton. Changes of cortical physiology during the task might also help to make subject-specific adjustments of task difficulty and guide adjunct interventions to facilitate motor learning for functional restoration.

  7. 基于Pubmed数据库文献挖掘的近5年脑机交互研究热点的聚类分析%Bibliometric and hotspot analysis of brain-machine interfaces based on pubmed database with literature mining in past five years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金磊; 胡柯嘉

    2015-01-01

    目的:调查有关脑机交互(brain-machine Interfaces,BCI)研究的医学文献,得出近期脑机交互研究热点。方法:应用美国国立医学图书馆开发的Pubmed数据库进行近5年有关脑机交互的文献检索,应用书目共现分析系统(bibliographic Item CO-Occurrence Matrix Builder,BICOMB)进行文献计量分析,SPSS 19.0软件进行聚类分析。结果:通过对脑机交互高频关键词聚类分析绘制树状图,总结得出了3大类研究热点:1)非侵入式的脑机交互信号获取和解码;2)侵入式获取信号的脑机交互研究;3)脑机交互在脑卒中康复中的研究。结论:脑机交互技术目前正在快速发展,但仍需更方便、有效、安全的信号提取及转化技术,以求积极应用于临床治疗。%Objective:To analyze the published articles of brain-machine interfaces and get the recent research hotspot. Methods:Searching brain-machine interfaces literatures through PubMed database of US Congress Library of Medicine in past ifve years, using BICOMB to bibliometric analysis and SPSS 19.0 to cluster analysis. Results:hTree research hotspots were concluded by analyzing the key words:1) non-invasive brain signal acquisition and decoding of brain-machine Interfaces;2) invasive brain signal acquisition of brain-machine Interfaces;3) brain-computer interaction research in stroke rehabilitation. Conclusion:Researches on BCI developed rapidly, but signal acquisition and decoding need more convenient, effective and safer in the future studies and useful clinical practice for BCI is the ifrst priority.

  8. Brain machine interfaces for serious gaming application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Werkhoven, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Serious games are intended to provide an engaging, self reinforcing context to motivate and educate the players. One of the challenges in serious gaming is to provide intuitive interaction techniques. Serious games are meant to facilitate creative and educational processes and so they should optimal

  9. Brain-machine interface circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zjajo, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a complete overview of significant design challenges in respect to circuit miniaturization and power reduction of the neural recording system, along with circuit topologies, architecture trends, and (post-silicon) circuit optimization algorithms. The introduced novel circuits for signal conditioning, quantization, and classification, as well as system configurations focus on optimized power-per-area performance, from the spatial resolution (i.e. number of channels), feasible wireless data bandwidth and information quality to the delivered power of implantable system.

  10. Intention estimation in brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Joline M.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. The objective of this work was to quantitatively investigate the mechanisms underlying the performance gains of the recently reported ‘recalibrated feedback intention-trained Kalman Filter’ (ReFIT-KF). Approach. This was accomplished by designing variants of the ReFIT-KF algorithm and evaluating training and online data to understand the neural basis of this improvement. We focused on assessing the contribution of two training set innovations of the ReFIT-KF algorithm: intention estimation and the two-stage training paradigm. Main results. Within the two-stage training paradigm, we found that intention estimation independently increased target acquisition rates by 37% and 59%, respectively, across two monkeys implanted with multiunit intracortical arrays. Intention estimation improved performance by enhancing the tuning properties and the mutual information between the kinematic and neural training data. Furthermore, intention estimation led to fewer shifts in channel tuning between the training set and online control, suggesting that less adaptation was required during online control. Retraining the decoder with online BMI training data also reduced shifts in tuning, suggesting a benefit of training a decoder in the same behavioral context; however, retraining also led to slower online decode velocities. Finally, we demonstrated that one- and two-stage training paradigms performed comparably when intention estimation is applied. Significance. These findings highlight the utility of intention estimation in reducing the need for adaptive strategies and improving the online performance of BMIs, helping to guide future BMI design decisions.

  11. Biomimetic Olfactory Sensing System Based on Brain-Machine Interface and Olfactory Decoding%基于脑-机接口和嗅觉解码的仿生气味识别系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董琪; 秦臻; 胡靓; 庄柳静; 张斌; 王平

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian olfactory systems have merits of higher sensitivity, selectivity and faster response than current electronic nose systems based on chemical sensor array in odor recognition. The purpose of this study is to develop a biomimetic olfactory sensing system based on brain-machine interface technology for odor detection in vivo electrophysiological measurements of olfactory bulb. In this work, extracellular potentials of mitral/tufted cells in olfactory bulb were recorded by implanted 16-channel microwire electrode arrays. The odor-evoked response signals were analyzed. We found that neural activities of different neurons showed visible different firing patterns in both temporal features and rate features when stimulated by different small molecular odorants. Odors were classified by an algorithm based on population vector similarity and support vector machine. The results suggest that the novel bioelectonic nose is sensitive to odorant stimuli. With the development of BMI and olfactory decoding methods, we believe that this system will represent emerging and promising platforms for wide applications in medical diagnosis and security fields.%为了探讨利用生物嗅觉传感系统进行气味识别的可行性,提出了一种基于脑-机接口的仿生气味识别系统。该系统利用大鼠嗅觉感受细胞作为气味敏感传感单元,使用16通道植入式微丝电极记录和分析具有气味刺激特征的嗅球僧帽细胞电位响应信号。实验结果显示,该系统对气味具有高度敏感性,通过一定模式识别处理算法,不同的气味刺激具有较好的区分性,证明了该系统有望应用于气味的检测和识别。

  12. 基于干电极的头带式射频无线脑-机接口系统%A Dry electrode based headband radio frequency wireless brain-machine interface system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭凯; 裴为华; 王宇; 许冰; 归强; 李晓倩; 杨宇; 刘剑; 陈弘达

    2012-01-01

    研发了一种采用干电极的脑-机接口系统,此系统克服了现有脑机接口用脑电信号采集及信号处理系统笨重而不便于携带的缺点.此系统采用半导体微加工工艺制作的“干”电极作为采集脑电信号的电极,佩戴方便且能长时间使用.整个便携式脑机接口系统在脑电信号采集、处理和传输三个方面都采用了利于便携的设计,信号处理采用专用的集成电路,信号的采集和处理端与信号接收端采用射频芯片收发数据.整个系统的重量只有39g.该脑-机接口系统以人体的专注程度作为控制外部设备的控制信号,经过训练的受试者可以通过脑电信号实现对机器的控制.%A new portable wireless brain-machine interface (BMI) system was designed and fabricated using the techin-que of dry electrode. The dry electrode was used in this system to record Electroencephalography (EEG) , and it was fabricated using the standard micromachining techniques so it is easy to wear. The system was composed of the three parts of signal recording, processing and transmission. Electroencephalography was recorded by the dry electrode , and was amplified, processed by using the application specific integrate circuit ( ASIC) , and the processed signal waw transmitted to the receiver by the wireless module. The EEG recording and processing module weighs 39g only. The system can be used to obtain the attention amplitude of the testees, and those trained testees could have the ability to control the machine through the EEG signal.

  13. Independent Mobility Achieved through a Wireless Brain-Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiming; Kyar, Toe K.; Ho, Duncun; Lim, Clement; Chan, Louiza; Chua, Yuanwei; Yao, Lei; Cheong, Jia Hao; Lee, Jung Hyup; Vishal, Kulkarni Vinayak; Guo, Yongxin; Chen, Zhi Ning; Lim, Lay K.; Li, Peng; Liu, Lei; Zou, Xiaodan; Ang, Kai K.; Gao, Yuan; Ng, Wai Hoe; Han, Boon Siew; Chng, Keefe; Guan, Cuntai; Je, Minkyu; Yen, Shih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with tetraplegia lack independent mobility, making them highly dependent on others to move from one place to another. Here, we describe how two macaques were able to use a wireless integrated system to control a robotic platform, over which they were sitting, to achieve independent mobility using the neuronal activity in their motor cortices. The activity of populations of single neurons was recorded using multiple electrode arrays implanted in the arm region of primary motor cortex, and decoded to achieve brain control of the platform. We found that free-running brain control of the platform (which was not equipped with any machine intelligence) was fast and accurate, resembling the performance achieved using joystick control. The decoding algorithms can be trained in the absence of joystick movements, as would be required for use by tetraplegic individuals, demonstrating that the non-human primate model is a good pre-clinical model for developing such a cortically-controlled movement prosthetic. Interestingly, we found that the response properties of some neurons differed greatly depending on the mode of control (joystick or brain control), suggesting different roles for these neurons in encoding movement intention and movement execution. These results demonstrate that independent mobility can be achieved without first training on prescribed motor movements, opening the door for the implementation of this technology in persons with tetraplegia. PMID:27802344

  14. The Mind and the Machine. On the Conceptual and Moral Implications of Brain-Machine Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Maartje

    2009-12-01

    Brain-machine interfaces are a growing field of research and application. The increasing possibilities to connect the human brain to electronic devices and computer software can be put to use in medicine, the military, and entertainment. Concrete technologies include cochlear implants, Deep Brain Stimulation, neurofeedback and neuroprosthesis. The expectations for the near and further future are high, though it is difficult to separate hope from hype. The focus in this paper is on the effects that these new technologies may have on our 'symbolic order'-on the ways in which popular categories and concepts may change or be reinterpreted. First, the blurring distinction between man and machine and the idea of the cyborg are discussed. It is argued that the morally relevant difference is that between persons and non-persons, which does not necessarily coincide with the distinction between man and machine. The concept of the person remains useful. It may, however, become more difficult to assess the limits of the human body. Next, the distinction between body and mind is discussed. The mind is increasingly seen as a function of the brain, and thus understood in bodily and mechanical terms. This raises questions concerning concepts of free will and moral responsibility that may have far reaching consequences in the field of law, where some have argued for a revision of our criminal justice system, from retributivist to consequentialist. Even without such a (unlikely and unwarranted) revision occurring, brain-machine interactions raise many interesting questions regarding distribution and attribution of responsibility.

  15. Integrating robotic action with biologic perception: A brain-machine symbiosis theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Babak

    In patients with motor disability the natural cyclic flow of information between the brain and external environment is disrupted by their limb impairment. Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) aim to provide new communication channels between the brain and environment by direct translation of brain's internal states into actions. For enabling the user in a wide range of daily life activities, the challenge is designing neural decoders that autonomously adapt to different tasks, environments, and to changes in the pattern of neural activity. In this dissertation, a novel decoding framework for BMIs is developed in which a computational agent autonomously learns how to translate neural states into action based on maximization of a measure of shared goal between user and the agent. Since the agent and brain share the same goal, a symbiotic relationship between them will evolve therefore this decoding paradigm is called a Brain-Machine Symbiosis (BMS) framework. A decoding agent was implemented within the BMS framework based on the Actor-Critic method of Reinforcement Learning. The rule of the Actor as a neural decoder was to find mapping between the neural representation of motor states in the primary motor cortex (MI) and robot actions in order to solve reaching tasks. The Actor learned the optimal control policy using an evaluative feedback that was estimated by the Critic directly from the user's neural activity of the Nucleus Accumbens (NAcc). Through a series of computational neuroscience studies in a cohort of rats it was demonstrated that NAcc could provide a useful evaluative feedback by predicting the increase or decrease in the probability of earning reward based on the environmental conditions. Using a closed-loop BMI simulator it was demonstrated the Actor-Critic decoding architecture was able to adapt to different tasks as well as changes in the pattern of neural activity. The custom design of a dual micro-wire array enabled simultaneous implantation of MI and

  16. Instruction, Feedback and Biometrics: The User Interface for Fingerprint Authentication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Chris; Johnson, Graham; McCracken, Heather; Al-Saffar, Ahmed

    Biometric authentication is the process of establishing an individual’s identity through measurable characteristics of their behaviour, anatomy or physiology. Biometric technologies, such as fingerprint systems, are increasingly being used in a diverse range of contexts from immigration control, to banking and personal computing. As is often the case with emerging technologies, the usability aspects of system design have received less attention than technical aspects. Fingerprint systems pose a number of challenges for users and past research has identified issues with correct finger placement, system feedback and instruction. This paper describes the development of an interface for fingerprint systems using an iterative, participative design approach. During this process, several different methods for the presentation of instruction and feedback were identified. The different types of instruction and feedback were tested in a study involving 82 participants. The results showed that feedback had a statistically significant effect on overall system performance, but instruction did not. The design recommendations emerging from this study, and the use of participatory design in this context, are discussed.

  17. Brain-machine interfaces in space: Using spontaneous rather than intentionally generated brain signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffey, E.B.J.; Brouwer, A.M.; Wilschut, E.S.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2010-01-01

    De auteurs bespreken de beperkingen en mogelijkheden van gesuggereerde BMI toepassingen in een ruimtevaart en breken een lans voor BMIs die zijn gebaseerd op spontane in plaats van op doelbewuste hersensignalen

  18. A Brain-Machine-Brain Interface for Rewiring of Cortical Circuitry after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Task 1 (Electronics Testing/Microsystem Packaging) 1.1 Conduct in vivo experiments in brain-injured monkeys using a fully assembled microsystem...rodent studies in constructing the microsystem for non- human primate (squirrel monkey ) studies. This is because the capabilities of the rat ASIC (e.g...Aplysia californica (see Appendix II). In Year 4, the SAR algorithm was integrated on an ASIC that combined spike recording, electrical microstimulation

  19. A Brain-Machine-Brain Interface for Rewiring of Cortical Circuitry after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    the OFF condition. Spike rates in the OLS group were slightly lower than the ADS group in the OFF condition, but were significantly lower than the...for/Received: None yet. Conclusion Rapid progress is being made toward developing smart prosthetic platforms for altering plasticity in the injured...information to M1 about the position of the limb in space. Thus, injury to M1 results in impaired motor performance due, at least in part, to disruption in

  20. Closed-loop brain-machine-body interfaces for noninvasive rehabilitation of movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccard, Frédéric D; Mullen, Tim; Chi, Yu Mike; Peterson, David; Iversen, John R; Arnold, Mike; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Makeig, Scott; Poizner, Howard; Sejnowski, Terrence; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2014-08-01

    Traditional approaches for neurological rehabilitation of patients affected with movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and essential tremor (ET) consist mainly of oral medication, physical therapy, and botulinum toxin injections. Recently, the more invasive method of deep brain stimulation (DBS) showed significant improvement of the physical symptoms associated with these disorders. In the past several years, the adoption of feedback control theory helped DBS protocols to take into account the progressive and dynamic nature of these neurological movement disorders that had largely been ignored so far. As a result, a more efficient and effective management of PD cardinal symptoms has emerged. In this paper, we review closed-loop systems for rehabilitation of movement disorders, focusing on PD, for which several invasive and noninvasive methods have been developed during the last decade, reducing the complications and side effects associated with traditional rehabilitation approaches and paving the way for tailored individual therapeutics. We then present a novel, transformative, noninvasive closed-loop framework based on force neurofeedback and discuss several future developments of closed-loop systems that might bring us closer to individualized solutions for neurological rehabilitation of movement disorders.

  1. A Brain-Machine-Brain Interface for Rewiring of Cortical Circuitry after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    lesion vi- cinity, from approximately 3.7 mm anterior to the bregma to 3.2 mm posterior to the bregma, were then collected using a cryostat ( Paxinos and...mice. J. Neurotrauma 25, 153–171. Paxinos , G., and Watson, C. (2007). The Rat Brain in Stereotaxic Coordinates, 6th ed. Academic Press: New York

  2. A Brain-Machine-Brain Interface for Rewiring of Cortical Circuitry after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    movement in the upper limb of paralyzed patients with spinal cord injury [23]. To that end, two discrete board-level devices were recently developed using...Towards a neural prosthesis for upper limb function,” IEEE Trans. Neural Syst. Rehab. Eng., vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 187–190, Jun. 2006. [24] S. Venkatraman...4 Body…………………………………………………………………………………... 4 Key Research Accomplishments………………………………………….…….. 5 Reportable Outcomes

  3. A Framework and Implementation of User Interface and Human-Computer Interaction Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslak, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that up to 50 % of the effort in development of information systems is devoted to user interface development (Douglas, Tremaine, Leventhal, Wills, & Manaris, 2002; Myers & Rosson, 1992). Yet little study has been performed on the inclusion of important interface and human-computer interaction topics into a current…

  4. Flaws in current human training protocols for spontaneous Brain-Computer Interfaces: lessons learned from instructional design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien eLotte

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While recent research on Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI has highlighted their potential for many applications, they remain barely used outside laboratories. The main reason is their lack of robustness. Indeed, with current BCI, mental state recognition is usually slow and often incorrect. Spontaneous BCI (i.e., mental imagery-based BCI often rely on mutual learning efforts by the user and the machine, with BCI users learning to produce stable EEG patterns (spontaneous BCI control being widely acknowledged as a skill while the computer learns to automatically recognize these EEG patterns, using signal processing. Most research so far was focused on signal processing, mostly neglecting the human in the loop. However, how well the user masters the BCI skill is also a key element explaining BCI robustness. Indeed, if the user is not able to produce stable and distinct EEG patterns, then no signal processing algorithm would be able to recognize them. Unfortunately, despite the importance of BCI training protocols, they have been scarcely studied so far, and used mostly unchanged for years.In this paper, we advocate that current human training approaches for spontaneous BCI are most likely inappropriate. We notably study instructional design literature in order to identify the key requirements and guidelines for a successful training procedure that promotes a good and efficient skill learning. This literature study highlights that current spontaneous BCI user training procedures satisfy very few of these requirements and hence are likely to be suboptimal. We therefore identify the flaws in BCI training protocols according to instructional design principles, at several levels: in the instructions provided to the user, in the tasks he/she has to perform, and in the feedback provided. For each level, we propose new research directions that are theoretically expected to address some of these flaws and to help users learn the BCI skill more efficiently.

  5. Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Computerens interface eller grænseflade har spredt sig overalt. Mobiltelefoner, spilkonsoller, pc'er og storskærme indeholder computere – men computere indbygges også i tøj og andre hverdagslige genstande, så vi konstant har adgang til digitale data. Interface retter fokus mod, hvordan den digita...

  6. An empirical appraisal of the effectiveness of adaptive interfaces for instructional systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Sinclair

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Navigating an information space, particularly in educational hypermedia, has its difficulties. Users may become spatially disoriented, they may be distracted, lose sight of educational objectives, or fail to relate important items of content. The predominant approaches to aid navigation in this in a well-defined information space such as educational software, involves the provision of a range of advanced navigation tools, to employ a strong metaphor and maintain interest through multimedia sequences, or to semantically structure the knowledge in the space according to some cognitively-based theory. However, none of these techniques can account for an individual learner's needs, knowledge, preferences or cognitive abilities. Adaptivity is a particular functionality that may be implemented in educational hypermedia systems in a variety of ways to recognise the importance of an individual discourse with an information space, and to alleviate navigational difficulties on that basis. This paper seeks to provide a broad understanding of some of the instructional and design principles implicit in adaptive educational hypermedia systems, those that use adaptive navigation support techniques and in particular adaptive link annotation. The claim that adaptive techniques can help solve navigation problems is examined through a review of two recent empirical studies that were undertaken to determine the effect of adaptive navigation support on user paths and learning, and a third study, the results of which is being introduced to the literature in this paper. These studies taken together have not shown a clear link between adaptivity and an improvement in learning, but offer some guidance for ongoing productive research in this field.

  7. interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipayan Sanyal

    2005-01-01

    macroscopic conservation equations with an order parameter which can account for the solid, liquid, and the mushy zones with the help of a phase function defined on the basis of the liquid fraction, the Gibbs relation, and the phase diagram with local approximations. Using the above formalism for alloy solidification, the width of the diffuse interface (mushy zone was computed rather accurately for iron-carbon and ammonium chloride-water binary alloys and validated against experimental data from literature.

  8. Cognitive signals for brain-machine interfaces in posterior parietal cortex include continuous 3D trajectory commands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Markus; Mulliken, Grant H; Fineman, Igor; Loeb, Gerald E; Andersen, Richard A

    2012-10-16

    Cortical neural prosthetics extract command signals from the brain with the goal to restore function in paralyzed or amputated patients. Continuous control signals can be extracted from the motor cortical areas, whereas neural activity from posterior parietal cortex (PPC) can be used to decode cognitive variables related to the goals of movement. Because typical activities of daily living comprise both continuous control tasks such as reaching, and tasks benefiting from discrete control such as typing on a keyboard, availability of both signals simultaneously would promise significant increases in performance and versatility. Here, we show that PPC can provide 3D hand trajectory information under natural conditions that would be encountered for prosthetic applications, thus allowing simultaneous extraction of continuous and discrete signals without requiring multisite surgical implants. We found that limb movements can be decoded robustly and with high accuracy from a small population of neural units under free gaze in a complex 3D point-to-point reaching task. Both animals' brain-control performance improved rapidly with practice, resulting in faster target acquisition and increasing accuracy. These findings disprove the notion that the motor cortical areas are the only candidate areas for continuous prosthetic command signals and, rather, suggests that PPC can provide equally useful trajectory signals in addition to discrete, cognitive variables. Hybrid use of continuous and discrete signals from PPC may enable a new generation of neural prostheses providing superior performance and additional flexibility in addressing individual patient needs.

  9. Endpoint-based parallel data processing with non-blocking collective instructions in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Cernohous, Bob R; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-11-18

    Methods, apparatuses, and computer program products for endpoint-based parallel data processing with non-blocking collective instructions in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer are provided. Embodiments include establishing by a parallel application a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI, including associating with the geometry a list of collective algorithms valid for use with the endpoints of the geometry. Embodiments also include registering in each endpoint in the geometry a dispatch callback function for a collective operation and executing without blocking, through a single one of the endpoints in the geometry, an instruction for the collective operation.

  10. Cognitive state monitoring and the design of adaptive instruction in digital environments: lessons learned from cognitive workload assessment using a passive brain-computer interface approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerjets, Peter; Walter, Carina; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Bogdan, Martin; Zander, Thorsten O

    2014-01-01

    According to Cognitive Load Theory (CLT), one of the crucial factors for successful learning is the type and amount of working-memory load (WML) learners experience while studying instructional materials. Optimal learning conditions are characterized by providing challenges for learners without inducing cognitive over- or underload. Thus, presenting instruction in a way that WML is constantly held within an optimal range with regard to learners' working-memory capacity might be a good method to provide these optimal conditions. The current paper elaborates how digital learning environments, which achieve this goal can be developed by combining approaches from Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, and Computer Science. One of the biggest obstacles that needs to be overcome is the lack of an unobtrusive method of continuously assessing learners' WML in real-time. We propose to solve this problem by applying passive Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) approaches to realistic learning scenarios in digital environments. In this paper we discuss the methodological and theoretical prospects and pitfalls of this approach based on results from the literature and from our own research. We present a strategy on how several inherent challenges of applying BCIs to WML and learning can be met by refining the psychological constructs behind WML, by exploring their neural signatures, by using these insights for sophisticated task designs, and by optimizing algorithms for analyzing electroencephalography (EEG) data. Based on this strategy we applied machine-learning algorithms for cross-task classifications of different levels of WML to tasks that involve studying realistic instructional materials. We obtained very promising results that yield several recommendations for future work.

  11. Interfacing with the computational brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2011-10-01

    Neuroscience is just beginning to understand the neural computations that underlie our remarkable capacity to learn new motor tasks. Studies of natural movements have emphasized the importance of concepts such as dimensionality reduction within hierarchical levels of redundancy, optimization of behavior in the presence of sensorimotor noise and internal models for predictive control. These concepts also provide a framework for understanding the improvements in performance seen in myoelectric-controlled interface and brain-machine interface paradigms. Recent experiments reveal how volitional activity in the motor system combines with sensory feedback to shape neural representations and drives adaptation of behavior. By elucidating these mechanisms, a new generation of intelligent interfaces can be designed to exploit neural plasticity and restore function after neurological injury.

  12. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  13. Interfacing with the brain using organic electronics (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliaras, George G.

    2015-10-01

    Implantable electrodes are being used for diagnostic purposes, for brain-machine interfaces, and for delivering electrical stimulation to alleviate the symptoms of diseases such as Parkinson's. The field of organic electronics made available devices with a unique combination of attractive properties, including mixed ionic/electronic conduction, mechanical flexibility, enhanced biocompatibility, and capability for drug delivery. I will present examples of organic electrodes, transistors and other devices for recording and stimulation of brain activity and discuss how they can improve our understanding of brain physiology and pathology, and how they can be used to deliver new therapies.

  14. A hybrid brain interface for a humanoid robot assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Andrea; Knoblauch, Andreas; Koesling, Hendrik; Ritter, Helge

    2011-01-01

    We present an advanced approach towards a semi-autonomous, robotic personal assistant for handicapped people. We developed a multi-functional hybrid brain-robot interface that provides a communication channel between humans and a state-of-the-art humanoid robot, Honda's Humanoid Research Robot. Using cortical signals, recorded, processed and translated by an EEG-based brain-machine interface (BMI), human-robot interaction functions independently of users' motor control deficits. By exploiting two distinct cortical activity patterns, P300 and event-related desynchronization (ERD), the interface provides different dimensions for robot control. An empirical study demonstrated the functionality of the BMI guided humanoid robot. All participants could successfully control the robot that accomplished a shopping task.

  15. Interface entre neurones et puces structurées électroniques pour la détection de potentiels d'action

    OpenAIRE

    Larramendy, Florian

    2013-01-01

    The interface man / machine had followed of many researches in biotechnology. A part of these researches concern the interconnections brain / machine. Indeed, the brain arranges numerous intellectual connections thanks to neurons. These neurons communicate between them and propagate information thanks to a "bio-electric" signal called action potential. The objective of my doctoral thesis is to measure this signal thanks to ion sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET). The ISFET process was m...

  16. Feasibility study for future implantable neural-silicon interface devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Armaghany, Allann; Yu, Bo; Mak, Terrence; Tong, Kin-Fai; Sun, Yihe

    2011-01-01

    The emerging neural-silicon interface devices bridge nerve systems with artificial systems and play a key role in neuro-prostheses and neuro-rehabilitation applications. Integrating neural signal collection, processing and transmission on a single device will make clinical applications more practical and feasible. This paper focuses on the wireless antenna part and real-time neural signal analysis part of implantable brain-machine interface (BMI) devices. We propose to use millimeter-wave for wireless connections between different areas of a brain. Various antenna, including microstrip patch, monopole antenna and substrate integrated waveguide antenna are considered for the intra-cortical proximity communication. A Hebbian eigenfilter based method is proposed for multi-channel neuronal spike sorting. Folding and parallel design techniques are employed to explore various structures and make a trade-off between area and power consumption. Field programmable logic arrays (FPGAs) are used to evaluate various structures.

  17. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  18. Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The number of school districts using instructional coaches is growing at a staggering rate. Coaching is becoming popular, in part, because many educational leaders recognize the old form of professional development, built around traditional in-service sessions for teachers, simply does not affect student achievement. By offering support, feedback,…

  19. Safety Instructions

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Please note that the Safety Instructions N0 37 rev. 3 (IS 37 rev. 3) entitled ""LEVEL-3" SAFETY ALARMS AND ALARM SYSTEMS" Is available on the web at the following URL: http://edms.cern.ch/document/335802 Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS divisional secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch TIS Secretariat

  20. Training Research in Automated Instruction (TRAIN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Computers in Human Behavior , 12(4), 527-548. Keywords: Algebra word problems, varied forms of instructional support 18 Feedback: The...Gomez, C. C. (1996). Interface, instructional approach, and domain learning with a mathematics problem-solving environment. Computers in Human Behavior , 12...mathematics problem-solving environment. Computers in Human Behavior , 12(4), 527-548. Yadrick, R.M., Regian, J.W., Connolly-Gomez,

  1. Interface dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interface dermatitis includes diseases in which the primary pathology involves the dermo-epidermal junction. The salient histological findings include basal cell vacuolization, apoptotic keratinocytes (colloid or Civatte bodies, and obscuring of the dermo-epidermal junction by inflammatory cells. Secondary changes of the epidermis and papillary dermis along with type, distribution and density of inflammatory cells are used for the differential diagnoses of the various diseases that exhibit interface changes. Lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, lichen planus, graft versus host disease, erythema multiforme, fixed drug eruptions, lichen striatus, and pityriasis lichenoides are considered major interface diseases. Several other diseases (inflammatory, infective, and neoplastic may show interface changes.

  2. Artificial Intelligence Tools for Grammar and Spelling Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijls, Fieny; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses grammar and spelling instruction in The Netherlands for students aged 10-15 and describes an intelligent computer-assisted instructional environment consisting of a linguistic expert system, a didactic module, and a student interface. Three prototypes are described: BOUWSTEEN and COGO for analyzing sentences, and TDTDT for conjugating…

  3. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two...

  4. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  5. Testing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Henriksen, Mogens; Nilson, Jesper K.;

    1999-01-01

    The wide use of solid insulating materials combinations in combinations has introduced problems in the interfaces between components. The most common insulating materials are cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), silicone rubber (SIR) and ethylene-propylene rubbers (EPR). Assemblies of these materials...... have caused major failures. In the Netherlands, a major black out was caused by interface problems in 150kV cable terminations, causing a cascade of breakdowns. There is a need to investigate the reasons for this and other similar breakdowns.The major problem is expected to lie in the interface between...... two different materials. Environmental influence, surface treatment, defects in materials and interface, design, pressure and rubbing are believed to have an effect on interface degradation. These factors are believed to increase the possibility of partial discharges (PD). PD will, with time, destroy...

  6. Dissecting local design: Instructional leadership, curriculum and science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Matthew Aaron

    Local instructional design describes the process of customization that naturally occurs when curriculum innovations interface with local classrooms and schools. Describing the practice of local instructional design can help to explain how curriculum is adapted to local conditions and provides insight on how instructional leaders mediate curriculum, teaching, and school conditions to allow for reform-oriented curriculum to occur. Research on local design has tended to focus on the intersection of curriculum, teachers, and students. This case-based dissertation study documents the process of local instructional design in the context of high school science education through a distributed leadership perspective. The study develops a model of instructional design, points to the important roles of administrators, parents, and university consultants in leading local design, and suggests instructional reform advocates consider the role of school leadership and community when further studying local instructional design.

  7. Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Brian Keith; Fischer, James; Falgout, Jane; Schweers, John

    2013-01-01

    The Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System (BORIS) is a six-degree-of-freedom rotational robotic manipulator system simulation used for training of fundamental robotics concepts, with in-line shoulder, offset elbow, and offset wrist. BORIS is used to provide generic robotics training to aerospace professionals including flight crews, flight controllers, and robotics instructors. It uses forward kinematic and inverse kinematic algorithms to simulate joint and end-effector motion, combined with a multibody dynamics model, moving-object contact model, and X-Windows based graphical user interfaces, coordinated in the Trick Simulation modeling environment. The motivation for development of BORIS was the need for a generic system for basic robotics training. Before BORIS, introductory robotics training was done with either the SRMS (Shuttle Remote Manipulator System) or SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System) simulations. The unique construction of each of these systems required some specialized training that distracted students from the ideas and goals of the basic robotics instruction.

  8. Microprocessor interfacing

    CERN Document Server

    Vears, R E

    2014-01-01

    Microprocessor Interfacing provides the coverage of the Business and Technician Education Council level NIII unit in Microprocessor Interfacing (syllabus U86/335). Composed of seven chapters, the book explains the foundation in microprocessor interfacing techniques in hardware and software that can be used for problem identification and solving. The book focuses on the 6502, Z80, and 6800/02 microprocessor families. The technique starts with signal conditioning, filtering, and cleaning before the signal can be processed. The signal conversion, from analog to digital or vice versa, is expl

  9. Interface Realisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2005-01-01

    This article argues for seeing the interface as an important representational and aesthetic form with implications for postmodern culture and digital aesthetics. The interface emphasizes realism due in part to the desire for transparency in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and partly to the devel......This article argues for seeing the interface as an important representational and aesthetic form with implications for postmodern culture and digital aesthetics. The interface emphasizes realism due in part to the desire for transparency in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and partly...... to the development of illusionistic realism within computer graphics and games. The article compares the pragmatic realism of HCI with aesthetic notions of realism in the computer game Max Payne (illusionistic realism), the artist Jodi's game modifications (media realism), and Adrian Ward's software art work......, "Signwave Auto Illustrator" (functional realism)....

  10. Learning a novel myoelectric-controlled interface task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Saritha M; Baker, Stuart N; Jackson, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Control of myoelectric prostheses and brain-machine interfaces requires learning abstract neuromotor transformations. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this ability, we trained subjects to move a two-dimensional cursor using a myoelectric-controlled interface. With the upper limb immobilized, an electromyogram from multiple hand and arm muscles moved the cursor in directions that were either intuitive or nonintuitive and with high or low variability. We found that subjects could learn even nonintuitive arrangements to a high level of performance. Muscle-tuning functions were cosine shaped and modulated so as to reduce cursor variability. Subjects exhibited an additional preference for using hand muscles over arm muscles, which resulted from a greater capacity of these to form novel, task-specific synergies. In a second experiment, nonvisual feedback from the hand was degraded with amplitude- and frequency-modulated vibration. Although vibration impaired task performance, it did not affect the rate at which learning occurred. We therefore conclude that the motor system can acquire internal models of novel, abstract neuromotor mappings even in the absence of overt movements or accurate proprioceptive signals, but that the distal motor system may be better suited to provide flexible control signals for neuromotor prostheses than structures related to the arm.

  11. Designing Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Despite all of the UI toolkits available today, it's still not easy to design good application interfaces. This bestselling book is one of the few reliable sources to help you navigate through the maze of design options. By capturing UI best practices and reusable ideas as design patterns, Designing Interfaces provides solutions to common design problems that you can tailor to the situation at hand. This updated edition includes patterns for mobile apps and social media, as well as web applications and desktop software. Each pattern contains full-color examples and practical design advice th

  12. Testing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Henriksen, Mogens; Nilson, Jesper K.;

    1999-01-01

    The wide use of solid insulating materials combinations in combinations has introduced problems in the interfaces between components. The most common insulating materials are cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), silicone rubber (SIR) and ethylene-propylene rubbers (EPR). Assemblies of these materials...

  13. Gesture Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkert, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    Take away mouse and keyboard. Now, how do you interact with a computer? Especially one that has a display that is the size of an entire wall. One possibility is through gesture interfaces. Remember Minority Report? Cool stuff, but that was already five years ago.. So, what is already possible now an

  14. Manufacturing Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van F.J.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper identifies the changing needs and requirements with respect to the interfacing of manufacturing functions. It considers the manufacturing system, its components and their relationships from the technological and logistic point of view, against the background of concurrent engineering. Desi

  15. Speechreading Instruction for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    1988-01-01

    This holistic approach to speechreading instruction proposes: enhancement of the child's self-motivation, strategy-based instruction, an interactive processing approach that focuses on meaning and psycholinguistic guessing, bisensory instruction, and a hierarchical continuum beginning with easy, successful activities that gradually increase in…

  16. iPhone User Interface Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Banga, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Written in a cookbook style, this book offers solutions using a recipe based approach. Each recipe contains step-by-step instructions followed by an analysis of what was done in each task and other useful information. The cookbook approach means you can dive into whatever recipes you want in no particular order. The iPhone Interface Cookbook is written from the ground up for people who are new to iOS or application interface design in general. Each chapter discusses the reasoning and design strategy behind critical interface components, as well as how to best integrate each into any iPhone or

  17. Interface learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorhauge, Sally

    2014-01-01

    for students. The research focuses on the learning that the students experience in the interface of the two learning environments: The formal learning environment of the upper secondary school and the informal learning environment of the museum. Focus is also on the learning that the teachers and museum......"Interface learning - New goals for museum and upper secondary school collaboration" investigates and analyzes the learning that takes place when museums and upper secondary schools in Denmark work together in local partnerships to develop and carry out school-related, museum-based coursework...... professionals experience as a result of their collaboration. The dissertation demonstrates how a given partnership’s collaboration affects the students’ learning experiences when they are doing the coursework. The dissertation presents findings that museum-school partnerships can use in order to develop...

  18. Museets interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Søren Pold gør sig overvejelser med udgangspunkt i museumsprojekterne Kongedragter.dk og Stigombord.dk. Han argumenterer for, at udviklingen af internettets interfaces skaber nye måder at se, forstå og interagere med kulturen på. Brugerne får nye medievaner og perceptionsmønstre, der må medtænkes i...

  19. Kansei Behavior of Robots Following Instruction of Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Shibata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When coexisting with humans and support them, robots need to be instructed to move by humans without burden, and the motion should not to instigate anxiety but to be accepted to human psychology. To realize Kansei behavior of robots following instruction of human, the concept of “Kansei transfer function”, which can add softness and smoothness to robots, is explained, and the effectiveness of its applications to humanrobot interfaces is confirmed from psychological aspects.

  20. Gloved Human-Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard (Inventor); Olowin, Aaron (Inventor); Hannaford, Blake (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Certain exemplary embodiments can provide a system, machine, device, manufacture, circuit, composition of matter, and/or user interface adapted for and/or resulting from, and/or a method and/or machine-readable medium comprising machine-implementable instructions for, activities that can comprise and/or relate to: tracking movement of a gloved hand of a human; interpreting a gloved finger movement of the human; and/or in response to interpreting the gloved finger movement, providing feedback to the human.

  1. Designing Instructional Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Lorraine T.

    1974-01-01

    The author presents an instructional design model for teachers that evolves around a teacher-manager concept which recognizes management functions of: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. (EA)

  2. 直接脑控机器人接口技术%Direct Brain-controlled Robot Interface Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伏云发; 王越超; 李洪谊; 徐保磊; 李永程

    2012-01-01

    直接脑控机器人接口(Brain-controlled robot interface,BCRI)是一种新型的人-机器人接口技术,是脑-机器接口/脑-计算机接口 (Brain-machine interface,BMI/Brain-computer interface,BCI)在机器人控制领域的重要应用和研究方向.研究者相继在Nature、Science和其他重要国际期刊上报道了相关的实验研究和开发,目前已成为国际前沿研究热点.本文主要围绕BCRI中的控制策略、BMI/BCI模块与机器人多层控制模块的适应和融合、BCRI中的脑信号自适应分类算法以及人、BMI/BCI模块和机器人控制系统的三边自适应展开论述,分析了目前的研究情况、存在的局限和面临的若干重要问题,指出进一步的研究思路和方向.%Direct brain-controlled robot interface (BCRI) is a new type human-robot interface which is an important research and development direction for brain-machine interface (BMI) / brain-computer interface (BCI) in the robot control field. Many experimental researches and developments for BCRI were reported by Nature, Science and other important international journals and it has become an international frontier research hotspot. The paper mainly discussed the control strategies for BCRI, the adaptation and fusion between BMI/BCI module and robot multilayer control architecture module, the adaptive classification algorithms for brain signal used in BCRI and the trilateral adaptation among human, BMI/BCI module and robot control system. The current situation and limitation for BCRI and some important problems faced by BCRI were analyzed and the further research ideas and directions were also pointed out.

  3. Winterkill indicator model, Crop Condition Assessment Division (CCAD) data base interface driver, user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Instructions are given for using the Winterkill indicator model CCAD data base interface driver. The purpose of the system is to interface the Winterkill Indicator Model with the CCAD operational data base. The interface driver routine decides what meteorological stations should be processed and calls the proper subroutines to process the stations.

  4. Instructional Design Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Judith A.; Collins, Keith

    1974-01-01

    An instructional design team, composed of experts in nursing, education, and media production, is used at the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, Madison, to produce instructional units for a new curriculum. The authors summarize steps of team/faculty communications, team methodology, and factors influencing the team's effectiveness. (EA)

  5. Instructional Coaching. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Julie; Steiner, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Schools and districts invest a great deal of time and money in professional development for teachers through instructional coaching. With this effort comes the responsibility to design coaching programs that have the greatest potential to improve classroom instruction and, in turn, increase student learning. What research is available to help…

  6. Foreign Language Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkmaier, Emma; Lange, Dale

    1967-01-01

    This review of research in foreign language instruction summarizes and interprets selected studies produced during the period 1963-66. Topics covered include the psychology of learning, comparisons o f methods, language skills, visual-auditory relationships, vocabulary, grammar, and FLES, as well as programed instruction, technological media,…

  7. Content-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, M.; Alonso, O.

    2013-01-01

    DelliCarpini and Alonso's book "Content-Based Instruction" explores different approaches to teaching content-based instruction (CBI) in the English language classroom. They provide a comprehensive overview of how to teach CBI in an easy-to-follow guide that language teachers will find very practical for their own contexts. Topics…

  8. Using Principles of Programmed Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Harry

    1971-01-01

    Although programmed instruction in accounting is available, it is limited in scope and in acceptance. Teachers, however, may apply principles of programming to the individualizing of instruction. (Author)

  9. Interfaces habladas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Soto Sanfiel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo describe y piensa al fenómeno de las Interfaces habladas (IH desde variados puntos de vista y niveles de análisis. El texto se ha concebido con los objetivos específicos de: 1.- procurar una visión panorámica de aspectos de la producción y consumo comunicativo de las IH; 2.- ofrecer recomendaciones para su creación y uso eficaz, y 3.- llamar la atención sobre su proliferación e inspirar su estudio desde la comunicación. A pesar de la creciente presencia de las IF en nues-tras vidas cotidianas, hay ausencia de textos que las caractericen y analicen por sus aspectos comunicativos. El trabajo es pertinente porque el fenómeno significa un cambio respecto a estadios comunica-tivos precedentes con consecuencias en las concepciones intelectuales y emocionales de los usuarios. La proliferación de IH nos abre a nue-vas realidades comunicativas: hablamos con máquinas.

  10. GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Terry L [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Tadinada, Sashi [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL

    2013-06-01

    As part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the objective of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface project is to create the capability to apply GRIZZLY 3-D finite element (thermal and stress) analysis results as input to FAVOR probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses. The one benefit of FAVOR to Grizzly is the PROBABILISTIC capability. This document describes the implementation of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface, the preliminary verification and tests results and a user guide that provides detailed step-by-step instructions to run the program.

  11. Instructions for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ GENERAL SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS These guidelines have been prepared in accordance with the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals.1 Authors should familiarize themselves with these requirements before submission.

  12. Instructing for Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bob

    1978-01-01

    To illustrate the importance of clarity and precision in stating objectives for learning a particular job task, a training consultant provides answers to the previous issue's questionnaire on writing instructional objectives. (MF)

  13. Designing Printed Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lucille; Pett, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of identifying the audience and determining specific objectives when designing printed instructional materials that will communicate effectively and provides detailed guidelines for dealing with such design factors as content, writing style, typography, illustrations, and page organization. (MBR)

  14. Applying learning theories and instructional design models for effective instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Elkhider, Ihsan A

    2016-06-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning outcomes, the science of instruction and instructional design models are used to guide the development of instructional design strategies that elicit appropriate cognitive processes. Here, the major learning theories are discussed and selected examples of instructional design models are explained. The main objective of this article is to present the science of learning and instruction as theoretical evidence for the design and delivery of instructional materials. In addition, this article provides a practical framework for implementing those theories in the classroom and laboratory.

  15. Cross Cultural Instruction: An Instructional Design Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica W. Tracey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In an authentic example of linking design and development with learning and performance, an international real estate development firm defined a problem; implementing a cleaning system in the largest mall in the world with a cross-cultural unskilled work force in Dubai, UAE. Partnering with a university instructional design team employing a rapid prototyping methodology and the constructivist ID approach, Layers of Negotiation Model, a comprehensive curriculum was designed. This article describes the project background, initial design, the ID team's work in Dubai, illustrates the product, and summarizes the design experience.

  16. Shipibo-Spanish: Differences in Residual Transfer at the Syntax-Morphology and the Syntax-Pragmatics Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Liliana; Camacho, Jose; Ulloa, Jose Elias

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present a study that tests the Interface Hypothesis (Sorace and Filiaci, 2006) at the syntax-pragmatics interface and its possible extension to the syntax-morphology interface in two groups of first language (L1) speakers of Shipibo with different levels of formal instruction in Spanish as a second language (L2). Shipibo is a…

  17. Instruct coders' manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, J.

    1971-01-01

    A manual designed both as an instructional manual for beginning coders and as a reference manual for the coding language INSTRUCT, is presented. The manual includes the major programs necessary to implement the teaching system and lists the limitation of current implementation. A detailed description is given of how to code a lesson, what buttons to push, and what utility programs to use. Suggestions for debugging coded lessons and the error messages that may be received during assembly or while running the lesson are given.

  18. Instructions for authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editors Editorial Board

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS
    Author Guidelines
    Authors must submit their papers via email to brain@edusoft.ro (please! or they can create an account and submit their papers online, at www.brain.edusoft.ro. Submited papers must be written in DOC format (Microsoft Word document, in as clear and as simple as possible English. Preferred maximum paper length for the papers is 20 pages, including figures.
    The template for the paper is at this address:
    http://www.edusoft.ro/Template_for_BRAIN.docRAIN vol. 3, issue 3, Instructions for authors

  19. Interface Simulation Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Černý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical (boolean notion of refinement for behavioral interfaces of system components is the alternating refinement preorder. In this paper, we define a distance for interfaces, called interface simulation distance. It makes the alternating refinement preorder quantitative by, intuitively, tolerating errors (while counting them in the alternating simulation game. We show that the interface simulation distance satisfies the triangle inequality, that the distance between two interfaces does not increase under parallel composition with a third interface, and that the distance between two interfaces can be bounded from above and below by distances between abstractions of the two interfaces. We illustrate the framework, and the properties of the distances under composition of interfaces, with two case studies.

  20. Tinker's Toys: The VIC-20 For Laboratory Interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farringer, L. Dwight

    1983-01-01

    Discusses use of the VIC-20 microcomputers for laboratory interfacing. Topics considered include the game connections and use of: the ADC0809 A/D converter and timers with the VIC-20; the free-running mode of T1; and the pulse-counting mode of T2. Instructions and diagrams are provided. Descriptions of several programs are also provided. (JN)

  1. Job Instruction Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Job Instruction Training (JIT) is a step-by-step, relatively simple technique used to train employees on the job. It is especially suitable for teaching manual skills or procedures; the trainer is usually an employee's supervisor but can be a co-worker. The JIT technique consists of a series of steps that a supervisor or other instructor follows…

  2. Gaze Interactive Building Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Ahmed, Zaheer; Mardanbeigi, Diako

    We combine eye tracking technology and mobile tablets to support hands-free interaction with digital building instructions. As a proof-of-concept we have developed a small interactive 3D environment where one can interact with digital blocks by gaze, keystroke and head gestures. Blocks may be moved...

  3. Using Realia in Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Lloyd H.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Seven articles in this issue focus on the use of realia in instruction. Authors discuss reasons why realia effectively motivate students and enhance learning; the place of realia in supervised occupational experience programs; the importance of real-life experiences to vocational agriculture; and student teaching as a reality experience. (SK)

  4. Instructional Guide for Cosmetology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    Intended as a tool for cosmetology teachers in Virginia public and private schools, the document is an instructional guide which offers 12 units of study, arranged in a three year course. Materials covered help prepare students for licensure in the State of Virginia and the guide is designed to cover the 1,500 hours required to be spent in the…

  5. Wind Power. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas (see note). The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  6. Sourcebook for Bibliographic Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbury, Carolyn, Ed.; And Others

    Direction and guidance are provided for establishing and maintaining bibliographic instruction (BI) programs. This document provides an overview of BI and BI programs and points readers to other sources of information. Five key topics were identified and the following papers are presented: (1) "An Introduction to Learning Theory" (Lori Arp); (2)…

  7. Orwell's Instructive Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Liam

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about George Orwell, his instructive errors, and the manner in which Orwell pierced worthless theory, faced facts and defended decency (with fluctuating success), and largely ignored the tradition of accumulated wisdom that has rendered him a timeless teacher--one whose inadvertent lessons, while infrequently…

  8. Secondary Dance Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD. Dept. of Instructional Planning and Development.

    This manual provides guidelines for dance teachers in secondary schools. A brief statement is made on the purpose and philosophy of dance education, and activities and instructional suggestions are presented for various dance forms: (1) group dance--folk/ethnic, square dance, and social dance; (2) aerobic dance; (3) jazz dance; (4) modern dance;…

  9. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  10. Grammar Instruction and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacina, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research literature from the past 25 years has supported the importance of teaching grammar in the context of writing instruction (Calkins, 1980; DiStefano & Killion, 1984; Weaver, 1996,1998). Unlike other content areas, practice does not make perfect when learning grammar. While isolated drill and practice of grammatical concepts may…

  11. Computer-assisted instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Fisser, P.; Wright, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of computer technology in education in the 1960s, it was claimed that computers can assist instructional practice and hence improve student learning. Since then computer technology has developed, and its potential for education has increased. In this article, we first discuss th

  12. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  13. Paratransit: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici, Anthony

    A concept-based introduction to paratransit is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses for disciplines such as engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of paratransit generally refers to modes of transportation other than mass transit and solo-driven automobiles. The…

  14. Safety instruction no 50

    CERN Multimedia

    Secrétariat SC

    2004-01-01

    Please note that the safety instruction no 50 (IS 50) entitled 'Safety Coordination on CERN Worksites' is available on the web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/479454/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC unit Secretariat, email: sc.secretariat@cern.ch SC Secretariat

  15. Safety Instruction No 43

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Please note that the Safety Instruction No 43 (IS 43) entitled "ASBESTOS - DANGERS AND PRECAUTIONS" is available on the web at the following URL: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335809/LAST_RELEASED/ Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch. SC Secretariat

  16. Scaffolding in Assisted Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On-The-Job Training, developed as direct instruction, is one of the earliest forms of training. This method is still widely in use today because it requires only a person who knows how to do the task, and the tools the person uses to do the task. This paper is intended to be a study of the methods used in education in Knowledge Society, with more specific aspects in training the trainers; as a result of this approach, it promotes scaffolding in assisted instruction as a reflection of the digital age for the learning process. Training the trainers in old environment with default techniques and designing the learning process in assisted instruction, as an application of the Vygotskian concept of the zone of proximal development (ZPD to the area of computer literacy for the younger users, generate diversity in educational communities and requires standards for technology infrastructure, standards for the content, developed as a concepts map, and applications for personalized in-struction, based on ZPD theory.

  17. After Rigid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troiano, Giovanni Maria

    Deformable and shape-changing interfaces are rapidly emerging in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Deformable interfaces provide users with newer input possibilities such as bending, squeezing, or stretching, which were impossible to achieve with rigid interfaces. Shape-changing inte......Deformable and shape-changing interfaces are rapidly emerging in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Deformable interfaces provide users with newer input possibilities such as bending, squeezing, or stretching, which were impossible to achieve with rigid interfaces. Shape...

  18. Task-Based Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantis, Alexandros

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of task-based writing instruction, a communicative language-teaching method, on second language acquisition and differentiation of instruction for English language learners during the independent work time instructional component of the Open Court Reading program. Through student-teacher…

  19. Academic and Military Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Robert K.

    This paper examines the practices and accomplishments of the military in the area of instructional technology. An examination of historical background is used to increase the precision of the definition of instructional technology. Specific contributions of the military are described and then uses of instructional technology in the military and…

  20. Individual Differences, Computers, and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayersman, David J.; Minden, Avril von

    1995-01-01

    Provides a conceptual foundation for the development of hypermedia as an instructional tool for addressing individual differences in learning styles. Highlights include a literature review; computers and instruction; individual differences, computers, and instruction; cognitive controls; cognitive styles and learning; personality types; and future…

  1. Student Models of Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliaro, Susan G.; Shambaugh, Neal

    2006-01-01

    Mental models are one way that humans represent knowledge (Markman, 1999). Instructional design (ID) is a conceptual model for developing instruction and typically includes analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (i.e., ADDIE model). ID, however, has been viewed differently by practicing teachers and instructional designers…

  2. The Human-Computer Interface and Information Literacy: Some Basics and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Gary M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses human/computer interaction research, human/computer interface, and their relationships to information literacy. Highlights include communication models; cognitive perspectives; task analysis; theory of action; problem solving; instructional design considerations; and a suggestion that human/information interface may be a more appropriate…

  3. Interface localization near criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Delfino, Gesualdo

    2016-01-01

    The theory of interface localization in near-critical planar systems at phase coexistence is formulated from first principles. We show that mutual delocalization of two interfaces, amounting to interfacial wetting, occurs when the bulk correlation length critical exponent $\

  4. Microcomputer interfacing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, M A

    1990-01-01

    This is the applications guide to interfacing microcomputers. It offers practical non-mathematical solutions to interfacing problems in many applications including data acquisition and control. Emphasis is given to the definition of the objectives of the interface, then comparing possible solutions and producing the best interface for every situation. Dr Mustafa A Mustafa is a senior designer of control equipment and has written many technical articles and papers on the subject of computers and their application to control engineering.

  5. Complex Interfaces Under Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Dan

    and mechanical processes that develop within this structure. Water-related processes at the interfaces between the compartments are complex, depending both on the interface itself, and on the characteristics of the interfaced compartments. Various aspects of global change directly or indirectly impact...

  6. Water at Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Hodgson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives...

  7. Interactive radio instruction: developing instructional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, J

    1989-01-01

    The USAID has, since 1972, funded the development of a new methodology for educational radio for young children through 3 projects: the Radio Mathematics PRoject of Nicaragua, the Radio Language Arts Project of Kenya, and the Radio Science PRoject of Papua New Guinea. These projects developed math programs for grades 1-4 and English as a second language for grades 1-3; programs to teach science in grades 4-6 are now being developed. Appropriate techniques were developed to engage young children actively in the learning process. Lessons are planned as a "conversation" between the children and the radio; scripts are written as 1/2 of a dialogue, with pauses carefully timed so that written as 12 of a dialogue, with pauses carefully timed so that students can contribute their 1/2. Teaching techniques used in all 3 projects include choral responses, simultaneous individual seatwork, and activities using simple materials such as pebbles and rulers. Certain techniques were specific to the subject being taught, or to the circumstances in which the lessons were to be used. Patterned oral drill was used frequently in the English lessons, including sound-cued drills. "Deferred" oral responses were used often in the math lessons. In this method, the children are instructed to solve a problem silently, not giving the answer aloud until requested, thus allowing time for even the slower children to participate. "One-child" questions were used in both English and science: the radio asks a question to be answered by a single child, who is selected on the spot by the classroom teacher. This allows for open-ended questions, but also requires constant supervision of the classroom teacher. Songs and games were used in all programs, and extensively for didactic purposes in the teaching of English. Instructions for science activities are often more complex than in other courses, particularly when the children are using science apparatus, especially when they work in pairs to share scarce

  8. Instructional immediacy in elearning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkem, Kerrie

    2014-01-01

    Instructor immediacy has been positively associated with many desirable academic outcomes including increased student learning. This study extends existing understanding of instructional immediacy behaviours in elearning by describing postgraduate nursing students' reflections on their own experience. An exploratory, descriptive survey design was used to collect qualitative data. Participants were asked what behaviours or activities help to create rapport or a positive interpersonal connection (immediacy) between students and their online teacher(s). Thematic analysis of the data revealed three main themes: acknowledging and affirming student's personal and professional responsibilities; providing clear and timely information; and utilising rich media. These findings give lecturers insight into instructional strategies they may adopt to increase immediacy in elearning and hence improve student learning outcomes.

  9. Groundwater hydrology instructional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ronald G.

    Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, is preparing for its third cycle of the Interactive Remote Instructional System (IRIS) in groundwater hydrology, beginning January 15, 1986. The first cycle finished with an impressive completion ratio for registered participants, and the second cycle has currently been underway since July. This comprehensive hydrogeology program was originally developed for the Soil Conservation Service (of the U.S. Department of Agriculture) to prepare their personnel for professional practice work. Since its evolution into IRIS, an 80% participant completion rate has been recorded for the first cycle, which is a significant departure from success rates traditionally recorded by correspondence courses. This excellent rate of success is the result of 2 years of refinement and demonstrates the progressive nature of the program. IRIS has met the needs of participants by developing a curriculum that reflects current trends in the groundwater industry and has provided a unique educational approach that ensures maximum interaction between the instructional staff and participants.

  10. Safety instruction No. 36

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Secretariat

    2005-01-01

    Please note that a revised version of Safety Instruction No. 36 (IS 36), entitled "Safety rules for the use of static magnetic fields at CERN" is available on the Web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335801/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC unit secretariat (e-mail : sc.secretariat@cern.ch) SC Secretariat

  11. Interfacing with the WEB

    CERN Document Server

    Dönszelmann, M

    1995-01-01

    Interfacing to the Web or programming interfaces for the Web is used to provide dynamic information for Web users. Using the Web as a transport system of information poses three constraints: namespace, statelessness and performance. To build interfaces on either server or client side of the Web one has to meet these constraints. Several examples, currently in use in High Energy Physics Experiments are described. They range from an interface to show where buildings are located to an interface showing active values of the On-line System of the DELPHI (CERN)..

  12. Quantization of interface currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotani, Motoko [AIMR, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Schulz-Baldes, Hermann [Department Mathematik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Villegas-Blas, Carlos [Instituto de Matematicas, Cuernavaca, UNAM, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    At the interface of two two-dimensional quantum systems, there may exist interface currents similar to edge currents in quantum Hall systems. It is proved that these interface currents are macroscopically quantized by an integer that is given by the difference of the Chern numbers of the two systems. It is also argued that at the interface between two time-reversal invariant systems with half-integer spin, one of which is trivial and the other non-trivial, there are dissipationless spin-polarized interface currents.

  13. Entanglement and topological interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Brehm, Enrico M; Jaud, Daniel; Schmidt-Colinet, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider entanglement entropies in two-dimensional conformal field theories in the presence of topological interfaces. Tracing over one side of the interface, the leading term of the entropy remains unchanged. The interface however adds a subleading contribution, which can be interpreted as a relative (Kullback-Leibler) entropy with respect to the situation with no defect inserted. Reinterpreting boundaries as topological interfaces of a chiral half of the full theory, we rederive the left/right entanglement entropy in analogy with the interface case. We discuss WZW models and toroidal bosonic theories as examples.

  14. Effective Multicultural Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin T. Thompson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The reason why the Trayvon Martin murder trial and similar court cases create a philosophical rift in our nation is due in part to flaws in the delivery of multicultural education. Traditional multicultural instruction does not prepare citizens for the subtleties and complexities of race relations. This study investigates critical strategies and practices that address multicultural missing gaps. I also seek to fill a void in the literature created by a lack of student input regarding teaching strategies that encourage lifelong learning. Students (N = 337 enrolled at a Midwestern university were asked to rate the efficacy of selected instructional strategies. Utilizing a 9-point Likert-type scale, students gave themselves a personal growth rating of 7.15 (SD = 1.47. Variables important to predicting that growth (R2 = .56, p < .0005 were a six-factor variable known as a non-color-blind instructional approach (t = 10.509, p ≤ .0005, allowing students an opportunity to form their own opinions apart from the instructor (t = 4.797, p ≤ .0005, and a state law that mandated multicultural training (t = 3.234, p = .001. Results demonstrated that utilizing a 35% traditional and 65% critical pedagogy mixture when teaching multicultural education helped promote win/win scenarios for education candidates hoping to become difference makers.

  15. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like ‘Face in a Crowd’ task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the ‘Crowd’) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a ‘Crowd Off’ condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main results. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  16. PEDOT:PSS interfaces support the development of neuronal synaptic networks with reduced neuroglia response in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada eCellot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of electrodes based on conductive polymers in brain-machine interface technology offers the opportunity to exploit variably manufactured materials to reduce gliosis, indeed the most common brain response to chronically implanted neural electrodes. In fact, the use of conductive polymers, finely tailored in their physical-chemical properties, might result in electrodes with improved adaptability to the brain tissue and increased charge-transfer efficiency. Here we interfaced poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS doped with different amounts of ethylene glycol (EG with rat hippocampal primary cultures grown for 3 weeks on these synthetic substrates. We used immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy combined to single cell electrophysiology to assess the biocompatibility of PEDOT:PSS in terms of neuronal growth and synapse formation. We investigated neuronal morphology, density and electrical activity. We reported the novel observation that opposite to neurons, glial cell density was progressively reduced, hinting at the ability of this material to down regulate glial reaction. Thus PEDOT:PSS is an attractive candidate for the design of new implantable electrodes, controlling the extent of glial reactivity without affecting neuronal viability and function.

  17. Control of a two-dimensional movement signal by a noninvasive brain-computer interface in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; McFarland, Dennis J.

    2004-12-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can provide communication and control to people who are totally paralyzed. BCIs can use noninvasive or invasive methods for recording the brain signals that convey the user's commands. Whereas noninvasive BCIs are already in use for simple applications, it has been widely assumed that only invasive BCIs, which use electrodes implanted in the brain, can provide multidimensional movement control of a robotic arm or a neuroprosthesis. We now show that a noninvasive BCI that uses scalp-recorded electroencephalographic activity and an adaptive algorithm can provide humans, including people with spinal cord injuries, with multidimensional point-to-point movement control that falls within the range of that reported with invasive methods in monkeys. In movement time, precision, and accuracy, the results are comparable to those with invasive BCIs. The adaptive algorithm used in this noninvasive BCI identifies and focuses on the electroencephalographic features that the person is best able to control and encourages further improvement in that control. The results suggest that people with severe motor disabilities could use brain signals to operate a robotic arm or a neuroprosthesis without needing to have electrodes implanted in their brains. brain-machine interface | electroencephalography

  18. AXIOLOGICAL MODEL OF INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takushevich I. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents instructional design as a new approach to the issue of developing value-oriented worldview. Scientific research and analysis led the author to summarize instructional design theory, broaden the definition of instructional design and apply it to instruction and learning in a new manner. The goal to build a pattern of instruction aimed at developing learners’ value-oriented worldview required the author to study the existing instructional design model, to analyse and generalize a number of monographs and articles devoted to the problem of building value systems and value orientations, and finally to investigate and apply the new knowledge to real life in the form of experiment. The work conducted brought the author to axiological model of instructional design, which consists of three dimensions: a linear sequence of the events from designing the instructional material to independent learning activities, interaction between a teacher and a learner, pace of learning and design. The article touches upon every dimension, level and stage of the model, describes and defines the procedures that take place on each of them, as well as suggests a possible way to visualize the model in a form of a sketch. The author also points out the advantages of using instructional design as an efficient and smart tool to organize learning and justifies the use of the new instructional design model in XXI century

  19. USING GOOGLE+ FOR INSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin YEE

    Full Text Available Introduced in July, 2011 in a beta test of invited users only, the new social media service Google+ (or G+ quickly spread by word of mouth, and Google leader Larry Page (2011 blogged that within sixteen days it had 10 million users. By August, it had 25 million users (Cashmore, 2011. Even with slower growth ahead (still with no marketing budget, the service looks likely to crest 100 million users perhaps as early as ten months, a feat that took Facebook three years. Other social networks, most notably Facebook and Twitter, have been used increasingly as instructional tools, since they are platforms with which students are already familiar (Maloney, 2007; McLoughlin & Lee, 2007. Selwyn (2009 found that students often eschew official channels for communication in favor of less formal community-based formats such as Facebook, implying a growing need for instructional communication tools that will be used willingly by students. The question is whether Google+ can be used like Twitter or Facebook to augment instruction, or even, perhaps, to improve upon those predecessors for academic purposes. Google+ is like Twitter in that anyone can follow a given user’s posts. There is no direct “friend” relationship required to read the posts written by others. However, it also approximates some features of Facebook. Rather than friends sorted into “lists” like in Facebook, Google+ allows users to place feeds into one or more “circles,” the better to monitor (or control the flow of information to and from different audiences. Circles are more intuitive, and more central to the experience, than the Facebook lists. They provide an explicit organizational structure, compared to the less-obvious listing functionality, which feels like an afterthought, found in Facebook.

  20. Instructional Use of Weblogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz AKBULUT

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 can provide learners with increased interaction and online collaboration. Among its applications, weblogs have gained an increasing popularity as they allow bloggers to voice their own perspectives which can be delivered to a large audience through the Web. Weblogs can be integrated into teaching-learning process as they encourage learners to collaborate and freely voice their ideas. However, innovative technologies might not always lead to innovative distance education practices if timely adaptation lags behind. This study presents a review on instructional use of weblogs along with implications for open and distance learning.

  1. Turbomachine Interface Sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Chupp, Raymond E.; Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2005-01-01

    Sealing interfaces and coatings, like lubricants, are sacrificial, giving up their integrity for the benefit of the component. Clearance control is a major issue in power systems turbomachine design and operational life. Sealing becomes the most cost-effective way to enhance system performance. Coatings, films, and combined use of both metals and ceramics play a major role in maintaining interface clearances in turbomachine sealing and component life. This paper focuses on conventional and innovative materials and design practices for sealing interfaces.

  2. Popeye Project: ROV interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scates, C.R.; Hernandez, D.A.; Hickok, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) interface with the Popeye Project Subsea System. It describes the ROV-related plans, design philosophies, intervention tasks, tooling/equipment requirements, testing activities, and offshore installation experiences. Early identification and continuous consideration of the ROV interfaces significantly improved the overall efficiency of equipment designs and offshore operations. The Popeye Project helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deep water subsea production systems.

  3. Universal computer interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  4. FPGA Implementation of Deblocking Filter Custom Instruction Hardware on NIOS - II Based SOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolla Leela Naresh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a frame work for hardware acceleration for post video processing system implemented on FPGA. The deblocking filter algorithms ported on SOC having Alter a NIOS-II soft core processor.SOC designed with the help of SOPC builder .Custom instructions are chosen by identifying the most frequently used tasks in the algorithm and the instruction set of NIOS-II processor has been extended. Deblocking filter new instruction added to the processor that are implemented in hardware and interfaced to the NIOSII processor. New instruction added to the processor to boost the performance of the deblocking filter algorithm. Use of custom instructions the implemented tasks have been accelerated by 5.88%. The benefit of the speed is obtained at the cost of very small hardware resources.

  5. FPGA Implementation of Deblocking Filter Custom Instruction Hardware on NIOS - II Based SOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addanki Purna Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a frame work for hardware acceleration for post video processing system implemented on FPGA. The deblocking filter algorithms ported on SOC having Altera NIOS-II soft core processor.SOC designed with the help of SOPC builder .Custom instructions are chosen by identifying the most frequently used tasks in the algorithm and the instruction set of NIOS-II processor has been extended. Deblockingfilter new instruction added to the processor that are implemented in hardware and interfaced to the NIOSII processor. New instruction added to the processor to boost the performance of the deblocking filteralgorithm. Use of custom instructions the implemented tasks have been accelerated by 5.88%. The benefit of the speed is obtained at the cost of very small hardware resources.

  6. Electromagnetic Interface Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electromagnetic Interface Testing facilitysupports such testing asEmissions, Field Strength, Mode Stirring, EMP Pulser, 4 Probe Monitoring/Leveling System, and...

  7. Shape-changing interfaces:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård; Pedersen, Esben Warming; Petersen, Marianne Graves;

    2015-01-01

    these shortcomings. We identify eight types of shape that are transformed in various ways to serve both functional and hedonic design purposes. Interaction with shape-changing interfaces is simple and rarely merges input and output. Three questions are discussed based on the review: (a) which design purposes may......Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address...

  8. Allocating instruction time: How language instruction can affect multiple skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghans, L.; Diris, R.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    There exists substantial variation in how schools allocate instruction time to school subjects. The effectiveness of that allocation depends on the immediate effect of instruction in one subject on achievement in the same subject, on how skills further develop over time, and on possible spillover ef

  9. Direct Instruction Revisited: A Key Model for Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliaro, Susan G.; Lockee, Barbara B.; Burton, John K.

    2005-01-01

    Rooted in behavioral theory, particularly the radical or selectivist behaviorism of B.F. Skinner (1953, 1954, 1966, 1968, 1974), the direct instruction (DI) approach to teaching is now well into its third decade of influencing curriculum, instruction, and research. It is also in its third decade of controversy. Our purpose is to present the DI…

  10. The Instructional Network: Using Facebook to Enhance Undergraduate Mathematics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter; Gregory, Karen; Eddy, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Facebook is a website with over one billion users worldwide that is synonymous with social-networking. However, in this study, Facebook is used as an "instructional network". Two sections of an undergraduate calculus course were used to study the effects of participating in a Facebook group devoted solely to instruction. One section was…

  11. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  12. The User Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Martha J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The first of three articles on the design of user interfaces for information retrieval systems discusses the need to examine types of display, prompting, and input as separate entities. The second examines the use of artificial intelligence in creating natural language interfaces, and the third outlines standards for case studies in human computer…

  13. Interface or Interlace?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed; Wamberg, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Departing from an analysis of the computer's indeterminate location between medium and machine, this paper problematises the idea of a clear-cut interface in complex computing, especially Augmented Reality. The idea and pratice of the interface is derived from the medium as a representational...

  14. Verden som interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af Peter Weibels tekst "The World as Interface" i Passepartout # 27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07......Oversættelse af Peter Weibels tekst "The World as Interface" i Passepartout # 27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07...

  15. A Primer on Instructional Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The pressure to improve the quality of instruction in schools may be higher today than at any other time in the history of U.S. education. To respond to this urgent demand, schools across the nation are hiring instructional coaches (ICs), even though there is little published research that shows what works and what does not work when it comes to…

  16. Adaptive instruction and pupil achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtveen, A.A M; Booy, N; de Jong, Robert (Rob); van de Grift, W.J C M

    1999-01-01

    In this article the results are reported of a quasi-experiment on effects of adaptive instruction on reading results of children in the first year of reading instruction in Dutch primary schools. The research involved 456 pupils from 23 schools (12 experimental and 11 control group schools). Teacher

  17. Professional Cosmetology Practices. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcus, Sharron; Armstrong, Ivan J.

    This publication is designed to assist the instructor and students in understanding the latest concepts and techniques of the instructional phase of cosmetology programs. The instructional units are in five areas: (1) orientation, (2) professional practices: hair, (3) professional practices: skin and nails, (4) cosmetology science, and (5)…

  18. Overcoming Resistance to Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William G.; Anderson, Susan; Love, Don

    2000-01-01

    Administrators must convince and motivate faculty to adopt instructional technology if departments are to remain on the cutting edge. Describes seven actions to promote the use of instructional technology: know your faculty; be aware of faculty concerns; use technology yourself; review potential barriers; explore and obtain resources; communicate…

  19. Marketing Instructional Development Internally, Externally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lied, James

    This description of the marketing process as a practical way to manage the function of instruction development emphasizes the importance of the identification and evaluation of customer needs before developing objectives. To assist the instructional development agency in focusing on this aspect of planning, a check list of possible marketing…

  20. Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunenburg, Frederick C.; Irby, Beverly J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher behavior research has shown that teacher behaviors, as well as specific teaching strategies, make a difference with regard to student achievement. Ten durable instructional strategies are discussed: set induction, stimulus variation, reinforcement, questioning, recognizing attending behavior, lecturing or direct instruction, planned…

  1. Distance Education Instructional Model Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of graduate students involved in distance education on North Dakota State University's Interactive Video Network included 80 on campus and 13 off. The instructional models rated most effective were role playing, simulation, jurisprudential (Socratic method), memorization, synectics, and inquiry. Direct instruction was rated least…

  2. Instructional Analysis for Health Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This instructional analysis centers on identifying the skills, related knowledge, teacher activities, and student activities that are central to teaching various topics included in the core curriculum for health occupations courses. Addressed in the volume are the following instructional areas: first aid; medical terminology; medical asepsis;…

  3. Analyzing Classroom Instruction in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, William L.

    A method for analyzing instructional techniques employed during reading group instruction is reported, and the characteristics of the effective reading teacher are discussed. Teaching effectiveness is divided into two categories: (1) how the teacher acts and interacts with children on a personal level and (2) how the teacher performs his…

  4. ROTI-OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Barker,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The instructional model presented here is a combination of systems used by the United States Navy and R. F. Mager's Criteria Referenced Instruction Model for Analysis Design and Implementation. The author has taken what he believes is the best components from each system and established a working model.

  5. Student Attitudes toward Bibliographic Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damko, Ellen E.

    This study was designed to determine what value, if any, college students place upon library use instruction. A survey conducted on a random sample of college and university students working at Cedar Point Amusement Park in Sandusky, Ohio, during the summer of 1990 was designed to determine the type and amount of library instruction each student…

  6. Entanglement and topological interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehm, E.; Brunner, I.; Jaud, D.; Schmidt-Colinet, C. [Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper we consider entanglement entropies in two-dimensional conformal field theories in the presence of topological interfaces. Tracing over one side of the interface, the leading term of the entropy remains unchanged. The interface however adds a subleading contribution, which can be interpreted as a relative (Kullback-Leibler) entropy with respect to the situation with no defect inserted. Reinterpreting boundaries as topological interfaces of a chiral half of the full theory, we rederive the left/right entanglement entropy in analogy with the interface case. We discuss WZW models and toroidal bosonic theories as examples. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms; Myers, Brad A

    2008-01-01

    User Interfaces have been around as long as computers have existed, even well before the field of Human-Computer Interaction was established. Over the years, some papers on the history of Human-Computer Interaction and User Interfaces have appeared, primarily focusing on the graphical interface era...... and early visionaries such as Bush, Engelbart and Kay. With the User Interface being a decisive factor in the proliferation of computers in society and since it has become a cultural phenomenon, it is time to paint a more comprehensive picture of its history. This SIG will investigate the possibilities...... of  launching a concerted effort towards creating a History of User Interfaces. ...

  8. Intelligent Educational Systems for Anchored Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David D.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential for using Intelligent Educational Systems (IES) for anchoring instruction in macro contexts in science education. Topics include anchored instruction; situated cognition; problem solving; cognitivism; interactive video environments; and examples of combining IES and anchored instruction. (LRW)

  9. The Challenge of Individualized Instruction in Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Carl B.; McKee, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses 14 challenges to the use of individualized instruction in corrections. Emphasizes a systems approach, motivational tools, programmed instructional materials, and approaches such as Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching. (SK)

  10. Academic Service Quality and Instructional Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Keith; Westbrook, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between academic service quality and instructional quality in higher education. Found a high correlation between academic service and instructional quality, with academic service overlapping instructional quality in three dimensions: enthusiasm, organization, and rapport. (EV)

  11. Cortical Spiking Network Interfaced with Virtual Musculoskeletal Arm and Robotic Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Zhou, Xianlian; Neymotin, Samuel A; Przekwas, Andrzej; Francis, Joseph T; Lytton, William W

    2015-01-01

    Embedding computational models in the physical world is a critical step towards constraining their behavior and building practical applications. Here we aim to drive a realistic musculoskeletal arm model using a biomimetic cortical spiking model, and make a robot arm reproduce the same trajectories in real time. Our cortical model consisted of a 3-layered cortex, composed of several hundred spiking model-neurons, which display physiologically realistic dynamics. We interconnected the cortical model to a two-joint musculoskeletal model of a human arm, with realistic anatomical and biomechanical properties. The virtual arm received muscle excitations from the neuronal model, and fed back proprioceptive information, forming a closed-loop system. The cortical model was trained using spike timing-dependent reinforcement learning to drive the virtual arm in a 2D reaching task. Limb position was used to simultaneously control a robot arm using an improved network interface. Virtual arm muscle activations responded to motoneuron firing rates, with virtual arm muscles lengths encoded via population coding in the proprioceptive population. After training, the virtual arm performed reaching movements which were smoother and more realistic than those obtained using a simplistic arm model. This system provided access to both spiking network properties and to arm biophysical properties, including muscle forces. The use of a musculoskeletal virtual arm and the improved control system allowed the robot arm to perform movements which were smoother than those reported in our previous paper using a simplistic arm. This work provides a novel approach consisting of bidirectionally connecting a cortical model to a realistic virtual arm, and using the system output to drive a robotic arm in real time. Our techniques are applicable to the future development of brain neuroprosthetic control systems, and may enable enhanced brain-machine interfaces with the possibility for finer control of

  12. Cortical spiking network interfaced with virtual musculoskeletal arm and robotic arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eDura-Bernal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Embedding computational models in the physical world is a critical step towards constraining their behavior and building practical applications. Here we aim to drive a realistic musculoskeletal arm model using a biomimetic cortical spiking model, and make a robot arm reproduce the same trajectories in real time. Our cortical model consisted of a 3-layered cortex, composed of several hundred spiking model-neurons, which display physiologically realistic dynamics. We interconnected the cortical model to a two-joint musculoskeletal model of a human arm, with realistic anatomical and biomechanical properties. The virtual arm received muscle excitations from the neuronal model, and fed back proprioceptive information, forming a closed-loop system. The cortical model was trained using spike timing-dependent reinforcement learning to drive the virtual arm in a 2D reaching task. Limb position was used to simultaneously control a robot arm using an improved network interface. Virtual arm muscle activations responded to motoneuron firing rates, with virtual arm muscles lengths encoded via population coding in the proprioceptive population. After training, the virtual arm performed reaching movements which were smoother and more realistic than those obtained using a simplistic arm model. This system provided access to both spiking network properties and to arm biophysical properties, including muscle forces. The use of a musculoskeletal virtual arm and the improved control system allowed the robot arm to perform movements which were smoother than those reported in our previous paper using a simplistic arm.This work provides a novel approach consisting of bidirectionally connecting a cortical model to a realistic virtual arm, and using the system output to drive a robotic arm in real time. Our techniques are applicable to the future development of brain neuro-prosthetic control systems, and may enable enhanced brain-machine interfaces with the possibility

  13. The Java Legacy Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    The Java Legacy Interface is designed to use Java for encapsulating native legacy code on small embedded platforms. We discuss why existing technologies for encapsulating legacy code (JNI) is not sufficient for an important range of small embedded platforms, and we show how the Java Legacy...... Interface offers this previously missing functionality. We describe an implementation of the Java Legacy Interface for a particular virtual machine, and how we have used this virtual machine to integrate Java with an existing, commercial, soft real-time, C/C++ legacy platform....

  14. The interface effect

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, Alexander R

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces are back, or perhaps they never left. The familiar Socratic conceit from the Phaedrus, of communication as the process of writing directly on the soul of the other, has returned to center stage in today's discussions of culture and media. Indeed Western thought has long construed media as a grand choice between two kinds of interfaces. Following the optimistic path, media seamlessly interface self and other in a transparent and immediate connection. But, following the pessimistic path, media are the obstacles to direct communion, disintegrating self and other into misunderstanding

  15. The computer graphics interface

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrugge Chauveau, Karla; Niles Reed, Theodore; Shepherd, B

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Interface provides a concise discussion of computer graphics interface (CGI) standards. The title is comprised of seven chapters that cover the concepts of the CGI standard. Figures and examples are also included. The first chapter provides a general overview of CGI; this chapter covers graphics standards, functional specifications, and syntactic interfaces. Next, the book discusses the basic concepts of CGI, such as inquiry, profiles, and registration. The third chapter covers the CGI concepts and functions, while the fourth chapter deals with the concept of graphic obje

  16. Tiered Instruction: An Effective Strategy to Differentiation of Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya BELER

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effects of a tiered instructional design on classroom management, attitude and the learning level of students. The instructional program was prepared for an introductory science course for 3rd grade students. The case study research method was used. Observation form, teacher and student interview forms were used to collect data. The teaching program was planned using a tiered instruction method for nine subjects of the “Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow” curriculum theme. The teacher made a short presentation and then students were classified into ability groups. Finally, each group completed learning activity via individual and group tasks based on activities appropriate to their abilities. The results indicate that tiered instruction had positive effects on the learning outcomes of students. All groups completed the classroom activities easily, which increased their motivation. Students participated in activities voluntarily and enthusiastically.

  17. The Function of Gesture in Lexically Focused L2 Instructional Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smotrova, Tetyana; Lantolf, James P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the mediational function of the gesture-speech interface in the instructional conversation that emerged as teachers attempted to explain the meaning of English words to their students in two EFL classrooms in the Ukraine. Its analytical framework is provided by Vygotsky's sociocultural psychology…

  18. Interface Anywhere Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To illustrate the viability of this technology, a prototype Natural User Interface (NUI) was developed as a proof-of-concept for system control.  Gesture and...

  19. Motivational Measure of the Instruction Compared: Instruction Based on the ARCS Motivation Theory vs Traditional Instruction in Blended Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Ozgur M.; Akdemir, Omur

    2012-01-01

    The ARCS Motivation Theory was proposed to guide instructional designers and teachers who develop their own instruction to integrate motivational design strategies into the instruction. There is a lack of literature supporting the idea that instruction for blended courses if designed based on the ARCS Motivation Theory provides different…

  20. Mass and charge transport in IPMC actuators with fractal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Longfei; Wu, Yucheng; Zhu, Zicai; Li, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) actuators have been attracting a growing interest in extensive applications, which consequently raises the demands on the accuracy of its theoretical modeling. For the last few years, rough landscape of the interface between the electrode and the ionic membrane of IPMC has been well-documented as one of the key elements to ensure a satisfied performance. However, in most of the available work, the interface morphology of IPMC was simplified with structural idealization, which lead to perplexity in the physical interpretation on its interface mechanism. In this paper, the quasi-random rough interface of IPMC was described with fractal dimension and scaling parameters. And the electro-chemical field was modeled by Poisson equation and a properly simplified Nernst-Planck equation set. Then, by simulation with Finite Element Method, a comprehensive analysis on he inner mass and charge transportation in IPMC actuators with different fractal interfaces was provided, which may be further adopted to instruct the performance-oriented interface design for ionic electro-active actuators. The results also verified that rough interface can impact the electrical and mechanical response of IPMC, not only from the respect of the real surface increase, but also from mass distribution difference caused by the complexity of the micro profile.

  1. Interface-Based Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1466, pages 163–178. Springer-Verlag, 1998. A. Chakrabarti, L. de Alfaro, T.A...Henzinger, M. Jurdziński, and F.Y.C. Mang. Interface compatibility checking for software modules. In Proc. Computer-Aided Verification, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 2404...bidirectional component interfaces. In Proc. Computer-Aided Verification, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 2404, pages 414–427.

  2. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-06-30

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint comprising a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including a deterministic data communications network, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  3. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-08-11

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint comprising a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including a deterministic data communications network, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  4. Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-10-29

    Data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the parallel computer including a plurality of compute nodes that execute a parallel application, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes and the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources, including receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a data communications instruction, the instruction characterized by an instruction type, the instruction specifying a transmission of transfer data from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint and transmitting, in accordance with the instruction type, the transfer data from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint.

  5. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-06-09

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task; the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including at least one segment of shared random access memory; including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers through a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  6. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  7. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-06-02

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task; the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including at least one segment of shared random access memory; including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers through a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  8. Interfaces: nanometric dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, T J [School of Informatics, University of Wales Bangor, Dean Street, Bangor, Gwynedd, LL70 9PX (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-21

    The incorporation of nanometric size particles in a matrix to form dielectric composites shows promise of materials (nanodielectrics) with new and improved properties. It is argued that the properties of the interfaces between the particles and the matrix, which will themselves be of nanometric dimensions, will have an increasingly dominant role in determining dielectric performance as the particle size decreases. The forces that determine the electrical and dielectric properties of interfaces are considered, with emphasis on the way in which they might influence composite behaviour. A number of examples are given in which interfaces at the nanometric level exercise both passive and active control over dielectric, optical and conductive properties. Electromechanical properties are also considered, and it is shown that interfaces have important electrostrictive and piezoelectric characteristics. It is demonstrated that the process of poling, namely subjecting macroscopic composite materials to electrical stress and raised temperatures to create piezoelectric materials, can be explained in terms of optimizing the collective response of the nanometric interfaces involved. If the electrical and electromechanical features are coupled to the long-established electrochemical properties, interfaces represent highly versatile active elements with considerable potential in nanotechnology.

  9. Interfaces: nanometric dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, T. J.

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nanometric size particles in a matrix to form dielectric composites shows promise of materials (nanodielectrics) with new and improved properties. It is argued that the properties of the interfaces between the particles and the matrix, which will themselves be of nanometric dimensions, will have an increasingly dominant role in determining dielectric performance as the particle size decreases. The forces that determine the electrical and dielectric properties of interfaces are considered, with emphasis on the way in which they might influence composite behaviour. A number of examples are given in which interfaces at the nanometric level exercise both passive and active control over dielectric, optical and conductive properties. Electromechanical properties are also considered, and it is shown that interfaces have important electrostrictive and piezoelectric characteristics. It is demonstrated that the process of poling, namely subjecting macroscopic composite materials to electrical stress and raised temperatures to create piezoelectric materials, can be explained in terms of optimizing the collective response of the nanometric interfaces involved. If the electrical and electromechanical features are coupled to the long-established electrochemical properties, interfaces represent highly versatile active elements with considerable potential in nanotechnology.

  10. Lectures on random interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Funaki, Tadahisa

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces are created to separate two distinct phases in a situation in which phase coexistence occurs. This book discusses randomly fluctuating interfaces in several different settings and from several points of view: discrete/continuum, microscopic/macroscopic, and static/dynamic theories. The following four topics in particular are dealt with in the book. Assuming that the interface is represented as a height function measured from a fixed-reference discretized hyperplane, the system is governed by the Hamiltonian of gradient of the height functions. This is a kind of effective interface model called ∇φ-interface model. The scaling limits are studied for Gaussian (or non-Gaussian) random fields with a pinning effect under a situation in which the rate functional of the corresponding large deviation principle has non-unique minimizers. Young diagrams determine decreasing interfaces, and their dynamics are introduced. The large-scale behavior of such dynamics is studied from the points of view of the hyd...

  11. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Crawford, Cary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, Brent [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Insolves LLC, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  12. A Fallibilistic Model for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, A. J.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses models in inquiry and of instruction based on critical Fallibilistic philosophy, developed by Karl R. Popper, which holds that all knowledge grows by conjecture and refutation. Classroom applications of strategies which result from the model are presented. (JP)

  13. Managing Motivation In Personalized Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, G. R.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    addresses the topic of managing motivation in Keller's Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). Outlines the reinforcing features that are at the foundation of PSI theory, and examines methods used to ensure that these reinforcing properties are fu lly utilized. (JR)

  14. Measurement Control Workshop Instructional Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Crawford, Cary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, Brent [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States) and Insolves LLC

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  15. Hypermedia Environments and Adaptive Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Reviews relevant professional literature concerning hypermedia environments and adaptive instruction for online learning for distance education and continuing education. Highlights include aptitude-treatment interaction; cognitive processes; navigational paths; log files; and intelligent tutors. Contains 125 references. (LRW)

  16. Papers from the Fifth International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Jane E.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2014-06-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), also known as brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), translate brain activity into new outputs that replace, restore, enhance, supplement or improve natural brain outputs. BCI research and development has grown rapidly for the past two decades. It is beginning to provide useful communication and control capacities to people with severe neuromuscular disabilities; and it is expanding into new areas such as neurorehabilitation that may greatly increase its clinical impact. At the same time, significant challenges remain, particularly in regard to translating laboratory advances into clinical use. The papers in this special section report some of the work presented at the Fifth International BCI Meeting held on 3-7 June 2013 at the Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove, California, USA. Like its predecessors over the past 15 years, this meeting was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and a variety of other governmental and private sponsors [1]. This fifth meeting was organized and managed by a program committee of BCI researchers from throughout the world [2]. It retained the distinctive retreat-style format developed by the Wadsworth Center researchers who organized and managed the first four meetings. The 301 attendees came from 165 research groups in 29 countries; 37% were students or postdoctoral fellows. Of more than 200 extended abstracts submitted for peer review, 25 were selected for oral presentation [3], and 181 were presented as posters [4] and published in the open-access conference proceedings [5]. The meeting featured 19 highly interactive workshops [6] covering the broad spectrum of BCI research and development, as well as many demonstrations of BCI systems and associated technology. Like the first four meetings, this one included attendees and embraced topics from across the broad spectrum of disciplines essential to effective BCI research and development, including

  17. Colleague to Colleague: Deepening Instructional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullen, Kristine; Chaffee, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative dialogue about instructional practices is essential to the growth of the education profession. To determine what effective instruction is and how to improve their own instructional practice, educators must clarify and publicly state their beliefs about instruction, teaching, and leadership. This is messy and complex work, and to…

  18. Professional Development: Identifying Effective Instructional Coaching Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the instructional coaching activities most used by instructional coaches in southeast Texas school districts and to test if there was a relationship between the use of instructional coaching and perceived improvement in the instructional practices of teachers and student achievement. The participants for…

  19. Instructional Coaching: Leadership Styles and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Maurisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Principals are traditionally the instructional leaders of a school. However, instructional coaching moves the emphasis from principals to instructional coaches by charging instructional coaches with improving the effectiveness of teachers who are critical to ensuring the successful education of a student. This research analyzed the leadership…

  20. Instructional Technology Must Contribute to Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenda, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Those involved in instructional technology in higher education are urged to view instructional technology as a means of improving academic productivity. Instructional technology has been used for over forty years to analyze instructional problems and design solutions that reduce costs and improve learning outcomes. The Pew Program in Course…

  1. Expertise in Swiss mathematics instruction

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This chapter draws on data and findings from several video studies to describe the quality of mathematics teaching in Switzerland. The focus is on features of instructional practice and quality as core components of classroom behavior that reflect the teacher’s expertise in creating optimal learning opportunities. The didactic triangle is used as the basis for describing the profile of expertise in Swiss mathematics instruction in terms of three interdependent dimensions of ins...

  2. Prediction of stroke thrombolysis outcome using CT brain machine learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bentley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical decision-step in the emergency treatment of ischemic stroke is whether or not to administer thrombolysis — a treatment that can result in good recovery, or deterioration due to symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (SICH. Certain imaging features based upon early computerized tomography (CT, in combination with clinical variables, have been found to predict SICH, albeit with modest accuracy. In this proof-of-concept study, we determine whether machine learning of CT images can predict which patients receiving tPA will develop SICH as opposed to showing clinical improvement with no haemorrhage. Clinical records and CT brains of 116 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis were collected retrospectively (including 16 who developed SICH. The sample was split into training (n = 106 and test sets (n = 10, repeatedly for 1760 different combinations. CT brain images acted as inputs into a support vector machine (SVM, along with clinical severity. Performance of the SVM was compared with established prognostication tools (SEDAN and HAT scores; original, or after adaptation to our cohort. Predictive performance, assessed as area under receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC, of the SVM (0.744 compared favourably with that of prognostic scores (original and adapted versions: 0.626–0.720; p < 0.01. The SVM also identified 9 out of 16 SICHs, as opposed to 1–5 using prognostic scores, assuming a 10% SICH frequency (p < 0.001. In summary, machine learning methods applied to acute stroke CT images offer automation, and potentially improved performance, for prediction of SICH following thrombolysis. Larger-scale cohorts, and incorporation of advanced imaging, should be tested with such methods.

  3. Portraying User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    2008-01-01

    history at large have been sparse. However, a small spate of publications appeared recently, so a reasonable number of papers are available. Hence this work-in-progress paints a portrait of the current history of user interfaces at large. The paper first describes a theoretical framework recruited from...... history. Next the paper analyses a selected sample of papers on UI history at large. The analysis shows that the current state-of-art is featured by three aspects: Firstly internalism, in that the papers adress the tech­nologies in their own right with little con­text­ualization, secondly whiggism......The user interface is coming of age. Papers adressing UI history have appeared in fair amounts in the last 25 years. Most of them address particular aspects such as an in­novative interface paradigm or the contribution of a visionary or a research lab. Contrasting this, papers addres­sing UI...

  4. Workshop on Interface Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first Workshop on Interface Phenomena, organized jointly by the surface science groups at Dalhousie University and the University of Maine. It was our intention to concentrate on just three topics related to the kinetics of interface reactions which, in our opinion, were frequently obscured unnecessarily in the literature and whose fundamental nature warranted an extensive discussion to help clarify the issues, very much in the spirit of the Discussions of the Faraday Society. Each session (day) saw two principal speakers expounding the different views; the session chairmen were asked to summarize the ensuing discussions. To understand the complexity of interface reactions, paradigms must be formulated to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimen­ tal data and for the construction of theoretical models. Phenomenological approaches have been based on a small number of rate equations for the concentrations or mole numbers of the various species involved i...

  5. Urban water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, M. O.; Hinkelmann, R.; Nützmann, G.; Jekel, M.; Singer, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nehls, T.; Barjenbruch, M.

    2014-06-01

    Urban water systems consist of large-scale technical systems and both natural and man-made water bodies. The technical systems are essential components of urban infrastructure for water collection, treatment, storage and distribution, as well as for wastewater and runoff collection and subsequent treatment. Urban aquatic ecosystems are typically subject to strong human influences, which impair the quality of surface and ground waters, often with far-reaching impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems and water users. The various surface and subsurface water bodies in urban environments can be viewed as interconnected compartments that are also extensively intertwined with a range of technical compartments of the urban water system. As a result, urban water systems are characterized by fluxes of water, solutes, gases and energy between contrasting compartments of a technical, natural or hybrid nature. Referred to as urban water interfaces, boundaries between and within these compartments are often specific to urban water systems. Urban water interfaces are generally characterized by steep physical and biogeochemical gradients, which promote high reaction rates. We hypothesize that they act as key sites of processes and fluxes with notable effects on overall system behaviour. By their very nature, urban water interfaces are heterogeneous and dynamic. Therefore, they increase spatial heterogeneity in urban areas and are also expected to contribute notably to the temporal dynamics of urban water systems, which often involve non-linear interactions and feedback mechanisms. Processes at and fluxes across urban water interfaces are complex and less well understood than within well-defined, homogeneous compartments, requiring both empirical investigations and new modelling approaches at both the process and system level. We advocate an integrative conceptual framework of the urban water system that considers interfaces as a key component to improve our fundamental

  6. Semiconductor Oxide Interface States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    0C for 30 minutes. B 9 7 and B17 curves were taken before forming gas annealing and A297 and A77 were taken after annealing in forming gas... A297 and A77’ AL .show a substantial reduction of interface states and a slight increase of positive oxide charges. The reduction of the interface...states is deduced from the voltage differences between A297 and the A77 C-V curves both above and below the cross-over point which are smaller than the

  7. Distributed User Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Gallud, Jose A; Penichet, Victor M R

    2011-01-01

    The recent advances in display technologies and mobile devices is having an important effect on the way users interact with all kinds of devices (computers, mobile devices, laptops, tablets, and so on). These are opening up new possibilities for interaction, including the distribution of the UI (User Interface) amongst different devices, and implies that the UI can be split and composed, moved, copied or cloned among devices running the same or different operating systems. These new ways of manipulating the UI are considered under the emerging topic of Distributed User Interfaces (DUIs). DUIs

  8. Brain computer interface for operating a robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Humaira; Balasubramaniam, Hari Chand; Malik, Aamir Saeed

    2013-10-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a hardware/software based system that translates the Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals produced by the brain activity to control computers and other external devices. In this paper, we will present a non-invasive BCI system that reads the EEG signals from a trained brain activity using a neuro-signal acquisition headset and translates it into computer readable form; to control the motion of a robot. The robot performs the actions that are instructed to it in real time. We have used the cognitive states like Push, Pull to control the motion of the robot. The sensitivity and specificity of the system is above 90 percent. Subjective results show a mixed trend of the difficulty level of the training activities. The quantitative EEG data analysis complements the subjective results. This technology may become very useful for the rehabilitation of disabled and elderly people.

  9. User interface design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...

  10. The Liquid Vapour Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1985-01-01

    In this short review we are concerned with the density variation across the liquid-vapour interface, i.e. from the bulk density of the liquid to the essentially zero density of the vapour phase. This density variation can in principle be determined from the deviation of the reflectivity from...

  11. Photochemistry at Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-02-24

    We have advanced our capabilities to investigate ultrafast excited state dynamics at a liquid interface using a pump to excite molecules to higher electronic states and then probe the subsequent time evolution of the interfacial molecules with femtosecond time delayed vibrational SFG.

  12. Human-Machine Interface for the Control of Multi-Function Systems Based on Electrocutaneous Menu: Application to Multi-Grasp Prosthetic Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose; Dosen, Strahinja; Amsuess, Sebastian; Yu, Wenwei; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Modern assistive devices are very sophisticated systems with multiple degrees of freedom. However, an effective and user-friendly control of these systems is still an open problem since conventional human-machine interfaces (HMI) cannot easily accommodate the system's complexity. In HMIs, the user is responsible for generating unique patterns of command signals directly triggering the device functions. This approach can be difficult to implement when there are many functions (necessitating many command patterns) and/or the user has a considerable impairment (limited number of available signal sources). In this study, we propose a novel concept for a general-purpose HMI where the controller and the user communicate bidirectionally to select the desired function. The system first presents possible choices to the user via electro-tactile stimulation; the user then acknowledges the desired choice by generating a single command signal. Therefore, the proposed approach simplifies the user communication interface (one signal to generate), decoding (one signal to recognize), and allows selecting from a number of options. To demonstrate the new concept the method was used in one particular application, namely, to implement the control of all the relevant functions in a state of the art commercial prosthetic hand without using any myoelectric channels. We performed experiments in healthy subjects and with one amputee to test the feasibility of the novel approach. The results showed that the performance of the novel HMI concept was comparable or, for some outcome measures, better than the classic myoelectric interfaces. The presented approach has a general applicability and the obtained results point out that it could be used to operate various assistive systems (e.g., prosthesis vs. wheelchair), or it could be integrated into other control schemes (e.g., myoelectric control, brain-machine interfaces) in order to improve the usability of existing low-bandwidth HMIs.

  13. Human-Machine Interface for the Control of Multi-Function Systems Based on Electrocutaneous Menu: Application to Multi-Grasp Prosthetic Hands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Gonzalez-Vargas

    Full Text Available Modern assistive devices are very sophisticated systems with multiple degrees of freedom. However, an effective and user-friendly control of these systems is still an open problem since conventional human-machine interfaces (HMI cannot easily accommodate the system's complexity. In HMIs, the user is responsible for generating unique patterns of command signals directly triggering the device functions. This approach can be difficult to implement when there are many functions (necessitating many command patterns and/or the user has a considerable impairment (limited number of available signal sources. In this study, we propose a novel concept for a general-purpose HMI where the controller and the user communicate bidirectionally to select the desired function. The system first presents possible choices to the user via electro-tactile stimulation; the user then acknowledges the desired choice by generating a single command signal. Therefore, the proposed approach simplifies the user communication interface (one signal to generate, decoding (one signal to recognize, and allows selecting from a number of options. To demonstrate the new concept the method was used in one particular application, namely, to implement the control of all the relevant functions in a state of the art commercial prosthetic hand without using any myoelectric channels. We performed experiments in healthy subjects and with one amputee to test the feasibility of the novel approach. The results showed that the performance of the novel HMI concept was comparable or, for some outcome measures, better than the classic myoelectric interfaces. The presented approach has a general applicability and the obtained results point out that it could be used to operate various assistive systems (e.g., prosthesis vs. wheelchair, or it could be integrated into other control schemes (e.g., myoelectric control, brain-machine interfaces in order to improve the usability of existing low

  14. A comparison of parallelism in interface designs for computer-based learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Min, Rik; Yu, Tao; Spenkelink, Gerd; Vos, Hans

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an experiment that was carried out with a prototype, designed in conformity with the concept of parallelism and the Parallel Instruction theory (the PI theory). We designed this prototype with five different interfaces, and ran an empirical study in which 18 participants com

  15. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  16. Best practices in writing instruction

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzgerald, Jill; MacArthur, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    An indispensable teacher resource and course text, this book presents evidence-based practices for helping all K-12 students develop their skills as writers. Every chapter draws clear connections to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Leading authorities describe how to teach the skills and strategies that students need to plan, draft, evaluate, and revise multiple types of texts. Also addressed are ways for teachers to integrate technology into the writing program, use assessment to inform instruction, teach writing in the content areas, and tailor instruction for English language learner

  17. Discussion on Form Focused Instruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯滢

    2007-01-01

    The pedagogy of language teaching has moved from one extreme-Grammar Translation Method to the other-Communicative Language Teaching.Today Form Focused Instruction(FFI) has emerged,intending to bring language forms instruction back to the communicative language classroom.Despite of the approval of this new approach,there is a hot dispute on its two types of application:Focus on Form or Focus on FormS.This article briefly analyzes FFI in recent research studies with focus on the choice between the two types ...

  18. Easy-to-use interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, M M; Blattner, D O; Tong, Y

    1999-04-01

    Easy-to-use interfaces are a class of interfaces that fall between public access interfaces and graphical user interfaces in usability and cognitive difficulty. We describe characteristics of easy-to-use interfaces by the properties of four dimensions: selection, navigation, direct manipulation, and contextual metaphors. Another constraint we introduced was to include as little text as possible, and what text we have will be in at least four languages. Formative evaluations were conducted to identify and isolate these characteristics. Our application is a visual interface for a home automation system intended for a diverse set of users. The design will be expanded to accommodate the visually disabled in the near future.

  19. Evaluating Instructional Effectiveness with the Instructional Improvement Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, John T.

    The Instructional Improvement Questionnaire (IIQ) is a four-part questionnaire designed to collect evaluative feedback from students on their instructors and courses. The class characteristics section collects data from the student on variables such as grade point average, sex, class level, grade expected, time spent studying for the course, etc.…

  20. Aligning Business Needs and Instructional Assets (Recycling Instructional Assets)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendelman, Joel

    2009-01-01

    High-performing organizations and performance improvement professionals frequently speak about the alignment of their instructional curricula with the needs of the business. However, they often lack a systematic methodology for performing that alignment. This article presents such a method. The process provides the ability to better support…

  1. Extending Library Instruction: Using Blogger to Collaborate, Connect, and Instruct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Harold, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The expectations placed on library instruction programs by the Association of College and Research Libraries are high. Many universities also include information literacy competencies as learning objectives to be assessed at the institutional level. With those standards in mind, it is becoming increasingly difficult to adequately educate students…

  2. Techno-Instruction or Primitivism: Blended Instruction in Algebra I

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Silvia Ann

    2014-01-01

    Integrated technology within a learning environment has become a common instructional expectation in public schools. Many school officials are embracing constructivist views that students learn best within a blended learning environment that promotes active learning by anchoring skills and concepts affiliated to real-world activities. This…

  3. TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

    1999-12-31

    ) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the

  4. PREFACE: Water at interfaces Water at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, P.; Rovere, M.

    2010-07-01

    This special issue is devoted to illustrating important aspects and significant results in the field of modeling and simulation of water at interfaces with solutes or with confining substrates, focusing on a range of temperatures from ambient to supercooled. Understanding the behavior of water, in contact with different substrates and/or in solutions, is of pivotal importance for a wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biochemistry. Simulations of confined and/or interfacial water are also relevant for testing how different its behavior is with respect to bulk water. Simulations and modeling in this field are of particular importance when studying supercooled regions where water shows anomalous properties. These considerations motivated the organization of a workshop at CECAM in the summer of 2009 which aimed to bring together scientists working with computer simulations on the properties of water in various environments with different methodologies. In this special issue, we collected a variety of interesting contributions from some of the speakers of the workshop. We have roughly classified the contributions into four groups. The papers of the first group address the properties of interfacial and confined water upon supercooling in an effort to understand the relation with anomalous behavior of supercooled bulk water. The second group deals with the specific problem of solvation. The next group deals with water in different environments by considering problems of great importance in technological and biological applications. Finally, the last group deals with quantum mechanical calculations related to the role of water in chemical processes. The first group of papers is introduced by the general paper of Stanley et al. The authors discuss recent progress in understanding the anomalies of water in bulk, nanoconfined, and biological environments. They present evidence that liquid water may display 'polymorphism', a property that can be present in

  5. Time to address the problems at the neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Dominique M.; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Krames, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    , Ojemann J G, Moran D W, Wolpaw J R and Leuthardt E C 2008 Two-dimensional movement control using electrocorticographic signals in humans J. Neural Eng. 5 75 [8] Serruya M D, Hatsopoulos N G, Paninski L, Fellows M R and Donoghue J P 2002 Brain-machine interface: instant neural control of a movement signal Nature 416 141-2 [9] Hochberg L R, Serruya M D, Friehs G M, Mukand J A, Saleh M, Caplan A H, Branner A, Chen D, Penn R D and Donoghue J P 2006 Neuronal ensemble control of prosthetic devices by a human with tetraplegia Nature 442 164-71 [10] Collinger J L et al 2013 High-performance neuroprosthetic control by an individual with tetraplegia Lancet 381 557-64 [11] Leuthardt E C, Schalk G, Wolpaw J R, Ojemann J G and Moran D W 2004 A brain-computer interface using electrocorticographic signals in humans J. Neural Eng. 1 63 [12] Maynard E M, Nordhausen C T and Normann R A 1997 The Utah intracortical electrode array: a recording structure for potential brain-computer interfaces Electroencephalogr. Clin. Neurophysiol. 102 228-39 1 www.neuromodulation.com/8-june-2013 2 http://neuro.embs.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/05/SymposiumAdvert1.pdf 3 www.gsk.com/explore-gsk/how-we-do-r-and-d/bioelectronics.html 4 www.whitehouse.gov/share/brain-initiative

  6. Types of verbal interaction with instructable robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crangle, C.; Suppes, P.; Michalowski, S.

    1987-01-01

    An instructable robot is one that accepts instruction in some natural language such as English and uses that instruction to extend its basic repertoire of actions. Such robots are quite different in conception from autonomously intelligent robots, which provide the impetus for much of the research on inference and planning in artificial intelligence. Examined here are the significant problem areas in the design of robots that learn from vebal instruction. Examples are drawn primarily from our earlier work on instructable robots and recent work on the Robotic Aid for the physically disabled. Natural-language understanding by machines is discussed as well as in the possibilities and limits of verbal instruction. The core problem of verbal instruction, namely, how to achieve specific concrete action in the robot in response to commands that express general intentions, is considered, as are two major challenges to instructability: achieving appropriate real-time behavior in the robot, and extending the robot's language capabilities.

  7. Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/medwords/medicalwordsdownload.html Understanding Medical Words Tutorial: Download Instructions To use the sharing features ... no Internet connection is available. Download: Understanding Medical Words [16MB zip file] Download instructions : Click on the ...

  8. Popeye Project: ROV interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scates, C.R. [Shell Oil Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States); Hickok, D.D. [Dvaerner FSSL Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Hernandez, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    The Popeye Project in the Gulf of Mexico helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deepwater subsea production systems. Some of the many successful ROV operations during installation and completion were {open_quotes}first-of-it`s-kind{close_quotes} activities-enabled by many technical advances. The use and reliance upon ROV systems for support of deepwater drilling and installation operations significantly increased in the past 10 years. Shell Offshore Inc.`s (SOI) confidence in this increased capability was an important factor in many of the design decisions which characterized the innovative system. Technology advancements, which depended on effective ROV intervention, were implemented with no significant difficulties. These advancements, in particular the flying leads and seabed position methods, are available to the industry for other deepwater subsea systems. In addition, several Popeye ROV interfaces have helped advance the subsea standardization initiative; e.g., hot stabs, torque-tool end effectors, and paint color.

  9. Politics at the interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannabiran, Gobinaath; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2010-01-01

    At the birth of participatory design, there was a strong political consciousness surrounding the design of new technology, the design process in particular, establishing a rich set of methods and tools for user-centered design. Today, the term design has extended its scope of concern beyond...... the process of design and into how users interact with the designed product on a day-to-day basis. This paper is an attempt to call to attention the need for a new set of methods, attitudes and approaches, along with the existing, to discuss, analyze and reflect upon the politics at the interface....... By presenting a critical analysis of two design cases, we elicit the importance of such an agenda and the implications for design in doing so. We use the Foucauldian notion of power to analyze the power relationships in these two cases and to articulate the politics at the interface. We conclude by emphasizing...

  10. Driving with navigational instructions: Investigating user behaviour and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, P; Agarwal, P; Fraenkel, N; Baichoo, J; Masry, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an inter-disciplinary study investigating user preferences and performance in relation to spoken in-car route guidance. In-car navigation systems are becoming increasingly popular. However, despite large amounts of research assessing the presentation of spatial information, and the usability and interaction issues surrounding the interfaces, there has been much less investigation of the impacts of auditory presentation of route information. We addressed this issue using a multi-disciplinary approach to collect both qualitative and quantitative data through questionnaires and user experiments. Our research identified a user preference for auditory presentation of route information, as well as a memory advantage for auditory over visual presentation. We also found that simple auditory route instructions could be followed without significant interference to a simulated driving task, whereas more complex auditory instructions did cause interference. Taken together, this research highlights the importance of the design of spoken route guidance instructions in minimising the cognitive demands that they impose.

  11. An Approach to Interface Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan; Hald, Bjarne

    1995-01-01

    may contain the re-use of existing modules). The interface synthesis approach describes the basic transformations needed to transform the server interface description into an interface description on the client side of the communication medium. The synthesis approach is illustrated through a point......Presents a novel interface synthesis approach based on a one-sided interface description. Whereas most other approaches consider interface synthesis as optimizing a channel to existing client/server modules, we consider the interface synthesis as part of the client/server module synthesis (which......-to-point communication, but is applicable to synthesis of a multiple client/server environment. The interface description is based on a formalization of communication events....

  12. Standard interface file handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C. (Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This handbook documents many of the standard interface file formats that have been adopted by the US Department of Energy to facilitate communications between and portability of, various large reactor physics and radiation transport software packages. The emphasis is on those files needed for use of the VENTURE/PC diffusion-depletion code system. File structures, contents and some practical advice on use of the various files are provided.

  13. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  14. Microsystem Interfaces for Space

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Microsystem interfaces to the macroscopic surroundings and within the microsystems themselves are formidable challenges that this thesis makes an effort to overcome, specifically for enabling a spacecraft based entirely on microsystems. The NanoSpace-1 nanospacecraft is a full-fledged satellite design with mass below 10 kg. The high performance with respect to mass is enabled by a massive implementation of microsystem technology – the entire spacecraft structure is built from square silicon p...

  15. SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Angel; Raines, Matthew; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Mata, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have very limited diagnostic and no prognostic capabilities, while current smart sensor designs do not have the capability to communicate over Fieldbus networks. The aim is to interface smart sensors with PLCs so that health and status information, such as failure mode identification and measurement tolerance, can be communicated via an industrial Fieldbus such as ControlNet. The SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface (SIFI) is an embedded device that acts as a communication module in a networked smart sensor. The purpose is to enable a smart sensor to communicate health and status information to other devices, such as PLCs, via an industrial Fieldbus networking protocol. The SNE (Smart Network Element) is attached to a commercial off-the-shelf Any bus-S interface module through the SIFI. Numerous Anybus-S modules are available, each one designed to interface with a specific Fieldbus. Development of the SIFI focused on communications using the ControlNet protocol, but any of the Anybus-S modules can be used. The SIFI communicates with the Any-bus module via a data buffer and mailbox system on the Anybus module, and supplies power to the module. The Anybus module transmits and receives data on the Fieldbus using the proper protocol. The SIFI is intended to be connected to other existing SNE modules in order to monitor the health and status of a transducer. The SIFI can also monitor aspects of its own health using an onboard watchdog timer and voltage monitors. The SIFI also has the hardware to drive a touchscreen LCD (liquid crystal display) unit for manual configuration and status monitoring.

  16. Electrokinetics of heterogeneous interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Maria

    2004-12-31

    The influence of surface heterogeneity of various types on electrokinetic parameters is reviewed. The scope of the paper covers classical electrokinetic phenomena characterized by linear dependence of electrokinetic parameters vs. related driving forces. Neither non-linear effects nor the effects of non-equilibrium electric double layer are considered. A historical description of hydrodynamic aspect of electrokinetic phenomena exploiting the slip plane idea is briefly outlined. Attempts to estimate the slip plane location by comparing the diffuse layer and zeta potential values for some model systems are presented. The surface heterogeneity was divided into three categories. Heterogeneity of the first type was related to geometrical morphology of an interfacial region characterized by a considerable surface development producing a three-dimensional interfacial region. The effects of solid roughness, hairy surface, dense polymer layers and gel-like layers are discussed here. The very high surface conductivity detected for such interfaces seems to be a good indicator of the presence of structured layers of this type. Heterogeneous interfaces of the second class cover systems exhibiting non-uniform distribution of surface charge. The non-uniform surface charge distribution can be either of a molecular (discrete charges) or of a microscale (two-dimensional micropatches or three-dimensional structures formed by polyelectrolyte multilayers). The last class of systems examined includes interfaces composed of charged substrate covered by charged bulky objects (particles). In comparison to the homogeneous surfaces, adsorbed charged particles modify both hydrodynamic flow and the electrostatic field significantly altering the electrokinetic parameters. The new description of electrokinetics of composed interfaces presented here takes into account both hydrodynamic and electric field modification and is free of the previously assumed slip plane shift caused by adsorbed

  17. Instructive selection and immunological theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederberg, Joshua

    2002-07-01

    The turning point of modern immunological theory was the advent of the clonal selection theory (Burnet, Talmage - 1957). A useful heuristic in the classification of theoretical models was the contrast of 'instructive' with 'selective' models of the acquisition of information by biological systems. The neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1940s had consolidated biologists' model of evolution based on prior random variation and natural selection, viz. differential fecundity. While evolution in the large was by then pretty well settled, controversy remained about examples of cellular adaptation to chemical challenges, like induced drug-resistance, enzyme formation and the antibody response. While instructive theories have been on the decline, some clear cut examples can be found of molecular imprinting in the abiotic world, leading, e.g. to the production of specific sorbents. Template-driven assembly, as in DNA synthesis, has remained a paradigm of instructive specification. Nevertheless, the classification may break down with more microscopic scrutiny of the processes of molecular fit of substrates with enzymes, of monomers to an elongating polymer chain, as the reactants often traverse a state space from with activated components are appropriately selected. The same process may be 'instructive' from a holistic, 'selective' from an atomic perspective.

  18. Classic writings on instructional technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ely, Donald P.; Plomp, Tjeerd

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the selection process of 17 articles for inclusion in the book, "Classic Writings on Instructional Technology." The book brings together original "classic" educational technology articles into one volume to document the history of the field through its literature. It is also an

  19. Alternative Approaches to Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1992-01-01

    Reexamines the notion of "teaching." Drawing on data from a range of classrooms, as well as from recently published teaching texts, particular attention is focused on the question: "What do we mean by teaching/instruction?" (eight references) (Author/JL)

  20. The Basics of Blended Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Catlin R.

    2013-01-01

    Even though many of teachers do not have technology-rich classrooms, the rapidly evolving education landscape increasingly requires them to incorporate technology to customize student learning. Blended learning, with its mix of technology and traditional face-to-face instruction, is a great approach. Blended learning combines classroom learning…

  1. Instructional Computing: Ten Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargan, Carol; Hunter, Beverly

    These case studies are written for educational institutions that wish to plan, extend, or improve their use of computers for learning and teaching. Each case study includes a brief description of each of the following: profile of the institution, history of the development of instructional computing, organization and management, student access to…

  2. Market Segmentation: An Instructional Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Peter H.

    A concept-based introduction to market segmentation is provided in this instructional module for undergraduate and graduate transportation-related courses. The material can be used in many disciplines including engineering, business, marketing, and technology. The concept of market segmentation is primarily a transportation planning technique by…

  3. Assistant for instructional development (AID)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.P. van; Veldhuis, G.J.; Emmerik, M.L. van; Theunissen, N.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Due to periodical job rotation within the military, instructional developers are not always experts in their field and are consequently unaware of the types of educational concepts that are available to teach with (Jans & Frazer-Jans, 2004). These observations have led to the construct

  4. Embedded Instructional Coaching: What Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habegger, Shelly; Hodanbosi, Philip

    2011-01-01

    How are administrators leveraging the expertise and passion in their buildings? How do they inspire enthusiasm in their teachers and improve student achievement? How do they act as an agent for change? Those are the tasks the authors are given as instructional coaches. In the beginning, they were unsure how to tackle those tasks--or even if it was…

  5. Coaching Conversations: Enacting Instructional Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sharan A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed coaching conversations and interviews of four coach/teacher partnerships for specific ways in which kindergarten and first-grade teachers, and coaches, conceptualized instructional scaffolding for guided reading. Interview transcripts were coded for coaches' and teachers' specific hypotheses/ ideas regarding instructional…

  6. Instructional Coaching and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avant, Rue Celia

    2012-01-01

    School site-based instructional coaching is a form of job-embedded professional development for teachers and an element of school reform. Coaches are hired based upon their pedagogical knowledge, content expertise, prior teaching experience, and "people skills." They are adept at handling a variety of social interactions at school sites,…

  7. Instructional Leadership for Quality Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Dumitrascu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available According to this study, through leadership training, school principals learn about highqualityinstruction and about actions that they can take to motivate and support their teachers. Principalsthen organize professional learning for their teachers and otherwise help teachers improve their classroompractices. With improved instruction, the theory maintains, student achievement will also improve.Thestudy objective of learning for district and school administrators is guided by a theory of action that isdepicted in Figure 1. As the figure suggests, principals play a key role in the instructional improvementprocess by setting in motion a sequence of school-level behavior changes that make for improved teachingand learning. We want to definitive the method that can be used to improve learning and we named thisprogram - Principles of Learning - this Principles are about concrete actions that professor can take to motivateand support their teachers. Principals are expected to organize professional learning for their teachersas well as to monitor teachers’' classroom practices and help them incorporate new behaviors that are inaccordance with the Principles of Learning into their instructional repertory. With improved instruction,the theory holds, student achievement will improve.

  8. Archery: Success through Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Ralph W.

    1982-01-01

    For maximum early success in mastering the sport of archery, the first few days of instruction should be taken in the classroom. Two positions, the grip and the anchor, which can be taught and rehearsed in the classroom, are described. (JN)

  9. Equal Opportunity Through Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Margarite A.

    1985-01-01

    The assumption is that sex-integrated classes are inherently equal by the very fact that boys and girls are in the same class. In fact, educational inequity has increased primarily because of instructional design which perpetuates differences among individuals. Good teaching must accommodate individual differences. (MT)

  10. Dedicated online virtual reference instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Ladonna; Stahr, Beth; Plaisance, Louise

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate nursing students' information literacy skills and enhance traditional library user services, academic librarians have developed synchronous (real-time) online virtual reference instruction in nursing research classes. The authors discuss collaborative efforts of nursing and library faculty in planning, implementing, and evaluating a discipline-specific virtual reference pilot program.

  11. Three Logics of Instructional Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Jessica G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines conceptions of instructional leadership in the institutional environment. We know that principals' practices affect student learning and that principals are influenced by ideas in the broader environment. This article examines and defines the multiple conceptions of what it means for principals to be instructional…

  12. Attrition Cost Model Instruction Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagiura, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    This instruction manual explains in detail how to use the Attrition Cost Model program, which estimates the cost of student attrition for a state's higher education system. Programmed with SAS, this model allows users to instantly calculate the cost of attrition and the cumulative attrition rate that is based on the most recent retention and…

  13. Women Administrators as Instructional Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    Women are under-represented in educational research and are much less likely to hold administrative positions than are men. This study, using the Liberal Feminist Theory and Structural Barrier Theory, proffers possible explanations for this phenomenon. Four women leaders were interviewed to gain insight into their instructional leadership…

  14. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  15. Aesthetic Principles for Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Patrick E.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers principles that contribute to developing the aesthetics of instructional design. Rather than describing merely the surface qualities of things and events, the concept of aesthetics as applied here pertains to heightened, integral experience. Aesthetic experiences are those that are immersive, infused with meaning, and felt as…

  16. Instruction Scheduling Across Control Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Charles Golumbic

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Instruction scheduling algorithms are used in compilers to reduce run-time delays for the compiled code by the reordering or transformation of program statements, usually at the intermediate language or assembly code level. Considerable research has been carried out on scheduling code within the scope of basic blocks, i.e., straight line sections of code, and very effective basic block schedulers are now included in most modern compilers and especially for pipeline processors. In previous work Golumbic and Rainis: IBM J. Res. Dev., Vol. 34, pp.93–97, 1990, we presented code replication techniques for scheduling beyond the scope of basic blocks that provide reasonable improvements of running time of the compiled code, but which still leaves room for further improvement. In this article we present a new method for scheduling beyond basic blocks called SHACOOF. This new technique takes advantage of a conventional, high quality basic block scheduler by first suppressing selected subsequences of instructions and then scheduling the modified sequence of instructions using the basic block scheduler. A candidate subsequence for suppression can be found by identifying a region of a program control flow graph, called an S-region, which has a unique entry and a unique exit and meets predetermined criteria. This enables scheduling of a sequence of instructions beyond basic block boundaries, with only minimal changes to an existing compiler, by identifying beneficial opportunities to cover delays that would otherwise have been beyond its scope.

  17. Learning Strategy Instruction Innovation Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Jean B.

    2011-01-01

    One way of helping students with learning disabilities and other struggling students to be independent life-long learners is to teach them how to use learning strategies in efficient ways. Learning strategy instruction can provide students the opportunity to succeed in today's schools and meet rigorous standards, transforming ineffective learners…

  18. The Role of Formal Instruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yu

    2011-01-01

    This paper looks at second language acquisition in a classroom setting. It considers whether formal instruction makes a difference to SLA. This is an important issue, because it address the question of the role played by environmental factors in SLA. It is also an important educational issue, as language pedagogy has traditionally operated on the assumption that grammar can be taught.

  19. Psychology of Learning for Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Marcy P.

    This cognitively-oriented book focuses on learning and instruction. Specific applications and implications of learning theories are discussed and examples are drawn from educational situations and educational problems. Theoretical concepts are illustrated in concrete terms and a wide variety of examples are provided. The text embodies a theme of…

  20. Succession Planning for Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Karen; Drewry, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Detailed succession planning helps libraries pass information from one employee to the next. This is crucial in preparing for hiring, turnover, retirements, training of graduate teaching assistants in academic libraries, and other common situations. The authors of this article discuss succession planning for instruction programs in academic…

  1. Transmission protocols for instruction streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; C.A. Middelburg

    2009-01-01

    Sequential programs under execution produce behaviours to be controlled by some execution environment. Threads as considered in basic thread algebra model such behaviours: upon each action performed by a thread, a reply from an execution environment - which takes the action as an instruction to be p

  2. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  3. Safety instruction 51 (IS51)

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Secretariat

    2005-01-01

    Please note that Safety Instruction No. 51 (IS51) entitled 'Operational and Information Procedures in Response to Accidents' is available on the web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/502036/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC unit secretariat, e-mail : sc.secretariat@cern.ch SC Secretariat

  4. Interior Design: Teacher's Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Tricia

    This teacher's instructional guide, which is part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, is intended to assist teachers responsible for teaching one- and two-year interior design programs for Texas high school students. The following are among the items included: (1) introductory…

  5. Criterion Reading Instructional Project (CRIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden Board of Education, NJ.

    This booklet describes the Linden Title I Program between the years 1971-1974, with a focus on the Criterion Reading Instructional Project (CRIP). The program (in Linden, New Jersey) evolved from a supplemental reading and mathematics program to a structured developmental program of language arts designed to meet the needs of primary grade…

  6. New Approaches to String Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaching Music, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that use of the Suzuki, Orff, and Dalcroze methods have assisted string teachers in helping music students achieve mastery from the beginning of instruction. Describes how these methods are used by five music teachers. Includes addresses of organizations that provide information about these music teaching methods. CFR)

  7. Instruction of Competent Psychomotor Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Valerie Dong

    2008-01-01

    Instruction of competent psychomotor skill necessitates an eclectic approach. The principles of learning, complemented with learning styles and sensory modalities preferences, provide a background for teaching physical skills. The use of the psychomotor domain of Bloom's Taxonomy as a map and corresponding behavioral objectives foster the mastery…

  8. Assessing Electromyographic Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Armando Pires Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic apppliances are increasingly a part of our everyday lives. In particular, mobile devices, with their reduced dimensions with power rivaling desktop computers, have substantially augmented our communication abilities offering instant availability, anywhere, to everyone. These devices have become essential for human communication but also include a more comprehensive tool set to support productivity and leisure applications.However, the many applications commonly available are not adapted to people with special needs. Rather, most popular devices are targeted at teenagers or young adults with excellent eyesight and coordination. What is worse, most of the commonly used assistive control interfaces are not available in a mobile environment where user's position, accommodation and capacities can vary even widely.To try and address people with special needs new approaches and techniques are sorely needed. This paper presents a control interface to allow tetraplegic users to interact with electronic devices. Our method uses myographic information (Electromyography or EMG collected from residually controlled body areas. User evaluations validate electromyography as a daily wearable interface. In particular our results show that EMG can be used even in mobility contexts.

  9. Effective instruction for English learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Margarita; Slavin, Robert; Sánchez, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The fastest-growing student population in U.S. schools today is children of immigrants, half of whom do not speak English fluently and are thus labeled English learners. Although the federal government requires school districts to provide services to English learners, it offers states no policies to follow in identifying, assessing, placing, or instructing them. Margarita Calderón, Robert Slavin, and Marta Sánchez identify the elements of effective instruction and review a variety of successful program models. During 2007-08, more than 5.3 million English learners made up 10.6 percent of the nation's K-12 public school enrollment. Wide and persistent achievement disparities between these English learners and English-proficient students show clearly, say the authors, that schools must address the language, literacy, and academic needs of English learners more effectively. Researchers have fiercely debated the merits of bilingual and English-only reading instruction. In elementary schools, English learners commonly receive thirty minutes of English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction but attend general education classes for the rest of the day, usually with teachers who are unprepared to teach them. Though English learners have strikingly diverse levels of skills, in high school they are typically lumped together, with one teacher to address their widely varying needs. These in-school factors contribute to the achievement disparities. Based on the studies presented here, Calderón, Slavin, and Sánchez assert that the quality of instruction is what matters most in educating English learners. They highlight comprehensive reform models, as well as individual components of these models: school structures and leadership; language and literacy instruction; integration of language, literacy, and content instruction in secondary schools; cooperative learning; professional development; parent and family support teams; tutoring; and monitoring implementation and outcomes

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy at electrified interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wieckowski, Andrzej; Braunschweig, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Reviews the latest theory, techniques, and applications Surface vibrational spectroscopy techniques probe the structure and composition of interfaces at the molecular level. Their versatility, coupled with their non-destructive nature, enables in-situ measurements of operating devices and the monitoring of interface-controlled processes under reactive conditions. Vibrational Spectroscopy at Electrified Interfaces explores new and emerging applications of Raman, infrared, and non-linear optical spectroscopy for the study of charged interfaces. The book draws from hu

  11. Data communications for a collective operation in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraj, Daniel A.

    2015-11-19

    Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and bit masks; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a collective instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint; constructing a bit mask for the received collective instruction; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and bit masks, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the constructed bit mask; and executing the collective instruction, transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

  12. Data communications for a collective operation in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Daniel A

    2013-07-16

    Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and bit masks; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a collective instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint; constructing a bit mask for the received collective instruction; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and bit masks, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the constructed bit mask; and executing the collective instruction, transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

  13. The Roles of Teacher Efficacy in Instructional Innovation: Its Predictive Relations to Constructivist and Didactic Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Youyan; Tan, Gim Hoon; Liau, Albert Kienfie; Lau, Shun; Chua, Bee Leng

    2013-01-01

    Constructivist instruction has been implemented in the current instructional innovation in Singapore. Large scale survey study was conducted to examine the roles of teacher efficacy in implementing the innovative constructivist instruction. The results showed that the positive correlation between teacher efficacy and constructivist instruction was…

  14. A Comparison of Traditional Classroom Instruction and Anchored Instruction with University General Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, John; Malone, D. Michael; Stecker, Pamela M.; Greene, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Effects of a traditional instructional format and technology-enhanced anchored instruction on the immediate and long-term acquisition of knowledge was evaluated with 100 university students in a special-education course. The CD-ROM-based anchored-instruction group outperformed the traditional instruction group on the multiple-choice follow-up test…

  15. A History of Instructional Design and Technology: Part I: A History of Instructional Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the history of the field of instructional design and technology in the United States. Includes a definition, major features, rational for using instructional design and technology as the label for the field, history of instructional media from 1900 to the present, effects media have had on instructional practices, and the effect…

  16. Interface Input/Output Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Nyman, Ulrik; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Building on the theory of interface automata by de Alfaro and Henzinger we design an interface language for Lynch’s I/O, a popular formalism used in the development of distributed asynchronous systems, not addressed by previous interface research. We introduce an explicit separation of assumption...

  17. Distributed Instructional Leadership in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Richard; Clifford, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the idea of distributed instructional leadership as a way to understand instructional leadership practice in comprehensive high schools. Our argument is that distributed leadership analyses allow researchers to uncover and explain how instructional improvement in high schools occurs through the efforts of multiple individuals…

  18. Direct Reading Instruction and the NYS ELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Carey, Margaret H.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact of classroom based reading instruction ("direct instruction") on the standardized test scores of 6th grade students as measured by the New York State English Language Arts assessment (NYS ELA). It was hypothesized that the implementation of direct instruction in reading in grade 6 would improve NYS ELA…

  19. 16 CFR 1204.5 - Manufacturer's instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacturer's instructions. 1204.5 Section... Manufacturer's instructions. (a) For all antennas covered under this part 1204, the following statement shall be included in the manufacturer's instructions, in addition to the material required by 16 CFR...

  20. When innovative instructional designs are too innovative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas; Wahl, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of what happens when innovation of an instructional design is too innovative. The study investigates an implementation process of a new instructional design in nursing education. The new instructional design should be a step away for a functionalist approach to learning...

  1. Building Conceptual Understanding through Vocabulary Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupley, William H.; Nichols, William Dee; Mraz, Maryann; Blair, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Instructional design is an integral part of a balanced approach to teaching vocabulary instruction. This article presents several instructional procedures using research-based vocabulary strategies and explains how to design and adapt those strategies in order to reach desired learning outcomes. Emphasis is placed on research-based principles that…

  2. 33 CFR 157.49 - Instruction manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Instruction manual. 157.49... Vessel Operation § 157.49 Instruction manual. The master of a tank vessel shall ensure that the instruction manual under § 157.23 is available and used when the cargo or ballast systems are operated....

  3. New Electronic Technologies for Facilitating Differentiated Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    With electronic technologies, differentiated instruction has the same meaning as in traditional instruction, but different tools are available for teachers to help students learn. Electronic technologies for differentiated instruction can add powerful new types of media inclusion, levels of interactivity, and response actions. This rapidly…

  4. Audi-Tutorial Instruction in Basic Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard D.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a study in which audio-tutorial instruction was compared to illustrated lecture instruction are reported. No great differences in achievement levels in the two strategies of instruction were found. The development of such an alternative teaching strategy forces better teacher organization, leading to improvement of the illustrated…

  5. Students and Instructors Opinions about Piano Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Deniz Beste Çevik

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the opinions of the students and piano instructors in the Turkish Education Faculties' Fine Arts Instruction Departments' music instruction programs about piano instruction. The study data were collected using a questionnaire administered to the piano instructors and the students who took lessons from them. The study results…

  6. Review--Processing Instruction and Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chang

    2014-01-01

    This book, written by the research experts in the field of processing instruction Alessandro G.Benati and James F.Lee, informs readers of the newest development in processing instruction research and suggests the directions for the future research on processing instruction at the discourse level.

  7. Review——Processing Instruction and Discourse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Chang

    2014-01-01

    This book,written by the research experts in the field of processing instruction Alessandro G.Benati and James F.Lee,informs readers of the newest development in processing instruction research and suggests the directions for the future research on processing instruction at the discourse level.

  8. Looking Mother Tongue Instruction through Different Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Kapil Dev

    2008-01-01

    Mother Tongue Instruction has been a debatable issue since long. There may be two options in the medium of instruction: either to teach especially primary and preprimary schoolchildren in their own mother tongue or continue using second or foreign language as the medium of instruction. Both of the approaches bear some pros and cons. This article…

  9. 21 CFR 606.122 - Instruction circular.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Instruction circular. 606.122 Section 606.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Finished Product Control § 606.122 Instruction circular. An instruction...

  10. A Reflexive Model for Teaching Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, Neal; Magliaro, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Documents a five-year study of two instructors who collaborated on formally studying their teaching of a master's level instructional design course. Outlines their views on learning, teaching, and instructional design (ID), describes the ID course, and explains the reflexive instructional model used, in which the teachers examined their teaching…

  11. Effective Instruction: A Mathematics Coach's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesniak, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Effective instruction is multifaceted, dependent largely on the context and, consequently, on numerous variables. Although "effective instruction" is difficult to define, in the author's experience--and as the work of mathematics education specialists and researchers indicates--three key features of quality instruction stand out: (1) Teaching…

  12. On the Practice Architectures of Instructional Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Petri; Nylund, Jan; Stjernstrøm, Else

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of instructional leadership and principals' perceptions of the practices of instructional leadership. Despite the emphasis on the effects of school leadership regarding teaching practices and learning outcomes, research on direct instructional leadership is scarce. It is focused either on identifying overall…

  13. Direct Vocabulary Instruction in Preschool: A Comparison of Extended Instruction, Embedded Instruction, and Incidental Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus-Rattan, Susan M.; Mitchell, Alison M.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Based on its coincidence with a significant period in language development for children, preschool provides a favorable setting to foster vocabulary growth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two instructional conditions and an incidental exposure condition for teaching targeted vocabulary words to preschool students…

  14. Single-interface Casimir torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Tiago A.; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2016-10-01

    A different type of Casimir-type interaction is theoretically predicted: a single-interface torque at a junction of an anisotropic material and a vacuum or another material system. The torque acts to reorient the polarizable microscopic units of the involved materials near the interface, and thus to change the internal structure of the materials. The single-interface torque depends on the zero-point energy of the interface localized and extended modes. Our theory demonstrates that the single-interface torque is essential to understand the Casimir physics of material systems with anisotropic elements and may influence the orientation of the director of nematic liquid crystals.

  15. Evaluation of a Theory of Instructional Sequences for Physics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermann, Rainer; Trendel, Georg; Fischer, Hans E.

    2010-05-01

    The background of the study is the theory of basis models of teaching and learning, a comprehensive set of models of learning processes which includes, for example, learning through experience and problem-solving. The combined use of different models of learning processes has not been fully investigated and it is frequently not clear under what circumstances a particular model should be used by teachers. In contrast, the theory under investigation here gives guidelines for choosing a particular model and provides instructional sequences for each model. The aim is to investigate the implementation of the theory applied to physics instruction and to show if possible effects for the students may be attributed to the use of the theory. Therefore, a theory-oriented education programme for 18 physics teachers was developed and implemented in the 2005/06 school year. The main features of the intervention consisted of coaching physics lessons and video analysis according to the theory. The study follows a pre-treatment-post design with non-equivalent control group. Findings of repeated-measures ANOVAs show large effects for teachers' subjective beliefs, large effects for classroom actions, and small to medium effects for student outcomes such as perceived instructional quality and student emotions. The teachers/classes that applied the theory especially well according to video analysis showed the larger effects. The results showed that differentiating between different models of learning processes improves physics instruction. Effects can be followed through to student outcomes. The education programme effect was clearer for classroom actions and students' outcomes than for teachers' beliefs.

  16. Fencing network direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-07-14

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to a deterministic data communications network through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and the deterministic data communications network; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  17. Fencing network direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-07-07

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to a deterministic data communications network through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and the deterministic data communications network; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  18. Opto- μECoG array: a hybrid neural interface with transparent μECoG electrode array and integrated LEDs for optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki Yong; Sirowatka, Brenton; Weber, Arthur; Li, Wen

    2013-10-01

    Electrocorticogram (ECoG) recordings, taken from electrodes placed on the surface of the cortex, have been successfully implemented for control of brain machine interfaces (BMIs). Optogenetics, direct optical stimulation of neurons in brain tissue genetically modified to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), enables targeting of specific types of neurons with sub-millisecond temporal precision. In this work, we developed a BMI device, called an Opto- μECoG array, which combines ECoG recording and optogenetics-based stimulation to enable multichannel, bi-directional interactions with neurons. The Opto- μECoG array comprises two sub-arrays, each containing a 4 × 4 distribution of micro-epidural transparent electrodes ( ∼ 200 μm diameter) and embedded light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for optical neural stimulation on a 2.5 × 2.5 mm² footprint to match the bilateral hemispherical area of the visual cortex in a rat. The transparent electrodes were fabricated with indium tin oxide (ITO). Parylene-C served as the main structural and packaging material for flexibility and biocompatibility. Optical, electrical, and thermal characteristics of the fabricated device were investigated and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the device.

  19. Conceptual Framework for Aquatic Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, J.; Krause, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic interfaces are generally characterized by steep gradients of physical, chemical and biological properties due to the contrast between the two adjacent environments. Innovative measurement techniques are required to study the spatially heterogeneous and temporally variable processes. Especially the different spatial and temporal scales are a large challenge. Due to the steep biogeochemical gradients and the intensive structural and compositional heterogeneity, enhanced biogeochemical processing rates are inherent to aquatic interfaces. Nevertheless, the effective turnover depends strongly on the residence time distribution along the flow paths and in sections with particular biogeochemical milieus and reaction kinetics. Thus, identification and characterization of the highly complex flow patterns in and across aquatic interfaces are crucial to understand biogeochemical processing along exchange flow paths and to quantify transport across aquatic interfaces. Hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes are closely coupled at aquatic interfaces. However, interface processing rates are not only enhanced compared to the adjacent compartments that they connect; also completely different reactions might occur if certain thresholds are exceeded or the biogeochemical milieu differs significantly from the adjacent environments. Single events, temporal variability and spatial heterogeneity might increase overall processing rates of aquatic interfaces and thus, should not be neglected when studying aquatic interfaces. Aquatic interfaces are key zones relevant for the ecological state of the entire ecosystem and thus, understanding interface functioning and controls is paramount for ecosystem management. The overall aim of this contribution is a general conceptual framework for aquatic interfaces that is applicable to a wide range of systems, scales and processes.

  20. Matched Interface and Boundary Method for Elasticity Interface Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Elasticity theory is an important component of continuum mechanics and has had widely spread applications in science and engineering. Material interfaces are ubiquity in nature and man-made devices, and often give rise to discontinuous coefficients in the governing elasticity equations. In this work, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method is developed to address elasticity interface problems. Linear elasticity theory for both isotropic homogeneous and inhomogeneous media is employed. In our approach, Lamé’s parameters can have jumps across the interface and are allowed to be position dependent in modeling isotropic inhomogeneous material. Both strong discontinuity, i.e., discontinuous solution, and weak discontinuity, namely, discontinuous derivatives of the solution, are considered in the present study. In the proposed method, fictitious values are utilized so that the standard central finite different schemes can be employed regardless of the interface. Interface jump conditions are enforced on the interface, which in turn, accurately determines fictitious values. We design new MIB schemes to account for complex interface geometries. In particular, the cross derivatives in the elasticity equations are difficult to handle for complex interface geometries. We propose secondary fictitious values and construct geometry based interpolation schemes to overcome this difficulty. Numerous analytical examples are used to validate the accuracy, convergence and robustness of the present MIB method for elasticity interface problems with both small and large curvatures, strong and weak discontinuities, and constant and variable coefficients. Numerical tests indicate second order accuracy in both L∞ and L2 norms. PMID:25914439

  1. Brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of providing an interface between a user and a processing unit, the method comprising : presenting one or more stimuli to a user, each stimulus varying at a respective stimulation frequency, each stimulation frequency being associated with a respective user......-selectable input; receiving at least one signal indicative of brain activity of the user; and determining, from the received signal, which of the one or more stimuli the user attends to and selecting the user-selectable input associated with the stimulation frequency of the determined stimuli as being a user...

  2. Urban Sound Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live. In this pa....... In this paper, three sound works are discussed in relation to the iPod, which is considered as a more private way to explore urban environments, and as a way to control the individual perception of urban spaces....

  3. Interfacing with the Night

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Alex; Parkinson, Adam

    2014-01-01

    In  this  paper,  the  authors  consider  the  interfaces  between academia and dance music. Dance music and club culture are, we argue, important to computer music and the live performance of electronic music, but there are many different difficulties encountered when trying to present electronic dance music within academic contexts. The authors draw upon their experiences as promoters, performers, researchers and audience members to discuss these difficulties and how and why we might negoti...

  4. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  5. MAN – MACHINE INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Bhuvaneswari

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Agents trained by learning techniques provide a powerful approximation of state spaces in games that aretoo large for naive approaches. In the study Genetic Algorithms and Manual Interface was implementedand used to train agents for the board game LUDO. The state space of LUDO is generalized to a small setand encoded to suit the different techniques. The impact of variables and tactics applied in training aredetermined. Agents based on the techniques performed satisfactory against a baseline finite agent, and aGenetic Algorithm based agent performed satisfactory against competitors from the course. Better statespace representations will improve the success of learning based agents.

  6. Automated illustration of patients instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Duy; Nakamura, Carlos; Bray, Bruce E; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A picture can be a powerful communication tool. However, creating pictures to illustrate patient instructions can be a costly and time-consuming task. Building on our prior research in this area, we developed a computer application that automatically converts text to pictures using natural language processing and computer graphics techniques. After iterative testing, the automated illustration system was evaluated using 49 previously unseen cardiology discharge instructions. The completeness of the system-generated illustrations was assessed by three raters using a three-level scale. The average inter-rater agreement for text correctly represented in the pictograph was about 66 percent. Since illustration in this context is intended to enhance rather than replace text, these results support the feasibility of conducting automated illustration.

  7. Remote instruction in groundwater hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    staff of the Interactive Remote Instructional System

    Wright State University (Dayton, Ohio) is preparing for its fourth cycle of the Interactive Remote Instructional System (IRIS) in groundwater hydrology beginning July 15, 1986. The Department of Geological Sciences proudly announces that the first two cycles recorded an impressive 83% completion ratio for registered participants. This completion rate is a significant departure from success rates traditionally recorded by courses of this nature; it is the result of 2 years of implementation and refinement and demonstrates the progressive orientation of the program. The third cycle has been underway since January. This comprehensive hydrogeology program was originally developed for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service to prepare their personnel for professional practice work. As a result of that cooperative effort, the IRIS program has evolved to meet the needs of participants by developing a curriculum that reflects current trends in the groundwater industry and has provided a unique educational approach that ensures maximum interaction between the instructional staff and participants.

  8. SAFETY INSTRUCTION AND SAFETY NOTE

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS Secretariat

    2002-01-01

    Please note that the SAFETY INSTRUCTION N0 49 (IS 49) and the SAFETY NOTE N0 28 (NS 28) entitled respectively 'AVOIDING CHEMICAL POLLUTION OF WATER' and 'CERN EXHIBITIONS - FIRE PRECAUTIONS' are available on the web at the following urls: http://edms.cern.ch/document/335814 and http://edms.cern.ch/document/335861 Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS Divisional Secretariat, email: TIS.Secretariat@cern.ch

  9. Optimal Structures for Multimedia Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Pinker , Steven , Simcox, William, and Parker,Leon. Understanding Charts and Graphs: A Project in Applied Cognitive Science. Technical Report, Office of...Prancisco, CA 96503 Dr. Steven Pinker Dr. Judith Orasanu Department of Psychology Army Research Institute E1O-018 5001 Eisenhower Avenue M.I.T...understanding of the audience. Similarly, in a study of Navy instruction manuals, [ Stevens & * Steinberg 811 provide a typology of explanations which

  10. Cognitive Research and Elementary Science Instruction: From the Laboratory, to the Classroom, and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, David; Li, Junlei

    2005-06-01

    Can cognitive research generate usable knowledge for elementary science instruction? Can issues raised by classroom practice drive the agenda of laboratory cognitive research? Answering yes to both questions, we advocate building a reciprocal interface between basic and applied research. We discuss five studies of the teaching, learning, and transfer of the "Control of Variables Strategy" in elementary school science. Beginning with investigations motivated by basic theoretical questions, we situate subsequent inquiries within authentic educational debates—contrasting hands-on manipulation of physical and virtual materials, evaluating direct instruction and discovery learning, replicating training methods in classroom, and narrowing science achievement gaps. We urge research programs to integrate basic research in "pure" laboratories with field work in "messy" classrooms. Finally, we suggest that those engaged in discussions about implications and applications of educational research focus on clearly defined instructional methods and procedures, rather than vague labels and outmoded "-isms."

  11. Laparoscopic simulation interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2006-04-04

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  12. Engineering graded tissue interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer E; Burns, Kellie L; Le Doux, Joseph M; Guldberg, Robert E; García, Andrés J

    2008-08-26

    Interfacial zones between tissues provide specialized, transitional junctions central to normal tissue function. Regenerative medicine strategies focused on multiple cell types and/or bi/tri-layered scaffolds do not provide continuously graded interfaces, severely limiting the integration and biological performance of engineered tissue substitutes. Inspired by the bone-soft tissue interface, we describe a biomaterial-mediated gene transfer strategy for spatially regulated genetic modification and differentiation of primary dermal fibroblasts within tissue-engineered constructs. We demonstrate that zonal organization of osteoblastic and fibroblastic cellular phenotypes can be engineered by a simple, one-step seeding of fibroblasts onto scaffolds containing a spatial distribution of retrovirus encoding the osteogenic transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1. Gradients of immobilized retrovirus, achieved via deposition of controlled poly(L-lysine) densities, resulted in spatial patterns of transcription factor expression, osteoblastic differentiation, and mineralized matrix deposition. Notably, this graded distribution of mineral deposition and mechanical properties was maintained when implanted in vivo in an ectopic site. Development of this facile and robust strategy is significant toward the regeneration of continuous interfacial zones that mimic the cellular and microstructural characteristics of native tissue.

  13. Flexible DCP interface. [environmental sensor and signal conditioning interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; Schimmelpfenning, H.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A user of an ERTS data collection system (DCS) must supply the sensors and signal-conditioning interface. The electronic interface must be compatible with the NASA-furnished data collection platform. A universal signal-conditioning system for use with a wide range of environmental sensors is described. The interface is environmentally and electronically compatible with the DCP and has operated satisfactorily for a complete winter wheat growing season in Kansas.

  14. Development of MATLAB-Based Digital Signal Processing Teaching Module with Graphical User Interface Environment for Nigerian University

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The development of a teaching aid module for digital Signal processing (DSP) in Nigeria Universities was undertaken to address the problem associated with non-availability instructional module. This paper annexes the potential of Peripheral Interface Controllers (PICs) with MATLAB resources to develop a PIC-based system with graphic user interface environment suitable for data acquisition and signal processing. The module accepts data from three different sources: real time acquisition, pre-r...

  15. Proceedings Foundations for Interface Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Legay, Axel; 10.4204/EPTCS.46

    2011-01-01

    FIT stands for Foundations of Interface Technologies. Component-based design is widely considered as a major approach to developing systems in a time and cost effective way. Central in this approach is the notion of an interface. Interfaces summarize the externally visible properties of a component and are seen as a key to achieving component interoperability and to predict global system behavior based on the component behavior. To capture the intricacy of complex software products, rich interfaces have been proposed. These interfaces do not only specify syntactic properties, such as the signatures of methods and operations, but also take into account behavioral and extra-functional properties, such as quality of service, security and dependability. Rich interfaces have been proposed for describing, e.g., the legal sequences of messages or method calls accepted by components, or the resource and timing constraints in embedded software. The development of a rigorous framework for the specification and analysis...

  16. Space as interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    This Ph.D. dissertation takes its offset in the migration of technology and computing power into our physical environment. The consequence of this movement, termed ubiquitous computing (Wieser, 1991), is a new relationship between humans, technology and spaces. In this new context, I seek...... to conceptualize space as more than the physical container for human activity. I do this by investigating space as interface. Based on a theory of space and place set forth by Tuan (Tuan, 1977), and informed by an explorative research approach, I make the distinction between space and place as a Euclidian space...... and a Phenomenological experienced place. In this perspective, place is created by humans as they appropriate space in investing it with emotions and memories and hereby making it meaningful. Space consists of formable physical and digital space, whereas place is made up by four dimensions relating to personal, physical...

  17. Porphyrins at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwärter, Willi; Écija, David; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V.

    2015-02-01

    Porphyrins and other tetrapyrrole macrocycles possess an impressive variety of functional properties that have been exploited in natural and artificial systems. Different metal centres incorporated within the tetradentate ligand are key for achieving and regulating vital processes, including reversible axial ligation of adducts, electron transfer, light-harvesting and catalytic transformations. Tailored substituents optimize their performance, dictating their arrangement in specific environments and mediating the assembly of molecular nanoarchitectures. Here we review the current understanding of these species at well-defined interfaces, disclosing exquisite insights into their structural and chemical properties, and also discussing methods by which to manipulate their intramolecular and organizational features. The distinct characteristics arising from the interfacial confinement offer intriguing prospects for molecular science and advanced materials. We assess the role of surface interactions with respect to electronic and physicochemical characteristics, and describe in situ metallation pathways, molecular magnetism, rotation and switching. The engineering of nanostructures, organized layers, interfacial hybrid and bio-inspired systems is also addressed.

  18. A note on charged interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Huaqiang [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Yu, M Y [Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr-University, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    A condition associated with the plasma boundary or other charged interface is reviewed. It is pointed out that in comparing theories and simulations of such interfaces, in order to avoid conflicting results it should be ascertained that the systems under consideration are thermodynamically equivalent. For the plasma-wall interface in equilibrium, the rate of change of the surface-charge density with respect to the surface potential must be positive.

  19. Intelligent interface design and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Intelligent interface concepts and systematic approaches to assessing their functionality are discussed. Four general features of intelligent interfaces are described: interaction efficiency, subtask automation, context sensitivity, and use of an appropriate design metaphor. Three evaluation methods are discussed: Functional Analysis, Part-Task Evaluation, and Operational Testing. Design and evaluation concepts are illustrated with examples from a prototype expert system interface for environmental control and life support systems for manned space platforms.

  20. Capillary flows with forming interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D

    2007-01-01

    PREFACEINTRODUCTION Free-surface flows in nature and industryScope of the bookFUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID MECHANICS Main concepts Governing equations Elements of thermodynamics Classical boundary conditions Physically meaningful solutions and paradoxes of modelingMOVING CONTACT LINES: AN OVERVIEW Essence of the problem Experimental observations Molecular dynamics simulations Review of theoriesThe key to the moving contact-line problemBOUNDARY CONDITIONS ON FORMING INTERFACES Modeling of interfacesConservation lawsLiquid-gas and liquid-solid interfacesLiquid-liquid interfaces SummaryOpen questions an

  1. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, Karthik V. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  2. Playful user interfaces: interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the inte

  3. Learning procedures from interactive natural language instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Scott B.; Laird, John E.

    1994-01-01

    Despite its ubiquity in human learning, very little work has been done in artificial intelligence on agents that learn from interactive natural language instructions. In this paper, the problem of learning procedures from interactive, situated instruction is examined in which the student is attempting to perform tasks within the instructional domain, and asks for instruction when it is needed. Presented is Instructo-Soar, a system that behaves and learns in response to interactive natural language instructions. Instructo-Soar learns completely new procedures from sequences of instruction, and also learns how to extend its knowledge of previously known procedures to new situations. These learning tasks require both inductive and analytic learning. Instructo-Soar exhibits a multiple execution learning process in which initial learning has a rote, episodic flavor, and later executions allow the initially learned knowledge to be generalized properly.

  4. Instructions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Animal Husbandry and Feed Science(ISSN 1943-9911)is an academic journal sponsored by Wu Chu(USA-China)Science and Culture Media Co.(USA).It was first published in 2009.The journal is published bimonthly to report basic theory and applied research about animal husbandry,veterinary,aquaculture,feed science and other related fields,including aspects of genetics and breeding,reproduction,physiology,biochemistry,nutrition,

  5. A brain-computer interface for potential non-verbal facial communication based on EEG signals related to specific emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashihara, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Unlike assistive technology for verbal communication, the brain-machine or brain-computer interface (BMI/BCI) has not been established as a non-verbal communication tool for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Face-to-face communication enables access to rich emotional information, but individuals suffering from neurological disorders, such as ALS and autism, may not express their emotions or communicate their negative feelings. Although emotions may be inferred by looking at facial expressions, emotional prediction for neutral faces necessitates advanced judgment. The process that underlies brain neuronal responses to neutral faces and causes emotional changes remains unknown. To address this problem, therefore, this study attempted to decode conditioned emotional reactions to neutral face stimuli. This direction was motivated by the assumption that if electroencephalogram (EEG) signals can be used to detect patients' emotional responses to specific inexpressive faces, the results could be incorporated into the design and development of BMI/BCI-based non-verbal communication tools. To these ends, this study investigated how a neutral face associated with a negative emotion modulates rapid central responses in face processing and then identified cortical activities. The conditioned neutral face-triggered event-related potentials that originated from the posterior temporal lobe statistically significantly changed during late face processing (600-700 ms) after stimulus, rather than in early face processing activities, such as P1 and N170 responses. Source localization revealed that the conditioned neutral faces increased activity in the right fusiform gyrus (FG). This study also developed an efficient method for detecting implicit negative emotional responses to specific faces by using EEG signals. A classification method based on a support vector machine enables the easy classification of neutral faces that trigger specific individual emotions. In

  6. Scaffolding Instruction on Business English Writing Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱迪

    2014-01-01

    The scaffolding instruction is to help students probe into knowledge learning independently, and achieve the construction of knowledge and information finally by constructing a series of appropriate conceptual frameworks and concrete teaching circumstances. This instruction has been extensively applied and has been proved to be very effective in teaching in western countries. But in China very few empirical studies have been carried out on the scaffolding instruction, especial y in the field of teaching Business English writing.

  7. Exploring Instruction Cache Analysis - On Arm

    OpenAIRE

    Svedenborg, Stian Valentin

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the challenges of implementing an instruction cache side-channel attack on an ARM platform. The information leakage through the instruction cache is formally discussed using information theoretic metrics. A successful Prime+Probe instruction cache side-channel attack against RSA is presented, recovering 967/1024 secret key bits by observing a single decryption using a synchronous spy process. Furthermore, an unsuccessful attempt is made at decoupling the spy from the vict...

  8. Explicit Comprehension Instruction: A Review of Research and a New Conceptualization of Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, P. David; Dole, Janice A.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews representative instructional studies of inference training, reciprocal teaching, and process training. Discusses both the concept of explicit comprehension instruction and potential difficulties in classroom implementation. Raises two important curricular concerns. (NH)

  9. GRAPHIC INTERFACES FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion PANA,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using effective the method of calculating Fitness for Service requires the achievement of graphical interfaces. This paper presents an example of such interfaces, made with Visual Basic program and used in the evaluation of pipelines in a research contract [4

  10. The interface at the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    2011-01-01

    In the development of and discourses around interfaces there has always been a strong urge to bypass representation and ‘jack’ directly in to the human brain, consciousness, perceptions and feelings. In her article ”The interface at the skin” Lone Koefoed Hansen looks at how two contemporary...

  11. Playful Interfaces: Introduction and History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Nijholt, Anton

    2014-01-01

    In this short survey we have some historical notes about human-computer interface development with an emphasis on interface technology that has allowed us to design playful interactions with applications. The applications do not necessarily have to be entertainment applications. We can have playful

  12. Archery: A Planning Guide for Group and Individual Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This instructor's manual for group or individual instruction in archery includes line drawings as illustrations. The manual advances from facilities to beginning instruction and general instructional practices (safety tips, instructional aids, archery etiquette) to intermediate instruction (discussions of causes of faulty arrow flight, analysis of…

  13. Effects of Instruction and Stage-Fright on Intelligence Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Joost; Oostdam, Ron

    2011-01-01

    In the present research, it was tried to unravel the influence of various types of instruction on test anxiety levels and, in turn, its influence on intelligence test performance. Three types of instruction were compared: a stressful, achievement-orientated instruction; a reassuring, task-orientated instruction; and an ambiguous instruction.…

  14. Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI): A Partner for PI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, John S.; Tillman, Murray

    1982-01-01

    Discusses differences between computer-delivered instruction and print-delivered instruction and the importance of the role of the instructional design process when adapting traditional teaching materials to newer media. The use of authoring systems for preparing materials and computer-managed instruction as a support for programed instruction are…

  15. Modified Cognitive Strategy Instruction: An Expository Writing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel-Ozmen, Ruya

    2009-01-01

    In this article, modified cognitive strategy instruction in writing (CSIW), a cognitive strategy instructional model is described. Modified CSIW was designed based on two effective instructional models: cognitive strategy instruction in writing (CSIW) and self-regulated strategy development (SRSD). Modified CSIW provides tailored instruction to…

  16. Addressing the Missing Instructional Data Problem: Using a Teacher Log to Document Tier 1 Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Alexander; Elliott, Stephen N.; Roach, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Response-to-intervention (RTI) systems posit that Tier 1 consists of high-quality general classroom instruction using evidence-based methods to address the needs of most students. However, data on the extent to which general education teachers provide such instruction are rarely collected. This missing instructional data problem may result in RTI…

  17. Instructed Pragmatics at a Glance: Where Instructional Studies Were, Are, and Should Be Going

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings together the research and developments of instructed pragmatics over the past three decades by reporting the synthesis findings of instructional intervention studies in interlanguage pragmatics. Two questions have guided this investigation: (1) is instruction effective in learning pragmatics?; and (2) what methods are most…

  18. How Much English Language Arts and Mathematics Instruction Do Students Receive? Investigating Variation in Instructional Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Corey, Douglas; DeMonte, Jenny; Harrison, Delena; Loewenberg Ball, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The amount of instruction students receive has long been viewed as a foundational educational resource. This article presents an analysis of the time students spend in elementary English language arts (ELA) and mathematics instruction. In mathematics, the average student received about 140 hr of instruction, but students in the top sixth of…

  19. Elementary Students' Retention of Environmental Science Knowledge: Connected Science Instruction versus Direct Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar; DeFranco, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study compares 3rd-grade elementary students' gain and retention of science vocabulary over time in two different classes--"connected science instruction" versus "direct instruction." Data analysis yielded that students who received connected science instruction showed less gain in science knowledge in the short term compared to students who…

  20. Individualizing Student Instruction Precisely: Effects of Child x Instruction Interactions on First Graders' Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Piasta, Shayne B.; Fishman, Barry; Glasney, Stephanie; Schatschneider, Christopher; Crowe, Elizabeth; Underwood, Phyllis; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that the most effective reading instruction may vary with children's language and literacy skills. These Child x Instruction interactions imply that individualizing instruction would be a potent strategy for improving students' literacy. A cluster-randomized control field trial, conducted in 10 high-moderate poverty…

  1. Tutorial Instruction in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Miles

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to examine the tutorial practices of in-service teachers to address the underachievement in the science education of K-12 students. Method: In-service teachers in Virginia and North Carolina were given a survey questionnaire to examine how they tutored students who were in need of additional instruction. Results: When these teachers were asked, “How do you describe a typical one-on-one science tutorial session?” the majority of their responses were categorized as teacher-directed. Many of the teachers would provide a science tutorial session for a student after school for 16-30 minutes, one to three times a week. Respondents also indicated they would rely on technology, peer tutoring, scientific inquiry, or themselves for one-on-one science instruction. Over half of the in-service teachers that responded to the questionnaire stated that they would never rely on outside assistance, such as a family member or an after school program to provide tutorial services in science. Additionally, very few reported that they incorporated the ethnicity, culture, or the native language of ELL students into their science tutoring sessions.

  2. Power User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) is a system of middleware, written for expert users in the Earth-science community, PUI enables expedited ordering of data granules on the basis of specific granule-identifying information that the users already know or can assemble. PUI also enables expert users to perform quick searches for orderablegranule information for use in preparing orders. PUI 5.0 is available in two versions (note: PUI 6.0 has command-line mode only): a Web-based application program and a UNIX command-line- mode client program. Both versions include modules that perform data-granule-ordering functions in conjunction with external systems. The Web-based version works with Earth Observing System Clearing House (ECHO) metadata catalog and order-entry services and with an open-source order-service broker server component, called the Mercury Shopping Cart, that is provided separately by Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the Department of Energy. The command-line version works with the ECHO metadata and order-entry process service. Both versions of PUI ultimately use ECHO to process an order to be sent to a data provider. Ordered data are provided through means outside the PUI software system.

  3. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  4. How to Create, Modify, and Interface Aspen In-House and User Databanks for System Configuration 2:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, D W

    2000-10-27

    The goal of this document is to provide detailed instructions to create, modify, interface, and test Aspen User and In-House databanks with minimal frustration. The level of instructions are aimed at a novice Aspen Plus simulation user who is neither a programming nor computer-system expert. The instructions are tailored to Version 10.1 of Aspen Plus and the specific computing configuration summarized in the Title of this document and detailed in Section 2. Many details of setting up databanks depend on the computing environment specifics, such as the machines, operating systems, command languages, directory structures, inter-computer communications software, the version of the Aspen Engine and Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the directory structure of how these were installed.

  5. How to Create, Modify, and Interface Aspen In-House and User Databanks for System Configuration 1:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, D W

    2000-10-27

    The goal of this document is to provide detailed instructions to create, modify, interface, and test Aspen User and In-House databanks with minimal frustration. The level of instructions are aimed at a novice Aspen Plus simulation user who is neither a programming nor computer-system expert. The instructions are tailored to Version 10.1 of Aspen Plus and the specific computing configuration summarized in the Title of this document and detailed in Section 2. Many details of setting up databanks depend on the computing environment specifics, such as the machines, operating systems, command languages, directory structures, inter-computer communications software, the version of the Aspen Engine and Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the directory structure of how these were installed.

  6. A study of System Interface Sets (SIS) for the host, target and integration environments of the Space Station Program (SSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Charles; Auty, David; Rogers, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    System interface sets (SIS) for large, complex, non-stop, distributed systems are examined. The SIS of the Space Station Program (SSP) was selected as the focus of this study because an appropriate virtual interface specification of the SIS is believed to have the most potential to free the project from four life cycle tyrannies which are rooted in a dependance on either a proprietary or particular instance of: operating systems, data management systems, communications systems, and instruction set architectures. The static perspective of the common Ada programming support environment interface set (CAIS) and the portable common execution environment (PCEE) activities are discussed. Also, the dynamic perspective of the PCEE is addressed.

  7. Instructable autonomous agents. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Scott Bradley

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to current intelligent systems, which must be laboriously programmed for each task they are meant to perform, instructable agents can be taught new tasks and associated knowledge. This thesis presents a general theory of learning from tutorial instruction and its use to produce an instructable agent. Tutorial instruction is a particularly powerful form of instruction, because it allows the instructor to communicate whatever kind of knowledge a student needs at whatever point it is needed. To exploit this broad flexibility, however, a tutorable agent must support a full range of interaction with its instructor to learn a full range of knowledge. Thus, unlike most machine learning tasks, which target deep learning of a single kind of knowledge from a single kind of input, tutorability requires a breadth of learning from a broad range of instructional interactions. The theory of learning from tutorial instruction presented here has two parts. First, a computational model of an intelligent agent, the problem space computational model, indicates the types of knowledge that determine an agent's performance, and thus, that should be acquirable via instruction. Second, a learning technique, called situated explanation specifies how the agent learns general knowledge from instruction. The theory is embodied by an implemented agent, Instructo-Soar, built within the Soar architecture. Instructo-Soar is able to learn hierarchies of completely new tasks, to extend task knowledge to apply in new situations, and in fact to acquire every type of knowledge it uses during task performance - control knowledge, knowledge of operators' effects, state inferences, etc. - from interactive natural language instructions. This variety of learning occurs by applying the situated explanation technique to a variety of instructional interactions involving a variety of types of instructions (commands, statements, conditionals, etc.). By taking seriously the requirements of flexible

  8. Cockpit Interfaces, Displays, and Alerting Messages for the Interval Management Alternative Clearances (IMAC) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Palmer, Michael T.; Swieringa, Kurt A.

    2015-01-01

    This document describes the IM cockpit interfaces, displays, and alerting capabilities that were developed for and used in the IMAC experiment, which was conducted at NASA Langley in the summer of 2015. Specifically, this document includes: (1) screen layouts for each page of the interface; (2) step-by-step instructions for data entry, data verification and input error correction; (3) algorithm state messages and error condition alerting messages; (4) aircraft speed guidance and deviation indications; and (5) graphical display of the spatial relationships between the Ownship aircraft and the Target aircraft. The controller displays for IM will be described in a separate document.

  9. Development of a Control and Vision Interface for an AR.Drone

    OpenAIRE

    Cheema Prasad; Luo Simon; Gibbens Peter

    2016-01-01

    The AR.Drone is a remote controlled quadcopter which is low cost, and readily available for consumers. Therefore it represents a simple test-bed on which control and vision research may be conducted. However, interfacing with the AR.Drone can be a challenge for new researchers as the AR.Drone's application programming interface (API) is built on low-level, bit-wise, C instructions. Therefore, this paper will demonstrate the use of an additional layer of abstraction on the AR.Drone’s API via t...

  10. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative foundation system. See § 3285.301. (b) For anchor assembly type installations, the installation instructions... instructions and design for anchor type assemblies must be prepared by a registered professional engineer...

  11. Motivational Design in Information Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Amanda Nichols

    2015-01-01

    Motivational design theory complements instructional design theory and, when used together, both principles can affect learning, knowledge acquisition, and knowledge retention. In information literacy instruction, motivational design exists throughout the appropriate standards documents. However, there is limited current research on the best…

  12. Project Physics Programmed Instruction, Vectors 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    This programmed instruction booklet is an interim version of instructional materials being developed by Harvard Project Physics. It is the first in a series of three booklets on vectors and covers the definitions of vectors and scalars, drawing vector quantities to scale, and negative vectors. For others in this series, see SE 015 550 and SE 015…

  13. Advancing Instructional Communication: Integrating a Biosocial Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Sean M.; Afifi, Tamara D.

    2014-01-01

    Celebrating 100 years of the National Communication Association necessitates that, as we commemorate our past, we also look toward our future. As part of a larger conversation about the future of instructional communication, this essay reinvestigates the importance of integrating biosocial approaches into instructional communication research. In…

  14. Guidelines for Language Classroom Instruction1(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Craig Chaudron; Graham Crookes

    2008-01-01

    @@ In"Guidelines for Language Classroom Instruction,"Crookes and Chaudron review research and practice in both second and foreign language contexts.The main areas of classroom instruction described are:presentational modes and focus on form,types of activities and parameters of tasks and interaction,classroom organization,teacher control of interaction,and corrective feedback.

  15. The Future of Instructional Teacher Leader Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, Melinda M.; Stoelinga, Sara Ray

    2010-01-01

    In response to increased performance expectations, schools and districts are turning to nonsupervisory, school-based, instructional teacher leader roles to help improve teachers' instruction and enhance student learning. Increased opportunities to learn about teacher leadership may facilitate the implementation and institutionalization of…

  16. Preparing Instructional Objectives: Agony or Ecstasy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Wesley K.

    This paper 1) discusses the problems encountered in preparing objectives for instructional programs; 2) describes an informal research project in which seven instructional designers working on the same project attempted to determine agreement on an objective; and 3) suggests how to prepare objectives so that difficulties can be minimized. One…

  17. Effects of Media Attributes in Anchored Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Hsin-Yih

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the effects of computer-assisted video-based anchored instruction on promoting students' attitudes toward mathematical instruction and problem-solving skills. Examines the effects of different media attributes on students' mathematical achievement and attitudes in a situated learning environment. Findings suggest that anchored…

  18. Assessing the Cost of Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David S.

    2012-01-01

    School-based instructional coaching is an increasingly popular approach to professional development used to support in-service learning for teachers. However, little is known about the cost of coaching. The following study aims to fill this gap. First, the study describes a framework for measuring the cost of an instructional coaching program;…

  19. Instructional Coaching in One Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Cheryl Ann

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines a model of instructional coaching in a middle school using interviews and observations of both teachers and their coaches. During the 2012-2013 school year, Creekside Middle School implemented a new model of instructional coaching that differed from the traditional model of coaching; it focused on student learning…

  20. Linking Assessment and Instruction Innovation Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosp, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation configuration identifies the skills and competencies teachers need to make sound decisions about using assessment information to improve instruction and establishes a framework and justification for effective ways that teachers can collect and use assessment data to make instructional decisions. It is designed to provide a…

  1. English Instruction in English-Language Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conseil des Colleges, Quebec (Quebec).

    Developed to promote the consistency and quality of English instruction and to support the English-language colleges of Quebec in this direction, the report presents an overview of English instruction at the college level and presents recommendations to the Minister of Higher Education and Science (MHES) and the English-language colleges. Part I…

  2. Whitewater Kayaking Instruction: Skills and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poff, Raymond; Stuessy, Tom

    This paper briefly presents ideas and techniques that can facilitate effective whitewater kayaking instruction. Instructors often focus so much on the mechanics of specific skills that they overlook less obvious, but equally important, aspects of instruction. These aspects include the underlying purposes and guiding principles of kayaking…

  3. Vocabulary Instruction for Second Language Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Deanna L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, research has consistently affirmed the importance of explicit vocabulary instruction for adult learners of English as a second language (ESL). Given the significant vocabulary demands faced by adult second language readers, ESL teachers must carefully target their instruction for maximum impact and to foster meaningful…

  4. Measuring the Mathematical Quality of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe a framework and instrument for measuring the mathematical quality of mathematics instruction. In describing this framework, we argue for the separation of the "mathematical quality of instruction" (MQI), such as the absence of mathematical errors and the presence of sound mathematical reasoning, from pedagogical…

  5. Aligning Learning Activities with Instructional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvitch, Rachel; Metzler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Model-based instruction has been increasingly used in physical education for the past two decades. Metzler (2011) identified eight instructional models that are commonly used in physical education today. Each model is designed to promote certain kinds of learning outcomes for students and to address different combinations of the national…

  6. Instructional Models Effective in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    The purpose of this study was to identify which instructional models based on the framework of Joyce, Weil, and Showers, could be used effectively in distance education over the Interactive Video Network (IVN) system in North Dakota. Instructional models have been organized into families such as Information Processing, Social, Personal, and…

  7. Author and reader in Instructions for use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steehouder, Michael F.

    1997-01-01

    Instructions for use should not be seen as merely instrumental-they should also persuade the reader to read the text and to act accordingly. Moreover, they should establish a positive image of the product and the manufacturer. In this paper, a collection of instructions for use is used to identify s

  8. Technology: Differentiating Instruction by Flipping the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del

    2014-01-01

    Flipping the classroom can be an effective instructional strategy for differentiating instruction for gifted and talented students. The author presents a rationale for using the strategy with gifted students, possible problems educators might encounter, and practical tips for beginning the process of flipping the classroom.

  9. Text-Picture Relations in Cooking Instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Ielka; Leito, Shadira; Redeker, Gisela; Bunt, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Like many other instructions, recipes on packages with ready-to-use ingredients for a dish combine a series of pictures with short text paragraphs. The information presentation in such multimodal instructions can be compact (either text or picture) and/or cohesive (text and picture). In an explorato

  10. Robust Vocabulary Instruction in a Readers' Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feezell, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This article presents strategies for integrating explicit vocabulary instruction within a reading workshop. The author begins by describing a process for involving students in word selection. The author then provides a weeklong instructional sequence using student-selected words. Finally, the author briefly examines the role of vocabulary…

  11. Instructional Computing in Wyoming: Status and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, Bob

    The status of instructional computing in Wyoming's public schols as of April 1980 is reported. Specifically the document indicates the nature and extent of computer usage in grades K-12, summarizes teachers' opinions regarding the potential instructional uses of computers in the schools, and presents the recommendations of a select committee of…

  12. Instructional Computing. An Action Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, J. Richard; Kansky, Robert J.

    This book is directed to any educator who is interested in the use of the computer to improve classroom instruction. It is a book about the materials, human factors, and decision-making procedures that make up the instructional application of computers. This document's single goal is to promote educators' thoughtful selection and use of both…

  13. Implicit and Explicit Instruction of Spelling Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M. J.; Verhoeven, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the differential effectiveness of explicit and implicit instruction of two Dutch spelling rules. Students with and without spelling disabilities were instructed a spelling rule either implicitly or explicitly in two experiments. Effects were tested in a pretest-intervention-posttest control group design. Experiment 1…

  14. Implicit and explicit instruction of spelling rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, M.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to compare the differential effectiveness of explicit and implicit instruction of two Dutch spelling rules. Students with and without spelling disabilities were instructed a spelling rule either implicitly or explicitly in two experiments. Effects were tested in a pretest-interventio

  15. A Self-Instructional System in Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Mark M.; And Others

    The purpose of this system is to teach rural high school students the process of forming objects with expandable polystyrene plastic beads. Instruction in the system generally follows a three-step sequence in which the student: 1) views one of the four demonstration films; 2) progresses through a corresponding programed instruction book; and 3)…

  16. Augmenting the ADDIE Paradigm for Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiaopeng; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss topics appropriate for augmenting the ADDIE paradigm for instructional design. The topics selected are based on data from a study of working professionals who successfully completed an instructional design and technology certificate program and who identified related topics that they regarded as beneficial. The participants…

  17. Instructional or Managerial Leadership: The Principal Role!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazzar, Michael

    2004-01-01

    "Instructional Or Managerial Leadership: The Principal Role" is a case study written to challenge the beliefs of graduate students preparing for educational leadership roles and educational leaders already in these positions as to the importance of the principal as an instructional leader. This case explores communication between superintendents…

  18. Instructional Alignment under No Child Left Behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikoff, Morgan S.

    2012-01-01

    The alignment of instruction with the content of standards and assessments is the key mediating variable separating the policy of standards-based reform (SBR) from the outcome of improved student achievement. Few studies have investigated SBR's effects on instructional alignment, and most have serious methodological limitations. This research uses…

  19. Sketching a Context for Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lone, Richard H.

    Instructional technology has dramatized the need for a complete overhaul of educational systems; tacking on "innovations" will not do. The grip of dead tradition on education must be pried loose. Process, rather than content, should be stressed in learning. The challenge for instructional technology, as for education in general, is to devise an…

  20. Instructional Leadership: Are Women Principals Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Richard L.; Basom, Margaret R.

    1990-01-01

    A 1984 study found that female elementary school principals spent 38.4 percent of their time on instructional leadership activities, while their male counterparts spent only 21.8 percent. A 1989 follow-up study found that women principals were more likely to be seen by their staffs as instructional leaders. A sidebar examines sex discrimination in…

  1. Mass Communication Instruction in the Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James E.; Surlin, Stuart H.

    The steady increase of mass communication instruction in secondary schools has resulted from the demands by educators and the public for programs to help students cope with the impact and potential of mass media. This book describes the status and potential of mass communication instruction in secondary schools. Following an introductory chapter…

  2. Self-Paced Instruction: Hello, Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuba, Richard J.; Flammer, Gordon H.

    1975-01-01

    Answers criticisms of self-paced instruction (SPI) by citing advantages of SPI over lecture methods. Concludes that criticisms of SPI are useful since they indicate in which areas further research should be conducted to improve this method of instruction. (MLH)

  3. Sources of Information for Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Ann L., Comp.

    This booklet is designed to help instructional technologists, students of instructional technology, faculty, and researchers in the field locate information quickly and easily. Information services described are libraries, the ERIC system, online information services, state education departments, regional education centers, and information…

  4. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  5. Instruction in Transliterating Russian to English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    System Development Corp., Santa Monica, CA. Research and Development Div.

    The Russian transliteration package provides the equivalent of six units of this instructional package, but it is presented as a continuous sequence that requires a total of three to four hours of a trainee's time. It is presented in the form of a programmed text. (Other units of the instructional package are: LI004051-004054. The package is…

  6. Instructional Podcasting with Undergraduate Digital Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kevin M.; Willis, Dottie

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the use of instructional podcasts with students in introductory computer application classes at a small, independent, private university. Participants were all undergraduates in the school of education. In an effort to model effective use of instructional technology for preservice teachers and to "meet digital native…

  7. Culinary Occupations. Instructional Materials Committee Recommendations Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Technical Resource Center, Natchitoches.

    This resource listing contains those culinary occupations instructional materials given a rating of "highly recommended" or "recommended" by a committee of instructors. Titles are arranged alphabetically by title within each of the following Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) categories: institutional management;…

  8. Rule Difficulty and the Usefulness of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Pawel

    2009-01-01

    It is now generally agreed that some form of focus on the target code is necessary in adult L2 instruction. One question that remains to be answered is whether all aspects of L2 grammar are equally amenable to pedagogic intervention. A number of researchers have examined the effectiveness of instruction with regard to simple vs. difficult grammar…

  9. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Thomas P. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  10. Methods used for research regarding iteration in instructional design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, D.M.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the search for suitable research methods for research regarding iteration in instructional design. More specifically my research concerned the question how instructional designers can be supported during an iterative design process. Although instructional design and development

  11. Playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The book is about user interfaces to applications that have been designed for social and physical interaction. The interfaces are ‘playful’, that is, users feel challenged to engage in social and physical interaction because that will be fun. The topics that will be present in this book are interactive playgrounds, urban games using mobiles, sensor-equipped environments for playing, child-computer interaction, tangible game interfaces, interactive tabletop technology and applications, full-body interaction, exertion games, persuasion, engagement, evaluation, and user experience. Readers of the book will not only get a survey of state-of-the-art research in these areas, but the chapters in this book will also provide a vision of the future where playful interfaces will be ubiquitous, that is, present and integrated in home, office, recreational, sports and urban environments, emphasizing that in the future in these environments game elements will be integrated and welcomed.

  12. Through the Interface - a human activity approach to user interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    In providing a theoretical framework for understanding human- computer interaction as well as design of user interfaces, this book combines elements of anthropology, psychology, cognitive science, software engineering, and computer science. The framework examines the everyday work practices...

  13. Computer Simulation Instruction: Carrying out Chemical Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibtesam Al-Mashaqbeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of computer simulation Instruction (CSI on students' achievements: Carrying out chemical experiments to acquire chemical concepts for eleventh grade students. The subject of the study consisted two sections of a one girl's high school in Jordan. One section was randomly assigned to experimental group in which computer simulation Instruction (CSI was used, and the other section was randomly assigned to control group in which students were instructed by using the traditional teaching instruction. The findings indicated that there is progress on the part of the experimental group which used the computer simulation Instruction (CSI and this was reflected positively in the students’ achievement in carrying out chemical experiments to acquire chemical concepts.

  14. Interface gateways: defining the solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R; Zobian, M

    1994-02-01

    In summary, an interface gateway is able to quickly create and support relationships. In the healthcare environment of the 1990s, organization executives will be faced with an exponential increase in the number of provider, payor and employer alliances, affiliations and acquisitions. One of the recurring requirements in this scenario is the need to share information. Most of the data standards in existence today do not address the vast interface requirements of these organizations. However, the capabilities, flexibility and capacity of interface gateways can allow these relationships to be created and supported in a fraction of the time that conventional methods require.

  15. Practical speech user interface design

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, James R

    2010-01-01

    Although speech is the most natural form of communication between humans, most people find using speech to communicate with machines anything but natural. Drawing from psychology, human-computer interaction, linguistics, and communication theory, Practical Speech User Interface Design provides a comprehensive yet concise survey of practical speech user interface (SUI) design. It offers practice-based and research-based guidance on how to design effective, efficient, and pleasant speech applications that people can really use. Focusing on the design of speech user interfaces for IVR application

  16. Superconducting interfaces between insulating oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyren, N; Thiel, S; Caviglia, A D; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Hammerl, G; Richter, C; Schneider, C W; Kopp, T; Rüetschi, A-S; Jaccard, D; Gabay, M; Muller, D A; Triscone, J-M; Mannhart, J

    2007-08-31

    At interfaces between complex oxides, electronic systems with unusual electronic properties can be generated. We report on superconductivity in the electron gas formed at the interface between two insulating dielectric perovskite oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The behavior of the electron gas is that of a two-dimensional superconductor, confined to a thin sheet at the interface. The superconducting transition temperature of congruent with 200 millikelvin provides a strict upper limit to the thickness of the superconducting layer of congruent with 10 nanometers.

  17. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  18. Designing end-user interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Heaton, N

    1988-01-01

    Designing End-User Interfaces: State of the Art Report focuses on the field of human/computer interaction (HCI) that reviews the design of end-user interfaces.This compilation is divided into two parts. Part I examines specific aspects of the problem in HCI that range from basic definitions of the problem, evaluation of how to look at the problem domain, and fundamental work aimed at introducing human factors into all aspects of the design cycle. Part II consists of six main topics-definition of the problem, psychological and social factors, principles of interface design, computer intelligenc

  19. Search-User Interface Design

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Max

    2011-01-01

    Search User Interfaces (SUIs) represent the gateway between people who have a task to complete, and the repositories of information and data stored around the world. Not surprisingly, therefore, there are many communities who have a vested interest in the way SUIs are designed. There are people who study how humans search for information, and people who study how humans use computers. There are people who study good user interface design, and people who design aesthetically pleasing user interfaces. There are also people who curate and manage valuable information resources, and people who desi

  20. Kinaesthetic activities in physics instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Christiansen, Frederik V

    2016-01-01

    One of the major difficulties in learning physics is for students to develop a conceptual understanding of the core concepts of physics. Many authors argue that students’ conceptions of basic physical phenomena are rooted in basic schemas, originating in fundamental kinaesthetic experiences...... of being. We argue that this idea should be utilized in physics instruction, that kinaesthetic activities will provide useful entry point for students’ acquisition of the basic conceptions of physics, and that they can overcome the phenomenological gap between experiential and conceptual understanding. We...... discuss the nature of image schemas and focus particularly on one: effort-resistance-flow. This schema is fundamental not only in our everyday experience, but also in most of school physics. We show how enactment of a particular kinaesthetic model can support student understanding and intuition...

  1. Kinaesthetic activities in physics instruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Christiansen, Frederik V

    2016-01-01

    of being. We argue that this idea should be utilized in physics instruction, that kinaesthetic activities will provide useful entry point for students’ acquisition of the basic conceptions of physics, and that they can overcome the phenomenological gap between experiential and conceptual understanding. We......One of the major difficulties in learning physics is for students to develop a conceptual understanding of the core concepts of physics. Many authors argue that students’ conceptions of basic physical phenomena are rooted in basic schemas, originating in fundamental kinaesthetic experiences...... discuss the nature of image schemas and focus particularly on one: effort-resistance-flow. This schema is fundamental not only in our everyday experience, but also in most of school physics. We show how enactment of a particular kinaesthetic model can support student understanding and intuition...

  2. Discussion on Form Focused Instruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯滢

    2007-01-01

    The pedagogy of language teaching has moved from one extreme-Grammar Translation Method to the other-Communicative Language Teaching.Today Form Focused Instruction(FFI)has emerged,intending to bring language forms instructionback to the communicative language classroom.Despite of the approval of this new approach,there is a hot dispute on its two types of application:Focus on Form or Focus on FormS.This article briefly analyzes FFI in recent research studies with focus on the choice between the two types of application.The tentative conclusion is FFI does show some explicit and reliable effects on accuracy and error elimination in language teaching;however,the investigation into its application is not simply either Focus on Form Or Focus on FormS,but focuses on the optimal combination of the two in teaching.

  3. Dispersive transport across interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Adler, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Experiments demonstrating asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials have recently been performed. Here, this phenomenon is studied numerically on the pore scale. The flow field is derived by solving the Stokes equation. The dispersive transport is simulated by a large number of particles undergoing random walks under the simultaneous action of convection and diffusion. Two main two-dimensional configurations are studied; each consists of two segments (called coarse and fine) with the same structure, porosity, and length along the main flow, but different characteristic solid/pore sizes. One structure consists of two channels containing cavities of different sizes, and the second of square "grains" of different sizes. At time t=0, a large number of particles is injected (as a pulse) around a given cross-section. The corresponding breakthrough curves (BTCs) are registered as functions of time at six different cross sections. Calculations are made twice; in the first case (CtoF), particles are injected in the coarse side and are transported towards the fine one; in the second one (FtoC), the opposite case is studied. These calculations are performed for various Péclet numbers (Pe). Comparison of the resulting BTCs shows features that are similar to experimental observations, but with qualitative and quantitative differences. The influences of the medium, of the injection and observation planes, and of Pe are detailed and discussed. A BTC for pulse injection can be characterized by its maximum M(t_M) and the time tM at which it occurs. The observed differences for channels bounded by cavities are very small. However for the granular structures, M(t_M) is always larger for FtoC than for CtoF ; tM depends on all the parameters, namely Pe, the size ratio between the large and small grains, the injection and the observation planes. The numerical results are systematically compared with solutions of one

  4. Interface engineering in organic transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Don Park

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent technological advances in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs have triggered intensive research into the molecular and mesoscale structures of organic semiconductor films that determine their charge-transport characteristics. Since the molecular structure and morphology of an organic semiconductor are largely determined by the properties of the interface between the organic film and the insulator, a great deal of research has focused on interface engineering. We review recent progress in interface engineering for the fabrication of high-performance OFETs and, in particular, engineering of the interfaces between semiconductors and insulators. The effects of interfacial characteristics on the molecular and mesoscale structures of π-conjugated molecules and the performance of OFET devices are discussed.

  5. Mathematics for 2d Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bardos, Claude

    2010-01-01

    We present here a survey of recent results concerning the mathematical analysis of instabilities of the interface between two incompressible, non viscous, fluids of constant density and vorticity concentrated on the interface. This configuration includes the so-called Kelvin-Helmholtz (the two densities are equal), Rayleigh-Taylor (two different, nonzero, densities) and the water waves (one of the densities is zero) problems. After a brief review of results concerning strong and weak solutions of the Euler equation, we derive interface equations (such as the Birkhoff-Rott equation) that describe the motion of the interface. A linear analysis allows us to exhibit the main features of these equations (such as ellipticity properties); the consequences for the full, non linear, equations are then described. In particular, the solutions of the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor problems are necessarily analytic if they are above a certain threshold of regularity (a consequence is the illposedness of the initial ...

  6. The Simple Publishing Interface (SPI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Massart, David; Totschnig, Michael; Klerkx, Joris; Duval, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Ternier, S., Massart, D., Totschnig, M., Klerkx, J., & Duval, E. (2010). The Simple Publishing Interface (SPI). D-Lib Magazine, September/October 2010, Volume 16 Number 9/10, doi:10.1045/september2010-ternier

  7. A comparison of video modeling, text-based instruction, and no instruction for creating multiple baseline graphs in Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Bryan C; Fienup, Daniel M

    2015-09-01

    Graphing is socially significant for behavior analysts; however, graphing can be difficult to learn. Video modeling (VM) may be a useful instructional method but lacks evidence for effective teaching of computer skills. A between-groups design compared the effects of VM, text-based instruction, and no instruction on graphing performance. Participants who used VM constructed graphs significantly faster and with fewer errors than those who used text-based instruction or no instruction. Implications for instruction are discussed.

  8. Interfacing with an EVA Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy

    2011-01-01

    A NASA spacesuit under the EVA Technology Domain consists of a suit system; a PLSS; and a Power, Avionics, and Software (PAS) system. Ross described the basic functions, components, and interfaces of the PLSS, which consists of oxygen, ventilation, and thermal control subsystems; electronics; and interfaces. Design challenges were reviewed from a packaging perspective. Ross also discussed the development of the PLSS over the last two decades.

  9. Paper Interfaces for Learning Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnard, Quentin; Verma, Himanshu; Kaplan, Frédéric; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Paper interfaces offer tremendous possibilities for geometry education in primary schools. Existing computer interfaces designed to learn geometry do not consider the integration of conventional school tools, which form the part of the curriculum. Moreover, most of computer tools are designed specifically for individual learning, some propose group activities, but most disregard classroom-level learning, thus impeding their adoption. We present an augmented reality based tabletop system with ...

  10. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  11. Hydrophobic effect at aqueous interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual basis for hydrophobic effects in bulk water and at aqueous interfaces have similar conceptual basis but often manifests itself differently. Using a wide range of computer simulations as the basis, I will review different forms of hydrophobic effects at a variety of interfaces starting from simple liquid-vapor and water-oil interfaces and progressing to water-membrane interfaces. I will start with discussing how water is organized at different interfaces, stressing both similarities and differences. The main thread is that, as in the bulk liquid, hydrophobic effects have profound influence on conformational equilibria and organization of both small molecules and macromolecules, but the result of this influence is quite different. Specifically, it will be shown that many small, but not necessarily amphiphilic molecules tend to accumulate at the interface and, and this tendency will be explained. Furthermore, I will show that many short peptides that are disordered in water spontaneously fold into well-defined structures in the interfacial environment. Biological implications of this self-organizing effect will be discussed.

  12. Spoken Dialogue Interfaces: Integrating Usability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulos, Dimitris; Stavropoulou, Pepi; Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    Usability is a fundamental requirement for natural language interfaces. Usability evaluation reflects the impact of the interface and the acceptance from the users. This work examines the potential of usability evaluation in terms of issues and methodologies for spoken dialogue interfaces along with the appropriate designer-needs analysis. It unfolds the perspective to the usability integration in the spoken language interface design lifecycle and provides a framework description for creating and testing usable content and applications for conversational interfaces. Main concerns include the problem identification of design issues for usability design and evaluation, the use of customer experience for the design of voice interfaces and dialogue, and the problems that arise from real-life deployment. Moreover it presents a real-life paradigm of a hands-on approach for applying usability methodologies in a spoken dialogue application environment to compare against a DTMF approach. Finally, the scope and interpretation of results from both the designer and the user standpoint of usability evaluation are discussed.

  13. Development of brain computer interface technology and its application prospect in brain control animals%脑-机接口技术发展现状及脑控动物应用前景

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙中磊; 刘英富; 涂悦; 杨凯; 程远驰; 刚琳; 陈旭义; 陈锋

    2016-01-01

    The study of brain-machine interfaces ( BMI) based on humans or animals is expected to improve the living conditions of patients with brain injury, nervous system disease and limb movement disorders.Considerable progress has been made over the past ten years, which is gradually being used to address the long-term and stability issues of BMIs technology.The result of study on safety and security of BMIs has led to the appearance of brain control animals.In this paper, the development of BMI technology and the application prospects of brain control animals are reviewed.%通过基于人或动物的脑机接口技术( brain-machine interfaces,BMI)的研究,有望改善脑损伤、神经系统疾病及肢体运动障碍等患者的生活状态。在过去10年中BMI已取得了相当大的进展,正在逐步解决技术的长期性、稳定性的相关问题。其中BMI在安全、安保方面的研究成果当属“脑控动物”的出现。该文就BMI技术发展现状及“脑控动物”应用前景展开综述。

  14. Magnetosheath-cusp interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We advance the achievements of Interball-1 and other contemporary missions in exploration of the magnetosheath-cusp interface. Extensive discussion of published results is accompanied by presentation of new data from a case study and a comparison of those data within the broader context of three-year magnetopause (MP crossings by Interball-1. Multi-spacecraft boundary layer studies reveal that in ∼80% of the cases the interaction of the magnetosheath (MSH flow with the high latitude MP produces a layer containing strong nonlinear turbulence, called the turbulent boundary layer (TBL. The TBL contains wave trains with flows at approximately the Alfvén speed along field lines and "diamagnetic bubbles" with small magnetic fields inside. A comparison of the multi-point measurements obtained on 29 May 1996 with a global MHD model indicates that three types of populating processes should be operative:

    • large-scale (∼few RE anti-parallel merging at sites remote from the cusp;
    • medium-scale (few thousandkm local TBL-merging of fields that are anti-parallel on average;
    • small-scale (few hundredkm bursty reconnection of fluctuating magnetic fields, representing a continuous mechanism for MSH plasma inflow into the magnetosphere, which could dominate in quasi-steady cases.

    The lowest frequency (∼1–2mHz TBL fluctuations are traced throughout the magnetosheath from the post-bow shock region up to the inner magnetopause border. The resonance of these fluctuations with dayside flux tubes might provide an effective correlative link for the entire dayside region of the solar wind interaction with the magnetopause and cusp ionosphere. The TBL disturbances are characterized by kinked, double-sloped wave power spectra and, most probably, three-wave cascading. Both elliptical polarization and nearly Alfvénic phase velocities with characteristic dispersion indicate the

  15. A Helping Hand: Individually Prescribed Instruction (IPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard W. Andrews

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Individually Prescribed Instruction (IPI is an approach to teaching that emphasizes the diagnosis of learning problems and the provision of prescriptive assignments to assist individual students overcome their difficulties.  When this strategy is employed effectively, the teaching environment is highly adaptive.  The teacher matches the students' abilities to alternate ways of learning, and also provides remedial assistance and positive reinforcement.  Individually Prescribed Instruction has been shown to be effective across the school curriculum.  This writer reviews the success of this strategy for assisting students overcome learning problems, and proposes a model for its implementation in music instruction.

  16. Interface groups and financial transfer architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstra, Jan A

    2007-01-01

    Analytic execution architectures have been proposed by the same authors as a means to conceptualize the cooperation between heterogeneous collectives of components such as programs, threads, states and services. Interface groups have been proposed as a means to formalize interface information concerning analytic execution architectures. These concepts are adapted to organization architectures with a focus on financial transfers. Interface groups (and monoids) now provide a technique to combine interface elements into interfaces with the flexibility to distinguish between directions of flow dependent on entity naming. The main principle exploiting interface groups is that when composing a closed system of a collection of interacting components, the sum of their interfaces must vanish in the interface group modulo reflection. This certainly matters for financial transfer interfaces. As an example of this, we specify an interface group and within it some specific interfaces concerning the financial transfer arch...

  17. Numerical approaches to determine the interface tension of curved interfaces from free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröster, A.; Oettel, M.; Block, B.; Virnau, P.; Binder, K.

    2012-02-01

    A recently proposed method to obtain the surface free energy σ(R) of spherical droplets and bubbles of fluids, using a thermodynamic analysis of two-phase coexistence in finite boxes at fixed total density, is reconsidered and extended. Building on a comprehensive review of the basic thermodynamic theory, it is shown that from this analysis one can extract both the equimolar radius Re as well as the radius Rs of the surface of tension. Hence the free energy barrier that needs to be overcome in nucleation events where critical droplets and bubbles are formed can be reliably estimated for the range of radii that is of physical interest. It is found that the conventional theory of nucleation, where the interface tension of planar liquid-vapor interfaces is used to predict nucleation barriers, leads to a significant overestimation, and this failure is particularly large for bubbles. Furthermore, different routes to estimate the effective radius-dependent Tolman length δ(Rs) from simulations in the canonical ensemble are discussed. Thus we obtain an instructive exemplification of the basic quantities and relations of the thermodynamic theory of metastable droplets/bubbles using simulations. However, the simulation results for δ(Rs) employing a truncated Lennard-Jones system suffer to some extent from unexplained finite size effects, while no such finite size effects are found in corresponding density functional calculations. The numerical results are compatible with the expectation that δ(Rs → ∞) is slightly negative and of the order of one tenth of a Lennard-Jones diameter, but much larger systems need to be simulated to allow more precise estimates of δ(Rs → ∞).

  18. Generating and executing programs for a floating point single instruction multiple data instruction set architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Michael K

    2013-04-16

    Mechanisms for generating and executing programs for a floating point (FP) only single instruction multiple data (SIMD) instruction set architecture (ISA) are provided. A computer program product comprising a computer recordable medium having a computer readable program recorded thereon is provided. The computer readable program, when executed on a computing device, causes the computing device to receive one or more instructions and execute the one or more instructions using logic in an execution unit of the computing device. The logic implements a floating point (FP) only single instruction multiple data (SIMD) instruction set architecture (ISA), based on data stored in a vector register file of the computing device. The vector register file is configured to store both scalar and floating point values as vectors having a plurality of vector elements.

  19. Innovations in Curriculum and Instructional Materials Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population Education in Asia and the Pacific Newsletter, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents a sample population education lesson plan from China. Included with the lesson, which focuses on quality of life and socialist modernization, are objectives, instructional strategies, list of materials needed, evaluation methods, and sample test items. (JN)

  20. Rethinking monolingual instructional strategies in multilingual classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Cummins

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three inter-related assumptions regarding best practice in second/foreign language teaching and bilingual/immersion education continue to dominate classroom instruction. These assumptions are that: (a the target language (TL should be used exclusively for instructional purposes without recourse to students’ first language (L1; (b translation between L1 and TL has no place in the language classroom; and (c within immersion and bilingual programs, the two languages should be kept rigidly separate. Research evidence provides minimal support for these assumptions and they are also inconsistent with the instructional implications of current theory in the areas of cognitive psychology and applied linguistics. Based on current research and theory, a set of bilingual instructional strategies are proposed and concrete examples are provided to illustrate how these strategies can be used together with monolingual strategies in a balanced and complementary way.